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Sample records for cluster ions induced

  1. Clustered DNA damage induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K; Stepan, V.; Vysin, L.; Sihver, L.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces in DNA strand breaks, damaged bases and modified sugars, which accumulate with increasing density of ionizations in charged particle tracks. Compared to isolated DNA damage sites, the biological toxicity of damage clusters can be for living cells more severe. We investigated the clustered DNA damage induced by protons (30 MeV) and high LET radiation (C 290 MeV/u and Fe 500 MeV/u) in pBR322 plasmid DNA. To distinguish between direct and indirect pathways of radiation damage, the plasmid was irradiated in pure water or in aqueous solution of one of the three scavengers (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, dimethylsulfoxide, and glycylglycine). The goal of the contribution is the analysis of determined types of DNA damage in dependence on radiation quality and related contribution of direct and indirect radiation effects. The yield of double strand breaks (DSB) induced in the DNA plasmid-scavenger system by heavy ion radiation was found to decrease with increasing scavenging capacity due to reaction with hydroxyl radical, linearly with high correlation coefficients. The yield of non-DSB clusters was found to occur twice as much as the DSB. Their decrease with increasing scavenging capacity had lower linear correlation coefficients. This indicates that the yield of non-DSB clusters depends on more factors, which are likely connected to the chemical properties of individual scavengers. (authors)

  2. Visualization of DNA clustered damage induced by heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, M.; Yatagai, F.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most lethal damage induced by ionizing radiations. Accelerated heavy-ions have been shown to induce DNA clustered damage, which is two or more DNA lesions induced within a few helical turns. Higher biological effectiveness of heavy-ions could be provided predominantly by induction of complex DNA clustered damage, which leads to non-repairable DSBs. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed of catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA-binding heterodimer (Ku70 and Ku86). DNA-PK acts as a sensor of DSB during non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), since DNA-PK is activated to bind to the ends of double-stranded DNA. On the other hand, NBS1 and histone H2AX are essential for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) in higher vertebrate cells. Here we report that phosphorylated H2AX at Ser139 (named γ-H2AX) and NBS1 form large undissolvable foci after exposure to accelerated Fe ions, while DNA-PKcs does not recognize DNA clustered damage. NBS1 and γ-H2AX colocalized with forming discrete foci after exposure to X-rays. At 0.5 h after Fe ion irradiation, NBS1 and γ-H2AX also formed discrete foci. However, at 3-8 h after Fe ion irradiation, highly localized large foci turned up, while small discrete foci disappeared. Large NBS1 and γ-H2AX foci were remained even 16 h after irradiation. DNA-PKcs recognized Ku-binding DSB and formed foci shortly after exposure to X-rays. DNA-PKcs foci were observed 0.5 h after 5 Gy of Fe ion irradiation and were almost completely disappeared up to 8 h. These results suggest that NBS1 and γ-H2AX can be utilized as molecular marker of DNA clustered damage, while DNA-PK selectively recognizes repairable DSBs by NHEJ

  3. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam

  4. Ion implantation induced conducting nano-cluster formation in PPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Patnaik, A.; Ghosh, G.; Dhara, S.

    1997-01-01

    Conversion of polymers and non-polymeric organic molecules from insulating to semiconducting materials as an effect of energetic ion implantation is an established fact. Formation of nano-clusters enriched with carbonaceous materials are made responsible for the insulator-semiconductor transition. Conduction in these implanted materials is observed to follow variable range hopping (VRH) mechanism. Poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide) [PPO] compatible in various proportion with polystyrene is used as a high thermal resistant insulating polymer. PPO has been used for the first time in the ion implantation study

  5. Ion induced electron emission statistics under Agm- cluster bombardment of Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuers, A.; Penning, R.; Wucher, A.

    2018-05-01

    The electron emission from a polycrystalline silver surface under bombardment with Agm- cluster ions (m = 1, 2, 3) is investigated in terms of ion induced kinetic excitation. The electron yield γ is determined directly by a current measurement method on the one hand and implicitly by the analysis of the electron emission statistics on the other hand. Successful measurements of the electron emission spectra ensure a deeper understanding of the ion induced kinetic electron emission process, with particular emphasis on the effect of the projectile cluster size to the yield as well as to emission statistics. The results allow a quantitative comparison to computer simulations performed for silver atoms and clusters impinging onto a silver surface.

  6. Collision cascades and sputtering induced by larger cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental work on larger cluster impact on solid surfaces suggests large deviations from the standard case of additive sputter yields both in the nuclear and electronic stopping regime. The paper concentrates on elastic collision cascades. In addition to very pronounced spike effects, two phenomena are pointed out that are specific to cluster bombardment. Multiple hits of cluster atoms on one and the same target atom may result in recoil atoms that move faster than the maximum recoil speed for monomer bombardment at the same projectile speed. This effect is important when the atomic mass of a beam atom is less than that of a target atom, M 1 2 . In the opposite case, M 1 >> M 2 , collisions between beam particles may accelerate some beam particles and slow down others. Some consequences are mentioned. Remarks on the nuclear stopping power of larger clusters and on electronic sputtering by cluster bombardment conclude the paper. 38 refs., 2 figs

  7. Molecular growth in clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induced by collisions with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    This thesis concerns the experimental study of the interaction between low energy ions (keV range) and neutral isolated molecules or clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the gas phase. The use of ionising radiations on these complex molecular systems of astrophysical interest allowed to highlight processes of statistical fragmentation, corresponding to the redistribution of the energy through the degrees of freedom of the target, and non-statistical fragmentation, linked to binary collisions of the ions on the nuclei of the target. A mechanism of intermolecular growth in clusters of PAH is observed. It is associated to the ultrafast (≤ ps) formation of fragments inside the clusters following binary collisions. The presence of a molecular environment around the fragments formed during the interaction may initiate a process of reactivity between the fragments and the molecules of the clusters. More precisely, the study focusses on the importance of the electronic stopping power SE and the nuclear stopping power SN of the projectile ion. It shows that the molecular growth is enhanced when SN is higher than SE. This can be explained by the fact that the deposit of energy is mainly due to the interaction with the nuclei of the target. The process of growth has been observed for all the molecules of PAH studied during this thesis and also for nitrogenated analogues of the molecule of anthracene. This demonstrates that molecular growth may be efficiently induced by collisions of low energy ions with clusters of PAH. (author) [fr

  8. Cluster ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popok, V.N.; Prasalovich, S.V.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Campbell, E.E.B.

    2001-01-01

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  9. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  10. Ion-streaming induced order transition in three-dimensional dust clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Kählert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dust dynamics simulations utilizing a dynamical screening approach are performed to study the effect of ion-streaming on the self-organized structures in a three-dimensional spherically confined complex (dusty) plasma. Varying the Mach number M, the ratio of ion drift velocity to the sound velocity, the simulations reproduce the experimentally observed cluster configurations in the two limiting cases: at M = 0 strongly correlated crystalline structures consisting of nested spherical shells (Yukawa balls) and, for M ⩾ 1, flow-aligned dust chains, respectively. In addition, our simulations reveal a discontinuous transition between these two limits. It is found that already a moderate ion drift velocity (M ≈ 0.1 for the plasma conditions considered here) destabilizes the highly ordered Yukawa balls and initiates an abrupt melting transition. The critical value of M is found to be independent of the cluster size. (paper)

  11. Ion collision-induced chemistry in pure and mixed loosely bound clusters of coronene and C60 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaracka, Alicja; Delaunay, Rudy; Mika, Arkadiusz; Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning; Cederquist, Henrik; Rousseau, Patrick; Huber, Bernd A

    2018-05-23

    Ionization, fragmentation and molecular growth have been studied in collisions of 22.5 keV He2+- or 3 keV Ar+-projectiles with pure loosely bound clusters of coronene (C24H12) molecules or with loosely bound mixed C60-C24H12 clusters by using mass spectrometry. The heavier and slower Ar+ projectiles induce prompt knockout-fragmentation - C- and/or H-losses - from individual molecules and highly efficient secondary molecular growth reactions before the clusters disintegrate on picosecond timescales. The lighter and faster He2+ projectiles have a higher charge and the main reactions are then ionization by ions that are not penetrating the clusters. This leads mostly to cluster fragmentation without molecular growth. However, here penetrating collisions may also lead to molecular growth but to a much smaller extent than with 3 keV Ar+. Here we present fragmentation and molecular growth mass distributions with 1 mass unit resolution, which reveals that the same numbers of C- and H-atoms often participate in the formation and breaking of covalent bonds inside the clusters. We find that masses close to those with integer numbers of intact coronene molecules, or with integer numbers of both intact coronene and C60 molecules, are formed where often one or several H-atoms are missing or have been added on. We also find that super-hydrogenated coronene is formed inside the clusters.

  12. Electron induced formation and stability of molecular and cluster ions in gas phase and superfluid helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleem, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The present PhD thesis represents a broad range study of electron induced formation and stability of positive and negative ions in gas phase and superfluid helium nanodroplets. The molecules studied are of industrial, environmental, plasma and biological relevance. The knowledge obtained from the study provides new insight for the proper understanding and control on energetics and dynamics of the reactions involved in the formation and fragmentation processes of the studied molecules and clusters. The experiments are accomplished and investigated using mass spectrometric techniques for the formation of molecular and cluster ions using different mass spectrometers available in our laboratory. One part of the work is focused on electron-induced reactions of the molecules in gas phase. Especially focus is laid to electron attachment to the isomers of mononitrotolouene used as an additive to explosives. The fragile nature and high internal energy of these molecules has lead to extensive fragmentation following the ionisation process. Dissociative electron attachment to the three different isomers has shown different resonances and therefore this process can be utilized to explicitly distinguish these isomers. Anion efficiency curves of the isomers have been studied using effusive molecular beam source in combination with a hemispherical electron monochromator as well as a Nier-type ion source attached to a sector field mass spectrometer. The outcome of the experiment is a reliable and effective detection method highly desirable for environmental and security reasons. Secondly, dissociative electron ionization of acetylene and propene is studied and their data is directly related to the plasma modelling for plasma fusion and processing reactors. Temperature effects for dissociative electron attachment to halo-hydrocarbons are also measured using a trochoidal electron monochromator. The second part of the work is concerned with the investigation of electron-induced

  13. Recombination of cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  14. Binding energies of cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, R.; Matt, S.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    The binding energy of charged clusters may be measured by analyzing the kinetic energy released in the metastable decay of mass selected parent ions. Using finite heat bath theory to determine the binding energies of argon, neon, krypton, oxygen and nitrogen from their respective average kinetic energy released were carried out. A high-resolution double focussing two-sector mass spectrometer of reversed Nier-Johnson type geometry was used. MIKE ( mass-analysed ion kinetic energy) were measured to investigate decay reactions of mass-selected ions. For the inert gases neon (Ne n + ), argon (Ar n + ) and krypton (Kr n + ), it is found that the binding energies initially decrease with increasing size n and then level off at a value above the enthalpy of vaporization of the condensed phase. Oxygen cluster ions shown a characteristic dependence on cluster size (U-shape) indicating a change in the metastable fragmentation mechanism when going from the dimer to the decamer ion. (nevyjel)

  15. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  16. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  17. Chemical degradation of selected Zn-based corrosion products induced by C{sub 60} cluster, Ar cluster and Ar{sup +} ion sputtering in the focus of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, R., E-mail: roland.steinberger@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sicking, J., E-mail: jens.sicking@bayer.com [Bayer AG, Engineering & Technology, Applied Physics, Chempark Building E 41, 51368 Leverkusen (Germany); Weise, J., E-mail: juliane.weise@physik.tu-freiberg.de [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Duchoslav, J., E-mail: jiri.duchoslav@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Greunz, T., E-mail: theresia.greunz@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Meyer, D.C., E-mail: Dirk-Carl.Meyer@physik.tu-freiberg.de [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Stifter, D., E-mail: david.stifter@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • XPS investigations for various sputter concepts on Zn-based corrosions products. • Direct comparison of induced chemical damage for ion and cluster sputtering. • Azimuthal rotation or heavy projectile bombardment was not found to be beneficial. • Ar cluster etching is rated as unsuitable for surface cleaning or depth profiling. • C{sub 60} and Ar{sup +} are applicable for sputtering when degradation is carefully considered. - Abstract: Monoatomic ion sputtering is a common concept for surface sensitive analysis methods to clean surfaces prior investigation or to obtain information from deeper regions. However, severe damage of the materials – linked to preferential sputtering, ion implantation, atomic mixing and in worst case chemical degradation – can affect the validity of the analysis. Hence, the impact of C{sub 60} cluster etching, furthermore, of Ar{sup +} ion bombardment with and without azimuthal sample rotation and also the application of heavy projectiles (Xe{sup +} ions) was investigated to find a concept, which is less destructive or with less critical influence on the chemical nature of the investigated materials. In this work the focus is set on hydrozincite and zinc oxide, two common corrosion products of Zn-based coatings. As a main point, all the obtained results from (i) Ar{sup +} ion, (ii) Ar cluster, and (iii) C{sub 60} cluster etching on the degradation kinetics of hydrozincite were compared with respect to the reached sputter depth. In addition, the sputter rate of all three methods was experimentally determined for ZnO. In total, fully non-destructive conditions could not be found, but valuable knowledge on the type and rate of degradation, which is essential to choose the most suited sputter concept.

  18. Experimental investigations of hydrogen cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumig, H.A. van.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to obtain information about the structure and stability of small hydrogen cluster ions have been performed. Attenuation and fragmentation measurements are presented of hydrogen cluster ions colliding with nitrogen, argon, hydrogen and helium over fixed energy ranges. The total collision and differential fragmentation cross sections are tabulated. (C.F.)

  19. Some properties of ion and cluster plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudzenko, L.I.; Derzhiev, V.I.; Yakovlenko, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    The aggregate of problems connected with the physics of ion and cluster plasma is qualitatively considered. Such a plasma can exist when a dense gas is ionized by a hard ionizer. The conditions for the formation of an ion plasma and the difference between its characteristics and those of an ordinary electron plasma are discussed; a solvated-ion model and the distribution of the clusters with respect to the number of solvated molecules are considered. The recombination rate of the positively and negatively charged clusters is roughly estimated. The parameters of a ball-lightning plasma are estimated on the basis of the cluster model

  20. Crater formation by single ions, cluster ions and ion "showers"

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Timko, Helga; Nordlund, Kai; Calatroni, Sergio; Taborelli, Mauro; Wuensch, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The various craters formed by giant objects, macroscopic collisions and nanoscale impacts exhibit an intriguing resemblance in shapes. At the same time, the arc plasma built up in the presence of sufficiently high electric fields at close look causes very similar damage on the surfaces. Although the plasma–wall interaction is far from a single heavy ion impact over dense metal surfaces or the one of a cluster ion, the craters seen on metal surfaces after a plasma discharge make it possible to link this event to the known mechanisms of the crater formations. During the plasma discharge in a high electric field the surface is subject to high fluxes (~1025 cm-2s-1) of ions with roughly equal energies typically of the order of a few keV. To simulate such a process it is possible to use a cloud of ions of the same energy. In the present work we follow the effect of such a flux of ions impinging the surface in the ‘‘shower’’ manner, to find the transition between the different mechanisms of crater formati...

  1. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N 2 ). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi) n Li + , (HCOOLi) n Li m m+ , (HCOOLi) n HCOO − , and (HCOOLi) n (HCOO) m m− . Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi) 3 Li + being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi) 2 ) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi) 3 Li + as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability

  2. CO2 laser photolysis of clustered ions, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Soga, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ohno, Shin-ichi.

    1990-09-01

    Vibrational excitation and the following decomposition of cluster ions by CO 2 laser photons are studied. Characteristics of the cluster ion and the CO 2 laser photon are summarized in their relation to the photolysis of cluster ions. An apparatus was installed, which is composed of (1) corona discharge-jet expansion section (formation of cluster ions), (2) CO 2 laser section (photolysis of cluster ions), and (3) mass spectrometer section. Experimental results of ammonia cluster ions were described. Effects of repeller voltage, shape of repellers, and adiabatic cooling are examined on the formation of ammonia cluster ions by corona discharge-jet expansion method. Collisional dissociation of cluster ions was observed at high repeller voltages. Size distribution of the ammonia cluster ion is discussed in connection with the temperature of cluster ions. Intensity of CO 2 laser was related to decomposition yield of cluster ions. (author)

  3. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....

  4. Fullerene nanostructure design with cluster ion impacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Vacík, Jiří; Naramoto, H.; Narumi, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 483, - (2009), s. 479-483 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200480702; GA AV ČR IAA400100701; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : fullerene films, clusters C60+ * cluster ion implantation * patterning Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.135, year: 2009

  5. Cluster ions and van der Waals molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    1992-01-01

    This review discusses current ideas in the physics and chemistry of cluster ions and Van der Waals molecules as well as presenting numerical data on their parameters and the processes involving them. It is also a detailed reference on basic data relating to many species.

  6. Graphene defects induced by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Grzegorz; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Baranowski, Jacek; Jagielski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    The CVD graphene deposited on the glass substrate was bombarded by molecular carbon ions C3+ C6+ hydrocarbon ions C3H4+ and atomic ions He+, C+, N+, Ar+, Kr+ Yb+. Size and density of ion induced defects were estimated from evolution of relative intensities of Raman lines D (∼1350 1/cm), G (∼1600 1/cm), and D‧ (∼1620 1/cm) with ion fluence. The efficiency of defect generation by atomic ions depend on ion mass and energy similarly as vacancy generation directly by ion predicted by SRIM simulations. However, efficiency of defect generation in graphene by molecular carbon ions is essentially higher than summarized efficiency of similar group of separate atomic carbon ions of the same energy that each carbon ion in a cluster. The evolution of the D/D‧ ratio of Raman lines intensities with ion fluence was observed. This effect may indicate evolution of defect nature from sp3-like at low fluence to a vacancy-like at high fluence. Observed ion graphene interactions suggest that the molecular ion interacts with graphene as single integrated object and should not be considered as a group of atomic ions with partial energy.

  7. Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rui; Zhang Zaodi; Wang Zesong; Wang Shixu; Wang Wei; Fu Dejun; Liu Jiarui

    2012-01-01

    We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C 1 , C 2 , and C 4 at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

  8. Heavy-ion dominance near Cluster perigees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Time periods in which heavy ions dominate over H+ in the energy range of 1-40 keV were observed by the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS)/COmposition DIstribution Function (CODIF) instrument onboard Cluster Spacecraft 4 at L values less than 4. The characteristic feature is a narrow flux peak at around 10 keV that extends into low L values, with He+ and/or O+ dominating. In the present work we perform a statistical study of these events and examine their temporal occurrence and spatial distribution. The observed features, both the narrow energy range and the heavy-ion dominance, can be interpreted using a model of ion drift from the plasma sheet, subject to charge exchange losses. The narrow energy range corresponds to the only energy range that has direct drift access from the plasma sheet during quiet times. The drift time to these locations from the plasma sheet is > 30 h, so that charge exchange has a significant impact on the population. We show that a simple drift/loss model can explain the dependence on L shell and MLT of these heavy-ion-dominant time periods.

  9. Ion-induced sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yasumichi; Shimizu, Ryuichi; Shimizu, Hazime; Ito, Noriaki.

    1983-01-01

    The research on ion-induced sputtering has been continued for a long time, since a hundred or more years ago. However, it was only in 1969 by Sigmund that the sputtering phenomena were theoretically arranged into the present form. The reason why the importance of sputtering phenomena have been given a new look recently is the application over wide range. This paper is a review centering around the mechanism of causing sputtering and its characteristics. Sputtering is such a phenomenon that the atoms in the vicinity of a solid surface are emitted into vacuum by receiving a part of ion energy, or in other words, it is a kind of irradiation damage in the vicinity of a solid surface. In this meaning, it can be considered that the sputtering based on the ions located on the clean surface of a single element metal is simple, and has already been basically understood. On the contrary, the phenomena can not be considered to be fully understood in the case of alloys and compounds, because these surface conditions under irradiation are not always clear due to segregation and others. In the paper, the physical of sputtering, single element sputtering, the sputtering in alloys and compounds, and the behaviour of emitted particles are explained. Finally, some recent topics of the sputtering measurement by laser resonant excitation, the sputtering by electron excitation, chemical sputtering, and the sputtering in nuclear fusion reactors are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Ion induced Auger spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.W.; Legg, K.O.; Metz, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    Auger electron spectra are induced by impact of heavy ions (e.g. Ar + ) on surfaces; it has been suggested that analysis of such spectra would be a useful technique for surface analysis. We have examined the Auger spectra for various projectile-target combinations and present as representative data the spectra for 100 keV Ar + impact on Al, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co. For a projectile incident on a species of higher nuclear charge the spectrum is dominated by Auger lines from the projectile, broadened considerably by the Doppler effect due to the projectile's motion. The spectra are not characteristic of the target and therefore offer no opportunity for surface analysis. For a projectile incident on a target of lower nuclear charge the spectrum is that of the target species but the spectrum is consistent with the source being sputtered excited atoms; the Auger electrons do not come from the surface. We conclude that the ion induced Auger spectra are in general not a convenient method for surface analysis. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzyna Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS. It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to ~ 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  12. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzyna, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS). It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers) are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  13. Low-energy irradiation effects of gas cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houzumi, Shingo; Takeshima, Keigo; Mochiji, Kozo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2007-01-01

    A cluster-ion irradiation system with cluster-size selection has been developed to study the effects of the cluster size for surface processes using cluster ions. A permanent magnet with a magnetic field of 1.2 T is installed for size separation of large cluster ions. Trace formations at HOPG surface by the irradiation with size-selected Ar-cluster ions under acceleration energy of 30 keV were investigated by a scanning tunneling microscopy. Generation behavior of the crater-like traces is strongly affected by the number of constituent atoms (cluster size) of the irradiating cluster ion. When the incident cluster ion is composed of 100-3000 atoms, crater-like traces are observed on the irradiated surfaces. In contrast, such traces are not observed at all with the irradiation of the cluster-ions composed of over 5000 atoms. Such the behavior is discussed on the basis of the kinetic energy per constituent atom of the cluster ion. To study GCIB irradiation effects against macromolecule, GCIB was irradiated on DNA molecules absorbed on graphite surface. By the GCIB irradiation, much more DNA molecules was sputtered away as compared with the monomer-ion irradiation. (author)

  14. Dependence of surface smoothing, sputtering and etching phenomena on cluster ion dosage

    CERN Document Server

    Song, J H; Choi, W K

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of surface smoothing and sputtering phenomena of Si (1 0 0) solid surfaces irradiated by CO sub 2 cluster ions on cluster-ion dosage was investigated using an atomic force microscope. The flux and total ion dosage of impinging cluster ions at the acceleration voltage of 50 kV were fixed at 10 sup 9 ions/cm sup 2 s and were scanned from 5x10 sup 1 sup 0 to 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 ions/cm sup 2 , respectively. The density of hillocks induced by cluster ion impact was gradually increased with the dosage up to 5x10 sup 1 sup 1 ions/cm sup 2 , which caused that the irradiated surface became rough from 0.4 to 1.24 nm in root-mean-square roughness (sigma sub r sub m sub s). At the boundary of the ion dosage of 10 sup 1 sup 2 ions/cm sup 2 , the density of the induced hillocks was decreased and sigma sub r sub m sub s was about 1.21 nm, not being deteriorated further. At the dosage of 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 ions/cm sup 2 , the induced hillocks completely disappeared and the surface became very flat as much as sigma...

  15. Energetics and Dynamics of Decaying Cluster Ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gluch, K.; Fedor, J.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Parajuli, R.; Mair, C.; Stamatovic, A.; Echt, O.; Lifshitz, C.; Harvey, J.; Hagelberg, F.; Herman, Zdeněk; Probst, M.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 24, 1/3 (2003), s. 131-136 ISSN 1434-6060 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) Euroatom Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : surface-induced reactions * kinetics-energy release * polyatomic ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.612, year: 2003

  16. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y-(HF) n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF) n . The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y - produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y - (HF) n (Y=F, O 2 ), where larger clusters with n ≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F - (HF) n , and O 2 - (HF) n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F - (HF) n ( n =1-3), the energies for the loss of HF from F - (HF) 3 , F - (HF) 2 , and F - (HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy ( E CM ). These E CM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O 2 (HF) n ] - ( n =1-4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O 2 H-F - (HF) n and O 2 - H-F(HF) n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O 2 (HF) 4 ] - separated into O 2 H and F - (HF) 3 .

  17. XPS investigation of monatomic and cluster argon ion sputtering of tantalum pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Robin, E-mail: r.simpson@surrey.ac.uk [The Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Thermo Scientific, East Grinstead (United Kingdom); White, Richard G. [Thermo Scientific, East Grinstead (United Kingdom); Watts, John F.; Baker, Mark A. [The Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Ion beam induced oxide reduction from monatomic and gas cluster ion beam exposure are compared. • Lower relative level of preferential sputtering is shown in gas cluster ion beam depth profiling. • A lack of “steady state” is observed in gas cluster ion beam depth profiles of tantalum pentoxide. • Possible mechanisms behind the observed results, including temperature effects are proposed. - Abstract: In recent years, gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have become the cutting edge of ion beam technology to sputter etch organic materials in surface analysis. However, little is currently known on the ability of argon cluster ions (Ar{sub n}{sup +}) to etch metal oxides and other technologically important inorganic compounds and no depth profiles have previously been reported. In this work, XPS depth profiles through a certified (European standard BCR-261T) 30 nm thick Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer grown on Ta foil using monatomic Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} cluster ions have been performed at different incident energies. The preferential sputtering of oxygen induced using 6 keV Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} ions is lower relative to 3 keV and 500 eV Ar{sup +} ions. Ar{sup +} ions exhibit a steady state O/Ta ratio through the bulk oxide but Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} ions show a gradual decrease in the O/Ta ratio as a function of depth. The depth resolution and etch rate is substantially better for the monatomic beam compared to the cluster beam. Higher O concentrations are observed when the underlying Ta bulk metal is sputtered for the Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} profiles compared to the Ar{sup +} profiles.

  18. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  19. Indium tin oxide surface smoothing by gas cluster ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Song, J H; Choi, W K

    2002-01-01

    CO sub 2 cluster ions are irradiated at the acceleration voltage of 25 kV to remove hillocks on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces and thus to attain highly smooth surfaces. CO sub 2 monomer ions are also bombarded on the ITO surfaces at the same acceleration voltage to compare sputtering phenomena. From the atomic force microscope results, the irradiation of monomer ions makes the hillocks sharper and the surfaces rougher from 1.31 to 1.6 nm in roughness. On the other hand, the irradiation of CO sub 2 cluster ions reduces the height of hillocks and planarize the ITO surfaces as smooth as 0.92 nm in roughness. This discrepancy could be explained by large lateral sputtering yield of the cluster ions and re-deposition of sputtered particles by the impact of the cluster ions on surfaces.

  20. Control of cluster ion sizes for efficient injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enjoji, Hiroshi; Be, S.H.; Yano, Katsuki; Okamoto, Kosuke

    1976-01-01

    For heating of plasmas by injection of hydrogen cluster ions, the specific size (N/Z) approximately 10 2 molecules/charge is believed to be most desirable. A fundamental research to develop a practical method for tailoring large cluster ions into small suitable sizes has been carried out by using nitrogen cluster ions of the initial mean specific size (N/Z) 0 approximately 10 5 . The beam of neutral large clusters of total intensity 20 mAsub(eq) was led to an ionizer and then the large cluster ions are accelerated to 8.9 keV before entering the divider which disintegrates them into small fragments by multiple ionization. The mean specific size of disintegrated cluster ions (N/Z)' becomes smaller with increase in ionizing electron current of the divider. (N/Z)' becomes 10 3 approximately 10 4 at an electron current of 140 mA and an accelerating voltage of 680 V of the divider with its efficiency of 20 approximately 60%. Thus, the original large cluster ions are divided into small fragments of which the mean specific size is 1/20 approximately 1/100 of the initial value without much decrease in total intensity of the cluster ion beam

  1. A quadrupole ion trap as low-energy cluster ion beam source

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, N; Kanayama, T

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic energy distribution of ion beams was measured by a retarding field energy analyzer for a mass-selective cluster ion beam deposition system that uses a quadrupole ion trap as a cluster ion beam source. The results indicated that the system delivers a cluster-ion beam with energy distribution of approx 2 eV, which corresponded well to the calculation results of the trapping potentials in the ion trap. Using this deposition system, mass-selected hydrogenated Si cluster ions Si sub n H sub x sup + were actually deposited on Si(111)-(7x7) surfaces at impact kinetic energy E sub d of 3-30 eV. Observation by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) demonstrated that Si sub 6 H sub x sup + cluster ions landed on the surface without decomposition at E sub d =3 eV, while the deposition was destructive at E sub d>=18 eV. (author)

  2. Preparation and electrical-property characterization of poly(vinyl chloride)-derived carbon nanosheet by ion beam irradiation-induced carbon clustering and carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan-Hee; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Kim, Hyo-Sub; Hwang, In-Tae; Lee, Hong-Joon; Shin, Junhwa; Choi, Jae-Hak

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that carbon nanosheet (CNS) can easily be produced by a room-temperature, solid-state proton irradiation-induced clustering of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films followed by carbonization. The results of the optical, chemical, and structural analyses revealed that oxidized and sp2-hybridized carbon clusters were effectively created in the PVC thin film by combined dehydrochlorination and inter-coupling reactions during proton irradiation. This was further converted to pseudo-hexagonally-structured nano-crystalline CNS with 2-D symmetry and metallic transporting character by high-temperature treatment. As a result, the CNS exhibited a very high electrical conductivity (587 S/cm) without a significant change in their thickness, a low surface roughness (0.36 nm), and a high work function (5.11 eV). These findings demonstrate that the radiation-based approach opens new avenues for the design and development of 2-D CNS as a graphene allotrope for the application of electronic devices, including field-effect transistors, electric heating devices, biosensors, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

  3. Irradiation effects of Ar cluster ion beams on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Masahiro; Sugahara, Gaku; Takaoka, G.H.; Yamada, Isao

    1993-01-01

    Gas-cluster ion beams can be applied to new surface modification techniques such as surface cleaning, low damage sputtering and shallow junction formation. The effects of energetic Ar cluster impacts on solid surface were studied for cluster energies of 10-30keV. Irradiation effects were studied by RBS. For Si(111) substrates, irradiated with Ar ≥500 clusters to a dose of 1x10 15 ion/cm 2 at acceleration voltage 15kV, 2x10 14 atoms/cm 2 implanted Ar atoms were detected. In this case, the energy per cluster atom was smaller than 30eV; at this energy, no significant implantation occurs in the case of monomer ions. Ar cluster implantation into Si substrates occurred due to the high energy density irradiation. (author)

  4. Properties of an ionised-cluster beam from a vaporised-cluster ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Yamada, I.; Sasaki, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new type of ion source vaporised-metal cluster ion source, has been developed for deposition and epitaxy. A cluster consisting of 10 2 to 10 3 atoms coupled loosely together is formed by adiabatic expansion ejecting the vapour of materials into a high-vacuum region through the nozzle of a heated crucible. The clusters are ionised by electron bombardment and accelerated with neutral clusters toward a substrate. In this paper, mechanisms of cluster formation experimental results of the cluster size (atoms/cluster) and its distribution, and characteristics of the cluster ion beams are reported. The size is calculated from the kinetic equation E = (1/2)mNVsub(ej) 2 , where E is the cluster beam energy, Vsub(ej) is the ejection velocity, m is the mass of atom and N is the cluster size. The energy and the velocity of the cluster are measured by an electrostatic 127 0 energy analyser and a rotating disc system, respectively. The cluster size obtained for Ag is about 5 x 10 2 to 2 x 10 3 atoms. The retarding potential method is used to confirm the results for Ag. The same dependence on cluster size for metals such as Ag, Cu and Pb has been obtained in previous experiments. In the cluster state the cluster ion beam is easily produced by electron bombardment. About 50% of ionised clusters are obtained under typical operation conditions, because of the large ionisation cross sections of the clusters. To obtain a uniform spatial distribution, the ionising electrode system is also discussed. The new techniques are termed ionised-cluster beam deposition (ICBD) and epitaxy (ICBE). (author)

  5. METI/NEDO Projects on Cluster Ion Beam Process Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Isao; Matsuo, Jiro; Toyoda, Noriaki

    2003-01-01

    Since the initial study of gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) was started in the Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory of Kyoto University, more than 15 years have passed. Some of the results of that study have already been applied for industrial use. Unique characteristics of gas cluster ion bombardment have been found to offer potential for various other industrial applications. The impact of an accelerated cluster ion upon a target surface imparts very high energy densities into the impact area and produces non-linear effects that are not associated with the impacts of atomic ions. Among prospective applications for these effects are included shallow ion implantation, high rate sputtering, surface cleaning and smoothing, and low temperature thin film formation

  6. Fragmentation of cluster ions produced by electron impact ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, R.

    2001-12-01

    By studying fragmentation of dimer and cluster ions produced by electron impact ionization of a neutral cluster beam, it is possible to elucidate structure, stability and energetics of these species and the dynamics of the corresponding decay reactions. Fragmentation of carbon cluster ions formed from C 6 0 fullerenes, rare gas cluster ions and dimer ions and simple molecular cluster ions (oxygen and nitrogen) and dimer ions have been studied in this thesis using a high resolution two sector field mass spectrometer of reversed geometry and a NIER type electron impact ion source. Spontaneous decay reactions of triply and quadruply charged C 4 0 z + and C 4 1 z + cluster ions which are formed from C 6 0 fullerenes by electron impact ionization have been analyzed. A new but very weak decay reaction for the even-sized carbon clusters ions is observed, namely loss of C 3 . The odd-sized clusters ions preferentially decay by loss of carbon atoms and, to a lesser degree, trimers. A weak signal due to C 2 loss is observed for C 4 1 3 + ion. These decay channels are discussed in terms of the geometric structure of these metastable, relatively cold cluster ions. Measurements on metastable fragmentation of mass selected rare gas cluster ions (Ne, Ar, Kr) which are produced by electron impact ionization of a neutral rare gas cluster beam have been carried out. From the shape of the fragment ion peaks (MIKE scan technique) information about the distribution of kinetic energy that is released in the decay reaction can be deduced. In this study, the peak shape observed for cluster ions with sizes larger than five is Gaussian and thus from the peak width the mean kinetic energy release of the corresponding decay reactions can be calculated. Using finite heat bath theory, the binding energies of the decaying cluster ions are calculated from these data and have been compared to data in the literature where available. In addition to the decay reactions of cluster ions the metastable

  7. Ion clusters, REB, and current sheath characteristics in focused discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, A.; Brzosko, J.; DeChiara, P.; Kilic, H.; Mezzetti, F.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.; Zeng, D.

    1990-01-01

    Small fluctuations in the current sheath characteristics (peak current density, FWHM of leading sheath, control parameters of sheath internal structure) are linked to wide fluctuations of ion and ion cluster emission from the pinch. Magnetic probe data are used for correlating variations of current sheath parameters with particle emission intensity, Z/M composition, particle energy spectrum. The emission of ion and ion clusters at 90 degrees from the axis of a plasma focus discharge is monitored simultaneously with the 0 degrees emission. The particle energy spectrum is analyzed with a Thomson (parabola) spectrometer (time resolution ∼ 1 nanosec). The cross-sectional structure of the REB at 180 degrees along the discharge axis is monitored via the deposition of collective-field accelerated ions on a target in the REB direction. Etched tracks of ion and ion clusters are in all cases recorded on CR-39 plates. Sharp peaks of the D + -ion spectrum at 90 degrees are found for E > 200 keV/unit charge in all focused discharges. These peaks are due to ion crossing of the azimuthal magnetic field of the pinch region, in a predominant ion cluster structure

  8. Pre-equilibrium (exciton) model and the heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission

    CERN Document Server

    Betak, E

    2015-01-01

    We bring the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton) model enlarged for considering also the heavy ion collisions. At this moment, the calculations have been done without treatment of angular momentum variables, but all the approach can be straightforwardly applied to heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission including the angular momentum variables. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing the superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, $\\alpha$-particles).

  9. Clustering of noise-induced oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Fomin, A I; Postnov, D E

    2001-01-01

    The subject of our study is clustering in a population of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise and with randomly distributed coupling strength. The cluster state is frequency-locked state in which all functional units run at the same noise-induced frequency. Cooperative dynamics...

  10. Unimolecular and collisionally induced ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynon, J.H.; Boyd, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is reviewed under the following headings: introduction (mass spectroscopy and the study of fragmentation reactions of gaseous positive ions); techniques and methods (ion sources, detection systems, analysis of ions, data reduction); collision-induced reactions of ions and unimolecular fragmentations of metastable ions; applications (ion structure, energetic measurements, analytical applications, other applications). 305 references. (U.K.)

  11. Gas cluster ion beam equipments for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, J.; Takaoka, G.H.; Yamada, I.

    1995-01-01

    30 keV and 200 keV gas cluster ion beam equipments have been developed for industrial applications. A gas cluster source with a non-cooled nozzle was used for both the equipments. Sufficient monomer ion suppression was achieved by using an ExB filter and chromatic lenses mass filter with low extraction voltage. These equipments are suitable to be used for low-damage surface treatment of metals, insulators and semiconductors without heavy metal contamination. (orig.)

  12. Probing thin over layers with variable energy/cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spool, A.; White, R.

    2006-01-01

    A series of carbon-coated magnetic recording disks proved ideal for exploring sampling depth and ion formation trends as a function of variations in energy and cluster size (Au x ) of the primary ion beam, and variations in over coat thickness and type. Ion yield from the underlying metal layer increased with increasing energy and decreasing cluster size of the primary ions. The yields varied nearly linearly with over layer thickness. In contrast, M x Cs y depth profiles were unaffected by changes in the primary ion. The samples were fortuitously dosed with dinonyl phthalate, allowing a study similar to prior GSIMS work [I.S. Gilmore, M.P. Seah, J.E. Johnstone, in: A. Benninghoven, P. Bertrand, H.-N. Migeon, H.W. Werner (Eds.), Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on SIMS, Elsevier, Brussels, 2000, p. 801]. Ions prominent in the EI mass spectrum, including even electron ions, were more consistently enhanced at lower energies and higher cluster sizes than the primary (M + H) + ion. The total secondary ion count was inversely proportional to the film thickness. Secondary electrons, largely originating in the buried metal layer, may be inducing organic ion formation [A.M. Spool, Surf. Interface Anal. 36 (2004) 264

  13. Vacancy defect and defect cluster energetics in ion-implanted ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yufeng; Tuomisto, F.; Svensson, B. G.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Brillson, Leonard J.

    2010-02-01

    We have used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence, positron annihilation, and surface photovoltage spectroscopies to determine the energy levels of Zn vacancies and vacancy clusters in bulk ZnO crystals. Doppler broadening-measured transformation of Zn vacancies to vacancy clusters with annealing shifts defect energies significantly lower in the ZnO band gap. Zn and corresponding O vacancy-related depth distributions provide a consistent explanation of depth-dependent resistivity and carrier-concentration changes induced by ion implantation.

  14. Cluster observations of ion dispersion discontinuities in the polar cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Berchem, J.; Pitout, F.; Richard, R. L.; Trattner, K. J.; Grison, B.; Taylor, M. G.; Masson, A.; Dunlop, M. W.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    The reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the Earth’s magnetic field is taking place at the magnetopause on magnetic field lines threading through the polar cusp. When the IMF is southward, reconnection occurs near the subsolar point, which is magnetically connected to the equatorward boundary of the polar cusp. Subsequently the ions injected through the reconnection point precipitate in the cusp and are dispersed poleward. If reconnection is continuous and operates at constant rate, the ion dispersion is smooth and continuous. On the other hand if the reconnection rate varies, we expect interruption in the dispersion forming energy steps or staircase. Similarly, multiple entries near the magnetopause could also produce steps at low or mid-altitude when a spacecraft is crossing subsequently the field lines originating from these multiple sources. In addition, motion of the magnetopause induced by solar wind pressure changes or erosion due to reconnection can also induce a motion of the polar cusp and a disruption of the ions dispersion observed by a spacecraft. Cluster with four spacecraft following each other in the mid-altitude cusp can be used to distinguish between these “temporal” and “spatial” effects. We will present a cusp crossing with two spacecraft, separated by around two minutes. The two spacecraft observed a very similar dispersion with a step in energy in its centre and two other dispersions poleward. We will show that the steps could be temporal (assuming that the time between two reconnection bursts corresponds to the time delay between the two spacecraft) but it would be a fortuitous coincidence. On the other hand the steps and the two poleward dispersions could be explained by spatial effects if we take into account the motion of the open-closed boundary between the two spacecraft crossings.

  15. The smoke ion source: A device for the generation of cluster ions via inert gas condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, K.M.; Sarkas, H.W.; Eaton, J.G.; Bowen, K.H.; Westgate, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of an ion source for generating intense, continuous beams of both positive and negative cluster ions. This device is the result of the marriage of the inert gas condensation method with techniques for injecting electrons directly into expanding jets. In the preliminary studies described here, we have observed cluster ion size distributions ranging from n=1-400 for Pb n + and Pb n - and from n=12-5700 for Li n - . (orig.)

  16. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  17. Chemical composition of waterfall-induced air ions: Spectrometry vs. simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parts, T.-E.; Luts, A. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia). Dept. of Environmental Physics; Laakso, L.; Hirsikko, A.; Groenholm, T.; Kulmala, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Sciences

    2007-07-01

    Our measurements of ion size distributions near a waterfall provided new evidence for a waterfall-induced modification of air ion sizes. The ion size spectrum near a waterfall permanently differs from that in ordinary tropospheric air. In this paper we investigated the near-waterfall air ions chemical nature in detail. We carried out a simulation series of air small negative ion evolution, proposing that falling water, as a new environmental component, increases the concentration of OH{sup -} cluster ions. The produced OH{sup -} ions were employed as an extra input for our ion evolution model. The presence of additional OH{sup -} ions resulted in a decrease of typically model-provided NO{sub 3}{sup -} and/or HSO{sub 4}{sup -} cluster ion concentrations and an increase of the abundance of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} cluster ions. Near the waterfall the latter ions became dominant in our simulations. (orig.)

  18. Ion-induced surface modification of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1983-11-01

    In addition to the accumulation of the implanted species, a considerable number of processes can affect the composition of an alloy in the surface region during ion bombardment. Collisions of energetic ions with atoms of the alloy induce local rearrangement of atoms by displacements, replacement sequences and by spontaneous migration and recombination of defects within cascades. Point defects form clusters, voids, dislocation loops and networks. Preferential sputtering of elements changes the composition of the surface. At temperatures sufficient for thermal migration of point defects, radiation-enhanced diffusion promotes alloy component redistribution within and beyond the damage layer. Fluxes of interstitials and vacancies toward the surface and into the interior of the target induce fluxes of alloying elements leading to depth-dependent compositional changes. Moreover, Gibbsian surface segregation may affect the preferential loss of alloy components by sputtering when the kinetics of equilibration of the surface composition becomes competitive with the sputtering rate. Temperature, time, current density and ion energy can be used to influence the individual processes contributing to compositional changes and, thus, produce a rich variety of composition profiles near surfaces. 42 references

  19. Comparison of secondary ion emission yields for poly-tyrosine between cluster and heavy ion impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Narumi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Emission yields of secondary ions necessary for the identification of poly-tyrosine were compared for incident ion impacts of energetic cluster ions (0.8 MeV C 8 + , 2.4 MeV C 8 + , and 4.0 MeV C 8 + ) and swift heavy monoatomic molybdenum ions (4.0 MeV Mo + and 14 MeV Mo 4+ ) with similar mass to that of the cluster by time-of-flight secondary ion mass analysis combined with secondary ion electric current measurements. The comparison revealed that (1) secondary ion emission yields per C 8 + impact increase with increasing incident energy within the energy range examined, (2) the 4.0 MeV C 8 + impact provides higher emission yields than the impact of the monoatomic Mo ion with the same incident energy (4.0 MeV Mo + ), and (3) the 2.4 MeV C 8 + impact exhibits comparable emission yields to that for the Mo ion impact with higher incident energy (14 MeV Mo 4+ ). Energetic cluster ion impacts effectively produce the characteristic secondary ions for poly-tyrosine, which is advantageous for highly sensitive amino acid detection in proteins using time-of-flight secondary ion mass analysis.

  20. Investigations on carbon cluster formation in heavy ion irradiated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, S.P.; Mishra, R.; Mawar, A.K.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Khathing, D.T.; Srivastava, A.; Avasthi, D.K.; Ghosh, S.; Fink, D.

    2000-01-01

    In polymers, the carbonaceous clusters are supposed to be responsible for the electrical conductivity. So, the irradiation of organic polymers namely polypropylene (8μ) and polyimide (50μ) by energetic heavy ions 28 Si and 58 Ni produce significant changes in the size of these clusters leading to the corresponding change in the band gap and other electrical properties as revealed by the UV-VIS spectroscopic examinations. (author)

  1. CO2 laser photo-induced decomposition of ammoniated ammonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Soga, Takesi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Moriyama, Noboru; Ohno, Shin-ichi

    1995-01-01

    Photo-induced decomposition of ammoniated (clustered) ammonium ions was studied using a CO 2 laser to excite vibrational levels of the cluster ion. A tandem mass spectrometer (TMS) was installed with two quadrupole mass filters, a corona discharge ionization chamber, and a series of einzel lenses. Cluster ions of NH 4 + ·nNH 3 with n=1-7 were formed in TMS, and found to decompose at the frequency of 1077 cm -1 to an extent in proportional to laser intensity. CO 2 laser between 925 and 1055 do not decompose the cluster ions with laser intensities examined. (author)

  2. The mobilies of chiral molecular cluster ions in He gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kazuyuki; Matoba, Shiro; Koizumi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takao M; Tanuma, Hajime; Shiromaru, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    We measured the mobilities of Li + -(2-butanol) and Li + -(limonene) ions in He gas at room temperature using a drift tube mass spectrometer. The zero field mobilities of Li + -(2-Butanol) and Li + -(Limonene) were much lower than the polarization limit, indicating that the geometric collision cross-sections between the cluster ions and He atom were larger than the cross-sections predicted by the presence of a polarization force alone.

  3. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  4. Detection of gold cluster ions by ion-to-ion conversion using a CsI-converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.-T.; Novilkov, A.C.; Obnorskii, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Gold cluster ions in the m/z range of 10 4 -2 x 10 6 u were produced by bombarding a thin film of gold with 252 Cf-fission fragments. The gold covering a C-Al substrate formed islets having a mean diameter of 44 A. Their size- and mass-distribution was determined by means of electron microscopy. The main task was to measure the m/z distribution of the cluster ions ejected from the sample surface. For this purpose we built a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, which could be used as a linear TOF instrument or, alternatively, as a tandem-TOF instrument being equipped with an ion-to-ion converter. Combining the results obtained in both modes, it turned out that the linear TOF instrument equipped with micro-channel plates had a mean detection efficiency for 20 keV cluster ions of about 40%. In the tandem mode, the cluster ions hit a CsI converter with energies of 40z keV (z = charge state), from where secondary ions - mainly Cs + and (CsI) n Cs + cluster ions - were ejected. These ions were used to measure the TOF spectrum of the gold cluster ions. The detection efficiency of the cluster ions was found to vary in the available mass range from 99.7% to 96.5%. The complete mass distribution between 4 x 10 4 and 4 x 10 6 u was determined and compared with the corresponding mass distribution of the gold islets covering the substrate. (orig.)

  5. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  6. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  7. Electronic structure and dynamics of ordered clusters with ME or RE ions on oxide surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulagin, N.A., E-mail: nkulagin@bestnet.kharkov.u [Kharkiv National University for Radio Electronics, Avenue Shakespeare 6-48, 61045 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15

    Selected data of ab initio simulation of the electronic structure and spectral properties of either cluster with ions of iron, rare earth or actinium group elements have been presented here. Appearance of doped Cr{sup +4} ions in oxides, Cu{sup +2} in HTSC, Nd{sup +2} in solids has been discussed. Analysis of experimental data for plasma created ordered structures of crystallites with size of about 10{sup -9} m on surface of separate oxides are given, too. Change in the spectroscopic properties of clusters and nano-structures on surface of strontium titanate crystals discussed shortly using the X-ray line spectroscopy experimental results. - Research highlights: External influence and variation of technology induce changes in valence of nl ions in compounds. Wave function of cluster presented as anti-symmetrical set of ions wave functions. The main equation describes the self-consistent field depending on state of all electrons of cluster. Level scheme of Cr{sup 4+} ions in octo- and tetra-site corresponds to doped oxides spectra after treatment. Plasma treatment effects in appearance of systems of unit crystallites with size of about 10{sup -6}-10{sup -9} m.

  8. Electronic structure and dynamics of ordered clusters with ME or RE ions on oxide surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Selected data of ab initio simulation of the electronic structure and spectral properties of either cluster with ions of iron, rare earth or actinium group elements have been presented here. Appearance of doped Cr +4 ions in oxides, Cu +2 in HTSC, Nd +2 in solids has been discussed. Analysis of experimental data for plasma created ordered structures of crystallites with size of about 10 -9 m on surface of separate oxides are given, too. Change in the spectroscopic properties of clusters and nano-structures on surface of strontium titanate crystals discussed shortly using the X-ray line spectroscopy experimental results. - Research highlights: → External influence and variation of technology induce changes in valence of nl ions in compounds. → Wave function of cluster presented as anti-symmetrical set of ions wave functions. → The main equation describes the self-consistent field depending on state of all electrons of cluster. → Level scheme of Cr 4+ ions in octo- and tetra-site corresponds to doped oxides spectra after treatment. → Plasma treatment effects in appearance of systems of unit crystallites with size of about 10 -6 -10 -9 m.

  9. Experimental study of ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, F.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    In the environment, the presence of ions from natural radioactivity may increase the rate of new particle formation through ion-induced nucleation. A thermal diffusion cloud chamber (TDCC) has been built to experimentally study ion-induced nucleation where the ions are produced by gaseous radioactive sources. The critical supersaturation values and nucleation rates for methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol vapors on ions produced within the volume of the chamber by alpha decay of 222 Rn have been measured quantitatively at various radioactivity concentrations and supersaturations. The presence of ion tracks and the effect of an external electric field were also investigated. The alpha tracks and ion-induced nucleation formed by 222 Rn decay become visible at the critical supersaturation that is below the value needed for homogeneous nucleation. At this supersaturation, the nucleation rates increase substantially with increasing 222 Rn at low activity concentrations, but attain limiting values at higher concentrations. The experimental results indicate that the ionization by radon decay will promote ion-cluster formation and lower the free energy barriers. The formation of visible droplets is strongly dependent on the supersaturation. This study also confirms that the external electric field has a significant effect on the observed rates of nucleation

  10. Interaction of ion clusters with fusion plasmas: Scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.; Bringa, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The interaction between large ion clusters or very intense ion beams with fusion plasma is studied using the dielectric function formalism with appropriate quantum corrections. The contributions from individual and collective modes to the energy loss are calculated. The general properties of the interference effects are characterized in terms of the relevant parameters, and simple scaling laws are obtained. In particular, the conditions for a maximum enhancement in the energy deposition are derived. The study provides a unified view and a general formulation of collective effects in the energy loss for low and high velocities of the beam particles. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. Upgrading the Lyon cluster ion accelerator by a radiofrequency quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, H.O.; Schempp, A.

    1987-02-01

    The design is presented of an RFQ with variable final energy suitable to post-accelerate cluster ions from the Lyon electrostatic cluster-ion accelerator in the mass ranges from 1 to 25 μ and 1 to 50 μ to kinetic energies of 1.32-2.5 MeV and 2.64-5.0 MeV for cw and pulsed operation, respectively. Furthermore, a beam line is described which matches the electrostatically preaccelerated beam to the RFQ by use of electrostatic quadrupole triplets. When used without RFQ this beam line serves to improve beam parameters on the target, such as the particle flux density or beam divergence. The estimated costs of this project are about DM 345 000.- or FF 1 200 000.- without VAT. (orig.) [de

  12. Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane injury and sugar contents in salt-sensitive rice ( Oryza sativa L. spp. indica ) roots under isoosmotic conditions. ... The accumulation of sugars in PT1 roots may be a primary salt-defense mechanism and may function as an osmotic control. Key words: ...

  13. Influence of residual Ar+ in Ar cluster ion beam for DLC film formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Teruyuki; Miyauchi, Kazuya; Toyoda, Noriaki; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tokumi; Tsubakino, Harushige; Matsuo, Jiro; Matsui, Shinji; Yamada, Isao

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the influences of residual Ar monomer ion (Ar + ) on sp 2 content and hardness of diamond like carbon (DLC) films formed by Ar cluster ion beam assisted deposition, Ar cluster ion, Ar + and their mixed ions (Ar cluster ion and Ar + ) bombardments were performed during evaporation of C 60 . From near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy measurements, lower sp 2 content in the carbon films was obtained with Ar cluster ion bombardment than that with Ar + and mixed ion. Furthermore higher hardness and smooth surface were shown with Ar cluster ion bombardments. Therefore it was important to reduce Ar + in Ar cluster ion beams to obtain hard DLC films with flat surface

  14. Observations on small anionic clusters in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eritt, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The term atomic cluster relates to compounds of at least two or three atoms. Thereby the physical properties are size dependent and the property transitions between single atoms and bulk material are not always smooth. Ion traps allow it to observe internal cluster properties independent from the influence of external forces. In this work the electron induced decay of singly negatively charged atomic clusters was observed. The dissociation cross section of the clusters is dominated by detachment of the only weakly bound outer electrons. For simple atoms at low electron energies a simple scaling law can be obtained that includes only the binding energies of the valence electrons. Nevertheless for larger sizes theoretical calculations predict so called ''giant resonances'' as dominant decay process in metal clusters. Due to mass limitations in storage rings exist so far only cross section measurements for simple anions and small negative molecules. In this work the electron detachment cross sections of small negatively charged carbon (C n - n=2-12), aluminium (Al n - n=2-7) and silver clusters (Ag n - n=1-11) were measured in an electrostatic ion beam trap. The classical scaling law, including only the binding energies of the valence electrons, turned out to be not sufficient, especially for larger clusters. In order to improve the correlation between measured and predicted values it was proposed to involve the influence of the cluster volume and the specific polarisability induced by long range coulomb interaction. For silver clusters the best agreement was obtained using a combination of the projected area reduced by the polarisability. The existence of ''giant resonances'' could not be confirmed. According to theory for clusters with a broad internal energy distribution, a power-law decay close to 1/time is expected. For some clusters the lifetime behaviour would be strongly quenched by photon emission. The thermionic evaporative decay of anionic aluminium and

  15. Observations on small anionic clusters in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eritt, Markus

    2008-10-02

    The term atomic cluster relates to compounds of at least two or three atoms. Thereby the physical properties are size dependent and the property transitions between single atoms and bulk material are not always smooth. Ion traps allow it to observe internal cluster properties independent from the influence of external forces. In this work the electron induced decay of singly negatively charged atomic clusters was observed. The dissociation cross section of the clusters is dominated by detachment of the only weakly bound outer electrons. For simple atoms at low electron energies a simple scaling law can be obtained that includes only the binding energies of the valence electrons. Nevertheless for larger sizes theoretical calculations predict so called ''giant resonances'' as dominant decay process in metal clusters. Due to mass limitations in storage rings exist so far only cross section measurements for simple anions and small negative molecules. In this work the electron detachment cross sections of small negatively charged carbon (C{sub n}{sup -} n=2-12), aluminium (Al{sub n}{sup -} n=2-7) and silver clusters (Ag{sub n}{sup -} n=1-11) were measured in an electrostatic ion beam trap. The classical scaling law, including only the binding energies of the valence electrons, turned out to be not sufficient, especially for larger clusters. In order to improve the correlation between measured and predicted values it was proposed to involve the influence of the cluster volume and the specific polarisability induced by long range coulomb interaction. For silver clusters the best agreement was obtained using a combination of the projected area reduced by the polarisability. The existence of ''giant resonances'' could not be confirmed. According to theory for clusters with a broad internal energy distribution, a power-law decay close to 1/time is expected. For some clusters the lifetime behaviour would be strongly quenched by photon

  16. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-01-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates

  17. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K., E-mail: fujiik@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., Mihama 919-1205 (Japan); Fukuya, K. [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., Mihama 919-1205 (Japan); Hojo, T. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  18. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S.

    2006-02-01

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni 25+ ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO 2 radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H 2 O 2+ makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  19. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  20. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  1. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Nicholas B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  2. Cluster ion-surface interactions: from meV to MeV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, Kai; Meinander, Kristoffer; Jaervi, Tommi T.; Peltola, Jarkko; Samela, Juha [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The nature of cluster ion-surface interactions changes dramatically with the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster species. In this talk I review some of our recent work on the nature of cluster-surface interactions spanning an energy range from a few MeV/cluster to about 1 MeV/cluster and cluster sizes in the range of 10 - 1000 atoms/cluster. In the energy range of a few MeV/cluster ion, the kinetic energy of the incoming ion is insignificant compared to the energy gained when the surface potential energy at the cluster-surface interface is released and partly translated into kinetic energy. Even in this energy regime I show that surprisingly drastic effects can occur. When the energy of the incoming cluster is raised to a few eV/atom, the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster starts to affect the deposition. It will cause the cluster to entirely reform on impact. When the energy is raised to the range of keV's/cluster, the clusters start to penetrate the sample, fairly similar to conventional ion implantation. However, in dense targets the cluster ions may stick close to each other long enough to cause a significant enhancement of the heat spike in the material. Finally, I show that at kinetic energies around 1 MeV/cluster the cluster enhancement of the heat spike may lead to dramatic surface effects.

  3. Group IIB-VIA semiconductor oxide cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekharan, Thankan

    2018-05-01

    Metal oxide cluster ions, MnOm± (M = Zn, Cd) and HgnOm- of various stoichiometry have been generated from solid IIB-VIA semiconductor oxides targets, (ZnO(s), CdO(s), and HgO(s)) by using pulse laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with a laser of λ = 355 nm. Analysis of mass spectral data indicates the formation of stoichiometric cluster ions viz., (ZnO)n=1-30+ and (CdO)n=1-40+ along with -O bound anions, (ZnO)n=1-30O-, (CdO)n=1-40O- and (HgO)n=1-36O- from their respective solids. Further, metal oxoanions such as ZnOn=2,3-, CdOn=2,3,6-, and HgOn=2,3,6,7- have also been noted signifying the higher coordination ability of both Cd and Hg with O/O2/O3 species.

  4. Production of strange clusters in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.; Baltz, A.J.; Pang, Yang; Schlagel, T.J.; Kahana, S.H.

    1993-02-01

    We address a number of issues related to the production of strangeness in high energy heavy ion collisions, including the possibility that stable states of multi-strange hyperonic or quark matter might exist, and the prospects that such objects may be created and detected in the laboratory. We make use of events generated by the cascade code ARC to estimate the rapidity distribution dN/dy of strange clusters produced in Si+Au and Au+Au collisions at AGS energies. These calculations are performed in a simple coalescence model, which yields a consistent description of the strange cluster (d, 3 HE, 3 H, 4 He) production at these energies. If a doubly strange, weakly bound ΛΛ dibaryon exists, we find that it is produced rather copiously in Au+Au collisions, with dN/dy ∼0.1 at raid-rapidity. If one adds another non-strange or strange baryon to a cluster, the production rate decreases by roughly one or two orders of magnitude, respectively. For instance, we predict that the hypernucleus ΛΛ 6 He should have dN/dy ∼5 x 10 -6 for Au+Au central collisions. It should be possible to measure the successive Λ → pπ- weak decays of this object. We comment on the possibility that conventional multi-strange hypernuclei may serve as ''doorway states'' for the production of stable configurations of strange quark matter, if such states exist

  5. Cluster induced ignition - A new approach to inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, T.; Mendonca, J.T.; Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.

    2001-01-01

    An ultra intense laser interaction with clusters produce energetic ions and electrons in MeV range due to cluster explosion. Here we discuss the possibility of harnessing these particle energies to heat a part of the pre compressed DT fuel to ignition condition. In this article we are striving to present the principle concept and the preliminary results are discussed. (author)

  6. Investigation of the alpha cluster model and the density matrix expansion in ion-ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashdan, M.B.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with the investigation of the alpha cluster model (ACM) of brink and studies of the accuracy of the density matrix expansion (DME) approximation in deriving the real part of the ion-ion optical potential. the ACM is applied to calculate the inelastic 0 1 + →2 1 + charge form factor for electron scattering by 12 C to investigate the validity of this model for 12 C nucleus. it is found that the experimental curve can be fitted over the entire range of the momentum transfer by a generator - coordinate state for the 2 1 + state that consist of a superposition of two triangular ACM states with two different cluster separations and the same oscillator parameter

  7. Ag clustering investigation in laser irradiated ion-exchanged glasses by optical and vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trave, E., E-mail: enrico.trave@unive.it [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Cattaruzza, E.; Gonella, F.; Calvelli, P. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Quaranta, A. [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Rahman, A.; Mariotto, G. [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modify the properties of Ag{sup +} exchanged glasses by thermal and laser treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced microstructural changes are analyzed by optical and Raman spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-based species in the glass show a peculiar PL activity in the UV-Vis range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman and OA analysis allow for determining the Ag cluster size evolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser processing leads to different cluster formation and fragmentation mechanisms. - Abstract: Ion exchange process is widely used to dope silicate glass layers with silver for several applications, ranging from light waveguide to nanostructured composite glass fabrication. The silver-doped structure and its physical properties depend on the preparation parameters as well as on subsequent treatments. In particular, laser irradiation of the ion exchanged glasses has been demonstrated to be an effective tool to control cluster size and size distribution. Nevertheless, a complete comprehension of the basic phenomena and a systematic characterization of these systems are still lacking. In this paper, an extended optical characterization is presented for soda-lime glass slides, doped with silver by Ag{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion exchange, thermally treated and irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser beam at different wavelengths, and for different energy density. The samples were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques, namely, optical absorption, photoluminescence and micro-Raman analysis. The availability of all these characterization techniques allowed pointing out a suitable scenario for the Ag clustering evolution as a function of the ion exchange, annealing and laser irradiation parameters.

  8. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impact ionization for highly sensitive chemical structure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Energetic cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater were applied to time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry. This gave various advantages including enhancement of SIs required for chemical structure characterization and prevention of charging effects in SI mass spectra for organic targets. We report some characteristic features of TOF SI mass spectrometry using energetic cluster ion impact ionization and discuss two future applications of it.

  9. Field Observation of the Green Ocean Amazon. Neutral Cluster Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petaja, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Backman, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manninen, H. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wimmer, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) was deployed to the T3 site for Intensive Operations Periods 1 and 2 (IOP1 and IOP2). The NAIS is an instrument that measures aerosol particle and ion number size distributions in the mobility diameter range of 0.8 to 42 nm, corresponding to electrical mobility range between 3.2 and 0.0013 cm2 V-1 s-1. New particle formation (NPF) events were detected using the NAIS at the T3 field site during IOP1 and IOP2. Secondary NPF is a globally important source of aerosol number. To fully explain atmospheric NPF and subsequent growth, we need to directly measure the initial steps of the formation processes in different environments, including rain forest. Particle formation characteristics, such as formation and growth rates, were used as indicators of the relevant processes and participating compounds in the initial formation. In a case of parallel ion and neutral cluster measurements, we estimated the relative contribution of ion-induced and neutral nucleation to the total particle formation.

  10. Dependence of energy per molecule on sputtering yields with reactive gas cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Gas cluster ions show dense energy deposition on a target surface, which result in the enhancement of chemical reactions. In reactive sputtering with gas cluster ions, the energy per atom or molecule plays an important role. In this study, the average cluster size (N, the number of atoms or molecules in a cluster ion) was controlled; thereby the dependences of the energy per molecule on the sputtering yields of carbon by CO 2 cluster ions and that of Si by SF 6 /Ar mixed gas cluster ions were investigated. Large CO 2 cluster ions with energy per molecule of 1 eV showed high reactive sputtering yield of an amorphous carbon film. However, these ions did not cause the formation of large craters on a graphite surface. It is possible to achieve very low damage etching by controlling the energy per molecule of reactive cluster ions. Further, in the case of SF 6 /Ar mixed cluster ions, it was found that reactive sputtering was enhanced when a small amount of SF 6 gas (∼10%) was mixed with Ar. The reactive sputtering yield of Si by one SF 6 molecule linearly increased with the energy per molecule.

  11. Non-linear sputtering effects induced by MeV energy gold clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussofiane-Baudin, K.; Brunelle, A.; Chaurand, P.; Della-Negra, S.; Depauw, J.; Le Beyec, Y.; Hakansson, P.

    1993-09-01

    Gold clusters Au n + with 1 < n ≤ 4, accelerated to MeV energies at the Orsay tandem accelerator, have been used to induce secondary ion emission from the surface of thin organic and inorganic films. A non-linear enhancement of the secondary ion yields is observed when cluster impacts are compared to single atom impacts at the same velocity. It has been shown that the collective effects propagate in the solid over a depth larger than 2000 A. The equilibrium charge state of cluster constituents after their passage through a thin carbon foil (1000 A) has been measured. The mean value for the cluster constituents is the same as for single atoms at the same velocity. (authors). 41 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. Case Study of Ion Beams Observed By Cluster At Perigee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Perigee Beam Team

    During substorms the short beams of ions in the keV-to-tens keV energy range are injected into the auroral flux tubes from the magnetotail (sometimes extending up to >100 keV energy) carrying the information on the source distance, scale-size and temporal history of plasma acceleration. We present observations with the CLUSTER crossing inward the auroral zone flux tubes at ~4Re distance near its perigee during the substorm activity on February 14, 2001. The ion beams cover the same region (poleward half) of the auroral oval where the low-energy ions are extracted from the ionosphere, and where the small-scale transient transverse Alfven waves are observed which carry predominantly the downward parallel Poynting flux into the ionosphere. The multiple beams were basically confirmed to be the transient effects, although some effects including the (spatial) velocity filter and the parallel electric fields (im- posed by quasineutrality requirement) may complicate the interpretation. The gener- ation region of ion beams is not limited to most poleward, newly-reconnected flux tubes; the beam generation region could extend across magnetic field inward by as much as >100km (if mapped to the ionosphere). Surprising variety of injection dis- tances observed nearly simultaneously (ranging between >60 Re and ~10 Re) have been inferred when using the full available energy and time resolution, with shorter injection distances be possibly associated with the flow braking process. The beam multiplicity often displays the apparent ~3 min quasiperiodicity inherent to the basic dissipation process, it was not yet explained by any substorm theory.

  13. Skinning of argon clusters by Coulomb explosion induced with an intense femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakabe, S.; Shirai, K.; Hashida, M.; Shimizu, S.; Masuno, S.

    2006-01-01

    The energy distributions of ions emitted from argon clusters Coulomb exploded at an intensity of 17 W/cm 2 with an intense femtosecond laser have been experimentally studied. The power m of energy E of the ion energy distribution (dN/dE∼E m ) is expected to be 1/2 for spherical ion clusters, but it is in fact reduced smaller than 1/2 as the laser intensity is decreased. This reduction can be well interpreted as resulting from the instantaneous ionization of the surface of the cluster. The validity of this interpretation was confirmed by experiments with double pulse irradiation. A cluster irradiated by the first pulse survives as a skinned cluster, and the remaining core part is Coulomb exploded by the second pulse. It is shown that a cluster can be skinned by an intense short laser pulse, and the laser-intensity dependence of the skinned layer thickness can be reasonably explained by the laser-induced space charge field created in the cluster

  14. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  15. Smoothing of ZnO films by gas cluster ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.; Liu, S.W.; Wang, X.M.; Iliev, M.N.; Chen, C.L.; Yu, X.K.; Liu, J.R.; Ma, K.; Chu, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    Planarization of wide-band-gap semiconductor ZnO surface is crucial for thin-film device performance. In this study, the rough initial surfaces of ZnO films deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering on Si substrates were smoothed by gas cluster ion beams. AFM measurements show that the average surface roughness (R a ) of the ZnO films could be reduced considerably from 16.1 nm to 0.9 nm. Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor the structure of both the as-grown and the smoothed ZnO films. Rutherford back-scattering in combination with channeling effect was used to study the damage production induced by the cluster bombardment

  16. Ionization of water clusters by fast Highly Charged Ions: Stability, fragmentation, energetics and charge mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S; Maisonny, R; Capron, M; Bernigaud, V; Cassimi, A; Gervais, B; Grandin, J-P; Huber, B A; Manil, B; Rousseau, P; Tarisien, M; Adoui, L; Lopez-Tarifa, P; AlcamI, M; MartIn, F; Politis, M-F; Penhoat, M A Herve du; Vuilleumier, R; Gaigeot, M-P; Tavernelli, I

    2009-01-01

    We study dissociative ionization of water clusters by impact of fast Ni ions. Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) is used to obtain information about stability, energetics and charge mobility of the ionized clusters. An unusual stability of the (H 2 O) 4 H ''+ ion is observed, which could be the signature of the so called ''Eigen'' structure in gas phase water clusters. High charge mobility, responsible for the formation of protonated water clusters that dominate the mass spectrum, is evidenced. These results are supported by CPMD and TDDFT simulations, which also reveal the mechanisms of such mobility.

  17. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.O.

    1988-09-01

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  18. Particle modeling of transport of α-ray generated ion clusters in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Lizhu; Nanbu, Kenichi; Hirata, Yosuke; Izumi, Mikio; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    A particle model is developed using the test-particle Monte Carlo method to study the transport properties of α-ray generated ion clusters in a flow of air. An efficient ion-molecule collision model is proposed to simulate the collisions between ion and air molecule. The simulations are performed for a steady state of ion transport in a circular pipe. In the steady state, generation of ions is balanced with such losses of ions as absorption of the measuring sensor or pipe wall and disappearance by positive-negative ion recombination. The calculated ion current to the measuring sensor agrees well with the previous measured data. (author)

  19. A study of defect cluster formation in vanadium by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Kazunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Formation of defect clusters in thin foils of vanadium was investigated by heavy ion irradiation. In the very thin region of the specimens less than 20 nm, vacancy clusters were formed under gold ion irradiation, while very few clusters were detected in the specimens irradiated with 200 and 400 keV self-ions up to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}. The density of vacancy clusters were found to be strongly dependent on ion energy. Only above the critical value of kinetic energy transfer density in vanadium, vacancy clusters are considered to be formed in the cascade damage from which interstitials can escape to the specimen surface in the very thin region. (author)

  20. Range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases near the critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.; Quevedo, H.J.; Bonasera, A.; Donovan, M.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Guardo, G.L.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, D.; Palmerini, S.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Smith, H.; Trippella, O.; Anzalone, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Ditmire, T.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases by using the Petawatt laser at the University of Texas-Austin. The produced plasma propagated in all directions some hitting the cold cluster gas not illuminated by the laser. From the ratio of the measured ion distributions at different angles we can estimate the range of the ions in the cold cluster gas. It is much smaller than estimated using popular models, which take only into account the slowing down of charged particles in uniform matter. We discuss the ion range in systems prepared near a liquid–gas phase transition. - Highlights: • We present experimental results obtained at the UT Petawatt laser facility, Austin, TX. • The ion range is strongly modified for cluster gases as compared to its value in a homogeneous system. • Large fluctuations are found if the cluster gas is prepared near the liquid–gas phase transition region.

  1. Range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases near the critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, 77843 College Station, TX (United States); Quevedo, H.J. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bonasera, A., E-mail: abonasera@comp.tamu.edu [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, 77843 College Station, TX (United States); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Donovan, M.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Guardo, G.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Libera Universita' Kore, 94100 Enna (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, D. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Palmerini, S. [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Smith, H. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Trippella, O. [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2017-05-18

    We measure the range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases by using the Petawatt laser at the University of Texas-Austin. The produced plasma propagated in all directions some hitting the cold cluster gas not illuminated by the laser. From the ratio of the measured ion distributions at different angles we can estimate the range of the ions in the cold cluster gas. It is much smaller than estimated using popular models, which take only into account the slowing down of charged particles in uniform matter. We discuss the ion range in systems prepared near a liquid–gas phase transition. - Highlights: • We present experimental results obtained at the UT Petawatt laser facility, Austin, TX. • The ion range is strongly modified for cluster gases as compared to its value in a homogeneous system. • Large fluctuations are found if the cluster gas is prepared near the liquid–gas phase transition region.

  2. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  3. Electron-induced chemistry in microhydrated sulfuric acid clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lengyel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the mixed sulfuric acid–water clusters in a molecular beam experiment with electron attachment and negative ion mass spectrometry and complement the experiment by density functional theory (DFT calculations. The microhydration of (H2SO4m(H2On clusters is controlled by the expansion conditions, and the electron attachment yields the main cluster ion series (H2SO4m(H2OnHSO4− and (H2OnH2SO4−. The mass spectra provide an experimental evidence for the onset of the ionic dissociation of sulfuric acid and ion-pair (HSO4−  ⋅  ⋅  ⋅  H3O+ formation in the neutral H2SO4(H2On clusters with n ≥ 5 water molecules, in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. In the clusters with two sulfuric acid molecules (H2SO42(H2On this process starts as early as n ≥ 2 water molecules. The (H2SO4m(H2OnHSO4− clusters are formed after the dissociative electron attachment to the clusters containing the (HSO4−  ⋅  ⋅  ⋅  H3O+ ion-pair structure, which leads to the electron recombination with the H3O+ moiety generating H2O molecule and the H-atom dissociation from the cluster. The (H2OnH2SO4− cluster ions point to an efficient caging of the H atom by the surrounding water molecules. The electron-energy dependencies exhibit an efficient electron attachment at low electron energies below 3 eV, and no resonances above this energy, for all the measured mass peaks. This shows that in the atmospheric chemistry only the low-energy electrons can be efficiently captured by the sulfuric acid–water clusters and converted into the negative ions. Possible atmospheric consequences of the acidic dissociation in the clusters and the electron attachment to the sulfuric acid–water aerosols are discussed.

  4. Electron-induced chemistry in microhydrated sulfuric acid clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the mixed sulfuric acid-water clusters in a molecular beam experiment with electron attachment and negative ion mass spectrometry and complement the experiment by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The microhydration of (H2SO4)m(H2O)n clusters is controlled by the expansion conditions, and the electron attachment yields the main cluster ion series (H2SO4)m(H2O)nHSO4- and (H2O)nH2SO4-. The mass spectra provide an experimental evidence for the onset of the ionic dissociation of sulfuric acid and ion-pair (HSO4- ṡ ṡ ṡ H3O+) formation in the neutral H2SO4(H2O)n clusters with n ≥ 5 water molecules, in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. In the clusters with two sulfuric acid molecules (H2SO4)2(H2O)n this process starts as early as n ≥ 2 water molecules. The (H2SO4)m(H2O)nHSO4- clusters are formed after the dissociative electron attachment to the clusters containing the (HSO4- ṡ ṡ ṡ H3O+) ion-pair structure, which leads to the electron recombination with the H3O+ moiety generating H2O molecule and the H-atom dissociation from the cluster. The (H2O)nH2SO4- cluster ions point to an efficient caging of the H atom by the surrounding water molecules. The electron-energy dependencies exhibit an efficient electron attachment at low electron energies below 3 eV, and no resonances above this energy, for all the measured mass peaks. This shows that in the atmospheric chemistry only the low-energy electrons can be efficiently captured by the sulfuric acid-water clusters and converted into the negative ions. Possible atmospheric consequences of the acidic dissociation in the clusters and the electron attachment to the sulfuric acid-water aerosols are discussed.

  5. Specific gene mutations induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeling, M.; Karoly, C.W.; Cheng, D.S.K.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes our heavy-ion research rationale, progress, and plans for the near future. The major project involves selecting a group of maize Adh1 mutants induced by heavy ions and correlating their altered behavior with altered DNA nucleotide sequences and sequence arrangements. This research requires merging the techniques of classical genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Our secondary projects involve (1) the use of the Adh gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a second system with which to quantify the sort of specific gene mutants induced by heavy ions as compared to x rays, and (2) the development of a maize Adh1 pollen in situ monitor for environmental mutagens

  6. Ion induced polymerization in benzene frozen films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagno, G [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Strazzulla, G [Catania Univ. (Italy). Osservatorio Astrofisico; Fichera, M; Foti, G [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1983-07-01

    The cross section of the polymerization process induced by energetic protons colliding with frozen benzene layers has been measured. The results have been described by a simple theory and they show that the process is a volume one occurring along the ion track and interesting all of the crossed layers.

  7. Proton-Induced Plasticity in Hydrogen Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stich, I. [JRCAT, Angstrom Technology Partnership, 1-1-4 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Marx, D.; Parrinello, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Terakura, K. [NAIR, Angstrom Technology Partnership, 1-1-4 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Terakura, K. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332 (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    The effect of protonation of pure hydrogen clusters is investigated at low temperature using a combination of path-integral simulations and first-principles electronic structure calculations. The added proton gets trapped as a very localized H{sub 3}{sup +} impurity in the cluster core, and is surrounded by stable shells of solvating H{sub 2} molecules. These clusters are frozen with respect to the translational degrees of freedom, while the H{sub 2} ligands undergo large-amplitude rotations. The classical approximation for the nuclei fails to account for this effect which is akin to plastic behavior in crystals. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Proton-Induced Plasticity in Hydrogen Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stich, I.; Marx, D.; Parrinello, M.; Terakura, K.; Terakura, K.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of protonation of pure hydrogen clusters is investigated at low temperature using a combination of path-integral simulations and first-principles electronic structure calculations. The added proton gets trapped as a very localized H 3 + impurity in the cluster core, and is surrounded by stable shells of solvating H 2 molecules. These clusters are frozen with respect to the translational degrees of freedom, while the H 2 ligands undergo large-amplitude rotations. The classical approximation for the nuclei fails to account for this effect which is akin to plastic behavior in crystals. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Dynamics of Neutral Cluster Growth and Cluster Ion Fragmentation for Toluene/Water, Aniline/Argon, and 4-Fluorostyrene/Argon Clusters: Covariance Mapping of the Mass Spectral Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foltin, M

    1998-01-01

    .... To explore sensitivity of the parent ion/fragment ion correlation coefficient to cluster fragmentation, correlation coefficients are measured as a function of ionization photon energy as thresholds...

  10. Ion-induced damage and amorphization in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; White, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Ion-induced damage growth in high-energy, self-ion irradiated Si was studied using electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The results show that there is a marked variation in the rate of damage growth, as well as the damage morphology, along the path of the ion. Near the ion end-of-range (eor), damage increases monotonically with ion fluence until a buried amorphous layer is formed, while damage growth saturates at a low level in the region ahead. The morphology of the damage in the saturated region is shown to consist predominantly of simple defect clusters such as the divacancy. Damage growth remains saturated ahead of the eor until expansion of the buried amorphous layer encroaches into the region. A homogeneous growth model is presented which accounts for damage saturation, and accurately predicts the dose-rate dependence of the saturation level. Modifications of the model are discussed which are needed to account for the rapid growth in the eor region and near the interface of the buried amorphous layer. Two important factors contributing to rapid damage growth are identified. Spatial separation of the Frenkel defect pairs (i.e. interstitials and vacancies) due to the momentum of the interstitials is shown to greatly impact damage growth near the eor, while uniaxial strain in the interfacial region of the amorphous layer is identified as an important factor contributing to growth at that location. 20 refs., 10 figs

  11. Radiation defects in lithium fluoride induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K.; Steckenreiter, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/SPMC; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-07-01

    Single crystals of lithium fluoride were irradiated with various species of heavy ions in the energy regime between 1 and 30 MeV/u. The induced radiation damage was studied with techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, chemical etching and profilometry, complemented by annealing experiments. Clear evidence is given for a complex track structure and defect morphology. Single defects such as F-centers are produced in a large halo of several tens of nanometers around the ion trajectory. The defect creation in this zone is similar to that under conventional radiation. For heavy ions above a critical energy loss of 10 keV/nm, new effects occur within a very small core region of 2-4 nm in diameter. The damage in this zone is responsible for chemical etching and for a characteristic anisotropic x-ray scattering. It is assumed that in this core, complex defect aggregates (e.g., cluster of color centers, molecular anions and vacancies) are created. Their formation is only slightly influenced by the irradiation temperature and takes place even at 15 K where diffusion processes of primary defects are frozen. Furthermore, irradiation with heavy ions leads to pronounced swelling effects which can be related to an intermediate zone of around 10 nm around the ion path. (orig.) 40 refs.

  12. Cluster Observations of Ion Dispersions near the Exterior Cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C.; Grison, B.; Berchem, J.; Trattner, K. J.; Pitout, F.; Richard, R. L.; Taylor, M. G.; Laakso, H. E.; Masson, A.; Dunlop, M. W.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Daly, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    The cusps are the places where the Earth's magnetic field lines, connected to the inner side of the magnetopause, converge. It is therefore the place where signatures of processes occurring near the subsolar point, in the tail lobes, as well as near the dawn and dusk flanks are observed. The main process that injects solar wind plasma into the polar cusp is now generally accepted to be magnetic reconnection. Depending on the IMF direction, this process will take place equatorward (for IMF southward), poleward (for IMF northward) or on the side (for IMF azimuthal) of the cusp. We report a Cluster crossing on 5 January 2002 near the exterior cusp on the southern dusk side. The IMF was mainly azimuthal (IMF-By around -5 nT), the solar wind speed around 280 km/s and the density around 5 cm-3. The four Cluster spacecraft were still in the "magnetotail" configuration with two perfect tetrahedra of 2000 km around apogee and turning into an elongated configuration near the magnetopause. C4 was the first spacecraft to enter the cusp around 19:52:04 UT, followed by C2 at 19:52:35 UT, C1 at 19:54:24 UT and C3 at 20:13:15 UT. C4 and C1 observed two ion energy dispersions at 20:10 UT and 20:40 UT and C3 at 20:35 UT and 21:15 UT. We will investigate the origin of the injections forming the dispersions and if these can be explained by the reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the Earth's magnetic field.

  13. Tidally Induced Bars of Galaxies in Clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokas, E.; Ebrová, Ivana; del Pino, A.; Sybilska, A.; Athanassoula, E.; Semczuk, M.; Gajda, G.; Fouquet, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 6 (2016), 227/1-227/13 ISSN 0004-637X Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : galaxies * clusters * evolution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  14. Mixed clusters from the coexpansion of C2F6 and n2 in a pulsed, supersonic expansion cluster ion source and beam deflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer: A first application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven D.

    The following topics are discussed: (1) cluster ion genesis; (2) cluster ion detection; (3) Ion source; (4) pulse valve; (5) e-gun; (6) Ion optics; (7) a first order model; and (8) a modified Bakker's model.

  15. A theoretical investigation of the collective acceleration of cluster ions with accelerated potential waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Enjoji, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Motoichi; Noritake, Toshiya

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of the acceleration of cluster ions for additional heating of fusion plasma using the trapping effect in an accelerated potential wave is described. The conceptual design of the accelerator is the same as that by Enjoji, and the potential wave used is sinusoidal. For simplicity, collisions among cluster ions and the resulting breakups are neglected. The masses of the cluster ions are specified to range from 100 m sub(D) to 1000 m sub(D) (m sub(D): mass of a deuterium atom). Theoretical treatment is carried out only for the injection velocity which coincides with the phase velocity of the applied wave at the entrance of the accelerator. An equation describing the rate for successful acceleration of ions with a certain mass is deduced for the continuous injection of cluster ions. Computation for a typical mass distribution shows that more than 70% of the injected particles are effectively accelerated. (author)

  16. The quantitative analysis of silicon carbide surface smoothing by Ar and Xe cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshkin, A. E.; Kireev, D. S.; Ermakov, Yu. A.; Trifonov, A. S.; Presnov, D. E.; Garshev, A. V.; Anufriev, Yu. V.; Prokhorova, I. G.; Krupenin, V. A.; Chernysh, V. S.

    2018-04-01

    The gas cluster ion beam technique was used for the silicon carbide crystal surface smoothing. The effect of processing by two inert cluster ions, argon and xenon, was quantitatively compared. While argon is a standard element for GCIB, results for xenon clusters were not reported yet. Scanning probe microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques were used for the analysis of the surface roughness and surface crystal layer quality. The gas cluster ion beam processing results in surface relief smoothing down to average roughness about 1 nm for both elements. It was shown that xenon as the working gas is more effective: sputtering rate for xenon clusters is 2.5 times higher than for argon at the same beam energy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the surface defect layer gives values of 7 ± 2 nm and 8 ± 2 nm for treatment with argon and xenon clusters.

  17. Angular distributions of particles sputtered from multicomponent targets with gas cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieshkin, A.E. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Yu.A., E-mail: yuriermak@yandex.ru [Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernysh, V.S. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    The experimental angular distributions of atoms sputtered from polycrystalline W, Cd and Ni based alloys with 10 keV Ar cluster ions are presented. RBS was used to analyze a material deposited on a collector. It has been found that the mechanism of sputtering, connected with elastic properties of materials, has a significant influence on the angular distributions of sputtered components. The effect of non-stoichiometric sputtering at different emission angles has been found for the alloys under cluster ion bombardment. Substantial smoothing of the surface relief was observed for all targets irradiated with cluster ions.

  18. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  19. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  20. Chemisorption on size-selected metal clusters: activation barriers and chemical reactions for deuterium and aluminum cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrold, M.F.; Bower, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a new approach to investigating chemisorption on size-selected metal clusters. This approach involves investigating the collision-energy dependence of chemisorption using low-energy ion beam techniques. The method provides a direct measure of the activation barrier for chemisorption and in some cases an estimate of the desorption energy as well. They describe the application of this technique to chemisorption of deuterium on size-selected aluminum clusters. The activation barriers increase with cluster size (from a little over 1 eV for Al 10 + to around 2 eV for Al 27 + ) and show significant odd-even oscillations. The activation barriers for the clusters with an odd number of atoms are larger than those for the even-numbered clusters. In addition to chemisorption of deuterium onto the clusters, chemical reactions were observed, often resulting in cluster fragmentation. The main products observed were Al/sub n-1/D + , Al/sub n-2/ + , and Al + for clusters with n + and Al/sub n-1/D + for the larger clusters

  1. Contextual Learning Induces Dendritic Spine Clustering in Retrosplenial Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and electrophysiological studies find convergent evidence suggesting that plasticity within a dendritic tree is not randomly dispersed, but rather clustered into functional groups. Further, results from in silico neuronal modeling show that clustered plasticity is able to increase storage capacity 45 times compared to dispersed plasticity. Recent in vivo work utilizing chronic 2-photon microscopy tested the clustering hypothesis and showed that repetitive motor learning is able to induce clustered addition of new dendritic spines on apical dendrites of L5 neurons in primary motor cortex; moreover, clustered spines were found to be more stable than non-clustered spines, suggesting a physiological role for spine clustering. To further test this hypothesis we used in vivo 2-photon imaging in Thy1-YFP-H mice to chronically examine dendritic spine dynamics in retrosplenial cortex (RSC during spatial learning. RSC is a key component of an extended spatial learning and memory circuit that includes hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, RSC is known from both lesion and immediate early gene studies to be critically involved in spatial learning and more specifically in contextual fear conditioning. We utilized a modified contextual fear conditioning protocol wherein animals received a mild foot shock each day for five days; this protocol induces gradual increases in context freezing over several days before the animals reach a behavioral plateau. We coupled behavioral training with four separate in vivo imaging sessions, two before training begins, one early in training, and a final session after training is complete. This allowed us to image spine dynamics before training as well as early in learning and after animals had reached behavioral asymptote. We find that this contextual learning protocol induces a statistically significant increase in the formation of clusters of new dendritic spines in trained animals when compared to home

  2. Reprint of: Negative carbon cluster ion beams: New evidence for the special nature of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; O'brien, S. C.; Zhang, Q.; Heath, J. R.; Tittel, F. K.; Curl, R. F.; Kroto, H. W.; Smalley, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Cold carbon cluster negative ions are formed by supersonic expansion of a plasma created at the nozzle of a supersonic cluster beam source by an excimer laser pulse. The observed distribution of mass peaks for the Cn- ions for n > 40 demonstrates that the evidence previously given for the special stability of neutral C60 and the existence of spheroidal carbon shells cannot be an artifact of the ionization conditions.

  3. Effect of low-oxygen-concentration layer on iron gettering capability of carbon-cluster ion-implanted Si wafer for CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Nakai, Toshiro; Okuyama, Ryosuke; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Kurita, Kazunari; Sueoka, Koji

    2018-02-01

    The effect of oxygen (O) concentration on the Fe gettering capability in a carbon-cluster (C3H5) ion-implanted region was investigated by comparing a Czochralski (CZ)-grown silicon substrate and an epitaxial growth layer. A high Fe gettering efficiency in a carbon-cluster ion-implanted epitaxial growth layer, which has a low oxygen region, was observed by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It was demonstrated that the amount of gettered Fe in the epitaxial growth layer is approximately two times higher than that in the CZ-grown silicon substrate. Furthermore, by measuring the cathodeluminescence, the number of intrinsic point defects induced by carbon-cluster ion implantation was found to differ between the CZ-grown silicon substrate and the epitaxial growth layer. It is suggested that Fe gettering by carbon-cluster ion implantation comes through point defect clusters, and that O in the carbon-cluster ion-implanted region affects the formation of gettering sinks for Fe.

  4. Ion-induced effects on metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimmer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the ion-irradiation of metallic nanoparticles in combination with various substrates. Particle diameters were systematically varied within the range of 2.5-14 nm, inter-particle distances range from 30-120 nm. Irradiations were performed with various inert gas ions with energies of 200 keV, resulting in an average ion range larger than the particle dimensions and therefore the effects of irradiation are mainly due to creation of structural defects within the particles and the underlying substrate as well. The main part of this work deals with ion-induced burrowing of metallic nanoparticles into the underlying substrate. The use of micellar nanoparticles with sharp size distribution combined with AFM and TEM analysis allows a much more detailed look at this effect than other works on that topic so far. With respect to the particle properties also a detailed look on the effect of irradiation on the particle structure would be interesting, which might lead to a deliberate influence on magnetic properties, for example. Within the context of this work, first successful experiments were performed on FePt particles, showing a significant reduction of the ordering temperature leading to the magnetically interesting, ordered L1 0 phase. (orig.)

  5. Mass spectrometric probes of metal cluster distributions and metastable ion decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, E.K.; Liu, K.; Cole, S.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The study of metal clusters has provided both an opportunity and a challenge to the application of mass spectrometry. These days the most often-used technique for cluster generation - laser vaporization - leads to extensive distributions of cluster sizes, from one to perhaps thousands of atoms, and most studies reported to date use excimer laser ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry for cluster detection. Our apparatus is a simple one-stage TOF design employing Wiley-McLauren spatial focusing and a one-meter drift tube. In a second apparatus employing a pulsed valve in the cluster source, we see asymmetric broadening of niobium cluster mass peaks under multiphoton ionization conditions, indicating metastable decay of parent cluster ions. Other studies of niobium clusters have shown no such asymmetric peaks. 2 figs

  6. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe{sub 3}Si clusters during ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakirev, N. [Kazan National Research Technological University, K.Marx st. 68, Kazan 420015 (Russian Federation); Zhikharev, V., E-mail: valzhik@mail.ru [Kazan National Research Technological University, K.Marx st. 68, Kazan 420015 (Russian Federation); Gumarov, G. [Zavoiskii Physico-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, 10/7 Sibirskii trakt st., Kazan 420029 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe{sub 3}Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  7. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  8. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe 3 Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field

  9. Magnetoresistance and ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeink, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the combination of the magnetic patterning of the unidirectional anisotropy and the tunnel magnetoresistance effect is investigated. In my diploma thesis, it has been shown that it is in principle possible to use the magnetic patterning by ion bombardment to magnetically structure the pinned layer in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with alumina barrier. Furthermore, it has been shown that the side effects which have been observed after this treatment can be at least reduced by an additional heating step. Starting from this point, the applicability of ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP) in general and the combination of IBMP and MTJs in particular is investigated and new applications are developed. (orig.)

  10. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  11. Magic numbers and isotopic effect of ion clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghou

    1989-04-01

    The magic numbers and isotopic effect as well as stable configurations in relation to the charge state of the clusters are discussed. Ionic (atomic) clusters are small atomic aggregates, a physical state between gas and solid states, and have many interesting properties, some of them are more or less similar to those in nuclei

  12. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  13. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Ion beam induced stress formation and relaxation in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T., E-mail: Tobias.Steinbach@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Reupert, A.; Schmidt, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Ion irradiation of crystalline solids leads not only to defect formation and amorphization but also to mechanical stress. In the past, many investigations in various materials were performed focusing on the ion beam induced damage formation but only several experiments were done to investigate the ion beam induced stress evolution. Especially in microelectronic devices, mechanical stress leads to several unwanted effects like cracking and peeling of surface layers as well as changing physical properties and anomalous diffusion of dopants. To study the stress formation and relaxation process in semiconductors, crystalline and amorphous germanium samples were irradiated with 3 MeV iodine ions at different ion fluence rates. The irradiation induced stress evolution was measured in situ with a laser reflection technique as a function of ion fluence, whereas the damage formation was investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The investigations show that mechanical stress builds up at low ion fluences as a direct consequence of ion beam induced point defect formation. However, further ion irradiation causes a stress relaxation which is attributed to the accumulation of point defects and therefore the creation of amorphous regions. A constant stress state is reached at high ion fluences if a homogeneous amorphous surface layer was formed and no further ion beam induced phase transition took place. Based on the results, we can conclude that the ion beam induced stress evolution seems to be mainly dominated by the creation and accumulation of irradiation induced structural modification.

  15. Structure and reactivity of molybdenum oxide cluster ions in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.B.; Fialko, E.F.

    2002-01-01

    A set of cluster ions of molybdenum oxides Mo x O y + (x = 1-5, y = 1-15) was prepared using a combination of the ionic cyclotron resonance method and Knudsen effusion source. Dependence of concentration of different molybdenum oxide ions on the time of retention and their interaction with carbon monoxide was studied. It is shown that Mo x O y + ions with x>3 contain cyclic fragment Mo 3 O 9 in their structure. Oxygen binding energies within ionic clusters Mo x O y + were estimated [ru

  16. Ionization and fragmentation of water clusters by fast highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoui, L; Cassimi, A; Gervais, B; Grandin, J-P; Guillaume, L; Maisonny, R; Legendre, S; Tarisien, M; Lopez-Tarifa, P; Alcami, M; Martin, F; Politis, M-F; Penhoat, M-A Herve du; Vuilleumier, R; Gaigeot, M-P; Tavernelli, I

    2009-01-01

    We study the dissociative ionization of water clusters by impact of 12 MeV/u Ni 25+ ions. Cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) is used to obtain information about stability, energetics and charge mobility of the ionized water clusters. An unusual stability of the H 9 O + 4 ion is observed, which could be the signature of the so-called Eigen structure in gas-phase water clusters. From the analysis of coincidences between charged fragments, we conclude that charge mobility is very high and is responsible for the formation of protonated water clusters, (H 2 O) n H + , that dominate the mass spectrum. These results are supported by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory simulations, which also reveal the mechanisms of such mobility.

  17. Self-Assembled Gold Nano-Ripple Formation by Gas Cluster Ion Beam Bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilakaratne, Buddhi P; Chen, Quark Y; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2017-09-08

    In this study, we used a 30 keV argon cluster ion beam bombardment to investigate the dynamic processes during nano-ripple formation on gold surfaces. Atomic force microscope analysis shows that the gold surface has maximum roughness at an incident angle of 60° from the surface normal; moreover, at this angle, and for an applied fluence of 3 × 10 16 clusters/cm², the aspect ratio of the nano-ripple pattern is in the range of ~50%. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis reveals a formation of a surface gradient due to prolonged gas cluster ion bombardment, although the surface roughness remains consistent throughout the bombarded surface area. As a result, significant mass redistribution is triggered by gas cluster ion beam bombardment at room temperature. Where mass redistribution is responsible for nano-ripple formation, the surface erosion process refines the formed nano-ripple structures.

  18. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comins, J.D.; Amolo, G.O.; Derry, T.E.; Connell, S.H.; Erasmus, R.M.; Witcomb, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I 3 - structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I 3 - and I 5 - aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 x 10 15 to 250 x 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  19. Ion beam induced defects in solids studied by optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comins, J. D.; Amolo, G. O.; Derry, T. E.; Connell, S. H.; Erasmus, R. M.; Witcomb, M. J.

    2009-08-01

    Optical methods can provide important insights into the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam interactions with solids. This is illustrated by four distinctly different systems. X- and Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with 8 MeV Au 3+ ions with a fluence of 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 result in gold nanoparticle formation during high temperature annealing. Optical extinction curves simulated by the Mie theory provide the average nanoparticle sizes. TEM studies are in reasonable agreement and confirm a near-spherical nanoparticle shape but with surface facets. Large temperature differences in the nanoparticle creation in the X- and Y-cut crystals are explained by recrystallisation of the initially amorphised regions so as to recreate the prior crystal structure and to result in anisotropic diffusion of the implanted gold. Defect formation in alkali halides using ion beam irradiation has provided new information. Radiation-hard CsI crystals bombarded with 1 MeV protons at 300 K successfully produce F-type centres and V-centres having the I3- structure as identified by optical absorption and Raman studies. The results are discussed in relation to the formation of interstitial iodine aggregates of various types in alkali iodides. Depth profiling of I3- and I5- aggregates created in RbI bombarded with 13.6 MeV/A argon ions at 300 K is discussed. The recrystallisation of an amorphous silicon layer created in crystalline silicon bombarded with 100 keV carbon ions with a fluence of 5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 during subsequent high temperature annealing is studied by Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Irradiation of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films with 1 MeV protons with fluences from 1 × 10 15 to 250 × 10 15 ions/cm -2 induces visible darkening over a broad spectral region that shows three stages of development. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters by a model of defect growth and also high fluence optical absorption studies. X-ray diffraction studies show

  20. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  1. Fast electrons from multi-electron dynamics in xenon clusters induced by inner-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostedt, Christoph; Thomas, Heiko; Hoener, Matthias; Moeller, Thomas; Saalmann, Ulf; Georgescu, Ionut; Gnodtke, Christian; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Fast electrons emitted from xenon clusters in strong femtosecond 90 eV pulses have been measured at the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Energy absorption occurs mainly through atomic inner-shell photo-ionization. Photo-electrons are trapped in the strong Coulomb potential of the cluster ions and form a non-equilibrium plasma with supra-atomic density. Its equilibration through multiple energy-exchanging collisions within the entire cluster volume produces electrons with energies well beyond the dominant emission line of atomic xenon. Here, in contrast to traditional low-frequency laser plasma heating, the plasma gains energy from electrons delivered through massive single-photon excitation from bound states. Electron emission induced by thermalization of a non-equilibrium plasma is expected to be a general phenomenon occurring for strong atomic x-ray absorption in extended systems.

  2. Radiation-Induced Chemical Dynamics in Ar Clusters Exposed to Strong X-Ray Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Jurek, Zoltan; Xu, Weiqing; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Motomura, Koji; Iablonskyi, Denys; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Wada, Shin-ichi; Mondal, Subhendu; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Ito, Yuta; Sakai, Tsukasa; Matsunami, Kenji; Nishiyama, Toshiyuki; Umemoto, Takayuki; Nicolas, Christophe; Miron, Catalin; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Owada, Shigeki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Son, Sang-Kil; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2018-06-01

    We show that electron and ion spectroscopy reveals the details of the oligomer formation in Ar clusters exposed to an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) pulse, i.e., chemical dynamics triggered by x rays. With guidance from a dedicated molecular dynamics simulation tool, we find that van der Waals bonding, the oligomer formation mechanism, and charge transfer among the cluster constituents significantly affect ionization dynamics induced by an XFEL pulse of moderate fluence. Our results clearly demonstrate that XFEL pulses can be used not only to "damage and destroy" molecular assemblies but also to modify and transform their molecular structure. The accuracy of the predictions obtained makes it possible to apply the cluster spectroscopy, in connection with the respective simulations, for estimation of the XFEL pulse fluence in the fluence regime below single-atom multiple-photon absorption, which is hardly accessible with other diagnostic tools.

  3. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F.

    2011-01-01

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  4. Repair pathways for heavy ion-induced complex DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Hirohiko; Nakajima, Nakako; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) is a deleterious damage leading to cell death and genome instability if not properly repaired. It is well known that DSB is repaired by two major pathways, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). It is also known that NHEJ is dominant throughout the cell cycle after X- or gamma-ray irradiation in mammalian cells, Meanwhile, it is thought that heavy-ion radiation (e.g., carbon-ions, iron-ions) gives rise to clustered DNA damages consisting of not only strand breaks but also aberrant bases in the vicinity of DSBs (complex DSBs). Our previous work suggested that the efficiency of NHEJ is diminished for repair of complex DSBs induced by heavy-ion radiation. We thought that this difficulty in NHEJ process associated with heavy ion induced complex DNA damage might be extended to HR process in cells exposed to heavy ions. In order to find out if this notion is true or not, exposed human cells to X-rays and heavy-ions, and studied HR associated processes at the molecular level. Our result indicates that complex DSBs induced by heavy ions effectively evoke DNA end resection activity during the HR process. Together with our results, a relevant recent progress in the field of DNA DSB repair will be discussed. (author)

  5. Cluster-assistant generation of multiply charged atomic ions in nanosecond laser ionization of seeded methyl iodide beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaolin; Niu Dongmei; Kong Xianglei; Wen Lihua; Liang Feng; Pei Kemei; Wang Bin; Li Haiyang

    2005-01-01

    The photoionization of methyl iodide beam seeded in argon and helium is studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a 25 ns, 532 nm Nd-YAG laser with intensities in the range of 2 x 10 10 -2 x 10 11 W/cm 2 . Multiply charged ions of I q+ (q = 2-3) and C 2+ with tens of eV kinetic energies have been observed when laser interacts with the middle part of the pulsed molecular beam, whose peak profiles are independent on the laser polarization directions. Strong evidences show that these ions are coming from the Coulomb explosion of multiply charged CH 3 I clusters, and laser induced inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of caged electrons plays a key role in the formation of multiply charged ions

  6. Minimization of Ion-Solvent Clusters in Gel Electrolytes Containing Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Hsu, Shih-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Hsien; Yeh, Te-Fu; Hou, Sheng-Shu; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lee, Yuh-Lang; Teng, Hsisheng

    2018-03-01

    This study uses graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) to enhance the Li + -ion mobility of a gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The GPE comprises a framework of poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinylacetate) blended with poly(methyl methacrylate) and a salt LiPF 6 solvated in carbonate solvents. The GOQDs, which function as acceptors, are small (3-11 nm) and well dispersed in the polymer framework. The GOQDs suppress the formation of ion-solvent clusters and immobilize PF6- anions, affording the GPE a high ionic conductivity and a high Li + -ion transference number (0.77). When assembled into Li|electrolyte|LiFePO 4 batteries, the GPEs containing GOQDs preserve the battery capacity at high rates (up to 20 C) and exhibit 100% capacity retention after 500 charge-discharge cycles. Smaller GOQDs are more effective in GPE performance enhancement because of the higher dispersion of QDs. The minimization of both the ion-solvent clusters and degree of Li + -ion solvation in the GPEs with GOQDs results in even plating and stripping of the Li-metal anode; therefore, Li dendrite formation is suppressed during battery operation. This study demonstrates a strategy of using small GOQDs with tunable properties to effectively modulate ion-solvent coordination in GPEs and thus improve the performance and lifespan of LIBs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. MeV ion induced damage production and accumulation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoyuki; Okazaki, Makoto; Shin, Kazuo; Takagi, Ikuji; Yoshida, Koji

    1993-01-01

    Measurement and analysis were made for radiation damages in silicon induced by MeV ions. A single crystal silicon was bombarded by 800 keV O + and 700 keV Si + with the dose from 2x10 15 up to 8x10 15 cm -2 . And defects induced by the ion bombardments were observed by the channeling method. Some new modifications were made to the analysis of the channeling RBS spectrum so that the accuracy of the unfolded defect distribution may be improved. A new model of point-defect clustering and amorphous formation was proposed, which well reproduced the observed defect distribution in silicon. (author)

  8. Selective population of high-j states via heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early hopes of heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions was to populate states not seen easily or at all by other means. To date, however, I believe it is fair to say that spectroscopic studies of previously unknown states have had, at best, limited success. Despite the early demonstration of selectivity with cluster transfer to high-lying states in light nuclei, the study of heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions has emphasized the reaction mechanism. The value of using two of these reactions for spectroscopy of high spin states is demonstrated: 143 Nd( 16 O, 15 O) 144 Nd and 170 Er( 16 O, 15 Oγ) 171 Er

  9. First multispacecraft ion measurements in and near the Earth’s magnetosphere with the identical Cluster ion spectrometry (CIS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rème

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available On board the four Cluster spacecraft, the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS experiment measures the full, three-dimensional ion distribution of the major magnetospheric ions (H+, He+, He++, and O+ from the thermal energies to about 40 keV/e. The experiment consists of two different instruments: a COmposition and DIstribution Function analyser (CIS1/CODIF, giving the mass per charge composition with medium (22.5° angular resolution, and a Hot Ion Analyser (CIS2/HIA, which does not offer mass resolution but has a better angular resolution (5.6° that is adequate for ion beam and solar wind measurements. Each analyser has two different sensitivities in order to increase the dynamic range. First tests of the instruments (commissioning activities were achieved from early September 2000 to mid January 2001, and the operation phase began on 1 February 2001. In this paper, first results of the CIS instruments are presented showing the high level performances and capabilities of the instruments. Good examples of data were obtained in the central plasma sheet, magnetopause crossings, magnetosheath, solar wind and cusp measurements. Observations in the auroral regions could also be obtained with the Cluster spacecraft at radial distances of 4–6 Earth radii. These results show the tremendous interest of multispacecraft measurements with identical instruments and open a new area in magnetospheric and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction physics.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetopheric configuration and dynamics; solar wind - magnetosphere interactions

  10. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne, E-mail: egarand@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  11. Cluster ion formation during sputtering processes: a complementary investigation by ToF-SIMS and plasma ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welzel, T; Ellmer, K; Mändl, S

    2014-01-01

    Plasma ion mass spectrometry using a plasma process monitor (PPM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) have been complementarily employed to investigate the sputtering and ion formation processes of Al-doped zinc oxide. By comparing the mass spectra, insights on ion formation and relative cross-sections have been obtained: positive ions as measured during magnetron sputtering by PPM are originating from the plasma while those in SIMS start at the surface leading to large differences in the mass spectra. In contrast, negative ions originating at the surface will be accelerated through the plasma sheath. They arrive at the PPM after traversing the plasma nearly collisionless as seen from the rather similar spectra. Hence, it is possible to combine the high mass resolution of ToF-SIMS to obtain insight for separating cluster ions, e.g. Zn x and ZnO y , and the energy resolution of PPM to find fragmentation patterns for negative ions. While the ion formation processes during both experiments can be assumed to be similar, differences may arise due to the lower volume probed by SIMS. In the latter case, there is a chance of small target inhomogeneities being able to be enhanced and lower surface temperatures leading to less outgassing and, thus, retention of volatile compounds. (paper)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations with electronic stopping can reproduce experimental sputtering yields of metals impacted by large cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiting; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian

    2018-03-01

    An unsolved problem in research of sputtering from metals induced by energetic large cluster ions is that molecular dynamics (MD) simulations often produce sputtering yields much higher than experimental results. Different from the previous simulations considering only elastic atomic interactions (nuclear stopping), here we incorporate inelastic electrons-atoms interactions (electronic stopping, ES) into MD simulations using a friction model. In this way we have simulated continuous 45° impacts of 10-20 keV C60 on a Ag(111) surface, and found that the calculated sputtering yields can be very close to the experimental results when the model parameter is appropriately assigned. Conversely, when we ignore the effect of ES, the yields are much higher, just like the previous studies. We further expand our research to the sputtering of Au induced by continuous keV C60 or Ar100 bombardments, and obtain quite similar results. Our study indicates that the gap between the experimental and the simulated sputtering yields is probably induced by the ignorance of ES in the simulations, and that a careful treatment of this issue is important for simulations of cluster-ion-induced sputtering, especially for those aiming to compare with experiments.

  13. Pulse laser-induced generation of cluster codes from metal nanoparticles for immunoassay applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yin Chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have developed an assay for the detection of proteins by functionalized nanomaterials coupled with laser-induced desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS by monitoring the generation of metal cluster ions. We achieved selective detection of three proteins [thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB] by modifying nanoparticles (NPs of three different metals (Au, Ag, and Pt with the corresponding aptamer or antibody in one assay. The Au, Ag, and Pt acted as metal bio-codes for the analysis of thrombin, VEGF-A165, and PDGF-BB, respectively, and a microporous cellulose acetate membrane (CAM served as a medium for an in situ separation of target protein-bound and -unbound NPs. The functionalized metal nanoparticles bound to their specific proteins were subjected to LDI-MS on the CAM. The functional nanoparticles/CAM system can function as a signal transducer and amplifier by transforming the protein concentration into an intense metal cluster ion signal during LDI-MS analysis. This system can selectively detect proteins at picomolar concentrations. Most importantly, the system has great potential for the detection of multiple proteins without any pre-concentration, separation, or purification process because LDI-MS coupled with CAM effectively removes all signals except for those from the metal cluster ions.

  14. Detection of high mass cluster ions sputtered from Bi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, A; Hewitt, R W; Slusser, G J; Baitinger, W E; Cooks, R G; Winograd, N [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Delgass, W N [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind. (USA); Varon, A; Devant, G [Societe RIBER, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1976-12-01

    The technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed to detect Bi/sup 3 +/ ions and associated oxides Bi/sub 3/Osub(x)sup(+)(x=1 to 4) from a Bi foil. Using a 3 keV Ar/sup +/ ion primary beam of 5x10/sup -7/ A/cm/sup 2/, mass resolution to nearly 700 with the requisite sensitivity has been achieved. The Bi surface was also monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). The presence of a weak O 1s peak at 532.7 eV and a strong SIMS Bi/sup 3 +/ peak is interpreted to mean that the oxygen is weakly incorporated into the Bi lattice without disrupting metal-metal bonds.

  15. Transmitted ion energy loss distributions to detect cluster formation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selen, L.J.M.; Loon, A. van; IJzendoorn, L.J. van; Voigt, M.J.A. de

    2002-01-01

    The energy loss distribution of ions transmitted through a 5.7±0.2 μm thick Si crystal was measured and simulated with the Monte Carlo channeling simulation code FLUX. A general resemblance between the measured and simulated energy loss distributions was obtained after incorporation of an energy dependent energy loss in the simulation program. The energy loss calculations are used to investigate the feasibility to detect the presence of light element dopant clusters in a host crystal from the shape of the energy loss distribution, with transmission ion channeling. A curved crystal structure is used as a model for a region in the host crystal with clusters. The presence of the curvature does have a large influence on the transmitted energy distribution, which offers the possibility to determine the presence of dopant clusters in a host crystal with transmission ion channeling

  16. The role of ion-induced aerosol formation in the lower atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raes, Frank; Janssens, Augustin; Dingenen, Rita van

    1986-01-01

    The rate of ion-induced aerosol formation in a H 2 0-H 2 S0 4 mixture depends on the relative humidity, the relative acidity and the number of ions (clusters) available for nucleation. Figure 1 shows the rates of homogeneous and ion-induced aerosol formation as a function of the H 2 S0 4 sup((gas)) concentration, for conditions prevailing in the lower atmosphere. The rate of ion-induced aerosol formation is plotted for different concentrations of pre-existing aerosol. It can be seen that ion-induced aerosol formation will only play a role in the formation of new particles when (1) the H 2 S0 4 sup((gas)) concentration is confined within the critical values for ion-induced and homogeneous aerosol formation (about 5 x 10 7 and 4 x 10 8 cm -3 respectively), and (2) the concentration of pre-existing aerosol is lower than about 5 x 10 3 cm -3 (Dp = 0.1 μm). It will be shown by numerical calculations that such conditions may be expected above the oceans. (author)

  17. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Escoubet, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2011), s. 1049-1060 ISSN 0992-7689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mirror mode waves * trapped particles * magnetosheath ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2011 http://www.ann-geophys.net/29/1049/2011/angeo-29-1049-2011.pdf

  18. In situ study of heavy ion induced radiation damage in NF616 (P92) alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topbasi, Cem; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The ferritic–martensitic alloy NF616 was irradiated in situ with 1 MeV Kr ions at 50 K and 473 K. ► The defect cluster density increases with dose and saturates at ∼6 dpa at 50 K and 473 K. ► The defect size distributions do not change with dose at this temperature range. ► Results indicate that defect cluster formation and destruction is governed by cascade impact. - Abstract: NF616 is a nominal 9Cr ferritic–martensitic steel that is amongst the primary candidates for cladding and duct applications in the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. In this study, an in situ investigation of the microstructure evolution in NF616 under heavy ion irradiation has been conducted. NF616 was irradiated to 8.4 dpa at 50 K and to 7.6 dpa at 473 K with 1 MeV Kr ions. Nano-sized defects first appeared as white dots in dark-field TEM images and their areal density increased until saturation (∼6 dpa). Dynamic observations at 50 K and 473 K showed appearance and disappearance of TEM-visible defect clusters under irradiation that continued above saturation dose. Quantitative analysis showed no significant change in the average size (∼3–4 nm) and distribution of defect clusters with increasing dose at 50 K and 473 K. These results indicate a cascade-driven process of microstructure evolution under irradiation in these alloys that involves both the formation of TEM-visible defect clusters by various degrees of cascade overlap and cascade induced defect cluster elimination. According to this mechanism, saturation of defect cluster density is reached when the rate of defect cluster formation by overlap is equal to the rate of cluster elimination during irradiation.

  19. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  20. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  1. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuexing.

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs - . In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy

  2. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S., E-mail: asozcan@us.ibm.com [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Lavoie, Christian; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Alptekin, Emre; Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M. [TEL Epion Inc., 900 Middlesex Turnpike, Bldg. 6, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  3. Investigation of energy thresholds of atomic and cluster sputtering of some elements under ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Atabaev, B G; Lifanova, L F

    2002-01-01

    Threshold energies of sputtering of negative cluster ions from the Si(111) surface were measured at bombardment by Cs sup + , Rb sup + , and Na sup + ions with energy of 0.1-3.0 keV. These results are compared with the calculations of the similar thresholds by Bohdansky etc. formulas (3) for clusters Si sub n sup - and Cu sub n sup - with n=(1-5) and also for B, C, Al, Si, Fe, Cu atoms. Threshold energies of sputtering for the above elements were also estimated using the data from (5). Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was obtained. (author)

  4. Acceleration of cluster and molecular ions by TIARA 3 MV tandem accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Y; Tajima, S

    2000-01-01

    We succeeded in accelerating molecular and cluster ions (B sub 2 sub - sub 4 , C sub 2 sub - sub 1 sub 0 , O sub 2 , Al sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Si sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Cu sub 2 sub - sub 3 , Au sub 2 sub - sub 3 , LiF, and AlO) to MeV energies with high-intensity beam currents by means of a 3 MV tandem accelerator in the TIARA facility. These cluster ions were generated by a cesium sputter-type negative ion source. We tested three types of carbon sputter cathodes in which graphite powder was compressed with different pressures. The pressure difference affected the generating ratio of clusters generated to single atom ions extracted from the source and it appeared that the high-density cathode was suitable. We also investigated the optimum gas pressure for charge exchange in the tandem high-voltage terminal. Clusters of larger size tend to require lower pressure than do smaller ones. In addition, we were able to obtain doubly charged AlO molecular ions. (authors)

  5. Light-induced ion-acoustic instability of rarefied plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, I.V.; Sizykh, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of ion-acoustic instability excitation under the effect of coherent light, resonance to ion quantum transitions on collisionless plasma, is suggested. The light-induced ion-acoustic instability (LIIAI) considered is based on the induced progressive nonequilibrium resonance particles in the field of travelling electromagnetic wave. Principal possibility to use LIIAI in high-resolution spectroscopy and in applied problems of plasma physics, related to its instability, is pointed out

  6. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the ''unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ''unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the 218 PoO 2 + ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the 218 PoO 2 + ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the 218 PoO 2 + ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos)

  7. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C2H5O, and linear Cn (n = 4--6).

  8. Mass-spectrometric study of ion clustering in alkali-metal hydroxide vapor: cluster-ion energy and structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudin, L.S.; Butman, M.F.; Krasnov, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various positive and negative ions have been recorded in the equilibrium vapors from alkali-metal hydroxides: M/sup +/-/, OH - , O - , MO - , MOH - , and X/sup +/-/ (MOH)/sub n/, where X = M/sup +/-/, OH - , n = 1-6. The equilibrium constants have been measured for X/sup +/-/(MOH)/sub n/ = x/sup +/-/ + nMOH(k), n = 1-3, and the enthalpies of reaction have been determined, from which the enthalpies of formation and dissociation energies of X/sup +/-/ (MOH)/sub n/ have been calculated. The relative stabilities of the ions in the series from Na to Cs are examined

  9. Cluster approach to intranuclear cascade for relativistic heavy ion colisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.; Duarte, S.B.; Chung, K.C.; Nazareth, R.A.M.S.

    1982-01-01

    A new approach to the intranuclear cascade model for relativistic heavy ion reaction is presented. The effect of nucleon conventration on the collision process is explicitly included. It is found that the contributions from the non-binary processes are far from being negligible. Such processes are shown to broaden the angular distribution of inclusive proton spectra for 20 Ne + 238 U head-on collisions. (Author) [pt

  10. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  11. Formation and metastable decomposition of unprotonated ammonia cluster ions upon femtosecond ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzza, S.A.; Wei, S.; Purnell, J.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The formation and metastable dissociation mechanism of unprotonated ammonia cluster ions, (NH 3 ) + n , produced by multiphoton ionization (MPI) at 624 nm and a nominal pulse width of 350 fs, are investigated through a reflectron time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometric technique. Detection of the unprotonated ions after femtosecond and nanosecond multiphoton ionization under various intensity conditions is explained. The role of the energy of the ionizing photons, and the observation of these ions after femtosecond MPI is examined. The formation of the unprotonated series is found to be a function of intensity in the case of ionization on the nanosecond time scale, but not so for the femtosecond time domain. The results can be explained in terms of ionization mechanisms and ionizing pulse durations. The findings of the present study suggest that the unprotonated ions are trapped behind the barrier to intracluster proton transfer and/or concomitant NH 2 loss. The studies of metastable decomposition also reveal that the unprotonated ammonia cluster ions dissociate in the field-free region of the TOF by losing an NH 2 radical rather than via the evaporative loss of NH 3 as occurs for protonated clusters. Additionally, isotopic investigations of the unimolecular decay reveal a strong dependence on the conditions of cluster formation. The cluster formation condition dependence of the unimolecular decay is further investigated by altering formation temperatures and observing the consequences reflected by changes in the spontaneous metastable decay rate constant. This is a unique example of a cluster system whose metastable dissociation does not obey an evaporative ensemble model

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of the formation and stability of small tin clusters and their ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodlaa, A.; Suliman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the results of previous quantum-chemical study of electronic structure properties for neutral and single positively and negatively charged thin clusters in the size range of N 2-17 atoms, and on the thermodynamic laws, we have studied the thermodynamic properties of tin clusters and their ions. The characteristic amounts (cohesive enthalpy, formation enthalpy, fragmentation enthalpy, entropy and free enthalpy) for the formation and stability of these clusters at different temperatures were calculated. From the results, which are presented and discussed in this work, one can observe the following: The tin clusters Sn N (N=2-17) and their cations Sn + N and anions Sn - N are formed in the gas phase, and this agrees with experimental results. The clusters Sn 3 and Sn 1 0 are the most stable clusters of all. Here we also, find a correspondence with the results of the experimental studies. Our results go beyond that since we have found Sn 1 5 is also specially stable. By this thermodynamic study we could evaluate approximately the formation and stability of small neutral, single positively and negatively charged tin clusters. It has also allowed us to study the effects of the temperature on the formation and stability of these clusters. The importance of such study is not only what mentioned above, but it is also the first thermodynamic study for modeling the formation and stability of small tin clusters. (author)

  13. Using the thermal diffusion cloud chamber to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yefei.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal diffusion cloud chamber is steady-state device and has been extensively used for nucleation research. In order to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay, a new chamber was designed with improved both upper and bottom plates, the system of circulating fluid, the gasketting, the temperature measurement and the insulation. An alternative method of using oxygen as carrier gas was examined. Therefore, the heavy carrier gas including nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon and air can be used to study radon radiolysis-induced nucleation for the water or organic compounds in the TDCC. The effects of the pressure and temperature ranges on the density, supersaturation, temperature and partial pressure profile for the water-oxygen-helium in the TDCC have been examined. Based on the classical theory, the rate profile of ion-induced nucleation by radon decays was calculated and compared with the homogeneous nucleation. From measured indoor concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), thermodynamic theory models were used to assess the possibility that these compounds will form ultrafine particles in indoor air by ion-induced nucleation. The energy, number of molecules and equilibrium radius of clusters have been calculated based on Such and Thomson theories. These two sets of values have been compared. Ion cluster radii corresponding to 1--3 VOC molecules are in range of 3--5 x 10 -8 cm. 43 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  14. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  15. ION INJECTION AT QUASI-PARALLEL SHOCKS SEEN BY THE CLUSTER SPACECRAFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Retinò, A.; Dandouras, I.

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasma are known to be capable of accelerating ions to very high energies through diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). This process requires an injection of suprathermal ions, but the mechanisms producing such a suprathermal ion seed population are still not fully understood. We study acceleration of solar wind ions resulting from reflection off short large-amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs) in the quasi-parallel bow shock of Earth using in situ data from the four Cluster spacecraft. Nearly specularly reflected solar wind ions are observed just upstream of a SLAMS. The reflected ions are undergoing shock drift acceleration (SDA) and obtain energies higher than the solar wind energy upstream of the SLAMS. Our test particle simulations show that solar wind ions with lower energy are more likely to be reflected off the SLAMS, while high-energy ions pass through the SLAMS, which is consistent with the observations. The process of SDA at SLAMSs can provide an effective way of accelerating solar wind ions to suprathermal energies. Therefore, this could be a mechanism of ion injection into DSA in astrophysical plasmas

  16. Model of large volumetric capacitance in graphene supercapacitors based on ion clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Brian; Fogler, M. M.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    Electric double-layer supercapacitors (SCs) are promising devices for high-power energy storage based on the reversible absorption of ions into porous conducting electrodes. Graphene is a particularly good candidate for the electrode material in SCs due to its high conductivity and large surface area. In this paper, we consider SC electrodes made from a stack of graphene sheets with randomly inserted spacer molecules. We show that the large volumetric capacitances C≳100F/cm3 observed experimentally can be understood as a result of collective intercalation of ions into the graphene stack and the accompanying nonlinear screening by graphene electrons that renormalizes the charge of the ion clusters.

  17. A model of large volumetric capacitance in graphene supercapacitors based on ion clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Brian; Fogler, Michael; Shklovskii, Boris

    2012-02-01

    Electric double layer supercapacitors are promising devices for high-power energy storage based on the reversible absorption of ions into porous, conducting electrodes. Graphene is a particularly good candidate for the electrode material in supercapacitors due to its high conductivity and large surface area. In this paper we consider supercapacitor electrodes made from a stack of graphene sheets with randomly-inserted ``spacer" molecules. We show that the large volumetric capacitances C > 100 F/cm^3 observed experimentally can be understood as a result of collective intercalation of ions into the graphene stack and the accompanying nonlinear screening by graphene electrons that renormalizes the charge of the ion clusters.

  18. Site-specific fragmentation of polystyrene molecule using size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Mukai, Gen; Hashinokuchi, Michihiro; Mochiji, Kozo

    2009-01-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrum (SIMS) of a polystyrene thin film was investigated using a size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). The fragmentation in the SIM spectrum varied by kinetic energy per atom (E atom ); the E atom dependence of the secondary ion intensity of the fragment species of polystyrene can be essentially classified into three types based on the relationship between E atom and the dissociation energy of a specific bonding site in the molecule. These results indicate that adjusting E atom of size-selected GCIB may realize site-specific bond breaking within a molecule. (author)

  19. On the mechanism of water cluster-ion formation in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneck, P.; Rakshit, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A drift chamber mass spectrometer has been used to study the formation of water cluster-ions in carbon dioxide containing traces of water vapour. The dominant reaction sequences were identified up to the fourth generation of daughter ions starting with CO 2 + . The subsequent reaction mechanism remains uncertain and several possibilities are discussed. The final ions are H 3 O + H 2 O and H 3 O + (H 2 O) 2 . The significance of the reaction schemes to the radiation chemistry of carbon dioxide is pointed out. (orig.)

  20. Summary of Industry-Academia Collaboration Projects on Cluster Ion Beam Process Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Isao; Toyoda, Noriaki; Matsuo, Jiro

    2008-01-01

    Processes employing clusters of ions comprised of a few hundred to many thousand atoms are now being developed into a new field of ion beam technology. Cluster-surface collisions produce important non-linear effects which are being applied to shallow junction formation, to etching and smoothing of semiconductors, metals, and dielectrics, to assisted formation of thin films with nano-scale accuracy, and to other surface modification applications. In 2000, a four year R and D project for development of industrial technology began in Japan under funding from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). Subjects of the projects are in areas of equipment development, semiconductor surface processing, high accuracy surface processing and high-quality film formation. In 2002, another major cluster ion beam project which emphasized nano-technology applications has started under a contract from the Ministry of Economy and Technology for Industry (METI). This METI project involved development related to size-selected cluster ion beam equipment and processes, and development of GCIB processes for very high rate etching and for zero damage etching of magnetic materials and compound semiconductor materials. This paper describes summery of the results.

  1. Surface Collisions of Small Cluster Ions at Incident Energies 10-102 eV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 233, - (2004), s. 361-371 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 561 Grant - others:XE(CZ) EURATOM-IPP.CR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : surface collisions * cluster ions * unimolecular dissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2004

  2. Graphene synthesis on SiC: Reduced graphitization temperature by C-cluster and Ar-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.; Li, H.; Zhang, Z.D.; Wang, Z.S.; Zhou, S.Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, T.C.; Liu, J.R.; Fu, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of SiC is a promising method for high quality production of wafer-scale graphene layers, when the high decomposition temperature of SiC is substantially reduced. The high decomposition temperature of SiC around 1400 °C is a technical obstacle. In this work, we report on graphene synthesis on 6H–SiC with reduced graphitization temperature via ion implantation. When energetic Ar, C 1 and C 6 -cluster ions implanted into 6H–SiC substrates, some of the Si–C bonds have been broken due to the electronic and nuclear collisions. Owing to the radiation damage induced bond breaking and the implanted C atoms as an additional C source the graphitization temperature was reduced by up to 200 °C

  3. Characterization of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, N.; Suzuki, C.; Kitamura, S.; Watanabe, H.; Tano, S.; Tanaka, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana by carbon ions was carried out to investigate the mutational effect of ion particles in higher plants. The averaged mutation rate of carbon ions was 2.0 X 10 -6 / Gy, which was 18-fold higher than that of electrons. PCR analysis of the carbon ion-induced mutants showed that, out of 28 mutant alleles, 14 had point-like mutations within the gene, while 14 contained large structural alterations. In the case of 12 electron-induced mutants, 9 had point-like mutations within the gene, while 3 contained large structural alterations. These results suggest that carbon ions are more likely to induce large structural alterations compared with electrons. Further sequence analysis revealed that most of the point-like mutations induced by carbon ions were short deletions. In the case of rearrangements, DNA strand breaks were found to be rejoined using, if present, short homologous sequences for both types of radiation. After carbon ion-irradiation, small deletions were frequently observed around the breakpoints, whereas duplications of terminal sequence were found after electron-irradiation. These results suggest that non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway operates after plant cells are exposed to both ion particles and electrons but that different mode of rejoining deals with the broken ends produced by each radiation. From the present results, it seems reasonable to assume that carbon ions could predominantly induce null mutations in Arabidopsis. The fact that the molecular nature of carbon ion-induced mutation was different from that of electrons and that the molecular mechanisms of cells to induce mutations appeared to be also different implicates that ion particle is not only valuable as a new mutagen but also useful as a new tool to study repair mechanisms of certain types of DNA damage

  4. Electron-ion collision rates in atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, M; Hilse, P; Schlanges, M; Bornath, Th; Krainov, V P

    2010-01-01

    In atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses, plasmas with high density and high temperature are created. The heating is mainly caused by inverse bremsstrahlung, i.e. determined by electron-ion collisions. In the description of the scattering of electrons on noble gas ions in such plasmas, it is important to account for the inner structure of the ions and the screening by the surrounding plasma medium which can be accomplished by using suitable model potentials. In the wide parameter range met in experiments, the Born approximation is not applicable. Instead, the electron-ion collision frequency is calculated on the basis of classical momentum transport cross sections. Results are presented for xenon, krypton and argon ions in different charge states. A comparison of these results to those for the scattering on Coulomb particles with the same charge shows an enhancement of the collision frequency. The Born approximation, however, leads to an overestimation.

  5. Determination of interstellar pickup ion distributions in the solar wind with SOHO and Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Möbius

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 10 years, the experimental basis for the study of the local interstellar medium has been substantially enhanced by the direct detection of interstellar pickup ions and of interstellar neutral helium within the heliosphere. Pickup ions can be studied for a wide range of interstellar species. However, currently the accuracy of the method to determine the parameters of the interstellar medium, namely neutral density, temperature and relative velocity, is hampered by two problems: (1 In most cases the crucial ionization rates are not available from simultaneous measurements and (2 the transport of the pickup ions in the interplanetary medium substantially modifies the measured spatial distribution of the ions. In this study we will discuss how the enhanced capabilities of the instrumentation on SOHO and Cluster in combination with ongoing efforts to model the pickup ion distributions will lead to a significant improvement over the coming years.

  6. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Terato, Hiroaki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm -1 , respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. (author)

  7. Relaxation effects in ionic mobility and cluster formation: negative ions in SF6 at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez, A M; De Urquijo, J; Hinojosa, G; Hernandez-Avila, J L; Basurto, E

    2010-01-01

    The relaxation effects of the ionic mobility and the formation of negative-ion clusters in SF 6 are studied in this work. For this purpose, we have measured the mobility of negative ions in SF 6 over the pressure range 100-800 Torr at a fixed value of density-normalized electric field, E/N, of 20 Td (1 Townsend = 10 -17 V cm 2 ). The data obtained show a clear dependence of the negative-ion drift velocity on drift distance. It is observed that the drift velocity (mobility) reaches a steady-state value only for drift distances above 2 cm, over the studied pressure range. In addition to this, we have observed that the ionic mobility depends strongly on the gas pressure. An explanation of this dependence of the ionic mobility on gas pressure is given in terms of a negative-ion clustering formation process. It was found that the assumption of a linear dependence of the cluster ion mass on pressure provides a satisfactory explanation for the observed mobilities.

  8. From molecular clusters to nanoparticles: second-generation ion-mediated nucleation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ions, which are generated in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays and other ionization sources, may play an important role in the formation of atmospheric aerosols. In the paper, a new second-generation ion-mediated nucleation (IMN model is presented. The new model explicitly treats the evaporation of neutral and charged clusters and it describes the evolution of the size spectra and composition of both charged and neutral clusters/particles ranging from small clusters of few molecules to large particles of several micrometers in diameter. Schemes used to calculate the evaporation coefficients for small neutral and charged clusters are consistent with the experimental data within the uncertainty range. The present IMN model, which is size-, composition-, and type-resolved, is a powerful tool for investigating the dominant mechanisms and key parameters controlling the formation and subsequent growth of nanoparticles in the atmosphere. This model can be used to analyze simultaneous measurements of the ion-mobility spectra and particle size distributions, which became available only recently. General features of the spectra for ions smaller than the critical size, size-dependent fractions of charged nanoparticles, and asymmetrical charging of freshly nucleated particles predicted by the new IMN model are consistent with recent measurements. Results obtained using the second generation IMN model, in which the most recent thermodynamic data for neutral and charged H2SO4-H2O clusters were used, suggest that ion-mediated nucleation of H2SO4-H2O can lead to a significant production of new particles in the lower atmosphere (including the boundary layer under favorable conditions. It has been shown that freshly nucleated particles of few nanometers in size can grow by the condensation of low volatile organic compounds to the size of cloud condensation nuclei. In such cases, the chemical composition of nucleated particles larger than ~10 nm is dominated

  9. Lipid reorganization induced by Shiga toxin clustering on planar membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Windschiegl

    Full Text Available The homopentameric B-subunit of bacterial protein Shiga toxin (STxB binds to the glycolipid Gb(3 in plasma membranes, which is the initial step for entering cells by a clathrin-independent mechanism. It has been suggested that protein clustering and lipid reorganization determine toxin uptake into cells. Here, we elucidated the molecular requirements for STxB induced Gb(3 clustering and for the proposed lipid reorganization in planar membranes. The influence of binding site III of the B-subunit as well as the Gb(3 lipid structure was investigated by means of high resolution methods such as fluorescence and scanning force microscopy. STxB was found to form protein clusters on homogenous 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC/cholesterol/Gb(3 (65:30:5 bilayers. In contrast, membranes composed of DOPC/cholesterol/sphingomyelin/Gb(3 (40:35:20:5 phase separate into a liquid ordered and liquid disordered phase. Dependent on the fatty acid composition of Gb(3, STxB-Gb(3 complexes organize within the liquid ordered phase upon protein binding. Our findings suggest that STxB is capable of forming a new membrane phase that is characterized by lipid compaction. The significance of this finding is discussed in the context of Shiga toxin-induced formation of endocytic membrane invaginations.

  10. Ion clustering in aqueous salt solutions near the liquid/vapor interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Smith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous NaCl, KCl, NaI, and KI solutions are used to study the effects of salts on the properties of the liquid/vapor interface. The simulations use the models which include both charge transfer and polarization effects. Pairing and the formation of larger ion clusters occurs both in the bulk and surface region, with a decreased tendency to form larger clusters near the interface. An analysis of the roughness of the surface reveals that the chloride salts, which have less tendency to be near the surface, have a roughness that is less than pure water, while the iodide salts, which have a greater surface affinity, have a larger roughness. This suggests that ions away from the surface and ions near the surface affect the interface in opposite ways.

  11. Cluster-assisted multiple ionization of methyl iodide by a nanosecond laser: Influence of laser intensity on the kinetic energy and peak profile of multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lihua; Li Haiyang; Luo Xiaolin; Niu Dongmei; Xiao Xue; Wang Bin; Liang Feng; Hou Keyong; Shao Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    The dependences of kinetic energies and peak profiles of multicharged ions of I q+ (q = 2-3) and C 2+ on the laser intensity have been studied in detail by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, those multicharged ions are produced by irradiation of methyl iodide cluster beam with a nanosecond 532 nm Nd-YAG laser. Our experiments show that the kinetic energies released of multicharged ions increase linearly with the laser intensity in the range of 3 x 10 9 -2 x 10 11 W/cm 2 . The peaks of multicharged ions are split to forward ions and backward ions, and the ratio of the backward ions to forward ions decreases exponentially with laser intensity. The decreasing of backward ions is probably due to Coulomb scattering by the heavier I + ions when they turn around through the laser focus point. The linear dependence of kinetic energy of multicharged ions on laser intensity is interpreted by the ionization mechanism, in which the laser induced inverse bremsstrahlung heating of electron is the rate-limiting step

  12. Experimental study of the dissociation of 100-600 KeV hydrogen cluster ions in an argon gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, M.; Clouvas, A.; Frischkorn, H.J.; Gaillard, M.J.; Poizat, J.C.; Remillieux, J.

    1985-09-01

    We have studied the break-up of accelerated hydrogen cluster ions passing through an argon gas target. The absolute dissociation cross section has been measured for a wide variety of H n + (odd masses only) cluster ions, with n between 5 and 23 and with projectile velocities ranging from 1.5 to 5 x 10 8 cm/s. We discuss the dissociation processes and the dependence of their cross-sections upon the cluster mass and velocity

  13. Molecular dynamic simulation of interaction of low-energy Ar and Xe ions with copper clusters at graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornich, G.V.; Lozovskaya, L.I.; Betts, G.; Zaporozhchenko, V.I.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    One conducted molecular and dynamic simulation of sputtering of isolated clusters consisting of 13, 27 and 195 Cu atoms from the (0001) graphite surface by 200 eV energy Ar and Xe ions. It is shown that the factors of reflection of Ar and Xe ions from copper clusters differ from one another insignificantly, though the energy of the reflected Xe ions is essentially lower than that of Ar ions. The values of the factor of cluster sputtering by Xe ions are higher in contrast to sputtering by Ar ions. One identified two mechanisms of cluster sputtering resulting in the maximum of sputtering intensity at the polar angles near the normal one, and in periodicity of maximums within the azimuth distributions of sputtering intensity with 60 deg period [ru

  14. N+ ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z Q; Sekiguchi, T; Yuan, X L; Maekawa, M; Kawasuso, A

    2004-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N + ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10 12 to 10 14 cm -2 . Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N + implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity

  15. Induced clustering of Escherichia coli by acoustic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Ramos, Salomé; Hoyos, Mauricio; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2018-03-16

    Brownian or self-propelled particles in aqueous suspensions can be trapped by acoustic fields generated by piezoelectric transducers usually at frequencies in the megahertz. The obtained confinement allows the study of rich collective behaviours like clustering or spreading dynamics in microgravity-like conditions. The acoustic field induces the levitation of self-propelled particles and provides secondary lateral forces to capture them at nodal planes. Here, we give a step forward in the field of confined active matter, reporting levitation experiments of bacterial suspensions of Escherichia coli. Clustering of living bacteria is monitored as a function of time, where different behaviours are clearly distinguished. Upon the removal of the acoustic signal, bacteria rapidly spread, impelled by their own swimming. Nevertheless, long periods of confinement result in irreversible bacteria entanglements that could act as seeds for levitating bacterial aggregates.

  16. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  18. Ion species dependence of the implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Naramoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we implanted B + , O + , Al + , and P + ions into ZnO with energy of 50-380 keV and total doses of 4 x 10 15 cm -2 for each ion. The implantation-induced defects and their thermal recovery were studied using a slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced in all the implanted samples. It is found that the thermal recovery of these vacancies induced by different ions shows much difference. In case of B + and Al + -implantation, the vacancy clusters agglomerate to much larger size and might evolve to microvoids during annealing. However, for O + and P + ions, which are heavier than B + and Al + , the vacancies show a much weaker agglomeration process. The mechanism of such difference is discussed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Charge-sign-clustering observed in high-multiplicity, high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Gregory, J.C.; Hayashi, T.

    1989-01-01

    Charge-sign distribution in 200 GeV/amu heavy-ion collisions is studied with the Magnetic-Interferometric-Emulsion-Chamber (MAGIC) for central collision events in 16 O + Pb and 32 S + Pb interactions. Charge-sign clustering is observed in most of the fully-analyzed events. A statistical 'run-test' is performed for each measured event, which shows significant deviation from a Gaussian distribution (0,1) expected for random-charge distribution. Candidates of charge clusters have 5 - 10 multiplicity of like-sign particles, and are often accompanied by opposite-sign clusters. Observed clustering of identical charges is more significant in the fragmentation region than in the central region. Two-particle Bose-Einstein interference and other effects are discussed for the run-test examination. (author)

  20. Properties of ammonium ion-water clusters: analyses of structure evolution, noncovalent interactions, and temperature and humidity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shi-Tu; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhu, Yu-Peng; Huang, Wei

    2015-03-26

    Although ammonium ion-water clusters are abundant in the biosphere, some information regarding these clusters, such as their growth route, the influence of temperature and humidity, and the concentrations of various hydrated clusters, is lacking. In this study, theoretical calculations are performed on ammonium ion-water clusters. These theoretical calculations are focused on determining the following characteristics: (1) the pattern of cluster growth; (2) the percentages of clusters of the same size at different temperatures and humidities; (3) the distributions of different isomers for the same size clusters at different temperatures; (4) the relative strengths of the noncovalent interactions for clusters of different sizes. The results suggest that the dipole moment may be very significant for the ammonium ion-water system, and some new stable isomers were found. The nucleation of ammonium ions and water molecules is favorable at low temperatures; thus, the clusters observed at high altitudes might not be present at low altitudes. High humidity can contribute to the formation of large ammonium ion-water clusters, whereas the formation of small clusters may be favorable under low-humidity conditions. The potential energy surfaces (PES) of these different sized clusters are complicated and differ according to the distribution of isomers at different temperatures. Some similar structures are observed between NH4(+)(H2O)n and M(H2O)n (where M represents an alkali metal ion or water molecule); when n = 8, the clusters begin to form the closed-cage geometry. As the cluster size increases, these interactions become progressively weaker. The successive binding energy at the DF-MP2-F12/VDZ-F12 level is better than that at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level and is consistent with the experimentally determined values.

  1. Dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free molecules and clusters of iron pentacarbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Lokhman, V. N.; Poydashev, D. G.; Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free Fe(CO) 5 molecules and their clusters owing to the resonant excitation of vibrations of CO bonds in the 5-μm range has been studied. The technique of infrared excitation and photoionization probing (λ = 400 nm) by femtosecond pulses has been used in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It has been found that an infrared pulse selectively excites vibrations of CO bonds in free molecules, which results in a decrease in the yield of the Fe(CO) 5 + molecular ion. Subsequent relaxation processes have been analyzed and the results have been interpreted. The time of the energy transfer from excited vibrations to other vibrations of the molecule owing to intramolecular relaxation has been measured. The dynamics of dissociation of [Fe(CO) 5 ] n clusters irradiated by femtosecond infrared radiation has been studied. The time dependence of the yield of free molecules has been measured under different infrared laser excitation conditions. We have proposed a model that well describes the results of the experiment and makes it possible, in particular, to calculate the profile of variation of the temperature of clusters within the “evaporation ensemble” concept. The intramolecular and intracluster vibrational relaxation rates in [Fe(CO) 5 ] n clusters have been estimated.

  2. Energetics and dynamics of the neutralization of clustered ions in ammonia and water vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sennhauser, E.S.; Armstrong, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The energetics and dynamics of neutralization reactions of clustered ions in ammonia and water vapour have been analysed. Neutralization rate coefficients were calculated for the ions in ammonia and for H + .(H 2 O)sub(n) combining with various clustered anions in water vapour up to densities of 4 x 10 19 molecule cm -3 at 390 K. In the case of ammonia, calculations were also performed at 298 K. For all systems, fractional contributions of the neutralization coefficients for specific cluster sizes to the overall coefficient αsub(eff) were evaluated. The computed value of αsub(eff) for NH 3 was in reasonable agreement with experimental data in the [NH 3 ] range 0.3 to 4 x 10 19 molecule cm -3 , and general trends stemming from the effects of increasing ion mass were pointed out. Calculations of energies of individual cluster sizes indicate possible neutralization reaction mechanisms. With some exception, proton transfer is the only possible path and no H atoms should be formed. This is in general agreement with literature results for water vapour at approximately 390 K and with [H 2 O] >= 2 x 10 x 10 19 molecule cm -3 . (author)

  3. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano, G.; Ferron, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He + , Ne + and Ar + ) and Li + ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  4. Swift Heavy Ion Induced Modification of Aliphatic Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Umme Habiba

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the high energy heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers is studied. Two polymer groups, namely polyvinyl polymers (PVF, PVAc, PVA and PMMA) and fluoropolymers (PVDF, ETFE, PFA and FEP) were used in this work. Polyvinyl polymers were investigated since they will be used as insulating materials in the superconducting magnets of the new ion accelerators of the planned International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at the GSI Helmholtz-Centre of Heavy I...

  5. Heavy ion induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Apavatjrut, P.; Phanchaisri, B.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-01-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment of biological materials for genetic modification purposes has experienced rapid growth in the last decade, particularly for the direct DNA transfer into living organisms including both plants and bacteria. Attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms involved in ion-bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into biological cells. Here we summarize the present status of the application of low-energy ions for genetic modification of living sample materials

  6. Ion-neutral Clustering of Bile Acids in Electrospray Ionization Across UPLC Flow Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Patrick; Broeckling, Corey D.; Murphy, James; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2018-02-01

    Bile acid authentic standards were used as model compounds to quantitatively evaluate complex in-source phenomenon on a UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS operated in the negative mode. Three different diameter columns and a ceramic-based microfluidic separation device were utilized, allowing for detailed descriptions of bile acid behavior across a wide range of flow regimes and instantaneous concentrations. A custom processing algorithm based on correlation analysis was developed to group together all ion signals arising from a single compound; these grouped signals produce verified compound spectra for each bile acid at each on-column mass loading. Significant adduction was observed for all bile acids investigated under all flow regimes and across a wide range of bile acid concentrations. The distribution of bile acid containing clusters was found to depend on the specific bile acid species, solvent flow rate, and bile acid concentration. Relative abundancies of each cluster changed non-linearly with concentration. It was found that summing all MS level (low collisional energy) ions and ion-neutral adducts arising from a single compound improves linearity across the concentration range (0.125-5 ng on column) and increases the sensitivity of MS level quantification. The behavior of each cluster roughly follows simple equilibrium processes consistent with our understanding of electrospray ionization mechanisms and ion transport processes occurring in atmospheric pressure interfaces. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Generation of CsI cluster ions for mass calibration in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.; Dongen, van J.L.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method was developed for the generation of cesium iodide (CsI) cluster ions up to m/z over 20,000 in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Calibration ions in both positive and negative ion modes can readily be generated from a single MALDI spot of CsI(3)

  8. Development of a collision induced dissociation ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.N.

    1982-01-01

    A transient analysis ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer is developed to investigate the phenomena of collision induced dissociation. The Fourier transform method and the modified maximum entropy spectral analysis or covariance least square method are implemented in measuring the mass spectrum of the ion ensemble. The Fourier transform method can be used in quantitative analysis while the maximum entropy method as developed here is useful for qualitative analysis only. The cyclotron resonance frequency, relaxation time constant, and the relative ion population are observable from the Fourier transform spectrum. These parameters are very important in investigating collision induced dissociation process and other topics in gas phase chemistry. The ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer is not only developed to study fragments and their abundance from a parent ion, but also to determine the threshold energy and reaction cross section in the collision induced dissociation process. When hard sphere model is used in the ion-molecule collision, the radius of acetone ion measured from the reactive cross section is 2.2 angstrom which is very close to the physical dimension of acetone. The threshold energy for acetone ion in collision induced dissociation process is 1.8 eV which is similar to the result obtained by the angle-resolved mass spectrometer

  9. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A A; Jamieson, D N; Prawer, S; Allen, M G [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  10. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  11. Parameterization of ion-induced nucleation rates based on ambient observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nieminen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric ions participate in the formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles, yet their exact role in this process has remained unclear. Here we derive a new simple parameterization for ion-induced nucleation or, more precisely, for the formation rate of charged 2-nm particles. The parameterization is semi-empirical in the sense that it is based on comprehensive results of one-year-long atmospheric cluster and particle measurements in the size range ~1–42 nm within the EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions project. Data from 12 field sites across Europe measured with different types of air ion and cluster mobility spectrometers were used in our analysis, with more in-depth analysis made using data from four stations with concomitant sulphuric acid measurements. The parameterization is given in two slightly different forms: a more accurate one that requires information on sulfuric acid and nucleating organic vapor concentrations, and a simpler one in which this information is replaced with the global radiation intensity. These new parameterizations are applicable to all large-scale atmospheric models containing size-resolved aerosol microphysics, and a scheme to calculate concentrations of sulphuric acid, condensing organic vapours and cluster ions.

  12. Radiation enhanced copper clustering processes in Fe-Cu alloys during electron and ion irradiations as measured by electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, S.; Chimi, Y.; Bagiyono; Tobita, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Suzuki, M.; Iwase, A.

    2003-01-01

    To study the mechanism of radiation-enhanced clustering of copper atoms in Fe-Cu alloys, in situ electrical resistivity measurements are performed during irradiation with 100 MeV carbon ions and with 2 MeV electrons at 300 K. Two kinds of highly pure Fe-Cu alloys with Cu content of 0.02 and 0.6 wt% are used. The results are summarized as follows: - Although there is a steep initial resistivity increase below about 10 μdpa, the resistivity steadily decreases after this initial transient in Fe-0.6wt%Cu alloy, while in Fe-0.02wt%Cu alloy, the resistivity either decreases slowly or stays almost constant. The rate of change in resistivity depends on copper concentration. - The rate of change in resistivity per dpa is larger for electron irradiation than for ion irradiation. - Change in dose rate from 10 -8 to 10 -9 dpa/s slightly enhances the rate of resistivity change per dpa. The decrease in resistivity with dose is considered to be due to clustering or precipitation of copper atoms. The initial abrupt increase in resistivity is too large to be accounted for by initial introduction of point defects before copper clustering. Tentatively the phenomenon is explained as due to the formation of embryos of copper precipitates with a large strain field around them. Quantitative evaluation of the results using resistivity contribution of a unit concentration of Frenkel pairs and that of copper atoms gives an important conclusion that more than one copper atom are removed from solid solution by one Frenkel pair. The clustering efficiency is surprisingly high in the present case compared with the ordinary radiation-induced or radiation-enhanced precipitation processes

  13. Optically induced structural phase transitions in ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horak, Peter; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures, such as b......We investigate numerically the structural dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap when influenced by an additional one-dimensional optically induced periodical potential. We demonstrate that transitions between thermally excited crystal structures...

  14. Bi-Directional Ion Emission from Massive Gold Cluster Impacts on Nanometric Carbon Foils

    OpenAIRE

    DeBord, J. Daniel; Della-Negra, Serge; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon cluster emission from thin carbon foils (5–40 nm) impacted by individual Aun+q cluster projectiles (95–125 qkeV, n/q = 3–200) reveals features regarding the energy deposition, projectile range, and projectile fate in matter as a function of the projectile characteristics. For the first time, the secondary ion emission from thin foils has been monitored simultaneously in both forward and backward emission directions. The projectile range and depth of emission were examined as a function...

  15. Metal cluster cation reactions: Carbon monoxide association to Cu + n ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuchtner, R. E.; Harms, A. C.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1990-06-01

    Copper cluster cations (Cu+n,n=1-14) were produced in a laser vaporization/flow tube apparatus and equilibrated to room temperature. The association rate constants of carbon monoxide onto these ions were measured; low-pressure, termolecular behavior was observed for the smaller species while for clusters greater than Cu+7, the longer lifetimes due to the increased number of degrees of freedom leads to pressure independence (>0.3 Torr) of the effective bimolecular rates. Unimolecular decay theory (RRKM) is used to explain the overall trend and when intrinsic surface site reactivity is taken into account, excellent agreement with measured reactivity is obtained.

  16. Push-and-stick mechanism for charged and excited small cluster emission under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitensky, I.S.; Parilis, E.S.; Wojciechowski, I.A.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism for the formation, excitation and ionization of small clusters emitted under ion bombardment is discussed. It is shown that the increased degree of ionization for the transition metal dimers, trimers and tetramers can be explained by the existence of an additional effective channel for their formation, namely the associative ionization process. A simple estimate shows that the sticking together of a fast cascade atom and the pushed out surface atom is 30-40 times more effective for dimer formation, than the recombination of two fast atoms. This push-and-stick mechanism of cluster formation could also be effective for the formation of trimers and tetramers. (orig.)

  17. Radiation-induced radical ions in calcium sulfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogushevich, S. E.

    2006-07-01

    We have used EPR to study the effect of γ radiation on calcium sulfite. We have observed and identified the radiation-induced radical ions SO 2 - (iso) with g = 2.0055 and SO 2 - (orth-1) with g1 = 2.0093, g2 = 2.0051, g3 = 2.0020, identical to the initial and thermally induced SO 2 - respectively, SO 3 - (iso) with g = 2.0031 and SO 3 - (axial) with g⊥ = 2.0040, g∥ = 2.0023, identical to mechanically induced SO 3 - . We have established the participation of radiation-induced radical ions SO 3 - in formation of post-radiation SO 2 - .

  18. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  19. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H. E-mail: yhiroya@nias.affrc.go.jp; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  20. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region.

  1. Radiation-induced segregation on defect clusters in single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Yang, Taini; Jin, Ke; Gao, Ning; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Weber, William J.; Sun, Kai; Dong, Yan; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-01

    A group of single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys (SP-CSAs), including NiFe, NiCoFe, NiCoFeCr, as well as a high entropy alloy NiCoFeCrMn, was irradiated with 3 MeV Ni"2"+ ions at 773 K to a fluence of 5 × 10"1"6 ions/cm"2 for the study of radiation response with increasing compositional complexity. Advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to characterize the dislocation loop distribution and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) on defect clusters in the SP-CSAs. The results show that a higher fraction of faulted loops exists in the more compositionally complex alloys, which indicate that increasing compositional complexity can extend the incubation period and delay loop growth. The RIS behaviors of each element in the SP-CSAs were observed as follows: Ni and Co tend to enrich, but Cr, Fe and Mn prefer to deplete near the defect clusters. RIS level can be significantly suppressed by increasing compositional complexity due to the sluggish atom diffusion. According to molecular static (MS) simulations, “disk” like segregations may form near the faulted dislocation loops in the SP-CSAs. Segregated elements tend to distribute around the whole faulted loop as a disk rather than only around the edge of the loop.

  2. Bi-Directional Ion Emission from Massive Gold Cluster Impacts on Nanometric Carbon Foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debord, J Daniel; Della-Negra, Serge; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Schweikert, Emile A

    2012-04-12

    Carbon cluster emission from thin carbon foils (5-40 nm) impacted by individual Au(n) (+q) cluster projectiles (95-125 qkeV, n/q = 3-200) reveals features regarding the energy deposition, projectile range, and projectile fate in matter as a function of the projectile characteristics. For the first time, the secondary ion emission from thin foils has been monitored simultaneously in both forward and backward emission directions. The projectile range and depth of emission were examined as a function of projectile size, energy, and target thickness. A key finding is that the massive cluster impact develops very differently from that of a small polyatomic projectile. The range of the 125 qkeV Au(100q) (+q) (q ≈ 4) projectile is estimated to be 20 nm (well beyond the range of an equal velocity Au(+)) and projectile disintegration occurs at the exit of even a 5 nm thick foil.

  3. Polar cap ion beams during periods of northward IMF: Cluster statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Above the polar caps and during prolonged periods of northward IMF, the Cluster satellites detect upward accelerated ion beams with energies up to a few keV. They are associated with converging electric field structures indicating that the acceleration is caused by a quasi-static field-aligned electric field that can extend to altitudes higher than 7 RE (Maggiolo et al., 2006; Teste et al., 2007. Using the AMDA science analysis service provided by the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas, we have been able to extract about 200 events of accelerated upgoing ion beams above the polar caps from the Cluster database. Most of these observations are taken at altitudes lower than 7 RE and in the Northern Hemisphere. We investigate the statistical properties of these ion beams. We analyze their geometry, the properties of the plasma populations and of the electric field inside and around the beams, as well as their dependence on solar wind and IMF conditions. We show that ~40 % of the ion beams are collocated with a relatively hot and isotropic plasma population. The density and temperature of the isotropic population are highly variable but suggest that this plasma originates from the plasma sheet. The ion beam properties do not change significantly when the isotropic, hot background population is present. Furthermore, during one single polar cap crossing by Cluster it is possible to detect upgoing ion beams both with and without an accompanying isotropic component. The analysis of the variation of the IMF BZ component prior to the detection of the beams indicates that the delay between a northward/southward turning of IMF and the appearance/disappearance of the beams is respectively ~2 h and 20 min. The observed electrodynamic characteristics of high altitude polar cap ion beams suggest that they are closely connected to polar cap auroral arcs. We discuss the implications of these Cluster observations above the polar cap on the magnetospheric

  4. Ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three types of perturbation theory have been used to describe inner shell vacancy production by light to medium ion bombardment. Inclusion of Coulomb deflection and binding effects in the plane wave Born approximation is discussed. More recently this relativistic Coulomb deflection corrected perturbed stationary state theory has been extended to include energy loss effects. This ECPSSR theory is one of the most successful in predicting inner shell ionisation cross sections for both K and L shells, provided the projectile to target atomic number ratio is less than about 0.3 and, for the heavier ions, electron capture processes by the projectile are included

  5. Heavy-ion induced current through an oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Nagasawa, Takaharu; Nakajima, Yasuhito; Kawanabe, Ryu; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Hirao, Toshio; Onoda, Shinobu; Mishima, Kenta; Kawano, Katsuyasu; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the heavy-ion induced current in MOS structure is investigated. We have measured the transient gate current in a MOS capacitor and a MOSFET induced by single heavy-ions, and found that a transient current can be observed when the semiconductor surface is under depletion condition. In the case of MOSFET, a transient gate current with both positive and negative peaks is observed if the ion hits the gate area, and that the total integrated charge is almost zero within 100-200 ns after irradiation. From these results, we conclude that the radiation-induced gate current is dominated by a displacement current. We also discuss the generation mechanism of the radiation-induced current through the oxide layer by device simulation

  6. Properties of clusters in the gas phase: V. Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesee, R.G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion--molecules association reactions of the form A - (B)/sub n1/-+B=A - (B)/sub n/ were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl - , I - , and NO 2 - with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO 2 - and SO 3 - with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl - , I - , NO 2 - , CO 3 - , and SO 3 - with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions. For any given ion, the relative order of the addition enthalpies among the neutrals was found to be dependent on the polarizabilities of the neutrals and on the covalency in the ion-neutral bond. Dispersion of charge via covalent bonding was found to affect significantly the succeeding clustering steps

  7. Major signal suppression from metal ion clusters in SFC/ESI-MS - Cause and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglind, Alfred; Hedeland, Mikael; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt E

    2018-05-01

    The widening application area of SFC-MS with polar analytes and water-containing samples facilitates the use of quick and simple sample preparation techniques such as "dilute and shoot" and protein precipitation. This has also introduced new polar interfering components such as alkali metal ions naturally abundant in e.g. blood plasma and urine, which have shown to be retained using screening conditions in SFC/ESI-TOF-MS and causing areas of major ion suppression. Analytes co-eluting with these clusters will have a decreased signal intensity, which might have a major effect on both quantification and identification. When investigating the composition of the alkali metal clusters using accurate mass and isotopic pattern, it could be concluded that they were previously not described in the literature. Using NaCl and KCl standards and different chromatographic conditions, varying e.g. column and modifier, the clusters proved to be formed from the alkali metal ions in combination with the alcohol modifier and make-up solvent. Their compositions were [(XOCH 3 ) n  + X] + , [(XOH) n  + X] + , [(X 2 CO 3 ) n  + X] + and [(XOOCOCH 3 ) n  + X] + for X = Na + or K + in ESI+. In ESI-, the clusters depended more on modifier, with [(XCl) n  + Cl] - and [(XOCH 3 ) n  + OCH 3 ] - mainly formed in pure methanol and [(XOOCH) n  + OOCH] - when 20 mM NH 4 Fa was added. To prevent the formation of the clusters by avoiding methanol as modifier might be difficult, as this is a widely used modifier providing good solubility when analyzing polar compounds in SFC. A sample preparation with e.g. LLE would remove the alkali ions, however also introducing a time consuming and discriminating step into the method. Since the alkali metal ions were retained and affected by chromatographic adjustments as e.g. mobile phase modifications, a way to avoid them could therefore be chromatographic tuning, when analyzing samples containing them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  8. FY 2000 report on the results of the research and development project for new industry creation type industrial science technologies. Cluster ion beam process technology; 2000 nendo shinki sangyo soshutsugata sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seido seika hokokusho. Cluster ion beam process technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 2000 results of development of cluster ion beams. This technology generates the strong ion beams of atom and molecule clusters, and irradiate them onto the solid surfaces, to create new materials or treat materials. It allows the nano-level treatment. The program for high-current cluster ion beam generation/irradiation technology for industrial purposes attains the target high-current beam of 500{mu}m. It is necessary to establish the optimum cluster size, irradiated energy and ion species for the highly functional surface treatment, for which applicable technologies, e.g., those related to time of flight and molecular dynamics, are developed. Studies on high-current, large-area irradiation technologies are started. The program for material processing technologies involves evaluation of crystalline defects formed during the beam implantation by photoluminescence spectroscopy, and studies on semiconductor surface processing technologies. The surface smoothening technology is investigated to reduce crystalline defects and stress-induced strains for difficult-to-process materials, e.g., SiC and diamond, and the good results are produced. The program for development of superflat/superhard thin film formation technology involves irradiation of the Ar ion beams during the deposition of C{sub 60}(fullerene), to produce the superhard thin film. (NEDO)

  9. Neoplastic transformation induced by carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Hessel, Petra; Stucchi, Claudio G; Weyrather, Wilma K

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare the oncogenic potential of carbon ion beams and conventional photon beams for use in radiotherapy. The HeLa X human skin fibroblast cell line CGL1 was irradiated with carbon ions of three different energies (270, 100, and 11.4 MeV/u). Inactivation and transformation data were compared with those for 15 MeV photons. Inactivation and transformation frequencies for the 270 MeV/u carbon ions were similar to those for 15-MeV photons. The maximal relative biologic effectiveness (RBE(alpha)) values for 100MeV/u and 11.4 MeV/u carbon ions, respectively, were as follows: inactivation, 1.6 +/- 0.2 and 6.7 +/- 0.7; and transformation per surviving cell, 2.5 +/- 0.6 and 12 +/- 3. The curve for dose-transformation per cell at risk exhibited a maximum that was shifted toward lower doses at lower energies. Transformation induction per cell at risk for carbon ions in the entrance channel was comparable to that for photons, whereas for the lower energies, 100 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u, which are representative of the energies delivered to the tumor margins and volume, respectively, the probability of transformation in a single cell was greater than it was for photons. In addition, at isoeffective doses with respect to cell killing, the 11.4-MeV/u beam was more oncogenic than were photons.

  10. Probing potential Li-ion battery electrolyte through first principles simulation of atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Anoop Kumar; Sahoo, Mihir Ranjan; Nayak, Saroj

    2018-04-01

    Li-ion battery has wide area of application starting from low power consumer electronics to high power electric vehicles. However, their large scale application in electric vehicles requires further improvement due to their low specific power density which is an essential parameter and is closely related to the working potential windows of the battery system. Several studies have found that these parameters can be taken care of by considering different cathode/anode materials and electrolytes. Recently, a unique approach has been reported on the basis of cluster size in which the use of Li3 cluster has been suggested as a potential component of the battery electrode material. The cluster based approach significantly enhances the working electrode potential up to 0.6V in the acetonitrile solvent. In the present work, using ab-initio quantum chemical calculation and the dielectric continuum model, we have investigated various dielectric solvent medium for the suitable electrolyte for the potential component Li3 cluster. This study suggests that high dielectric electrolytic solvent (ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate) could be better for lithium cluster due to improvement in the total electrode potential in comparison to the other dielectric solvent.

  11. Novel radial vanadium pentoxide nanobelt clusters for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanping; Zhong, Wenwu [Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou, Zhejiang 318000 (China); Du, Yinxiao, E-mail: duyinxiao@zzia.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Zhengzhou Institute of Aeronautical Industry Management, Zhengzhou 450015 (China); Yuan, Q.X. [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Zhengzhou Institute of Aeronautical Industry Management, Zhengzhou 450015 (China); Wang, Xu [School of Microelectronics, Key Laboratory of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Jia, Renxu, E-mail: rxjia@mail.xidian.edu.cn [School of Microelectronics, Key Laboratory of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Radial V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanobelt clusters were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal process. • The V{sub 2}O{sub 5} clusters are single crystallites with [0 1 0] growth direction. • Specific discharge capacity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 134 mA h/g coupled with good cycle stability. - Abstract: This paper reports the synthesis, characterization and Li-ion intercalation properties of moundlily-like radial vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) nanobelt clusters. The V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanobelt clusters was successfully synthesized by a novel soft template assisted hydrothermal process followed by thermal annealing. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, FT-IR spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The obtained V{sub 2}O{sub 5} possesses a single-crystalline structure with a preferred orientation along the [0 1 0] crystal plane. Electrochemical analysis shows that the specific discharge capacity of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanobelt clusters reaches 134 mA h/g at a current density of 2 A/g coupled with good cycle stability.

  12. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of He ion particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushibara, A.; Shikazono, N.; Watanabe, R.; Fujii, K.; O'Neill, P.; Yokoya, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present here evidence showing that the yields of DNA lesions induced by He 2+ ions strongly depend on Linear energy transfer (LET). In this study, hydrated plasmid DNA was irradiated with He 2+ ions with LET values of 19, 63 and 95 keVμm -1 . The yields of prompt single-strand breaks (SSBs) are very similar at the varying LET values, whereas the yields of prompt double-strand breaks (DSBs) increase with increasing LET. Further, base lesions were revealed as additional strand breaks by post-irradiation treatment of the DNA with endonuclease III (Nth) and formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg). The reduction in the yield of these enzymatically induced SSBs and DSBs becomes significant as the LET increases. These results suggest that the clustering of DNA lesions becomes more probable in regions of high LET. (authors)

  13. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianbao; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network

  14. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbao; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhang, Gang

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network.

  15. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  16. Collision-induced dissociation of diatomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los, J.; Govers, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate how mass spectrometric studies of dissociation in diatomic molecular ions can provide information on the dynamics of these collisions and on the predissociative states involved. Restriction is made to primary beam energies of the order of at least keV. The review covers the dynamics of dissociation, experimental techniques, direct dissociation in heavy-particle collisions, and translational spectroscopy. 120 references

  17. Investigations of Atomic Transport Induced by Heavy Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, Thomas Clyde

    The mechanisms of atomic transport induced by ion irradiation generally fall into the categories of anisotropic or isotropic processes. Typical examples of these are recoil implantation and cascade mixing, respectively. We have measured the interaction of these processes in the mixing of Ti/SiO(,2)/Si, Cr/SiO(,2)/Si and Ni/SiO(,2)/Si multi-layers irradiated with Xe at fluences of 0.01 - 10 x 10('15)cm('-2). The fluence dependence of net metal transport into the underlying layers was measured with different thicknesses of SiO(,2) and different sample temperatures during irradiation (-196 to 500C). There is a linear dependence at low fluences. At high fluences, a square-root behavior predominates. For thin SiO(,2) layers (primary recoils is quite pronounced since the gross mixing is small. A significant correlation exists between the mixing and the energy deposited through elastic collisions F(,D ). Several models are examined in an attempt to describe the transport process in Ni/SiO(,2). It is likely that injection of Ni by secondary recoil implantation is primarily responsible for getting Ni into the SiO(,2). Secondary recoil injection is thought to scale with F(,D). Trends in the mixing rates indicate that the dominant mechanism for Ti and Cr could be the same as for Ni. The processes of atomic transport and phase formation clearly fail to be separable at higher temperatures. A positive correlation with chemical reactivity emerges at higher irradiation temperatures. The temperature at which rapid mixing occurs is not much below that for spontaneous thermal reaction. Less Ni is retained in the SiO(,2) at high irradiation temperatures. Ni incorporated in the SiO(,2) by low temperature irradiation is not expelled during a consecutive high temperature irradiation. The Ni remains trapped within larger clusters during a sequential 500C irradiation. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  18. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  19. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  20. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: gdruano@ceride.gov.ar; Ferron, J. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and Ar{sup +}) and Li{sup +} ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  1. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banaś, D., E-mail: d.banas@ujk.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Fijał-Kirejczyk, I. [The Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A. [The National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kretschmer, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Mukoyama, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Trautmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Universität Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster–Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L{sub 2}-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  2. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  3. Temperature-controlled depth profiling in polymeric materials using cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Christine M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States)]. E-mail: christine.mahoney@nist.gov; Fahey, Albert J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States); Gillen, Greg [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States); Xu Chang [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States); Batteas, James D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States)

    2006-07-30

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) employing an SF{sub 5} {sup +} polyatomic primary ion source was used to depth profile through poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) thin films at a series of temperatures from -125 deg. C to 150 deg. C. It was found that for PMMA, reduced temperature analysis produced depth profiles with increased secondary ion stability and reduced interfacial widths as compared to analysis at ambient temperature. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that this improvement in interfacial width may be related to a decrease in sputter-induced topography. Depth profiling at higher temperatures was typically correlated with increased sputter rates. However, the improvements in interfacial widths and overall secondary ion stability were not as prevalent as was observed at low temperature. For PLA, improvements in signal intensities were observed at low temperatures, yet there was no significant change in secondary ion stability, interface widths or sputter rates. High temperatures yielded a significant decrease in secondary ion stability of the resulting profiles. PS films showed rapid degradation of characteristic secondary ion signals under all temperatures examined.

  4. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  5. Advanced ion beam analysis of materials using ion-induced fast electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Ishihara, Toyoyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    1997-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-energy shadowing effect using ion-induced electron spectroscopy is reported with emphasis on a possibility of determination of local electronic structure in solids, which has been a difficult problem to approach with other experimental techniques. We demonstrate real-space determination of covalent-bond electron distribution in Si crystal. The analysis technique may provide a new field of ion beam analysis of solids. (author)

  6. Ion bombardment induced ripple topography on amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Paton, F.; Williams, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    Earlier studies of the ion bombardment induced ripple morphology on the surfaces of amorphous solids when compared with geomorphological effects are shown to possess many similar features. The present study, with 40 keV Ar + ion bombarded Si suggests that analogies are incomplete, however, and that greater similarities with the process of macroscopic sandblasting (corrosion) exist. It is shown that the genesis of wave like structures on Si is from isolated features, which have the appearance of ripple trains, which are faceted. It is suggested that these features result from particle flux enhancement processes near surface dimples generated by stress induced surface lifting. (author)

  7. Heavy-ion-induced, gate-rupture in power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    A new, heavy-ion-induced, burnout mechanism has been experimentally observed in power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This mechanism occurs when a heavy, charged particle passes through the gate oxide region of n- or p-channel devices having sufficient gate-to-source or gate-to-drain bias. The gate-rupture leads to significant permanent degradation of the device. A proposed failure mechanism is discussed and experimentally verified. In addition, the absolute immunity of p-channel devices to heavy-ion-induced, semiconductor burnout is demonstrated and discussed along with new, non-destructive, burnout testing methods

  8. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, C.C.

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C 6 - /C 6 , Si n - /Si n (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge 2 - /Ge 2 , In 2 P - /In 2 P,InP 2 - /InP 2 , and Ga 2 As - . The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I - ·CH 3 I S N 2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C 6 , as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C 6 - spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ∼40 cm -1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C 6 , and the open shell of the anion

  9. Applications of simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musket, R.G.

    1983-05-01

    Simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission (E/sub x/greater than or equal to 300 eV) analyses have been performed using helium ions as probes of the first few hundred nanometers of various materials. These studies serve as a demonstration of the complementary nature of the two types of information obtained. Uncertainties associated with each of the individual techniques were reduced by performing both analyses. The principal advantages of simultaneous analyses over sequential analyses have been delineated

  10. Evaluation of secondary ion yield enhancement from polymer material by using TOF-SIMS equipped with a gold cluster ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimoto, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)]. E-mail: dm053502@cc.seikei.ac.jp; Aoyagi, S. [Department of Regional Development, Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu-cho, Matsue-shi, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Kato, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Iida, N. [ULVAC-PHI, Inc., 370 Enzo, Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0084 (Japan); Yamamoto, A. [ULVAC-PHI, Inc., 370 Enzo, Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0084 (Japan); Kudo, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)

    2006-07-30

    We investigated the enhancement of the secondary ion intensity in the TOF-SIMS spectra obtained by Au{sup +} and Au{sub 3} {sup +} bombardment in comparison with Ga{sup +} excitation using polymer samples with different molecular weight distributions. Since the polymer samples used in this experiment have a wide molecular weight distribution, the advantages of the gold cluster primary ion source over monoatomic ion could accurately be evaluated. It was observed that the degree of fragmentation decreased by the usage of cluster primary ion beam compared with monoatomic ion beam, which was observed as a shift of the intensity distribution in the spectra. It was also found out that the mass effect of Au{sup +} and Ga{sup +} as monoatomic primary ion, resulted in about 10-60 times of enhancement for both samples with different molecular distributions. On the other hand, the Au{sub 3} {sup +} bombardment caused intensity enhancement about 100-2600 compared with Ga{sup +} bombardment, depending on the mass range of the detected secondary ion species. The cluster primary ion effect of Au{sub 3} {sup +}, compared with Au{sup +}, therefore, was estimated to be about 10-45.

  11. Comparison of proton and phosphorous ion implantation-induced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2007-05-02

    We report and compare proton and phosphorous ion implantation-induced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs). After ion implantation at 20-300 deg. C, the QDs are rapid thermally annealed at 850 deg. C for 30 s. Proton implantation induces less energy shift than P ion implantation for a given concentration of atomic displacements due to the more efficient dynamic annealing of the defects created by protons. The implantation-induced energy shift reaches a maximum value of about 260 meV for a dose of 5 x 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2} in the P ion implanted QDs, which also show narrower PL linewidths compared to the proton implanted QDs. We also report the effects of an InGaAs top cap layer on the ion implantation-induced QD intermixing and show that defect production and annihilation processes evolve differently in InGaAs and InP layers and vary with the implantation temperature. When the implantation is performed at higher temperatures, the energy shift of the P ion implanted QDs capped with an InP layer increases due to the reduction in larger defect cluster formation at higher temperatures, while the energy shift of the proton implanted QDs decreases due to increased dynamic annealing irrespective of their cap layers.

  12. Ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Clayton, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE). Its use as a tool for multi-element non-destructive trace element analysis of small samples is addressed. Concepts and details needed for the construction of a PIXE system are offered

  13. Magnetic and Moessbauer-spectroscopic studies of iron-clusters in zeolites. [Reduction of ferrous ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F; Gunsser, W; Knappwost, A [Hamburg Univ. (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie

    1975-12-01

    Iron clusters have been prepared within zeolite holes by reduction of zeolites containing ferrous ions. The diameter of these particles must therefore be smaller that 13 A. They are superparamagnetic and their Moessbauer spectra show no HFS, even at 4K. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of the unreduced zeolites obeys a Curie-Weiss law with p/sub eff/ = 4.45 ..mu..B and THETA = 105K. The Weiss curves of the reduced samples lie distinctly below those of the bulk material.

  14. Study on interaction of swift cluster ion beam with matter and irradiation effect (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yuichi; Shibata, Hiromi

    2010-07-01

    This review covers results of the 'Study of interaction on swift cluster ion beam with matter and irradiation effect' supported by the Interorganization Atomic Energy Research Program from 2006FY to 2008FY. It is composed of a research abstract for each sub-group with viewgraphs which were presented at the group meeting held on March 2009 or 'Meeting of High LET radiation -From fundamental study among physics, chemistry and biology to medical applications-' sponsored by Japan Society of Radiation Chemistry, cosponsored by this research group. (author)

  15. Metastable decay and binding energies of van der Waals cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernstberger, B.; Krause, H.; Neusser, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this work the appearance potentials for the metastable decay channel of a series of van der Waals dimer ions are presented. Ionization and metastable dissociation is achieved by resonance-enhanced two-photon absorption in a linear reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. From the appearance potentials the binding energy of the neutral dimers is obtained and from the additionally measured ionization potentials binding energies of the dimer cations are achieved. The contribution of charge transfer resonance interaction to the binding in cluster ions is evaluated by investigation of several homo- and heterodimers of aromatic components and the heterodimer benzene/cyclohexane as an example for a dimer consisting of an aromatic and a nonaromatic component. (orig.)

  16. Study of point defect clustering in electron and ion irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellio, C.; Boulanger, L.

    1986-09-01

    Dislocation loops created by 500 keV Zr + ions and 1 MeV electrons in zirconium have a/3 type Burgers vectors, and in ion irradiated samples, loops lie preferentially on planes close to (1010). From in-situ observations of loop growth under 1 MeV electron irradiation in zirconium and dilute Zr (Nb,O) alloys, a strong increase of the vacancy migration energy with oxygen concentration was observed, from 0.72 eV for pure zirconium to 1.7 eV for Zr and Zr-1% Nb doped with 1800 ppm weight oxygen, indicating large trapping of vacancies by O single interstitials or clusters

  17. Yields of clustered DNA damage induced by charged-particle radiations of similar kinetic energy per nucleon: LET dependence in different DNA microenvironments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszenman, D.J.; Sutherland, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the biological effects of densely ionizing radiation in relation to changes in the ionization density along the track, we measured the yields and spectrum of clustered DNA damages induced by charged particles of different atomic number but similar kinetic energy per nucleon in different DNA microenvironments. Yeast DNA embedded in agarose in solutions of different free radical scavenging capacity was irradiated with 1 GeV protons, 1 GeV/nucleon oxygen ions, 980 MeV/nucleon titanium ions or 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions. The frequencies of double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites and oxypurine clusters were quantified. The total DNA damage yields per absorbed dose induced in non-radioquenching solution decreased with LET, with minor variations in radioquenching conditions being detected. However, the total damage yields per particle fluence increased with LET in both conditions, indicating a higher efficiency per particle to induce clustered DNA damages. The yields of DSBs and non-DSB clusters as well as the damage spectra varied with LET and DNA milieu, suggesting the involvement of more than one mechanism in the formation of the different types of clustered damages.

  18. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  19. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  20. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  1. MHD induced fast-ion losses on ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Bobkov, V.; Bruedgam, M.; Guenter, S.; Igochine, V.; Lauber, Ph.; Mantsinen, M.J.; Maraschek, M.; Poli, E.; Sassenberg, K.; Tardini, G.; Zohm, H.; Pinches, S.D.; Gobbin, M.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Piovesan, P.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of the interplay between MHD instabilities and energetic particles has been gained from direct measurements of fast-ion losses (FILs). Time-resolved energy and pitch angle measurements of FIL caused by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) have been obtained using a scintillator based FIL detector. The study of FIL due to TAEs has revealed the existence of a new core-localized MHD fluctuation, the Sierpes mode. The Sierpes mode is a non-pure Alfvenic fluctuation which appears in the acoustic branch, dominating the transport of fast-ions in ICRF heated discharges. The internal structure of both TAEs and Sierpes mode has been reconstructed by means of highly resolved multichord soft x-ray measurements. A spatial overlapping of their eigenfunctions leads to a FIL coupling, showing the strong influence that a core-localized fast-ion driven MHD instability may have on the fast-ion transport. We have identified the FIL mechanisms due to NTMs as well as due to TAEs. Drift islands formed by fast-ions in particle phase space are responsible for the loss of NBI fast-ions due to NTMs. In ICRF heated plasmas, a resonance condition fulfilled by the characteristic trapped fast-ion orbit frequencies leads to a phase matching between fast-ion orbit and NTM or TAE magnetic fluctuation. The banana tips of a resonant trapped fast-ion bounce radially due to an E x B drift in the TAE case. The NTM radial bounce of the fast-ion banana tips is caused by the radial component of the perturbed magnetic field lines.

  2. Electron emission from solids induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Guoqing

    2000-01-01

    The recent progresses in experimental and theoretical studies of the collision between swift heavy ion and solids as well as electron emission induced by swift heavy ion in solids were briefly reviewed. Three models, Coulomb explosion, thermal spike and repulsive long-lived states, for interpreting the atomic displacements stimulated by the electronic energy loss were discussed. The experimental setup and methods for measuring the electron emission from solids were described. The signification deviation from a proportionality between total electron emission yields and electronic stopping power was found. Auger-electron and convoy-electron spectra are thought to be a probe for investigating the microscopic production mechanisms of the electronic irradiation-damage. Electron temperature and track potential at the center of nuclear tracks in C and polypropylene foils induced by 5 MeV/u heavy ions, which are related to the electronic excitation density in metals and insulators respectively, were extracted by measuring the high resolution electron spectra

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A A; Gonon, P; Jamieson, D N [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Heavy ion and proton-induced single event multiple upset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, R.A.; Carts, M.A.; Marshall, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Individual ionizing heavy ion events are shown to cause two or more adjacent memory cells to change logic states in a high density CMOS SRAM. A majority of the upsets produced by normally incident heavy ions are due to single-particle events that causes a single cell to upset. However, for grazing angles a majority of the upsets produced by heavy-ion irradiation are due to single-particle events that cause two or more cells to change logic states. Experimental evidence of a single proton-induced spallation reaction that causes two adjacent memory cells to change logic states is presented. Results from a dual volume Monte-Carlo simulation code for proton-induced single-event multiple upsets are within a factor of three of experimental data for protons at normal incidence and 70 degrees

  6. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  7. Plastic Flow Induced by Single Ion Impacts on Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The formation of holes in thin gold foils as a result of single ion impacts by 200keV Xe ions has been followed using transmission electron microscopy. Video recording provided details of microstructure evolution with a time resolution of 1/30th sec. Hole formation involves the movement by plastic flow of massive amounts of material, on the order of tens of thousands of Au atoms per ion impact. Plastic flow, as a consequence of individual ion impacts, results in a continual filling of both holes and craters as well as a thickening of the gold foil. Changes in morphology during irradiation is attributed to a localized, thermal-spike induced melting, coupled with plastic flow of effected material under the influence of surface forces. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation. A fast, evolutionary process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, V.E.; Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Ginger, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Morley, K.B.; Hsi, W.C.; Wang, G.; Korteling, R.G.; Legrain, R.

    1996-09-01

    GeV light-ion-induced reactions offer a unique tool for preparing hot, dilute nuclear matter. Time evolution of nuclear multifragmentation in 3 He + nat Ag and 3 He + 197 Au reactions are investigated. Fragment-fragment correlations are studied in order to gain information on multifragmentation mechanism. (K.A.)

  9. Deuterium ion irradiation induced blister formation and destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jaemin; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Jin, Younggil; Roh, Ki-Baek; Kim, Gon-Ho, E-mail: ghkim@snu.ac.kr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The areal number density of blisters on the grain with (1 1 1) plane orientation increased with increasing ion fluence. • No more blisters were created above the temperature about 900 K due to high thermal mobility of ions and inactivity of traps. • The destruction of blister at the boundary induced by sputtering is proposed. • The blisters were destructed at the position about the boundary by high sputtering yield of oblique incident ions and thin thickness due to plastic deformation at the boundary. - Abstract: The blisters formation and destruction induced by the deuterium ions on a polycrystalline tungsten were investigated with varying irradiation deuterium ion fluence from 3.04 × 10{sup 23} to 1.84 × 10{sup 25} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and an fixed irradiated ion energy of 100 eV in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source, which was similar to the far-scrape off layer region in the nuclear fusion reactors. Target temperature was monitored during the irradiation. Most of blisters formed easily on the grain with (1 1 1) plane orientation which had about 250 nm in diameter. In addition, the areal number density of blisters increased with increasing the ion fluence under the surface temperature reaching to about 900 K. When the fluence exceeded 4.6 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2}, the areal number density of the blister decreased. It could be explained that the destruction of the blister was initiated by erosion at the boundary region where the thickness of blister lid was thin and the sputtering yield was high by oblique incident ions, resulting in remaining the lid open, e.g., un-eroded center dome. It is possible to work as a tungsten dust formation from the plasma facing divertor material at far-SOL region of fusion reactor.

  10. Graphite surface topography induced by Ta cluster impact and oxidative etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, C.T.; Olsson, L.; Erlandsson, R.; Henkel, M.; Urbassek, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Freshly cleaved highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), when baked in air at ∝630 C, forms one-monolayer(ML)-deep circular pits due to oxidation initiated at surface defect sites. We found that the areal density and depths of these pits could be modulated by deliberately introducing surface and sub-surface defects by energetic ion bombardment prior to baking. Bombardment by 555-eV/atom Ta 1 + , Ta 2 + , Ta 4 + , or Ta 9 + , always enhanced the areal density of etch pits, but only bombardment by Ta 4 + , or Ta 9 + significantly enhanced the depths of the pits. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of Ta n cluster bombardment of HOPG (n = 1, 2, 4, and 9) with the aim of characterizing the damage structures induced by the bombardment and correlating them with the experimental data. For Ta 9 + , the simulations showed a high level of damage extending from the surface down to nine MLs, in agreement with the most probable etch pit depth observed. For other cluster species, predicted etch pit depths were deeper than the observed ones. Annealing or steric requirements for initiating oxidation may account for some of the differences between simulations and experimental results. (orig.)

  11. Rapid thermal and swift heavy ion induced annealing of Co ion implanted GaN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranwal, V.; Pandey, A. C.; Gerlach, J. W.; Rauschenbach, B.; Karl, H.; Kanjilal, D.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2008-01-01

    Thin epitaxial GaN films grown on 6H-SiC(0001) substrates were implanted with 180 keV Co ions at three different fluences. As-implanted samples were characterized with secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry to obtain the Co depth profiles and the maximum Co concentrations. As-implanted samples were annealed applying two different techniques: rapid thermal annealing and annealing by swift heavy ion irradiation. Rapid thermal annealing was done at two temperatures: 1150 deg. C for 20 s and 700 deg. C for 5 min. 200 MeV Ag ions at two fluences were used for annealing by irradiation. Crystalline structure of the pristine, as-implanted, and annealed samples was investigated using x-ray diffraction, and the results were compared. Improvement of the crystalline quality was observed for rapid thermal annealed samples at the higher annealing temperature as confirmed with rocking curve measurements. The results indicate the presence of Co clusters in these annealed samples. Swift heavy ion irradiation with the parameters chosen for this study did not lead to a significant annealing

  12. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy ε n deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 μm thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of ε e HRF =(10.5±1.0) kev nm -1 was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation ε e S a =(12±2) keV nm -1 for the first time extracted for a Ge the characteristic linear behaviour of the

  13. Study of Flux Ratio of C60 to Ar Cluster Ion for Hard DLC Film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, K.; Toyoda, N.; Kanda, K.; Matsui, S.; Kitagawa, T.; Yamada, I.

    2003-01-01

    To study the influence of the flux ratio of C60 molecule to Ar cluster ion on (diamond like carbon) DLC film characteristics, DLC films deposited under various flux ratios were characterized with Raman spectrometry and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). From results of these measurements, hard DLC films were deposited when the flux ratio of C60 to Ar cluster ion was between 0.7 and 4. Furthermore the DLC film with constant sp2 content was obtained in the range of the ratio from 0.7 to 4, which contents are lower values than that of conventional films such as RF plasma. DLC films deposited under the ratio from 1 to 4 had hardness from 40 to 45GPa. It was shown that DLC films with stable properties of low sp2 content and high hardness were formed even when the fluxes were varied from 1 to 4 during deposition. It was indicated that this process was useful in the view of industrial application

  14. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  15. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10 35 cm -2 s -1 . In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E C -0.460 eV and E205a at E C -0.395 eV where E C is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V 3 ) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V 3 defect exhibits a bistability, as does the leakage current. In oxygen

  16. Plasma diagnostics of the SIMPA Ecr ion source by X-ray spectroscopy, Collisions of H-like Neon ions with Argon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrouche, N.

    2006-09-01

    The first part of this thesis is devoted to the SIMPA ECR ion source characterization, first, I explored the ion source's capacities on the point of view of extracted currents for three elements, argon, krypton and neon. By analyzing the Bremsstrahlung spectra, I determined the electronic temperature in the plasma and the electronic and ionic densities. In a second time, I recorded high resolution X-spectra of argon and krypton plasma's. By taking into account the principal mechanisms of production of a K hole in the ions inside the plasma, I determined the ionic densities of the high charge states of argon. Lastly, I highlighted a correlation between the ions charge states densities with the intensities of extracted currents. The second part of the thesis is devoted to Ne 9+- argon clusters collisions. First, I presented simple and effective theoretical models allowing to describe the phenomena occurring during a collision, from the point of view of the projectile. I carried out a simulation for a collision of an ion Ne 9+ with an argon cluster of a given size, which has enabled us to know the energy levels populated during the electronic capture and to follow the number of electrons in each projectile shell. Lastly, I presented the first results of a collision between a Ne 9+ beam and argon clusters. These results, have enabled me by using projectile X-ray spectroscopy during the ions-clusters collision, to evidence a strong clustering of targets atoms and to highlight an electronic multi-capture in the projectile ion excited states. (author)

  17. ELECTROMAGNETIC THERMAL INSTABILITY WITH MOMENTUM AND ENERGY EXCHANGE BETWEEN ELECTRONS AND IONS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasov, Anatoly K.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal instability in an electron-ion magnetized plasma, which is relevant in the intragalactic medium of galaxy clusters, solar corona, and other two-component plasma objects, is investigated. We apply the multicomponent plasma approach where the dynamics of all species are considered separately through electric field perturbations. General expressions for the dynamical variables obtained in this paper can be applied over a wide range of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas also containing neutrals and dust grains. We assume that background temperatures of electrons and ions are different and include the energy exchange in thermal equations for electrons and ions along with the collisional momentum exchange in equations of motion. We take into account the dependence of collision frequency on density and temperature perturbations. The cooling-heating functions are taken for both electrons and ions. A condensation mode of thermal instability has been studied in the fast sound speed limit. We derive a new dispersion relation including different electron and ion cooling-heating functions and other effects mentioned above and find its simple solutions for growth rates in limiting cases. We show that the perturbations have an electromagnetic nature and demonstrate the crucial role of the electric field perturbation along the background magnetic field in the fast sound speed limit. We find that at the conditions under consideration, condensation must occur along the magnetic field while the transverse scale sizes can be both larger and smaller than the longitudinal ones. The results obtained can be useful for interpretating observations of dense cold regions in astrophysical objects.

  18. Theory of ion Bernstein wave induced shear suppression of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, G. G.; Diamond, P. H.; Ono, M.; Biglari, H.

    1994-06-01

    The theory of radio frequency induced ion Bernstein wave- (IBW) driven shear flow in the edge is examined, with the goal of application of shear suppression of fluctuations. This work is motivated by the observed confinement improvement on IBW heated tokamaks [Phys. Fluids B 5, 241 (1993)], and by previous low-frequency work on RF-driven shear flows [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 1535 (1991)]. It is found that the poloidal shear flow is driven electrostatically by both Reynolds stress and a direct ion momentum source, analogous to the concepts of helicity injection and electron momentum input in current drive, respectively. Flow drive by the former does not necessarily require momentum input to the plasma to induce a shear flow. For IBW, the direct ion momentum can be represented by direct electron momentum input, and a charge separation induced stress that imparts little momentum to the plasma. The derived Er profile due to IBW predominantly points inward, with little possibility of direction change, unlike low-frequency Alfvénic RF drive. The profile scale is set by the edge density gradient and electron dissipation. Due to the electrostatic nature of ion Bernstein waves, the poloidal flow contribution dominates in Er. Finally, the necessary edge power absorbed for shear suppression on Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M) [9th Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas, Charleston, SC, 1991 (American Institute of Physics, New York, 1991), p. 129] is estimated to be 100 kW distributed over 5 cm.

  19. Sample and plume luminescence in fast heavy ion induced desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszynski, W.; Koch, K.; Hilf, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The luminescence arising in 252 Cf-fission fragment induced desorption events has been measured using the time-correlated single photon counting technique. Photons emitted from the sample have been guided from a plasma desorption ion source to a photodetector by an optical fibre. Spectra and decay functions have been obtained using thin layers of Coronene or POPOP as samples. The results are strongly dependent on the acceleration field applied for ion extraction. Approximately 10 photons per fission fragment have been produced when applying no accelerating voltage. The results clearly show that these photons come from radiative electronic relaxations of molecules in the solid sample. Considerably more photons per fission fragment have been produced when applying a positive acceleration voltage. The intensity increases almost linearly for acceleration fields below 10 kV/cm and saturates at a nearly 10-fold higher value when compared to no acceleration. The intensity is also affected by the homogeneity of the accelerating field. These additional photons are attributed to radiative electronic relaxations of desorbed neutral molecules in the plume excited by inelastic collisions with accelerated positive ions. No additional photons have been observed when extracting negative ions. The negative ions produced do obviously not hit and/or excite desorbed neutral molecules, presumably due to their specific desorption characteristics. The experimental data have been analyzed by comparing with the cw and time-resolved sample luminescence obtained by optical excitation. The findings demonstrate that valuable information on ion-solid interactions, on specific desorption quantities and on processes in the plume can be obtained by measuring and analyzing the luminescence induced by the impact of high energy primary ions. (orig.)

  20. Swift heavy ion induced surface and microstructural evolution in metallic glass thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Hysen; Thomas, Senoy; Ramanujan, Raju V.; Avasthi, D.K.; Al- Omari, I.A.; Al-Harthi, Salim; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Swift heavy ion induced changes in microstructure and surface morphology of vapor deposited Fe–Ni based metallic glass thin films have been investigated by using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Ion beam irradiation was carried out at room temperature with 103 MeV Au 9+ beam with fluences ranging from 3 × 10 11 to 3 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The atomic force microscopy images were subjected to power spectral density analysis and roughness analysis using an image analysis software. Clusters were found in the image of as-deposited samples, which indicates that the film growth is dominated by the island growth mode. As-deposited films were amorphous as evidenced from X-ray diffraction; however, high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed a short range atomic order in the samples with crystallites of size around 3 nm embedded in an amorphous matrix. X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-deposited films after irradiation does not show any appreciable changes, indicating that the passage of swift heavy ions stabilizes the short range atomic ordering, or even creates further amorphization. The crystallinity of the as-deposited Fe–Ni based films was improved by thermal annealing, and diffraction results indicated that ion beam irradiation on annealed samples results in grain fragmentation. On bombarding annealed films, the surface roughness of the films decreased initially, then, at higher fluences it increased. The observed change in surface morphology of the irradiated films is attributed to the interplay between ion induced sputtering, volume diffusion and surface diffusion.

  1. Systematics of quasi-elastic processes induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltz, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to delineate the areas in the systematics of quasi-elastic processes induced by heavy ions that are well described theoretically from the specific features that seem not to be understood. One- and two-particle transfer reactions are considered. A general systematic seen in transfer angular distribution data and theory, some successes and failures of the DWBA and coupled-channels theories in describing heavy-ion-reaction data, and the specific example 232 Th( 40 Ar,K) and implications for deep inelastic reactions with even heavier projectiles such as Kr and Xe are considered

  2. Ion induced spinodal dewetting of thin solid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, Luca; Setina Batic, Barbara; Firpo, Giuseppe; Piano, Emanuele; Valbusa, Ugo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2012-05-28

    We present experimental data and numerical simulations in order to show that the mechanism of spinodal dewetting is active during ion beam irradiation of thin solid films. The expected scaling law for the characteristic wavelengths versus the initial film thickness is modified by the presence of sputtering. The conclusion is fully supported by model simulation which shows a square law dependence for null sputtering yield and a bimodal trend when sputtering is included. This result is in contrast to earlier studies and opens the possibility to control and use ion induced dewetting for the fabrication of functional nanostructures.

  3. Study of shallow junction formation by boron-containing cluster ion implantation of silicon and two-stage annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin-Ming

    Shallow junction formation made by low energy ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing is facing a major challenge for ULSI (ultra large scale integration) as the line width decreases down to the sub micrometer region. The issues include low beam current, the channeling effect in low energy ion implantation and TED (transient enhanced diffusion) during annealing after ion implantation. In this work, boron containing small cluster ions, such as GeB, SiB and SiB2, was generated by using the SNICS (source of negative ion by cesium sputtering) ion source to implant into Si substrates to form shallow junctions. The use of boron containing cluster ions effectively reduces the boron energy while keeping the energy of the cluster ion beam at a high level. At the same time, it reduces the channeling effect due to amorphization by co-implanted heavy atoms like Ge and Si. Cluster ions have been used to produce 0.65--2keV boron for low energy ion implantation. Two stage annealing, which is a combination of low temperature (550°C) preannealing and high temperature annealing (1000°C), was carried out to anneal the Si sample implanted by GeB, SiBn clusters. The key concept of two-step annealing, that is, the separation of crystal regrowth, point defects removal with dopant activation from dopant diffusion, is discussed in detail. The advantages of the two stage annealing include better lattice structure, better dopant activation and retarded boron diffusion. The junction depth of the two stage annealed GeB sample was only half that of the one-step annealed sample, indicating that TED was suppressed by two stage annealing. Junction depths as small as 30 nm have been achieved by two stage annealing of sample implanted with 5 x 10-4/cm2 of 5 keV GeB at 1000°C for 1 second. The samples were evaluated by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) profiling, TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry)/channeling. Cluster ion implantation

  4. Swift heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Umme Habiba

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the high energy heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers is studied. Two polymer groups, namely polyvinyl polymers (PVF, PVAc, PVA and PMMA) and fluoropolymers (PVDF, ETFE, PFA and FEP) were used in this work. Polyvinyl polymers were investigated since they will be used as insulating materials in the superconducting magnets of the new ion accelerators of the planned International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at the GSI Helmholtz-Centre of Heavy Ion Research (GSI) in Darmstadt. In order to study ion-beam induced degradation, all polymer foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (U, Au, Sm, Xe) and experimentation sites (beam lines X0 and M3) over a large fluence regime (1 x 10 10 - 5 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 ). Five independent techniques, namely infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, residual gas analysis (RGA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mass loss analysis (ML), were used to analyze the irradiated samples. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that ion irradiation led to the decrease of characteristic band intensities showing the general degradation of the polymers, with scission of side groups and the main backbone. As a consequence of the structural modification, new bands appeared. UV-Vis transmission analysis showed an absorption edge shift from the ultraviolet region towards the visible region indicating double bond and conjugated double bond formation. On-line massspectrometric residual gas analysis showed the release of small gaseous fragment molecules. TGA analysis gave evidence of a changed thermal stability. With ML analysis, the considerable mass loss was quantified. The results of the five complementary analytical methods show how heavy ion irradiation changes the molecular structure of the polymers. Molecular degradation mechanisms are postulated. The amount of radiation damage is found to be sensitive to the used type of ionic species. While

  5. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  6. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm 2 ) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  7. Acoustically Induced Microparticle Orbiting and Clustering on a Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.; Tarimala, S.; Roberts, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Behavior of colloidal particles in the bulk solution or at interfaces under the effect of high-frequency acoustics is critical to many seemingly different applications ranging from enhanced oil recovery to improved mixing in microfluidic channels and from accelerated contaminant extractions to surface cleaning, drug delivery and microelectronics. It can be detrimental or beneficial, depending on the application. In medical research, flow cytometry and microfluidics, for example, acoustically induced clustering of tracer particles and/or their sticking to the walls of channels, vessels, or tubes often becomes a problem. On the other hand, it can be tailored to enhance processes such as mixing in microfluidic devices, particle separation and sizing, and power generation microdevices. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, microscopic visualization experiments were performed in which polystyrene fluorescent (468/508 nm wavelength) microspheres with a mean diameter of 2.26-µm and density of 1.05 g/cm3, were suspended in either de-ionized water or a 0.1M NaCl solution. The freshly-prepared colloidal suspension was injected into a parallel-plate glass flow cell, which was subjected to high-frequency acoustics (200-500 kHz) through a piezoelectric transducer attached to one of the cell's outer walls. When the suspending medium is de-ionized water, acoustic stimulation of the cell at 313 kHz induced three distinct particle behaviors: 1) entrainment and bulk transport via wavelength-scale Rayleigh streaming, 2) transport via direct radiation forces to concentrate at nodal or anti-nodal planes, and 3) entrapment via boundary layer vorticular microstreaming resulting in mobile particles orbiting deposited particles. This latter phenomenon is intriguing. It occurs at specific frequencies and the shape of the orbits is determined by the applied frequency, whereas the rotation speed is proportional to the applied amplitude. At the higher ionic strength, on the other

  8. Si clusters/defective graphene composites as Li-ion batteries anode materials: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Meng; Liu, Yue-Jie; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Wang, Xiao-guang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the interaction between Si clusters with pristine and defective graphene. • We find that the binding strength of Si clusters on graphene can be enhanced to different degrees after introducing various defects. • It is found that both graphene and Si cluster in the Si/graphene composites can preserve their Li uptake ability. - Abstract: Recently, the Si/graphene hybrid composites have attracted considerable attention due to their potential application for Li-ion batteries. How to effectively anchor Si clusters to graphene substrates to ensure their stability is an important factor to determine their performance for Li-ion batteries. In the present work, we have performed comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the geometric structures, stability, and electronic properties of the deposited Si clusters on defective graphenes as well as their potential applications for Li-ion batteries. The results indicate that the interfacial bonding between these Si clusters with the pristine graphene is quietly weak with a small adsorption energy (<−0.21 eV). Due to the presence of vacancy site, the binding strength of Si clusters on defective graphene is much stronger than that of pristine one, accompanying with a certain amount of charge transfer from Si clusters to graphene substrates. Moreover, the ability of Si/graphene hybrids for Li uptake is studied by calculating the adsorption of Li atoms. We find that both graphenes and Si clusters in the Si/graphene composites preserve their Li uptake ability, indicating that graphenes not only server as buffer materials for accommodating the expansion of Si cluster, but also provide additional intercalation sites for Li

  9. Characteristics of high altitude oxygen ion energization and outflow as observed by Cluster: a statistical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, H.; Waara, M.; Arvelius, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R. [Inst. of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Marghitu, O. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Extraterrestriche Physik, Garching (Germany); Inst. for Space Sciences, Bucharest (Romania); Bouhram, M. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Extraterrestriche Physik, Garching (Germany); CETP-CNRS, Saint-Maur (France); Hobara, Y. [Inst. of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Univ. of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Reme, H.; Sauvaud, J.A.; Dandouras, I. [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France); Balogh, A. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Kistler, L.M. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (United States); Klecker, B. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Extraterrestriche Physik, Garching (Germany); Carlson, C.W. [Space Science Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Bavassano-Cattaneo, M.B. [Ist. di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, Roma (Italy); Korth, A. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The results of a statistical study of oxygen ion outflow using cluster data obtained at high altitude above the polar cap is reported. Moment data for both hydrogen ions (H{sup +}) and oxygen ions (O{sup +}) from 3 years (2001-2003) of spring orbits (January to May) have been used. The altitudes covered were mainly in the range 5-12 R{sub E} geocentric distance. It was found that O{sup +} is significantly transversely energized at high altitudes, indicated both by high perpendicular temperatures for low magnetic field values as well as by a tendency towards higher perpendicular than parallel temperature distributions for the highest observed temperatures. The O{sup +} parallel bulk velocity increases with altitude in particular for the lowest observed altitude intervals. O{sup +} parallel bulk velocities in excess of 60 km s{sup -1} were found mainly at higher altitudes corresponding to magnetic field strengths of less than 100 nT. For the highest observed parallel bulk velocities of O{sup +} the thermal velocity exceeds the bulk velocity, indicating that the beam-like character of the distribution is lost. The parallel bulk velocity of the H{sup +} and O{sup +} was found to typically be close to the same throughout the observation interval when the H{sup +} bulk velocity was calculated for all pitch-angles. When the H{sup +} bulk velocity was calculated for upward moving particles only the H{sup +} parallel bulk velocity was typically higher than that of O{sup +}. The parallel bulk velocity is close to the same for a wide range of relative abundance of the two ion species, including when the O{sup +} ions dominates. The thermal velocity of O{sup +} was always well below that of H{sup +}. Thus perpendicular energization that is more effective for O{sup +} takes place, but this is not enough to explain the close to similar parallel velocities. Further parallel acceleration must occur. The results presented constrain the models of perpendicular heating and parallel

  10. Characteristics of high altitude oxygen ion energization and outflow as observed by Cluster: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nilsson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a statistical study of oxygen ion outflow using Cluster data obtained at high altitude above the polar cap is reported. Moment data for both hydrogen ions (H+ and oxygen ions (O+ from 3 years (2001-2003 of spring orbits (January to May have been used. The altitudes covered were mainly in the range 5–12 RE geocentric distance. It was found that O+ is significantly transversely energized at high altitudes, indicated both by high perpendicular temperatures for low magnetic field values as well as by a tendency towards higher perpendicular than parallel temperature distributions for the highest observed temperatures. The O+ parallel bulk velocity increases with altitude in particular for the lowest observed altitude intervals. O+ parallel bulk velocities in excess of 60 km s-1 were found mainly at higher altitudes corresponding to magnetic field strengths of less than 100 nT. For the highest observed parallel bulk velocities of O+ the thermal velocity exceeds the bulk velocity, indicating that the beam-like character of the distribution is lost. The parallel bulk velocity of the H+ and O+ was found to typically be close to the same throughout the observation interval when the H+ bulk velocity was calculated for all pitch-angles. When the H+ bulk velocity was calculated for upward moving particles only the H+ parallel bulk velocity was typically higher than that of O+. The parallel bulk velocity is close to the same for a wide range of relative abundance of the two ion species, including when the O+ ions dominates. The thermal velocity of O+ was always well below that of H+. Thus perpendicular energization that is more effective for O+ takes place, but this is not enough to explain the close to similar parallel velocities. Further

  11. Characteristics of high altitude oxygen ion energization and outflow as observed by Cluster: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nilsson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of a statistical study of oxygen ion outflow using Cluster data obtained at high altitude above the polar cap is reported. Moment data for both hydrogen ions (H+ and oxygen ions (O+ from 3 years (2001-2003 of spring orbits (January to May have been used. The altitudes covered were mainly in the range 5–12 RE geocentric distance. It was found that O+ is significantly transversely energized at high altitudes, indicated both by high perpendicular temperatures for low magnetic field values as well as by a tendency towards higher perpendicular than parallel temperature distributions for the highest observed temperatures. The O+ parallel bulk velocity increases with altitude in particular for the lowest observed altitude intervals. O+ parallel bulk velocities in excess of 60 km s-1 were found mainly at higher altitudes corresponding to magnetic field strengths of less than 100 nT. For the highest observed parallel bulk velocities of O+ the thermal velocity exceeds the bulk velocity, indicating that the beam-like character of the distribution is lost. The parallel bulk velocity of the H+ and O+ was found to typically be close to the same throughout the observation interval when the H+ bulk velocity was calculated for all pitch-angles. When the H+ bulk velocity was calculated for upward moving particles only the H+ parallel bulk velocity was typically higher than that of O+. The parallel bulk velocity is close to the same for a wide range of relative abundance of the two ion species, including when the O+ ions dominates. The thermal velocity of O+ was always well below that of H+. Thus perpendicular energization that is more effective for O+ takes place, but this is not enough to explain the close to similar parallel velocities. Further parallel acceleration must occur. The results presented constrain the models of perpendicular heating and parallel acceleration. In particular centrifugal acceleration of the outflowing ions, which may

  12. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Caroline Chick [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C6-/C6, Sin-/Sin (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge2-/Ge2, In2P-/In2P,InP2-/InP2, and Ga2As-. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I-•CH3I SN2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C6, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C6- spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ~40 cm-1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C6, and the open shell of the anion.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of few-layer graphene prepared by C2–C6 cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, Z.D.; Huang, Z.H.; Liu, C.S.; Fu, D.J.; Liu, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Few-layer graphene has been prepared on 300 nm-thick Ni films by C 2 –C 6 cluster ion implantation at 20 keV/cluster. Raman spectroscopy reveals significant influence of the number of atoms in the cluster, the implantation dose, and thermal treatment on the structure of the graphene layers. In particular, the graphene samples exhibit a sharp G peak at 1584 cm −1 and 2D peaks at 2711–2717 cm −1 . The I G /I 2D ratios higher than 1.70 and I G /I D ratio as high as 1.95 confirm that graphene sheets with low density of defects have been synthesized with much improved quality by ion implantation with larger clusters of C 4 –C 6

  14. Ion induced fragmentation of biomolecular systems at low collision energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V; Adoui, L; Chesnel, J Y; Rangama, J; Huber, B A; Manil, B; Alvarado, F; Bari, S; Hoekstra, R; Postma, J; Schlathoelter, T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of different collision experiments between multiply charged ions at low collision energies (in the keV-region) and biomolecular systems. This kind of interaction allows to remove electrons form the biomolecule without transferring a large amount of vibrational excitation energy. Nevertheless, following the ionization of the target, fragmentation of biomolecular species may occur. It is the main objective of this work to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. By considering the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases), a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels and their modification, has been clearly proven. This result is explained, in the thymine and uracil case, by the formation of hydrogen bonds between O and H atoms, which is known to favor planar cluster geometries.

  15. Tracks induced by swift heavy ions in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.; Horvath, Z.E.; Pecz, B.; Toth, L.; Paszti, F.

    2002-01-01

    InSb, GaSb, InP, InAs, and GaAs single crystals were irradiated with Pb ions in the range of 385-2170 MeV. The samples were studied by transmission and high-resolution electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering in channeling geometry. The energetic ions induced isolated tracks in all crystals but GaAs. The thermal spike analysis revealed that the variation of the damage cross section with the ion energy is considerably weaker than in insulators. The widths of the thermal spike a(0) was estimated. The analysis was extended to recent C 60 experiments on Ge and Si. A quantitative relation was found between a(0) and the gap energy E g : a(0) is reduced with increasing E g , and its lowest value is close to that found in insulators

  16. Ion and laser beam induced metastable alloy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westendorp, J.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with ion and laser beam induced thin film mixing. It describes the development of an Ultra High Vacuum apparatus for deposition, ion irradiation and in situ analysis of thin film sandwiches. This chamber has been developed in close collaboration with High Voltage Engineering Europa. Thin films can be deposited by an e-gun evaporator. The atom flux is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A comparison is made between ion beam and laser mixing of Cu with Au and Cu with W. The comparison provides a better understanding of the relative importance of purely collisional mixing, the role of thermodynamic effects and the contribution of diffusion due to defect generation and migration. (Auth.)

  17. Benzoate-Induced High-Nuclearity Silver Thiolate Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan-Min; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shu-Ao; Li, Yan-An; Yu, Fei; Zhao, Quan-Qin; Wang, Xing-Po; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2018-04-03

    Compared with the well-known anion-templated effects in shaping silver thiolate clusters, the influence from the organic ligands in the outer shell is still poorly understood. Herein, three new benzoate-functionalized high-nuclearity silver(I) thiolate clusters are isolated and characterized for the first time in the presence of diverse anion templates such as S 2- , α-[Mo 5 O 18 ] 6- , and MoO 4 2- . Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals that the nuclearities of the three silver clusters (SD/Ag28, SD/Ag29, SD/Ag30) vary from 32 to 38 to 78 with co-capped tBuS - and benzoate ligands on the surface. SD/Ag28 is a turtle-like cluster comprising a Ag 29 shell caging a Ag 3 S 3 trigon in the center, whereas SD/Ag29 is a prolate Ag 38 sphere templated by the α-[Mo 5 O 18 ] 6- anion. Upon changing from benzoate to methoxyl-substituted benzoate, SD/Ag30 is isolated as a very complicated core-shell spherical cluster composed of a Ag 57 shell and a vase-like Ag 21 S 13 core. Four MoO 4 2- anions are arranged in a supertetrahedron and located in the interstice between the core and shell. Introduction of the bulky benzoate changes elaborately the nuclearity and arrangements of silver polygons on the shell of silver clusters, which is exemplified by comparing SD/Ag28 and a known similar silver thiolate cluster. The three new clusters emit luminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) region and show different thermochromic luminescence properties. This work presents a flexible approach to synthetic studies of high-nuclearity silver clusters decorated by different benzoates, and structural modulations are also achieved. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Coherent structures at ion scales in fast and slow solar wind: Cluster observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Zouganelis, Y.; Roberts, O.; Lion, S.; Escoubet, C. P.; Walsh, A. P.; Maksimovic, M.; Lacombe, C.

    2017-12-01

    Spacecraft measurements generally reveal that solar wind electromagnetic fluctuations are in a state of fully-developed turbulence. Turbulence represents a very complex problem in plasmas since cross-scale coupling and kinetic effects are present. Moreover, the intermittency phenomenon, i.e. the manifestation of the non-uniform and inhomogeneous energy transfer and dissipation in a turbulent system, represents a very important aspect of the solar wind turbulent cascade. Here, we study coherent structures responsible for solar wind intermittency around ion characteristic scales. We find that, in fast solar wind, intermittency is due to Alfvén vortex-like structures and current sheets. In slow solar wind, we observe as well compressive structures like magnetic solitons, holes and shocks. By using high-time resolution magnetic field data of multi-point measurements of Cluster spacecraft, we characterize the observed coherent structures in terms of topology and propagation speed. We show that all structures around ion characteristic scales, both in fast and slow solar wind, are characterized by a strong wave-vector anisotropy in the perpendicular direction with respect to the local magnetic field. Moreover, some of them propagate in the plasma rest frame in the direction perpendicular to the local field. Finally, a further analysis on the electron and ion velocity distributions shows a high variability; in particular, close to coherent structures the electron and ion distribution functions appear strongly deformed and far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. Possible interpretations of the observed structures and their role in the heating process of the plasma are also discussed.

  19. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  20. Recent advances in heavy-ion-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasil, F.

    1984-01-01

    Three topics are discussed. The first deals with results that have been published recently on angular-momentum-dependent fission barriers. They are discussed because of the significance that we attach to them. We feel that, after a decade of study and controversy, we have arrived at a quantitative understanding of the competition between heavy-ion-induced fission and particle emission from compound nuclei at relatively low bombarding energies. The second topic concerns the extension of our heavy-ion-induced fission studies to higher energies. It is clear that in this regime the effects, both of fission following incomplete fusion and of extra-push requirements, need to be considered. Finally, discussed are our recent conclusions concerning the fissionlike decay of products from reactions between two 58 Ni nuclei at an incident energy, E/A, of 15.3 MeV, as well as the impact of our findings on the conclusions drawn from previous, similar measurements. 39 references

  1. Ion-Induced Surface Modification of Magnetically Operated Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Arushanov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made of permalloy (iron-nickel contacts of reed switches before and after ion-induced surface modification using atomic force and optical microscopy, Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been found that the formation of surface nitride layers enhances corrosion and erosion resistance of contacts. We proposed to produce such layers directly into sealed reed switches by means of pulsing glow-discharge nitrogen plasma.

  2. Focused ion beam induced deflections of freestanding thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.-R.; Chen, P.; Aziz, M. J.; Branton, D.; Vlassak, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prominent deflections are shown to occur in freestanding silicon nitride thin membranes when exposed to a 50 keV gallium focused ion beam for ion doses between 10 14 and 10 17 ions/cm 2 . Atomic force microscope topographs were used to quantify elevations on the irradiated side and corresponding depressions of comparable magnitude on the back side, thus indicating that what at first appeared to be protrusions are actually the result of membrane deflections. The shape in high-stress silicon nitride is remarkably flat-topped and differs from that in low-stress silicon nitride. Ion beam induced biaxial compressive stress generation, which is a known deformation mechanism for other amorphous materials at higher ion energies, is hypothesized to be the origin of the deflection. A continuum mechanical model based on this assumption convincingly reproduces the profiles for both low-stress and high-stress membranes and provides a family of unusual shapes that can be created by deflection of freestanding thin films under beam irradiation

  3. The molecular dynamics simulation of ion-induced ripple growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suele, P.; Heinig, K.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of ion-sputtering induced growth of repetitive nanostructures, such as ripples has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in Si. The early stage of the ion erosion driven development of ripples has been simulated on prepatterned Si stripes with a wavy surface. The time evolution of the height function and amplitude of the sinusoidal surface profile has been followed by simulated ion-sputtering. According to Bradley-Harper (BH) theory, we expect correlation between the wavelength of ripples and the stability of them. However, we find that in the small ripple wavelength (λ) regime BH theory fails to reproduce the results obtained by molecular dynamics. We find that at short wavelengths (λ 35 nm is stabilized in accordance with the available experimental results. According to the simulations, few hundreds of ion impacts in λ long and few nanometers wide Si ripples are sufficient for reaching saturation in surface growth for for λ>35 nm ripples. In another words, ripples in the long wavelength limit seems to be stable against ion-sputtering. A qualitative comparison of our simulation results with recent experimental data on nanopatterning under irradiation is attempted.

  4. Formation of clusters (ions solvated with products of radiolysis) during irradiation of certain chloralkanes in the condensed phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhov, F.F.; Karatun, A.A.; Slovokhotova, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    Using the infrared spectroscopy method, the radiolysis of the 2-chloropropane and 2-chloro-2-methylpropane was investigated in various phase states and in argon matrix at 15 and 77 K. A conclusion is drawn that the reaction of the radiation dehydrochlorination in the chloralkanes investigated occurs under certain conditions in the vicinity of ions, mostly; as this takes place, unique clusters composed of radiolysis products, i.e. ions solvated with complexes of alkane and hydrogen chloride are being formed. (author)

  5. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    -ray scattering (SAXS) were used. The changes of physical properties, in particular the electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and stiffness of the foils were studied by in-situ 4-point probe, laser flash analysis and atomic force microscopy, respectively. A technique for measuring temperature of very thin, semitransparent and free-standing stripper foils during irradiation by means of an infrared (IR) camera was developed and applied. The experimental investigations were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous carbon exposed to different swift heavy ions. The simulations provide information on the structural changes in the tracks at atomic scale. Virtual amorphous carbon cells were created by simulating liquid quenching and plasma deposition, yielding cells with different degrees of clustering of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonding. The impacts of swift heavy ions were modeled by an instantaneous energy deposition deduced from inelastic thermal spike model calculations. Results of experiments and simulations provide evidence for the beam-induced transformation of amorphous carbon to a defected graphitic structure and for clustering of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds. These structural changes result in severe property changes. The electrical and thermal properties of amorphous carbon seem to improve during beam exposure, but the mechanical properties degrade severely. The beam conditions have a strong influence on the evolution of induced structure and property changes. A better understanding of the response of (amorphous) carbon stripper foils to swift heavy ion beams as revealed by dedicated irradiation and characterization experiments performed within this thesis, provides criteria for material requirements for future stripper foils used in high-power heavy ion accelerators such as FAIR.

  6. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    -ray scattering (SAXS) were used. The changes of physical properties, in particular the electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and stiffness of the foils were studied by in-situ 4-point probe, laser flash analysis and atomic force microscopy, respectively. A technique for measuring temperature of very thin, semitransparent and free-standing stripper foils during irradiation by means of an infrared (IR) camera was developed and applied. The experimental investigations were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous carbon exposed to different swift heavy ions. The simulations provide information on the structural changes in the tracks at atomic scale. Virtual amorphous carbon cells were created by simulating liquid quenching and plasma deposition, yielding cells with different degrees of clustering of sp 2 and sp 3 bonding. The impacts of swift heavy ions were modeled by an instantaneous energy deposition deduced from inelastic thermal spike model calculations. Results of experiments and simulations provide evidence for the beam-induced transformation of amorphous carbon to a defected graphitic structure and for clustering of sp 2 and sp 3 bonds. These structural changes result in severe property changes. The electrical and thermal properties of amorphous carbon seem to improve during beam exposure, but the mechanical properties degrade severely. The beam conditions have a strong influence on the evolution of induced structure and property changes. A better understanding of the response of (amorphous) carbon stripper foils to swift heavy ion beams as revealed by dedicated irradiation and characterization experiments performed within this thesis, provides criteria for material requirements for future stripper foils used in high-power heavy ion accelerators such as FAIR.

  7. Nuclear dynamics in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy ion induced fission and fission-like reactions evolve through a complex nuclear dynamics encountered in the medium energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. In the recent years, measurements of the fragment-neutron and fragment-charged particle angular correlations in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions, have provided new information on the dynamical times of nuclear deformations of the initial dinuclear complex to the fission saddle point and the scission point. From the studies of fragment angular distributions in heavy ion induced fission it has been possible to infer the relaxation times of the dinuclear complex in the K-degree of freedom and our recent measurements on the entrance channel dependence of fragment anisotropies have provided an experimental signature of the presence of fissions before K-equilibration. This paper reviews recent experimental and theoretical status of the above studies with particular regard to the questions relating to dynamical times, nuclear dissipation and the effect of nuclear dissipation on the K-distributions at the fission saddle in completely equilibrated compound nucleus. (author). 19 refs., 9 figs

  8. Controllable fabrication of amorphous Si layer by energetic cluster ion bombardment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Dejneka, Alexandr; Chvostová, Dagmar; Jäger, Aleš; Vacík, Jiří; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Naramoto, H.; Narumi, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 98, SI (2013), s. 49-55 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : energetic cluster s * silicon * surface modification * amorphization * nanostructure * Raman scattering * ion channeling Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2013 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0042207X13001759/1-s2.0-S0042207X13001759-main.pdf?_tid=04e9c946-21dd-11e3-b076-00000aacb361&acdnat=1379672070_859355b2850a09ac74bc8ff413e35dda

  9. Smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo: Applications to lithium ion-Stockmayer clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H. M.; Jake, L. C.; Curotto, E.

    2016-05-01

    In a recent investigation [K. Roberts et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074104 (2012)], we have shown that, for a sufficiently complex potential, the Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) random walk can become quasiergodic, and we have introduced smart darting-like moves to improve the sampling. In this article, we systematically characterize the bias that smart darting moves introduce in the estimate of the ground state energy of a bosonic system. We then test a simple approach to eliminate completely such bias from the results. The approach is applied for the determination of the ground state of lithium ion-n-dipoles clusters in the n = 8-20 range. For these, the smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo simulations find the same ground state energy and mixed-distribution as the traditional approach for n simulations may produce a more reliable ground state mixed-distribution.

  10. Study of Si wafer surfaces irradiated by gas cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isogai, H.; Toyoda, E.; Senda, T.; Izunome, K.; Kashima, K.; Toyoda, N.; Yamada, I.

    2007-01-01

    The surface structures of Si (1 0 0) wafers subjected to gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation have been analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). GCIB irradiation is a promising technique for both precise surface etching and planarization of Si wafers. However, it is very important to understand the crystalline structure of Si wafers after GCIB irradiation. An Ar-GCIB used for the physically sputtering of Si atoms and a SF 6 -GCIB used for the chemical etching of the Si surface are also analyzed. The GCIB irradiation increases the surface roughness of the wafers, and amorphous Si layers are formed on the wafer surface. However, when the Si wafers are annealed in hydrogen at a high temperature after the GCIB irradiation, the surface roughness decreases to the same level as that before the irradiation. Moreover, the amorphous Si layers disappear completely

  11. Reconstruction of CMB temperature anisotropies with primordial CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in galaxy clusters induces polarization signals determined by the quadrupole anisotropy in the photon distribution at the location of clusters. This `remote quadrupole' derived from the measurements of the induced polarization in galaxy clusters provides an opportunity to reconstruct local CMB temperature anisotropies. In this Letter, we develop an algorithm of the reconstruction through the estimation of the underlying primordial gravitational potential, which is the origin of the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations and CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters. We found a nice reconstruction for the quadrupole and octopole components of the CMB temperature anisotropies with the assistance of the CMB induced polarization signals. The reconstruction can be an important consistency test on the puzzles of CMB anomalies, especially for the low-quadrupole and axis-of-evil problems reported in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck data.

  12. Irradiation characteristics of metal-cluster-complex ions containing diverse multi-elements with large mass differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Kondou, Kouji; Teranishi, Yoshikazu; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Saito, Naoaki; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki; Kurokawa, Akira; Ichimura, Shingo; Tomita, Mitsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Tetrairidium dodecacarbonyl, Ir 4 (CO) 12 , is a metal cluster complex which has a molecular weight of 1104.9. Using a metal-cluster-complex ion source, the interaction between Ir 4 (CO) n + ions (n=0-12) and silicon substrates was studied at a beam energy ranging from 2keV to 10keV at normal incidence. By adjusting Wien-filter voltage, the influence of CO ligands was investigated. Experimental results showed that sputtering yield of silicon bombarded with Ir 4 (CO) n + ions at 10keV decreased with the number of CO ligands. In the case of 2keV, deposition tended to be suppressed by removing CO ligands from the impinging cluster ions. The influence of CO ligands was explained by considering changes in surface properties caused by the irradiation of Ir 4 (CO) n + ions. It was also found that the bombardment with Ir 4 (CO) 7 + ions at 2.5keV caused deposition on silicon target

  13. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Bae, Chang-Hyu [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea); Ozaki, Takuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Wang, Jing Ming [Akita Prefectural Univ. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M{sub 1} seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M{sub 3} progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to {sup 14}N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M{sub 1} progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M{sub 1} seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  14. Stress-tolerant mutants induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo; Bae, Chang-Hyu; Ozaki, Takuo

    2000-01-01

    Comparative study was made on mutagenesis in tobacco embryo induced by exposure to EMS (ethyl methane-sulfonate) ion beams during the fertilization cycle. Tobacco embryo cells immediately after pollination were exposed to heavy ion beam and the sensitivity to the irradiation was assessed in each developmental stage and compared with the effects of EMS, a chemical mutagen. Morphologically abnormality such as chlorophyll deficiency was used as a marker. A total of 17 salt-tolerant plants were selected from 3447 M 1 seeds. A cell line showed salt resistance. The cell growth and chlorophyll content were each two times higher than that of WT cells in the medium containing 154 mM NaCl. Seven strains of M 3 progeny of 17 salt-tolerant plants, showed strong resistance, but no salt tolerant progeny were obtained from Xanthi or Ne-ion irradiation. This shows that the sensitivity of plant embryo to this irradiation technique may vary among species. When exposed to 14 N ion beam for 24-108 hours after pollination, various morphological mutants appeared at 18% in M 1 progeny and herbicide tolerant and salt tolerant mutants were obtained. A strong Co-tolerant strain was obtained in two of 17 salt-tolerant strains and a total of 46 tolerant strains (0.2%) were obtained from 22,272 grains of M 1 seeds. In these tolerant strains, the absorption of Co was slightly decreased, but those of Mg and Mn were increased. Mutants induced with ion-beam irradiation have potential not only for practical use in the breeding of stress-tolerant plants but also for gene analysis that will surely facilitate the molecular understanding of the tolerance mechanisms. (M.N.)

  15. Metallic oxide nano-clusters synthesis by ion implantation in high purity Fe10Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ce

    2015-01-01

    ODS (Oxide Dispersed Strengthened) steels, which are reinforced with metal dispersions of nano-oxides (based on Y, Ti and O elements), are promising materials for future nuclear reactors. The detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved in the precipitation of these nano-oxides would improve manufacturing and mechanical properties of these ODS steels, with a strong economic impact for their industrialization. To experimentally study these mechanisms, an analytical approach by ion implantation is used, to control various parameters of synthesis of these precipitates as the temperature and concentration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of this method and concerned the behaviour of alloys models (based on aluminium oxide) under thermal annealing. High purity Fe-10Cr alloys were implanted with Al and O ions at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the nano-oxides appear in the Fe-10Cr matrix upon ion implantation at room temperature without subsequent annealing. The mobility of implanted elements is caused by the defects created during ion implantation, allowing the nucleation of these nanoparticles, of a few nm in diameter. These nanoparticles are composed of aluminium and oxygen, and also chromium. The high-resolution experiments show that their crystallographic structure is that of a non-equilibrium compound of aluminium oxide (cubic γ-Al 2 O 3 type). The heat treatment performed after implantation induces the growth of the nano-sized oxides, and a phase change that tends to balance to the equilibrium structure (hexagonal α-Al 2 O 3 type). These results on model alloys are fully applicable to industrial materials: indeed ion implantation reproduces the conditions of milling and heat treatments are at equivalent temperatures to those of thermo-mechanical treatments. A mechanism involving the precipitation of nano-oxide dispersed in ODS alloys is proposed in this manuscript based on the obtained experimental results

  16. Multi-point observations of Ion Dispersions near the Exterior Cusp with Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C.-Philippe; Grison, Benjamin; Berchem, Jean; Trattner, Kralheinz; Pitout, Frederic; Richard, Robert; Taylor, Matt; Soucek, Jan; Laakso, Harri; Masson, Arnaud; Dunlop, Malcolm; Dandouras, Iannis; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Daly, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The exterior cusp is the most external region of the polar magnetosphere in direct contact with the plasma and the magnetic field from the solar wind. Unlike the rest of the magnetopause surface, the exterior cusp is a singular region with small and turbulent magnetic field and where large entry of plasma from solar origin takes place. The main process that injects solar wind plasma into the polar cusp is now generally accepted to be magnetic reconnection. Depending on the IMF direction, this process will take place equatorward (for IMF southward), poleward (for IMF northward) or on the dusk or dawn sides (for IMF azimuthal) of the cusp. We report a Cluster crossing on 5 January 2002 near the exterior cusp on the southern dusk side. The IMF was mainly azimuthal (IMF-By around -5 nT), the solar wind speed lower than usual around 280 km/s and the density around 5 cm-3. The four Cluster spacecraft were still in the "magnetotail" configuration with two perfect tetrahedra of 2000 km around apogee and turning into an elongated configuration near the magnetopause. C4 was the first spacecraft to enter the cusp around 19:52:04 UT, followed by C2 at 19:52:35 UT, C1 at 19:54:24 UT and C3 at 20:13:15 UT. C4 and C1 observed two ion energy dispersions at 20:10 UT and 20:40 UT and C3 at 20:35 UT and 21:15 UT. Using the time of flight technique on the upgoing and downgoing ions in the dispersions, we obtain an altitude of the sources of these ions between 14 and 20 RE. Using Tsyganenko model, these sources are located on the dusk flank, past the terminator. In addition, before entering the cusp, the magnetopause crossing was characterized by a large shear in By and bipolar plasma flows, suggesting that reconnection was taking place near the exterior cusp. We will discuss the extent of the reconnection line along the flank of the magnetopause based on these observations.

  17. Differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells into insulin-producing clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaer, Anahita; Azarpira, Negar; Vahdati, Akbar; Karimi, Mohammad Hosein; Shariati, Mehrdad

    2015-02-01

    In diabetes mellitus type 1, beta cells are mostly destroyed; while in diabetes mellitus type 2, beta cells are reduced by 40% to 60%. We hope that soon, stem cells can be used in diabetes therapy via pancreatic beta cell replacement. Induced pluripotent stem cells are a kind of stem cell taken from an adult somatic cell by "stimulating" certain genes. These induced pluripotent stem cells may be a promising source of cell therapy. This study sought to produce isletlike clusters of insulin-producing cells taken from induced pluripotent stem cells. A human-induced pluripotent stem cell line was induced into isletlike clusters via a 4-step protocol, by adding insulin, transferrin, and selenium (ITS), N2, B27, fibroblast growth factor, and nicotinamide. During differentiation, expression of pancreatic β-cell genes was evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction; the morphologic changes of induced pluripotent stem cells toward isletlike clusters were observed by a light microscope. Dithizone staining was used to stain these isletlike clusters. Insulin produced by these clusters was evaluated by radio immunosorbent assay, and the secretion capacity was analyzed with a glucose challenge test. Differentiation was evaluated by analyzing the morphology, dithizone staining, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemistry. Gene expression of insulin, glucagon, PDX1, NGN3, PAX4, PAX6, NKX6.1, KIR6.2, and GLUT2 were documented by analyzing real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Dithizone-stained cellular clusters were observed after 23 days. The isletlike clusters significantly produced insulin. The isletlike clusters could increase insulin secretion after a glucose challenge test. This work provides a model for studying the differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells to insulin-producing cells.

  18. Solar wind dependence of ion parameters in the Earth's magnetospheric region calculated from CLUSTER observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Moments calculated from the ion distributions (~0–40 keV measured by the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS instrument are combined with data from the Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM instrument and used to characterise the bulk properties of the plasma in the near-Earth magnetosphere over five years (2001–2005. Results are presented in the form of 2-D xy, xz and yz GSM cuts through the magnetosphere using data obtained from the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS and the Cluster Active Archive (CAA. Analysis reveals the distribution of ~0–40 keV ions in the inner magnetosphere is highly ordered and highly responsive to changes in solar wind velocity. Specifically, elevations in temperature are found to occur across the entire nightside plasma sheet region during times of fast solar wind. We demonstrate that the nightside plasma sheet ion temperature at a downtail distance of ~12 to 19 Earth radii increases by a factor of ~2 during periods of fast solar wind (500–1000 km s−1 compared to periods of slow solar wind (100–400 km s−1. The spatial extent of these increases are shown in the xy, xz and yz GSM planes. The results from the study have implications for modelling studies and simulations of solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling, which ultimately rely on in situ observations of the plasma sheet properties for input/boundary conditions.

  19. Fragmentation of pure and hydrated clusters of 5Br-uracil by low energy carbon ions: observation of hydrated fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Castrovilli, M. C.; Markush, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Cartoni, A.; Delaunay, R.; Domaracka, A.; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Huber, B. A.; Avaldi, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2017), s. 19807-19814 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fragmentation * nano-hydrated 5BrU clusters * low energy carbon ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  20. Delay-induced cluster patterns in coupled Cayley tree networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Jalan, S.

    2013-07-01

    We study effects of delay in diffusively coupled logistic maps on the Cayley tree networks. We find that smaller coupling values exhibit sensitiveness to value of delay, and lead to different cluster patterns of self-organized and driven types. Whereas larger coupling strengths exhibit robustness against change in delay values, and lead to stable driven clusters comprising nodes from last generation of the Cayley tree. Furthermore, introduction of delay exhibits suppression as well as enhancement of synchronization depending upon coupling strength values. To the end we discuss the importance of results to understand conflicts and cooperations observed in family business.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations to examine structure, energetics, and evaporation/condensation dynamics in small charged clusters of water or methanol containing a single monatomic ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Christopher D; Cann, Natalie M

    2012-11-01

    We study small clusters of water or methanol containing a single Ca(2+), Na(+), or Cl(-) ion with classical molecular dynamics simulations, using models that incorporate polarizability via the Drude oscillator framework. Evaporation and condensation of solvent from these clusters is examined in two systems, (1) for isolated clusters initially prepared at different temperatures and (2) those with a surrounding inert (Ar) gas of varying temperature. We examine these clusters over a range of sizes, from almost bare ions up to 40 solvent molecules. We report data on the evaporation and condensation of solvent from the clusters and argue that the observed temperature dependence of evaporation in the smallest clusters demonstrates that the presence of heated gas alone cannot, in most cases, solely account for bare ion production in electrospray ionization (ESI), neglecting the key contribution of the electric field. We also present our findings on the structure and energetics of the clusters as a function of size. Our data agree well with the abundant literature on hydrated ion clusters and offer some novel insight into the structure of methanol and ion clusters, especially those with a Cl(-) anion, where we observe the presence of chain-like structures of methanol molecules. Finally, we provide some data on the reparameterizations necessary to simulate ions in methanol using the separately developed Drude oscillator models for methanol and for ions in water.

  2. On novel mechanisms of slow ion induced electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, H.

    2000-09-01

    The present work has contributed in new ways to the field of slow ion induced electron emission. First, measurements of the total electron yield γ for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on atomically clean polycrystalline gold and graphite have been made. The respective yields were determined by current measurements and measurements of the electron number statistics. A new mechanism for kinetic emission (KE) below the so called 'classical threshold' was found and discussed. For a given ion species and impact velocity a slight decrease of the yields was found for ion charge state q = 1 toward 3, but no significant differences in KE yields for higher q values. Comparison of the results from gold and graphite showed overall similar behavior, but for C+ a relatively strong difference was observed and ascribed to more effective electron promotion in the C-C- than in the C-Au system. Secondly, for the very specific system H0 on LiF we investigated single electron excitation processes under grazing incidence conditions. In this way long-range interactions of hydrogen atoms with the ionic crystal surface could be probed. Position- and velocity-dependent electron production rates were found which indicate that an electron promotion mechanism is responsible for the observed electron emission. Thirdly, in order to investigate the importance of plasmon excitation and -decay in slow ion induced electron emission, measurements of electron energy distributions from impact of singly and doubly charged ions on poly- and monocrystalline aluminum surfaces were performed. From the results we conclude that direct plasmon excitation by slow ions occurs due to the potential energy of the projectile in a quasi-resonant fashion. The highest relative plasmon intensities were found for impact of 5 keV Ne+ on Al(111) with 5 % of the total yield. For impact of H + and H 2 + characteristical differences were observed for Al(111) and polycrystalline aluminum. We show that

  3. Damage induced in semiconductors by swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levalois, M.; Marie, P.

    1999-01-01

    The behaviour of semiconductors under swift heavy ion irradiation is different from that of metals or insulators: no spectacular effect induced by the inelastic energy loss has been reported in these materials. We present here a review of irradiation effects in the usual semiconductors (silicon, germanium and gallium arsenide). The damage is investigated by means of electrical measurements. The usual mechanisms of point defect creation can account for the experimental results. Besides, some results obtained on the wide gap semiconductor silicon carbide are reported. Concerning the irradiation effects induced by heavy ions in particle detectors, based on silicon substrate, we show that the deterioration of the detector performances can be explained from the knowledge of the substrate properties which are strongly perturbed after high doses of irradiation. Finally, some future ways of investigation are proposed. The silicon substrate is a good example to compare the irradiation effects with different particles such as electrons, neutrons and heavy ions. It is then necessary to use parameters which account for the local energy deposition, in order to describe the damage in the material

  4. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, Andrew A.; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-belle; Tao, Ye; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (<100 nm), a sensitive detection system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique

  5. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M.P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given

  6. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of ion beam induced secondary electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, U., E-mail: uhuh@vols.utk.edu [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Cho, W. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Joy, D.C. [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Science, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Ion induced secondary electrons (iSE) can produce high-resolution images ranging from a few eV to 100 keV over a wide range of materials. The interpretation of such images requires knowledge of the secondary electron yields (iSE δ) for each of the elements and materials present and as a function of the incident beam energy. Experimental data for helium ions are currently limited to 40 elements and six compounds while other ions are not well represented. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple procedure based on the comprehensive work of Berger et al. Here we show that between the energy range of 10–100 keV the Berger et al. data for elements and compounds can be accurately represented by a single universal curve. The agreement between the limited experimental data that is available and the predictive model is good, and has been found to provide reliable yield data for a wide range of elements and compounds. - Highlights: • The Universal ASTAR Yield Curve was derived from data recently published by NIST. • IONiSE incorporated with the Curve will predict iSE yield for elements and compounds. • This approach can also handle other ion beams by changing basic scattering profile.

  8. Universal scaling for biomolecule desorption induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal activation mechanism is proposed for the desorption of biomolecules. Good agreement is found with the experiments in a broad range of the electronic stopping power. The activation energies of desorption U are 0.33, 1.57 and 5.35 eV for positive, negative and neutral leucine molecules, respectively, and 2.05 eV for positive ergosterol molecules. The desorption of valine clusters is analyzed. The magnitude of the specific heat shows that the internal degrees of freedom are not excited up to the moment of desorption. The effect of irradiation temperature and of ion velocity on the desorption yield is discussed on the basis of the author's model. The scaling function derived in the model for the desorption of biomolecules is applied also to the sputtering of SiO 2 and U = 0.42 eV is obtained

  9. Changes in cluster magnetism and suppression of local superconductivity in amorphous FeCrB alloy irradiated by Ar"+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunev, V.D.; Samoilenko, Z.A.; Szymczak, H.; Szewczyk, A.; Szymczak, R.; Lewandowski, S.J.; Aleshkevych, P.; Malinowski, A.; Gierłowski, P.; Więckowski, J.; Wolny-Marszałek, M.; Jeżabek, M.; Varyukhin, V.N.; Antoshina, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that cluster magnetism in ferromagnetic amorphous Fe_6_7Cr_1_8B_1_5 alloy is related to the presence of large, D=150–250 Å, α-(Fe Cr) clusters responsible for basic changes in cluster magnetism, small, D=30–100 Å, α-(Fe, Cr) and Fe_3B clusters and subcluster atomic α-(Fe, Cr, B) groupings, D=10–20 Å, in disordered intercluster medium. For initial sample and irradiated one (Φ=1.5×10"1"8 ions/cm"2) superconductivity exists in the cluster shells of metallic α-(Fe, Cr) phase where ferromagnetism of iron is counterbalanced by antiferromagnetism of chromium. At Φ=3×10"1"8 ions/cm"2, the internal stresses intensify and the process of iron and chromium phase separation, favorable for mesoscopic superconductivity, changes for inverse one promoting more homogeneous distribution of iron and chromium in the clusters as well as gigantic (twice as much) increase in density of the samples. As a result, in the cluster shells ferromagnetism is restored leading to the increase in magnetization of the sample and suppression of local superconductivity. For initial samples, the temperature dependence of resistivity ρ(T)~T"2 is determined by the electron scattering on quantum defects. In strongly inhomogeneous samples, after irradiation by fluence Φ=1.5×10"1"8 ions/cm"2, the transition to a dependence ρ(T)~T"1"/"2 is caused by the effects of weak localization. In more homogeneous samples, at Φ=3×10"1"8 ions/cm"2, a return to the dependence ρ(T)~T"2 is observed. - Highlights: • The samples at high dose of ion irradiation become more homogeneous. • Gigantic increase in density of the samples (twice as much) is observed. • Ferromagnetism in large Fe–Cr clusters is restored. • Ferromagnetism of Fe–Cr clusters suppresses local superconductivity in them. • The participation of quantum defects in scattering of electrons is returned.

  10. Cluster analysis by optimal decomposition of induced fuzzy sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backer, E

    1978-01-01

    Nonsupervised pattern recognition is addressed and the concept of fuzzy sets is explored in order to provide the investigator (data analyst) additional information supplied by the pattern class membership values apart from the classical pattern class assignments. The basic ideas behind the pattern recognition problem, the clustering problem, and the concept of fuzzy sets in cluster analysis are discussed, and a brief review of the literature of the fuzzy cluster analysis is given. Some mathematical aspects of fuzzy set theory are briefly discussed; in particular, a measure of fuzziness is suggested. The optimization-clustering problem is characterized. Then the fundamental idea behind affinity decomposition is considered. Next, further analysis takes place with respect to the partitioning-characterization functions. The iterative optimization procedure is then addressed. The reclassification function is investigated and convergence properties are examined. Finally, several experiments in support of the method suggested are described. Four object data sets serve as appropriate test cases. 120 references, 70 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  11. Collision induced fragmentation dynamics of small metallic clusters; Dynamique de fragmentation induite par collision de petits agregats metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, Y

    1999-04-15

    The goal of this work is the complete analysis of the fragmentation of alkali clusters (Na{sub n}{sup +} (n < 10), NaK{sup +} and K{sub 2}{sup +}) induced by collision with light atomic (He) or molecular (H{sub 2}) targets. The main point is to study how the energy is transmitted to the cluster during the collision and how this energy is shared among the various degrees of freedom of the system and leads to its fragmentation. Two types of interactions govern the collision induced dissociation processes: on one hand, the electronic mechanisms where the target perturbs the electronic cloud and brings the molecule into a dissociative state, and on the other hand, the impulsive mechanisms where the momentum transferred to the atomic cores leads to the rotational-vibrational dissociation of the molecule. The experimental procedure is based on the measurement of the velocity vectors of the outgoing fragments detected in coincidence. This allows to reconstruct the full kinematics of the fragmentation and to separate and characterize for the first time the two types of interactions. The two basic mechanisms of collision induced dissociation are then clearly resolved for the diatomic molecule Na{sub 2}{sup +}. For the heteronuclear molecular ion NaK{sup +}, it is shown that the dissociation process is due to a combination of electronic and impulsive mechanisms in some of the dissociation pathways. The extension to the study of metallic clusters Na{sub n}{sup +} (n < 10) fragmentation shows the role and the relative importance of the electronic and impulsive mechanisms and their evolution with the cluster size. The complete analysis of Na{sub 3}{sup +} multi-fragmentation is also presented. (author)

  12. Electron impact ionization of size selected hydrogen clusters (H2)N: ion fragment and neutral size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J Peter

    2008-05-21

    Clusters consisting of normal H2 molecules, produced in a free jet expansion, are size selected by diffraction from a transmission nanograting prior to electron impact ionization. For each neutral cluster (H2)(N) (N=2-40), the relative intensities of the ion fragments Hn+ are measured with a mass spectrometer. H3+ is found to be the most abundant fragment up to N=17. With a further increase in N, the abundances of H3+, H5+, H7+, and H9+ first increase and, after passing through a maximum, approach each other. At N=40, they are about the same and more than a factor of 2 and 3 larger than for H11+ and H13+, respectively. For a given neutral cluster size, the intensities of the ion fragments follow a Poisson distribution. The fragmentation probabilities are used to determine the neutral cluster size distribution produced in the expansion at a source temperature of 30.1 K and a source pressure of 1.50 bar. The distribution shows no clear evidence of a magic number N=13 as predicted by theory and found in experiments with pure para-H2 clusters. The ion fragment distributions are also used to extract information on the internal energy distribution of the H3+ ions produced in the reaction H2+ + H2-->H3+ +H, which is initiated upon ionization of the cluster. The internal energy is assumed to be rapidly equilibrated and to determine the number of molecules subsequently evaporated. The internal energy distribution found in this way is in good agreement with data obtained in an earlier independent merged beam scattering experiment.

  13. Laser-induced charge exchange in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of laser-induced charge transfer (LICT) in ion-atom collisions is presented for the range of impact energies in which a quasimolecular description is appropriate. For each relative orientation of the AC field, LICT cross sections can be obtained with trivial modifications of standard programs. Simpler, perturbative expressions for the orientation-averaged cross sections are accurate for I v -1 6 W s cm -3 , and the analytical Landau-Zener perturbative expression often provides good estimates for these cross sections. The practical advantages of the dressed state formalism as an alternative approach are critically examined, and the general characteristics of LICT cross sections in multicharged ion-atom collisions are shown with the help of an example. (Auth.)

  14. Mutations induced by the action of metal ions in Pisum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Rosen, G

    1957-01-01

    Simple metal ions may induce both radiomimetic effects and genuine gene mutations of the same type which occurs from ionizing radiation and from treatment with some chemical agencies as e.g., mustard gas. The main material during the experiments has been species of Pisum. The biochemical principle which lies behind these reactions is the complex-forming ability among those reactive bivalent metal elements. The author assumes that interruptions of the chelate formation in the cell synthesis form the real background to the observed activity of the metal ions. The possible role in the evolution of the plant- and animal kingdom and the probable value for plant-breeding of the mutation activity observed are suggested. A new field for mutation experiments may here be opened and the results must hitherto be judged as interesting and promising. 13 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Ion species dependence of the implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Q. [Department of Physics, Wuhan University (China); Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Naramoto, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we implanted B{sup +}, O{sup +}, Al{sup +}, and P{sup +} ions into ZnO with energy of 50-380 keV and total doses of 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} for each ion. The implantation-induced defects and their thermal recovery were studied using a slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced in all the implanted samples. It is found that the thermal recovery of these vacancies induced by different ions shows much difference. In case of B{sup +} and Al{sup +}-implantation, the vacancy clusters agglomerate to much larger size and might evolve to microvoids during annealing. However, for O{sup +} and P{sup +} ions, which are heavier than B{sup +} and Al{sup +}, the vacancies show a much weaker agglomeration process. The mechanism of such difference is discussed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Tuning the electronic properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces by irradiating the LaAlO3 surface with low-energy cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Aureau, Damien; Bérini, Bruno; Dumont, Yves; Keller, Niels; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Domengès, Bernadette; Fouchet, Arnaud

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of low-energy ion beam irradiations using argon clusters on the chemical and electronic properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterointerfaces by combining x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrical transport measurements. Due to its unique features, we demonstrate that a short-time cluster ion irradiation of the LAO surface induces significant modifications in the chemical properties of the buried STO substrate with (1) a lowering of Ti atoms oxidation states (from Ti4 + to Ti3 + and Ti2 +) correlated to the formation of oxygen vacancies at the LAO surface and (2) the creation of new surface states for Sr atoms. Contrary to what is generally observed by using higher energy ion beam techniques, this leads to an increase of the electrical conductivity at the LAO/STO interface. Our XPS data clearly reveal the existence of dynamical processes on the titanium and strontium atoms, which compete with the effect of the cluster ion beam irradiation. These relaxation effects are in part attributed to the diffusion of the ion-induced oxygen vacancies in the entire heterostructure since an increase of the interfacial metallicity is also evidenced far from the irradiated area. This paper highlights the possibility of tuning the electrical properties of LAO/STO interfaces by surface engineering, confirming experimentally the intimate connection between LAO chemistry and electronic properties of LAO/STO interfaces.

  17. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  18. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  19. Laser Induced Fluorescence of Helium Ions in a Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, C. S.; Biloui, C.; Hardin, R. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R.

    2003-10-01

    The lack of a suitable Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) scheme for helium ions at visible wavelengths has prevented LIF from being employed in helium plasmas for measurements of ion temperature and bulk ion flow speeds. In this work, we will discuss our attempts to perform LIF of helium ions in a helicon source plasma using an infrared, tunable diode laser operating at 1012.36 nm. The infrared transition corresponds to excitation from the n = 4 level (4f ^2F) to the n = 5 (5g ^2G) level of singly ionized helium and therefore requires substantial electron temperatures (> 10 eV) to maintain an adequate ion population in the n = 4 state. Calculations using a steady state coronal model predict that the n = 4 state population will be 25% larger than the n = 5 population for our experimental conditions. The fluorescence decay from the n = 5 (5f ^2F) level of singly ionized helium level to the n = 3 (3d ^2D) level at 320.31 nm is monitored as the diode laser is swept through 10 GHz around the 1012.36 nm line. Note that the fluorescence emission requires a collisionally coupled transition between two different n = 5 quantum states. We will also present measurements of the emission intensities of both the 1012.36 nm and the 320.31 nm lines as a function of source neutral pressure, rf power, and plasma density. This work supported by the U.S. DoE EPSCoR Lab Partnership Program.

  20. Erythrocyte stiffness during morphological remodeling induced by carbon ion radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Zhang

    Full Text Available The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy. The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study

  1. Spatial distribution of ion energy related on electron density in a plasma channel generated in gas clusters by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, S. M.; Han, J. M.; Cha, Y. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Rhee, Y. J.; Cha, H. K.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron generation through Coulomb explosion of deuterium contained gas clusters is known as one of the very effective methods to produce fusion neutrons using a table top terawatt laser. The energy of ions produced through Coulomb explosions is very important factor to generate neutrons efficiently. Until the ion energy reaches around∼MeV level, the D D fusion reaction probability increases exponentially. The understanding of laser beam propagation and laser energy deposition in clusters is very important to improve neutron yields. As the laser beam propagates through clusters medium, laser energy is absorbed in clusters by ionization of molecules consisting clusters. When the backing pressure of gas increases, the average size of clusters increases and which results in higher energy absorption and earlier termination of laser propagation. We first installed a Michelson interferometer to view laser beam traces in a cluster plume and to measure spatial electron density profiles of a plasma channel which was produced by a laser beam. And then we measured the energy of ions distributed along the plasma channel with a translating slit to select ions from narrow parts of a plasma channel. In our experiments, methane gas was used to produce gas clusters at a room temperature and the energy distribution of proton ions for different gas backing pressure were measured by the time of flight method using dual micro channel plates. By comparing the distribution of ion energies and electron densities, we could understand the condition for effective laser energy delivery to clusters

  2. Pili-Induced Clustering of N. gonorrhoeae Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Taktikos

    Full Text Available Type IV pili (Tfp are prokaryotic retractable appendages known to mediate surface attachment, motility, and subsequent clustering of cells. Tfp are the main means of motility for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Tfp are also involved in formation of the microcolonies, which play a crucial role in the progression of the disease. While motility of individual cells is relatively well understood, little is known about the dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae aggregation. We investigate how individual N. gonorrhoeae cells, initially uniformly dispersed on flat plastic or glass surfaces, agglomerate into spherical microcolonies within hours. We quantify the clustering process by measuring the area fraction covered by the cells, number of cell aggregates, and their average size as a function of time. We observe that the microcolonies are also able to move but their mobility rapidly vanishes as the size of the colony increases. After a certain critical size they become immobile. We propose a simple theoretical model which assumes a pili-pili interaction of cells as the main clustering mechanism. Numerical simulations of the model quantitatively reproduce the experimental data on clustering and thus suggest that the agglomeration process can be entirely explained by the Tfp-mediated interactions. In agreement with this hypothesis mutants lacking pili are not able to form colonies. Moreover, cells with deficient quorum sensing mechanism show similar aggregation as the wild-type bacteria. Therefore, our results demonstrate that pili provide an essential mechanism for colony formation, while additional chemical cues, for example quorum sensing, might be of secondary importance.

  3. Processing of radiation-induced clustered DNA damage generates DSB in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulston, M.K.; De Lara, C.M.; Davis, E.L.; Jenner, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Clustered DNA damage sites, in which two or more lesions are formed within a few helical turns of the DNA after passage of a single radiation track, are signatures of DNA modifications induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cell. With 60 Co-radiation, the abundance of clustered DNA damage induced in CHO cells is ∼4x that of prompt double strand breaks (DSB) determined by PFGE. Less is known about the processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced in cells. To optimize observation of any additional DSB formed during processing of DNA damage at 37 deg C, xrs-5 cells deficient in non-homologous end joining were used. Surprisingly, ∼30% of the DSB induced by irradiation at 37 deg C are rejoined within 4 minutes in both mutant and wild type cells. No significant mis-repair of these apparent DSB was observed. It is suggested that a class of non-DSB clustered DNA damage is formed which repair correctly within 4 min but, if 'trapped' prior to repair, are converted into DSB during the lysis procedure of PFGE. However at longer times, a proportion of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites induced by γ-radiation are converted into DSB within ∼30 min following post-irradiation incubation at 37 deg C. The corresponding formation of additional DSB was not apparent in wild type CHO cells. From these observations, it is estimated that only ∼10% of the total yield of non DSB clustered DNA damage sites are converted into DSB through cellular processing. The biological consequences that the majority of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites are not converted into DSBs may be significant even at low doses, since a finite chance exists of these clusters being formed in a cell by a single radiation track

  4. Experimental studies of the formation of cluster ions formed by corona discharge in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Preben; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Støchkel, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on studies of ion-induced nucleation in a corona discharge taking place in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O at standard temperature and pressure. Positive ions such as H3O+(H2O)n, NH4+(H2O)n, and H+(H2SO4)(H2O)n and negative ions such as HSO5-(H2O)n, SO4-(H2O)n, HSO4-(H......5-, which has been observed in many studies, in our experiments is contaminated by O2-(HNO3)(H2O) ions, and this may also have been the case in other experiments. Finally an ion with m/z = 232 (where m is the cluster mass in amu and z is the charge state), capable of attaching H2O...

  5. Gas cluster ion beam for the characterization of organic materials in submarine basalts as Mars analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Naoko; Barlow, Anders J.; Cumpson, Peter J.; Purvis, Graham W. H.; Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Gray, Neil N. D.

    2016-01-01

    The solar system contains large quantities of organic compounds that can form complex molecular structures. The processing of organic compounds by biological systems leads to molecules with distinctive structural characteristics; thus, the detection and characterization of organic materials could lead to a high degree of confidence in the existence of extra-terrestrial life. Given the nature of the surface of most planetary bodies in the solar system, evidence of life is more likely to be found in the subsurface where conditions are more hospitable. Basalt is a common rock throughout the solar system and the primary rock type on Mars and Earth. Basalt is therefore a rock type that subsurface life might exploit and as such a suitable material for the study of methods required to detect and analyze organic material in rock. Telluric basalts from Earth represent an analog for extra-terrestrial rocks where the indigenous organic matter could be analyzed for molecular biosignatures. This study focuses on organic matter in the basalt with the use of surface analysis techniques utilizing Ar gas cluster ion beams (GCIB); time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), to characterize organic molecules. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis was also used to support the data obtained using the surface analysis techniques. The authors demonstrate that organic molecules were found to be heterogeneously distributed within rock textures. A positive correlation was observed to exist between the presence of microtubule textures in the basalt and the organic compounds detected. From the results herein, the authors propose that ToF-SIMS with an Ar GCIB is effective at detecting organic materials in such geological samples, and ToF-SIMS combined with XPS and TMAH thermochemolysis may be a useful approach in the study of extra-terrestrial organic material and life.

  6. Gas cluster ion beam for the characterization of organic materials in submarine basalts as Mars analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Naoko, E-mail: naoko.sano@ncl.ac.uk; Barlow, Anders J.; Cumpson, Peter J. [National EPSRC XPS Users' Service (NEXUS), School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Stephenson Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Purvis, Graham W. H.; Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Gray, Neil N. D. [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Devonshire Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The solar system contains large quantities of organic compounds that can form complex molecular structures. The processing of organic compounds by biological systems leads to molecules with distinctive structural characteristics; thus, the detection and characterization of organic materials could lead to a high degree of confidence in the existence of extra-terrestrial life. Given the nature of the surface of most planetary bodies in the solar system, evidence of life is more likely to be found in the subsurface where conditions are more hospitable. Basalt is a common rock throughout the solar system and the primary rock type on Mars and Earth. Basalt is therefore a rock type that subsurface life might exploit and as such a suitable material for the study of methods required to detect and analyze organic material in rock. Telluric basalts from Earth represent an analog for extra-terrestrial rocks where the indigenous organic matter could be analyzed for molecular biosignatures. This study focuses on organic matter in the basalt with the use of surface analysis techniques utilizing Ar gas cluster ion beams (GCIB); time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), to characterize organic molecules. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis was also used to support the data obtained using the surface analysis techniques. The authors demonstrate that organic molecules were found to be heterogeneously distributed within rock textures. A positive correlation was observed to exist between the presence of microtubule textures in the basalt and the organic compounds detected. From the results herein, the authors propose that ToF-SIMS with an Ar GCIB is effective at detecting organic materials in such geological samples, and ToF-SIMS combined with XPS and TMAH thermochemolysis may be a useful approach in the study of extra-terrestrial organic material and life.

  7. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  8. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Laura J.; O'Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a 'friend', leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a 'foe', resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue.

  9. Observation of the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of MeV ions accelerated by the hydrodynamic ambipolar expansion of clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanasaki, Masato; Jinno, Satoshi; Sakaki, Hironao; Faenov, Anatoly Ya.; Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Kando, Masaki; Sugiyama, Akira; Kondo, Kiminori; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Morishima, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Scullion, Clare; Smyth, Ashley G.; Alejo, Aaron; Doria, Domenico; Kar, Satyabrata; Borghesi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    An inhomogeneous spatial distribution of laser accelerated carbon/oxygen ions produced via the hydrodynamic ambipolar expansion of CO_2 clusters has been measured by using CR-39 detectors. An inhomogeneous etch pits spatial distribution has appeared on the etched CR-39 detector installed on the laser propagation direction, while homogeneous ones are appeared on those installed at 45° and 90° from the laser propagation direction. From the range of ions in CR-39 obtained by using the multi-step etching technique, the averaged energies of carbon/oxygen ions for all directions are determined as 0.78 ± 0.09 MeV/n. The number of ions in the laser propagation direction is about 1.5 times larger than those in other directions. The inhomogeneous etch pits spatial distribution in the laser propagation direction could originate from an ion beam collimation and modulation by the effect of electromagnetic structures created in the laser plasma. - Highlights: • A spatial distribution of ions due to hydrodynamic ambipolar expansion is measured. • The homogeneous ion energy distribution of 0.78 ± 0.09 MeV/n is measured by CR-39. • The number of ions in the laser axis is about 1.5 times larger than other directions.

  10. Nonelastic nuclear reactions induced by light ions with the BRIEFF code

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2010-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade (INC) code BRIC has been extended to compute nonelastic reactions induced by light ions on target nuclei. In our approach the nucleons of the incident light ion move freely inside the mean potential of the ion in its center-of-mass frame while the center-of-mass of the ion obeys to equations of motion dependant on the mean nuclear+Coulomb potential of the target nucleus. After transformation of the positions and momenta of the nucleons of the ion into the target nucleus frame, the collision term between the nucleons of the target and of the ion is computed taking into account the partial or total breakup of the ion. For reactions induced by low binding energy systems like deuteron, the Coulomb breakup of the ion at the surface of the target nucleus is an important feature. Preliminary results of nucleon production in light ion induced reactions are presented and discussed.

  11. Reference masses for precision mass spectrometry design and implementation of a Pierce geometry to the cluster Ion source at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, Jonathan

    At the mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP carbon clusters ($^{12}$Cn, 1$\\leqslant$n$\\leqslant$25) are provided as reference masses, which are of particular importance in higher mass ranges (m $\\geqslant$ 200u). In this mass range the measurlment uncertainty is increasingly dominated by the difference of the reference mass and the mass of the ion of interest. Using carbon clusters instead of the common $^{133}$Cs ions, this difference decreases. The carbon clusters are produced in a laser ion source which has been improved in the frame of this thesis. The fluctuations of the count rate have been investigated as a function of the laser energy. Furthermore, the energy density at the target has been increased by implementation of a telescope into the laser beam line, which leads to a more narrow energy distribution of the ions. Through the exact adjustment of timing and length of a pulsed cavity an energy range with constant count rate could be selected. In order to provide ideal starting conditions during and after the ...

  12. MicroRNA-302 Cluster Downregulates Enterovirus 71-Induced Innate Immune Response by Targeting KPNA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xuecheng; Zhu, Chengliang; Zhou, Li; Yu, Haisheng; Li, Mengqi; Lin, Yong; Wang, Xueyu; Li, Qian; She, Yinglong; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Qian; Lu, Mengji; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Shi

    2018-05-18

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) induces significantly elevated levels of cytokines and chemokines, leading to local or systemic inflammation and severe complications. As shown in our previous study, microRNA (miR) 302c regulates influenza A virus-induced IFN expression by targeting NF-κB-inducing kinase. However, little is known about the role of the miR-302 cluster in EV71-mediated proinflammatory responses. In this study, we found that the miR-302 cluster controls EV71-induced cytokine expression. Further studies demonstrated that karyopherin α2 (KPNA2) is a direct target of the miR-302 cluster. Interestingly, we also found that EV71 infection upregulates KPNA2 expression by downregulating miR-302 cluster expression. Upon investigating the mechanisms behind this event, we found that KPNA2 intracellularly associates with JNK1/JNK2 and p38, leading to translocation of those transcription factors from the cytosol into the nucleus. In EV71-infected patients, miR-302 cluster expression was downregulated and KPNA2 expression was upregulated compared with controls, and their expression levels were closely correlated. Taken together, our work establishes a link between the miR-302/ KPNA2 axis and EV71-induced cytokine expression and represents a promising target for future antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Dynamical coupling of electrons and ions in Xray-induced dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saalmann, Ulf; Camacho, Abraham; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Photo-absorption from short and intense Xray pulses by a molecule or a cluster triggers a complicated electron and ion dynamics. Whereas the excitation process concerns largely core-shell electrons, there are various subsequent relaxation channels like electronic decays and ionic Coulomb explosion. We will discuss the interplay of those processes for molecular clusters and fullerenes. (paper)

  14. Nucleation mechanisms in high energy ion beam induced dewetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Michael; Garmatter, Daniel; Ferhati, Redi; Amirthapandian, Sankarakumar; Bolse, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Solid coatings, when heated above their melting points, often break up by forming small round holes, which then grow, coalesce and finally turn the initially contiguous film into a pattern of isolated droplets. Such dewetting has been intensively studied using thin polymer films on Si. Three different hole nucleation mechanisms were discovered: homogeneous (spontaneous) nucleation, heterogeneous nucleation at defects, and spinodal dewetting by self-amplifying capillary waves. We have recently found that swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of thin oxide films on Si results in similar dewetting patterns, even though the films were kept far below their melting points. Using our new in-situ SEM at the UNILAC accelerator of GSI, we were now able to identify the mechanisms behind this SHI induced dewetting phenomenon. By varying the film thickness and introducing defects at the interface, we can directly address the hole nucleation processes. Besides homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, we also found a process, which very much resembles the spinodal mechanism found for liquid polymers, although in the present case the instable wavy surface is not generated by capillary waves, but by ion beam induced stresses.

  15. Smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo: Applications to lithium ion-Stockmayer clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, H. M.; Jake, L. C.; Curotto, E.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent investigation [K. Roberts et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074104 (2012)], we have shown that, for a sufficiently complex potential, the Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) random walk can become quasiergodic, and we have introduced smart darting-like moves to improve the sampling. In this article, we systematically characterize the bias that smart darting moves introduce in the estimate of the ground state energy of a bosonic system. We then test a simple approach to eliminate completely such bias from the results. The approach is applied for the determination of the ground state of lithium ion-n–dipoles clusters in the n = 8–20 range. For these, the smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo simulations find the same ground state energy and mixed-distribution as the traditional approach for n < 14. In larger systems we find that while the ground state energies agree quantitatively with or without smart darting moves, the mixed-distributions can be significantly different. Some evidence is offered to conclude that introducing smart darting-like moves in traditional DMC simulations may produce a more reliable ground state mixed-distribution.

  16. Smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo: Applications to lithium ion-Stockmayer clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H. M.; Jake, L. C.; Curotto, E., E-mail: curotto@arcadia.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038-3295 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    In a recent investigation [K. Roberts et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074104 (2012)], we have shown that, for a sufficiently complex potential, the Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) random walk can become quasiergodic, and we have introduced smart darting-like moves to improve the sampling. In this article, we systematically characterize the bias that smart darting moves introduce in the estimate of the ground state energy of a bosonic system. We then test a simple approach to eliminate completely such bias from the results. The approach is applied for the determination of the ground state of lithium ion-n–dipoles clusters in the n = 8–20 range. For these, the smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo simulations find the same ground state energy and mixed-distribution as the traditional approach for n < 14. In larger systems we find that while the ground state energies agree quantitatively with or without smart darting moves, the mixed-distributions can be significantly different. Some evidence is offered to conclude that introducing smart darting-like moves in traditional DMC simulations may produce a more reliable ground state mixed-distribution.

  17. Evidence for nano-Si clusters in amorphous SiO anode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Kodzuka, M.; Yamamura, H.; Saito, T.; Iba, H.; Hono, K.

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and high resolution transmission electron microscopy have shown the presence of nano-sized amorphous Si clusters in non-disproportionated amorphous SiO powders are under consideration for anode materials in Li-ion batteries. After Li insertion/extraction, no change was found in the chemistry and structure of the Si clusters. However, Li atoms were found to be trapped at the amorphous SiO phase after Li insertion/extraction, which may be attributed to the large capacity fade after the first charge/discharge cycle

  18. Adsorption and Formation of Small Na Clusters on Pristine and Double-Vacancy Graphene for Anodes of Na-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhicong; Fan, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Weitao; Singh, David J

    2017-05-24

    Layered carbon is a likely anode material for Na-ion batteries (NIBs). Graphitic carbon has a low capacity of approximately 35 (mA h)/g due to the formation of NaC 64 . Using first-principles methods including van der Waals interactions, we analyze the adsorption of Na ions and clusters on graphene in the context of anodes. The interaction between Na ions and graphene is found to be weak. Small Na clusters are not stable on the surface of pristine graphene in the electrochemical environment of NIBs. However, we find that Na ions and clusters can be stored effectively on defected graphene that has double vacancies. In addition, the adsorption energy of small Na clusters near a double vacancy is found to decrease with increasing cluster size. With high concentrations of vacancies the capacity of Na on defective graphene is found to be as much as 10-30 times higher than that of graphitic carbon.

  19. Controllable irregular melting induced by atomic segregation in bimetallic clusters with fabricating different initial configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guojian; Liu Tie; Wang Qiang; Lue Xiao; Wang Kai; He Jicheng

    2010-01-01

    The melting process of Co, Co-Cu and Co-Ni clusters with different initial configurations is studied in molecular dynamics by a general embedded atom method. An irregular melting, at which energy decreases as the temperature increase near the melting point, is found in the onion-like Co-Cu-Co clusters, but not in the mixed Co-Cu and onion-like Co-Ni-Co clusters. From the analysis of atomic distributions and energy variation, the results indicate the irregular melting is induced by Cu atomic segregation. Furthermore, this melting can be controlled by doping hetero atoms with different surface energies and controlling their distributions.

  20. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B. [Institute of Science and Technology Research, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  1. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, L.D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence

  2. Factors influencing the contribution of ion-induced nucleation in a boreal forest, Finland

    OpenAIRE

    S. Gagné; T. Nieminen; T. Kurtén; H. E. Manninen; T. Petäjä; L. Laakso; V.-M. Kerminen; M. Boy; M. Kulmala

    2010-01-01

    We present the longest series of measurements so far (2 years and 7 months) made with an Ion-DMPS at the SMEAR II measurement station in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. We show that the classification into overcharged (implying some participation of ion-induced nucleation) and undercharged (implying no or very little participation of ion-induced nucleation) days, based on Ion-DMPS measurements, agrees with the fraction of ion-induced nucleation based on NAIS measurements. Those classes are based ...

  3. Evidence for radical anion formation during liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of oligonucleotides and synthetic oligomeric analogues: a deconvolution algorithm for molecular ion region clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramée, J A; Arbogast, B; Deinzer, M L

    1989-10-01

    It is shown that one-electron reduction is a common process that occurs in negative ion liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS) of oligonucleotides and synthetic oligonucleosides and that this process is in competition with proton loss. Deconvolution of the molecular anion cluster reveals contributions from (M-2H).-, (M-H)-, M.-, and (M + H)-. A model based on these ionic species gives excellent agreement with the experimental data. A correlation between the concentration of species arising via one-electron reduction [M.- and (M + H)-] and the electron affinity of the matrix has been demonstrated. The relative intensity of M.- is mass-dependent; this is rationalized on the basis of base-stacking. Base sequence ion formation is theorized to arise from M.- radical anion among other possible pathways.

  4. Spectral artefacts post sputter-etching and how to cope with them - A case study of XPS on nitride-based coatings using monoatomic and cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Erik; Counsell, Jonathan; Patscheider, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    The issue of artefacts due to sputter-etching has been investigated for a group of AlN-based thin film materials with varying thermodynamical stability. Stability of the materials was controlled by alloying AlN with the group 14 elements Si, Ge or Sn in two different concentrations. The coatings were sputter-etched with monoatomic Ar+ with energies between 0.2 and 4.0 keV to study the sensitivity of the materials for sputter damage. The use of Arn+ clusters to remove an oxidised surface layer was also evaluated for a selected sample. The spectra were compared to pristine spectra obtained after in-vacuo sample transfer from the synthesis chamber to the analysis instrument. It was found that the all samples were affected by high energy (4 keV) Ar+ ions to varying degrees. The determining factors for the amount of observed damage were found to be the materials' enthalpy of formation, where a threshold value seems to exist at approximately -1.25 eV/atom (∼-120 kJ/mol atoms). For each sample, the observed amount of damage was found to have a linear dependence to the energy deposited by the ion beam per volume removed material. Despite the occurrence of sputter-damage in all samples, etching settings that result in almost artefact-free spectral data were found; using either very low energy (i.e. 200 eV) monoatomic ions, or an appropriate combination of ion cluster size and energy. The present study underlines that analysis post sputter-etching must be carried out with an awareness of possible sputter-induced artefacts.

  5. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiser, B.S.

    1981-04-01

    Two subjects are discussed in this report: advances in proposed studies on metal ion chemistry and expansion of laboratory facilities. The development of a combined pulsed laser source-ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer has proven to be a convenient and powerful method for generating metal ions and for studying their subsequent chemistry in the gas phase. The main emphasis of this research has been on the application of metal ions as a selective chemical ionization reagents and progress in this area are discussed. The goal is to identify trends in reactivity i.e. mechanisms useful in interpreting the chemical ionization spectra of unknown compounds and to test for the functional group selectivity of the various metal ions. The feasibility of these goals have been demonstrated in extensive studies on Cu + with esters and ketones, on Fe + with ethers, ketones, and hydrocarbons, and on Ti + with hydrocarbons. In addition, preliminary results on sulfur containing compounds and on a variety of other metallic ions have been obtained. Laboratory facilities were expanded from one ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer to two, plus a third instrument the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) spectrometer

  6. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S.; Sofferman, D. L.; Beskin, I.

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport

  7. Cross section measurements of the processes occurring in the fragmentation of Hn+ (3 ≤ n ≤ 35) hydrogen clusters induced by high speed (60 keV/u) collisions on helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louc, Sandrine

    1997-01-01

    Different processes involved in the fragmentation of ionised hydrogen clusters H 3 + (H 2 ) (n-3)/2 (n = 5-35) have been studied in the same experiment: the fragmentation of the cluster is induced by the collision with an helium atom at high velocity (≅ c/100). The collision is realised in reversed kinematic - clusters are accelerated - which allows the detection of neutral and charged fragments. The different channels of fragmentation are identified by using coincidence techniques. For all the cluster sizes studied the capture cross sections of one electron of the target by the cluster is equal to the capture cross section of the H 3 + ion. In the same way, the dissociation cross section of the H 3 + core of the cluster does not depend on cluster size. These fragmentation processes are due to the interaction of H 3 + core of the cluster and the helium atom without ionization of another component of the cluster. On the contrary, the cross sections of loss of one, two and three molecules by the cluster and the dissociation cross section of the cluster in all its molecular components depends strongly on the cluster size. This dependence is different from the one measured for the metastable decay of the cluster. Thus, the process of loss of molecules induced by a collision should correspond to a different dissociation mechanism. In regard of the singularities observed for the size dependence, the H 9 + , H 15 + , H 19 + and H 29 + clusters could be the 'core' of the biggest clusters. These observation are in agreement with the size effects of smaller magnitude observed for the dissociation cross section (all the processes). The values of the cross section for the process of at least one ionization of the cluster indicate that about 80% of the fragmentation events result from this process. (author)

  8. Mechanism of acetylcholine receptor cluster formation induced by DC electric field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Luke Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The formation of acetylcholine receptor (AChR cluster is a key event during the development of the neuromuscular junction. It is induced through the activation of muscle-specific kinase (MuSK by the heparan-sulfate proteoglycan agrin released from the motor axon. On the other hand, DC electric field, a non-neuronal stimulus, is also highly effective in causing AChRs to cluster along the cathode-facing edge of muscle cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand its molecular mechanism, quantum dots (QDs were used to follow the movement of AChRs as they became clustered under the influence of electric field. From analyses of trajectories of AChR movement in the membrane, it was concluded that diffuse receptors underwent Brownian motion until they were immobilized at sites of cluster formation. This supports the diffusion-mediated trapping model in explaining AChR clustering under the influence of this stimulus. Disrupting F-actin cytoskeleton assembly and interfering with rapsyn-AChR interaction suppressed this phenomenon, suggesting that these are integral components of the trapping mechanism induced by the electric field. Consistent with the idea that signaling pathways are activated by this stimulus, the localization of tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of AChR β-subunit and Src was observed at cathodal AChR clusters. Furthermore, disrupting MuSK activity through the expression of a kinase-dead form of this enzyme abolished electric field-induced AChR clustering. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that DC electric field as a physical stimulus elicits molecular reactions in muscle cells in the form of cathodal MuSK activation in a ligand-free manner to trigger a signaling pathway that leads to cytoskeletal assembly and AChR clustering.

  9. Electron-induced chemistry in microhydrated sulfuric acid clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lengyel, Jozef; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 22 (2017), s. 14171-14180 ISSN 1680-7324 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04068S Grant - others:Austrian Science Fund (FWF)(AT) M1983-N34 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : induced aerosol formation * particle formation * atmospheric implication Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  10. Field-induced cluster spin glass and inverse symmetry breaking enhanced by frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Zimmer, F. M.; Magalhaes, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    We consider a cluster disordered model to study the interplay between short- and long-range interactions in geometrically frustrated spin systems under an external magnetic field (h). In our approach, the intercluster long-range disorder (J) is analytically treated to get an effective cluster model that is computed exactly. The clusters follow a checkerboard lattice with first-neighbor (J1) and second-neighbor (J2) interactions. We find a reentrant transition from the cluster spin-glass (CSG) state to a paramagnetic (PM) phase as the temperature decreases for a certain range of h. This inverse symmetry breaking (ISB) appears as a consequence of both quenched disorder with frustration and h, that introduce a CSG state with higher entropy than the polarized PM phase. The competitive scenario introduced by antiferromagnetic (AF) short-range interactions increases the CSG state entropy, leading to continuous ISB transitions and enhancing the ISB regions, mainly in the geometrically frustrated case (J1 =J2). Remarkably, when strong AF intracluster couplings are present, field-induced CSG phases can be found. These CSG regions are strongly related to the magnetization plateaus observed in this cluster disordered system. In fact, it is found that each field-induced magnetization jump brings a CSG region. We notice that geometrical frustration, as well as cluster size, play an important role in the magnetization plateaus and, therefore, are also relevant in the field-induced glassy states. Our findings suggest that competing interactions support ISB and field-induced CSG phases in disordered cluster systems under an external magnetic field.

  11. Size effects in van der Waals clusters studied by spin and angle-resolved electron spectroscopy and multi-coincidence ion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Pesic, Z D; Zhang, H; Bilodeau, R C; Bozek, J D; Berrah, N

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the valence and inner-shell photoionization of free rare-gas clusters by means of angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and momentum resolving electron-multi-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The electron measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution and spin polarization parameters as a function of photon energy and cluster size, and reveal a strong cluster size dependence of the photoelectron angular distributions in certain photon energy regions. In contrast, the spin polarization parameter of the cluster photoelectrons is found to be very close to the atomic value for all covered photon energies and cluster sizes. The ion imaging measurements, which probe the fragmentation dynamics of multiply charged van der Waals clusters, also exhibit a pronounced cluster size dependence

  12. Ion-induced gammas for photofission interrogation of HEU.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-03-01

    High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded special nuclear material (SNM), such as HEU (highly enriched uranium), by detecting prompt and/or delayed induced fission signatures. In this work, we explore the underlying physics for a new type of photon source that generates high fluxes of mono-energetic gamma-rays from low-energy (<500 keV) proton-induced nuclear reactions. The characteristic energies (4- to 18-MeV) of the gamma-rays coincide with the peak of the photonuclear cross section. The source could be designed to produce gamma-rays of certain selected energies, thereby improving the probability of detecting shielded HEU or providing a capability to determine enrichment inside sealed containers. The fundamental physics of such an interrogation source were studied in this LDRD through scaled ion accelerator experiments and radiation transport modeling. The data were used to assess gamma and neutron yields, background, and photofission-induced signal levels from several (p,{gamma}) target materials under consideration.

  13. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of cryogenic surfaces bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Evans, L; Kollmus, H; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Severin, D; Wengenroth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to study the dynamic outgassing of cryogenic surfaces. Two different targets, bare and goldcoated copper, were bombarded under perpendicular impact with 4.2 MeV/u Pb54+ ions. Partial pressure rises of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 and effective desorption yields were measured at 300, 77, and 6.3 K using single shot and continuous ion bombardment techniques. We find that the heavy-ion-induced desorption yield is temperature dependent and investigate the influence of CO gas cryosorbed at 6.3 K. The gain in desorption yield reduction at cryogenic temperature vanishes after several monolayers of CO are cryosorbed on both targets. In this paper we describe the new cryogenic target assembly, the temperature-dependent pressure rise, desorption yield, and gas adsorption measurements.

  14. submitter The effect of acid–base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a ...

  15. Absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale in methanol determined by the lithium cluster-continuum approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliego, Josefredo R; Miguel, Elizabeth L M

    2013-05-02

    Absolute solvation free energy of the lithium cation in methanol was calculated by the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory of solvation. Clusters with up to five methanol molecules were investigated using X3LYP, MP2, and MP4 methods with DZVP, 6-311+G(2df,2p), TZVPP+diff, and QZVPP+diff basis sets and including the cluster solvation through the PCM and SMD continuum models. Our calculations have determined a value of -118.1 kcal mol(-1) for the solvation free energy of the lithium, in close agreement with a value of -116.6 kcal mol(-1) consistent with the TATB assumption. Using data of solvation and transfer free energy of a pair of ions, electrode potentials and pKa, we have obtained the solvation free energy of 25 ions in methanol. Our analysis leads to a value of -253.6 kcal mol(-1) for the solvation free energy of the proton, which can be compared with the value of -263.5 kcal mol(-1) obtained by Kelly et al. using the cluster pair approximation. Considering that this difference is due to the methanol surface potential, we have estimated that it corresponds to -0.429 V.

  16. [Studies of heavy-ion induced reactions]: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    An experiment was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, extending previous studies using inverse reactions to 50 MeV/u 139 La incident on targets of C and Al. Studies of excitation energy division in lower energy division in lower energy heavy-ion reactions were furthered using kinematic coincidences to measure the excitation energies of primary products in the Fe + Ho reaction at 12 MeV/u. These results will provide important systematics for comparisons with previous measurements at 9 MeV/u on the same system and at 15 MeV/u on the Fe + Fe and Fe + U systems. Also studied were different aspects of 15 MeV/u Fe-induced reactions, with experiments performed at the Oak Ridge HHIRF. The first three contributions of this report constitute a major portion of the results from this research. Finally, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac a large detector array for coincident detection of fragmentation products in heavy-ion collisions below 100 MeV/u is being built. A list of publications, personnel, and activities is provided

  17. Multicharged Ion-induced simple molecule fragmentation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarisien, M.

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this work is to study the dynamics of swift multicharged ion-induced fragmentation of diatomic (CO) and triatomic (CO 2 ) molecules. Performed at the GANIL facility, this study used the Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy technique (RIMS), which consists of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, coupled with a multi-hit capability position sensitive detector (delay line anode). The high-resolution measurement of the kinetic energy distribution released (KER) during the CO fragmentation points out the limitation of the Coulomb Explosion Model, revealing, for example, the di-cation CO 2 + electronic state contribution in the case of C + /O + fragmentation pathway. Furthermore, the multi-ionization cross section dependence with the orientation of the internuclear axis of CO is compared with a geometrical model calculation. Finally, different behaviours are observed for the dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule (CO 2 ). While triple ionization leads mainly to a synchronous concerted fragmentation dynamics, a weak fraction of dissociating molecule follows a sequential dynamics involving CO 2 + metastable states. In the case of double ionization, (CO 2 ) 2+ di-cation dissociation dynamics is asynchronously concerted and has been interpreted using a simple model involving an asymmetrical vibration of the molecule. (author)

  18. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    pumps can be taken into account. This method can be extended to any desorption experiment employing the single shot method for measurement. Of special interest for the operation of the SIS100 at high intensities is the minimization of desorption from cryogenic surfaces. A previous examination of this topic found a breakdown of the familiar scaling of the desorption yield with the beam's energy loss for cryogenic targets. Further examination of this effect with the techniques described above is another goal of this thesis. Simultaneously, desorption measurements at room temperature for several other targets have been conducted. An unexpected result of these experiments is the influence of target surface properties, which was found to be very weak in comparison to previous results. The methods developed during this thesis, along with the results gained by their application, represent another step towards the comprehension of (heavy) ion beam induced desorption.

  19. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions; Etude de l'ionisation et de la dissociation d'H{sub 2}O induites par collision avec des ions multicharges rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, S

    2006-02-15

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni{sup 25+} ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO{sub 2} radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  20. The yield, processing, and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Noguchi, Miho; Fujii, Kentaro; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yokoya, Akinari

    2009-01-01

    After living cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, a variety of chemical modifications of DNA are induced either directly by ionization of DNA or indirectly through interactions with water-derived radicals. The DNA lesions include single strand breaks (SSB), base lesions, sugar damage, and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites). Clustered DNA damage, which is defined as two or more of such lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA induced by a single radiation track, is considered to be a unique feature of ionizing radiation. A double strand break (DSB) is a type of clustered DNA damage, in which single strand breaks are formed on opposite strands in close proximity. Formation and repair of DSBs have been studied in great detail over the years as they have been linked to important biological endpoints, such as cell death, loss of genetic material, chromosome aberration. Although non-DSB clustered DNA damage has received less attention, there is growing evidence of its biological significance. This review focuses on the current understanding of (1) the yield of non-DSB clustered damage induced by ionizing radiation (2) the processing, and (3) biological consequences of non-DSB clustered DNA damage. (author)

  1. Swift heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Umme Habiba

    2015-01-15

    In this thesis, the high energy heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers is studied. Two polymer groups, namely polyvinyl polymers (PVF, PVAc, PVA and PMMA) and fluoropolymers (PVDF, ETFE, PFA and FEP) were used in this work. Polyvinyl polymers were investigated since they will be used as insulating materials in the superconducting magnets of the new ion accelerators of the planned International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at the GSI Helmholtz-Centre of Heavy Ion Research (GSI) in Darmstadt. In order to study ion-beam induced degradation, all polymer foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (U, Au, Sm, Xe) and experimentation sites (beam lines X0 and M3) over a large fluence regime (1 x 10{sup 10} - 5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}). Five independent techniques, namely infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, residual gas analysis (RGA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mass loss analysis (ML), were used to analyze the irradiated samples. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that ion irradiation led to the decrease of characteristic band intensities showing the general degradation of the polymers, with scission of side groups and the main backbone. As a consequence of the structural modification, new bands appeared. UV-Vis transmission analysis showed an absorption edge shift from the ultraviolet region towards the visible region indicating double bond and conjugated double bond formation. On-line massspectrometric residual gas analysis showed the release of small gaseous fragment molecules. TGA analysis gave evidence of a changed thermal stability. With ML analysis, the considerable mass loss was quantified. The results of the five complementary analytical methods show how heavy ion irradiation changes the molecular structure of the polymers. Molecular degradation mechanisms are postulated. The amount of radiation damage is found to be sensitive to the used type of ionic

  2. Cluster analysis for the probability of DSB site induced by electron tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Y. [Biological Research, Education and Instrumentation Center, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Sasaki, K. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University of Science, Sapporo 006-8585 (Japan); Matsuya, Y. [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Date, H., E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    To clarify the influence of bio-cells exposed to ionizing radiations, the densely populated pattern of the ionization in the cell nucleus is of importance because it governs the extent of DNA damage which may lead to cell lethality. In this study, we have conducted a cluster analysis of ionization and excitation events to estimate the number of double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by electron tracks. A Monte Carlo simulation for electrons in liquid water was performed to determine the spatial location of the ionization and excitation events. The events were divided into clusters by using the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN) algorithm. The algorithm enables us to sort out the events into the groups (clusters) in which a minimum number of neighboring events are contained within a given radius. For evaluating the number of DSBs in the extracted clusters, we have introduced an aggregation index (AI). The computational results show that a sub-keV electron produces DSBs in a dense formation more effectively than higher energy electrons. The root-mean square radius (RMSR) of the cluster size is below 5 nm, which is smaller than the chromatin fiber thickness. It was found that this size of clustering events has a high possibility to cause lesions in DNA within the chromatin fiber site.

  3. Influence of Energy and Temperature in Cluster Coalescence Induced by Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Jiménez-Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence induced by deposition of different Cu clusters on an epitaxial Co cluster supported on a Cu(001 substrate is studied by constant-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. The degree of epitaxy of the final system increases with increasing separation between the centres of mass of the projectile and target clusters during the collision. Structure, roughness, and epitaxial order of the supported cluster also influence the degree of epitaxy. The effect of energy and temperature is determinant on the epitaxial condition of the coalesced cluster, especially both factors modify the generation, growth and interaction among grains. A higher temperature favours the epitaxial growth for low impact parameters. A higher energy contributes to the epitaxial coalescence for any initial separation between the projectile and target clusters. The influence of projectile energy is notably greater than the influence of temperature since higher energies allow greater and instantaneous atomic reorganizations, so that the number of arisen grains just after the collision becomes smaller. The appearance of grain boundary dislocations is, therefore, a decisive factor in the epitaxial growth of the coalesced cluster.

  4. Formation of aluminum films on silicon by ion beam deposition: a comparison with ionized cluster beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhr, R.A.; Haynes, T.E.; Galloway, M.D.; Tanaka, S.; Yamada, A.; Yamada, I.

    1991-01-01

    The direct ion beam deposition (IBD) technique has been used to study the formation of oriented aluminum films on single crystal silicon substrates. In the IBD process, thin film growth is accomplished by decelerating a magnetically analyzed ion beam to low energies (10-200 eV) for direct deposition onto the substrate under UHV conditions. The aluminum-on-silicon system is one which has been studied extensively by ionized cluster beam (ICB) deposition. This technique has produced intriguing results for aluminum, with oriented crystalline films being formed at room temperature in spite of the 25% mismatch in lattice constant between aluminum and silicon. In this work, we have studied the formation of such films by IBD, with emphasis on the effects of ion energy, substrate temperature, and surface cleanliness. Oriented films have been grown on Si(111) at temperatures from 40 to 300degC and with ion energies of 30-120 eV per ion. Completed films were analyzed by ion scattering, X-ray diffraction, scanning-electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Results achieved for thin films grown by IBD are comparable to those for similar films grown by ICB deposition. (orig.)

  5. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Helium Branch Induced by Multiple Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Triggered Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, M.; Omura, Y.; Grison, B.; Pickett, J. S.; Dandouras, I. S.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions with rising tones between the H+ and He+ cyclotron frequencies were found in the inner magnetosphere by the recent Cluster observations. Another type of EMIC wave with a constant frequency is occasionally observed below the He+ cyclotron frequency after the multiple EMIC triggered emissions. We performed a self-consistent hybrid simulation with a one-dimensional cylindrical magnetic flux model approximating the dipole magnetic field of the Earth's inner magnetosphere. In the presence of energetic protons with a sufficient density and temperature anisotropy, multiple EMIC triggered emissions are reproduced due to the nonlinear wave growth mechanism of rising-tone chorus emissions, and a constant frequency wave in the He+ EMIC branch is subsequently generated. Through interaction with the multiple EMIC rising-tone emissions, the velocity distribution function of the energetic protons is strongly modified. Because of the pitch angle scattering of the protons, the gradient of the distribution in velocity phase space is enhanced along the diffusion curve of the He+ branch wave, resulting in the linear growth of the EMIC wave in the He+ branch.

  6. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bosqued

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of relevant CIS plasma

  7. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bosqued

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of

  8. EMPIRE-II 2.18, Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions Induced Cross-Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Michal Wladyslaw; Panini, Gian Carlo

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined optical, Multi-step Direct (TUL), Multi-step Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus(Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha-particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions and extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions. IAEA1169/06: This version corrects an error in the Absoft compile procedure. 2 - Method of solution: For projectiles with A<5 EMPIRE calculates fusion cross section using spherical optical model transmission coefficients. In the case of Heavy Ion induced reactions the fusion cross section can be determined using various approaches including simplified coupled channels method (code CCFUS). Pre-equilibrium emission is treated in terms of quantum-mechanical theories (TUL-MSD and NVWY-MSC). MSC contribution to the gamma emission is taken into account. These calculations are followed by statistical decay with arbitrary number of subsequent particle emissions. Gamma-ray competition is considered in detail for every decaying compound nucleus. Different options for level densities are available including dynamical approach with collective effects taken into account. EMPIRE contains following third party codes converted into subroutines: - SCAT2 by O. Bersillon, - ORION and TRISTAN by H. Lenske and H. Wolter, - CCFUS by C.H. Dasso and S. Landowne, - BARMOM by A. Sierk. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The code can be easily adjusted to the problem by changing dimensions in the dimensions.h file. The actual limits are set by the available memory. In the current formulation up to 4 ejectiles plus gamma are allowed. This limit can be relaxed

  9. Heavy ion induced fission between 10 and 100 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.

    1986-05-01

    Heavy ion induced fission between 10 and 100 MeV/u is discussed. It is shown that one can obtain information on fusion limits and on typical times characterizing nuclear matter. Intermediate energy heavy ions can be used to build very excited fusion nuclei. Section I shows that fission can then be used as a tool to test the fusion mechanism and to discover what are the extreme limits concerning fusion and hot nuclei formation. In section II, it is shown that when very hot nuclei are built, fission evaporation competition cannot any longer be fully described in the usual way by the statistical model. New features as dynamical aspects or cluster evaporation modify dramatically the landscape. Concerning the detailed fission properties of very hot nuclei (for instance fragments properties), no strong deviations from the already know systematics has been obtained. However, very few detailed studies are yet available and a clear experimental program has to be developed in order to progress. From a theoretical point of view, it is rather necessary to described fission and evaporation is an unified way

  10. Radiation induced grafting of tetrafluoroethylene on Nafion Films for ion exchange membrane application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Ferreto, Helio Fernando Rodrigues; Souza, Camila Pinheiro; Parra, Duclerc Fernandes; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Grafting of TFE nanocomposites onto Nafion was studied for synthesis of ion exchange membranes. Radiation-induced grafting of TFE gas onto Nafion films was investigated after simultaneous irradiation using a {sup 60}Co source. The thermal degradation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) waste has been used for production of TFE. Nafion films were irradiated at 15 kGy dose at room temperature and chemical changes were monitored after contact with TFE gas for grafting. The modified films were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Characterization by XRD suggests crystallinity changes after TFE grafting. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of membranes was determined by acid-base titration and the values for modified films were achieved similar to Nafion pristine films. DSC measurements revealed a displacement in the endothermic peaks and it was probably associated with the TFE graft. The graft forces the Nafion polymer chains to re-organize themselves and form a more cross-linked structure within the clusters. (author)

  11. Radiation induced grafting of tetrafluoroethylene on Nafion Films for ion exchange membrane application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Ferreto, Helio Fernando Rodrigues; Souza, Camila Pinheiro; Parra, Duclerc Fernandes; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo

    2011-01-01

    Grafting of TFE nanocomposites onto Nafion was studied for synthesis of ion exchange membranes. Radiation-induced grafting of TFE gas onto Nafion films was investigated after simultaneous irradiation using a 60 Co source. The thermal degradation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) waste has been used for production of TFE. Nafion films were irradiated at 15 kGy dose at room temperature and chemical changes were monitored after contact with TFE gas for grafting. The modified films were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Characterization by XRD suggests crystallinity changes after TFE grafting. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of membranes was determined by acid-base titration and the values for modified films were achieved similar to Nafion pristine films. DSC measurements revealed a displacement in the endothermic peaks and it was probably associated with the TFE graft. The graft forces the Nafion polymer chains to re-organize themselves and form a more cross-linked structure within the clusters. (author)

  12. Non-random intrachromosomal distribution of radiation-induced chromatid aberrations in Vicia faba. [Aberration clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, I; Rieger, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Gatersleben. Zentralinst. fuer Genetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

    1976-04-01

    A reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba, with all chromosomes individually distinguishable, was treated with X-rays, fast neutrons, (/sup 3/H) uridine (/sup 3/HU). The distribution within metaphase chromosomes of induced chromatid aberrations was non-random for all agents used. Aberration clustering, in part agent specific, occurred in chromosome segments containing heterochromatin as defined by the presence of G bands. The pattern of aberration clustering found after treatment with /sup 3/HU did not allow the recognition of chromosome regions active in transcription during treatment. Furthermore, it was impossible to obtain unambiguous indications of the presence of AT- and GC-base clusters from the patterns of /sup 3/HT- and /sup 3/HC-induced chromatid aberrations, respectively. Possible reasons underlying these observations are discussed.

  13. Improved mass resolution and mass accuracy in TOF-SIMS spectra and images using argon gas cluster ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Hyun Kyong; Yoon, Sohee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Tae Geol

    2016-06-09

    The popularity of argon gas cluster ion beams (Ar-GCIB) as primary ion beams in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has increased because the molecular ions of large organic- and biomolecules can be detected with less damage to the sample surfaces. However, Ar-GCIB is limited by poor mass resolution as well as poor mass accuracy. The inferior quality of the mass resolution in a TOF-SIMS spectrum obtained by using Ar-GCIB compared to the one obtained by a bismuth liquid metal cluster ion beam and others makes it difficult to identify unknown peaks because of the mass interference from the neighboring peaks. However, in this study, the authors demonstrate improved mass resolution in TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB through the delayed extraction of secondary ions, a method typically used in TOF mass spectrometry to increase mass resolution. As for poor mass accuracy, although mass calibration using internal peaks with low mass such as hydrogen and carbon is a common approach in TOF-SIMS, it is unsuited to the present study because of the disappearance of the low-mass peaks in the delayed extraction mode. To resolve this issue, external mass calibration, another regularly used method in TOF-MS, was adapted to enhance mass accuracy in the spectrum and image generated by TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB in the delayed extraction mode. By producing spectra analyses of a peptide mixture and bovine serum albumin protein digested with trypsin, along with image analyses of rat brain samples, the authors demonstrate for the first time the enhancement of mass resolution and mass accuracy for the purpose of analyzing large biomolecules in TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB through the use of delayed extraction and external mass calibration.

  14. Platelet apoptosis by cld-induced glycoportein Ibα clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Wal, Dianne E; Du, V X; Lo, KS

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background:  Cold-storage of platelets followed by rewarming induces changes in Glycoprotein (GP) Ibα-distribution indicative of receptor clustering and initiates thromboxane A2-formation. GPIbα is associated with 14-3-3 proteins, which contribute to GPIbα-signaling and in nucleated cells...

  15. Hot magnetospheric O+ and cold ion behavior in magnetopause reconnection: Cluster observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.; Liu, Y.; Genestreti, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    In reconnection, the presence of heavy ions like O+ increases the ion mass density reducing the fluid's Alfvén speed. In addition, it may modify the reconnection structure, which can also change the reconnection rate. However, because O+ ions have a larger Larmor radii than H+ ions at the same velocity, they may not be fully entrained in the reconnection flow and may have kinetic effects other than just increasing the mass density. In this study, for the first time, the ion velocity distribution functions of H+ and O+ from one magnetopause reconnection event with a strong guide field are analyzed to determine in detail the behavior of the different ion populations. We show that the hot magnetospheric O+ ions, along with the hot magnetospheric H+ ions almost fully participate in the reconnection exhaust flows. Finite Larmor radius effects are also apparent and control how far the ions extend on the magnetosheath side. Ion signatures consistent with heating after being picked up in the reconnection exhaust flow are observed in the H+ and O+ distribution functions. The dynamics of the cold magnetospheric ions depends on where they enter the reconnection region. If they enter the reconnection region at the downstream separatrix, they will be taken away by the magnetic field in an adiabatic way as analyzed by Drake et al. (2009a); if they enter close to the diffusion region, they behave as pick-up ions.

  16. High yield antibiotic producing mutants of Streptomyces erythreus induced by low energy ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen; Zhixin, Lin; Zuyao, Zou; Feng, Zhang; Duo, Liu; Xianghuai, Liu; Jianzhong, Tang; Weimin, Zhu; Bo, Huang

    1998-05-01

    Conidia of Streptomyces erythreus, an industrial microbe, were implanted by nitrogen ions with energy of 40-60 keV and fluence from 1 × 10 11 to 5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. The logarithm value of survival fraction had good linear relationship with the logarithm value of fluence. Some mutants with a high yield of erythromycin were induced by ion implantation. The yield increment was correlated with the implantation fluence. Compared with the mutation results induced by ultraviolet rays, mutation effects of ion implantation were obvious having higher increasing erythromycin potency and wider mutation spectrum. The spores of Bacillus subtilis were implanted by arsenic ions with energy of 100 keV. The distribution of implanted ions was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and calculated in theory. The mechanism of mutation induced by ion implantation was discussed.

  17. Clustering and training set selection methods for improving the accuracy of quantitative laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Bell, James F.; Wiens, Roger C.; Morris, Richard V.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated five clustering and training set selection methods to improve the accuracy of quantitative chemical analysis of geologic samples by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The LIBS spectra were previously acquired for 195 rock slabs and 31 pressed powder geostandards under 7 Torr CO 2 at a stand-off distance of 7 m at 17 mJ per pulse to simulate the operational conditions of the ChemCam LIBS instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. The clustering and training set selection methods, which do not require prior knowledge of the chemical composition of the test-set samples, are based on grouping similar spectra and selecting appropriate training spectra for the partial least squares (PLS2) model. These methods were: (1) hierarchical clustering of the full set of training spectra and selection of a subset for use in training; (2) k-means clustering of all spectra and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each cluster; (3) iterative use of PLS2 to predict sample composition and k-means clustering of the predicted compositions to subdivide the groups of spectra; (4) soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) classification of spectra, and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each class; (5) use of Bayesian information criteria (BIC) to determine an optimal number of clusters and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each cluster. The iterative method and the k-means method using 5 clusters showed the best performance, improving the absolute quadrature root mean squared error (RMSE) by ∼ 3 wt.%. The statistical significance of these improvements was ∼ 85%. Our results show that although clustering methods can modestly improve results, a large and diverse training set is the most reliable way to improve the accuracy of quantitative LIBS. In particular, additional sulfate standards and specifically

  18. Chemical changes in titanate surfaces induced by Ar+ ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.; Fernandez, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Munuera, G.; Sanz, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The reduction effects and compositional changes induced by 3.5 keV Ar + bombardment of several titanates (i.e. SrTiO 3 , Al 2 TiO 5 and NiTiO 3 ) have been quantitatively investigated by XPS. In all the samples studied here the original Ti 4+ species were reduced to lower oxidation states (i.e. Ti 3+ and Ti 2+ ), although to a lesser extent than in pure TiO 2 . On the contrary, whereas Sr 2+ and Al 3+ seem to remain unaffected by Ar + bombardment, in agreement with the behaviour of the respective oxides (i.e. SrO and Al 2 O 3 ), Ni 2+ appears more easily reducible to Ni o in NiTiO 3 than in NiO. In addition, other specific differences were observed between the titanates, which reveal the existence of interesting chemical effects related to the presence of the different counter-ions in the titanates. In the case of Al 2 TiO 5 , its Ar + -induced decomposition to form TiO 2 + Al 2 O 3 could be followed by XPS. (Author)

  19. Cellular structure formed by ion-implantation-induced point defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, N.; Taniwaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have found that a cellular defect structure is formed on the surface of Sn + ion implanted GaSb at a low temperature and proposed its formation mechanism based on the movement of the induced point defects. This research was carried out in order to examine the validity of the mechanism by clarifying the effect of the mobility of the point defects on the defect formation. The defect structure on the GaSb surfaces implanted at cryogenic temperature and room temperature was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. In the sample implanted at room temperature, the sponge-like structure (a pileup of voids) was formed and the cellular structure, as observed at a low temperature, did not develop. This behavior was explained by the high mobility of the vacancies during implantation at room temperature, and the proposed idea that the defect formation process is dominated by the induced point defects was confirmed

  20. Molecular analysis of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Yokota, Yukihiko

    1998-01-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of the mutations induced by ion particles at the molecular level in plants, mutated loci in carbon ion-induced mutants of Arabidopsis were investigated by PCR and Southern blot analyses. In the present study, two lines of gl1 mutant and two lines of tt4 mutant were isolated after carbon ion-irradiation. Out of four mutants, one had a deletion, other two contained rearrangements, and one had a point-like mutation. From the present result, it was suggested that ion particles induced different kinds of alterations of the DNA and therefore they could produce various types of mutant alleles in plants. (author)

  1. Laser-Induced Fluorescence diagnostic of barium ion plasmas in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moses; Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul trap whose purpose is to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of intense charged particle beam propagation in alternating-gradient magnetic transport systems. To investigate the ion plasma microstate in PTSX, including the ion density profile and the ion velocity distribution function, a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system is being developed as a nondestructive diagnostic. Instead of cesium, which has been used in the initial phase of the PTSX experiment, barium has been selected as the preferred ion for the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. A feasibility study of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic using barium ions is presented with the characterization of a tunable dye laser. The installation of the barium ion source and the development of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system are also discussed

  2. Quantification of ion-induced molecular fragmentation of isolated 2-deoxy-D-ribose molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarado Chacon, F.; Bari, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Schlathölter, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments on low energy ion-induced damage to DNA building blocks indicate that ion induced DNA damage is dominated by deoxyribose disintegration (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 95, 153201). We have studied interactions of keV H+ and Heq+ with isolated deoxyribose molecules by means of high

  3. A critical discussion of the vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heera, V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization of silicon including divacancy formation is developed. The model reproduces some of the experimental findings, as e.g. the dose rate dependence of the crystallization rate. However, the measured activation energy of the ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization cannot be accounted for by vacancy diffusion alone. (author)

  4. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  5. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  6. Ab initio dynamics and photoionization mass spectrometry reveal ion-molecule pathways from ionized acetylene clusters to benzene cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Tamar; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Troy, Tyler P; Fang, Yigang; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-05-23

    The growth mechanism of hydrocarbons in ionizing environments, such as the interstellar medium (ISM), and some combustion conditions remains incompletely understood. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and molecular beam vacuum-UV (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry experiments were performed to understand the ion-molecule growth mechanism of small acetylene clusters (up to hexamers). A dramatic dependence of product distribution on the ionization conditions is demonstrated experimentally and understood from simulations. The products change from reactive fragmentation products in a higher temperature, higher density gas regime toward a very cold collision-free cluster regime that is dominated by products whose empirical formula is (C 2 H 2 ) n + , just like ionized acetylene clusters. The fragmentation products result from reactive ion-molecule collisions in a comparatively higher pressure and temperature regime followed by unimolecular decomposition. The isolated ionized clusters display rich dynamics that contain bonded C 4 H 4 + and C 6 H 6 + structures solvated with one or more neutral acetylene molecules. Such species contain large amounts (>2 eV) of excess internal energy. The role of the solvent acetylene molecules is to affect the barrier crossing dynamics in the potential energy surface (PES) between (C 2 H 2 ) n + isomers and provide evaporative cooling to dissipate the excess internal energy and stabilize products including the aromatic ring of the benzene cation. Formation of the benzene cation is demonstrated in AIMD simulations of acetylene clusters with n > 3, as well as other metastable C 6 H 6 + isomers. These results suggest a path for aromatic ring formation in cold acetylene-rich environments such as parts of the ISM.

  7. Molecular dynamics studies of the ion beam induced crystallization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, L.A.; Caturla, M.J.; Huang, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the ion bombardment induced amorphous-to-crystal transition in silicon using molecular dynamics techniques. The growth of small crystal seeds embedded in the amorphous phase has been monitored for several temperatures in order to get information on the effect of the thermal temperature increase introduced by the incoming ion. The role of ion-induced defects on the growth has been also studied

  8. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced nanodot structures on InP surfaces by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Radny, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Surfaces of InP were bombarded by 1.9 keV Ar(+) ions under normal incidence. The total accumulated ion fluence the samples were exposed to was varied from 1 × 10(17) cm(-2) to 3 × 10(18)cm(-2) and ion flux densities f of (0.4-2) × 10(14) cm(-2) s(-1) were used. Nanodot structures were found to evolve on the surface from these ion irradiations, their dimensions however, depend on the specific bombardment conditions. The resulting surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a function of ion fluence, the mean radius, height, and spacing of the dots can be fitted by power-law dependences. In order to determine possible local compositional changes in these nanostructures induced by ion impact, selected samples were prepared for atom probe tomography (APT). The results indicate that by APT the composition of individual InP nanodots evolving under ion bombardment could be examined with atomic spatial resolution. At the InP surface, the values of the In/P concentration ratio are distinctly higher over a distance of ~1 nm and amount to 1.3-1.8. However, several aspects critical for the analyses were identified: (i) because of the small dimensions of these nanostructures a successful tip preparation proved very challenging. (ii) The elemental compositions obtained from APT were found to be influenced pronouncedly by the laser pulse energy; typically, low energies result in the correct stoichiometry whereas high ones lead to an inhomogeneous evaporation from the tips and deviations from the nominal composition. (iii) Depending again on the laser energy, a prolific emission of Pn cluster ions was observed, with n ≤ 11. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. New Parameterizations for Neutral and Ion-Induced Sulfuric Acid-Water Particle Formation in Nucleation and Kinetic Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, Anni; Merikanto, Joonas; Henschel, Henning; Duplissy, Jonathan; Makkonen, Risto; Ortega, Ismael K.; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    We have developed new parameterizations of electrically neutral homogeneous and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water particle formation for large ranges of environmental conditions, based on an improved model that has been validated against a particle formation rate data set produced by Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiments at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The model uses a thermodynamically consistent version of the Classical Nucleation Theory normalized using quantum chemical data. Unlike the earlier parameterizations for H2SO4-H2O nucleation, the model is applicable to extreme dry conditions where the one-component sulfuric acid limit is approached. Parameterizations are presented for the critical cluster sulfuric acid mole fraction, the critical cluster radius, the total number of molecules in the critical cluster, and the particle formation rate. If the critical cluster contains only one sulfuric acid molecule, a simple formula for kinetic particle formation can be used: this threshold has also been parameterized. The parameterization for electrically neutral particle formation is valid for the following ranges: temperatures 165-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1013 cm-3, and relative humidities 0.001-100%. The ion-induced particle formation parameterization is valid for temperatures 195-400 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 104-1016 cm-3, and relative humidities 10-5-100%. The new parameterizations are thus applicable for the full range of conditions in the Earth's atmosphere relevant for binary sulfuric acid-water particle formation, including both tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. They are also suitable for describing particle formation in the atmosphere of Venus.

  10. Study of structure and spectroscopy of water–hydroxide ion clusters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimen- talists are interested in determining the bonding,1–18 structure and spectroscopy of these systems and the- oreticians have contributed to the logical explanation of experimental findings. There are different types of systems ranging from atomic clusters, especially noble gas clusters (modelled by Lennard Jones ...

  11. IR photodissociation spectroscopy of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster ions: Similarity and dissimilarity in the structure of CO{sub 2}, OCS, and CS{sub 2} cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya, E-mail: y-inokuchi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Ebata, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} (n = 2–6) cluster ions are measured in the 1000–2300 cm{sup −1} region; these clusters show strong CO stretching vibrations in this region. For (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} and (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}, we utilize the messenger technique by attaching an Ar atom to measure their IR spectra. The IRPD spectrum of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}Ar shows two bands at 2095 and 2120 cm{sup −1}. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, these bands are assigned to a C{sub 2} isomer of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}, in which an intermolecular semi-covalent bond is formed between the sulfur ends of the two OCS components by the charge resonance interaction, and the positive charge is delocalized over the dimer. The (OCS){sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–6) cluster ions show a few bands assignable to “solvent” OCS molecules in the 2000–2080 cm{sup −1} region, in addition to the bands due to the (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} ion core at ∼2090 and ∼2120 cm{sup −1}, suggesting that the dimer ion core is kept in (OCS){sub 3–6}{sup +}. For the (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster anions, the IRPD spectra indicate the coexistence of a few isomers with an OCS{sup −} or (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} anion core over the cluster range of n = 2–6. The (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}Ar anion displays two strong bands at 1674 and 1994 cm{sup −1}. These bands can be assigned to a C{sub s} isomer with an OCS{sup −} anion core. For the n = 2–4 anions, this OCS{sup −} anion core form is dominant. In addition to the bands of the OCS{sup −} core isomer, we found another band at ∼1740 cm{sup −1}, which can be assigned to isomers having an (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} ion core; this dimer core has C{sub 2} symmetry and {sup 2}A electronic state. The IRPD spectra of the n = 3–6 anions show two IR bands at ∼1660 and ∼2020 cm{sup −1}. The intensity of the latter component relative to that of the former one becomes stronger and stronger with

  12. Electronic and geometric structures of Ge{sub n}{sup -} and Ge{sub n}{sup +} (n=5-10) clusters in comparison with corresponding Si{sub n} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Baoxing; Cao Peilin; Song Bin; Ye Zhezhen

    2003-02-10

    Using full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital molecular-dynamics (FP-LMTO-MD) method, we have studied the geometric and electronic structures of ionic Ge{sub 5-10} clusters. Our calculations show that the ground state structures of some Ge cluster ions are different from those of their corresponding neutral Ge clusters. Furthermore, the positive Ge ions have more severe structural distortion than the negative Ge ions due to Jahn-Teller distortion. In addition, there are differences between the ground state structures of Ge ions and Si ions, although most of the Ge ions have similar geometrical configurations to their corresponding Si ions.

  13. Dielectric-spectroscopy approach to ferrofluid nanoparticle clustering induced by an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnak, Michal; Kurimsky, Juraj; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kopcansky, Peter; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Taculescu-Moaca, Elena Alina; Timko, Milan

    2014-09-01

    An experimental study of magnetic colloidal particles cluster formation induced by an external electric field in a ferrofluid based on transformer oil is presented. Using frequency domain isothermal dielectric spectroscopy, we study the influence of a test cell electrode separation distance on a low-frequency relaxation process. We consider the relaxation process to be associated with an electric double layer polarization taking place on the particle surface. It has been found that the relaxation maximum considerably shifts towards lower frequencies when conducting the measurements in the test cells with greater electrode separation distances. As the electric field intensity was always kept at a constant value, we propose that the particle cluster formation induced by the external ac electric field accounts for that phenomenon. The increase in the relaxation time is in accordance with the Schwarz theory of electric double layer polarization. In addition, we analyze the influence of a static electric field generated by dc bias voltage on a similar shift in the relaxation maximum position. The variation of the dc electric field for the hysteresis measurements purpose provides understanding of the development of the particle clusters and their decay. Following our results, we emphasize the utility of dielectric spectroscopy as a simple, complementary method for detection and study of clusters of colloidal particles induced by external electric field.

  14. Thermodynamics of Small Alkali Metal Halide Cluster Ions: Comparison of Classical Molecular Simulations with Experiment and Quantum Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcek, Lukas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uhlik, Filip [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Moucka, Filip [Purkinje Univ. (Czech Republic); Nezbeda, Ivo [Purkinje Univ. (Czech Republic); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), Prague (Czech Republic); Chialvo, Ariel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-16

    We evaluate the ability of selected classical molecular models to describe the thermodynamic and structural aspects of gas-phase hydration of alkali halide ions and the formation of small water clusters. To understand the effect of many-body interactions (polarization) and charge penetration effects on the accuracy of a force field, we perform Monte Carlo simulations with three rigid water models using different functional forms to account for these effects: (i) point charge non-polarizable SPC/E, (ii) Drude point charge polarizable SWM4- DP, and (iii) Drude Gaussian charge polarizable BK3. Model predictions are compared with experimental Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of ion hydration, and with microscopic structural properties obtained from quantum DFT calculations. We find that all three models provide comparable predictions for pure water clusters and cation hydration, but differ significantly in their description of anion hydration. None of the investigated classical force fields can consistently and quantitatively reproduce the experimental gas phase hydration thermodynamics. The outcome of this study highlights the relation between the functional form that describes the effective intermolecular interactions and the accuracy of the resulting ion hydration properties.

  15. Energization of helium ions by proton-induced hydromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendrin, R.; Roux, A.

    1980-01-01

    We consider the diffusion of He + ions under the influence of ion cyclotron waves generated in a plasma consisting of three different ion populations: a thermal isotropic population containing both H + and He + ions and an energetic H + population, with a positive anisotropy A=T/sub perpendicular//T/sub parallel/-1. We compute, in the velocity space upsilon/sub parallel/, upsilon/sub perpendicular/, the diffusion curves that He + ions will follow in the presence of ion cyclotron waves propagating in such a medium. We show that for small concentrations of the He + ions, of the order of 1 to approx.10%, these ions can be energized by such a process up to and above suprathermal energies (E> or approx. =20 eV). On some occasions the He + ions may even reach energies of the order of the Alfven energy of the cold plasma population: E/sub a/approx. =m/sub p/V/sub a/ 2 approx. =5 keV. Characteristic diffusion times, in pitch angle and energy, for both ion species, are evaluated. They are of the order of 2 to 20 min. These theoretical results are discussed in the frame of recent observations by Geos experimenters showing the close association that exists between the occurrence of ion cyclotron ULF waves and the presence of thermal or supra-thermal He + ions in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere

  16. Photo-induced transformation process at gold clusters-semiconductor interface: Implications for the complexity of gold clusters-based photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2016-03-01

    The recent thrust in utilizing atomically precise organic ligands protected gold clusters (Au clusters) as photosensitizer coupled with semiconductors for nano-catalysts has led to the claims of improved efficiency in photocatalysis. Nonetheless, the influence of photo-stability of organic ligands protected-Au clusters at the Au/semiconductor interface on the photocatalytic properties remains rather elusive. Taking Au clusters-TiO2 composites as a prototype, we for the first time demonstrate the photo-induced transformation of small molecular-like Au clusters to larger metallic Au nanoparticles under different illumination conditions, which leads to the diverse photocatalytic reaction mechanism. This transformation process undergoes a diffusion/aggregation mechanism accompanied with the onslaught of Au clusters by active oxygen species and holes resulting from photo-excited TiO2 and Au clusters. However, such Au clusters aggregation can be efficiently inhibited by tuning reaction conditions. This work would trigger rational structural design and fine condition control of organic ligands protected-metal clusters-semiconductor composites for diverse photocatalytic applications with long-term photo-stability.

  17. Coulomb frustration of the multiphoton ionization of metallic clusters under intense EUV FEL evidenced by ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazza, T; Devetta, M; Milani, P; Motomura, K; Liu, X-J; Fukuzawa, H; Yamada, A; Nagaya, K; Iwayama, H; Sugishima, A; Mizoguchi, Y; Saito, N; Coreno, M; Nagasono, M; Tono, K; Togashi, T; Kimura, H; Okunishi, M; Fennel, Th; Senba, Y

    2015-01-01

    Free electron laser light sources delivering high intensity pulses of short wavelength radiation are opening novel possibilities for the investigation of matter at the nanoscale and for the discovery and understanding of new physical processes occurring at the exotic transient states they make accessible. Strong ionization of atomic constituents of a nano-sized sample is a representative example of such processes and the understanding of ionization dynamics is crucial for a realistic description of the experiments. We report here on multiple ionization experiments on free clusters of titanium, a high cohesive energy metal. The time of flight ion spectra reveal a saturation of the cluster ionization at ∼10 16 photons per pulse per cm 2 . Our results also show a clear lack of any explosion process, opposite to what is observed for a rare-gas cluster under similar conditions. A simple and generalized multi-step ionization model including Coulomb frustration of the photoemission process effectively reproduces with a good agreement the main features of the experimental observation and points to an interpretation of the data involving a substantial energy deposition into the cluster through electronic system heating upon scattering events within photoemission. (paper)

  18. Impact of slow gold clusters on various solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benguerba, M.; Brunelle, A.; Della-Negra, S.; Depauw, J.; Joret, H.; Beyec, Y. Le; Schweikert, E.A.; Assayag, G.B.; Sudraud, P.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal ion source has been installed on a pulsed ion gun. The time of flight (TOF) spectra of the pulsed beam were recorded. With the gold source several cluster ions (up to 10 atoms in the cluster) and doubly charged ions were identified in the ion beam TOF spectra. With a second pulsation, single cluster ions can be selected as projectiles for secondary ion TOF mass spectrometry. The secondary ion emission induced by cluster impact from a variety of targets (organic, CsI, metallic) was studied. A large enhancement of yield is observed by comparison to single atomic ion impact (e.g., a factor of 30 between Au 3 + and Au + ). The secondary ion yields increase nonlinearly with the number of constituents in the cluster. A comparison with other types of clusters and also fission fragments of 252 Cf has been performed. The rate of secondary emission stimulated by cluster is similar to the secondary ion yield induced by fission fragments. (author) 47 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Simulation of ion-beam induced defects in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dineva, M.; Marksteiner, M.; Lang, W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Heavy-ion irradiation of cuprate superconductors is well known to produce columnar defect tracks along which magnetic vortices can be pinned. Hence, this effect has a large potential for practical applications and can enhance the critical current of the high-temperature superconducting materials. On the other hand, little work has been devoted to light-ion irradiation of the new superconductors. Our previous experimental results have indicated a systematic change of electric transport properties when irradiating YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) with 75 KEXV He + ions. The purpose of the present study is the investigation of the ion-target interactions with computer simulation programs based on the binary collision approximation. The program package SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) is widely used to simulate the impact of energetic ions (10 eV to 2 GeV) on a solid target using a quantum mechanical treatment of ion-atom collisions under the assumption of an unstructured target material. A similar program, MARLOWE, includes the exact crystalline structure of the target and, thus, is able to calculate ion channeling effects and angle dependences. Detailed results of the penetration range of ions into YBCO, scattering cascades, creation of vacancies and interstitials, are reported for various kinds of ions. One of the central results is that light ions with energy of about 80 KEXV can penetrate through thin films of the cuprate superconductors and create point defects, mainly by oxygen displacement. (author)

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon and xenon ion velocities near the sheath boundary in 3 ion species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Severn, Greg [Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California 92110 (United States); Baalrud, Scott D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Bohm sheath criterion is studied with laser-induced fluorescence in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. Krypton is added to a low pressure unmagnetized DC hot filament discharge in a mixture of argon and xenon gas confined by surface multi-dipole magnetic fields. The argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions are measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate. The potential structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. Results are compared with previous experiments with Ar–Xe plasmas, where the two ion species were observed to reach the sheath edge at nearly the same speed. This speed was the ion sound speed of the system, which is consistent with the generalized Bohm criterion. In such two ion species plasmas, instability enhanced collisional friction was demonstrated [Hershkowitz et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 057102 (2011).] to exist which accounted for the observed results. When three ion species are present, it is demonstrated under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at their individual Bohm velocities. It is also shown that under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at the system sound speed. These observations are also consistent with the presence of the instabilities.

  1. Dependence of wavelength of Xe ion-induced rippled structures on the fluence in the medium ion energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Institute of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Ion-beam eroded self-organized nanostructures on semiconductors offer new ways for the fabrication of high density memory and optoelectronic devices. It is known that wavelength and amplitude of noble gas ion-induced rippled structures tune with the ion energy and the fluence depending on the energy range, ion type and substrate. The linear theory by Makeev predicts a linear dependence of the ion energy on the wavelength for low temperatures. For Ar{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} it was observed by different groups that the wavelength grows with increasing fluence after being constant up to an onset fluence and before saturation. In this coarsening regime power-law or exponential behavior of the wavelength with the fluence was monitored. So far, investigations for Xe ions on silicon surfaces mainly concentrated on energies below 1 keV. We found a linear dependence of both the ion energy and the fluence on the wavelength and amplitude of rippled structures over a wide range of the Xe{sup +} ion energy between 5 and 70 keV. Moreover, we estimated the ratio of wavelength to amplitude to be constant meaning a shape stability when a threshold fluence of 2.10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} was exceeded.

  2. Electron transport effects in ion induced electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubus, A. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: adubus@ulb.ac.be; Pauly, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Roesler, M. [Karl-Pokern-Str. 12, D-12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Ion induced electron emission (IIEE) is usually described as a three-step process, i.e. electron excitation by the incident projectile, electron transport (and multiplication) and electron escape through the potential barrier at the surface. In many cases, the first step of the process has been carefully described. The second step of the process, i.e. electron transport and multiplication, has often been treated in a very rough way, a simple decreasing exponential law being sometimes used. It is precisely the aim of the present work to show the importance of a correct description of electron transport and multiplication in a theoretical calculation of IIEE. A short overview of the electron transport models developed for IIEE is given in this work. The so-called 'Infinite medium slowing-down model' often used in recent works is evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, the importance of considering correctly the semi-infinite character of the medium and the boundary condition at the vacuum-medium interface is discussed. Quantities like the electron escape depth are also briefly discussed. This evaluation has been performed in the particular case of protons (25keV

  3. Hydrogen ion induced ultralow wear of PEEK under extreme load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuai; Wang, Anying; Fei, Jixiong; Wang, Zhenyang; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Bin

    2018-03-01

    As a high-performance engineering polymer, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is a perfect candidate material for applications under extreme working conditions. However, its high wear rate greatly shortens its service life. In this study, ultralow friction and wear between PEEK and silicon nitride (Si3N4) under extreme-load conditions (with a mean contact pressure above 100 MPa) are found in acid lubricating solutions. Both friction and wear decrease sharply with decreasing pH. At pH = 1, the friction coefficient decreases by an order of magnitude and the wear rate of the PEEK decreases by two orders of magnitude compared to the results with water lubrication. These reductions in friction and wear occur for different speed, load, and surface roughness conditions. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the formation of hydrogen-ion-induced electrical double layers on the surfaces of PEEK and Si3N4. The combined effect of the resulting repulsive force, electro-viscosity, and low shear strength of the water layer dramatically reduces both friction and wear.

  4. Heavy ion induced genetic effects in mammalian cells. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.; Brend'amour, M.; Casares, A.; Egenolf, R.; Gutermuth, F.; Ikpeme, S.E.; Koch, S.; Kost, M.; Loebrich, M.; Pross, H.D.; Russmann, C.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Stoll, U.; Weber, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generally assumed to be the most relevant initial event producing radiation-induced cellular lethality, as well as mutations and transformations. The dependence of their formation on radiation quality has been recently reviewed. Contrary to earlier observations there seems to be now agreement that the RBE does not increase above unity with increasing LET in mammalian cells when conventional techniques are applied which are not able to resolve smaller fragments. If they are, however, included in the analysis maximum RBE values around 2 are obtained. The situation is different with yeast: An increased effectiveness for DSB induction has been reported with alpha particles, as well as for heavy ions. This may be due to differences in methods or to chromosomal structure, as discussed in more detail in this paper. DSB induction was measured for a LET range of 100 to 11500 keV/? m in yeast cells using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Under the conditions applied the chromosomes of the yeast cells could be separated according to size allowing the direct quantification of the DSB yield by measuring the intensity of the largest chromosomes. The results demonstrate clearly that DSB induction in yeast depends on radiation quality. The derived cross-sections for DSB induction were also compared to those for cell inactivation determined in parallel experiments under identical irradiation conditions. (orig.)

  5. Giant metal sputtering yields induced by 20-5000 keV/atom gold clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, H.H.; Brunelle, A.; Della-Negra, S.; Depauw, J.; Jacquet, D.; Le Beyec, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Very large non-linear effects have been found in cluster-induced metal sputtering over a broad projectile energy interval for the first time. Recently available cluster beams from tandem accelerators have allowed sputtering yield measurements to be made with Au 1 to Au 5 from 20 keV/atom to 5 MeV/atom. The cluster-sputtering yield maxima were found at the same total energy but not at the same energy/atom as expected. For Au 5 a yield as high as 3000 was reached at 150 keV/atom while the Au 1 yield was only 55 at the same velocity. The Sigmund-Claussen thermal spike theory, which fits published data at low energy, cannot reproduce our extended new data set. (author)

  6. Cluster analysis of polymers using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with K-means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangmin, GUO; Yun, TANG; Yu, DU; Shisong, TANG; Lianbo, GUO; Xiangyou, LI; Yongfeng, LU; Xiaoyan, ZENG

    2018-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with K-means algorithm was employed to automatically differentiate industrial polymers under atmospheric conditions. The unsupervised learning algorithm K-means were utilized for the clustering of LIBS dataset measured from twenty kinds of industrial polymers. To prevent the interference from metallic elements, three atomic emission lines (C I 247.86 nm , H I 656.3 nm, and O I 777.3 nm) and one molecular line C–N (0, 0) 388.3 nm were used. The cluster analysis results were obtained through an iterative process. The Davies–Bouldin index was employed to determine the initial number of clusters. The average relative standard deviation values of characteristic spectral lines were used as the iterative criterion. With the proposed approach, the classification accuracy for twenty kinds of industrial polymers achieved 99.6%. The results demonstrated that this approach has great potential for industrial polymers recycling by LIBS.

  7. High-temperature superconductors induced by ion implantation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, A.C.; Johnson, E.

    1988-08-01

    High dose oxygen ion implantation (10 to the 17th power ions per sq. cm.) at elevated temperatures (300 C) has been shown to adjust the critical temperature of gamma-Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O materials. These results are in marked contrast to earlier work which showed complete destruction of superconducting properties for similar radiation doses, and marked reduction in superconducting properties at one-tenth this dose in the 1-2-3- compound only. Experiments also showed that the superconducting materials can be patterned into conducting and nonconducting areas without etching by ion implantation, allowing maintenance of planar geometries required for microcircuit fabrication. Experiments on deposition of thin films of high temperature superconductors for use with the ion implantation experiments showed that ion beam sputtering from a single target could achieve the correct stoichiometry. Variations of composition with ion beam energy and angle of sputtered ions were studied

  8. Ion-induced aerosol formation in a H20-H2S04 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raes, F.; Janssens, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an experiment that was set up to demonstrate the occurrence of ion-induced aerosol formation (see Part I of this paper, Raes and Janssens, 1985) are analysed quantitatively by modelling the dynamics of aerosol formation and growth under different irradiation conditions. The model calculations indicate that ion-induced aerosol formation may contribute significantly to the total particle formation in a gas mixture that is simultaneously being irradiated with u.v. and γ irradiation. However, the measurements do not appear to be accurate enough to support these calculations. A qualitative comparison of the experiments with the calculations suggests that ion-induced nucleation is actually occurring in the experiments and that the classical theory of ion-induced aerosol formation may underestimate the actual rate of aerosol formation around ions. (author)

  9. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A ′ -resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons

  10. Electron-induced hydrogen loss in uracil in a water cluster environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, M.; Kohanoff, J. [Atomistic Simulation Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Fabrikant, I. I., E-mail: ifabrikant1@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588, USA and Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-14

    Low-energy electron-impact hydrogen loss due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to the uracil and thymine molecules in a water cluster environment is investigated theoretically. Only the A{sup ′}-resonance contribution, describing the near-threshold behavior of DEA, is incorporated. Calculations are based on the nonlocal complex potential theory and the multiple scattering theory, and are performed for a model target with basic properties of uracil and thymine, surrounded by five water molecules. The DEA cross section is strongly enhanced when the attaching molecule is embedded in a water cluster. This growth is due to two effects: the increase of the resonance lifetime and the negative shift in the resonance position due to interaction of the intermediate negative ion with the surrounding water molecules. A similar effect was earlier found in DEA to chlorofluorocarbons.

  11. Modification on surface oxide layer structure and surface morphology of niobium by gas cluster ion beam treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, A.T.; Swenson, D.R.; Insepov, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that significant reductions in field emission on Nb surfaces could be achieved by means of a new surface treatment technique called gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). Further study as shown in this paper revealed that GCIB treatments could modify surface irregularities and remove surface asperities leading to a smoother surface finish as demonstrated through measurements using a 3D profilometer, an atomic force microscope, and a scanning electron microscope. These experimental observations were supported by computer simulation via atomistic molecular dynamics and a phenomenological surface dynamics. Measurements employing a secondary ion mass spectrometry found that GCIB could also alter Nb surface oxide layer structure. Possible implications of the experimental results on the performance of Nb superconducting radio frequency cavities treated by GCIB will be discussed. First experimental results on Nb single cell superconducting radio frequency cavities treated by GCIB will be reported.

  12. Arrays of Size-Selected Metal Nanoparticles Formed by Cluster Ion Beam Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceynowa, F. A.; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Zenin, Volodymyr

    2018-01-01

    Deposition of size-selected copper and silver nanoparticles (NPs) on polymers using cluster beam technique is studied. It is shown that ratio of particle embedment in the film can be controlled by simple thermal annealing. Combining electron beam lithography, cluster beam deposition, and heat...... with required configurations which can be applied for wave-guiding, resonators, in sensor technologies, and surface enhanced Raman scattering....

  13. Study on surface modification of M2 steel induced by Cu ions and Al ions implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chao; Liu Zhengmin

    2001-01-01

    Changes of surface hardness and wear resistances in M2 type steel implanted by Cu Al ions were reported. The dependence of surface strengthening on ion species and dose was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) for microhardness and wear resistances measurement. It is shown that both hardness and wear resistance increases apparently after ion implantation. XRD analysis indicates that different phases formed after Al Cu ions implanted. It is also suggested that Cu, Al ions have different role in surface strengthening

  14. Statistics of high-altitude and high-latitude O+ ion outflows observed by Cluster/CIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Korth

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The persistent outflows of O+ ions observed by the Cluster CIS/CODIF instrument were studied statistically in the high-altitude (from 3 up to 11 RE and high-latitude (from 70 to ~90 deg invariant latitude, ILAT polar region. The principal results are: (1 Outflowing O+ ions with more than 1keV are observed above 10 RE geocentric distance and above 85deg ILAT location; (2 at 6-8 RE geocentric distance, the latitudinal distribution of O+ ion outflow is consistent with velocity filter dispersion from a source equatorward and below the spacecraft (e.g. the cusp/cleft; (3 however, at 8-12 RE geocentric distance the distribution of O+ outflows cannot be explained by velocity filter only. The results suggest that additional energization or acceleration processes for outflowing O+ ions occur at high altitudes and high latitudes in the dayside polar region. Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, Solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  15. Irradiation-Induced Solute Clustering in a Low Nickel FeMnNi Ferritic Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, E.; Barbu, A.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Toffolon, C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is required to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. The mechanical properties degradation is partly due to the clustering of solute under irradiation. To gain knowledge about the clustering process, a Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy was irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 *10 17 n E≥1MeV . m -2 .s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 *10 24 n E≥1MeV ) . m -2 at 300 degrees C. Atom probe tomography (APT) experiments revealed that the irradiation promotes the formation in the α iron matrix of Mn/Mn and/or Ni/Ni pair correlations at low dose and Mn-Ni enriched clusters at high dose. These clusters dissolve partially after a thermal treatment at 400 degrees C. Based on a comparison with thermodynamic calculations, we show that the solute clustering under irradiation can just result from an induced mechanism. (authors)

  16. DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy neon and iron ions in human fibroblasts. I. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg, B.; Loebrich, M.; Cooper, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of high-energy neon and iron ions for the production of DNA double-strand breaks was measured in one transformed and one nontransformed human fibroblast cell line using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The DNA released from the gel plug (fraction of activity released: FAR) as well as the size distribution of the DNA entering the gel were used to compare the effects of the heavy-ion exposure with X-ray exposure. Both methods gave similar results, indicating similar distributions of breaks over megabase-pair distances for the heavy ions and the X rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to 225 kVp X rays of initially induced DNA double-strand breaks was found to be 0.85 for 425 MeV/u neon ions (LET 32 keV/μm) and 0.42-0.55 for 250-600 MeV/u iron ions (LET 190-350 keV/μm). Postirradiation incubation showed less efficient repair of breaks induced by the neon ions and the 600 MeV/u iron ions compared to X rays. Survival experiments demonstrated RBE values larger than one for cell killing by the heavy ions in parallel experiments (neon: RBE = 1.2, iron: RBE = 2.3-3.0, based on D 10 values). It is concluded that either the initial yield of DNA double-strand breaks induced by the high-energy particles is lower than the yield for X rays, or the breaks induced by heavy ions are present in clusters that cannot be resolved with the technique used. These results are confirmed in the accompanying paper. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Symposium on fast atom and ion induced mass spectrometry of nonvolatile organic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeal, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms of molecular and fragment ion production and the various parameters affecting ion yields were discussed by 6 invited speakers from Europe, Canada, and the US at this symposium. The work reported was almost equally divided between that using low-energy (keV) primary ion (or atom) beams, e.g. fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and that using high energy (MeV) particles, e.g. heavy ion induced mass spectrometry (HIIDMS) and 252 Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry ( 252 Cf-PDMS). Both theoretical foundations and observed experimental results for both techniques are included

  18. Physico-chemical modification of polyethersulphone induced by high energy proton, C+ and Ne6+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodh Kumar, S.; Biswavarathi, V.; Jal, P.; Dey, K.; Krishna, J.B.M.; Saha, A.

    2004-01-01

    Polyehersulphone (PES) was irradiated with 4 MeV proton, 3.6 MeV C + and 145 MeV Ne 6+ ions at different ion fluences. The ion induced spectral changes were analyzed by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. The increase in optical absorption, which shifts gradually from near UV to the visible region with increase in fluence for the three different types of bombarding ions was observed. A significant loss in fluorescence intensity with increase in fluence for three different ions was observed. (author)

  19. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10 13 -5x10 14 ions/cm 2 using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10 14 ions/cm 2 ) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed

  20. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A. E-mail: abhijit@alpha.iuc.res.in; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N

    2001-12-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with {sup 12}C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10{sup 13}-5x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 {mu}m) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed.

  1. Electron backscatter diffraction studies of focused ion beam induced phase transformation in cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.G., E-mail: helen.jones@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd, Claremont House, High St, Lydney GL15 5DX (United Kingdom); Cox, D.C. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A focused ion beam microscope was used to induce cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in a cobalt alloy, of similar composition to that of the binder phase in a hardmetal, in a controlled manner at 0°, 45° and 80° ion incident angles. The cobalt had an average grain size of ~ 20 μm, allowing multiple orientations to be studied, exposed to a range of doses between 6 × 10{sup 7} and 2 × 10{sup 10} ions/μm{sup 2}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to determine the original and induced phase orientations, and area fractions, before and after the ion beam exposure. On average, less phase transformation was observed at higher incident angles and after lower ion doses. However there was an orientation effect where grains with an orientation close to (111) planes were most susceptible to phase transformation, and (101) the least, where grains partially and fully transformed at varying ion doses. - Highlights: •Ion-induced phase change in FCC cobalt was observed at multiple incidence angles. •EBSD was used to study the relationship between grain orientation and transformation. •Custom software analysed ion dose and phase change with respect to grain orientation. •A predictive capability of ion-induced phase change in cobalt was enabled.

  2. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  3. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  4. EPR study of N+-ion-induced free radical formation in antibiotic-producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Liqing; Zhang Yinfen; Chen Ruyi; Gao Juncheng; Zhang Peiling; Ying Hengfeng.

    1995-01-01

    Under the room temperature, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used to study free radical formation in antibiotic-producers in order to investigate antibiotic-producer mutagenic breeding, which were induced by N + ion implanting into antibiotic-producers (e.g., Streptomyces ribosidificus, Streptomyces kanamyceticus and the phage-resistant culture of Streptomyces kanamyceticus). The results show that a lot of free radicals can be induced by N + ion implanting into antibiotic-producers, and the yields of the free radicals increase with implanting dose. The death rate of antibiotic-producers rises due to the increase of N + -ion-induced free radical yields. (author)

  5. Underling modification in ion beam induced Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Chini, T.K.; Sanyal, M.K.; Grenzer, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface (amorphous-crystalline interface) structure of keV ion beam modified Si(001) wafers was studied for the first time using non-destructive technique and compared with that of the top one. Ion-beam modifications of the Si samples were done using state-of-art high-current ion implanter facility at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics by changing energy, dose and angle of incidence of the Ar + ion beam. To bring out the underlying modification depth-resolved x-ray grazing incidence diffraction has been carried out using synchrotron radiation facility, while the structure of the top surface was studied through atomic force microscopy

  6. N{sup +} ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z Q [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Sekiguchi, T [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Yuan, X L [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Maekawa, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Kawasuso, A [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan)

    2004-01-21

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N{sup +} ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N{sup +} implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity.

  7. Fragmentation study of isolated and nano-solvated biomolecules induced by collision with multiply charged ions and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns a gas phase study of the fragmentation of bio-molecular systems induced by slow collisions with multiply charged ions (in the keV-region), alkali atoms and rare gases. The main objective was to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal and attachment. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. In a second part of the thesis, a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels, their modification and their new opening, has been clearly proven. This phenomenon occurs in the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases) as well as for molecules of a solvent (molecules of water, methanol and acetonitrile) in which the biomolecule is embedded. In order to extend these studies to larger systems, a new experimental set-up, based on an electro-spray ion source combined with a quadrupole mass filter has been developed. Due to the successful tests and proposed improvements of the device future experiments will become available concerning the fragmentation of large charged and solvated bio-molecular systems induced by collision processes. (author) [fr

  8. On light cluster production in nucleon induced reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.; Blideanu, V.; Durand, D.

    2004-09-01

    A dynamical model dedicated to nucleon induced reaction between 30-150 MeV is presented. It considers different stages of the reaction: the approaching phase, the in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions, the cluster formation and the secondary de-excitation process. The notions of influence area and phase-space exploration during the reaction are introduced. The importance of the geometry of the reaction and of the conservation laws are underlined. The model is able to globally reproduce the absolute cross sections for the emission of neutron and light charged particles for proton and neutron induced reactions on heavy and intermediate mass targets ( 56 Fe and 208 Pb). (authors)

  9. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Hase, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Ayako; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kikuo

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of γ-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by γ-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C → T:A, and all the transitions were G:C → A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by γ-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene

  10. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuo, Youichirou [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishijima, Shigehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hase, Yoshihiro [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ayako [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tanaka, Atsushi [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimizu, Kikuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-4, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: shimizu@rirc.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of {gamma}-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by {gamma}-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C {sup {yields}} T:A, and all the transitions were G:C {sup {yields}} A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by {gamma}-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene.

  11. Molecular depth profiling of trehalose using a C{sub 60} cluster ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected fullerene ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of depth profiles acquired on a 300-nm trehalose film on Si were studied as a function of the impact kinetic energy and charge state of the C{sub 60} projectile ions. We find that the achieved depth resolution depends only weakly upon energy.

  12. Proximity gettering technology for advanced CMOS image sensors using carbon cluster ion-implantation technique. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Kazunari; Kadono, Takeshi; Okuyama, Ryousuke; Shigemastu, Satoshi; Hirose, Ryo; Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko [SUMCO Corporation, Saga (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    A new technique is described for manufacturing advanced silicon wafers with the highest capability yet reported for gettering transition metallic, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities in CMOS image sensor fabrication processes. Carbon and hydrogen elements are localized in the projection range of the silicon wafer by implantation of ion clusters from a hydrocarbon molecular gas source. Furthermore, these wafers can getter oxygen impurities out-diffused to device active regions from a Czochralski grown silicon wafer substrate to the carbon cluster ion projection range during heat treatment. Therefore, they can reduce the formation of transition metals and oxygen-related defects in the device active regions and improve electrical performance characteristics, such as the dark current, white spot defects, pn-junction leakage current, and image lag characteristics. The new technique enables the formation of high-gettering-capability sinks for transition metals, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities under device active regions of CMOS image sensors. The wafers formed by this technique have the potential to significantly improve electrical devices performance characteristics in advanced CMOS image sensors. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Application of pulsed multi-ion irradiations in radiation damage research: A stochastic cluster dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan L.; Nazarov, Roman; Kang, Changwoo; Fan, Jiangyuan

    2018-07-01

    Under the multi-ion irradiation conditions present in accelerated material-testing facilities or fission/fusion nuclear reactors, the combined effects of atomic displacements with radiation products may induce complex synergies in the structural materials. However, limited access to multi-ion irradiation facilities and the lack of computational models capable of simulating the evolution of complex defects and their synergies make it difficult to understand the actual physical processes taking place in the materials under these extreme conditions. In this paper, we propose the application of pulsed single/dual-beam irradiation as replacements for the expensive steady triple-beam irradiation to study radiation damages in materials under multi-ion irradiation.

  14. Study on the effects of ion motion on laser-induced plasma wakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Suyun; Yu Wei; Yuan Xiao; Xu Han; Cao, L. H.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    A 2D analytical model is presented for the generation of plasma wakes (or bubbles) with an ultra-intense laser pulse by taking into account the response of plasma ions. It is shown that the effect of ion motion becomes significant at the laser intensity exceeding 10 21 W/cm 2 and plasma background density below 10 19 cm −3 . In this regime, ion motion tends to suppress the electrostatic field induced by charge separation and makes the electron acceleration less effective. As a result, the assumption of immobile ions overestimates the efficiency of laser wake-field acceleration of electrons. Based on the analytical model, the dynamics of plasma ions in laser-induced wake field is investigated. It is found that only one bubble appears as the plasmas background density exceeds the resonant density and the deposited laser energy is concentrated into the bubble, resulting in the generation of an ion bunch with extremely high energy density.

  15. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  16. Ion-induced redistribution of palladium in polymethyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Mueller, M.; Nakao, Y.; Hirata, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Behar, M.; Kaschny, J.R.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.

    2000-01-01

    Pd atoms are released into PMMA by thermal decomposition of a suitable organometallic compound dissolved in the polymer beforehand. These atoms eventually precipitate in ion-irradiated polymer regions. After Ar + ion implantation, metallic enrichment by up to a factor 4.5 in concentration could be achieved. We tend to attribute this Pd enrichment to gettering at the Ar gas bubbles

  17. The structure of small clusters ejected by ion bombardment of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Smith, R.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of small clusters predicted by the many-body potentials used in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of semiconductor processes is investigated. The potential minima are determined by using global optimisation algorithms which also find the local minima. It is shown that there are many such local minima for the Tersoff type potentials. If an MD simulation requires an accurate description of the small cluster geometries and energetics, then the potential can describe them provided they are included in the fitting process. (Author)

  18. Ion induced segregation in gold nanostructured thin films on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satyam, P.V.

    2008-01-01

    We report a direct observation of segregation of gold atoms to the near surface regime due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion impact on isolated gold nanostructures deposited on silicon. Irradiation at fluences of 6 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 14 and 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 at a high beam flux of 6.3 x 10 12 ions cm -2 s -1 show a maximum transported distance of gold atoms into the silicon substrate to be 60, 45 and 23 nm, respectively. At a lower fluence (6 x 10 13 ions cm -2 ) transport has been found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide (Au 5 Si 2 ). At a high fluence value of 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 , disassociation of gold silicide and out-diffusion lead to the segregation of gold to defect - rich surface and interface regions.

  19. Defect production and subsequent effects induced by electronic energy loss of swift heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Mingdong; Liu Jie; Sun Youmei; Yin Jingmin; Yao Huijun; Duan Jinglai; Mo Dan; Zhang Ling; Chen Yanfeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2008-01-01

    Swift heavy ion in matter is one of forfront fields of nuclear physics in the world. A series of new phenomena were discovered in recent years. The history and sta- tus on the development of this field were reviewed. Electronic energy loss effects induced by swift heavy ion irradiation, such as defect production and evolution, ion latent track formation, phase transformation and anisotropy plastic deformation were introduced emphatically. A trend of future investigation was explored. (authors)

  20. Heavy Ion Microbeam- and Broadbeam-Induced Transients in SiGe HBTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Reed, Robert A.; McMorrow, Dale; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Baggio, Jacques; Duhamel, Olivier; Moen, Kurt A.; Phillips, Stanley D.; Diestelhorst, Ryan M.; hide

    2009-01-01

    SiGe HBT heavy ion-induced current transients are measured using Sandia National Laboratories microbeam and high- and low-energy broadbeam sources at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds and the University of Jyvaskyla. The data were captured using a custom broadband IC package and real-time digital phosphor oscilloscopes with at least 16 GHz of analog bandwidth. These data provide detailed insight into the effects of ion strike location, range, and LET.

  1. Secondary-electron yield from Au induced by highly charged Ta ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Stöckli, M. P.; Fry, D.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 173, - (2001), s. 281-286 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : highly charged ion-surface interaction * ion-induced electron emission * angle impact effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.041, year: 2001

  2. Fast-ion losses induced by ACs and TAEs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. García-Muñoz,; Hicks, N.; van Voornveld, R.; Classen, I.G.J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Brambilla, M.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H. U.; Igochine, V.; Jaemsae, S.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    The phase-space of convective and diffusive fast-ion losses induced by shear Alfven eigenmodes has been characterized in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Time-resolved energy and pitch-angle measurements of fast-ion losses correlated in frequency and phase with toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and Alfven

  3. Fast-ion losses induced by ACs and TAEs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Munoz, M.; Hicks, N.; Voornveld, van R.; Classen, I.G.J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Brambilla, M.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H. -U.; Igochine, V.; Jaemsae, S.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    The phase-space of convective and diffusive fast-ion losses induced by shear Alfv´en eigenmodes has been characterized in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Time-resolved energy and pitch-angle measurements of fast-ion losses correlated in frequency and phase with toroidal Alfv´en eigenmodes (TAEs) and

  4. Study of transient current induced by heavy-ion microbeams in Si and GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirao, Toshio; Nashiyama, Isamu; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Suda, Tamotu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy-ion microbeams were applied to the study of mechanism of single event upset (SEU). Transient current induced in p{sup +}n junction diodes by strike of heavy ion microbeam were measured by using a high-speed digitizing sampling system. (author)

  5. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA : plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, H.M.; van Goethem, M.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Schlathölter, T.A.

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage

  6. A proposal for study of ion-beam induced chemical reactions using JAERI tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Problems in ion-beam induced chemical reactions using JAERI Tandem Accelerator were discussed. Research philosophy, some proposed experiments which are based on measurements during ion-beam bombardment, and main features of the experimental apparatus are briefly described in this report. (author)

  7. Clustering and training set selection methods for improving the accuracy of quantitative laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Ryan B., E-mail: randerson@astro.cornell.edu [Cornell University Department of Astronomy, 406 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bell, James F., E-mail: Jim.Bell@asu.edu [Arizona State University School of Earth and Space Exploration, Bldg.: INTDS-A, Room: 115B, Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Wiens, Roger C., E-mail: rwiens@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 MS J565, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Morris, Richard V., E-mail: richard.v.morris@nasa.gov [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Clegg, Samuel M., E-mail: sclegg@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 MS J565, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    We investigated five clustering and training set selection methods to improve the accuracy of quantitative chemical analysis of geologic samples by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The LIBS spectra were previously acquired for 195 rock slabs and 31 pressed powder geostandards under 7 Torr CO{sub 2} at a stand-off distance of 7 m at 17 mJ per pulse to simulate the operational conditions of the ChemCam LIBS instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. The clustering and training set selection methods, which do not require prior knowledge of the chemical composition of the test-set samples, are based on grouping similar spectra and selecting appropriate training spectra for the partial least squares (PLS2) model. These methods were: (1) hierarchical clustering of the full set of training spectra and selection of a subset for use in training; (2) k-means clustering of all spectra and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each cluster; (3) iterative use of PLS2 to predict sample composition and k-means clustering of the predicted compositions to subdivide the groups of spectra; (4) soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) classification of spectra, and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each class; (5) use of Bayesian information criteria (BIC) to determine an optimal number of clusters and generation of PLS2 models based on the training samples within each cluster. The iterative method and the k-means method using 5 clusters showed the best performance, improving the absolute quadrature root mean squared error (RMSE) by {approx} 3 wt.%. The statistical significance of these improvements was {approx} 85%. Our results show that although clustering methods can modestly improve results, a large and diverse training set is the most reliable way to improve the accuracy of quantitative LIBS. In particular, additional sulfate standards and

  8. Dual beam organic depth profiling using large argon cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweber, M; Shard, AG; Jungnickel, H; Luch, A; Unger, WES

    2014-01-01

    Argon cluster sputtering of an organic multilayer reference material consisting of two organic components, 4,4′-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl- amino]-biphenyl (NPB) and aluminium tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) (Alq3), materials commonly used in organic light-emitting diodes industry, was carried out using time-of-flight SIMS in dual beam mode. The sample used in this study consists of a ∽400-nm-thick NPB matrix with 3-nm marker layers of Alq3 at depth of ∽50, 100, 200 and 300 nm. Argon cluster sputtering provides a constant sputter yield throughout the depth profiles, and the sputter yield volumes and depth resolution are presented for Ar-cluster sizes of 630, 820, 1000, 1250 and 1660 atoms at a kinetic energy of 2.5 keV. The effect of cluster size in this material and over this range is shown to be negligible. © 2014 The Authors. Surface and Interface Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25892830

  9. Accelerator aspects of heavy ion induced inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, D

    1983-01-01

    Besides the possibilities of the magnetic fusion those of inertial fusion have increasingly found interest. Bundled photon and corpuscular beams shall be symetrically focussed from the outside on a pellet with the fusion fuel being compressed far beyond the density of the ordinary solids. Laser, light ion and heavy ion beams can be used as driver beams. The GSI took over the project leadership for a five years' research programme with formulated questions on heavy ion fusion. The project is promoted by the BMFT. During the international symposium the opportunity of intensive discussions on research work in this field in different countries was made use of.

  10. Ion Heating by Fast Particle Induced Alfven Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.; Gorelenkov, N.; White, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    A novel mechanism that directly transfers energy from Super-Alfvenic energetic ions to thermal ions in high-beta plasmas is described. The mechanism involves the excitation of compressional Alfvin eigenmodes (CAEs) in the frequency range with omega less than or approximately equal to omega(subscript ci). The broadband turbulence resulting from the large number of excited modes causes stochastic diffusion in velocity space, which transfers wave energy to thermal ions. This effect may be important on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and may scale up to reactor scenarios. This has important implications for low aspect ratio reactor concepts, since it potentially allows for the modification of the ignition criterion

  11. Ion-induced particle desorption in time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, S.; Primetzhofer, D.

    2018-05-01

    Secondary ions emitted from solids upon ion impact are studied in a time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (ToF-MEIS) set-up. In order to investigate characteristics of the emission processes and to evaluate the potential for surface and thin film analysis, experiments employing TiN and Al samples were conducted. The ejected ions exhibit a low initial kinetic energy of a few eV, thus, requiring a sufficiently high acceleration voltage for detection. Molecular and atomic ions of different charge states originating both from surface contaminations and the sample material are found, and relative yields of several species were determined. Experimental evidence that points towards a predominantly electronic sputtering process is presented. For emitted Ti target atoms an additional nuclear sputtering component is suggested.

  12. Cell surface clustering of Cadherin adhesion complex induced by antibody coated beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cadherin receptors mediate cell-cell adhesion, signal transduction and assembly of cytoskeletons. How a single transmembrane molecule Cadherin can be involved in multiple functions through modulating its binding activities with many membrane adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal components is an unanswered question which can be elucidated by clues from bead experiments. Human lung cells expressing N-Cadherin were examined. After co-incubation with anti-N-Cadherin monoclonal antibody coated beads, cell surface clustering of N-Cadherin was induced. Immunofluorescent detection demonstrated that in addition to Cadherin, β-Catenin, α-Catenin, α-Actinin and Actin fluorescence also aggregated respectively at the membrane site of bead attachment. Myosin heavy chain (MHC), another major component of Actin cytoskeleton, did not aggregate at the membrane site of bead attachment. Adhesion unrelated protein Con A and polylysine conjugated beads did not induce the clustering of adhesion molecules. It is indicated that the Cadherin/Catenins/α-Actinin/Actin complex is formed at Cadherin mediated cell adherens junction; occupancy and cell surface clustering of Cadherin is crucial for the formation of Cadherin adhesion protein complexes.

  13. Activity-induced clustering in model dumbbell swimmers: the role of hydrodynamic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Akira; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    Using a fluid-particle dynamics approach, we numerically study the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the collective dynamics of active suspensions within a simple model for bacterial motility: each microorganism is modeled as a stroke-averaged dumbbell swimmer with prescribed dipolar force pairs. Using both simulations and qualitative arguments, we show that, when the separation between swimmers is comparable to their size, the swimmers' motions are strongly affected by activity-induced hydrodynamic forces. To further understand these effects, we investigate semidilute suspensions of swimmers in the presence of thermal fluctuations. A direct comparison between simulations with and without hydrodynamic interactions shows these to enhance the dynamic clustering at a relatively small volume fraction; with our chosen model the key ingredient for this clustering behavior is hydrodynamic trapping of one swimmer by another, induced by the active forces. Furthermore, the density dependence of the motility (of both the translational and rotational motions) exhibits distinctly different behaviors with and without hydrodynamic interactions; we argue that this is linked to the clustering tendency. Our study illustrates the fact that hydrodynamic interactions not only affect kinetic pathways in active suspensions, but also cause major changes in their steady state properties.

  14. Transport of ions in presence of induced electric field and electrostatic turbulence - Source of ions injected into ring current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of ions from the polar ionosphere to the inner magnetosphere during stormtime conditions has been computed using a Monte Carlo diffusion code. The effect of the electrostatic turbulence assumed to be present during the substorm expansion phase was simulated by a process that accelerated the ions stochastically perpendicular to the magnetic field with a diffusion coefficient proportional to the energization rate of the ions by the induced electric field. This diffusion process was continued as the ions were convected from the plasma sheet boundary layer to the double-spiral injection boundary. Inward of the injection boundary, the ions were convected adiabatically. By using as input an O(+) flux of 2.8 x 10 to the 8th per sq cm per s (w greater than 10 eV) and an H(+) flux of 5.5 x 10 to the 8th per sq cm per s (w greater than 0.63 eV), the computed distribution functions of the ions in the ring current were found to be in good agreement, over a wide range in L (4 to 8), with measurements made with the ISEE-1 satellite during a storm. This O(+) flux and a large part of the H(+) flux are consistent with the DE satellite measurements of the polar ionospheric outflow during disturbed times.

  15. Ion-induced electron emission from clean metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Alonso, E.V.; Ferron, J.; Oliva-Florio, A.; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche

    1979-01-01

    We report recent experimental work on electron emission from clean polycrystalline metal surfaces under ion bombardment. We critically discuss existing theories and point out the presently unsolved problems. (orig.)

  16. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran ... check the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. ... tional changes of modified surfaces as a function of ion dose.

  17. Sputtering of Au induced by single Xe ion impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of Au thin films has been determined for Xe ions with energies between 50 and 600 keV. In-situ transmission electron microscopy was used to observe sputtered Au during deposition on a carbon foil near the specimen. Total reflection and transmission sputtering yields for a 62 nm thick Au thin film were determined by ex-situ measurement of the total amount of Au on the carbon foils. In situ observations show that individual Xe ions eject Au nanoparticles as large as 7 nm in diameter with an average diameter of approximately 3 nm. Particle emission correlates with crater formation due to single ion impacts. Nanoparticle emission contributes significantly to the total sputtering yield for Xe ions in this energy range in either reflection or transmission geometry

  18. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced modification of structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Physics, Salipur College, Salipur 754 103, India. 2Department of ... Ion irradiation; nanoparticles; atomic force microscopy; BiFeO3. 1. Introduction .... and to understand their possible origin, a study on power spectral density ...

  19. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  20. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittone, E., E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Department of Physics, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pastuovic, Z. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Breese, M.B.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Garcia Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Sevilla University, J. Andalucia, CSIC, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jaksic, M. [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruder Boškovic Institute (RBI), P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Raisanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Siegele, R. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Simon, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Vizkelethy, G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • We study the electronic degradation of semiconductors induced by ion irradiation. • The experimental protocol is based on MeV ion microbeam irradiation. • The radiation induced damage is measured by IBIC. • The general model fits the experimental data in the low level damage regime. • Key parameters relevant to the intrinsic radiation hardness are extracted. - Abstract: This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  1. Influence of chromatin condensation on the number of direct DSB damages induced by ions studied using a Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, M.; Clairand, I.; Gruel, G.; Barquinero, J.F.; Villagrasa, C.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the influence of the chromatin condensation on the number of direct double-strand break (DSB) damages induced by ions. Two geometries of chromosome territories containing either condensed or de-condensed chromatin were implemented as biological targets in the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation code and proton and alpha irradiation was simulated using the Geant4-DNA processes. A DBSCAN algorithm was used in order to detect energy deposition clusters that could give rise to single-strand breaks or DSBs on the DNA molecule. The results of this study show an increase in the number and complexity of DNA DSBs in condensed chromatin when compared with de-condensed chromatin. This work aims to evaluate the influence of the chromatin condensation in the number and complexity of direct DSB damages induced by proton and alpha irradiation. With the simulations of this study, the increase in the number and complexity of DSB-like clusters induced by ions in the heterochromatin when compared with euchromatin regions of the cell nucleus has been observed and quantified. These results suggest that condensed chromatin can be the location of more severe radiation-induced lesions, more difficult to repair, than de-condensed chromatin. On the other hand, it was also observed that, whatever the chromatin condensation, more possible damages are found after proton irradiation compared with alpha particles of the same LET. Nevertheless, as already remarked, this study concerns only the direct effect of ionising radiation that can be calculated from the results of the physical stage simulated with Geant4-DNA. To include indirect effects induced by radicals around the DNA molecule, the elements needed for simulating the chemical stage are being developed in the frame of the Geant4-DNA project(15, 16) and they are planned to be included in future work. With a complete calculation (direct + indirect damages) it would then be possible to estimate an energy

  2. Ion induced charge collection in GaAs MESFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A.; Knudson, A.; McMorrow, D.; Anderson, W.; Roussos, J.; Espy, S.; Buchner, S.; Kang, K.; Kerns, D.; Kerns, S.

    1989-01-01

    Charge collection measurements on GaAs MESFET test structures demonstrate that more charge can be collected at the gate than is deposited in the active layer and more charge can be collected at the drain than the total amount of charge produced by the ion. Enhanced charge collection at the gate edge is also observed. The current transients produced by the energetic ions have been measured directly with about 20 picosecond resolution

  3. Chemical effects induced by ion implantation in molecular solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foti, G.; Calcagno, L.; Puglisi, O.

    1983-01-01

    Ion implantation in molecular solids as ice, frozen noble gases, benzene and polymers produces a large amount of new molecules compared to the starting materials. Mass and energy analysis of ejected molecules together with the erosion yield, are discussed for several ion-target combinations at low temperature. The observed phenomena are analyzed in terms of deposited ennergy in electronic and nuclear collisions, for incoming beams, as helium or argon, in the range 10-2000 keV. (orig.)

  4. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond

  5. Wave number determination of Pc 1-2 mantle waves considering He++ ions: A Cluster study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Escoubet, C. P.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The present case study concerns narrowband electromagnetic emission detected in the distant cusp region simultaneously with upgoing plasma flows. The wave properties match the usual properties of the Pc 1-2 mantle waves: small angle between the wave vector and the magnetic field line, left-hand polarization, and propagation toward the ionosphere. We report here the first direct wave vector measurement of these waves (about 1.2 × 10- 2 rad/km) through multi spacecraft analysis using the three magnetic components and, at the same time, through single spacecraft analysis based on the refractive index analysis using the three magnetic components and two electric components. The refractive index analysis offers a simple way to estimate wave numbers in this frequency range. Numerical calculations are performed under the observed plasma conditions. The obtained results show that the ion distribution functions are unstable to ion cyclotron instability at the observed wave vector value, due to the large ion temperature anisotropy. We thus show that these electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are amplified in the distant cusp region. The Poynting flux of the waves is counterstreaming with respect to the plasma flow. This sense of propagation is consistent with the time necessary to amplify the emissions to the observed level. We point out the role of the wave damping at the He++ gyrofrequency to explain that such waves cannot be observed from the ground at the cusp foot print location.

  6. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data. (author)

  7. In vivo UVB irradiation induces clustering of Fas (CD95) on human epidermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Bo; Gniadecki, Robert; Larsen, Jørgen K

    2003-01-01

    In vitro studies with human cell lines have demonstrated that the death receptor Fas plays a role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced apoptosis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between Fas expression and apoptosis as well as clustering of Fas in human epidermis after...... a single dose of UVB irradiation. Normal healthy individuals were irradiated with three minimal erythema doses (MED) of UVB on forearm or buttock skin. Suction blisters from unirradiated and irradiated skin were raised, and Fas, FasL, and apoptosis of epidermal cells quantified by flow cytometry....... Clustering of Fas was from skin biopsied. Soluble FasL in suction blister fluid was quantified by ELISA. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated increased expression intensity of Fas after irradiation, with 1.6-,2.2- and 2.7-fold increased median expression at 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation, respectively (n...

  8. A splice variant of RILP induces lysosomal clustering independent of dynein recruitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsman, Marije; Jordens, Ingrid; Rocha, Nuno; Kuijl, Coenraad; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab7 controls fusion and transport of late endocytic compartments. A critical mediator is the Rab7 effector RILP that recruits the minus-end dynein-dynactin motor complex to these compartments. We identified a natural occurring splice variant of RILP (RILPsv) lacking only 27 amino acids encoded by exon VII. Both variants bind Rab7, prolong its GTP-bound state, and induce clustering of late endocytic compartments. However, RILPsv does not recruit the dynein-dynactin complex, implicating exon VII in motor recruitment. Clustering might still occur via dimerization, since both RILP and RILPsv are able to form hetero- and homo-dimers. Moreover, both effectors compete for Rab7 binding but with different outcome for dynein-dynactin recruitment and transport. Hence, RILPsv provides an extra dimension to the control of vesicle fusion and transport by the small GTPase Rab7

  9. Development of a new light collection and detection system optimized for ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Mi, Zhaohong; Koh, Long Cheng; Tao, Ye; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy is a new imaging technique which has the potential to achieve sub-50 nm spatial resolution fluorescence images. Currently the resolution of the technique has been limited to around 150 nm mainly because of inefficient collection and detection of emitted photons from the sample. To overcome this limitation, a new light collection system based on a custom made parabolic mirror is employed to enhance the fluorescence collection. The custom made mirror is designed so as to obtain both structural (scanning transmission ion microscopy) and ion beam induced fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The design and characterization of the parabolic mirror is discussed in detail

  10. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoene, H.; Walsh, D.S.; Sexton, F.W.; Doyle, B.L.; Aurand, J.F.; Dodd, P.E.; Flores, R.S.; Wing, N.

    1998-01-01

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth

  11. Energy dependence of ion-induced sputtering yields from monoatomic solids at normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori; Tawara, Hiro.

    1995-03-01

    The yields of the ion-induced sputtering from monoatomic solids at normal incidence for various ion-target combinations are presented graphically as a function of the incident ion energy. In order to fill the lack of the experimental data, the sputtering yields are also calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT for some ion-target combinations. Each graph shows available experimental data points and the ACAT data, together with the sputtering yields calculated by the present empirical formula, whose parameters are determined by the best-fit to available data. (author)

  12. Collision induced fragmentation of fast molecular ions in solids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is given of recent high resolution measurements on fragments arising from the collision-induced dissociation of fast (MeV) molecular ions. For solid targets, strong wake effects are observed. For gaseous targets, excited electronic states of the projectile ions play an important role. Measurements of this type provide useful information on the charge states of fast ions traversing matter. The experimental techniques show promise as a unique method for determining the geometrical structures of the molecular-ion projectiles. 41 references

  13. Polymerization of solid C60 under C60 cluster ion bombardment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Vacík, Jiří; Naramoto, H.; Narumi, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 95, - (2009), s. 867-873 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : fulleren * cluster * bombardment * polymerization Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.595, year: 2009 http://www.springerlink.com/content/0947-8396

  14. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  15. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low