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Sample records for cluster ion bombardment

  1. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzyna, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS). It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers) are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  2. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzyna Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS. It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to ~ 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  3. High depth resolution SIMS analysis using metal cluster complex ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, M; Kinno, T; Koike, M; Tanaka, H; Takeno, S [Corporate Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Fujiwara, Y; Kondou, K; Teranishi, Y; Nonaka, H; Fujimoto, T; Kurokawa, A; Ichimura, S [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: mitsuhiro.tomita@toshiba.co.jp

    2008-03-15

    SIMS depth profiles were measured using metal cluster complex ions of Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 7}{sup +} as a primary ion beam in order to obtain high depth resolution. Depth resolution was evaluated as a function of primary ion species, energy and incident angle using a multiple boron delta-doped silicon sample. The depth resolution obtained using cluster ion bombardment was considerably better than that obtained by oxygen ion bombardment under the same bombardment condition due to reduction of atomic mixing in the depth. The best depth resolution was 0.9 nm under the bombardment condition of 5 keV, 45 deg. with oxygen flooding, which approaches the value measured with state of the art SIMS analyses. However, depth resolution was not improved by decreasing the cluster ion energy (less than 5 keV), even though the roughness of the sputtered surface was suppressed. The limit of depth resolution improvement may be caused by a carbon cover-layer that prevents the formation of surface oxide that buffers atomic mixing. To overcome this issue, it will be necessary to eliminate carbon from the cluster ion.

  4. Investigation of energy thresholds of atomic and cluster sputtering of some elements under ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Atabaev, B G; Lifanova, L F

    2002-01-01

    Threshold energies of sputtering of negative cluster ions from the Si(111) surface were measured at bombardment by Cs sup + , Rb sup + , and Na sup + ions with energy of 0.1-3.0 keV. These results are compared with the calculations of the similar thresholds by Bohdansky etc. formulas (3) for clusters Si sub n sup - and Cu sub n sup - with n=(1-5) and also for B, C, Al, Si, Fe, Cu atoms. Threshold energies of sputtering for the above elements were also estimated using the data from (5). Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was obtained. (author)

  5. Photon and secondary ion emission from keV cluster bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, R.G. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    CsI clusters (Cs{sub n}I{sup {minus}}{sub n+1} n = 0 to 4) in the keV energy range (15 to 45 keV) have been used to bombard CsI targets in time-of-flight mass spectrometry experiments to study the relationships between secondary ion and photon emissions. Single ions and photons were detected simultaneously from the impact of single projectiles. The secondary ion yields from the polyatomic projectiles are proportional to the projectile momentum. The photon yields are roughly proportional to both the electronic and the nuclear stopping powers. The photon emission from the bulk of the CsI targets is attributed to excitonic processes.

  6. Strongly reduced fragmentation and soft emission processes in sputtered ion formation from amino acid films under large Ar(n)+ (n ≤ 2200) cluster ion bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Ichiki, Kazuya; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-01-15

    The analysis of organic and biological substances by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has greatly benefited from the use of cluster ions as primary bombarding species. Thereby, depth profiling and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of such systems became feasible. Large Ar(n)(+) cluster ions may constitute a further improvement in this direction. To explore this option, size-selected Ar(n)(+) cluster ions with 300 ≤ n ≤ 2200 (bombarding energies 5.5 and 11 keV) were used to investigate the emission of positive secondary ions from four amino acid specimens (arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine) by time-of-flight SIMS. For all cluster sizes, the protonated molecule of the respective amino acid is observed in the mass spectra. With increasing cluster size the number of fragment ions decreases strongly in relation to the intact molecules, to the extent that the fraction of fragment ions amounts to less than 10% in some cases. Such 'soft' emission processes also lead the ejection of dimers and even multimers of the amino acid molecules. In the case of the phenylalanine, secondary ion species composed of up to at least seven phenylalanine moieties were observed. Tentatively, the ionization probability of the emitted molecules is envisaged to depend on the presence of free protons in the emission zone. Their number can be expected to decrease concurrently with the decreasing amount of fragmentation for large Ar(n)(+) cluster ions (i.e. for low energies per cluster atom). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  8. Self-heating effect induced by ion bombardment on polycrystalline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to the self-heating effect by energy exchange between incident ions and Al surface, and the suppression by conti- nuous ion bombardment with a .... The temperature of the water-cooled substrate holder was fixed at 15. ◦. C. The Ar. + ... as the interaction between continuous ion bombardment and isotropic diffusion on the ...

  9. Influence of ion-beam bombardment on the optical properties of LDPE polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, R. A. M.; Abdul-Kader, A. M.; Ali, M.; Ali, Z. I.

    2008-10-01

    Ion beams have been found to be widely applicable in improving the structure and physical properties of polymers. In this paper, the effect of ion bombardment on the optical properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)/styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) blend (LDPE/SBR) was studied. Polymer samples were bombarded with 130 keV He and 320 keV Ar ions to fluencies ranging from 1 × 1013 to 2 × 1016 ions cm-2. The pristine and ion beam bombarded samples were investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry. The optical band gap (Eg) was decreased from ~2.3 to ~1.22 eV for the pristine sample and those samples bombarded with He and Ar ions at the highest fluence. The change in the optical gap indicates the presence of a gradual phase transition for the polymer blends. With increasing ion fluence, a decrease in both the energy gap and the activation energy was observed. The number of carbon atoms (N) in a formed cluster is found to be directly proportional to ion fluence and is determined according to the modified Tauc equation.

  10. Fundamentals for magnetic patterning by ion bombardment of exchange bias layer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresmann, A.; Engel, D.; Weis, T.; Schindler, A.; Junk, D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Höink, V.; Sacher, M. D.; Reiss, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate whether the ion bombardment induced magnetic modifications in exchange biased bilayers are stable in time, whether the direction of the exchange bias can be set to any arbitrary (in-plane) direction by the ion bombardment and whether the exchange bias field can be changed in successive bombardment steps. These three fundamental characteristics are prerequisites for ion bombardment used for an efficient, practical, and stable magnetic patterning of exchange biased layer systems.

  11. Surface chemical reactions induced on pyrite by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Gustavo; Pomiro, Fernando; Ferrón, Julio

    2018-01-01

    Through X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we studied the chemical changes induced in a natural crystal of pyrite (FeS2) upon exposure to 4.5 keV He+ beam. We found an important reducing effect induced by ion bombardment leading to the production of iron embedded in the pyrite matrix. Through a combination of the usual Doniach-Sunjic treatment and Factor Analysis of XPS yields, we were able of analyzing the full Fe 2p XPS signal. We could in this way distinguish Fe compounds with the same binding energy for the Fe 2p3/2 yield. Our results show that He+ bombardment disrupts the ionic environment producing S2-2 and S0, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions, and the reduction to metallic iron. The remaining pyrite matrix does not passivate the embedded iron structures, which are readily oxidized under air exposure. The oxide formed resembled that of magnetite from the XPS point of view. Further He+ bombardment proved to be efficient to reduce the iron oxide back to iron again.

  12. Fracture toughness and leaching behavior of ion bombarded waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Hj.; Linker, G.

    1984-02-01

    Fracture toughness Klc and fracture surface energy γ were measured on borosilicate waste glasses containing simulated fission products produced in the Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung, KFK. The Hertzian indentation technique with spherical indenters was shown to be a very powerful means with which to study mechanical and fracture properties of small highly radioactive samples. It was tested with Pu-ceramics as well as with Cm-doped glass ceramics. Radiation damage was produced by ion bombardment with Pb or Xe ions of energies up to 300 keV or with He 2+-ions (α-particles) of the cyclotron (KFK) with energies up to 77 MeV. The glasses were used either as-received or else following high-temperature, high-pressure autoclave leaching. The as-bombarded and the leached glasses were analyzed for surface composition and changes by Rutherford backscattering, RBS, with He-ions. In many cases, radiation damage caused an increase in fracture toughness, a very beneficial effect. The leached glasses that were investigated contained surface layers with thicknesses of up to ˜2 μm. RBS showed these layers to be similar in composition to thick layers analyzed by electron microprobe analysis (empa). There was no drastic influence of ion bombardment on the composition or thickness of these layers. The layers themselves caused changes of about ± 10% in the apparent fracture toughness, possibly by absorbing part of the applied energy by plastic deformation or by preventing pre-existing flaws from initiating crack formation.

  13. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semsang, Nuananong, E-mail: nsemsang@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, LiangDeng [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  14. Postannealing of magnetic tunnel junctions with ion-bombardment-modified exchange bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höink, V.; Sacher, M. D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Reiss, G.; Engel, D.; Junk, D.; Ehresmann, A.

    2005-04-01

    The influence of a postannealing procedure on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with ion-bombardment-manipulated exchange bias is investigated. The controlled manipulation of the direction of the exchange bias field in magnetic tunnel junctions by He ion bombardment usually is accompanied by a reduction of the tunneling magnetoresistance and an increase in the resistance. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to reduce these negative effects of the ion bombardment considerably by postannealing without a magnetic field. For optimized combinations of ion dose and postannealing temperature, the tunneling magnetoresistance recovers completely (>50% resistance change) while the exchange bias direction set by the ion bombardement is preserved.

  15. Spontaneous Pattern Formation on Ion Bombarded Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric; Erlebacher, Jonah, Aziz, Michael J.; Floro, Jerrold A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    1999-04-26

    Pattern formation on surfaces undergoing low-energy ion bombardment is a common phenomenon. Here, a recently developed in situ spectroscopic light scattering technique was used to monitor periodic ripple evolution on Si(001) during Ar(+) sputtering. Analysis of the rippling kinetics indicated that under high flux sputtering at low temperatures the concentration of mobile species on the surface is saturated, and, surprisingly, is both temperature and ion flux independent. This is due to an effect of ion collision cascades on the concentration of mobile species. This new understanding of surface dynamics during sputtering allowed us to measure straighforwardly the activation energy for atomic migration on the surface to be 1.2+0.1 eV. The technique is generalizable to any material, including high temperature and insulating materials for which surface migration energies are notoriously difficult to measure.

  16. Fundamentals for magnetic patterning by ion bombardment of exchange bias layer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehresmann, A.; Engel, D.; Weis, T. [Institute of Physics and Centre for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), Kassel University, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Schindler, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Junk, D. [Technische Physik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Schmalhorst, J.; Hoeink, V.; Sacher, M.D.; Reiss, G. [Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate whether the ion bombardment induced magnetic modifications in exchange biased bilayers are stable in time, whether the direction of the exchange bias can be set to any arbitrary (in-plane) direction by the ion bombardment and whether the exchange bias field can be changed in successive bombardment steps. These three fundamental characteristics are prerequisites for ion bombardment used for an efficient, practical, and stable magnetic patterning of exchange biased layer systems. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Hydrogen ion bombardment damage in stainless steel mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical University ' KhPI' , Kharkov, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Bardamid, A.F. [T. Shevchenko National University, Kiev (Ukraine); Davis, J.W. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Haasz, A.A. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada)]. E-mail: aahaasz@utias.utoronto.ca; Konovalov, V.G. [NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kudlenko, A.D. [National Technical University ' KhPI' , Kharkov, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Poon, M. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Slatin, K.A. [National Technical University ' KhPI' , Kharkov, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Voitsenya, V.S. [NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2005-10-15

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the changes in surface structure and the resulting effects on the optical properties of stainless steel due to hydrogen ion irradiation. Stainless steel (SS) is a standard material used for in-vessel components, including the first mirrors (FMs), in some current generation fusion devices. Optical microscopy, interferometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ellipsometry were used to characterize the surfaces. Results are presented for the bombardment of SS mirrors with H{sub 3}{sup +} ions having various fixed energies (0.3, 0.65, and 1.5keV/H{sup +}), with ion flux densities of (0.5-2)x10{sup 20} H{sup +}/m{sup 2}s and fluences of {approx}2.2x10{sup 24} H{sup +}/m{sup 2}. Variation of the ion energy at a constant fluence had a considerable effect on the damage structure that forms on the SS mirror surfaces. Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the surface are discussed and a model of the damaged surface layer is proposed.

  18. Hydrogen ion bombardment damage in stainless steel mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, A. I.; Bardamid, A. F.; Davis, J. W.; Haasz, A. A.; Konovalov, V. G.; Kudlenko, A. D.; Poon, M.; Slatin, K. A.; Voitsenya, V. S.

    2005-10-01

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the changes in surface structure and the resulting effects on the optical properties of stainless steel due to hydrogen ion irradiation. Stainless steel (SS) is a standard material used for in-vessel components, including the first mirrors (FMs), in some current generation fusion devices. Optical microscopy, interferometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ellipsometry were used to characterize the surfaces. Results are presented for the bombardment of SS mirrors with H3+ ions having various fixed energies (0.3, 0.65, and 1.5 keV/H+), with ion flux densities of (0.5-2) × 1020 H+/m2s and fluences of ∼2.2 × 1024 H+/m2. Variation of the ion energy at a constant fluence had a considerable effect on the damage structure that forms on the SS mirror surfaces. Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the surface are discussed and a model of the damaged surface layer is proposed.

  19. Direct and Recoil-Induced Electron Emission from Ion-Bombarded Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmen, G.; Svensson, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    1979-01-01

    The kinetic emission of secondary electrons from ion-bombarded solid surfaces is split into two contributions, a direct one caused by ionizing collisions between the bombarding ion and target atoms, and an indirect one originating from ionizing collisions undergone by recoil atoms with other target...... atoms. The direct contribution, which has been treated by several authors in previous studies, shows a behavior that is determined primarily by the electronic stopping power of the bombarding ion, while the indirect contribution is nonproportionally related to the nuclear stopping power. This latter...... contribution is known to be quite important for heavy-ion bombardment at keV energies, and is shown to be of crucial importance for the understanding of the energy dependence of the electron yield in such cases. The model is shown to give consistent results for copper bombarded with electrons, protons...

  20. Modification of the saturation magnetization of exchange bias thin film systems upon light-ion bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckfeldt, Henning; Gaul, Alexander; David Müglich, Nicolas; Holzinger, Dennis; Nissen, Dennis; Albrecht, Manfred; Emmrich, Daniel; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Ehresmann, Arno

    2017-03-29

    The magnetic modification of exchange bias materials by 'ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning' has been established more than a decade ago. To understand these experimental findings several theoretical models were introduced. Few investigations, however, did focus on magnetic property modifications caused by effects of ion bombardment in the ferromagnetic layer. In the present study, the structural changes occurring under ion bombardment were investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations and in experiments. A strong reduction of the saturation magnetization scaling linearly with increasing ion doses is observed and our findings suggest that it is correlated to the swelling of the layer material based on helium implantation and vacancy creation.

  1. Switchable resonant x-ray Bragg scattering on a magnetic grating patterned by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höink, V.; Sacher, M. D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Reiss, G.; Engel, D.; Weis, T.; Ehresmann, A.

    2006-09-01

    A local manipulation of the exchange bias coupling between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers by ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning enables a patterning of the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic layer without considerable structural changes. We show that a magnetic line grating with alternating antiparallel orientations of the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer acts as a magnetically switchable reflective grating for soft x-ray radiation. A common rotational direction of the magnetization at all boundaries between bombarded and not bombarded lines is shown by magnetic force microscopy measurements. Scattering at the edges of the bombarded lines might be responsible for the observed interference pattern.

  2. Initialization of unidirectional anisotropy in a ferromagnet antiferromagnet bilayer by keV-He ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, D.; Ehresmann, A.; Schmalhorst, J.; Sacher, M.; Höink, V.; Reiss, G.

    2005-06-01

    A polycrystalline Cu/Ni80Fe20/Mn83Ir17/Co/AlOx ferromagnet-antiferromagnet layer system grown without applying an external magnetic field shows no unidirectional anisotropy in the as-prepared state. After 10 keV-He ion bombardment in an external in-plane magnetic field, a clear unidirectional anisotropy collinear to the magnetic field direction during bombardment is observed, indicating that ion bombardment can be used for this system to initialize the unidirectional exchange anisotropy. The magnetization reversal processes for various ion doses are discussed, based on longitudinal magnetooptical Kerr-effect measurements.

  3. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B. [Institute of Science and Technology Research, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  4. Ion Fluence and Energy Effects on the Optical Properties of SS Mirrors Bombarded by Hydrogen Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardamid, A.F. [T. Shevchenko National Univ., Kiev (Ukraine); Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical Univ. KhPI, Kharkov (Ukraine); Bondarenko, V.N. [NSC KIPT, Kharkov (Ukraine)] (and others)

    2003-04-01

    The effects of hydrogen ion (H{sub 3}{sup +}) bombardment on the optical properties of polycrystal stainless steel (SS) mirrors were investigated. Ellipsometry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, angle distribution of scattered light, and spectral reflectance were used to characterize the surfaces. Results for the bombardment of SS mirrors with ions of fixed energy (0.3, 0.65 and 1.5 keV/H), with ion flux density (0.5-2) x 10{sup 20} H/m{sup 2}/s up to fluences of (1.1-4.3) x 10{sup 24} H/m{sup 2} are presented. The data show that the surface roughness rises with both increasing ion energy and ion fluence, and that surface roughening leads to an increase of the scattered light with a corresponding decrease of reflectance at normal incidence. The thickness of the apparent layer, obtained by ellipsometry, was found to rise with increasing ion energy at fixed ion fluence and with increasing ion fluence at fixed ion energy. Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the degradation rate of stainless steel mirrors and the origin of the apparent layer are discussed.

  5. Ion Fluence and Energy Effects on the Optical Properties of SS Mirrors Bombarded by Hydrogen Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardamid, A. F.; Belyaeva, A. I.; Bondarenko, V. N.; Davis, J. W.; Galuza, A. A.; Garkusha, I. E.; Haasz, A. A.; Konovalov, V. G.; Kudlenko, A. D.; Poon, M.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Solodovchenko, S. I.; Shtan, A. F.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Yakimov, K. I.

    The effects of hydrogen ion (H3+) bombardment on the optical properties of polycrystal stainless steel (SS) mirrors were investigated. Ellipsometry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, angle distribution of scattered light, and spectral reflectance were used to characterize the surfaces. Results for the bombardment of SS mirrors with ions of fixed energy (0.3, 0.65 and 1.5 keV/H), with ion flux density >(0.5-2) · 1020 H/m2s up to fluences of (1.1-4.3) · 1024 H}/m2 are presented.  The data show that the surface roughness rises with both increasing ion energy and ion fluence, and that surface roughening leads to an increase of the scattered light with a corresponding decrease of reflectance at normal incidence. The thickness of the apparent layer, obtained by ellipsometry, was found to rise with increasing ion energy at fixed ion fluence and with increasing ion fluence at fixed ion energy.  Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the degradation rate of stainless steel mirrors and the origin of the apparent layer are discussed.

  6. The interpretation of ellipsometric measurements of ion bombardment of noble gases on semiconductor surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.H.M.; Slager, U.C.; van Silfhout, Arend

    1985-01-01

    Low energy noble gas ion bombardment and thermal desorption studies were carried out on Si(111) and analysed, in situ, using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The amorphous layer thickness and implanted noble gas fraction were calculated.

  7. Influence of the ion bombardment of O{sub 2} plasmas on low-k materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdonck, Patrick, E-mail: verdonck@imec.be [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Samara, Vladimir [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Goodyear, Alec [Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferchichi, Abdelkarim; Van Besien, Els; Baklanov, Mikhail R. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Braithwaite, Nicholas [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-31

    In this study, special tests were devised in order to investigate the influence of ion bombardment on the damage induced in low-k dielectrics by oxygen plasmas. By placing a sample that suffered a lot of ion bombardment and one which suffered little ion bombardment simultaneously in the same plasma, it was possible to verify that ion bombardment in fact helped to protect the low-k film against oxygen plasma induced damage. Exhaustive analyses (ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, porosimetry, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, water contact angle analysis) show that ion bombardment induced the formation of a denser top layer in the film, which then hampered further penetration of active oxygen species deeper into the bulk. This was further confirmed by other tests combining capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that, at least for these plasmas, ion bombardment may help to reduce plasma induced damage to low-k materials.

  8. Nanometer-scale sharpening and surface roughening of ZnO nanorods by argon ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Behera, Akshaya K. [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Banerjee, Amarabha; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Som, Tapobrata [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-07-01

    We report the effects of exposing a hydrothermally grown, single crystalline ZnO nanorod array to a beam of 50 keV argon ions at room temperature. High resolution electron microscopy reveals that the ion bombardment results in a nanometer-scale roughening of the nanorod sidewalls, which were almost atomically flat in the pristine sample. Ion bombardment further causes the flat, Almost-Equal-To 100 nm diameter nanorod tips to get sharpened to ultrafine points less than 10 nm across. While tip sharpening is attributed to preferential sputtering, the formation of crystalline surface protuberances can be ascribed to surface instability due to curvature dependent sputtering and surface diffusion under argon-ion bombardment. Both the nanoscale roughening as well as the tip sharpening are expected to favorably impact a wide variety of applications, such as those involving catalysis, gas sensing, solar cells, field emission and gas discharge.

  9. Enhanced End-Contacts by Helium Ion Bombardment to Improve Graphene-Metal Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Jia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low contact resistance between graphene and metals is of paramount importance to fabricate high performance graphene-based devices. In this paper, the impact of both defects induced by helium ion (He+ bombardment and annealing on the contact resistance between graphene and various metals (Ag, Pd, and Pt were systematically explored. It is found that the contact resistances between all metals and graphene are remarkably reduced after annealing, indicating that not only chemically adsorbed metal (Pd but also physically adsorbed metals (Ag and Pt readily form end-contacts at intrinsic defect locations in graphene. In order to further improve the contact properties between Ag, Pd, and Pt metals and graphene, a novel method in which self-aligned He+ bombardment to induce exotic defects in graphene and subsequent thermal annealing to form end-contacts was proposed. By using this method, the contact resistance is reduced significantly by 15.1% and 40.1% for Ag/graphene and Pd/graphene contacts with He+ bombardment compared to their counterparts without He+ bombardment. For the Pt/graphene contact, the contact resistance is, however, not reduced as anticipated with He+ bombardment and this might be ascribed to either inappropriate He+ bombardment dose, or inapplicable method of He+ bombardment in reducing contact resistance for Pt/graphene contact. The joint efforts of as-formed end-contacts and excess created defects in graphene are discussed as the cause responsible for the reduction of contact resistance.

  10. Angular and energy dependence of ion bombardment of Mo/Si multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorma, H.J.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.

    1997-01-01

    The process of ion bombardment is investigated for the fabrication of Mo/Si multilayer x-ray mirrors using e-beam evaporation. The ion treatment is applied immediately after deposition of each of the Si layers to smoothen the layers by removing an additional thickness of the Si layer. In this study...

  11. Linear and nonlinear effects at low energy ion bombardment of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Elastic sputtering of crystalline xenon by 20-750 eV Xe ions has been studied with molecular dynamics. The nonlinear effects are dominant at 250 eV ion bombardment. They result in a partly amorphization of the impact volume as well as in a considerable reduction of the surface binding energy...

  12. Ion-Bombardment of Thin-Layers - the Effect on the Interface Roughness and Its X-Ray Reflectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puik, E. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Zeijlemaker, H.; Verhoeven, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we report on experiments which indicate the necessity of the use of ion-beam bombardment for e-beam deposited multilayer x-ray coatings. Measurements are described in which ion bombardment (200-300 eV Ar+) is used to ion etch metal layers after initial deposition and during deposition

  13. Secondary ion emission from A sup I sup I sup I B sup V compound semiconductors under MeV-energy heavy ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Ninomiya, S; Nagai, M; Nakata, Y; Imai, M; Imanishi, N

    2003-01-01

    Mass and yields of secondary ions emitted from GaP, GaAs, GaSb and InSb targets bombarded by MeV-energy heavy ion have been investigated. Obtained feature of the secondary ion emission depends characteristically on the target species. Molecular and small cluster ions were emitted from the GaP and GaAs targets. On the other hand, pretty large cluster ions were emitted from the GaSb and InSb targets. Yields of clusters from the GaSb target increase with increasing the incident energy and decrease exponentially with the cluster size, while yields from the InSb target keep constant or decrease gently with increasing the incident energy and show the power law dependence on the cluster size. These results show that cluster ions from the GaSb target are formed through a coagulation of small molecules emitted from the target in the selvage region near the surface, and those from the InSb target are emitted directly from the surface as cluster.

  14. Inverse photoemission and LEED investigation of the ion-bombarded Ni(110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Benjamin; Warner, Jim; Heskett, David

    2012-02-01

    Ion bombardment of the clean Ni(110) surface is investigated by a combination of Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES) with a Geiger-Muller detector and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) with a homebuilt video capture system. Disorder of the surface is induced by argon ion bombardment with various combinations of argon pressure and sputtering time. The intensity of the unoccupied surface state at ˜ 2eV above the Fermi level at the =Y point of the surface Brillouin zone decreases with increasing surface bombardment. Simultaneously, intensity profiles of diffraction spots in LEED exhibit broadening and a rising background level for increasing surface disorder. Multiple attempts at correlation between the results of the two techniques are presented.

  15. Direct evidence for a thermal effect of Ar/sup +/ ion bombardment in a conventional sputtering mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, F.; Fujimoto, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Evidence is presented that the Ar/sup +/ ion bombardment for sputtering in Auger electron spectroscopy can heat the target up to 2000 /sup 0/C if the target has poor heat conduction. Polycrystalline microneedles of Cr exhibited spherical tips after being exposed to 3 keV Ar/sup +/ ions, proving that the needle tips were melted by impacting Ar/sup +/ ions. Microneedles of Mo ion bombarded under the same condition were bent plastically, which perhaps reflects the thermal annealing of the needles during ion bombardment.

  16. The influence of argon ion bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of clean silicon surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, J.W.D.; van den Bogert, W.F.; van Silfhout, Arend

    1981-01-01

    The effect of low energy noble gas ion bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of Si(211) surfaces has been investigated by surface conductivity and field effect measurements, ellipsometry and AES. With this combination of techniques, information is obtained concerning the electrical

  17. Thermal stability of magnetic nanostructures in ion-bombardment-modified exchange-bias systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höink, V.; Sacher, M. D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Reiss, G.; Engel, D.; Weis, T.; Ehresmann, A.

    2006-06-01

    In magnetic bilayer systems consisting of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet the strength and direction of the exchange bias coupling can be set by ion bombardment in an external magnetic field. Magnetic nanostructures with a laterally varying exchange bias direction can be produced by local ion bombardment (ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning). We have investigated the thermal stability of these magnetic nanostructures by in situ x-ray photoemission electron microscopy while heating the samples above their blocking temperature. The investigations have been done at a 10.4μm×10.4μm large checkered pattern with a minimum size of the magnetic patterns of 800nm×800nm on a field cooled MnIr/CoFe stack and a pattern with 1.6μm wide lines with a periodicity of 5μm on an as-prepared MnIr/Co stack. The temperature dependence of the magnetization pattern can be explained by the temperature dependence of the exchange bias interaction, the exchange interaction energy, and the stray field energy. No substantial change of the thermal stability of magnetic patterns in remanence by the ion bombardment was found.

  18. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  19. Influence of the inert and active ion bombardment on structure of the transition metal thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Blazhevich, S; Martynov, I; Neklyudov, I

    2002-01-01

    The results of the experimental research of the inert (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) and active (O, N) ion impact on the transition metal structure are presented. Thin high-purity (99.999 at.%) films of nickel, chrome and iron were used in the experiment. The bombardment was realized under room temperature at high vacuum (P<1x10 sup - sup 7 Pa) by a separated ion beam of 10-10 sup 3 keV. As a main result of the experiment, the full absence of crystal matrix changes was ascertained for all the transition metals irradiated by inert gas ions. The chemical nature of the crystal structure changes observed in transition metals being under active ion bombardment was found out too.

  20. Films deposited from reactive sputtering of aluminum acetylacetonate under low energy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglin, Felipe Augusto Darriba; Prado, Eduardo Silva; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano, E-mail: elidiane@sorocaba.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Plasmas Tecnologicos; Caseli, Luciano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Ambientais, Quimicas e Farmaceuticas; Silva, Tiago Fiorini da; Tabacniks, Manfredo Harri [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2017-07-15

    Films were deposited from aluminum acetylacetonate (Al(acac)3 ) using a methodology involving reactive sputtering and low energy ion bombardment. The plasma was generated by the application of radiofrequency power to the powder containing electrode and simultaneously, negative pulses were supplied to the electrode where the substrates were attached. It was investigated the effect of the duty cycle of the pulses (Δ) on the properties of the coatings. Association of ion bombardment to the deposition process increased film thickness, structure reticulation and organic content. Ions from the deposition environment were implanted at the film-air interface or underneath it. Morphology and topography were altered depending on Δ. Considering the enhancement of Δ, it affected the flux of ions reaching the depositing interface and then the deposition rate, H content, crosslinking degree and surface microstructure. Alumina groups were detected in the infrared spectra, whereas the precipitation of amorphous alumina was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. (author)

  1. Modelling and simulation of surface morphology driven by ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yewande, E.O.

    2006-05-02

    Non-equilibrium surfaces, at nanometer length scales, externally driven via bombardment with energetic particles are known to exhibit well ordered patterns with a variety of applications in nano-technology. These patterns emerge at time scales on the order of minutes. Continuum theory has been quite successful in giving a general picture of the processes that interplay to give the observed patterns, as well as how such competition might determine the properties of the nanostructures. However, continuum theoretical descriptions are ideal only in the asymptotic limit. The only other theoretical alternative, which happens to be more suitable for the characteristic length-and time-scales of pattern formation, is Monte Carlo simulation. In this thesis, surface morphology is studied using discrete solid-on-solid Monte Carlo models of sputtering and surface diffusion. The simulations are performed in the context of the continuum theories and experiments. In agreement with the experiments, the ripples coarsen with time and the ripple velocity exhibits a power-law behaviour with the ripple wavelength, in addition, the exponent was found to depend on the simulation temperature, which suggests future experimental studies of flux dependence. Moreover, a detailed exploration of possible topographies, for different sputtering conditions, corresponding to different materials, was performed. And different surface topographies e.g. holes, ripples, and dots, were found at oblique incidence, without sample rotation. With sample rotation no new topography was found, its only role being to destroy any inherent anisotropy in the system. (orig.)

  2. Highly ordered nanoscale patterns produced by masked ion bombardment of a moving solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Martin P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2012-09-01

    We introduce a fabrication method in which a mask with a long, narrow slit is placed between the source of an ion beam and the surface of a solid moving with constant speed. Numerical simulations reveal the method can generate surface ripples and arrays of nanoholes that are virtually defect free. In contrast, the patterns produced by ion bombardment with a broad, unmasked beam are typically rife with defects.

  3. A low-voltage, high-current, ion-bombardment source using magnetron principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ja' fer, H.A.; Howson, R.P. (Loughborough Univ of Technology (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics)

    The operation of an unbalanced magnetron under conditions using extra electron injection is shown to be a source of plasma beam which can give a substrate a self-bias of between 25 and 100 V, and allow total ion-currents of over one ampere to be drawn to a target. The use of the device to give low-energy, ion-bombardment of a growing films and to form a dense plasma source for low voltage sputtering is reported. (Author).

  4. Particularities of LaB sub 6 behaviour under bombardment with helium and argon energetic ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lesnyakov, G G; Klyimenko, V M; Pershyin, V F

    2002-01-01

    The investigation results on the bombardment of LaB sub 6 of 18 - 26% porosity with 20 keV helium and 0.5 keV argon ions are presented. the main contribution to the erosion is made by the material removal from the surface, which confirms the earlier conclusions about weakness of boundary grain, pores, and formation of cracks and round dislocation etch pits. It is shown that, during the bombardment as a dose is increased, a layer is formed on the LaB sub 6 surface with a subsequent change of the relative content of two elements. It is determined when and where one can expect the formation of LaB sub 4 under bombardment of the surface.

  5. In-situ study of emerging metallicity and memory effect on ion-beam bombarded strontium titanate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Heiko

    In this work we present an investigation of the occurrence of conductivity on the surface of SrTiO3 due to argon ion bombardment. We created a model to describe this process and found that the temperature during the ion milling is a crucial factor for the conductivity. Depending on the temperatures we found surface carrier densities ranging from nS = 1:5 x 1018 to 2:6 x 1020 cm -3 by just analyzing the conductivity behavior. Clustering of vacancies goes along with temperature and affects the conductivity significantly. Furthermore we found that ion milling is a gentle way to create vacancies because the clustering rate is small compared to annealing samples in high vacuum. The amount of clusters at room temperature was measured to be around 3-4 times higher than at -140°C. We found that samples with a conducting surface change their resistance over time at room-temperature due to the ongoing process of oxygen vacancy clustering. This effect may be suppressed by decreasing the temperature. The bistable switching behavior in oxygen deficient SrTiO3 is shown without any additional doping. The vacancy migration is the major mechanism behind this memory effect. Comparing this behavior with annealed samples in high vacuum shows that the therein present amount of vacancy clusters must be much larger and has a negative effect on the bistable switching behavior.

  6. Adsorption Site of Gas Molecules on Defective Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Formed Through Ion Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzar, Zuriana; Johari, Zaharah; Sakina, S. H.; Alias, N. Ezaila

    2018-02-01

    High sensitivity and selectivity is desired in sensing devices. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the ion bombardment process in creating a defect on graphene nanoribbons (GNR), which significantly affects sensing properties, in particular adsorption energy, charge transfer and sensitivity. A process has been developed to form the defect on the GNR surface using molecular dynamic (MD) with a reactive force field with nitrogen ion. The sensing properties were calculated using the extended Huckel theory when oxygen (O2) and ammonia (NH3) molecules are exposed to different areas on the defective site. Through simulation, it was found that the ion bombardment process formed various types of defects on the GNR surface. Most notably, molecules adsorbed on the ripple area considerably improve the sensitivity by more than 50%. This indicates that the defect on the armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) surface can be a method to enhance graphene-based sensing performance.

  7. Importance of ion bombardment during coverage of Au nanoparticles on their structural features and optical response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resta, V.; Peláez, R. J.; Afonso, C. N. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica, CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-28

    This work studies the changes in the optical response and morphological features of 6 ± 1 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs) when covered by a layer of a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The laser fluence used for ablating the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} target is varied in order to modify the kinetic energy (KE) of the species bombarding the NPs during their coverage. When the ion KE < 200 eV, the structural features and optical properties of the NPs are close to those of uncovered ones. Otherwise, a shift to the blue and a strong damping of the surface plasmon resonance is observed as fluence is increased. There are two processes responsible for these changes, both related to aluminum ions arriving to the substrate during the coverage process, i.e., sputtering of the metal and implantation of aluminum species in the metal. Both processes have been simulated using standard models for ion bombardment, the calculated effective implanted depths allow explaining the observed changes in the optical response, and the use of a size-dependent sputtering coefficient for the Au NPs predicts the experimental sputtering fractions. In spite of the work is based on PLD, the concepts investigated and conclusions can straightforwardly be extrapolated to other physical vapor deposition techniques or processes involving ion bombardment of metal NPs by ions having KE > 200 eV.

  8. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of cryogenic surfaces bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Evans, L; Kollmus, H; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Severin, D; Wengenroth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to study the dynamic outgassing of cryogenic surfaces. Two different targets, bare and goldcoated copper, were bombarded under perpendicular impact with 4.2 MeV/u Pb54+ ions. Partial pressure rises of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 and effective desorption yields were measured at 300, 77, and 6.3 K using single shot and continuous ion bombardment techniques. We find that the heavy-ion-induced desorption yield is temperature dependent and investigate the influence of CO gas cryosorbed at 6.3 K. The gain in desorption yield reduction at cryogenic temperature vanishes after several monolayers of CO are cryosorbed on both targets. In this paper we describe the new cryogenic target assembly, the temperature-dependent pressure rise, desorption yield, and gas adsorption measurements.

  9. Initialization of unidirectional anisotropy in a ferromagnet-antiferromagnet bilayer by keV-He ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, D. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Str. D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)]. E-mail: wengel@rhrk.uni-kl.de; Ehresmann, A. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Str. D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Schmalhorst, J. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Sacher, M. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Hoeink, V. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Reiss, G. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    A polycrystalline Cu/Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/Mn{sub 83}Ir{sub 17}/Co/AlO{sub x} ferromagnet-antiferromagnet layer system grown without applying an external magnetic field shows no unidirectional anisotropy in the as-prepared state. After 10keV-He ion bombardment in an external in-plane magnetic field, a clear unidirectional anisotropy collinear to the magnetic field direction during bombardment is observed, indicating that ion bombardment can be used for this system to initialize the unidirectional exchange anisotropy. The magnetization reversal processes for various ion doses are discussed, based on longitudinal magnetooptical Kerr-effect measurements.

  10. Confirming the key role of Ar+ ion bombardment in the growth feature of nanostructured carbon materials by PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Lin, Jinghuang; Jia, Henan; Chen, Shulin; Qi, Junlei; Qu, Chaoqun; Cao, Jian; Feng, Jicai; Fei, Weidong

    2017-11-01

    In order to confirm the key role of Ar+ ion bombardment in the growth feature of nanostructured carbon materials (NCMs), here we report a novel strategy to create different Ar+ ion states in situ in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) by separating catalyst film from the substrate. Different bombardment environments on either side of the catalyst film were created simultaneously to achieve multi-layered structural NCMs. Results showed that Ar+ ion bombardment is crucial and complex for the growth of NCMs. Firstly, Ar+ ion bombardment has both positive and negative effects on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). On one hand, Ar+ ions can break up the graphic structure of CNTs and suppress thin CNT nucleation and growth. On the other hand, Ar+ ion bombardment can remove redundant carbon layers on the surface of large catalyst particles which is essential for thick CNTs. As a result, the diameter of the CNTs depends on the Ar+ ion state. As for vertically oriented few-layer graphene (VFG), Ar+ ions are essential and can even convert the CNTs into VFG. Therefore, by combining with the catalyst separation method, specific or multi-layered structural NCMs can be obtained by PECVD only by changing the intensity of Ar+ ion bombardment, and these special NCMs are promising in many fields.

  11. Computer simulation of chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, J H; Roth, J; Eckstein, W

    2003-01-01

    Chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment has been investigated theoretically by applying a model of chemical erosion to the TRIDYN code. The model involves the formation of methane at the end of the ion track as well as the kinetic emission of hydrocarbons from the target surface. Model calculations were performed for ion energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV and at target temperatures ranging from 300 to 900 K. Good agreement between calculated and measured erosion yields is obtained.

  12. Clusters distributions on charges and dimensions at ion metal sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, V I

    2001-01-01

    The theory on the metal sputtering in form of large (with the atoms number N >= 5) neutral and charged clusters under the impact of the ion bombardment is considered. The probability of the cluster emission, consisting of the N atoms, is calculated on the basis of the Einstein model. The charge state of the cluster, consisting of the N atoms, is determined. The obtained formulae agree well with the experimental results. It is noted, that the mass-spectra of the neutral clusters slightly depend on the target temperature, whereas the mass-spectra of the single charge clusters essentially depend on the target temperature

  13. Ion emission in solids bombarded with Au{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1 - 9) clusters accelerated within the 0.15 - 1.25 MeV energy range; Emission ionique des solides a l'impact d'agregats Au{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-9) acceleres entre 0,15 et 1,25 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehbe, Nimer [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    This experimental work is devoted to the study of the ion emission in solids at the impact of gold clusters of energies within 0.15 to 1.25 MeV range. The physics of ion-solid collisions and the theoretical models of sputtering of solids under ion bombardment are presented in the first chapter. The chapter no. 2 deals with the description of the experimental setup. The study of a gold target allowed to evidence the role of the size and energy of the clusters in determining the emission intensity and the mass distribution of the ions. The 4. chapter gives results from the study of cesium iodide in which the intense emission of CsI clusters could be investigated quantitatively due to multiplicity measurements. Finally, the chapter no. 5 was devoted to the study of a biologic molecule, the phenylalanine, and of a pesticide molecule, chlorosulfuron. This work evidenced the importance of clusters for surface analyses by mass spectrometry.

  14. A travelling wave model of ripple formation on ion bombarded surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi, E-mail: s.numazawa@hzdr.de; Smith, Roger, E-mail: R.Smith@lboro.ac.uk

    2013-05-15

    We present a mathematical model describing surface modification resulting from atomic motion after ion bombardment. The model considers only the defect production and recovery process induced by the local atom rearrangement and is essentially independent of surface topography changes formed by both sputtering and surface diffusion. A stable analytic, travelling wave solution is presented for a specific incident angle, which agrees with experimental observation excellently.

  15. Carbon monoxide production in low energy oxygen ion bombardment of pyrolytic graphite and Kapton surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an investigtion of the interaction of low energy oxygen ions with pyrolytic graphite and Kapton surface are reported. CO molecules emitted from the surface as a result of the ion bombardment were detected by a mass spectrometer. Because the ion-induced signals were small compared to that arising from the CO background pressure in the vacuum system, the ion beam was modulated and the modulated component of the CO signal measured with a lock-in amplifier. The quantum yield (CO molecules emitted per incident oxygen ion) for graphite rose from 1.9 at 4.5 eV ion energy to 6.6 at 465 eV. Comparable yields were obtained for Kapton. The large size of the yields suggests contributions to the reaction process from the background O2 molecules in the vacuum system.

  16. Light emission of sputtered particles induced by ion bombardment on water-enriched molecular ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Shuang; Ip, Wing; Liu, S. H.; Hsu, G. Y.; Lee, Shyong

    2007-03-01

    We had measured the light of sputtered particles in a visible region induced by various projectiles bombarding water-enriched molecular ices, like mixed ices of CH4 + NH3 + H2O (1:1:1). In this experiment, each constituent contained in this iced sample was found to emit a characteristic wavelength of light. We believe this characteristic is due to certain ion attached to parent molecule (constituent) that are dissociated with parent molecule in the collision process. Some of those ions, before emerging out the iced film, will become neutralized and develop into excited states due to electron capture. Then the characteristic wavelengths of light will decay from these excited sputtered particles; hence, from the light emission, one can analyze the constituents of an unknown ice. On the other hand, the intensity of the distribution of light emission during ion bombardment can be interpreted as an ion-ice interaction following the similar collision mechanism as ion-metal interaction, i.e. mainly the linear-cascade collision model.

  17. Low-energy ion beam bombardment effect on the plant-cell-envelope mimetic membrane for DNA transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K., E-mail: k.prakrajang@gmail.com [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90112 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-09-01

    This study is a systematic analysis of the mechanisms involved in ion-beam induced DNA transfer, an important application of ion beam biotechnology. Cellulose membranes were used to mimic the plant cell envelope. Ion beams of argon (Ar) or nitrogen (N) at an energy of 25 keV bombarded the cellulose membranes at fluences ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The damage to the ion-beam-bombarded membranes was characterized using infrared spectroscopy, a micro tensile test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chain scission was the dominant radiation damage type in the membrane. DNA diffusion across the membrane was significantly increased after ion beam bombardment. The increase in DNA transfer is therefore attributed to chain scission, which increases the permeability by increasing the number of pores in the membrane.

  18. Low temperature magnetron sputter deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films using high flux ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Jennifer E.; Abelson, John R.

    2007-03-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructure of polycrystalline silicon thin films depends strongly on the flux of low energy ions that bombard the growth surface during magnetron sputter deposition. The deposition system is equipped with external electromagnetic coils which, through the unbalanced magnetron effect, provide direct control of the ion flux independent of the ion energy. We report the influence of low energy (thin films onto amorphous substrates. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy to analyze the film microstructure. We demonstrate that increasing the flux ratio of Ar+ ions to silicon neutrals (J+/J0) during growth by an order of magnitude (from 3 to 30) enables the direct nucleation of polycrystalline Si on glass and SiO2 coated Si at temperatures below 400°C. We discuss possible mechanisms for this enhancement of crystalline microstructure, including the roles of enhanced adatom mobility and the formation of shallow, mobile defects.

  19. Ion Back-Bombardment of GaAs Photocathodes Inside DC High Voltage Electron Guns

    CERN Document Server

    Grames, Joseph M; Brittian, Joshua; Charles, Daniel; Clark, Jim; Hansknecht, John; Lynn Stutzman, Marcy; Poelker, Matthew; Surles-Law, Kenneth E

    2005-01-01

    The primary limitation for sustained high quantum efficiency operation of GaAs photocathodes inside DC high voltage electron guns is ion back-bombardment of the photocathode. This process results from ionization of residual gas within the cathode/anode gap by the extracted electron beam, which is subsequently accelerated backwards to the photocathode. The damage mechanism is believed to be either destruction of the negative electron affinity condition at the surface of the photocathode or damage to the crystal structure by implantation of the bombarding ions. This work characterizes ion formation within the anode/cathode gap for gas species typical of UHV vacuum chambers (i.e., hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane). Calculations and simulations are performed to determine the ion trajectories and stopping distance within the photocathode material. The results of the simulations are compared with test results obtained using a 100 keV DC high voltage GaAs photoemission gun and beamline at currents up to 10 mA D...

  20. Absorption of hydrogen in vanadium, enhanced by ion bombardment; Ionenbeschussunterstuetzte Absorption des Wasserstoffs in Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, H.; Lammers, M. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany); Mueller, K.H. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany)]|[Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule), Soest (Germany). Fachbereich 16 - Elektrische Energietechnik; Kiss, G.; Kemeny, Z. [Technical Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    Prior to hydrogen implantation into vanadium, the vanadium specimen usually is exposed to an activation process and is then heated at 1 atm hydrogen to temperatures between 500 and 600 C, subsequently cooled down in several steps. Within this temperature range, hydrogen solubility increases with declining temperature. A decisive factor determining hydrogen absorption is the fact that at temperatures above 250 C, oxygen desorbs from the material surface and thus no longer inhibits hydrogen absorption. Therefore a different approach was chosen for the experiments reported: Hydrogen absorption under UHV conditions at room temperature. After the usual activation process, the vanadium surface was cleaned by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. Thus oxygen absorption at the specimen surface (and new reactions with oxygen from the remaining gas) could be avoided, or removed. By means of thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS), hydrogen absorption as a function of argon ion dose was analysed. TDMS measurements performed for specimens treated by ion bombardment prior to H{sup 2} exposure showed two H{sup 2} desorption peaks, in contrast to the profiles measured with specimens not exposed to ion bombardment. It is assumed that the ion bombardment disturbs the crystal structure so that further sites for hydrogen absorption are produced. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Bei der Beladung von Vandium mit Wasserstoff wird ueblicherweise die Probe nach einer Aktivierungsprozedur bei 1 atm Wasserstoff auf Temperaturen im Bereich von 500 bis 600 C hochgeheizt und danach schrittweise abgekuehlt. In diesem Temperaturbereich nimmt die Wasserstoffloeslichkeit mit abnehmender Temperatur zu. Entscheidend fuer die Beladung ist aber auch die Tatsache, dass bei Temperaturen groesser 250 C Sauerstoff von der Oberflaeche desorbiert und dadurch die Absorption von Wasserstoff nicht mehr blockieren kann. Im Rahmen der hier beschriebenen Untersuchungen sollte die Wasserstoffbeladung unter UHV-Bedingungen bei

  1. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    are considered as local transition events constrained in potential energy wells over certain local time periods. These processes are represented by Markov chains of multi-dimensional Boolean valued functions in three dimensional lattice space. Consequently, the fluctuating system evolution process is implemented as a Markov chain of equivalence class objects. It is shown that the process can be characterized by the acceptance of metastable local transitions. The method is applied to a problem of Au and Ag cluster growth on a rippled surface. The simulation predicts the existence of a morphology dependent transition time limit from a local metastable to stable state for subsequent cluster growth by accretion. The third topic is the formation of ripple structures on ion bombarded semiconductor surfaces treated in the first topic as the prepatterned substrate of the metallic deposition. This intriguing phenomenon has been known since the 1960's and various theoretical approaches have been explored. These previous models are discussed and a new non-linear model is formulated, based on the local atomic flow and associated density change in the near surface region. Within this framework ripple structures are shown to form without the necessity to invoke surface diffusion or large sputtering as important mechanisms. The model can also be extended to the case where sputtering is important and it is shown that in this case, certain 'magic' angles can occur at which the ripple patterns are most clearly defined. The results including some analytic solutions of the nonlinear equation of motions are in very good agreement with experimental observation.

  2. Biological Effects of Low Energy Ar+ Ion Bombardment on Silkworm Eggs: a Novel Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaping; Wu, Yuejin; Liu, Xuelan; Yuan, Hang; Yu, Zengliang

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we found for the first time that silkworm eggs were able to survive in vacuum for a long period of time. Subsequently, low energy Ar+ ions with different energies and fluences were used to bombard silkworm eggs so as to explore the resulting biological effects. Results showed that (i) the exposure of silkworm eggs to vacuum within 10 min did not cause significant impact on the hatching rates, while the irradiation of silkworm eggs by Ar+ ions of 25 keV or 30 keV with fluences ranging from 2.6×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 to 8×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 caused a significant impact on the hatching rates, and the hatching rates decreased with the increase in the fluence and energy level; (ii) the irradiation of silkworm eggs by Ar+ ions of 30 keV with a fluence of 8×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 or 9×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 resulted in a noticeable etching on the egg shell surface which could be observed by a scanning electron microscope; and (iii) the irradiation of silkworm eggs by Ar+ ions of 30 keV with a fluence of 9×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 generated several mutant phenotypes which were observed in the 5th instar silkworms and a moth.

  3. Immediate fabrication of flower-like graphene oxide by ion beam bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Junjie [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Division of Nanobiomedicine, Key Laboratory for Nano-Bio Interface Research, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xiong, Shiquan [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pei, Renjun, E-mail: rjpei2011@sinano.ac.cn [Division of Nanobiomedicine, Key Laboratory for Nano-Bio Interface Research, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Cai, Dongqing, E-mail: dqcai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wu, Zhengyan, E-mail: zywu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment (IBB) could modify the microstructure of graphene oxide (GO). • IBB could transform a compact multi-layered GO to a few-layered flower-like GO. • IBB could effectively improve the dispersion and the related properties of GO. • The main mechanism was proposed to be the etching and charge effects of IBB. - Abstract: An effective and convenient method using ion beam bombardment (IBB) for separating a multi-layered compact graphene oxide (GO) piece into several small few-layered loose pieces was developed, and it was found that those small GO pieces had formed a flower-like structure. Therein, the main mechanism was proposed to be the etching and charge effects of IBB. This work could provide a facile and promising approach for improving the dispersion and the related properties of GO. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrum determinations demonstrated that, with the increasing fluence, IBB could effectively decrease the chemical groups in the layers of GO, resulting in the decrease of the layer distance.

  4. Ion bombardment induced buried lateral growth: the key mechanism for the synthesis of single crystal diamond wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Matthias; Gsell, Stefan; Brescia, Rosaria; Fischer, Martin

    2017-03-01

    A detailed mechanism for heteroepitaxial diamond nucleation under ion bombardment in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition setup on the single crystal surface of iridium is presented. The novel mechanism of Ion Bombardment Induced Buried Lateral Growth (IBI-BLG) is based on the ion bombardment induced formation and lateral spread of epitaxial diamond within a ~1 nm thick carbon layer. Starting from one single primary nucleation event the buried epitaxial island can expand laterally over distances of several microns. During this epitaxial lateral growth typically thousands of isolated secondary nuclei are generated continuously. The unique process is so far only observed on iridium surfaces. It is shown that a diamond single crystal with a diameter of ~90 mm and a weight of 155 carat can be grown from such a carbon film which initially consisted of 2 · 1013 individual grains.

  5. Seduction of Finding Universality in Sputtering Yields Due to Cluster Bombardment of Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruch, Robert J; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J

    2015-09-15

    Universal descriptions are appealing because they simplify the description of different (but similar) physical systems, allow the determination of general properties, and have practical applications. Recently, the concept of universality has been applied to the dependence of the sputtering (ejection) yield due to energetic cluster bombardment versus the energy of the incident cluster. It was observed that the spread in data points can be reduced if the yield Y and initial projectile cluster kinetic energy E are expressed in quantities scaled by the number of cluster atoms n, that is, Y/n versus E/n. The convergence of the data points is, however, not perfect, especially when the results for molecular and atomic solids are compared. In addition, the physics underlying the apparent universal dependence in not fully understood. For the study presented in this Account, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of Arn cluster bombardment of molecular (benzene, octane, and β-carotene) and atomic (Ag) solids in order to address the physical basis of the apparent universal dependence. We have demonstrated that the convergence of the data points between molecular and atomic solids can be improved if the binding energy of the solid U0 is included and the dependence is presented as Y/(E/U0) versus (E/U0)/n. As a material property, the quantity U0 is defined per the basic unit of material, which is an atom for atomic solids and a molecule for molecular solids. Analogously, the quantity Y is given in atoms and molecules, respectively. The simulations show that, for almost 3 orders of magnitude variation of (E/U0)/n, there are obvious similarities in the ejection mechanisms between the molecular and atomic solids, thus supporting the concept of universality. For large (E/U0)/n values, the mechanism of ejection is the fluid flow from a cone-shaped volume. This regime of (E/U0)/n is generally accessed experimentally by clusters with hundreds of atoms and results in the largest

  6. Fundamental characteristics of liquid cluster ion source for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, G.H. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: gtakaoka@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Noguchi, H. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Nakayama, K. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Hironaka, Y. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kawashita, M. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a cluster ion source using liquid organic materials, which has several advantages for surface modification based on the different properties of liquid cluster ions. When vapors of liquid materials such as ethanol were ejected through a nozzle into a high-vacuum region, clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon. The clusters produced were ionized by an electron bombardment method, and the cluster ion current increased with increase of an electron current for ionization. In order to achieve the effective transport of cluster ion beams, a unipotential or einzel lens was used. The current density was much larger than that without using the lens. Furthermore, the beam diameter could be controlled by adjusting the lens voltage, and it was changed between 5 mm and 20 mm. In addition, several kinds of substrates such as Si, SiO{sub 2}, PC substrates were irradiated at different acceleration voltages with ethanol cluster ion beams, and chemical and physical sputtering with a high sputtering yield was achieved. The sputtered surfaces were very smooth at an atomic level. The liquid cluster ion beams have a high potential for surface etching with the atomic level flatness, which is not obtained by a conventional wet process.

  7. Interaction of oxygen with an AISI 314 stainless steel surface studied by ellipsometry and auger electron spectroscopy in combination with ion bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, G.J.; van Silfhout, Arend; Bootsma, G.A.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of pretreatment (ion bombardment) on the initial oxidation of AISI 314 stainless steel has been investigated in ultra high vacuum systems with ellipsometry and Auger electron spectroscopy. The bombardment was carried out with Ar+ ions with energies up to 2.2 keV at various doses and

  8. Compositional change induced by ion bombardement on binary alloys. [5 KeV Ar+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Nakamura, H.; Hayashibara, M.; Itoh, N. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Crystalline Materials Science)

    1982-03-01

    The compositional change, induced by 5 keV Ar/sup +/ ion bombardment, of self-supporting films of Ni-Si (10%) alloy has been studied at elevated temperatures. The results are compared with those of similar studies for Ni-Au alloy and are explained using the previously suggested two-stepped segregation mechanism: the segregation from grain boundaries to the surface and that from the grains to the grain boundaries. The theoretical calculation for the two-stepped mechanism has been made for a thin film and for a thicker material. It is pointed out that the compositional change induced by sputtering of alloys at high temperatures may cause important effects on physical properties of materials.

  9. Ion-bombardment modification of the surface of mirrors fabricated of ZrTiCuNiBe amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitsenya, V S; Konovalov, V G; Kovtun, K V; Naidenkova, D I; Ryzhkov, V I; Shtan' , A F; Solodovchenko, S I; Trembach, O V; Vasil' ev, A A [National Science Center ' KIPT' , 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Bardamid, A F [Taras Shevchenko National University, 01033 Kyiv (Ukraine); Belyaeva, A I; Slatin, K A, E-mail: voitseny@ipp.kharkov.u [National Technical University ' KPI' , 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2010-01-01

    When preparing mirror samples of amorphous metal alloys some inhomogeneities of the structure became to be seen on the surface. These inhomogeneities were modified during bombardment with ions of deuterium and argon plasma. Besides, a new blister-like type of inhomogeneities was found on the mirror surface in one experiment. In the paper a short description of obtained results are presented.

  10. Enhancement of Reflectivity of Multilayer Mirrors for Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography by Temperature Optimization and Ion-Bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Louis,; Voorma, H. J.; Koster, N. B.; Shmaenok, L.; F. Bijkerk,; Schlatmann, R.; Verhoeven, J.; Platonov, Y. Y.; van Dorssen, G. E.; Padmore, H. A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two techniques to optimize the quality of multilayer x-ray mirrors, namely optimization of the temperature of the substrates during deposition and ion-bombardment of the layers. We produced Mo/Si multilayers applying both methods and present the effect on the near normal

  11. Characterization of CdZnTe after argon ion beam bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensalah, H., E-mail: hakima.bensalah@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hortelano, V. [GdS-Optronlab Group, Departamento Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I-D, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Plaza, J.L. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, O. [GdS-Optronlab Group, Departamento Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I-D, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Crocco, J.; Zheng, Q.; Carcelen, V.; Dieguez, E. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-12-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After argon irradiation using low fluence, the defects on surface were removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PL intensity increases after irradiation. This increase should be related to the improved quality of the CdZnTe surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation process lead to an elimination of Te precipitates from the surfaces of the CdZnTe samples. - Abstract: The objective of this work is to analyze the effects of argon ion irradiation process on the structure and distribution of Te inclusions in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te crystals. The samples were treated with different ion fluences ranging from 2 to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The state of the samples before and after irradiation were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Cathodoluminescence, Photoluminescence, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The effect of the irradiation on the surface of the samples was clearly observed by SEM or AFM. Even for small fluences a removal of polishing scratches on the sample surfaces was observed. Likely correlated to this effect, an important enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the irradiated samples was observed. An aggregation effect of the Te inclusions seems to occur due to the Ar bombardment, which are also eliminated from the surfaces for the highest ion fluences used.

  12. X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism studies of ion-bombarded ferromagnet-antiferromagnet bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalhorst, J.; Sacher, M.; Höink, V.; Reiss, G.; Engel, D.; Ehresmann, A.

    2004-11-01

    The influence of He ion bombardment on the structural and magnetic interface properties of a polycrystalline Mn83Ir17/Co antiferromagnet-ferromagnet bilayer system is investigated. For annealed as well as for not annealed samples an exchange bias field of up to 200Oe is induced by the ion bombardment for doses up to 5×1014ions/cm2 . The x-ray absorption and the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism of Co and Mn is not significantly altered by this ion dose. For higher doses the exchange bias field is strongly reduced and accompanied by an increase of the ratio of the Mn to Co x-ray absorption intensities and a reduction of the Co x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal. A model with a Gaussian-like intermixing zone at the AF/FM interface is developed to account for the observed changes of the x-ray absorption spectra.

  13. Treatment of PVC using an alternative low energy ion bombardment procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Elidiane C., E-mail: elidiane@sorocaba.unesp.br [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Av. Tres de Marco, 511 Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Nazir M. dos; Bortoleto, Jose Roberto R.; Durrant, Steven F. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Av. Tres de Marco, 511 Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Schreiner, Wido H. [Laboratorio de Interfaces e Filmes Finos, Universidade Federal de Parana (UFPR), C.P. 19044, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Honda, Roberto Y. [Laboratorio de Plasmas, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Cassia C Rangel, Rita de; Cruz, Nilson C. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Av. Tres de Marco, 511 Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    In many applications, polymers have progressively substituted traditional materials such as ceramics, glasses, and metals. Nevertheless, the use of polymeric materials is still limited by their surface properties. Frequently, selective modifications are necessary to suit the surface to a given application. Amongst the most common treatments, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has attracted the attention of many researchers owing to its versatility and practicality. This method, however, requires a power supply to provide high voltage (tens of kV) negative pulses, with a controlled duty cycle, width and frequency. Owing to this, the implementation of PIII on the industrial scale can become economically inviable. In this work, an alternative plasma treatment that enables low energy ion bombardment without the need of a high voltage pulse generator is presented. To evaluate the efficiency of the treatment of polymers, polyvinylchloride, PVC, specimens were exposed to 5 Pa argon plasmas for 3600 s, at excitation powers, P, of between 10 and 125 W. Through contact angle and atomic force microscopy data, the influence of P on the wettability, surface free energy and roughness of the samples was studied. Surface chemical composition was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS. To evaluate the effect of aging under atmospheric conditions, contact angle and XPS measurements were performed one and 1334 days after the treatment. The plasma potential and ion density around the driven electrode were determined from Langmuir probe measurements while the self-bias potential was derived with the aid of an oscilloscope. From these data it was possible to estimate the mean energy of ions bombarding the PVC surface. Chlorine, carbon and oxygen contamination were detected on the surface of the as-received PVC. Upon exposure to the plasma, the proportion of chlorine was observed to decrease while that of oxygen increased. Consequently, the wettability and surface energy

  14. Improvement of the magnetron sputtered coating adhesion through pulsed bombardment by high-energy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yu A.; Metel, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    Comparative study of titanium nitride deposition has been carried out, the growing coating being uninterruptedly bombarded by 100-eV ions or ions accelerated by high-voltage pulses applied to the substrate. The study revealed that microhardness of coatings synthesized using 25-kV pulses rises from 21 GPa to 29 GPa when percentage of nitrogen in the mixture with argon increases from 15% to 20%. With a further increase of nitrogen percentage to 30%, the microhardness slightly diminishes to 27 GPa. In contrast to golden coatings synthesized at low-voltage substrate biasing, the color of titanium nitride coating produced using high-voltage pulses is brown. The most striking difference of coating deposited using high-voltage pulses applied to the substrate is its perfect adhesion despite the interface formation at the room temperature without any preheating and activation. The adhesion characterization using a scratch-tester has revealed that critical loads of coatings synthesized using 25-kV pulses are several times higher than those of conventional nitride coatings synthesized at uninterrupted substrate biasing of 100 V. When the pulse amplitude diminishes to 5 kV, the critical loads and microhardness of the coating decrease to conventional values.

  15. Low-energy ion bombardment to tailor the interfacial and mechanical properties of polycrystalline 3C-silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fang; Li, Carolina H.; Pisano, Albert P.; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya [Department of Chemical Engineering and Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 and Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Low-energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline 3C-silicon carbide (poly-SiC) films is found to be a promising surface modification method to tailor the mechanical and interfacial properties of poly-SiC. The film average stress decreases as the ion energy and the bombardment time increase. Furthermore, this treatment is found to change the strain gradient of the films from positive to negative values. The observed changes in stress and strain gradient are explained by ion peening and thermal spikes models. In addition, the poly-SiC films show a significant enhancement in corrosion resistance by this treatment, which is attributed to a reduction in surface energy and to an increase in the compressive stress in the near-surface region.

  16. Diamond-like carbon layers modified by ion bombardment during growth and researched by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav; Písařík, Petr; Remsa, Jan; Janovská, Michaela; Landa, Michal; Zemek, Josef; Havránek, Vladimír

    2017-09-01

    Biocompatible Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique using the laser energy density of 10 J cm-2 on the graphite target. The surface of the grown film was modified during the deposition by bombardment with argon, xenon, nitrogen or oxygen ions. The ion energy (up to 150 eV) was changed by gun voltage and by ionic current. The films with high and low diamond/graphite content were prepared. Physical and mechanical properties of biocompatible DLC thin layers prepared by hybrid laser technology were studied. The composition of layers and the content trace elements were determined by the methods of Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Particle Induced X-ray Emission. The content of sp2 and sp3 bonds was measured using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. For different energy of argon and oxygen ions the maximum of sp3 bonds content was found (83.63% of sp3 bonds for argon ions). All films were smooth, which was confirmed by profilometry and Atomic Force Microscopy measurements. Maximum roughness Ra and RMS was did not exceed 1 nm. The Younǵs and shear moduli were studied by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy. The Young's Modulus attained the value of 601 GPa and the shear Modulus attained the value of 253 GPa at the energy of 30 eV of Ar ions. The influence of ion bombardment on DLC film properties is discussed.

  17. Tungsten oxide thin film bombarded with a low energy He ion beam: evidence for a reduced erosion and W enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C.; Hijazi, H.; Addab, Y.; Domenichini, B.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Pardanaud, C.; Giacometti, G.; Cabié, M.; Roubin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films synthesized by thermal oxidation of tungsten substrates were exposed to low energy helium ions (energy: 80 eV; flux: 1.4-1.7 × 1020 m-2 s-1) at room temperature and at 673 K. The structure and morphology changes of the oxide were studied using Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Due to the low ion energy, no erosion is observed at room temperature. In contrast, at 673 K, a color change is observed and a significant erosion is measured (˜70 nm for a fluence of ˜4 × 1021 m-2) due to a synergetic effect between ion bombardment and heating. We show that erosion processes and structural changes strongly depend on the ion fluence and in particular the higher the fluence, the lower the erosion yield, most likely due to oxygen depletion in the oxide near-surface layers.

  18. From crater functions to partial differential equations: a new approach to ion bombardment induced nonequilibrium pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Scott A; Brenner, Michael P; Aziz, Michael J

    2009-06-03

    We develop a methodology for deriving continuum partial differential equations for the evolution of large-scale surface morphology directly from molecular dynamics simulations of the craters formed from individual ion impacts. Our formalism relies on the separation between the length scale of ion impact and the characteristic scale of pattern formation, and expresses the surface evolution in terms of the moments of the crater function. We demonstrate that the formalism reproduces the classical Bradley-Harper results, as well as ballistic atomic drift, under the appropriate simplifying assumptions. Given an actual set of converged molecular dynamics moments and their derivatives with respect to the incidence angle, our approach can be applied directly to predict the presence and absence of surface morphological instabilities. This analysis represents the first work systematically connecting molecular dynamics simulations of ion bombardment to partial differential equations that govern topographic pattern-forming instabilities.

  19. Nano-scale pattern formation on the surface of HgCdTe produced by ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A.B.; Gudymenko, A.I.; Kladko, V.P.; Korchevyi, A.A.; Savkina, R.K.; Sizov, F.F.; Udovitska, R.S. [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-08-15

    Presented in this work are the results concerning formation of nano-scale patterns on the surface of a ternary compound Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∝ 0.223). Modification of this ternary chalcogenide semiconductor compound was performed using the method of oblique-incidence ion bombardment with silver ions, which was followed by low-temperature treatment. The energy and dose of implanted ions were 140 keV and 4.8 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively. Atomic force microscopy methods were used for the surface topography characterization. The structural properties of MCT-based structure was analyzed using double and triple crystal X-ray diffraction to monitor the disorder and strain of the implanted region as a function of processing conditions. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Surface Morphologies of Ti and Ti-Al-V Bombarded by 1.0-MeV Au+ Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. A.; Rickards, J.; Cuerno, R.; Trejo-Luna, R.; Cañetas-Ortega, J.; de la Vega, L. R.; Rodríguez-Fernández, L.

    2017-12-01

    Ion implantation is known to enhance the mechanical properties of biomaterials such as, e.g., the wear resistance of orthopedic joints. Increasing the surface area of implants may likewise improve their integration with, e.g., bone tissue, which requires surface features with sizes in the micron range. Ion implantation of biocompatible metals has recently been demonstrated to induce surface ripples with wavelengths of a few microns. However, the physical mechanisms controlling the formation and characteristics of these patterns are yet to be understood. We bombard Ti and Ti-6Al-4V surfaces with 1.0-MeV Au+ ions. Analysis by scanning electron and atomic force microscopies shows the formation of surface ripples with typical dimensions in the micron range, with potential indeed for biomedical applications. Under the present specific experimental conditions, the ripple properties are seen to strongly depend on the fluence of the implanted ions while being weakly dependent on the target material. Moreover, by examining experiments performed for incidence angle values θ =8 ° , 23°, 49°, and 67°, we confirm the existence of a threshold incidence angle for (ripple) pattern formation. Surface indentation is also used to study surface features under additional values of θ , agreeing with our single-angle experiments. All properties of the surface structuring process are very similar to those found in the production of surface nanopatterns under low-energy ion bombardment of semiconductor targets, in which the stopping power is dominated by nuclear contributions, as in our experiments. We consider a continuum model that combines the effects of various physical processes as originally developed in that context, with parameters that we estimate under a binary-collision approximation. Notably, reasonable agreement with our experimental observations is achieved, even under our high-energy conditions. Accordingly, in our system, ripple formation is determined by mass

  1. Evaluation of secondary ion yield enhancement from polymer material by using TOF-SIMS equipped with a gold cluster ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimoto, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)]. E-mail: dm053502@cc.seikei.ac.jp; Aoyagi, S. [Department of Regional Development, Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu-cho, Matsue-shi, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Kato, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Iida, N. [ULVAC-PHI, Inc., 370 Enzo, Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0084 (Japan); Yamamoto, A. [ULVAC-PHI, Inc., 370 Enzo, Chigasaki, Kanagawa 253-0084 (Japan); Kudo, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Seikei University, 3-3-1 Kichijioji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)

    2006-07-30

    We investigated the enhancement of the secondary ion intensity in the TOF-SIMS spectra obtained by Au{sup +} and Au{sub 3} {sup +} bombardment in comparison with Ga{sup +} excitation using polymer samples with different molecular weight distributions. Since the polymer samples used in this experiment have a wide molecular weight distribution, the advantages of the gold cluster primary ion source over monoatomic ion could accurately be evaluated. It was observed that the degree of fragmentation decreased by the usage of cluster primary ion beam compared with monoatomic ion beam, which was observed as a shift of the intensity distribution in the spectra. It was also found out that the mass effect of Au{sup +} and Ga{sup +} as monoatomic primary ion, resulted in about 10-60 times of enhancement for both samples with different molecular distributions. On the other hand, the Au{sub 3} {sup +} bombardment caused intensity enhancement about 100-2600 compared with Ga{sup +} bombardment, depending on the mass range of the detected secondary ion species. The cluster primary ion effect of Au{sub 3} {sup +}, compared with Au{sup +}, therefore, was estimated to be about 10-45.

  2. Chromium recoil implantation into SAE 1020 steel by nitrogen ion bombardment

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, G. F.; Ueda, M.; Reuther, H.; Richter, E.; Beloto, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    SAE 1020 is a widely used plain carbon steel, as mortar reinforcement in buildings and small machine parts. But aside from good mechanical properties, its surface suffer from severe corrosion and high wear rate, due to modest hardness. Chromium (Cr) in excess of 12% in Fe alloys renders them resistant to several corrosive attacks. So we tried to introduce Cr in such amounts into the surface of that steel. Cr films were deposited by electron beam on SAE 1020 steel. Bombarding the Cr film eithe...

  3. Production of liquid cluster ions and their application to surface etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, G.H. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: gtakaoka@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Noguchi, H. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Hironaka, Y. [Ion Beam Engineering Experimental Laboratory, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    A new type of cluster ion beam system using organic liquid materials such as ethanol has been developed, and it has several advantages for surface etching and chemical modification based on the different properties of liquid cluster ions. Ethanol vapors were ejected through a nozzle into a high-vacuum region, and ethanol clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon at the vapor pressures larger than 1 atm. In another case of producing ethanol clusters at a lower vapor pressure, He gas was used to mix up with ethanol vapors, and the mixed gases were ejected into a high vacuum region. Even if a vapor pressure of ethanol was 0.1 atm, ethanol clusters were produced at the He gas pressure larger than 1 atm. The ethanol clusters produced were ionized by an electron bombardment method, and the cluster ions were accelerated toward a substrate by applying an acceleration voltage. For the case of ethanol cluster ion irradiation at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV, the sputtering yields for Al, Cu, Ag and Au films, which were used as a substrate, were about ten times larger than that by Ar monomer ion irradiation. In addition, the surface flatness of the metal films was improved by irradiation of ethanol cluster ions.

  4. Crater formation by single ions, cluster ions and ion "showers"

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Timko, Helga; Nordlund, Kai; Calatroni, Sergio; Taborelli, Mauro; Wuensch, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The various craters formed by giant objects, macroscopic collisions and nanoscale impacts exhibit an intriguing resemblance in shapes. At the same time, the arc plasma built up in the presence of sufficiently high electric fields at close look causes very similar damage on the surfaces. Although the plasma–wall interaction is far from a single heavy ion impact over dense metal surfaces or the one of a cluster ion, the craters seen on metal surfaces after a plasma discharge make it possible to link this event to the known mechanisms of the crater formations. During the plasma discharge in a high electric field the surface is subject to high fluxes (~1025 cm-2s-1) of ions with roughly equal energies typically of the order of a few keV. To simulate such a process it is possible to use a cloud of ions of the same energy. In the present work we follow the effect of such a flux of ions impinging the surface in the ‘‘shower’’ manner, to find the transition between the different mechanisms of crater formati...

  5. Some properties of ion and cluster plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, L.I.; Derzhiev, V.I.; Yakovlenko, S.I.

    1982-11-01

    The aggregate of problems connected with the physics of ion and cluster plasma is qualitatively considered. Such a plasma can exist when a dense gas is ionized by a hard ionizer. The conditions for the formation of an ion plasma and the difference between its characteristics and those of an ordinary electron plasma are discussed; a solvated-ion model and the distribution of the clusters with respect to the number of solvated molecules are considered. The recombination rate of the positively and negatively charged clusters is roughly estimated. The parameters of a ball-lightning plasma are estimated on the basis of the cluster model.

  6. Ion-water clusters, bulk medium effects, and ion hydration

    CERN Document Server

    Merchant, Safir; Dean, Kelsey R; Asthagiri, D

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemistry of gas-phase ion-water clusters together with estimates of the hydration free energy of the clusters and the water ligands are used to calculate the hydration free energy of the ion. Often the hydration calculations use a continuum model of the solvent. The primitive quasichemical approximation to the quasichemical theory provides a transparent framework to anchor such efforts. Here we evaluate the approximations inherent in the primitive quasichemical approach and elucidate the different roles of the bulk medium. We find that the bulk medium can stabilize configurations of the cluster that are usually not observed in the gas phase, while also simultaneously lowering the excess chemical potential of the ion. This effect is more pronounced for soft ions. Since the coordination number that minimizes the excess chemical potential of the ion is identified as the optimal or most probable coordination number, for such soft ions, the optimum cluster size and the hydration thermodynamics obtained with...

  7. Features of polyatomic ion emission under sputtering of a silicon single crystal by Au sub m sup - cluster ions

    CERN Document Server

    Akhunov, S; Rasulev, U K

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies of the emission of secondary cluster Si sub n sup + ions (n=1-11) and polyatomic Si sub n X sub l Y sub k sup + ions (X, Y are Au, B, C, N), as well as doubly charged Si sup 2 sup + ions under bombardment of single crystalline silicon by cluster Au sub m sup - (m=1-5) ions with energy E sub 0 =4-18 keV have been carried out. High non-additivity enhancement of the yield of the Si sub n sup + ions and most polyatomic ones has been observed with an increase of the number of atoms in the projectiles. For Si sup 2 sup + ions the negative non-additive effect has been observed. The increase in the yield of impurity-containing cluster Si sub n X sup + ions allows for an increase by a factor of 100-1000 for the sensitivity of the SIMS analysis of the Au, B, C, N impurities in Si with the use of cluster ions as primary and secondary ones.

  8. Selective atomic-level etching using two heating procedures, infrared irradiation and ion bombardment, for next-generation semiconductor device manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, K.; Miyoshi, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Miura, M.; Kurihara, M.; Maeda, K.; Negishi, N.; Sonoda, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yasui, N.; Izawa, M.; Ishii, Y.; Okuma, K.; Saldana, T.; Manos, J.; Ishikawa, K.; Hori, M.

    2017-05-01

    The demand for precisely controlled etching is increasing as semiconductor device geometries continue to shrink. To fulfill this demand, cyclic atomic level/layer etching will become one of the key technologies in semiconductor device manufacturing at nanometer dimensions. This review describes recent trends in semiconductor devices and some of the latest results on cyclic atomic-level etching. In particular, it focuses on two types of cyclic etching that use different heating procedures: infrared irradiation for isotropic etching and Ar+ ion bombardment for anisotropic etching. It describes how an inductively-coupled-plasma down-flow etching apparatus with infrared lamps can be used for isotropic cyclic etching. The isotropic cyclic etching of SiN involves the formation and thermal desorption of ammonium hexafluorosilicate-based surface modified layers. This method features high selectivity with respect to SiO2, atomic-level control of the amount of SiN etching, and isotropic etched features. On the other hand, the anisotropic cyclic etching with Ar+ ion bombardment uses a microwave electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma etching apparatus. The anisotropic process for poly Si is composed of cyclic repetitions of chlorine adsorption and Ar+ ion bombardment. The anisotropic process for SiN is composed of cyclic repetitions involving an adsorption step using hydrofluorocarbon chemistry and a desorption step using Ar+ ion bombardment. Potential applications of these isotropic/anisotropic cyclic etching processes are described.

  9. Influence of substrate pre-treatments by Xe{sup +} ion bombardment and plasma nitriding on the behavior of TiN coatings deposited by plasma reactive sputtering on 100Cr6 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vales, S., E-mail: sandra.vales@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, Av. Trabalhador São Carlense 400, São Carlos, SP CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Brito, P., E-mail: ppbrito@gmail.com [Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Av. Dom José Gaspar 500, 30535-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pineda, F.A.G., E-mail: pipe8219@gmail.com [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, Av. Trabalhador São Carlense 400, São Carlos, SP CEP 13566-590 (Brazil); Ochoa, E.A., E-mail: abigail_ochoa@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campus Universitário Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); Droppa, R., E-mail: roosevelt.droppa@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Av. dos Estados, 5001, Santo André, SP CEP 09210-580 (Brazil); Garcia, J., E-mail: jose.garcia@sandvik.com [Sandvik Coromant R& D, Lerkrogsvägen 19, SE-12680, Stockholm (Sweden); Morales, M., E-mail: monieriz@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campus Universitário Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); Alvarez, F., E-mail: alvarez@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campus Universitário Zeferino Vaz, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, SP CEP 13083-970 (Brazil); and others

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the influence of pre-treating a 100Cr6 steel surface by Xe{sup +} ion bombardment and plasma nitriding at low temperature (380 °C) on the roughness, wear resistance and residual stresses of thin TiN coatings deposited by reactive IBAD was investigated. The Xe{sup +} ion bombardment was carried out using a 1.0 keV kinetic energy by a broad ion beam assistance deposition (IBAD, Kaufman cell). The results showed that in the studied experimental conditions the ion bombardment intensifies nitrogen diffusion by creating lattice imperfections, stress, and increasing roughness. In case of the combined pre-treatment with Xe{sup +} ion bombardment and subsequent plasma nitriding, the samples evolved relatively high average roughness and the wear volume increased in comparison to the substrates exposed to only nitriding or ion bombardment. - Highlights: • Effect of Xe ion bombardment and plasma nitriding on TiN coatings was investigated. • Xe ion bombardment with 1.0 KeV increases nitrogen retention in plasma nitriding. • 1.0 KeV ion impact energy causes sputtering, thus increasing surface roughness. • TiN coating wear is minimum after plasma nitriding due to lowest roughness.

  10. Measurements of secondary neutrons producted from thick targets bombarded by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, T.; Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Nakao, N.; Shibata, T.; Uwamino, Y.; Nakanishi, N.; Fukumura, A.; Kumamoto, Y.

    1997-03-01

    We measured neutron angular and energy distributions from high energy heavy ions stopping in targets of carbon, aluminum, copper and lead at HIMAC. These spectra are much harder for the lighter target nucleus like carbon. This means that the momentum transfer in the forward direction from heavy ion beam to lighter nuclei is much higher than that to heavier nuclei. (author)

  11. Aluminium surface morphology behaviour under high-flux helium ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girka, O.; Bizyukov, O.; Bogatyrenko, S.; Bizyukov, I.

    2017-08-01

    Samples of aluminium with purity 99.99% wt are irradiated with helium ion beam under ITER-like conditions using FALCON ion source. Aluminium is used as the surrogate material for plasma-material interaction studies. Typical parameters during steady-state exposure are the following: helium ion flux is 2-4 × 1022 m-2 s-1, heat flux is above 1 MW m-2, average ion energy is of 2 keV, and the ion fluence is well above 1027 m-2. Investigation of the surface morphology with SEM shows the formation of the cone-like structures, which develop with fluence increasing. Surface features suddenly disappear at the fluence of 1.06 × 1027 m-2 and then start to grow again. Further fluence increase with step-by-step surface diagnostics shows periodical character of the surface structures growth and degradation.

  12. Energy spectra of sputtered positive ions under Cs{sup +} bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnaser, Hubert, E-mail: gnaser@rhrk.uni-kl.d [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Institute for Surface and Thin-Film Analysis IFOS, Trippstadter Str. 120, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2011-05-01

    The emission-energy spectra of atomic and molecular secondary ions sputtered from various metals and semiconductors (Al, Cu, In, Si, InP, and InSb) under 5.5-keV Cs{sup +} irradiation were investigated. The emitted ions were detected in a high-sensitivity double-focusing secondary-ion mass spectrometer. Specifically, the energy distributions of Cs{sup +}, Cs{sub 2}{sup +}, MCs{sup +}, and M{sup +} ions (where M designates one of the target elements) were recorded for emission energies E {<=} 125 eV. All ion species exhibit a peak at low energy (E < 5 eV), but differ significantly in the respective fall-off to high emission energies. The influence of the oxygen partial pressure in the vicinity of the sputtered surface on the energy spectra was examined for Cs{sup +} ions emitted from Si. With an increase of the ratio r of the O{sub 2} flux to the Cs{sup +} flux, the spectra shift to higher emission-energy values, with the total shift amounting to {approx}0.45 eV at a value of r {approx} 3.3. Concurrently, the intensity of Cs{sup +} increases by {approx}30%. The measured emission distributions of Cs{sup +} ions from different samples were compared with the predictions of the electron-tunneling model of secondary-ion formation. It is found that the experimental spectra can be reproduced quite well when employing specific sets of parameters in that theoretical concept. The possible limitations of such a comparison are discussed.

  13. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  14. Sputtering layers of different materials on tungsten surface by light ions of medium energy bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhin, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    There is an analytical formula allows to calculate the sputtering yields of heterogonous solid targets with light ions, based on the model of sputtering layered surfaces with light ions. Of particular interest is the sputtering of layers of different materials with the tungsten surface, which can be a material for the first wall of fusion reactor. The results of the calculations are in good agreement with the data of computer simulation, and show that the sputtering yields layers with a certain thickness, higher than the sputtering yields of homogeneous material layer targets (“mirror effect”).

  15. Production of Oxidants by Ion Bombardment of Icy Moons in the Outer Solar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Boduch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our groups in Brazil, France and Italy have been active, among others in the world, in performing experiments on physical-chemical effects induced by fast ions colliding with solids (frozen gases, carbonaceous and organic materials, silicates, etc. of astrophysical interest. The used ions span a very large range of energies, from a few keV to hundreds MeV. Here we present a summary of the results obtained so far on the formation of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide and ozone after ion irradiation of frozen water, carbon dioxide and their mixtures. Irradiation of pure water ice produces hydrogen peroxide whatever is the used ion and at different temperatures. Irradiation of carbon dioxide and water frozen mixtures result in the production of molecules among which hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The experimental results are discussed in the light of the relevance they have to support the presence of an energy source for biosphere on Europa and other icy moons in the outer Solar System.

  16. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry of solid acid catalysts : Large zeolite crystals under bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, Jan P.; Rohnke, Marcus; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    This Perspective aims to inform the heterogeneous catalysis and materials science community about the recent advances in Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to characterize catalytic solids by taking large model H-ZSM-5 zeolite crystals as a showcase system. SIMS-based

  17. Light Ion Yields from Bombardment of Thick Targets by Protons, Helium-4 and Iron-56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Luis A.; McGirl, Natalie A.; Srikrishna, Ashwin P.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Tessa, Chiara La; Rusek, Adam; Sivertz, Michael; Blattnig, Steve; Clowdsley, Martha; Slaba, Tony; Zeitlin, Cary

    2017-09-01

    In March 2016 accelerator-based experiments colliding protons (0.4 and 0.8 GeV), helium (0.4 AGeV) and iron (0.4 and 0.8 AGeV) on thick aluminum targets with surface densities of 20, 40, and 60 g/cm2 were performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two targets were utilized in each experimental configuration. Hydrogen and helium ions were detected using organic liquid scintillators in conjunction with thin plastic scintillators at 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 80°, and 135° from beam axis. Time-of-flight techniques and pulse shape discrimination were used to identify light ion species in order to generate double differential energy spectra of the light ion fragments. Comparisons of these measured yields were compared with Monte Carlo calculations generated by MCNP6. These yields will be used to quantify uncertainty in radiation transport codes utilized in risk assessment for spaceflight missions with prolonged exposures to galactic cosmic rays.

  18. Effect of ion bombardment and substrate orientation on structure and properties of titanium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Guruvenket, S

    2002-01-01

    The effect of substrate orientation and ion bombardment during the growth on the structure and properties of TiN films deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering has been reported. Films deposited at a nitrogen partial pressure of 5x10 sup - sup 5 mbar and a current density of 2.50 mA cm-2 were golden yellow in color, characteristic of stoichiometric TiN. The effect of Si(100) and Si(111) substrates on the TiN film along with the substrate bias has been investigated. With an increase in the substrate bias on Si(111) substrate, TiN(111) is the most preferred orientation. On a Si(100) substrate with an increase in the substrate bias, TiN(220) orientation has been observed. The influence of the substrate on the growth of TiN films has been explained in terms of surface energy. The variation of grain size, resistivity, and the internal stress of TiN films as the function of substrate bias have also been investigated.

  19. Study of beryllium redeposition under bombardment by high intensity -low energy- hydrogen ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gureev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Danelyan, L.S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-01-01

    The results of studying the erosion of beryllium under an effect of intense ion fluxes with the energy of 250 eV, at the fluences {approx}10{sup 2}1 cm{sup -2}, at the MAGRAS-stand are given. The operating conditions under which a practically-complete redeposition of the sputtered beryllium upon the target surface were experimentally-realized. A change in the microstructure of a beryllium target under sputtering and redeposition is analyzed. Some technological applications are considered. (author)

  20. Electric propulsion. [pulsed plasma thruster and electron bombardment ion engine for MSAT attitude control and stationkeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    An alternative propulsion subsystem for MSAT is presented which has a potential of reducing the satellite weight by more than 15%. The characteristics of pulsed plasma and ion engines are described and used to estimate of the mass of the propellant and thrusters for attitude control and stationkeeping functions for MSAT. Preliminary estimates indicate that the electric propulsion systems could also replace the large momentum wheels necessary to counteract the solar pressure; however, the fine pointing wheels would be retained. Estimates also show that either electric propulsion system can save approximately 18% to 20% of the initial 4,000 kg mass. The issues that require further experimentation are mentioned.

  1. Influence of multi-element ion beam bombardment on the corrosion behavior of iron and steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Tian; Run, Wu; Weiping, Cai; Rutao, Wang (Wuhan Iron and Steel Univ., HB (China)); Godechot, X.; Brown, I. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The effect of multi-element ion implantation on the corrosion resistance to acid solution has been studied for stainless steel, medium carbon steel, pure iron, and chromium-deposited iron. The implanted elements were Cu, Mo, Cr, Ni, Yb and Ti at doses of each species of from 5 {times} 10{sup 15} to 1 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} and at ion energies of up to 100 keV. The stainless steel used was 18-8 Cr-Ni, and the medium carbon steel was 0.45% C. The implanted samples were soaked in dilute sulfuric acid solution for periods up to 48 hours and the weight loss measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The kinetic parameter values describing the weight loss as a function of time were determined for all samples. In this paper we summarize the corrosion resistance behavior for the various different combinations of implanted species, doses, and substrates. The influence of the composition and structure of the modified surface layer is discussed.8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nonlinear Amplitude Evolution During Spontaneous Patterning of Ion-Bombarded Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric; Erlebacher, Jonah, Aziz, Michael J.; Floro, Jerold A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    1999-05-05

    The time evolution of the amplitude of periodic nanoscale ripple patterns formed on Ar+ sputtered Si(OOl ) surfaces was examined using a recently developed in situ spectroscopic technique. At sufficiently long times, we find that the amplitude does not continue to grow exponentially as predicted by the standard Bradley-Harper sputter rippling model. In accounting for this discrepancy, we rule out effects related to the concentration of mobile species, high surface curvature, surface energy anisotropy, and ion-surface interactions. We observe that for all wavelengths the amplitude ceases to grow when the width of the topmost terrace of the ripples is reduced to approximately 25 nm. This observation suggests that a short circuit relaxation mechanism limits amplitude . growth. A strategy for influencing the ultimate ripple amplitude is discussed.

  3. Directional effect on coloration in LiF crystal by H{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan Mingle; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Zeng Jianer; Takeshita, Hidefumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    In the present paper, the first results are reported about the coloration in LiF crystals induced by bombardments of single hydrogen ions (H{sup +}) and molecular hydrogen ions (H{sub 2}{sup +}) with the same velocity under the <100> aligned and random conditions. For the single hydrogen ion irradiation, the coloration is rather simple. The F-type color center absorption under the <100> aligned condition becomes larger than that under the random condition with the dose increase because of larger fraction of electronic energy loss under channeling condition. On the contrary, the coloration for the molecular ions does not show big channeling effect. In the low dose region some difference can be seen but the difference of coloration is not observed any more with the dose increase. The pronounced coloration for molecular ions under the channeling condition is observed in comparison with that for single ions. (author)

  4. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite a...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter.......Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...

  5. Cluster ions and van der Waals molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    1992-01-01

    This review discusses current ideas in the physics and chemistry of cluster ions and Van der Waals molecules as well as presenting numerical data on their parameters and the processes involving them. It is also a detailed reference on basic data relating to many species.

  6. Distributions of neutron yields and doses around a water phantom bombarded with 290-MeV/nucleon and 430-MeV/nucleon carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, D., E-mail: satoh.daiki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kajimoto, T. [Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Shigyo, N.; Itashiki, Y.; Imabayashi, Y. [Kyushu University, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Koba, Y.; Matsufuji, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Sanami, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho-cho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nakao, N. [Shimizu Corporation, Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8530 (Japan); Uozumi, Y. [Kyushu University, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Double-differential neutron yields from a water phantom bombarded with 290-MeV/nucleon and 430-MeV/nucleon carbon ions were measured at emission angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°, and angular distributions of neutron yields and doses around the phantom were obtained. The experimental data were compared with results of the Monte-Carlo simulation code PHITS. The PHITS results showed good agreement with the measured data. On the basis of the PHITS simulation, we estimated the angular distributions of neutron yields and doses from 0° to 180° including thermal neutrons.

  7. Characteristics of liquid cluster ion beam for surface treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuto, H.; Ozaki, R.; Kubo, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2010-01-01

    A liquid cluster ion source, which is an ion source for the cluster beams produced with liquid materials, has been developed for the surface treatment of solid materials. The electrodes were designed for increasing the cluster beam intensity by a computer simulation of beam trajectories. The peaks of the cluster size distributions of the water and ethanol cluster ion beams of 3 atm vapor pressure were approximately at 2.4×103 and 1.6×103 molecules, respectively. The cluster size distributions...

  8. Enhancing ion yields in time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry: a comparative study of argon and water cluster primary beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheraz née Rabbani, Sadia; Razo, Irma Berrueta; Kohn, Taylor; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2015-02-17

    Following from our previous Letter on this topic, this Article reports a detailed study of time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) positive ion spectra generated from a set of model biocompounds (arginine, trehalose, DPPC, and angiotensin II) by water cluster primary ion beams in comparison to argon cluster beams over a range of cluster sizes and energies. Sputter yield studies using argon and water beams on arginine and Irganox 1010 have confirmed that the sputter yields using water cluster beams lie on the same universal sputtering curve derived by Seah for argon cluster beams. Thus, increased ion yield using water cluster beams must arise from increased ionization. The spectra and positive ion signals observed using cluster beams in the size range from 1,000 to 10,000 and the energy range 5-20 keV are reported. It is confirmed that water cluster beams enhance proton related ionization over against argon beams to a significant degree such that enhanced detection sensitivities from 1 μm(2) in the region of 100 to 1,000 times relative to static SIMS analysis with Ar2000 cluster beams appear to be accessible. These new studies show that there is an unexpected complexity in the ionization enhancement phenomenon. Whereas optimum ion yields under argon cluster bombardment occur in the region of E/n ≥ 10 eV (where E is the beam energy and n the number of argon atoms in the cluster) and fall rapidly when E/n beams, ion yields increase significantly in this E/n regime (where n is the number of water molecules in the cluster) and peak for 20 keV beams at a cluster size of 7,000 or E/n ∼3 eV. This important result is explored further using D2O cluster beams that confirm that in this low E/n regime protonation does originate to a large extent from the water molecules. The results, encouraging in themselves, suggest that for both argon and water cluster beams, higher energy beams, e.g., 40 and 80 keV, would enable larger cluster sizes to be exploited

  9. Photon emission produced by Kr{sup +} ions bombardment of Cr and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boujlaidi, A. El, E-mail: a.elboujlaidi@uca.ma [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Hammoum, K. [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Structures et Energétique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Jadoual, L.; Jourdani, R. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Ait El Fqih, M. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers (ENSAM), Université Hassan II Mohammedia – Casablanca (Morocco); Aouchiche, H. [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Structures et Energétique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Kaddouri, A. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2015-01-15

    The sputter induced photon spectroscopy technique was used to study the luminescence spectra of the species sputtered from chromium powder and its oxide Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, during 5 keV Kr{sup +} ions bombardment in vacuum better than 10{sup −7} torr. The optical spectra recorded between 350 and 470 nm exhibit discrete lines which are attributed to neutral excited atoms of chromium (Cr I lines). The experiments are also performed under 10{sup −5} torr ultra pure oxygen partial pressure. The results demonstrate that the measured intensities of the emitted photons are always higher in the presence of oxygen and even higher than those obtained for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target. In the presence of oxygen vapor we assume that an oxide film is formed on the chromium surface which is responsible of the increase of photon emission. This variation in the intensities is correctly explained in the model of electron transfer processes between the excited sputtered atom and the bombarded surface. This model suggests that the structure formed on the Cr surface in the case of oxygenated chromium is closer to that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide.

  10. Advanced analysis tool for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling: Cleaning of perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} oxide surface using argon cluster ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aureau, D., E-mail: damien.aureau@uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, (UMR 8180) Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines–CNRS, 45 Av. des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Ridier, K. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, (UMR 8180) Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines–CNRS, 45 Av. des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée (UMR 8635) Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines–CNRS, 45 Av. des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Bérini, B.; Dumont, Y.; Keller, N. [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée (UMR 8635) Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines–CNRS, 45 Av. des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Vigneron, J.; Bouttemy, M.; Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, (UMR 8180) Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines–CNRS, 45 Av. des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Fouchet, A. [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée (UMR 8635) Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines–CNRS, 45 Av. des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2016-02-29

    This article shows the comparison between three different ionic bombardments during X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of single crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrates. The abrasion using a “cluster argon ion source” is compared with the standard “monoatomic Ar”. The influence of the energy of the monoatomic ions used is clearly demonstrated. While the chemically adsorbed species on the STO surface are removed, such bombardment strongly modifies the surface. A reduction of part of the titanium atoms and the appearance of a different chemical environment for surface strontium atoms are observed. Implantation of argon ions is also detected. Cluster ion etching is used on oxide surface and, in this case only, due to a much lower kinetic energy per atom compared to monoatomic ions, the possibility to remove surface contaminants at the surface without modification of the XP spectra is clearly demonstrated, ensuring that the stoichiometry of the surface is preserved. Such result is crucial for everybody working with oxide surfaces to obtain a non-modified XPS analysis. The progressive effect of this powerful tool allows the monitoring of the removal of surface contamination in the first steps of the bombardment which was not achievable with usual guns. - Highlights: • The effects of three argon etchings are studied as a function of time on SrTiO3 oxide. • A method for obtaining non-modified chemical analysis of oxides is presented. • The soft removal of adsorbed species thanks to argon cluster is demonstrated. • The damages induced on SrTiO3 surface by ionic bombardment are shown. • The influence of the kinetic energy of incoming Ar atoms is examined.

  11. Historical milestones and future prospects of cluster ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Isao

    2014-08-01

    Development of technology for processing of surfaces by means of gas cluster ion beams began only about a quarter century ago even though fundamental research related to generation of gas clusters began much earlier. Industrial applications of cluster ion beams did not start to be explored until commercial equipment was first introduced to the ion beam community in around 2000. The technology is now evolving rapidly with industrial equipment being engineered for many diverse surface processing applications which are made possible by the unique characteristics of cluster-ion/solid-surface interactions. In this paper, important historical milestones in cluster ion beam development are described. Present activities related to a wide range of industrial applications in semiconductors, magnetic and optical devices, and bio-medical devices are reviewed. Several emerging new advances in cluster beam applications for the future are also discussed.

  12. Extended metastable Al solubility in cubic VAlN by metal-ion bombardment during pulsed magnetron sputtering: film stress vs subplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Ruess, H.; Hans, M.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    Dynamic ion-recoil mixing of near-film-surface atomic layers is commonly used to increase the metastable solubility limit xmax in otherwise immiscible thin film systems during physical vapor deposition. Recently, Al subplantation achieved by irradiating the film growth surface with Al+ metal-ion flux was shown to result in an unprecedented xmax for VAlN, far above values obtained with gas ion irradiation. However, it is reasonable to assume that ion irradiation necessary for subplantation also leads to a compressive stress σ buildup. In order to separate the effects of Al+ bombardment on σ and xmax, and realize low-stress high-xmax nitride alloys, we grow metastable cubic V1-xAlxN (0.17 ≤ x ≤ 0.74) films using reactive magnetron sputtering under different ion irradiation conditions. Al and V targets are operated in Ar/N2 discharges employing (i) conventional DC (Ar+, N2+), (ii) hybrid High-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS)/DC processing with one type of metal ion present (Al+ or V+/V2+), and (iii) HIPIMS with concurrent Al+ and V+/V2+ fluxes. Comparison to the ab initio calculated Al solubility limit reveals that xmax = 0.55 achieved with V+/V2+ irradiation is entirely accountable for by stress. In contrast, Al+ fluxes provide a substantial increase in xmax to 0.63, which is 12% higher than that expected based on the stress-induced increase in metastable solubility. Correlative stress and atom probe tomography data confirm that the metastable Al solubility enhancement is enabled by Al+ subplantation. The here proposed processing strategy allows for growth of single-phase cubic nitride alloys with significantly increased Al concentrations embodying tremendous promise for substantial improvements in high temperature oxidation resistance and mitigates the risk of stress-induced adhesive or cohesive coating failure.

  13. Characterization of ion-bombardment induced modifications of periodic La/B{sub 4}C-multilayer-mirrors for the reflection of soft X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merschjohann, Fabian; Lass, Maike; Gorholt, Lennart; Sacher, Marc D.; Heinzmann, Ulrich [Molecular and Surface Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Schaefers, Franz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The applicability of reflective optical components for the soft X-Ray region depends on the existence of multilayer-optics. Therefore stacks of alternating layers of two materials with different refractive index are applied. For the photon energy range of 100-190 eV Lanthanum (La) is favoured as the absorber material and Boroncarbide (B{sub 4}C) as the spacer material. Thin periodic layer systems of those materials with double layer periods of 5.6 nm have been produced by UHV Electron Beam Evaporation. The layer thickness is controlled by in-situ X-Ray Reflectometry. The purity and the stoichiometry of the layers has been analyzed by electron beam induced in-situ Auger Spectroscopy. Ion Polishing of each interface should diminish the interface roughness and thus enhance the reflectivity. The modification of the La- and B{sub 4}C-layers due to ion bombardment has been investigated by the in-situ Auger Spectroscopy, ex-situ X-Ray Diffraction and at-wavelength reflectivity measurements by use of Synchrotron radiation at the BESSY II facility. Effects of compaction, mixing, sputter-etching and smoothing have been found. The modifications can be influenced by varying the kinetic energy of the ions and/or the duration of the treatment.

  14. Doubly versus Singly Positively Charged Oxygen Ions Back-Scattering from a Silicon Surface under Dynamic O2+ Bombardment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franzreb, K.; Williams, P.; Lörinčík, Jan; Šroubek, Zdeněk

    203-204, 1/4 (2003), s. 39-42 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918; CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : low-energy ion scattering * doubly charged ions * molecular orbital Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.284, year: 2003

  15. An apparatus for in situ spectroscopy of radiation damage of polymers by bombardment with high-energy heavy ions

    OpenAIRE

    BAAKE, Olaf; SEIDL, Tim; HOSSAIN, Umme Habiba; DELGADO, A. O.; BENDER, Markus; SEVERIN, Daniel; ENSINGER, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A new target station providing Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and residual gas analysis (RGA) for in situ observation of ion-induced changes in polymers has been installed at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research. The installations as well as first in situ measurements at room temperature are presented here. A foil of polyimide Kapton HN (R) was irradiated with 1.1 GeV Au ions. During irradiation several in situ FT-IR spectra were recorded. Simultaneously outgassing...

  16. Chemical degradation of selected Zn-based corrosion products induced by C{sub 60} cluster, Ar cluster and Ar{sup +} ion sputtering in the focus of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, R., E-mail: roland.steinberger@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sicking, J., E-mail: jens.sicking@bayer.com [Bayer AG, Engineering & Technology, Applied Physics, Chempark Building E 41, 51368 Leverkusen (Germany); Weise, J., E-mail: juliane.weise@physik.tu-freiberg.de [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Duchoslav, J., E-mail: jiri.duchoslav@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Greunz, T., E-mail: theresia.greunz@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Meyer, D.C., E-mail: Dirk-Carl.Meyer@physik.tu-freiberg.de [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Stifter, D., E-mail: david.stifter@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • XPS investigations for various sputter concepts on Zn-based corrosions products. • Direct comparison of induced chemical damage for ion and cluster sputtering. • Azimuthal rotation or heavy projectile bombardment was not found to be beneficial. • Ar cluster etching is rated as unsuitable for surface cleaning or depth profiling. • C{sub 60} and Ar{sup +} are applicable for sputtering when degradation is carefully considered. - Abstract: Monoatomic ion sputtering is a common concept for surface sensitive analysis methods to clean surfaces prior investigation or to obtain information from deeper regions. However, severe damage of the materials – linked to preferential sputtering, ion implantation, atomic mixing and in worst case chemical degradation – can affect the validity of the analysis. Hence, the impact of C{sub 60} cluster etching, furthermore, of Ar{sup +} ion bombardment with and without azimuthal sample rotation and also the application of heavy projectiles (Xe{sup +} ions) was investigated to find a concept, which is less destructive or with less critical influence on the chemical nature of the investigated materials. In this work the focus is set on hydrozincite and zinc oxide, two common corrosion products of Zn-based coatings. As a main point, all the obtained results from (i) Ar{sup +} ion, (ii) Ar cluster, and (iii) C{sub 60} cluster etching on the degradation kinetics of hydrozincite were compared with respect to the reached sputter depth. In addition, the sputter rate of all three methods was experimentally determined for ZnO. In total, fully non-destructive conditions could not be found, but valuable knowledge on the type and rate of degradation, which is essential to choose the most suited sputter concept.

  17. Asteroids and Archaean crustal evolution: Tests of possible genetic links between major mantle/crust melting events and clustered extraterrestrial bombardments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, A. Y.

    1992-09-01

    Since the oldest intact terrestrial rocks of ca. 4.0 Ga and oldest zircon xenocrysts of ca. 4.3 Ga measured to date overlap with the lunar late heavy bombardment, the early Precambrian record requires close reexamination vis a vis the effects of megaimpacts. The identification of microtektite-bearing horizons containing spinals of chondritic chemistry and Ir anomalies in 3.5-3.4-Ga greenstone belts provides the first direct evidence for large-scale Archaean impacts. The Archaean crustal record contains evidence for several major greenstone-granite-forming episodes where deep upwelling and adiabatic fusion of the mantle was accompanied by contemporaneous crustal anatexis. Isotopic age studies suggest evidence for principal age clusters about 3.5, 3.0, and 2.7 (+/- 0.8) Ga, relics of a ca. 3.8-Ga event, and several less well defined episodes. These peak events were accompanied and followed by protracted thermal fluctuations in intracrustal high-grade metamorphic zones. Interpretations of these events in terms of internal dynamics of the Earth are difficult to reconcile with the thermal behavior of silicate rheologies in a continuously convecting mantle regime. A triggering of these episodes by mantle rebound response to intermittent extraterrestrial asteroid impacts is supported by (1) identification of major Archaean impacts from microtektite and distal ejecta horizons marked by Ir anomalies; (2) geochemical and experimental evidence for mantle upwelling, possibly from levels as deep as the transition zone; and (3) catastrophic adiabatic melting required to generate peridotitic komatites. Episodic differentiation/accretion growth of sial consequent on these events is capable of resolving the volume problem that arises from comparisons between modern continental crust and the estimated sial produced by continuous two-stage mantle melting processes. The volume problem is exacerbated by projected high accretion rates under Archaean geotherms. It is suggested that

  18. Clustering of Ions at Atomic-Dimensions in Quantum Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, P K

    2012-01-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting with the newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson (SE) force in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SE force is powerful to bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. Specifically, we present simulation results on the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SE force without and with confining external potentials and collisions between the ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SE force, ions attract each other, come closer and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield the ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar-like and ball-like shapes. The binding between the ions on account of the SE force may provide possibility of non-Coulombic explosions of ionic clusters for inertial confined fusion (ICF) schemes when high-energy density plasmas (density exceeding $10^{23}$ per cubic centimeters) are ...

  19. A meteor ablation-cluster ion atmospheric sodium theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, E. S.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Neutral and ionic forms of sodium form narrow, well-defined layers which peak in the 90-95 km altitude region at midlatitudes. A new theory for the sodium layer is presented, which is found to be in good agreement with existing atmospheric observations as well as available laboratory measurements of rate constants. The layer is believed to result naturally from a meteor ablation source over a chemical sink with vertical transport of Na(+) playing an important role in the layer shape and variation. While the neutral chemistry is believed to consist of chemical equilibrium between Na and NaO, the ion chemistry departs from earlier studies and considers a cluster ion scheme. It is possible that higher-order cluster ions of sodium play a role in the formation of aerosols, through attachment or ion-induced nucleation processes.

  20. Inertial fusion driven by intense cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, C.; Bret, A. [Universite Paris, Orsay (France); Eliezer, S.; Martinez-Val, J.M. [Universidad Politechnica de Madrid (Spain); Tahir, N.A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    The present state of the art concerning the use of intense cluster ion beams for driving an inertial fusion pellet containing a thermonuclear fuel is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the fragmentation and stopping of correlated ion fragments in dense target material. The direct drive approach is given a hydrodynamic as well as a full one-dimensional simulation treatment. Indirect drive looks highly promising. 28 refs., 22 figs.

  1. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon films bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Costa Pinto, P; Yin Vallgren, C; Bender, M

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2 Me...

  2. Large scale and orientation-controllable nanotip structures on CuInS₂, Cu(In,Ga)S₂, CuInSe₂, and Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ by low energy ion beam bombardment process: growth and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yu-Ting; Wang, Yi-Chung; Chen, Yu-Ze; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Hu, Fan; Lin, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chih-Chung; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-06-11

    One-step facile methodology to create nanotip arrays on chalcopyrite materials (such as CuInS2, Cu(In,Ga)S2, CuInSe2, and Cu(In,Ga)Se2) via a low energy ion beam bombardment process has been demonstrated. The mechanism of formation for nanotip arrays has been proposed by sputtering yields of metals and reduction of metals induced by the ion beam bombardment process. The optical reflectance of these chalcopyrite nanotip arrays has been characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometer and the efficient light-trapping effect has been observed. Large scale (∼4'') and high density (10(10) tips/cm(2)) of chalcopyrite nanotip arrays have been obtained by using low ion energy (< 1 kV), short processing duration (< 30 min), and template-free. Besides, orientation and length of these chalcopyrite nanotip arrays are controllable. Our results can be the guide for other nanostructured materials fabrication by ion sputtering and are available for industrial production as well.

  3. Ion pinhole imaging diagnostics on fast ion source in femtosecond laser plasma of cluster targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Sergey; Pikuz, Sergey; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Fukuda, Yuji; Skobelev, Igor; Zhvaniya, Irina; Varzar, Sergey; Kando, Masaki; Kodama, Ryousuke

    2017-07-10

    The spatial configuration of the ion source generated under femtosecond laser interaction with clusters is investigated. While intense laser pulses (36 fs, 60 mJ, intensity of 4 × 1017 W/cm2) propagated in CO2 cluster (~0.22 μm in diameter) media, the shape of the obtained plasma ion source was registered for the first time by means of pinhole imaging method. The remarkable decrease in fast ion yield in the vicinity of the assumed best laser focus near the gas cluster jet axis is observed. Such observed anisotropy of the ion source is suggested to originate from the influence of the laser prepulse destroying clusters in advance to the arrival of the main pulse. The assumption is confirmed by optical shadowgraphy images of the plasma channel and is important for further development of an efficient laser-plasma-based fast ion source. Following the observed geometry of the ion source, the laser intensity limit allowing to accelerate ions to ~100 keV energy range was estimated.

  4. Li-rich antiperovskite superionic conductors based on cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hong; Jena, Puru

    2017-10-17

    Enjoying great safety, high power, and high energy densities, all-solid-state batteries play a key role in the next generation energy storage devices. However, their development is limited by the lack of solid electrolyte materials that can reach the practically useful conductivities of 10-2 S/cm at room temperature (RT). Here, by exploring a set of lithium-rich antiperovskites composed of cluster ions, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li3SBF4, that has an estimated 3D RT conductivity of 10-2 S/cm, a low activation energy of 0.210 eV, a giant band gap of 8.5 eV, a small formation energy, a high melting point, and desired mechanical properties. A mixed phase of the material, Li3S(BF4)0.5Cl0.5, with the same simple crystal structure exhibits an RT conductivity as high as 10-1 S/cm and a low activation energy of 0.176 eV. The high ionic conductivity of the crystals is enabled by the thermal-excited vibrational modes of the cluster ions and the large channel size created by mixing the large cluster ion with the small elementary ion.

  5. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: cluster ion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočišek, J; Lengyel, J; Fárník, M

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of ≈8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations (≈0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C2H2)n(+). At the electron energies ≥21.5 eV above the CH+CH(+) dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C2H2)nCH(+), n ≥ 2, are observed. For n ≤ 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C2H2)n - k × H](+) and [(C2H2)nCH - k × H](+). The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C3H3(+) ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of ≈13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C6H6(+) ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Arn(C2H2)(+) fragments above ≈15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Arn≥2(C2H2)m≥2(+) at ≈13.7 eV is discussed in terms of an exciton transfer mechanism.

  6. A cluster ion chemistry for the mesospheric sodium layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, E. S.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A cluster ion chemistry for sodium is developed which relates the Na(+) profile to the Na profile using reactions involving Na(+).N2, Na(+).CO2, and Na(+).H2O. Removal of sodium from the mesosphere is accomplished by the formation of higher order clusters of the form Na(+).(H2O)n which presumably precipitate to the lower atmosphere. This sink is most effective in the 80-85 km altitude range. The chemical equilibrium model is applied to experimental observations of the Na and Na(+) layers.

  7. Chemical degradation of selected Zn-based corrosion products induced by C60 cluster, Ar cluster and Ar+ ion sputtering in the focus of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, R.; Sicking, J.; Weise, J.; Duchoslav, J.; Greunz, T.; Meyer, D. C.; Stifter, D.

    2017-05-01

    Monoatomic ion sputtering is a common concept for surface sensitive analysis methods to clean surfaces prior investigation or to obtain information from deeper regions. However, severe damage of the materials - linked to preferential sputtering, ion implantation, atomic mixing and in worst case chemical degradation - can affect the validity of the analysis. Hence, the impact of C60 cluster etching, furthermore, of Ar+ ion bombardment with and without azimuthal sample rotation and also the application of heavy projectiles (Xe+ ions) was investigated to find a concept, which is less destructive or with less critical influence on the chemical nature of the investigated materials. In this work the focus is set on hydrozincite and zinc oxide, two common corrosion products of Zn-based coatings. As a main point, all the obtained results from (i) Ar+ ion, (ii) Ar cluster, and (iii) C60 cluster etching on the degradation kinetics of hydrozincite were compared with respect to the reached sputter depth. In addition, the sputter rate of all three methods was experimentally determined for ZnO. In total, fully non-destructive conditions could not be found, but valuable knowledge on the type and rate of degradation, which is essential to choose the most suited sputter concept.

  8. Nonlinear phenomenon in nanostructures creation by fast cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslem, W. M.; El-Said, A. S.; Sabry, R.; Shalouf, A.; El-Labany, S. K.; Bahlouli, H.

    2017-01-01

    The development of accelerators technology offers a new window for the creation of surface nanostructures in an efficient and accurate way. The use of 30 MeV C60 cluster ions enables the creation of nano-hillocks of size larger than the ones produced by GeV monoatomic ions. The physical mechanism underlying the realization of such nanostructures is elucidated using a plasma expansion approach. Numerical analysis showed that increasing the ionic temperature (number density) ratios would lead to decrease (increase) the nano-hillocks height.

  9. Reactive magnetron sputtering of highly (001)-textured WS{sub 2-x} films: Influence of Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +} and Xe{sup +} ion bombardment on the film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellmer, K.; Seeger, S.; Sieber, I. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Dept. Solare Energetik, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Bohne, W.; Roehrich, J.; Strub, E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Dept. Ionenstrahllabor, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Mientus, R. [Opto-Transmitter-Umweltschutz-Technologie e.V., Koepenicker Str. 325b, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Layer-type van der Waals semiconductor WS{sub 2-x} films were grown by radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering from a metallic tungsten target onto oxidized silicon substrates. The sputtering atmosphere consisted of 75% hydrogen sulfide and 25% neon, argon or xenon. The substrate voltage and hence the energy of the ions bombarding the growing film, was varied from about 20 V (floating potential) to -80 V. By in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction the growth of the films was monitored and by elastic recoil detection analysis the film composition was measured. It was found that with xenon in the sputtering atmosphere a substrate voltage of -20 V is sufficient to suppress the crystalline film growth, while for argon as the sputtering rare gas this occurs only at -80 V. The disturbed film growth is accompanied by a sulfur loss of the growing WS{sub 2-x} films down to x = 1.1 for sputtering in Ar + H{sub 2}S at a substrate potential of -60 V. The results are tentatively explained by the different momentum transfers to sulfur atoms, which is highest for argon ions. It has also to be taken into account that the low-energy xenon bombardment is a many-body cascade process with a much higher local energy density compared to argon and neon bombardment and leading to a higher defect density and a supression of the crystalline growth. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Using MDECR-PECVD to study the impact of ion bombardment energy on microstructural properties of μc-Si:H thin film grown from an SiF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junkang; Florea, Ileana; Bulkin, Pavel V.; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Erik V. [LPICM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Universite Paris Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2016-12-15

    The matrix-distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MDECR-PECVD) technique has been shown to achieve high deposition rates for hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin film. Due to the fact that plasma is sustained by a microwave discharge, by biasing the substrate holder with additional power supply, one can achieve independent control over the plasma density and the maximum ion bombardment energy (IBE). In this work, we present studies of the impact of IBE on the microstructural properties of the μc-Si:H film deposited by MDECR-PECVD. Insufficient ion bombardment is found to be responsible for the substantial presence of nano-porous regions within the material, resulting in significant post-deposition oxidation. Good agreement between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) Fresnel contrast analysis and the results of infrared absorption and hydrogen effusion measurements for the deposited films suggest that moderate IBE is of vital importance to achieve high quality μc-Si:H. In doing so, denser films with significantly decreased nano-porous regions and better stability are obtained, which is of great interest to optimize the process parameters for solar cell applications. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations with electronic stopping can reproduce experimental sputtering yields of metals impacted by large cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiting; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian

    2018-03-01

    An unsolved problem in research of sputtering from metals induced by energetic large cluster ions is that molecular dynamics (MD) simulations often produce sputtering yields much higher than experimental results. Different from the previous simulations considering only elastic atomic interactions (nuclear stopping), here we incorporate inelastic electrons-atoms interactions (electronic stopping, ES) into MD simulations using a friction model. In this way we have simulated continuous 45° impacts of 10-20 keV C60 on a Ag(111) surface, and found that the calculated sputtering yields can be very close to the experimental results when the model parameter is appropriately assigned. Conversely, when we ignore the effect of ES, the yields are much higher, just like the previous studies. We further expand our research to the sputtering of Au induced by continuous keV C60 or Ar100 bombardments, and obtain quite similar results. Our study indicates that the gap between the experimental and the simulated sputtering yields is probably induced by the ignorance of ES in the simulations, and that a careful treatment of this issue is important for simulations of cluster-ion-induced sputtering, especially for those aiming to compare with experiments.

  12. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T/T>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  13. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  14. Low-energy collisions of helium clusters with size-selected cobalt cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Hideho; Ichihashi, Masahiko

    2017-04-01

    Collisions of helium clusters with size-selected cobalt cluster ions, Com+ (m ≤ 5), were studied experimentally by using a merging beam technique. The product ions, Com+Hen (cluster complexes), were mass-analyzed, and this result indicates that more than 20 helium atoms can be attached onto Com+ at the relative velocities of 103 m/s. The measured size distributions of the cluster complexes indicate that there are relatively stable complexes: Co2+Hen (n = 2, 4, 6, and 12), Co3+Hen (n = 3, 6), Co4+He4, and Co5+Hen (n = 3, 6, 8, and 10). These stabilities are explained in terms of their geometric structures. The yields of the cluster complexes were also measured as a function of the relative velocity (1 × 102-4 × 103 m/s), and this result demonstrates that the main interaction in the collision process changes with the increase of the collision energy from the electrostatic interaction, which includes the induced deformation of HeN, to the hard-sphere interaction. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80015-0

  15. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Nicholas B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  16. Clustering Analysis of Fast-ion Driven Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresl, J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Haskey, S.; Blackwell, B. D.

    2016-10-01

    Beam ions often drive Alfvén eigenmodes and other instabilities unstable in DIII-D. Many of these modes have been unambigously identified but some frequently occurring features have been neglected. In this work, datamining analysis techniques that successfully analyzed magnetics data from the H-1NF heliac are applied to arrays of magnetic and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) data from DIII-D. The techniques group instabilities with similar magnetic or ECE features into clusters. Once the clusters are found, a database of plasma parameters will facilitate mode identification. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG03-94ER54271, DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Structures and energetics of small lead cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelting, Rebecca; Otterstätter, Robin; Weis, Patrick; Drebov, Nedko; Ahlrichs, Reinhart; Kappes, Manfred M

    2011-01-14

    By a combination of gas phase ion mobility measurements and relativistic density functional theory calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling, we assign structures of lead cluster cations and anions in the range between 4 and 15 atoms. We find a planar rhombus for the tetramer, a trigonal bipyramid for the pentamer, and a pentagonal bipyramid for the heptamer, independent of charge state. For the hexamer, the cation and anion structures differ: we find an octahedron for the anion while the cation consists of fused tetrahedra. For the octamer, we find in both cases structures based on the pentagonal bipyramid motif plus adatom. For the larger clusters investigated we always find different structures for cations and anions. For example, Pb(12)(-) is confirmed to be a hollow icosahedron while Pb(12)(+) is a truncated filled icosahedron. Pb(13)(+) is a filled icosahedron but Pb(13)(-) is a hollow icosahedron with the additional atom capping a face. In order to get experimental information on the relative stabilities, we investigated the collision induced dissociation mass spectra for the different cluster sizes and charge states, and observe a strong correlation with the calculated fragmentation energies. Up to n = 13 the main fragmentation channel is atom loss; for the larger cluster sizes we observe fission into two large fragments. This channel is dominant for larger anions, less pronounced but clearly present for the cations.

  18. Hydrogenated carbon clusters produced by highly charged ion impact on solid C-84

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Newman, MW; Niedermayr, TR; Machicoane, GA; McDonald, JW; Schenkel, T; Hoekstra, R; Hamza, AV

    2000-01-01

    The emission of small (hydrogenated) carbon cluster ions: CnHm+ (n = 2-22) upon highly charged Xeq+ (q = 20- 14) impact on C-84 surfaces is studied by means of time-of-flight secundary ion mass spectrometry. The respective stage of hydrogenation/protonation of a certain carbon cluster ion C-n(+) is

  19. Theoretical investigations of proton-bound cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botschwina, P; Dutoi, T; Mladenović, M; Oswald, R; Schmatz, S; Stoll, H

    2001-01-01

    Several proton-bound cluster ions have been studied by means of coupled cluster calculations with large basis sets. Among these are complexes of a krypton or xenon atom with the cations HCO+, HN2+ and HNCH+. Various spectroscopic properties have been calculated in all cases. Effects of vibrational anharmonicity are particularly pronounced for the intramolecular stretching vibrations of Kr...HN2+ and Xe...HN2+. The proton stretching vibration of (N2)H+(N2) is predicted around 800 cm-1, with a large transition dipole moment of 1.15 D. Both (N2)H+(N2) and (HCN)H+(NCH) have linear centrosymmetric equilibrium structures. Those of (OC)H+(CO) and (HCC-)H+(CCH-) are asymmetric with barrier heights to the centrosymmetric saddle points of 382 and 2323 cm-1, respectively. The dissociation energy of the anionic complex Cl-...HCCH is calculated to be Do = 3665 cm-1, 650 cm-1 larger than the corresponding value for Br-...HCCH. The complex between a fluoride ion and acetylene is more strongly bound and shows strongly anharmonic behaviour, similar to the bihalides FHF- or ClHCl-. Strong Fermi resonance interaction is predicted between nu 3 (approximately proton stretch) and 2 nu 4 (first overtone of intermolecular stretch).

  20. A bent electrostatic ion beam trap for simultaneous measurements of fragmentation and ionization of cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, O; Toker, Y; Errit, M; Bhushan, K G; Pedersen, H B; Rappaport, M L; Heber, O; Schwalm, D; Zajfman, D

    2008-08-01

    We describe a bent electrostatic ion beam trap in which cluster ions of several keV kinetic energy can be stored on a V-shaped trajectory by means of an electrostatic deflector placed between two electrostatic mirrors. While maintaining all the advantages of its linear counterpart [Zajfman et al., Phys. Rev. A 55, R1577 (1997); Dahan et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 76 (1998)], such as long storage times, straight segments, and a field-free region for merged or crossed beam experiments, the bent trap allows for simultaneous measurement of charged and neutral fragments and determination of the average kinetic energy released in the fragmentation. These unique properties of the bent trap are illustrated by first results concerning the competition between delayed fragmentation and ionization of Al(n) (-) clusters after irradiation by a short laser pulse.

  1. Peptide structural analysis using continuous Ar cluster and C60 ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Fletcher, John S; Sheraz Rabbani, Sadia; Kawashima, Tomoko; Berrueta Razo, Irma; Henderson, Alex; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2013-08-01

    A novel application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) with continuous Ar cluster beams to peptide analysis was investigated. In order to evaluate peptide structures, it is necessary to detect fragment ions related to multiple neighbouring amino acid residues. It is, however, difficult to detect these using conventional ToF-SIMS primary ion beams such as Bi cluster beams. Recently, C60 and Ar cluster ion beams have been introduced to ToF-SIMS as primary ion beams and are expected to generate larger secondary ions than conventional ones. In this study, two sets of model peptides have been studied: (des-Tyr)-Leu-enkephalin and (des-Tyr)-Met-enkephalin (molecular weights are approximately 400 Da), and [Asn(1) Val(5)]-angiotensin II and [Val(5)]-angiotensin I (molecular weights are approximately 1,000 Da) in order to evaluate the usefulness of the large cluster ion beams for peptide structural analysis. As a result, by using the Ar cluster beams, peptide molecular ions and large fragment ions, which are not easily detected using conventional ToF-SIMS primary ion beams such as Bi3 (+), are clearly detected. Since the large fragment ions indicating amino acid sequences of the peptides are detected by the large cluster beams, it is suggested that the Ar cluster and C60 ion beams are useful for peptide structural analysis.

  2. Coordination of sodium cation to an oxygen function and olefinic double bond to form molecular adduct ion in fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Yamamura, Yumiko; Morisaki, Masuo; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2002-07-01

    Steroidal allylic alcohols formed Na+ adduct ion peaks [M+Na]+ by the addition of NaCl in FAB mass spectrometry. A comparison of the intensities of the adduct ion peaks of allylic alcohols with those of the corresponding saturated alcohols and olefin suggested that the olefinic double bond and the proximal hydroxyl group had coordinated to Na+. The adduct ion was stable and did not undergo dehydroxylation. We suggest that the Na+ adduction will be useful for the molecular weight determination of allylic alcohols which are susceptible to dehydroxylation under FAB mass spectrometric conditions. Na+ adduct ions of alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds were also investigated.

  3. Ion-molecule chemistry within boron tribromide clusters: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, David A; Kautzman, Kathryn E; Williams, Nathan G; Haile, Pamela A; Barker, Michael P

    2007-03-29

    Molecular clusters of BBr3 were subjected to electron ionization and mass analysis in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Five series of cluster ions were observed, with formulas corresponding to each of the possible fragment ions of BBr3 being solvated by neutral BBr3 molecules. Geometry optimizations on the observed cluster ions using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31G*) predict that fragment ions smaller than BBr3+ undergo reactions with neutral BBr3 molecules to form covalently bound adduct species that function as core ions within the clusters. Once all boron atoms are saturated, the reactions cease, and larger cluster ions consist of BBr3 molecules loosely bound to the core ions. Divalent bromine atoms are present in at least three of the cluster ions, and most of the intermolecular contact within the clusters is between Br atoms. Enthalpies of formation, addition reactions, and BBr3 elimination from the cluster ions were derived from B3LYP and MP2 calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* geometries using both the 6-31G* and the 6-311++G(2df,2p) basis sets. The results are compared to limiting expectations based on known bulk thermochemistry.

  4. Using polyatomic primary ions to probe an amino acid and a nucleic base in water ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlan, X.A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: x.conlan@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Biddulph, G.X. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: G.Biddulph@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Lockyer, N.P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, J.C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Vickerman@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-07-30

    In this study on pure water ice, we show that protonated water species [H{sub 2}O] {sub n}H{sup +} are more prevalent than (H{sub 2}O) {sub n} {sup +} ions after bombardment by Au{sup +} monoatomic and Au{sub 3} {sup +} and C{sub 60} {sup +} polyatomic projectiles. This data also reveals significant differences in water cluster yields under bombardment by these three projectiles. The amino acid alanine and the nucleic base adenine in solution have been studied and have been shown to have an effect on the water cluster ion yields observed using an Au{sub 3} {sup +} ion beam.

  5. Anomalous behavior in temporal evolution of ripple wavelength under medium energy Ar{sup +}-ion bombardment on Si: A case of initial wavelength selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, Sandeep Kumar [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Kanjilal, Dinakar [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, Tapobrata, E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2016-06-14

    We have studied the early stage dynamics of ripple patterns on Si surfaces, in the fluence range of 1–3 × 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup −2}, as induced by medium energy Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation at room temperature. Under our experimental conditions, the ripple evolution is found to be in the linear regime, while a clear decreasing trend in the ripple wavelength is observed up to a certain time (fluence). Numerical simulations of a continuum model of ion-sputtered surfaces suggest that this anomalous behavior is due to the relaxation of the surface features of the experimental pristine surface during the initial stage of pattern formation. The observation of this hitherto unobserved behavior of the ripple wavelength seems to have been enabled by the use of medium energy ions, where the ripple wavelengths are found to be order(s) of magnitude larger than those at lower ion energies.

  6. Self-terminated etching of GaN with a high selectivity over AlGaN under inductively coupled Cl2/N2/O2 plasma with a low-energy ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yaozong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hongwei; Dai, Shujun; He, Junlei; Feng, Meixin; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Jijun; Zhao, Yanfei; DingSun, An; Yang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Etching of GaN/AlGaN heterostructure by O-containing inductively coupled Cl2/N2 plasma with a low-energy ion bombardment can be self-terminated at the surface of the AlGaN layer. The estimated etching rates of GaN and AlGaN were 42 and 0.6 nm/min, respectively, giving a selective etching ratio of 70:1. To study the mechanism of the etching self-termination, detailed characterization and analyses were carried out, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). It was found that in the presence of oxygen, the top surface of the AlGaN layer was converted into a thin film of (Al,Ga)Ox with a high bonding energy, which effectively prevented the underlying atoms from a further etching, resulting in a nearly self-terminated etching. This technique enables a uniform and reproducible fabrication process for enhancement-mode high electron mobility transistors with a p-GaN gate.

  7. A study of defect cluster formation in vanadium by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Kazunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Formation of defect clusters in thin foils of vanadium was investigated by heavy ion irradiation. In the very thin region of the specimens less than 20 nm, vacancy clusters were formed under gold ion irradiation, while very few clusters were detected in the specimens irradiated with 200 and 400 keV self-ions up to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}. The density of vacancy clusters were found to be strongly dependent on ion energy. Only above the critical value of kinetic energy transfer density in vanadium, vacancy clusters are considered to be formed in the cascade damage from which interstitials can escape to the specimen surface in the very thin region. (author)

  8. Range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases near the critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, 77843 College Station, TX (United States); Quevedo, H.J. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bonasera, A., E-mail: abonasera@comp.tamu.edu [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, 77843 College Station, TX (United States); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Donovan, M.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Guardo, G.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Libera Universita' Kore, 94100 Enna (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, D. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Palmerini, S. [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Smith, H. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Trippella, O. [Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2017-05-18

    We measure the range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases by using the Petawatt laser at the University of Texas-Austin. The produced plasma propagated in all directions some hitting the cold cluster gas not illuminated by the laser. From the ratio of the measured ion distributions at different angles we can estimate the range of the ions in the cold cluster gas. It is much smaller than estimated using popular models, which take only into account the slowing down of charged particles in uniform matter. We discuss the ion range in systems prepared near a liquid–gas phase transition. - Highlights: • We present experimental results obtained at the UT Petawatt laser facility, Austin, TX. • The ion range is strongly modified for cluster gases as compared to its value in a homogeneous system. • Large fluctuations are found if the cluster gas is prepared near the liquid–gas phase transition region.

  9. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  10. Range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases near the critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bonasera, A.; Donovan, M.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, D.; Palmerini, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Smith, H.; Trippella, O.; Anzalone, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Ditmire, T.

    2017-05-01

    We measure the range of plasma ions in cold cluster gases by using the Petawatt laser at the University of Texas-Austin. The produced plasma propagated in all directions some hitting the cold cluster gas not illuminated by the laser. From the ratio of the measured ion distributions at different angles we can estimate the range of the ions in the cold cluster gas. It is much smaller than estimated using popular models, which take only into account the slowing down of charged particles in uniform matter. We discuss the ion range in systems prepared near a liquid-gas phase transition.

  11. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin S.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  12. Damage of niobium surfaces caused by bombardment with /sup 4/He/sup +/ ions of different energies typical for T-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I.; Gusev, V.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, N.

    1979-01-01

    The surface damage of cold worked and annealed polycrystalline Nb irradiated at room temperature with He/sup +/ ions sequentially at different energies over the range from 0.5 keV to 1.8 MeV has been investigated. The individual energy and the dose of the He/sup +/ ion was chosen to match the theoretically calculated He/sup +/ ion spectrum expected in the Tokamak T-20. In one set of irradiations, targets were irradiated at Kurchatov Institute starting with 0.5 keV /sup 4/He/sup +/ ions and extending up to 90 keV in eleven steps. Subsequently, the same area was irradiated at ANL starting at 150 keV and increased in eight steps up to 1.8 MeV. The irradiations were carried out for a total dose of 5.0 C/cm/sup 2/. In another set of irradiations the sequence was reversed. Scanning electron microscopy results show formation of blisters and exfoliation. For the same dose the broad energy implant (due to sequential irradiation) appears to decrease the blister diameter and density as compared to irradiation with monoenergetic He/sup +/ ions at a given energy (in the energy range considered). Some estimates of surface erosion yields due to blistering are given.

  13. Effect of ion species on apatite-forming ability of silicone elastomer substrates irradiated by cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashita, Masakazu [Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1306-1 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: m-kawa@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Araki, Rei; Takaoka, Gikan H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Indwelling catheters made of silicone elastomers sometimes cause serious infections owing to their poor biocompatibility. It is believed that these infections can be prevented by coating the silicone surface with apatite, which has excellent biocompatibility. If the surface of the silicone elastomer is in advance modified to have an apatite-forming ability, apatite can be coated on the modified silicone surface by soaking it in an aqueous solution such as a simulated body fluid (SBF) supersaturated with respect to apatite. In this study, silicone substrates were irradiated by four types of ion beams (Ar cluster, Ar cluster and monomer (Ar CM), O{sub 2} cluster, and O{sub 2} cluster and monomer (O{sub 2} CM) ion beams) at an acceleration voltage of 7 kV and a dose of 1 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and subsequently soaked in CaCl{sub 2} solution. The apatite-forming abilities of the substrates were examined using a metastable calcium phosphate solution whose ion concentration was 1.5 times that of SBF (1.5 SBF). Silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) clusters were formed on the silicone surface and the hydrophilicity of the substrates was improved by the irradiation, irrespective of the ion species used. The irradiation with O{sub 2} CM ion beams resulted in the highest apatite-forming ability among the analyzed ion beams.

  14. CERIUM IONS INFLUENCE ON A LUMINESCENCE AND ABSORPTION OF MOLECULAR SILVER CLUSTERS IN SILICATE GLASSES AFTER ION EXCHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Dyomichev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence and absorption spectrums of silicate glasses containing silver, embedded by ion exchange, were investigated. Intensive luminescence of such glasses was shown to appear right after ion exchange that can be associated with neutral molecular clusters of silver Agn formation. The increase of cerium ions concentration was also shown to cause the increase of luminescence intensity of the samples. The following UV-treatment decreases luminescence intensity. Thermal treatment under 300-350 0С temperature increases the luminescence intensity.

  15. XPS investigation of monatomic and cluster argon ion sputtering of tantalum pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Robin, E-mail: r.simpson@surrey.ac.uk [The Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Thermo Scientific, East Grinstead (United Kingdom); White, Richard G. [Thermo Scientific, East Grinstead (United Kingdom); Watts, John F.; Baker, Mark A. [The Surface Analysis Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Ion beam induced oxide reduction from monatomic and gas cluster ion beam exposure are compared. • Lower relative level of preferential sputtering is shown in gas cluster ion beam depth profiling. • A lack of “steady state” is observed in gas cluster ion beam depth profiles of tantalum pentoxide. • Possible mechanisms behind the observed results, including temperature effects are proposed. - Abstract: In recent years, gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have become the cutting edge of ion beam technology to sputter etch organic materials in surface analysis. However, little is currently known on the ability of argon cluster ions (Ar{sub n}{sup +}) to etch metal oxides and other technologically important inorganic compounds and no depth profiles have previously been reported. In this work, XPS depth profiles through a certified (European standard BCR-261T) 30 nm thick Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer grown on Ta foil using monatomic Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} cluster ions have been performed at different incident energies. The preferential sputtering of oxygen induced using 6 keV Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} ions is lower relative to 3 keV and 500 eV Ar{sup +} ions. Ar{sup +} ions exhibit a steady state O/Ta ratio through the bulk oxide but Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} ions show a gradual decrease in the O/Ta ratio as a function of depth. The depth resolution and etch rate is substantially better for the monatomic beam compared to the cluster beam. Higher O concentrations are observed when the underlying Ta bulk metal is sputtered for the Ar{sub 1000}{sup +} profiles compared to the Ar{sup +} profiles.

  16. Dependence of surface smoothing, sputtering and etching phenomena on cluster ion dosage

    CERN Document Server

    Song, J H; Choi, W K

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of surface smoothing and sputtering phenomena of Si (1 0 0) solid surfaces irradiated by CO sub 2 cluster ions on cluster-ion dosage was investigated using an atomic force microscope. The flux and total ion dosage of impinging cluster ions at the acceleration voltage of 50 kV were fixed at 10 sup 9 ions/cm sup 2 s and were scanned from 5x10 sup 1 sup 0 to 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 ions/cm sup 2 , respectively. The density of hillocks induced by cluster ion impact was gradually increased with the dosage up to 5x10 sup 1 sup 1 ions/cm sup 2 , which caused that the irradiated surface became rough from 0.4 to 1.24 nm in root-mean-square roughness (sigma sub r sub m sub s). At the boundary of the ion dosage of 10 sup 1 sup 2 ions/cm sup 2 , the density of the induced hillocks was decreased and sigma sub r sub m sub s was about 1.21 nm, not being deteriorated further. At the dosage of 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 ions/cm sup 2 , the induced hillocks completely disappeared and the surface became very flat as much as sigma...

  17. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Karchesy; L.Y. Foo; Richard W. Hemingway; E. Barofsky; D.F. Barofsky

    1989-01-01

    Condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives were studied by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) to assess the feasibility of using this technique for determining molecular weight and structural information about these compounds. Both positive- and negative-ion spectra provided useful data with regard to molecular weight, cation species present, and presence of...

  18. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran 16315-835, Iran. MS received 1 September 2015; ... Research Center (PPRC) at Science and Research Branch. The ion bombardment procedure was ..... dimension of clusters of about 57 nm. SEM investigations of the ...

  19. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Ion disturbance and clustering in the NaCl water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Xia; Zhao, Dong-Xia

    2013-02-01

    Ion clustering and the solvation properties in the NaCl solutions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations with several popular force fields. The existence of ions has a negligible disturbance to the hydrogen bond structures and rotational mobility of water beyond the first ion solvation shells, which is suggested by the local hydrogen bond structures and the rotation times of water. The potential of mean force (PMF) of ion pair in the dilute solution presents a consistent view with the populations of ion clusters in the electrolyte solutions. The aggregation level of ions is sensitive to the force field used in the simulations. The ion-ion interaction potential plays an important role in the forming of the contact ion pair. The entropy of water increases as the ion pair approaches each other and the association of ion pair is driven by the increment of water entropy according to the results from the selected force fields. The kinetic transition from the single solvent separated state to the contact ion pair is controlled by the enthalpy loss of solution.

  1. Interaction of intense laser pulses with atomic clusters: Measurements of ion emission, simulations and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisch, J.W.G. E-mail: john.tisch@ic.ac.uk; Hay, N.; Mendham, K.J.; Springate, E.; Symes, D.R.; Comley, A.J.; Mason, M.B.; Gumbrell, E.T.; Ditmire, T.; Smith, R.A.; Marangos, J.P.; Hutchinson, M.H.R

    2003-05-01

    This review paper provides a general introduction to the interaction of intense (>10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}), femtosecond laser pulses with atomic clusters in the size range 500-10{sup 5} atoms. A nanoplasma model of the laser-cluster interaction is used to elucidate the underlying physics. Measurements of ion emission from the laser-cluster interaction are presented together with numerical simulations. Emerging applications are described.

  2. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz

    2009-08-01

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C+24 were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO+ ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented. This paper comprises partly the PhD theses of J Ketelaer and C Smorra.

  3. Pre-equilibrium (exciton) model and the heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission

    CERN Document Server

    Betak, E

    2015-01-01

    We bring the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton) model enlarged for considering also the heavy ion collisions. At this moment, the calculations have been done without treatment of angular momentum variables, but all the approach can be straightforwardly applied to heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission including the angular momentum variables. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing the superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, $\\alpha$-particles).

  4. Quantitative characterization of ion pairing and cluster formation in strong 1:1 electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alan A; Pappu, Rohit V

    2007-06-14

    Aqueous solutions of 1:1 strong electrolytes are considered to be the prototype for complete ionic dissociation. Nonetheless, clustering of strong 1:1 electrolytes has been widely reported in all atom molecular dynamics simulations, and their presence is indirectly implicated in a diverse range of experimental results. Is there a physical basis for nonidealities such as ion pairing and cluster formation in aqueous solutions of strong 1:1 electrolytes? We attempt to answer this question by direct comparison of results from detailed molecular dynamics simulations to experimentally observed properties of 1:1 electrolytes. We report the analysis of a series of lengthy molecular dynamics simulations of alkali-halide solutions carried out over a wide range of physiologically relevant concentrations using explicit representations of water molecules. We find evidence for pronounced nonideal behavior of ions at all concentrations in the form of ion pairs and clusters which are in rapid equilibrium with dissociated ions. The phenomenology for ion pairing seen in these simulations is congruent with the multistep scheme proposed by Eigen and Tamm based on data from ultrasonic absorption experiments. For a given electrolyte, we show that the dependence of cluster populations on concentration can be described through a single set of equilibrium constants. We assess the accuracy of calculated ion pairing constants by favorable comparison to estimates obtained by Fuoss and co-workers and based on conductometric experiments. Ion pairs and clusters form on length scales where the size of individual water molecules is as important as the hard core radius of ions. Ion pairing results as a balance between the favorable Coulomb interactions and the unfavorable partial desolvation of ions needed to form a pair.

  5. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILVER CLUSTERS FORMED BY ION EXCHANGE METHOD IN PHOTO-THERMO-REFRACTIVE GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy M. Sgibnev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study.The paper deals with novel research of ion exchange duration influence on spectral-luminescent properties of silver clusters formed in photo-thermo-refractive glass. Method. Photo-thermo-refractive matrix glass based on Na2O–Al2O3–ZnO–SiO2–F (% mol. system doped with 0,002% mol. of Sb2O3 was synthesized for further research. Silver ions were introduced with low temperature ion exchange method. The glass samples were immersed in the mixture of sodium and silver nitrates 5AgNO3/95NaNO3 (% mol. at the temperature of 320 °C. Ion exchange duration varied from 5 minutes to 21 hours. Luminescent silver clusters were formed in surface layers of photo-thermo-refractive glass by subsequent heat treatment at the temperature of 450 °C. Main Results. Embedding of silver ions in photo-thermo-refractive glass with ion exchange method led to long-wavelength shift of the UV edge of strong absorption. Location of the UV edge of strong absorption and emission peak of silver clusters depends on ion exchange duration and shifts to the greater wavelengthswith increasing the ion exchange process time. Quantum yield of luminescence decreases significantly according to Stern-Volmer equation with the rising of ion exchange duration. Practical Relevance. Research results can be used for developing white LEDs and down-convertors of solar radiation.

  6. First multispacecraft ion measurements in and near the Earth’s magnetosphere with the identical Cluster ion spectrometry (CIS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rème

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available On board the four Cluster spacecraft, the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS experiment measures the full, three-dimensional ion distribution of the major magnetospheric ions (H+, He+, He++, and O+ from the thermal energies to about 40 keV/e. The experiment consists of two different instruments: a COmposition and DIstribution Function analyser (CIS1/CODIF, giving the mass per charge composition with medium (22.5° angular resolution, and a Hot Ion Analyser (CIS2/HIA, which does not offer mass resolution but has a better angular resolution (5.6° that is adequate for ion beam and solar wind measurements. Each analyser has two different sensitivities in order to increase the dynamic range. First tests of the instruments (commissioning activities were achieved from early September 2000 to mid January 2001, and the operation phase began on 1 February 2001. In this paper, first results of the CIS instruments are presented showing the high level performances and capabilities of the instruments. Good examples of data were obtained in the central plasma sheet, magnetopause crossings, magnetosheath, solar wind and cusp measurements. Observations in the auroral regions could also be obtained with the Cluster spacecraft at radial distances of 4–6 Earth radii. These results show the tremendous interest of multispacecraft measurements with identical instruments and open a new area in magnetospheric and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction physics.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetopheric configuration and dynamics; solar wind - magnetosphere interactions

  7. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  8. Studying liposomes by tritium bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyukova, L V; Ksenofontov, A L; Badun, G A; Baratova, L A; Shishkov, A V

    2001-12-01

    Bilayer liposomes from a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPC: DPPE = 8:2, molar ratio) or DPPC labeled with 14C-DPPC (DPPC: 14C-DPPC) were bombarded with thermally activated tritium atoms. The tritiated liposomes were hydrolyzed by phospholipase C, and the tritium incorporation into different parts of the bilayer along its thickness was determined. The tritium flux attenuation coefficients were calculated for the headgroup (k1 = 0.176+/-0.032 A(-1)) and acylglycerol residue (k2 = 0.046+/-0.004 A(-1)) layers indicating a preferential attenuation of the tritium flux in the headgroup region and relative transparence of the membrane hydrophobic part. The finding is potentially important to apply tritium bombardment for investigation of spatial organization of transmembrane proteins in their native lipid environment.

  9. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.; Smith, D.F.; Jungmann, JH|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/351240020; Heeren, R.M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105188476

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with

  10. Effect of Ar bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influence of low-energy Ar ion beam irradiation on both electrical and optical properties of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films is presented. The polymer films were bombarded with 320 keV Ar ions with fuences up to 1 × 10 15 cm − 2 . Electrical properties of LDPE films were measured and the effect of ion ...

  11. Sputtering yields of Ru, Mo, and Si under low energy Ar+ bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, S. M.; van de Kruijs, R.; Zoethout, E.; F. Bijkerk,

    2009-01-01

    Ion sputtering yields for Ru, Mo, and Si under Ar+ ion bombardment in the near-threshold energy range have been studied using an in situ weight-loss method with a Kaufman ion source, Faraday cup, and quartz crystal microbalance. The results are compared to theoretical models. The accuracy of the in

  12. Sputtering yields of Ru, Mo and Si under low energy Ar+ bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Shiou-Min; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Zoethout, E.; Zoethout, E.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2009-01-01

    Ion sputtering yields for Ru, Mo, and Si under Ar+ ion bombardment in the near-threshold energy range have been studied using an in situ weight-loss method with a Kaufman ion source, Faraday cup, and quartz crystal microbalance. The results are compared to theoretical models. The accuracy of the in

  13. Construction and test of a high power injector of hydrogen cluster ions

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, E W; Hagena, O F; Henkes, P R W; Klingelhofer, R; Moser, H O; Obert, W; Poth, I

    1979-01-01

    A high power injector of hydrogen cluster ions, rated for 1 MV and 100 kW, is described. The injector is split in three separate tanks connected by a 1 MV transfer line. The cluster ion beam source and all its auxiliary equipment is placed at high voltage, insulated by SF/sub 6/ gas at pressure of 4 bar. The main components of the injector are: The cluster ion beam source with integrated helium cryopumps, the CERN type acceleration tube with 750 mm ID, the beam dump designed to handle the mass and energy flux under DC conditions, a 1 MV high voltage terminal for the auxiliary equipment supplied by its 40 kVA power supply with power, and the 1 MV 120 kW DC high voltage generator. This injector is installed in Karlsruhe. Performance tests were carried out successfully. It is intended to use this injector for refuelling experiments at the ASDEX Tokamak. (12 refs).

  14. cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron transfer chains involved in a number of biologi- cal systems including respiration and photosynthesis.1. The most common iron–sulphur clusters found as active centres in iron–sulphur proteins are [Fe2S2], [Fe3S4] and [Fe4S4], in which Fe(III) ions are coordinated to cysteines from the peptide and are linked to each ...

  15. Generation of CsI cluster ions for mass calibration in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xianwen; van Dongen, Joost L J; Meijer, E W

    2010-07-01

    A simple method was developed for the generation of cesium iodide (CsI) cluster ions up to m/z over 20,000 in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Calibration ions in both positive and negative ion modes can readily be generated from a single MALDI spot of CsI(3) with 2-[(2E)-3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methylprop-2-enylidene] malononitrile (DCTB) matrix. The major cluster ion series observed in the positive ion mode is [(CsI)(n)Cs](+), and in the negative ion mode is [(CsI)(n)I](-). In both cluster series, ions spread evenly every 259.81 units. The easy method described here for the production of CsI cluster ions should be useful for MALDI MS calibrations. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  17. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S., E-mail: asozcan@us.ibm.com [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Lavoie, Christian; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Alptekin, Emre; Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M. [TEL Epion Inc., 900 Middlesex Turnpike, Bldg. 6, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  18. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C2H5O, and linear Cn (n = 4--6).

  19. Acceleration of cluster and molecular ions by TIARA 3 MV tandem accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Y; Tajima, S

    2000-01-01

    We succeeded in accelerating molecular and cluster ions (B sub 2 sub - sub 4 , C sub 2 sub - sub 1 sub 0 , O sub 2 , Al sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Si sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Cu sub 2 sub - sub 3 , Au sub 2 sub - sub 3 , LiF, and AlO) to MeV energies with high-intensity beam currents by means of a 3 MV tandem accelerator in the TIARA facility. These cluster ions were generated by a cesium sputter-type negative ion source. We tested three types of carbon sputter cathodes in which graphite powder was compressed with different pressures. The pressure difference affected the generating ratio of clusters generated to single atom ions extracted from the source and it appeared that the high-density cathode was suitable. We also investigated the optimum gas pressure for charge exchange in the tandem high-voltage terminal. Clusters of larger size tend to require lower pressure than do smaller ones. In addition, we were able to obtain doubly charged AlO molecular ions. (authors)

  20. Electronic structure and dynamics of ordered clusters with ME or RE ions on oxide surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulagin, N.A., E-mail: nkulagin@bestnet.kharkov.u [Kharkiv National University for Radio Electronics, Avenue Shakespeare 6-48, 61045 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15

    Selected data of ab initio simulation of the electronic structure and spectral properties of either cluster with ions of iron, rare earth or actinium group elements have been presented here. Appearance of doped Cr{sup +4} ions in oxides, Cu{sup +2} in HTSC, Nd{sup +2} in solids has been discussed. Analysis of experimental data for plasma created ordered structures of crystallites with size of about 10{sup -9} m on surface of separate oxides are given, too. Change in the spectroscopic properties of clusters and nano-structures on surface of strontium titanate crystals discussed shortly using the X-ray line spectroscopy experimental results. - Research highlights: External influence and variation of technology induce changes in valence of nl ions in compounds. Wave function of cluster presented as anti-symmetrical set of ions wave functions. The main equation describes the self-consistent field depending on state of all electrons of cluster. Level scheme of Cr{sup 4+} ions in octo- and tetra-site corresponds to doped oxides spectra after treatment. Plasma treatment effects in appearance of systems of unit crystallites with size of about 10{sup -6}-10{sup -9} m.

  1. Hierarchical cluster analysis of ignitable liquids based on the total ion spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Erin E; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Williams, Mary R; Sigman, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data of ignitable liquids in the Ignitable Liquids Reference Collection (ILRC) database were processed to obtain 445 total ion spectra (TIS), that is, average mass spectra across the chromatographic profile. Hierarchical cluster analysis, an unsupervised learning technique, was applied to find features useful for classification of ignitable liquids. A combination of the correlation distance and average linkage was utilized for grouping ignitable liquids with similar chemical composition. This study evaluated whether hierarchical cluster analysis of the TIS would cluster together ignitable liquids of the same ASTM class assignment, as designated in the ILRC database. The ignitable liquids clustered based on their chemical composition, and the ignitable liquids within each cluster were predominantly from one ASTM E1618-11 class. These results reinforce use of the TIS as a tool to aid in forensic fire debris analysis. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. First multispacecraft ion measurements in and near the Earth’s magnetosphere with the identical Cluster ion spectrometry (CIS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rème

    Full Text Available On board the four Cluster spacecraft, the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS experiment measures the full, three-dimensional ion distribution of the major magnetospheric ions (H+, He+, He++, and O+ from the thermal energies to about 40 keV/e. The experiment consists of two different instruments: a COmposition and DIstribution Function analyser (CIS1/CODIF, giving the mass per charge composition with medium (22.5° angular resolution, and a Hot Ion Analyser (CIS2/HIA, which does not offer mass resolution but has a better angular resolution (5.6° that is adequate for ion beam and solar wind measurements. Each analyser has two different sensitivities in order to increase the dynamic range. First tests of the instruments (commissioning activities were achieved from early September 2000 to mid January 2001, and the operation phase began on 1 February 2001. In this paper, first results of the CIS instruments are presented showing the high level performances and capabilities of the instruments. Good examples of data were obtained in the central plasma sheet, magnetopause crossings, magnetosheath, solar wind and cusp measurements. Observations in the auroral regions could also be obtained with the Cluster spacecraft at radial distances of 4–6 Earth radii. These results show the tremendous interest of multispacecraft measurements with identical instruments and open a new area in magnetospheric and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction physics.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetopheric configuration and dynamics; solar wind - magnetosphere interactions

  3. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILVER CLUSTERS FORMED BY ION EXCHANGE METHOD IN PHOTO-THERMO-REFRACTIVE GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Yevgeniy M. Sgibnev; Nikolay V. Nikonorov; Alexander I. Ignatiev; Dmitry S. Starodubov

    2016-01-01

    Subject of Study.The paper deals with novel research of ion exchange duration influence on spectral-luminescent properties of silver clusters formed in photo-thermo-refractive glass. Method. Photo-thermo-refractive matrix glass based on Na2O–Al2O3–ZnO–SiO2–F (% mol.) system doped with 0,002% mol. of Sb2O3 was synthesized for further research. Silver ions were introduced with low temperature ion exchange method. The glass samples were immersed in the mixture of sodium and silver nitrates 5AgNO...

  4. On cluster ions, ion transmission, and linear dynamic range limitations in electrospray (ionspray) mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zook, D.R; Bruins, A.P.

    The ion transmission in Electrospray (Ionspray) Mass Spectrometry (ESMS) was studied in order to examine the instrumental factors potentially contributing to observed ESMS linear dynamic range (LDR) limitations. A variety of means used for the investigation of ion transmission demonstrated that a

  5. Determination of interstellar pickup ion distributions in the solar wind with SOHO and Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Möbius

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 10 years, the experimental basis for the study of the local interstellar medium has been substantially enhanced by the direct detection of interstellar pickup ions and of interstellar neutral helium within the heliosphere. Pickup ions can be studied for a wide range of interstellar species. However, currently the accuracy of the method to determine the parameters of the interstellar medium, namely neutral density, temperature and relative velocity, is hampered by two problems: (1 In most cases the crucial ionization rates are not available from simultaneous measurements and (2 the transport of the pickup ions in the interplanetary medium substantially modifies the measured spatial distribution of the ions. In this study we will discuss how the enhanced capabilities of the instrumentation on SOHO and Cluster in combination with ongoing efforts to model the pickup ion distributions will lead to a significant improvement over the coming years.

  6. Determination of interstellar pickup ion distributions in the solar wind with SOHO and Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Möbius

    Full Text Available Over the last 10 years, the experimental basis for the study of the local interstellar medium has been substantially enhanced by the direct detection of interstellar pickup ions and of interstellar neutral helium within the heliosphere. Pickup ions can be studied for a wide range of interstellar species. However, currently the accuracy of the method to determine the parameters of the interstellar medium, namely neutral density, temperature and relative velocity, is hampered by two problems: (1 In most cases the crucial ionization rates are not available from simultaneous measurements and (2 the transport of the pickup ions in the interplanetary medium substantially modifies the measured spatial distribution of the ions. In this study we will discuss how the enhanced capabilities of the instrumentation on SOHO and Cluster in combination with ongoing efforts to model the pickup ion distributions will lead to a significant improvement over the coming years.

  7. Solar wind dependence of ion parameters in the Earth's magnetospheric region calculated from CLUSTER observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Moments calculated from the ion distributions (~0–40 keV measured by the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS instrument are combined with data from the Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM instrument and used to characterise the bulk properties of the plasma in the near-Earth magnetosphere over five years (2001–2005. Results are presented in the form of 2-D xy, xz and yz GSM cuts through the magnetosphere using data obtained from the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS and the Cluster Active Archive (CAA. Analysis reveals the distribution of ~0–40 keV ions in the inner magnetosphere is highly ordered and highly responsive to changes in solar wind velocity. Specifically, elevations in temperature are found to occur across the entire nightside plasma sheet region during times of fast solar wind. We demonstrate that the nightside plasma sheet ion temperature at a downtail distance of ~12 to 19 Earth radii increases by a factor of ~2 during periods of fast solar wind (500–1000 km s−1 compared to periods of slow solar wind (100–400 km s−1. The spatial extent of these increases are shown in the xy, xz and yz GSM planes. The results from the study have implications for modelling studies and simulations of solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling, which ultimately rely on in situ observations of the plasma sheet properties for input/boundary conditions.

  8. From molecular clusters to nanoparticles: second-generation ion-mediated nucleation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ions, which are generated in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays and other ionization sources, may play an important role in the formation of atmospheric aerosols. In the paper, a new second-generation ion-mediated nucleation (IMN model is presented. The new model explicitly treats the evaporation of neutral and charged clusters and it describes the evolution of the size spectra and composition of both charged and neutral clusters/particles ranging from small clusters of few molecules to large particles of several micrometers in diameter. Schemes used to calculate the evaporation coefficients for small neutral and charged clusters are consistent with the experimental data within the uncertainty range. The present IMN model, which is size-, composition-, and type-resolved, is a powerful tool for investigating the dominant mechanisms and key parameters controlling the formation and subsequent growth of nanoparticles in the atmosphere. This model can be used to analyze simultaneous measurements of the ion-mobility spectra and particle size distributions, which became available only recently. General features of the spectra for ions smaller than the critical size, size-dependent fractions of charged nanoparticles, and asymmetrical charging of freshly nucleated particles predicted by the new IMN model are consistent with recent measurements. Results obtained using the second generation IMN model, in which the most recent thermodynamic data for neutral and charged H2SO4-H2O clusters were used, suggest that ion-mediated nucleation of H2SO4-H2O can lead to a significant production of new particles in the lower atmosphere (including the boundary layer under favorable conditions. It has been shown that freshly nucleated particles of few nanometers in size can grow by the condensation of low volatile organic compounds to the size of cloud condensation nuclei. In such cases, the chemical composition of nucleated particles larger than ~10 nm is dominated

  9. Influence of temperature on the molecular composition of ions and charged clusters during pure biogenic nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Frege

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown by the CERN CLOUD experiment that biogenic highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs form particles under atmospheric conditions in the absence of sulfuric acid, where ions enhance the nucleation rate by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The biogenic HOMs were produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene at 5 °C. Here we extend this study to compare the molecular composition of positive and negative HOM clusters measured with atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometers (APi-TOFs, at three different temperatures (25, 5 and −25 °C. Most negative HOM clusters include a nitrate (NO3− ion, and the spectra are similar to those seen in the nighttime boreal forest. On the other hand, most positive HOM clusters include an ammonium (NH4+ ion, and the spectra are characterized by mass bands that differ in their molecular weight by ∼ 20 C atoms, corresponding to HOM dimers. At lower temperatures the average oxygen to carbon (O : C ratio of the HOM clusters decreases for both polarities, reflecting an overall reduction of HOM formation with decreasing temperature. This indicates a decrease in the rate of autoxidation with temperature due to a rather high activation energy as has previously been determined by quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, at the lowest temperature (−25 °C, the presence of C30 clusters shows that HOM monomers start to contribute to the nucleation of positive clusters. These experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the binding energies of representative neutral and charged clusters.

  10. Observations on small anionic clusters in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eritt, Markus

    2008-10-02

    The term atomic cluster relates to compounds of at least two or three atoms. Thereby the physical properties are size dependent and the property transitions between single atoms and bulk material are not always smooth. Ion traps allow it to observe internal cluster properties independent from the influence of external forces. In this work the electron induced decay of singly negatively charged atomic clusters was observed. The dissociation cross section of the clusters is dominated by detachment of the only weakly bound outer electrons. For simple atoms at low electron energies a simple scaling law can be obtained that includes only the binding energies of the valence electrons. Nevertheless for larger sizes theoretical calculations predict so called ''giant resonances'' as dominant decay process in metal clusters. Due to mass limitations in storage rings exist so far only cross section measurements for simple anions and small negative molecules. In this work the electron detachment cross sections of small negatively charged carbon (C{sub n}{sup -} n=2-12), aluminium (Al{sub n}{sup -} n=2-7) and silver clusters (Ag{sub n}{sup -} n=1-11) were measured in an electrostatic ion beam trap. The classical scaling law, including only the binding energies of the valence electrons, turned out to be not sufficient, especially for larger clusters. In order to improve the correlation between measured and predicted values it was proposed to involve the influence of the cluster volume and the specific polarisability induced by long range coulomb interaction. For silver clusters the best agreement was obtained using a combination of the projected area reduced by the polarisability. The existence of ''giant resonances'' could not be confirmed. According to theory for clusters with a broad internal energy distribution, a power-law decay close to 1/time is expected. For some clusters the lifetime behaviour would be strongly quenched by photon

  11. Structures of cobalt oxide cluster cations studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kosuke; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Ohshimo, Keijiro; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2013-11-01

    Structures of cobalt oxide cluster cations have been investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry. When the ions were injected into a drift cell with 250 eV kinetic energy, (CoO)n+ and ConOn-1+ were observed. Collision cross sections were experimentally determined for (CoO)2-7+ and ConOn-1+ (n = 5-7). Orientation-averaged collision cross sections were calculated for optimized structures of these ions obtained in quantum chemical calculations. By comparison between experimental and theoretical cross sections, (CoO)3-5+ ions are found to have monocyclic-ring structures. By contrast, (CoO)6,7+ have compact tower structures. Therefore, structural transition from the ring to compact structures occurs at (CoO)6+.

  12. Super-resolution scanning patch clamp reveals clustering of functional ion channels in adult ventricular myocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Anamika; Lin, Xianming; Novak, Pavel; Mehta, Kinneri; Korchev, Yuri; Delmar, Mario; Gorelik, Julia

    2013-04-12

    Compartmentation of ion channels on the cardiomyocyte surface is important for electric propagation and electromechanical coupling. The specialized T-tubule and costameric structures facilitate spatial coupling of various ion channels and receptors. Existing methods such as immunofluorescence and patch clamp techniques are limited in their ability to localize functional ion channels. As such, a correlation between channel protein location and channel function remains incomplete. To validate a method that permits routine imaging of the topography of a live cardiomyocyte and study clustering of functional ion channels from a specific microdomain. We used scanning ion conductance microscopy and conventional cell-attached patch clamp with a software modification that allows controlled increase of pipette tip diameter. The sharp nanopipette used for topography scan was modified into a larger patch pipette that could be positioned with nanoscale precision to a specific site of interest (crest, groove, or T-tubules of cardiomyocytes) and sealed to the membrane for cell-attached recording of ion channels. Using this method, we significantly increased the probability of detecting activity of L-type calcium channels in the T-tubules of ventricular cardiomyocytes. We also demonstrated that active sodium channels do not distribute homogenously on the sarcolemma instead, they segregate into clusters of various densities, most crowded in the crest region, that are surrounded by areas virtually free of functional sodium channels. Our new method substantially increases the throughput of recording location-specific functional ion channels on the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma, thereby allowing characterization of ion channels in relation to the microdomain where they reside.

  13. Collision of highly charged ion with clusters. Simulation study for electronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, Kazuhiro [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Collision of highly charged ion with cluster, for example, collision of C{sub 60}-Ar{sup 8+} at E=80 KeV, was simulated by the time-dependence Kohn-Shame equation. The distribution of electron densities and the self-consistent potential were obtained. A part of C{sub 60} potential curve became depressed by the Coulomb force of ion, so that the saddle point was produced on the potential. The behavior of electron transfer on the saddle point was agreed with the classical barrier model. Time-dependent density functional method was explained. (S.Y.)

  14. Polar cap ion beams during periods of northward IMF: Cluster statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Above the polar caps and during prolonged periods of northward IMF, the Cluster satellites detect upward accelerated ion beams with energies up to a few keV. They are associated with converging electric field structures indicating that the acceleration is caused by a quasi-static field-aligned electric field that can extend to altitudes higher than 7 RE (Maggiolo et al., 2006; Teste et al., 2007. Using the AMDA science analysis service provided by the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas, we have been able to extract about 200 events of accelerated upgoing ion beams above the polar caps from the Cluster database. Most of these observations are taken at altitudes lower than 7 RE and in the Northern Hemisphere. We investigate the statistical properties of these ion beams. We analyze their geometry, the properties of the plasma populations and of the electric field inside and around the beams, as well as their dependence on solar wind and IMF conditions. We show that ~40 % of the ion beams are collocated with a relatively hot and isotropic plasma population. The density and temperature of the isotropic population are highly variable but suggest that this plasma originates from the plasma sheet. The ion beam properties do not change significantly when the isotropic, hot background population is present. Furthermore, during one single polar cap crossing by Cluster it is possible to detect upgoing ion beams both with and without an accompanying isotropic component. The analysis of the variation of the IMF BZ component prior to the detection of the beams indicates that the delay between a northward/southward turning of IMF and the appearance/disappearance of the beams is respectively ~2 h and 20 min. The observed electrodynamic characteristics of high altitude polar cap ion beams suggest that they are closely connected to polar cap auroral arcs. We discuss the implications of these Cluster observations above the polar cap on the magnetospheric

  15. Carbon cluster ions for a study of the accuracy of ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kuckein, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L

    2003-01-01

    Cyclotron frequency measurements of singly charged carbon clusters $^{12}$C$_{n}^{+}$ were carried out with the ISOLTRAP apparatus. The carbon cluster ions were produced externally by use of laser- induced desorption, fragmentation, and ionization of C$_{60}$ fullerenes. They were injected into and stored in the Penning trap system. The observation of carbon clusters of different sizes has provided detailed insight into the final mass uncertainty achievable with ISOLTRAP and yielded a value of $u(m)/m = 8 \\times 10^{-9}$. Since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 the mass of the $^{12}$C atom, ISOLTRAP can now be used to carry out absolute mass measurements.

  16. Field Observation of the Green Ocean Amazon. Neutral Cluster Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petaja, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Backman, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manninen, H. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wimmer, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) was deployed to the T3 site for Intensive Operations Periods 1 and 2 (IOP1 and IOP2). The NAIS is an instrument that measures aerosol particle and ion number size distributions in the mobility diameter range of 0.8 to 42 nm, corresponding to electrical mobility range between 3.2 and 0.0013 cm2 V-1 s-1. New particle formation (NPF) events were detected using the NAIS at the T3 field site during IOP1 and IOP2. Secondary NPF is a globally important source of aerosol number. To fully explain atmospheric NPF and subsequent growth, we need to directly measure the initial steps of the formation processes in different environments, including rain forest. Particle formation characteristics, such as formation and growth rates, were used as indicators of the relevant processes and participating compounds in the initial formation. In a case of parallel ion and neutral cluster measurements, we estimated the relative contribution of ion-induced and neutral nucleation to the total particle formation.

  17. Interaction of plasma-generated water cluster ions with chemically-modified Si surfaces investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Hirano-Iwata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the interaction of water cluster ions generated by discharge plasma, with chemically modified Si surfaces using infrared absorption spectroscopy in the multiple internal reflection geometry. We observe that water cluster ions readily adsorb on SiO2-covered Si surfaces to form water droplets. We demonstrate that positively- and negatively-charged cluster ions adsorb on the SiO2-covered Si surface in different manners, indicating ionic interaction of the water droplets with the negatively-charged SiO2 surface. Water droplets formed on the protein-coated surface rupture the amide bond of the proteins, suggesting the function of protein decomposition of water cluster ions.

  18. Isolated and clustered DNA lesions induced by high-energy iron and carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, H.; Tanaka, R.; Nakaarai, Y.; Terato, H.; Furusawa, Y.

    During space flight astronauts are exposed to various types of radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays, the latter of which contain high-energy charged particles such as Fe and C ions. The radiation risk to astronauts toward such high-energy charged particles has been assessed by ground-based experiments. When irradiated by ionizing radiation, DNA molecules suffer from oxidation of bases and strand breaks. The distribution of these lesions along the DNA strand may differ significantly between densely ionizing high-energy Fe and C ions and sparsely ionizing radiation like 60Co gamma-rays. Among various types of DNA damage, bistranded clustered lesions comprised of multiple oxidized bases or strand breaks on opposite strands within a few helical turns are of particular interest since they are assumed to be resistant to repair or induce faulty repair, hence resulting in cell killing and mutations. In the present study, we have analyzed isolated and clustered DNA lesions generated by high-energy Fe and C ions to elucidate the nature of DNA lesions. Plasmid DNA (pDEL19) was irradiated in 10 mM Tris buffer (pH 7.5) by Fe (500 MeV/amu) and C (290 MeV/amu) ions and 60Co gamma-rays. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by analysis of conformational changes using agarose gel electrophoresis. For quantification of isolated and bistranded clustered base lesions, irradiated plasmid was exhaustively digested prior to agarose gel analysis by Endo III and Fpg that preferentially incise DNA at oxidative pyrimidine and purine lesions, respectively. The yield (site/Gy/nucleotide) of isolated damages (SSB and bases lesions) tended to decrease with increasing LET [gamma (0.2 keV/μ m) mutations was decreased with increasing LET [relative yield: 1 (gamma) > 0.77 (C) > 0.69 (Fe)]. This result is in contrast to the higher biological effectiveness (e.g. cell killing) of high-energy Fe and C ions than gamma-rays, suggesting a role of more complex

  19. Computer modeling and electron microscopy of silicon surfaces irradiated by cluster ion impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Z; Santeufemio, C; Jones, K S; Yamada, I

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid molecular dynamics model has been applied for modeling impacts of Ar and decaborane clusters, with energies ranging from 25 to 1500 eV/atom, impacting Si surfaces. Crater formation, sputtering, and the shapes of craters and rims were studied. Our simulation predicts that on a Si(1 0 0), craters are nearly triangular in cross-section, with the facets directed along the close-packed (1 1 1) planes. The Si(1 0 0) craters exhibit four fold symmetry. The craters on Si(1 1 1) surface are well rounded in cross-section and the top-view shows a complicated six fold or triangular image. The simulation results for individual gas cluster impacts were compared with experiments at low dose (10 sup 1 sup 0 ions/cm sup 2 charge fluence) for Ar impacts into Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) substrate surfaces. Atomic force microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscope imaging of individual gas cluster ion impacts into Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) substrate surfaces revealed faceting properties of t...

  20. ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal rat neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J. T.; Nie, H.-Y.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the power of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) cluster ion imaging to characterize biological structures, such as that of the rat central nervous system. A large number of the studies to date have been carried out on the "structural scale" imaging several mm 2 using mounted thin sections. In this work, we present our ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging results on hippocampal rat brain neurons, at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. As a part of an ongoing investigation to examine gut linked metabolic factors in autism spectrum disorders using a novel rat model, we have observed a possible variation in hippocampal Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neuron geometry in thin, paraformaldehyde fixed brain sections. However, the fixation process alters the tissue matrix such that much biochemical information appears to be lost. In an effort to preserve as much as possible this original information, we have established a protocol using unfixed thin brain sections, along with low dose, 500 eV Cs + pre-sputtering that allows imaging down to the sub-cellular scale with minimal sample preparation.

  1. Trapping of hydrogen atoms inside small beryllium clusters and their ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    Structure, stability and electronic properties are evaluated computationally for small Ben (n = 5-9) cluster cages accommodating atomic H inside and forming core-shell species. These parameters are predicted to vary significantly upon insertion of H, for ionic derivatives, and with the system size. In particular, the energy barrier for H-atom exit from the cage changes significantly for ions compared to the neutral counterparts. The corresponding effects predicted for cage assemblies suggest the possibility of efficient charge-control of hydrogen release. This, together with a high capacity for storing hydrogen in extended such assemblies might indicate a possible way towards feasible hydrogen-storage solutions.

  2. Ion-pair dissociation of highly excited carbon clusters: Size and charge effects

    OpenAIRE

    Launoy, Thibaut; Béroff, Karine; Chabot, Marin; Martinet, Guillaume; Le Padellec, A.; Pino, Thomas; Bouneau, S.; Vaeck, Nathalie; Liévin, Jacques; Féraud, Géraldine G.; Loreau, Jérôme; Mahajan, Thejus T. M

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of ion-pair dissociation (IPD) of highly excited neutral and ionized carbon clusters Cn=2-5(q=0-3)+. The tool for producing these species was a high-velocity collision between Cn+ projectiles (v=2.25 a.u.) and helium atoms. The setup allowed us to detect in coincidence anionic and cationic fragments, event by event, leading to a direct and unambiguous identification of the IPD process. Compared with dissociation without anion emission, we found typical 10-4 IPD rates, ...

  3. Positively and Negatively Charged Cesium and (C60)mCsn Cluster Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We report on the formation and ionization of cesium and C60Cs clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets. Size distributions of positively and negatively charged (C60)mCsn± ions have been measured for m ≤ 7, n ≤ 12. Reproducible intensity anomalies are observed in high-resolution mass spectra. For both charge states, (C60)mCs3± and (C60)mCs5± are particularly abundant, with little dependence on the value of m. Distributions of bare cesium cluster ions also indicate enhanced stability of Cs3± and Cs5±, in agreement with theoretical predictions. These findings contrast with earlier reports on highly Cs-doped cationic fullerene aggregates which showed enhanced stability of C60Cs6 building blocks attributed to charge transfer. The dependence of the (C60)mCs3– anion yield on electron energy shows a resonance that, surprisingly, oscillates in strength as m increases from 1 to 6. PMID:28572870

  4. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberreit, Derek [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Fluid Measurement Technologies, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota 55110 (United States); Rawat, Vivek K.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H.; Hogan, Christopher J., E-mail: hogan108@umn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI){sub x}M{sup +} (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.

  5. Investigation into the reactivity of unsupported and supported Ag7 and Ag8 clusters with toxic metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootharaju, M S; Pradeep, T

    2011-07-05

    We report the chemical interactions of unsupported and alumina-supported Ag(7) and Ag(8) clusters protected with MSA (mercaptosuccinic acid) with heavy metal ions Hg(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) in water at different concentrations. The investigation was carried out to determine the feasibility of this interesting new class of materials called quantum clusters for water purification. These systems were studied using various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques such as ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy and in detail by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We observed that the metal ions interact with both the silver atoms of the clusters and the functional groups of the capping agent (MSA). The mercuric ions were reduced to metallic mercury by both supported and unsupported clusters, due to the feasibility of the redox reaction, whereas no reduction was observed for Cd(II) and Pb(II). As a result of the interaction, the luminescence of the cluster is lost which can be used to sense Hg(II). At lower concentrations, the metal ions were chemically bonded to the carboxylate groups of MSA. Absence of reduction of Hg(II) at lower concentration is due to the chemical affinity of the ligands and the lower silver content per cluster compared to the number of carboxylate groups. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Formation of ion clusters in the phase separated structures of neutral-charged polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ha-Kyung; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte blends, consisting of at least one charged species, are promising candidate materials for fuel cell membranes, for their mechanical stability and high selectivity for proton conduction. The phase behavior of the blends is important to understand, as this can significantly affect the performance of the device. The phase behavior is controlled by χN, the Flory-Huggins parameter multiplied by the number of mers, as well as the electrostatic interactions between the charged backbone and the counterions. It has recently been shown that local ionic correlations, incorporated via liquid state (LS) theory, enhance phase separation of the blend, even in the absence of polymer interactions. In this study, we show phase diagrams of neutral-charged polymer blends including ionic correlations via LS theory. In addition to enhanced phase separation at low χN, the blends show liquid-liquid phase separation at high electrostatic interaction strengths. Above the critical strength, the charged polymer phase separates into ion-rich and ion-poor regions, resulting in the formation of ion clusters within the charged polymer phase. This can be shown by the appearance of multiple spinodal and critical points, indicating the coexistence of several charge separated phases. This work was performed under the following financial assistance award 70NANB14H012 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD).

  7. ToF SIMS analysis of a fluorocarbon-grafted PET with a gold cluster ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengmao; Kelley, Michael J.

    2006-07-01

    Cluster ions have been recognized as a superb primary species in time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) compared with monatomic primary ions, as they significantly enhance the secondary ion yields from bulk samples. Self-assembled monolayers provide an important system for studying the fundamental mechanism involved in the yield enhancement. We used a gold cluster ion source to analyze a new type of self-assembled monolayer: a fluorocarbon-grafted polyethylene terephthalate. In addition to the structure details, which helped to understand the grafting mechanism, ToF-SIMS analysis revealed that fluorocarbon secondary ion yield enhancements by cluster ions were due to the enhanced sputter efficiency. A larger information depth may also be expected from the enhancement. Both mathematical definitions of damage cross-section and disappearance cross-section were revisited under a new context. Another cross-section parameter, sputter cross-section, was introduced to differentiate the beam induced sputter process from damage process.

  8. A review of electron bombardment thruster systems/spacecraft field and particle interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper collates and summarizes information on the field and particle interfaces of electron bombardment ion thruster systems. Major areas discussed are the nonpropellant particles, neutral propellant, ion beam, low energy plasma, and fields. Spacecraft functions and subsystems reviewed are solar arrays, thermal control systems, optical sensors, communications, science, structures and materials, and potential control. An appendix is included to facilitate identification of specific interaction areas.

  9. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Caroline Chick [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C6-/C6, Sin-/Sin (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge2-/Ge2, In2P-/In2P,InP2-/InP2, and Ga2As-. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I-•CH3I SN2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C6, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C6- spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ~40 cm-1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C6, and the open shell of the anion.

  10. Dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy of Au nanoparticles on Si wafer using Bi3+ as primary ion coupled with surface etching by Ar cluster ion beam: The effect of etching conditions on surface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Ji; Choi, Chang Min; Kim, Il Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Gaehang; Jin, Jong Sung; Ganteför, Gerd; Kim, Young Dok; Choi, Myoung Choul

    2018-01-01

    Wet-chemically synthesized Au nanoparticles were deposited on Si wafer surfaces, and the secondary ions mass spectra (SIMS) from these samples were collected using Bi3+ with an energy of 30 keV as the primary ions. In the SIMS, Au cluster cations with a well-known, even-odd alteration pattern in the signal intensity were observed. We also performed depth profile SIMS analyses, i.e., etching the surface using an Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB), and a subsequent Bi3+ SIMS analysis was repetitively performed. Here, two different etching conditions (Ar1600 clusters of 10 keV energy or Ar1000 of 2.5 keV denoted as "harsh" or "soft" etching conditions, respectively) were used. Etching under harsh conditions induced emission of the Au-Si binary cluster cations in the SIMS spectra of the Bi3+ primary ions. The formation of binary cluster cations can be induced by either fragmentation of Au nanoparticles or alloying of Au and Si, increasing Au-Si coordination on the sample surface during harsh GCIB etching. Alternatively, use of the soft GCIB etching conditions resulted in exclusive emission of pure Au cluster cations with nearly no Au-Si cluster cation formation. Depth profile analyses of the Bi3+ SIMS combined with soft GCIB etching can be useful for studying the chemical environments of atoms at the surface without altering the original interface structure during etching.

  11. Study of Si wafer surfaces irradiated by gas cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isogai, H. [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, Toshiba Ceramics Co., Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashikou Seiroumachi Kitakanbaragun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan)]. E-mail: isogai@tocera.co.jp; Toyoda, E. [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, Toshiba Ceramics Co., Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashikou Seiroumachi Kitakanbaragun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Senda, T. [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, Toshiba Ceramics Co., Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashikou Seiroumachi Kitakanbaragun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Izunome, K. [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, Toshiba Ceramics Co., Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashikou Seiroumachi Kitakanbaragun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Kashima, K. [New Business Creation, Toshiba Ceramics Co., Ltd., 30 Soya Hadano City, Kanagawa 257-0031 (Japan); Toyoda, N. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto Kamigouri, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Yamada, I. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto Kamigouri, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    The surface structures of Si (1 0 0) wafers subjected to gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation have been analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). GCIB irradiation is a promising technique for both precise surface etching and planarization of Si wafers. However, it is very important to understand the crystalline structure of Si wafers after GCIB irradiation. An Ar-GCIB used for the physically sputtering of Si atoms and a SF{sub 6}-GCIB used for the chemical etching of the Si surface are also analyzed. The GCIB irradiation increases the surface roughness of the wafers, and amorphous Si layers are formed on the wafer surface. However, when the Si wafers are annealed in hydrogen at a high temperature after the GCIB irradiation, the surface roughness decreases to the same level as that before the irradiation. Moreover, the amorphous Si layers disappear completely.

  12. Tuning Mobility Separation Factors of Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation Products via Selective Ion-Neutral Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwantwi-Barima, Pearl; Ouyang, Hui; Hogan, Christopher J; Clowers, Brian H

    2017-11-21

    Combining experimental data with computational modeling, we illustrate the capacity of selective gas-phase interactions using neutral gas vapors to yield an additional dimension of gas-phase ion mobility separation. Not only are the mobility shifts as a function of neutral gas vapor concentration reproducible, but also the selective alteration of mobility separation factors is closely linked to existing chemical functional groups. Such information may prove advantageous in elucidating chemical class and resolving interferences. Using a set of chemical warfare agent simulants with nominally the same reduced mobility values as a test case, we illustrate the ability of the drift-gas doping approach to achieve separation of these analytes. In nitrogen, protonated forms of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) and methyl phosphonic acid (MPA) exhibit the reduced mobility values of 1.99 ± 0.01 cm2 V-1s-1 at 175 °C. However, when the counter current drift gas of the system is doped with 2-propanol at 20 μL/h, full baseline resolution of the two species is possible. By varying the concentration of the neutral modifier, the separation factor of the respective clusters can be adjusted. For the two species examined and at a 2-propanol flow rate of 160 μL/h, MPA demonstrated the greatest shift in mobility (1.58 cm2V-1s-1) compared the DMMP monomer (1.63 cm2V-1s-1). Meanwhile, the DMMP dimer experienced no change in mobility (1.45 cm2V-1s-1). The enhancement of separation factors appears to be brought about by the differential clustering of neutral modifiers onto different ions and can be explained by a model which considers the transient binding of a single 2-propanol molecule during mobility measurements. Furthermore, the application of the binding models not only provides a thermodynamic foundation for the results obtained but also creates a predictive tool toward a quantitative approach.

  13. High performance charge-state resolving ion energy analyzer optimized for intense laser studies on low-density cluster targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, D.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Tiggesbäumker, J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a versatile ion analyzer which is capable to resolve ion charge states and energies with a resolution of E/ΔE = 100 at 75 keV/nucleon. Charge states are identified by their characteristic deflection in a magnetic field, whereas the ion energies are independently determined by a time-of-flight measurement. To monitor the signals a delay-line detector is used which records ion impact positions and times in each laser shot. Compared to conventional Thomson parabola spectrometers our instrument provides a low background measurement, hence a superior dynamic range. Further features are an improved energy resolution and a significantly increased transmission. We demonstrate the performance by showing charge-state resolved ion energy spectra from the Coulomb explosion of a low-density target, i.e., silver clusters exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  14. Solar wind dependence of ion parameters in the Earth's magnetospheric region calculated from CLUSTER observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Moments calculated from the ion distributions (~0–40 keV measured by the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS instrument are combined with data from the Cluster Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM instrument and used to characterise the bulk properties of the plasma in the near-Earth magnetosphere over five years (2001–2005. Results are presented in the form of 2-D xy, xz and yz GSM cuts through the magnetosphere using data obtained from the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS and the Cluster Active Archive (CAA. Analysis reveals the distribution of ~0–40 keV ions in the inner magnetosphere is highly ordered and highly responsive to changes in solar wind velocity. Specifically, elevations in temperature are found to occur across the entire nightside plasma sheet region during times of fast solar wind. We demonstrate that the nightside plasma sheet ion temperature at a downtail distance of ~12 to 19 Earth radii increases by a factor of ~2 during periods of fast solar wind (500–1000 km s−1 compared to periods of slow solar wind (100–400 km s−1. The spatial extent of these increases are shown in the xy, xz and yz GSM planes. The results from the study have implications for modelling studies and simulations of solar-wind/magnetosphere coupling, which ultimately rely on in situ observations of the plasma sheet properties for input/boundary conditions.

  15. Tailoring Ion Charge State Distribution in Tetramethyltin Clusters under Influence of Moderate Intensity Picosecond Laser Pulse: Role of Laser Wavelength and Rate of Energy Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod; Das, Soumitra; Vatsa, Rajesh K.

    2017-07-01

    Systematic manipulation of ionic-outcome in laser-cluster interaction process has been realized for studies carried out on tetramethyltin (TMT) clusters under picosecond laser conditions, determined by choice of laser wavelength and intensity. As a function of laser intensity, TMT clusters exhibit gradual enhancement in overall ionization of its cluster constituents, up to a saturation level of ionization, which was distinct for different wavelengths (266, 355, and 532 nm). Simultaneously, systematic appearance of higher multiply charged atomic ions and shift in relative abundance of multiply charged atomic ions towards higher charge state was observed, using time-of-flight mass spectrometer. At saturation level, multiply charged atomic ions up to (C2+, Sn2+) at 266 nm, (C4+, Sn4+) at 355 nm, and (C4+, Sn6+) at 532 nm were detected. In addition, at 355 nm intra-cluster ion chemistry within the ionized cluster leads to generation of molecular hydrogen ion (H2 +) and triatomic molecular hydrogen ion (H3 +). Generation of multiply charged atomic ions is ascribed to efficient coupling of laser pulse with the cluster media, facilitated by inner-ionized electrons produced within the cluster, at the leading edge of laser pulse. Role of inner-ionized electrons is authenticated by measuring kinetic energy distribution of electrons liberated upon disintegration of excessively ionized cluster, under the influence of picosecond laser pulse.

  16. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Room temperature deposition of high figure of merit Al-doped zinc oxide by pulsed-direct current magnetron sputtering: Influence of energetic negative ion bombardment on film's optoelectronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fumagalli, F., E-mail: francesco.fumagalli@iit.it; Martí-Rujas, J., E-mail: javier.rujas@iit.it; Di Fonzo, F., E-mail: fabio.difonzo@iit.it

    2014-10-31

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide is regarded as a promising indium-free transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic and transparent electronics. In this study high transmittance (up to 90,6%) and low resistivity (down to 8,4°1{sup −4} Ω cm) AZO films were fabricated at room temperature on thermoplastic and soda-lime glass substrates by means of pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering in argon gas. Morphological, optical and electrical film properties were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis–nIR photo-spectrometer, X-ray spectroscopy and four probes method. Optimal deposition conditions were found to be strongly related to substrate position. The dependence of functional properties on substrate off-axis position was investigated and correlated to the angular distributions of negative ions fluxes emerging from the plasma discharge. Figure of merit as high as 2,15 ± 0,14 Ω{sup −1} were obtained outside the negative oxygen ions confinement region. Combination of high quality AZO films deposited on flexible polymers substrates by means of a solid and scalable fabrication technique is of interest for application in cost-effective optoelectrical devices, organic photovoltaics and polymer based electronics. - Highlights: • High figure of merit transparent conductive oxide's deposited at room temperature. • High transmittance and low resistivity obtained on thermoplastic substrates. • Competitive optoelectrical properties compared to high temperature deposition. • Negative ion fluxes confinement influence structural and optoelectrical properties. • Easily adaptable for scaled-up low temperature AZO film deposition installations.

  18. Transgenic sorghum plants via microprojectile bombardment.

    OpenAIRE

    Casas, A M; Kononowicz, A K; Zehr, U B; Tomes, D T; Axtell, J. D.; Butler, L. G.; Bressan, R. A.; Hasegawa, P M

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic sorghum plants have been obtained after microprojectile bombardment of immature zygotic embryos of a drought-resistant sorghum cultivar, P898012. DNA delivery parameters were optimized based on transient expression of R and C1 maize anthocyanin regulatory elements in scutellar cells. The protocol for obtaining transgenic plants consists of the delivery of the bar gene to immature zygotic embryos and the imposition of bialaphos selection pressure at various stages during culture, fr...

  19. Gas cluster ion beam for the characterization of organic materials in submarine basalts as Mars analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Naoko, E-mail: naoko.sano@ncl.ac.uk; Barlow, Anders J.; Cumpson, Peter J. [National EPSRC XPS Users' Service (NEXUS), School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Stephenson Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Purvis, Graham W. H.; Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Gray, Neil N. D. [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Devonshire Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The solar system contains large quantities of organic compounds that can form complex molecular structures. The processing of organic compounds by biological systems leads to molecules with distinctive structural characteristics; thus, the detection and characterization of organic materials could lead to a high degree of confidence in the existence of extra-terrestrial life. Given the nature of the surface of most planetary bodies in the solar system, evidence of life is more likely to be found in the subsurface where conditions are more hospitable. Basalt is a common rock throughout the solar system and the primary rock type on Mars and Earth. Basalt is therefore a rock type that subsurface life might exploit and as such a suitable material for the study of methods required to detect and analyze organic material in rock. Telluric basalts from Earth represent an analog for extra-terrestrial rocks where the indigenous organic matter could be analyzed for molecular biosignatures. This study focuses on organic matter in the basalt with the use of surface analysis techniques utilizing Ar gas cluster ion beams (GCIB); time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), to characterize organic molecules. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis was also used to support the data obtained using the surface analysis techniques. The authors demonstrate that organic molecules were found to be heterogeneously distributed within rock textures. A positive correlation was observed to exist between the presence of microtubule textures in the basalt and the organic compounds detected. From the results herein, the authors propose that ToF-SIMS with an Ar GCIB is effective at detecting organic materials in such geological samples, and ToF-SIMS combined with XPS and TMAH thermochemolysis may be a useful approach in the study of extra-terrestrial organic material and life.

  20. Reference masses for precision mass spectrometry design and implementation of a Pierce geometry to the cluster Ion source at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, Jonathan

    At the mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP carbon clusters ($^{12}$Cn, 1$\\leqslant$n$\\leqslant$25) are provided as reference masses, which are of particular importance in higher mass ranges (m $\\geqslant$ 200u). In this mass range the measurlment uncertainty is increasingly dominated by the difference of the reference mass and the mass of the ion of interest. Using carbon clusters instead of the common $^{133}$Cs ions, this difference decreases. The carbon clusters are produced in a laser ion source which has been improved in the frame of this thesis. The fluctuations of the count rate have been investigated as a function of the laser energy. Furthermore, the energy density at the target has been increased by implementation of a telescope into the laser beam line, which leads to a more narrow energy distribution of the ions. Through the exact adjustment of timing and length of a pulsed cavity an energy range with constant count rate could be selected. In order to provide ideal starting conditions during and after the ...

  1. Analysis of bone minerals by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry: a comparative study using monoatomic and cluster ions sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Per; Bexell, Ulf; Eriksson, Cecilia; Nygren, Håkan; Richter, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is an important tool for the analysis of bone minerals at implant surfaces. Most studies have been performed with monoatomic primary ion sources such as Ga(+) with poor secondary molecular ion production efficiency and only elemental distributions and minor fragments of bone minerals have been reported. By using cluster ion sources, such as Au(1-3) (+) and Bi(1-3) (+), identification of larger hydroxyapatite species at m/z 485, 541, 597 and 653, identified as Ca(5)P(3)O(12), Ca(6)P(3)O(13), Ca(7)P(3)O(14) and Ca(8)P(3)O(15), respectively, became possible. The ions appear to be fragments of the hydroxyapatite unit cell Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2). Each ion in the series is separated by 55.9 m/z units, corresponding to CaO, and this separation might reflect the columnar nature of the unit cell. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Cs{sup +} sputtered clusters from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, graphite and the structural transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Shoaib, E-mail: sahmad@gcu.edu.pk [Government College University (GCU), CASP, Church Road, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Javeed, Sumera; Zeeshan, Sumaira [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Naeem, Athar; Saadat, Shahzad; Yousuf, Muhammad; Khaleel, Muhammad; Mushtaq, Ahsan; Shahnawaz, Muhammad [Government College University (GCU), CASP, Church Road, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cs{sup +} irradiated MWCNTs investigated with sputtered carbon clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fragments include from monomers to large clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successive spectra identify the fragmentation to conversion into amorphous carbon. - Abstract: Experiments with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite as targets in a source of negative ions with cesium sputtering show that MWCNTs with nanometer radii and micrometer length can be compared with micrometer-size graphite grains. The comparative study helps to better understand the irradiation effects, including the formation, sputtering of carbon clusters and the resulting structural changes. The simultaneous adsorption of Cs{sup 0} on the surface and bombardment by energetic Cs{sup +} ions is shown to play a role in cluster formation and sputtering of carbon atoms and clusters (C{sub x}; x Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1) and the cesium-substituted carbon clusters (CsC{sub x}) as anions. Qualitative and quantitative outputs of sputtered species are related to their respective structures. Structural changes are shown to occur in MWCNTs and seen in scanning electron micrographs. The individual identity of the heavily bombarded MWCNTs may have given way to the merged structures while effects on the structure of heavily irradiated graphite grains size needs to be further investigated.

  3. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...

  4. Sputtering in supported cluster arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Sáez, J.C., E-mail: jc.jimenez@upm.es [Dept. Física Aplicada a la Ingeniería Aeronáutica y Naval, ETSIAE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pérez-Martín, A.M.C.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada III, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-01

    Bombardment of periodical arrays formed by Co nanoislands deposited on a Cu(0 0 1) substrate with 1-keV argon ions is simulated by using molecular dynamics. Sputtering yield is analyzed distinguishing between particles sputtered across the supported cluster surface and across the flat substrate surface without nanoparticle above. The dependence of this magnitude on the height and the periodical spacing between nanoislands has been investigated. Results show that this dependence for the sputtering across the nanoislands and across the substrate is different. In the case of the total sputtering, the “substrate” effect prevails since the behavior of this magnitude is approximately analogous to the sputtering across the substrate. The more probable causes are analyzed in this article.

  5. Proton bombarded reactions of Calcium target nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tel Eyyup

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, proton bombarded nuclear reactions calculations of Calcium target nuclei have been investigated in the incident proton energy range of 1–50 MeV. The excitation functions for 40Ca target nuclei reactions have been calculated by using PCROSS nuclear reaction calculation code. Weisskopf-Ewing and the full exciton models were used for equilibrium and for pre-equilibrium calculations, respectively. The excitation functions for 40Ca target nuclei reactions (p,α, (p,n, (p,p have been calculated using the semi-empirical formula Tel et al. [5].

  6. A stochastic optimization method based technique for finding out reaction paths in noble gas clusters perturbed by alkali metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biring, Shyamal Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chaudhury, Pinaki, E-mail: pinakc@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: The structure of a minimum in Ar{sub 19}K{sup +} cluster. Abstract: In this paper we explore the possibility of using stochastic optimizers, namely simulated annealing (SA) in locating critical points (global minima, local minima and first order saddle points) in Argon noble gas clusters perturbed by alkali metal ions namely sodium and potassium. The atomic interaction potential is the Lennard Jones potential. We also try to see if a continuous transformation in geometry during the search process can lead to a realization of a kind of minimum energy path (MEP) for transformation from one minimum geometry to another through a transition state (first order saddle point). We try our recipe for three sizes of clusters, namely (Ar){sub 16}M{sup +}, (Ar){sub 19}M{sup +} and (Ar){sub 24}M{sup +}, where M{sup +} is Na{sup +} and K{sup +}.

  7. submitter The effect of acid–base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a ...

  8. Ion multi-nose structures observed by Cluster in the inner Magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vallat

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available During the last 30 years, several magnetospheric missions have recorded the presence of narrow proton structures in the ring current region. These structures have been referred as "nose-like" structures, due to their appearance when represented in energy-time spectrograms, characterized by a flux value increase for a narrow energy range. Cluster's polar orbit, with a 4 RE perigee, samples the ring current region. The ion distribution functions obtained in-situ by the CIS experiment (for energies of ~5 eV/q to 40 keV/q reveal the simultaneous presence of several (up to 3 narrow nose-like structures. A statistical study (over one year and a half of CIS data reveals that double nose structures are preferentially observed in the post-midnight sector. Also, the characteristic energy of the nose (the one observed at the lower energy range when several noses occur simultaneously reveals a clear MLT dependence during quiet events (Kp<2: a sharp transition in the energy range occurs in the pre-noon sector. Moreover, the multi-nose structures (up to 3 simultaneous noses appear regardless of the magnetospheric activity level and/or the MLT sector crossed by the spacecraft. Numerical simulations of particles trajectories, using large-scale electric and magnetic field models are also presented. Most of the features have been accurately reproduced (namely the single and double noses, but the triple noses cannot be produced under these conditions and require to consider a more complex electric field model.

  9. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  10. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Bosqued

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of

  11. Single-ion versus dipolar origin of the magnetic anisotropy in iron(III)-oxo clusters: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbati, G L; Brunel, L C; Casalta, H; Cornia, A; Fabretti, A C; Gatteschi, D; Hassan, A K; Jansen, A G; Maniero, A L; Pardi, L; Paulsen, C; Segre, U

    2001-04-17

    A multitechnique approach has allowed the first experimental determination of single-ion anisotropies in a large iron(III)-oxo cluster, namely [NaFe6(OCH3)12(pmdbm)6ClO4 (1) in which Hpmdbm = 1,3-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanedione. High-frequency EPR (HF-EPR). bulk susceptibility measurements, and high-field cantilever torque magnetometry (HF-CTM) have been applied to iron-doped samples of an isomorphous hexagallium(III) cluster [NaGa6(OCH3)12-(pmdbm)6]ClO4, whose synthesis and X-ray structure are also presented. HF-EPR at 240 GHz and susceptibility data have shown that the iron(III) ions have a hard-axis type anisotropy with DFe = 0.43(1) cm(-1) and EFe = 0.066(3) cm(-1) in the zero-field splitting (ZFS) Hamiltonian H = DFe[S2(z) - S(S + 1)/3] + Fe[S2(x) - S2(y)]. HF-CTM at 0.4 K has then been used to establish the orientation of the ZFS tensors with respect to the unique molecular axis of the cluster, Z. The hard magnetic axes of the iron(III) ions are found to be almost perpendicular to Z, so that the anisotropic components projected onto Z are negative, DFe(ZZ)= -0.164(4) cm(-1). Due to the dominant antiferromagnetic coupling, a negative DFe(ZZ) value determines a hard-axis molecular anisotropy in 1, as experimentally observed. By adding point-dipolar interactions between iron(III) spins, the calculated ZFS parameter of the triplet state, D1 = 4.70(9) cm(-1), is in excellent agreement with that determined by inelastic neutron scattering experiments at 2 K, D1 = 4.57(2) cm(-1). Iron-doped samples of a structurally related compound, the dimer [Ga2(OCH3)2(dbm)4] (Hdbm = dibenzoylmethane), have also been investigated by HF-EPR at 525 GHz. The single-ion anisotropy is of the hard-axis type as well, but the DFe parameter is significantly larger [DFe = 0.770(3) cm(-1). EFe = 0.090(3) cm(-1)]. We conclude that, although the ZFS tensors depend very unpredictably on the coordination environment of the metal ions, single-ion terms can contribute significantly to the

  12. Surface layer evolution caused by the bombardment with ionized metal vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döbeli, M., E-mail: doebeli@phys.ethz.ch [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Schafmattstrasse 20, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Dommann, A.; Maeder, X.; Neels, A. [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique CSEM SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Passerone, D. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Rudigier, H. [OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); Scopece, D. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Widrig, B.; Ramm, J. [OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein)

    2014-08-01

    The evolution of the composition of tungsten carbide and silicon surfaces initiated by the bombardment with Zr and Cr ions has been investigated as a function of the substrate bias voltage. Surface composition profiles were measured by Rutherford backscattering and have been compared with the results obtained by the TRIDYN simulation program. It is found that the general dependence of film thickness on substrate bias is satisfactorily reproduced by this model. Deviations between experiment and simulation are attributed to possible partial oxidation of the surface or uncertainties in the charge state distribution of metal ions. The results confirm that TRIDYN facilitates the predictability of the nucleation of metallic vapor at substrate surfaces.

  13. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models.

  14. Beyond Bombardment: Subjectivity, Visual Culture, and Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Jennifer F.

    2006-01-01

    Beginning with an understanding of visual culture as a postmodern discourse, this article argues for more focused attention to how visual culture presents a critical rethinking of subjectivity within art education. Through an analysis of a language of bombardment, a discourse that positions the subject as bombarded by media messages, this article…

  15. IR photodissociation spectroscopy of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster ions: Similarity and dissimilarity in the structure of CO{sub 2}, OCS, and CS{sub 2} cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya, E-mail: y-inokuchi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Ebata, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} (n = 2–6) cluster ions are measured in the 1000–2300 cm{sup −1} region; these clusters show strong CO stretching vibrations in this region. For (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} and (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}, we utilize the messenger technique by attaching an Ar atom to measure their IR spectra. The IRPD spectrum of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}Ar shows two bands at 2095 and 2120 cm{sup −1}. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, these bands are assigned to a C{sub 2} isomer of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}, in which an intermolecular semi-covalent bond is formed between the sulfur ends of the two OCS components by the charge resonance interaction, and the positive charge is delocalized over the dimer. The (OCS){sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–6) cluster ions show a few bands assignable to “solvent” OCS molecules in the 2000–2080 cm{sup −1} region, in addition to the bands due to the (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} ion core at ∼2090 and ∼2120 cm{sup −1}, suggesting that the dimer ion core is kept in (OCS){sub 3–6}{sup +}. For the (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster anions, the IRPD spectra indicate the coexistence of a few isomers with an OCS{sup −} or (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} anion core over the cluster range of n = 2–6. The (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}Ar anion displays two strong bands at 1674 and 1994 cm{sup −1}. These bands can be assigned to a C{sub s} isomer with an OCS{sup −} anion core. For the n = 2–4 anions, this OCS{sup −} anion core form is dominant. In addition to the bands of the OCS{sup −} core isomer, we found another band at ∼1740 cm{sup −1}, which can be assigned to isomers having an (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} ion core; this dimer core has C{sub 2} symmetry and {sup 2}A electronic state. The IRPD spectra of the n = 3–6 anions show two IR bands at ∼1660 and ∼2020 cm{sup −1}. The intensity of the latter component relative to that of the former one becomes stronger and stronger with

  16. Study of structure and spectroscopy of water–hydroxide ion clusters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clusters where n = 1–6. We have shown that the use of SA can generate both global and local structures of these cluster systems. We also perform a DFT calculation, using the optimized coordinate obtained from SA as input and extract the IR spectra of these systems. Finally, we compare our results with available.

  17. State density formalism of the Iwamoto-Harada model: A suitable tool to treat cluster emission from heavy-ion collisions with account for spin variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Běták Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton model suitable also for heavy ion collisions. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, α-particles.

  18. Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transition in hydrogen cluster ions backbending of the caloric curve

    CERN Document Server

    Gobet, F; Carré, M; Farizon, B; Farizon, M; Gaillard, M J; Maerk, T D; Scheier, P

    2002-01-01

    By (i) selecting specific decay reactions in high energy collisions (60 keV/amu) of hydrogen cluster ions with a helium target (utilizing event-by-event data of a recently developed multi-coincidence experiment) and by (ii) deriving corresponding temperatures for these microcanonical cluster ensembles (analyzing the respective fragment distributions) we are able to construct caloric curves for ii sub 3 sup + (ii sub 2) sub m cluster ions (6 <= m <= 14). All individual curves and the mean of these curves show a backbending in the plateau region thus constituting direct evidence for a negative microcanonical heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like transition of these finite systems.

  19. The mathematical principles and design of the NAIS – a spectrometer for the measurement of cluster ion and nanometer aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mirme

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS – a multichannel aerosol instrument capable of measuring the distribution of ions (charged particles and cluster ions of both polarities in the electric mobility range from 3.2 to 0.0013 cm2 V−1 s−1 and the distribution of aerosol particles in the size range from 2.0 to 40 nm. We introduce the principles of design, data processing and spectrum deconvolution of the instrument.

  20. In Situ Studies on Twin-Thickness-Dependent Distribution of Defect Clusters in Heavy Ion-Irradiated Nanotwinned Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chen, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that twin boundaries are effective defect sinks in heavy ion irradiated nanotwinned (nt) metals. Prior in situ radiation studies on nt Ag at room temperature indicate that the accumulative defect concentration is higher in center areas in the 60-nm-thick twins, and twin boundaries are distorted and self-heal during the absorption of different types of defect clusters. In this follow-up study, we show that the spatial distribution of accumulative defect concentrations in nt metals has a clear dependence on twin thickness, and in certain cases, the trend of spatial distribution is reversed. Potential mechanisms for the counterintuitive findings are discussed.

  1. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

  2. Statistics of high-altitude and high-latitude O+ ion outflows observed by Cluster/CIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Korth

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The persistent outflows of O+ ions observed by the Cluster CIS/CODIF instrument were studied statistically in the high-altitude (from 3 up to 11 RE and high-latitude (from 70 to ~90 deg invariant latitude, ILAT polar region. The principal results are: (1 Outflowing O+ ions with more than 1keV are observed above 10 RE geocentric distance and above 85deg ILAT location; (2 at 6-8 RE geocentric distance, the latitudinal distribution of O+ ion outflow is consistent with velocity filter dispersion from a source equatorward and below the spacecraft (e.g. the cusp/cleft; (3 however, at 8-12 RE geocentric distance the distribution of O+ outflows cannot be explained by velocity filter only. The results suggest that additional energization or acceleration processes for outflowing O+ ions occur at high altitudes and high latitudes in the dayside polar region. Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, Solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  3. Geometric isotope effects on small chloride ion water clusters with path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi [Department of Chemistry, Tsukuba University, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, Kimichi [Research Institute for Nanosystem, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Chuo-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nagashima, Umpei, E-mail: u.nagashima@aist.go.jp [Department of Chemistry, Tsukuba University, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Research Institute for Nanosystem, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Chuo-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, Graduate School of Science, Yokohama-City University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Yan, Shiwei [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: • PIMD simulations with PM6-DH+ potential are carried out for Cl{sup −}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters. • The geometric isotope effects on the rearrangement of single and multi shell structures are presented. • The competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures is shown. • The correlations between r(Cl…O) and other vibration motions are discussed. - Abstract: The geometric isotope effects on the structures of hydrated chloride ionic hydrogen bonded clusters are explored by carrying out path integral molecular dynamics simulations. First, an outer shell coordinate is selected to display the rearrangement of single and multi hydration shell cluster structures. Next, to show the competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects, the intramolecular OH{sup ∗} stretching and intermolecular ion–water wagging motions are studied for single and multi shell structures, respectively. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects stabilize the ionic hydrogen bonds in single shell structures, while they are destabilized through the competition with intramolecular nuclear quantum effects in multi shell structures. In addition, the correlations between ion–water stretching motion and other cluster vibrational coordinates are discussed. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures are strongly related to the cooperation of the water–water hydrogen bond interactions.

  4. Molecular depth profiling of trehalose using a C{sub 60} cluster ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected fullerene ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of depth profiles acquired on a 300-nm trehalose film on Si were studied as a function of the impact kinetic energy and charge state of the C{sub 60} projectile ions. We find that the achieved depth resolution depends only weakly upon energy.

  5. Inertial fusion targets driven by cluster ion beam: the hydrodynamic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, S.; Martinez-Val, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Inst. of Nuclear Fusion; Deutsch, C. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas

    1995-09-01

    Cluster-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is analyzed. A cluster is defined as a charged supermolecule with a charge of one (or of the order 1) and with a very high mass number A, so that Z/A << 1. The energy deposition range is shown to be very small (a few micrometers) for projectiles with a few tens of kev/a.m.u. A significant momentum transfer is therefore possible in its slowing down as it passes through matter. In this case, a high hydrodynamic efficiency seems evident. Three relevant models for cluster beam-target interactions are discussed: (1) the rocket model, where the ablation pressure (P{sub a}) is much larger than the cluster beam direct pressure (II); (2) the hammer model, where P{sub a} << II (in this case, two possibilities are discussed - an impact interaction between the beam and the target, and an impact interaction between one cluster and its absorption volume); (3) an intermediate model, where P{sub a} {approx} II (in this regime, the hydrodynamic efficiency is maximum). Preliminary simulations were performed and the general features of the models were confirmed. Most relevant for ICF, it was found that approximately 75% of the beam energy is converted into X rays, so that the indirect drive is promising in this context. (Author).

  6. Surface damage of PET sheet in rf bias ion plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Christie, A.B.; Howson, R.P. (Loughborough Univ. of Technology (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    Surface damage of PET substrates caused by ion bombardment in ion plating has been studied by ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis). It was found that in rf bias ion plating, even brief (2s) bombardment prior to deposition causes very substantial damage of the plastic surface and the films are formed on that modified surface. The damaged layer is mainly composed of free carbons or hydrocarbons produced by the decomposition of PET, although its structure depends on bombardment conditions. Small amounts of new carbon-oxygen species are also produced, which are a characteristic feature of ion plating. The interactions between the plasma and the polymer surface are discussed, and compared with the results of in situ oxygen ion beam bombardment and electron beam bombardment experiments carried out in the ESCA spectrometer.

  7. Proximity gettering technology for advanced CMOS image sensors using carbon cluster ion-implantation technique. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Kazunari; Kadono, Takeshi; Okuyama, Ryousuke; Shigemastu, Satoshi; Hirose, Ryo; Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko [SUMCO Corporation, Saga (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    A new technique is described for manufacturing advanced silicon wafers with the highest capability yet reported for gettering transition metallic, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities in CMOS image sensor fabrication processes. Carbon and hydrogen elements are localized in the projection range of the silicon wafer by implantation of ion clusters from a hydrocarbon molecular gas source. Furthermore, these wafers can getter oxygen impurities out-diffused to device active regions from a Czochralski grown silicon wafer substrate to the carbon cluster ion projection range during heat treatment. Therefore, they can reduce the formation of transition metals and oxygen-related defects in the device active regions and improve electrical performance characteristics, such as the dark current, white spot defects, pn-junction leakage current, and image lag characteristics. The new technique enables the formation of high-gettering-capability sinks for transition metals, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities under device active regions of CMOS image sensors. The wafers formed by this technique have the potential to significantly improve electrical devices performance characteristics in advanced CMOS image sensors. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Transgenic sorghum plants via microprojectile bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, A M; Kononowicz, A K; Zehr, U B; Tomes, D T; Axtell, J D; Butler, L G; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M

    1993-12-01

    Transgenic sorghum plants have been obtained after microprojectile bombardment of immature zygotic embryos of a drought-resistant sorghum cultivar, P898012. DNA delivery parameters were optimized based on transient expression of R and C1 maize anthocyanin regulatory elements in scutellar cells. The protocol for obtaining transgenic plants consists of the delivery of the bar gene to immature zygotic embryos and the imposition of bialaphos selection pressure at various stages during culture, from induction of somatic embryogenesis to rooting of regenerated plantlets. One in about every 350 embryos produced embryogenic tissues that survived bialaphos treatment; six transformed callus lines were obtained from three of the eight sorghum cultivars used in this research. Transgenic (T0) plants were obtained from cultivar P898012 (two independent transformation events). The presence of the bar and uidA genes in the T0 plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity was detected in extracts of the T0 plants. These plants were resistant to local application of the herbicide Ignite/Basta, and the resistance was inherited in T1 plants as a single dominant locus.

  9. Energy increase in multi-MeV ion acceleration in the interaction of a short pulse laser with a cluster-gas target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y; Faenov, A Ya; Tampo, M; Pikuz, T A; Nakamura, T; Kando, M; Hayashi, Y; Yogo, A; Sakaki, H; Kameshima, T; Pirozhkov, A S; Ogura, K; Mori, M; Esirkepov, T Zh; Koga, J; Boldarev, A S; Gasilov, V A; Magunov, A I; Yamauchi, T; Kodama, R; Bolton, P R; Kato, Y; Tajima, T; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V

    2009-10-16

    An approach for accelerating ions, with the use of a cluster-gas target and an ultrashort pulse laser of 150-mJ energy and 40-fs duration, is presented. Ions with energy 10-20 MeV per nucleon having a small divergence (full angle) of 3.4 degrees are generated in the forward direction, corresponding to approximately tenfold increase in the ion energies compared to previous experiments using solid targets. It is inferred from a particle-in-cell simulation that the high energy ions are generated at the rear side of the target due to the formation of a strong dipole vortex structure in subcritical density plasmas.

  10. Study of structure and spectroscopy of water-hydroxide ion clusters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we explore the use of stochastic optimizer, namely simulated annealing (SA) followed by density function theory (DFT)-based strategy for evaluating the structure and infrared spectroscopy of (H2O) OH− clusters where = 1-6. We have shown that the use of SA can generate both global and local structures of ...

  11. Angular distribution of GaAs sputtered under oblique Cs{sup +} bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdeil, C. [Department ' Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Wirtz, T. [Department ' Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)], E-mail: wirtz@lippmann.lu; Scherrer, H. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2009-08-15

    The angular distribution of Ga and As sputtered from Gallium Arsenide (1 0 0) by a Cs{sup +} ion beam was experimentally measured through a collector technique allowing modifications of the energy and incidence angle of the ion beam. The impact energy was varied in the range of 2-10 keV and the angle of incidence from 30 deg. to 60 deg. The angular distributions of emitted matter are determined by means of SIMS depth profiles. Our series of experiments show an evolution of the preferential direction of emission as well as the spreading around this direction in function of the characteristics of the ion beam. The second objective is the study of the evolution of the stoichiometry of the deposit in function of the emission angle. A decrease of the As/Ga ratio around the preferential direction of emission and an increase of this ratio for oblique emission are observed for different conditions of primary bombardment. Considering that the angular distribution depends on the depth of origin, our results suggest that the Cs{sup +} bombardment changes the stoichiometry of the near-surface layers of the sample with an enrichment of As in the outmost layers while the sub-surface region is impoverished in As due to preferential sputtering.

  12. Effective methods for the measurement of CsI cluster ions using MALDI-MS with suitable solvent combinations and additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shunsuke

    2014-11-01

    A method to measure CsI cluster ions ((CsI)(n)Cs(+), (CsI)(n)I(-)) from CsI samples in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was developed with a 2-[(2E)-3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methylprop-2-enylidene] malononitrile (DCTB) matrix and additives. Solvent combinations in which the CsI and DCTB solutions were miscible were effective in detecting CsI cluster ions at a mass range of over m/z 2000 and are associated with a characteristic spread of DCTB within the CsI/DCTB mixture. The addition of saccharides or sugar alcohols to the CsI/DCTB mixture improved the DCTB distribution and widened the mass distribution of CsI cluster ions up to m/z 10,000 in the linear mode. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The influence of energetic bombardment on the structure formation of sputtered zinc oxide films. Development of an atomistic growth model and its application to tailor thin film properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehl, Dominik

    2011-02-17

    The focus of this work is the investigation of the growth of zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. It is demonstrated that with a modified, ion beam assisted sputtering (IBAS) process, zinc oxide films can be deposited which exhibit a markedly improved crystalline order. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that intense energetic oxygen ion bombardment can be utilized to change film texture from the typical (002)-self-texture to an a-axis texture where the (002)-planes are perpendicular to the substrate surface. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms is developed which also facilitates a more detailed understanding of the action of ion bombardment during zinc oxide film growth. It is shown that zinc oxide films are susceptible to the influence of ion bombardment particularly in the nucleation regime of growth and that this finding is generally true for all observed structural changes induced by ion bombardment with various species, energies and flux densities. It is demonstrated not only that the initial growth stage plays an important role in the formation of a preferred growth orientation but also that the action of texture forming mechanisms in subsequent growth stages is comparatively weak. (orig.)

  14. Mass accuracy improvement of reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry based urinary metabolomic analysis by post-run calibration using sodium formate cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juo, Chiun-Gung; Chen, Chien-Lun; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Fu, Shu-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2014-08-30

    Typically, a batch metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOF MS) takes 2 to 3 days. However, the mass accuracy - which has an important influence on metabolite identification - can drift by as much as about 17 ppm in such a time period. In an untargeted urinary metabolomics analysis by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)/ESI-MS, the signals of sodium formate cluster ions were detected at the column-washing step. The cluster ions were used to calibrate the mass spectrometer for more accurate detection. The spectra were calibrated post-run by the sodium formate cluster ions, which were used as the internal standard, in order to improve the mass accuracy. In the analysis of urine samples, we calibrated the spectra acquired by the micrOTOF with the sodium cluster ions. In positive mode ESI, the average errors of these cluster ions were improved to ±0.48 ppm and in negative mode ESI, to ±0.94 ppm after calibration. The mass accuracy remained within ±0.01 ppm over the duration of 6.25 days. An error window of 4 ppm appears to be suitable for metabolite identification when using post-calibration. The results showed that sodium formate cluster ions could be utilized for the calibration of LC/ESI-TOF MS and the average instrumental errors could be maintained at low levels for long-term analyses. This method could be applied not only to urine sample, but also to low sodium samples, such as saliva, by dissolving the sample in 1 μM sodium formate solution. This method provides a good solution for accurate mass detection of metabolomic analysis. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. submitter On the composition of ammonia–sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, S; Bianchi, F; Rondo, L; Duplissy, J; Kürten, A; Ortega, I K; Metzger, A; Schnitzhofer, R; Almeida, J; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Dunne, E M; Ehn, M; Gagné, S; Ickes, L; Junninen, H; Hansel, A; Kerminen, V -M; Kirkby, J; Kupc, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Mathot, S; Onnela, A; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Santos, F D; Sipilä, M; Tomé, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Viisanen, Y; Wagner, P E; Wimmer, D; Curtius, J; Donahue, N M; Baltensperger, U; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia $(NH_3)$ and sulfuric acid $(H-2SO_4)$. Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small $NH_3–H_2SO_4$ clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from 10. Positively charged clusters grew on average by Δm/Δn = 1.05 and were only observed at sufficiently high $[NH_3]$ / $[H_2SO_4]$. The $H_2SO_4$ molecules of these clusters are partially neutralized by $NH_3$, in close resemblance...

  16. Characteristic ion clusters as determinants for the identification of pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxides in pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing natural products using HPLC-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jianqing; Li, Na; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P; Peng, Shuying; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2012-03-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants are widely distributed in the world. PAs are hepatotoxic, affecting livestock and humans. PA N-oxides are often present together with PAs in plants and also exhibit hepatotoxicity but with less potency. HPLC-MS is generally used to analyze PA-containing herbs, although PA references are unavailable in most cases. However, to date, without reference standards, HPLC-MS methodology cannot distinguish PA N-oxides from PAs because they both produce the same characteristic ions in mass spectra. In the present study, the mass spectra of 10 PA N-oxides and the corresponding PAs were systemically investigated using HPLC-MS to define the characteristic mass fragment ions specific to PAs and PA N-oxides. Mass spectra of toxic retronecine-type PA N-oxides exhibited two characteristic ion clusters at m/z 118-120 and 136-138. These ion clusters were produced by three unique fragmentation pathways of PA N-oxides and were not found in their corresponding PAs. Similarly, the nontoxic platynecine-type PA N-oxides also fragmented via three similar pathways to form two characteristic ion clusters at m/z 120-122 and 138-140. Further application of using these characteristic ion clusters allowed successful and rapid identification of PAs and PA N-oxides in two PA-containing herbal plants. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that these characteristic ion clusters are unique determinants to discriminate PA N-oxides from PAs even without the availability of reference samples. Our findings provide a novel and specific method to differentiate PA N-oxides from PAs in PA-containing natural products, which is crucial for the assessment of their intoxication. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Deep inelastic reactions of /sup 32/S on /sup 27/Al at 130 MeV bombarding energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manduchi, C.; Russo-Manduchi, M.T.; Segato, G.F.; Andolfato, F.

    1985-10-01

    Deep inelastic reactions induced by /sup 32/S bombardment on /sup 27/Al were studied at 130 MeV incident energy. The experiment employed a coincidence spectrometer consisting of two ion chambers which measured the energy, position and nuclear charge of the heavy reaction products. Inclusive fragment measurements and fragment-fragment coincidences have been used to determine the production of fragments of different Z, and related Q-value distributions. (orig.).

  18. Ion-pair chromatographic separation of water-soluble gold monolayer-protected clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Martin M F; Douglas, Alicia D; Murray, Royce W

    2006-04-15

    We demonstrate the efficacy of ion-pair chromatography for separations of samples of charged, polydisperse, water-soluble gold nanoparticles protected by monolayers of N-acetyl-l-cysteine and of tiopronin ligands. These nanoparticle mixtures have 1-2-nm-diameter Au core sizes as estimated from UV-visible spectra of the separated components. This size range encompasses the transition from bulk metal to molecular properties. The nanoparticle mixtures were resolved, the smallest nanoparticles eluting first, on an octadecylsilyl (C18) column using isocratic elution with a methanol/water mobile phase containing tetrabutylammonium fluoride (Bu4N+F-) and phosphate buffer. The column retention increases with Bu4N+F- concentration, lowered pH, and decreasing methanol volume fraction. The retention mechanism is dominated by ion-pairing in either the mobile phase or at the stationary/mobile-phase interface. Size exclusion effects, used in many previous nanoparticle separations, are insignificant.

  19. Thin embedded current sheets: Cluster observations of ion kinetic structure and analytical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic structure of embedded thin horizontal current sheets is investigated. Current density estimated by curlometer technique is in general agreement with a sum of electron and proton currents. Embedding of observed thin current sheets in the much wider plasma sheet is apparent in the current density profiles. Ion velocity distributions consist of two parts: the cold non-drifting core likely belongs to the plasma sheet background, while the hotter asymmetric "wings" carry the main portion of the current. Oxygen ions (if present and higher-energy tails of distribution function can contribute up to 30% of the total current. We compared current density profiles across sheets with three typical current sheet models. Models which allow embedding, describe observed structures equally well at the level of experimental accuracy.

  20. Operation modes of the FALCON ion source as a part of the AMS cluster tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girka Oleksii

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the options to increase the production yield of temperature compensated surface acoustic wave (SAW devices with a defined range of operational frequencies. The paper focuses on the preparation of large wafers with SiO2 and AlN/Si3N4 depositions. Stability of the intermediate SiO2 layer is achieved by combining high power density UV radiation with annealing in high humidity environment. A uniform thickness of the capping AlN layer is achieved by local high-rate etching with a focused ion beam emitted by the FALCON ion source. Operation parameters and limitations of the etching process are discussed.

  1. Exposure to positively- and negatively-charged plasma cluster ions impairs IgE-binding capacity of indoor cat and fungal allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Kazuo; Fujimura, Takashi; Ota, Yasuhiro; Abe, Takuya; ElRamlawy, Kareem Gamal; Nakano, Miyako; Takado, Tomoaki; Uenishi, Akira; Kawazoe, Hidechika; Sekoguchi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Akihiko; Ono, Kazuhisa; Kawamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental control to reduce the amount of allergens in a living place is thought to be important to avoid sensitization to airborne allergens. However, efficacy of environmental control on inactivation of airborne allergens is not fully investigated. We have previously reported that positively- and negatively-charged plasma cluster ions (PC-ions) reduce the IgE-binding capacity of crude allergens from Japanese cedar pollen as important seasonal airborne allergens. Cat (Felis do...

  2. Ion surface treatments on organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    2001-04-01

    A study has been made of surface modification of various organic materials by ion bombardment or implantation to make the surface properties of high and multiple functions in RIKEN. Substrates used were polyimide (PI), polyacetylene, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber, various kinds of proteins and so on. Bombarded or implanted ions were inert gas elements, chemically active gaseous elements and metallic elements. Surface properties such as electrical conductivity, wettability and cell adhesion of implanted layers have been investigated. Surface characterization of implanted materials has been carried out by means of transmission electron microscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. In this paper, studies in RIKEN are reviewed of electrical conductivity, optical absorbance, wettability and cell adhesion depending on current densities and doping elements. Applications of ion bombardment to biomedical materials are introduced using cell adhesion control. It is concluded that ion bombardment or implantation is useful to change and control surface properties of various organic materials.

  3. The Energetic Ion Events Measured Upstream the Earth's Bow Shock by STEREO, Cluster, ACE and Geotail: Where is the Origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, E.; Bucik, R.; Haaland, S.; Klecker, B.; Daly, P. W.; Desai, M. I.; Yamauchi, M.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In earlier studies (e.g. Desai et al., 2008}) the observations of upstream events up to 3800 R_E were reported during declining phase of the solar cycle in 2007. These upstream events observed by STEREO-A mainly occurred after the corotating compression region passed the Earth's magnetosphere. We study the relation of these upstream events (from about 130 to 1600 R_E away from the Earth) with the observations in the direct vicinity of the terrestrial bow shock (up to X = 18 R_E). For this purpose simultaneous measurements of energetic ions with energies >30 keV by particle instruments onboard STEREO-A, STEREO-B, ACE (far upstream region), and onboard Cluster and Geotail (the direct vicinity of the bow shock) are used. The upstream events are observed simultaneously mainly when the magnetic field is pointing along the line joining those satellites in far upstream region with those near the terrestrial bow shock. Therefore the connection of the magnetic field to the bow shock plays an important role for the occurrence of the many energetic events far upstream. Nevertheless there is a number of energetic events whose origin seems not to be connected to the terrestrial bow shock. Using the estimation of the propagation time of solar wind discontinuities we show that these energetic events convect together with the solar wind, pass the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock and trigger the upstream events in the vicinity of the bow shock, not the other way around. The ion intensity observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B in these cases is often significantly higher than that observed in front of the bow shock by Cluster and Geotail. This suggests that, particles are accelerated in the solar wind, possibly by enhanced wave activity in high speed streams and corotating interaction regions (CIR).

  4. Structural Characterizations of Palladium Clusters Prepared by Polyol Reduction of [PdCl4]2− Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Schiavo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium nanoparticles are of great interest in many industrial fields, ranging from catalysis and hydrogen technology to microelectronics, thanks to their unique physical and chemical properties. In this work, palladium clusters have been prepared by reduction of [PdCl4]2− ions with ethylene glycol, in the presence of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP as stabilizer. The stabilizer performs the important role of nucleating agent for the Pd atoms with a fast phase separation, since palladium atoms coordinated to the polymer side-groups are forced at short distances during nucleation. Quasispherical palladium clusters with a diameter of ca. 2.6 nm were obtained by reaction in air at 90°C for 2 hours. An extensive materials characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and other characterizations (TGA, SEM, EDS-SEM, and UV-Vis has been performed in order to evaluate the structure and oxidation state of nanopalladium.

  5. Effects of incident energy and angle on carbon cluster ions implantation on silicon substrate: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ye; Sang, Shengbo; Zhou, Bing; Deng, Xiao; Chai, Jing; Ji, Jianlong; Ge, Yang; Huo, Yuanliang; Zhang, Wendong

    2017-09-01

    Carbon cluster ion implantation is an important technique in fabricating functional devices at micro/nanoscale. In this work, a numerical model is constructed for implantation and implemented with a cutting-edge molecular dynamics method. A series of simulations with varying incident energies and incident angles is performed for incidence on silicon substrate and correlated effects are compared in detail. Meanwhile, the behavior of the cluster during implantation is also examined under elevated temperatures. By mapping the nanoscopic morphology with variable parameters, numerical formalism is proposed to explain the different impacts on phrase transition and surface pattern formation. Particularly, implantation efficiency (IE) is computed and further used to evaluate the performance of the overall process. The calculated results could be properly adopted as the theoretical basis for designing nano-structures and adjusting devices’ properties. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51622507, 61471255, 61474079, 61403273, 51502193, 51205273), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi (Nos. 201601D021057, 201603D421035), the Youth Foundation Project of Shanxi Province (Nos. 2015021097), the Doctoral Fund of MOE of China (No. 20131402110013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2015AA042601), and the Specialized Project in Public Welfare from The Ministry of Water Resources of China (Nos. 1261530110110).

  6. Interaction of nanosecond laser pulse with tetramethyl silane (Si(CH34 clusters: Generation of multiply charged silicon and carbon ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purav M. Badani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Present work reports significantly high levels of ionization, eventually leading to Coulomb explosion of Tetramethyl silane (TMS clusters, on interaction with laser pulses of intensity ∼109 W/cm2. Tetramethyl silane clusters, prepared by supersonic expansion were photoionized at 266, 355 or 532 nm and the resultant ions were detected using time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It is observed that wavelength of irradiation and the size of the cluster are crucial parameters which drastically affect the nature of charge species generated upon photoionization of cluster. The results show that clusters absorb significantly higher energy from the laser field at longer wavelengths (532 nm and generate multiply charged silicon and carbon ions which have large kinetic energies. Further, laser-cluster interaction at different wavelengths has been quantified and charge densities at 266, 355 and 532 nm are found to be 4x 1010, 5x 1010 and 5x 1011 charges/cm3 respectively. These unusual results have been rationalized based on dominance of secondary ionization processes at 532 nm ultimately leading to Coulomb explosion of clusters. In another set of experiments, multiply charged ions of Ar (up to +5 state and Kr (up to +6 state were observed when TMS doped inert gas clusters were photoionized at 532 and 355 nm. The extent of energy absorption at these two wavelengths is clearly manifested from the charge state of the atomic ions generated upon Coulomb disintegration of the doped cluster. These experiments thus demonstrate a novel method for generation of multiply charged atomic ions of inert gases at laser intensity of ∼ 109 W/cm2. The average size of the cluster exhibiting Coulomb explosion phenomena under giga watt intensity conditions has been estimated to be ∼ 6 nm. Experimental results obtained in the present work agree qualitatively with the model proposed earlier [D. Niu, H. Li, F. Liang, L. Wen, X. Luo, B. Wang, and H. Qu, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 151103

  7. Plasma diagnostics of the SIMPA Ecr ion source by X-ray spectroscopy, Collisions of H-like Neon ions with Argon clusters; Diagnostic du plasma de la source d'ions ECR SIMPA par spectroscopie X, Collision d'ions neon hydrogenoides avec des agregats d'argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrouche, N

    2006-09-15

    The first part of this thesis is devoted to the SIMPA ECR ion source characterization, first, I explored the ion source's capacities on the point of view of extracted currents for three elements, argon, krypton and neon. By analyzing the Bremsstrahlung spectra, I determined the electronic temperature in the plasma and the electronic and ionic densities. In a second time, I recorded high resolution X-spectra of argon and krypton plasma's. By taking into account the principal mechanisms of production of a K hole in the ions inside the plasma, I determined the ionic densities of the high charge states of argon. Lastly, I highlighted a correlation between the ions charge states densities with the intensities of extracted currents. The second part of the thesis is devoted to Ne{sup 9+-} argon clusters collisions. First, I presented simple and effective theoretical models allowing to describe the phenomena occurring during a collision, from the point of view of the projectile. I carried out a simulation for a collision of an ion Ne{sup 9+} with an argon cluster of a given size, which has enabled us to know the energy levels populated during the electronic capture and to follow the number of electrons in each projectile shell. Lastly, I presented the first results of a collision between a Ne{sup 9+} beam and argon clusters. These results, have enabled me by using projectile X-ray spectroscopy during the ions-clusters collision, to evidence a strong clustering of targets atoms and to highlight an electronic multi-capture in the projectile ion excited states. (author)

  8. Direct simulation Monte Carlo method for gas cluster ion beam technology

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Z

    2003-01-01

    A direct simulation Monte Carlo method has been developed and applied for the simulation of a supersonic Ar gas expansion through a converging-diverging nozzle, with the stagnation pressures of P sub 0 =0.1-10 atm, at various temperatures. A body-fitted coordinate system has been developed that allows modeling nozzles of arbitrary shape. A wide selection of nozzle sizes, apex angles, with diffuse and specular atomic reflection laws from the nozzle walls, has been studied. The results of nozzle simulation were used to obtain a scaling law P sub 0 T sub 0 sup 1 sup 9 sup / sup 8 d supalpha L sub n supbeta=const. for the constant mean cluster sizes that are formed in conical nozzles. The Hagena's formula, valid for the conical nozzles with a constant length, has further been extended to the conical nozzles with variable lengths, based on our simulation results.

  9. Carbon nanotube growth from catalytic nano-clusters formed by hot-ion-implantation into the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Yasushi, E-mail: yhoshino@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Arima, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Ai; Saito, Yasunao; Nakata, Jyoji [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have studied growth of chirality-controlled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from hot-implantation-formed catalytic nano-clusters in a thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. This procedure has the advantage of high controllability of the diameter and the number of clusters by optimizing the conditions of the ion implantation. In the present study, Co{sup +} ions with ion dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted in the vicinity of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface at 300 Degree-Sign C temperature. The implanted Co atoms located in the SiO{sub 2} layer has an amorphous-like structure with a cluster diameter of several nm. In contrast, implanted Co atoms in the Si substrate are found to take a cobalt silicide structure, confirmed by the high-resolution image of transmission electron microscope. CNTs are grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have confirmed a large amount of vertically-aligned multi-walled CNTs from the Co nano-clusters formed by the hot-ion-implantation near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  10. Au-Ag nanoalloy molecule-like clusters for enhanced quantum efficiency emission of Er³⁺ ions in silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesca, Tiziana; Kalinic, Boris; Michieli, Niccolò; Maurizio, Chiara; Trapananti, Angela; Scian, Carlo; Battaglin, Giancarlo; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Mattei, Giovanni

    2015-11-14

    The occurrence of a very efficient non-resonant energy transfer process forming ultrasmall Au-Ag nanoalloy clusters and Er(3+) ions is investigated in silica. The enhancement of the room temperature Er(3+) emission efficiency by an order of magnitude is achieved by coupling rare-earth ions to molecule-like (Au(x)Ag(1-x))N alloy nanoclusters with N = 10-15 atoms and x = 0.6 obtained by optimized sequential ion implantation on Er-implanted silica. For comparison, AuN nanoclusters obtained by the same approach and with the same size and numerical density showed an enhancement by only a factor of 2 with respect to pure Er emission, demonstrating the beneficial effect of using nanoalloyed clusters. The temperature evolution of the energy transfer process is investigated by photoluminescence and exhibits a maximum efficiency at about 600 °C, where the clusters reach the optimal size and the silica matrix completely recovers the implantation damage. The nanoalloy cluster composition and size have been studied by EXAFS analysis, which indicated a stronger Ag-O interaction with respect to the Au-O one and a preferential location of the Ag atoms at the nanoalloy cluster surface.

  11. Effects of metal nanoparticles on the secondary ion yields of a model alkane molecule upon atomic and polyatomic projectiles in secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Nimer; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bertrand, Patrick; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2008-08-15

    A model alkane molecule, triacontane, is used to assess the effects of condensed gold and silver nanoparticles on the molecular ion yields upon atomic (Ga(+) and In(+)) and polyatomic (C60(+) and Bi3(+)) ion bombardment in metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry (MetA-SIMS). Molecular films spin-coated on silicon were metallized using a sputter-coater system, in order to deposit controlled quantities of gold and silver on the surface (from 0 to 15 nm equivalent thickness). The effects of gold and silver islets condensed on triacontane are also compared to the situation of thin triacontane overlayers on metallic substrates (gold and silver). The results focus primarily on the measured yields of quasi-molecular ions, such as (M - H)(+) and (2M - 2H)(+), and metal-cationized molecules, such as (M + Au)(+) and (M + Ag)(+), as a function of the quantity of metal on the surface. They confirm the absence of a simple rule to explain the secondary ion yield improvement in MetA-SIMS. The behavior is strongly dependent on the specific projectile/metal couple used for the experiment. Under atomic bombardment (Ga(+), In(+)), the characteristic ion yields an increase with the gold dose up to approximately 6 nm equivalent thickness. The yield enhancement factor between gold-metallized and pristine samples can be as large as approximately 70 (for (M - H)(+) under Ga(+) bombardment; 10 nm of Au). In contrast, with cluster projectiles such as Bi3(+) and C60(+), the presence of gold and silver leads to a dramatic molecular ion yield decrease. Cluster projectiles prove to be beneficial for triacontane overlayers spin-coated on silicon or metal substrates (Au, Ag) but not in the situation of MetA-SIMS. The fundamental difference of behavior between atomic and cluster primary ions is tentatively explained by arguments involving the different energy deposition mechanisms of these projectiles. Our results also show that Au and Ag nanoparticles do not induce the same behavior in Met

  12. Formation and emission of gold and silver carbide cluster ions in a single C60- surface impact at keV energies: experiment and calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Y; Bernshtein, V; Armon, E; Bekkerman, A; Kolodney, E

    2011-03-28

    Impact of fullerene ions (C(60)(-)) on a metallic surface at keV kinetic energies and under single collision conditions is used as an efficient way for generating gas phase carbide cluster ions of gold and silver, which were rarely explored before. Positively and negatively charged cluster ions, Au(n)C(m)(+) (n = 1-5, 1 ≤ m ≤ 12), Ag(n)C(m)(+) (n = 1-7, 1 ≤ m ≤ 7), Au(n)C(m)(-) (n = 1-5, 1 ≤ m ≤ 10), and Ag(n)C(m)(-) (n = 1-3, 1 ≤ m ≤ 6), were observed. The Au(3)C(2)(+) and Ag(3)C(2)(+) clusters are the most abundant cations in the corresponding mass spectra. Pronounced odd/even intensity alternations were observed for nearly all Au(n)C(m)(+/-) and Ag(n)C(m)(+/-) series. The time dependence of signal intensity for selected positive ions was measured over a broad range of C(60)(-) impact energies and fluxes. A few orders of magnitude immediate signal jump instantaneous with the C(60)(-) ion beam opening was observed, followed by a nearly constant plateau. It is concluded that the overall process of the fullerene collision and formation∕ejection of the carbidic species can be described as a single impact event where the shattering of the incoming C(60)(-) ion into small C(m) fragments occurs nearly instantaneously with the (multiple) pickup of metal atoms and resulting emission of the carbide clusters. Density functional theory calculations showed that the most stable configuration of the Au(n)C(m)(+) (n = 1, 2) clusters is a linear carbon chain with one or two terminal gold atoms correspondingly (except for a bent configuration of Au(2)C(+)). The calculated AuC(m) adiabatic ionization energies showed parity alternations in agreement with the measured intensity alternations of the corresponding ions. The Au(3)C(2)(+) ion possesses a basic Au(2)C(2) acetylide structure with a π-coordinated third gold atom, forming a π-complex structure of the type [Au(π-Au(2)C(2))](+). The calculation shows meaningful contributions of direct gold-gold bonding to

  13. Computer simulation of cluster impact induced electronic excitation of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidtmann, B.; Hanke, S.; Duvenbeck, A. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Wucher, A., E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-deu.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    We present a computational study of electronic excitation upon bombardment of a metal surface with cluster projectiles. Our model employs a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to calculate the particle dynamics following the projectile impact. Kinetic excitation is implemented via two mechanisms describing the electronic energy loss of moving particles: autoionization in close binary collisions and a velocity proportional friction force resulting from direct atom–electron collisions. Two different friction models are compared with respect to the predicted sputter yields after single atom and cluster bombardment. We find that a density dependent friction coefficient leads to a significant reduction of the total energy transferred to the electronic sub-system as compared to the Lindhard friction model, thereby strongly enhancing the predicted sputter yield under cluster bombardment conditions. In contrast, the yield predicted for monoatomic projectile bombardment remains practically unchanged.

  14. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  15. Protons from the alpha-particle bombardment of 31P

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperus, J.

    Resonances in the yield of ground-state protons from alpha-particle bombardment of 31P were investigated in the energy range Eα = 1.7 − 3.3 MeV. Fourteen resonances were observed, none of which was known before. Resonance energies and strengths are presented. Angular distribution measurements lead

  16. Protons from the alpha-particle bombardment of 23Na

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperus, J.

    1964-01-01

    Resonances in the yield of ground-state protons from alpha-particle bombardment of 23Na were investigated in the energy range Eα = 1.0 – 3.3 MeV. At least thirty-eight resonances were observed. Resonance energies and strengths are presented. At nine resonances angular distribution measurements lead

  17. Electronic and vibronic cluster models for the T24(G) level of d5 ions in tetrahedral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, R.; Boulanger, D.

    2006-08-01

    Electronic and vibronic cluster models are proposed to elaborate a general model for the T24(G) orbital triplet levels of d5 ions in tetrahedral symmetry. These models involve perturbation schemes and the diagonalization of the molecular electronic structure and vibronic Hamiltonian. First, the electronic fine structure is determined from the first- and second-order molecular spin-orbit (MSO) interaction. Then, Ham’s perturbation model for vibronic interactions is used in conjunction with the molecular model to analyze the vibronic interactions corresponding to a strong coupling to ɛ -vibrational modes. Then, a more general model is considered to account for the energy-level schemes and the strong intensity transfer observed, for example, on the fine structure lines of the T24(G) level of Mn2+ in ZnS and ZnSe. This model involves the diagonalization of the vibronic Hamiltonian for the T24(G) level and a perturbation model to account for vibronic interactions with all other multiplets of the d5 configuration. It is shown that the energy-level schemes as well as the strong intensity transfer of the fine structure lines of the T24(G) level of Mn2+ in ZnS and ZnSe are very well accounted for from the electronic molecular model involving the first- and second-order MSO interaction and from the proposed diagonalization and perturbation models for the coupling to ɛ -vibrational modes.

  18. FY 2000 report on the results of the research and development project for new industry creation type industrial science technologies. Cluster ion beam process technology; 2000 nendo shinki sangyo soshutsugata sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seido seika hokokusho. Cluster ion beam process technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 2000 results of development of cluster ion beams. This technology generates the strong ion beams of atom and molecule clusters, and irradiate them onto the solid surfaces, to create new materials or treat materials. It allows the nano-level treatment. The program for high-current cluster ion beam generation/irradiation technology for industrial purposes attains the target high-current beam of 500{mu}m. It is necessary to establish the optimum cluster size, irradiated energy and ion species for the highly functional surface treatment, for which applicable technologies, e.g., those related to time of flight and molecular dynamics, are developed. Studies on high-current, large-area irradiation technologies are started. The program for material processing technologies involves evaluation of crystalline defects formed during the beam implantation by photoluminescence spectroscopy, and studies on semiconductor surface processing technologies. The surface smoothening technology is investigated to reduce crystalline defects and stress-induced strains for difficult-to-process materials, e.g., SiC and diamond, and the good results are produced. The program for development of superflat/superhard thin film formation technology involves irradiation of the Ar ion beams during the deposition of C{sub 60}(fullerene), to produce the superhard thin film. (NEDO)

  19. Polynuclear Bismuth Oxido Sulfonato Clusters, Polymers, and Ion Pairs from Bi2O3 under Mild Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathna, Dimuthu C; Blair, Victoria L; Werrett, Melissa V; Andrews, Philip C

    2016-11-07

    Eight novel bismuth(III) sulfonato compounds have been synthesized and characterized using the sonochemical reaction of Bi2O3 with a range of sulfonic acids, including 2,5-dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (2,5-DMSH), 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (2,4-DNSH), 2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonic acid (2,5-DCSH), 1,2-benzenedisulfonic acid (1,2-BDSH2), 1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (1,3-BDSH2), 2-sulfobenzoic acid (2-SBH2), 3-sulfobenzoic acid (3-SBH2), and 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (NPSH). Six of the complexes (1, 2, 4, and 6-8) were structurally characterized through single-crystal X-ray crystallography. In the presence of the monosulfonic acids 2,5-DMSH, 2,4-DNSH, and 2,5-DCSH, polynuclear bismuth(III) oxido clusters were isolated: namely, [Bi6O4(OH)4(2,5-DMS)6(H2O)6]·10H2O (1·10H2O), [Bi6O4(OH)4(2,4-DNS)6(H2O)6]·6H2O (2·6H2O), and [Bi6O4(OH)4(2,5-DCS)6(H2O)6] (3). The disulfonic acid 1,3-BDSH2 also produced an oxido cluster: [Bi6O4(OH)4(1,3-BDS)3]·8H2O (5·8H2O). The remaining diacid ligands (1,2-BDSH2, 2-SBH2, and 3-SBH2), upon reaction with Bi2O3, produced polymeric Bi(III) sulfonato complexes: namely [Bi(1,2-BDS)(OH)(H2O)2]∞ (4), [Bi(2-SB)(2-SBH)H2O]∞·2H2O (6·2H2O), and [NH2(Me)2]2[Bi2(3-SB)4]∞ (7). The larger NPSH ligand produced the monomeric contact ion pair [Bi(NPS)2(H2O)6][NPS]·3H2O (8·3H2O), upon sonication with Bi2O3.

  20. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF)n. The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y− produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2), where larger clusters with n≥4 were not dete...

  1. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure study for optimization of hard diamond-like carbon film formation with Ar cluster ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kitagawa, T; Kanda, K; Shimizugawa, Y; Toyoda, N; Matsui, S; Yamada, I; Tsubakino, H; Matsuo, J

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited using C sub 6 sub 0 vapor with simultaneous irradiation of an Ar cluster ion beam was characterized by a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in order to optimize the hard DLC film deposition conditions. Contents of sp sup 2 orbitals in the films, which were estimated from NEXAFS spectra, are 30% lower than that of a conventional DLC film deposited by a RF plasma method. Those contents were obtained under the flux ratio of the C sub 6 sub 0 molecules to the Ar cluster ions to range from 1 to 20, at 5keV of Ar cluster ion acceleration energy. Average hardness of the films was 50 GPa under these flux ratios. This hardness was three times higher than that of a conventional DLC film. Furthermore, the lowest sp sup 2 content and above-mentioned high hardness were obtained at room temperature of the substrate when the depositions were performed in the range of the substrate temperature from room temperature to 250degC. (author)

  2. Impact Characteristics of Different Rocks in a Pulsed Laser Irradiation Experiment: Simulation of Micrometeorite Bombardment on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanxue; Li, Xiongyao; Yao, Wenqing; Wang, Shijie

    2017-10-01

    Without the protection of the atmosphere, the soils on lunar surfaces undergo a series of optical, physical, and chemical changes during micrometeorite bombardment. To simulate the micrometeorite bombardment process and analyze the impact characteristics, four types of rocks, including terrestrial basalt and anorthosite supposed to represent lunar rock, an H-type chondrite (the Huaxi ordinary chondrite), and an iron meteorite (the Gebel Kamil iron meteorite) supposed to represent micrometeorite impactors, are irradiated by a nanosecond pulse laser in a high vacuum chamber. Based on laser irradiation experiments, the laser pits are found to be of different shapes and sizes which vary with the rock type. Many melt and vapor deposits are found on the mineral surfaces of all the samples, and nanophase iron (npFe) or Fe-Ni alloy particles are typically distributed on the surfaces of ilmenite, kamacite, or other minerals near kamacite. By analyzing the focused ion beam ultrathin slices of laser pits with a transmission electron microscope, the results show that the subsurface structures can be divided into three classes and that npFe can be easily found in Fe-bearing minerals. These differences in impact characteristics will help determine the source material of npFe and infer the type of micrometeorite impactors. During micrometeorite bombardment, in the mare regions, the npFe are probably produced simultaneously from lunar basalt and micrometeorites with iron-rich minerals, while the npFe in the highlands regions mainly come from micrometeorites.

  3. A broader view on ion heating in traveling-wave devices using fragmentation of CsI clusters and extent of H˙ migration as molecular thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermyte, Frederik; Sobott, Frank

    2017-09-08

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is becoming increasingly important in mass spectrometry-based analysis of peptides and proteins. Supplemental collisional activation of undissociated electron transfer products can significantly increase fragmentation yield and sequence coverage, but hydrogen rearrangements - specifically, transfer of a hydrogen radical from a c to a z fragment - lead to distorted isotope distributions and increased potential for signal overlap. Concomitant collisional activation during the ion/ion reaction significantly reduces these rearrangements, but, in ion traps, also leads to lower reaction rates and reduced overlap of anion and cation clouds. In traveling-wave ion mobility devices, it has been reported - although not under ETD conditions - that significant ion activation can occur depending on the T-wave height and velocity. Here, we investigate this phenomenon in more detail using a commercial instrument (Waters Synapt G2) and report that a similar effect can be induced within the traveling-wave Trap cell where the ETD reaction occurs, using fairly typical T-wave settings. This ion 'heating' is demonstrated by analyzing the observed isotope distributions (sensitive to the aforementioned hydrogen rearrangements) of ETD fragments of ubiquitin and substance P. A more detailed investigation of ion activation using cesium iodide clusters (without ETD reagent anions present) shows that the observed behavior is consistent with the known dynamics of ions within traveling-wave devices. The insights gained in this work are potentially relevant both for 'native ETD' studies (in which tuning needs to be optimized to avoid unintentional ion activation) as well as the design of future T-wave ETD devices (where this 'heating' effect might be exploited to promote fragment release).

  4. Four-shell polyoxometalates featuring high-nuclearity Ln{sub 26} clusters. Structural transformations of nanoclusters into frameworks triggered by transition-metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhong; Li, Xin-Xiong; Yang, Tao; Cai, Zhen-Wen; Zheng, Shou-Tian [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fujian (China)

    2017-03-01

    A series of polyoxometalates (POMs) that incorporate the highest-nuclearity Ln clusters that have been observed in such structures to date (Ln{sub 26}, Ln=La and Ce) are described, which exhibit giant multishell configurations (Ln is contained in W{sub 6} is contained in Ln{sub 26} is contained in W{sub 100}). Their structures are remarkably different from known giant POMs that feature multiple Ln ions. In particular, the incorporated Ln-O clusters with a nuclearity of 26 are significantly larger than known high-nuclearity (≤10) Ln-O clusters in POM chemistry. Furthermore, they also contain the largest number of La and Ce centers for any POM reported to date and represent a new kind of rare giant POMs with more than 100 W atoms. Interestingly, the La{sub 26}-containing POM can undergo a single-crystal to single-crystal structural transformation in the presence of various transition-metal ions, such as Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+}, from an inorganic molecular nanocluster into an inorganic-organic hybrid extended framework that is built from POM building blocks with even higher-nuclearity La{sub 28} clusters bridged by transition-metal complexes. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Low energy electron bombardment induced surface contamination of Ru mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Kanjilal, A.; Catalfano, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-03-01

    The impact of secondary electrons induced contamination of the Ru surface was investigated. Mirror-like Ru sample was bombarded with low energy (100 eV) electrons and the change in surface chemistry was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).Along with XPS studies the corresponding effect on in-situ EUV reflectivity was examined by exposing the Ru surface to photons at a wavelength of 13.5 nm in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. Detailed XPS analyses showed a sudden increase in carbon concentrations on the Ru surface in the first 60 min, followed by a slow but linear growth in carbon concentration. In parallel, a noticeable decrease in water content was observed during the time of electrons irradiation along with slight oxidation of pure Ru surface. All chemical changes were discussed in terms of the electrons bombardment mediated dissociation of water and hydrocarbon molecules. A time dependent EUV reflectivity measurements show insignificant change in reflectivity up to 510 min of electrons bombardment. The impact of water molecules on the Ru surface and the accumulation of carbon through dissociation of residual hydrocarbons is discussed in details.

  6. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced nanodot structures on InP surfaces by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnaser, Hubert, E-mail: gnaser@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Institut für Oberflächen- und Schichtanalytik GmbH (IFOS), Trippstadter Strasse 120, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Radny, Tobias [Fachbereich Physik and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Surfaces of InP were bombarded by 1.9 keV Ar{sup +} ions under normal incidence. The total accumulated ion fluence the samples were exposed to was varied from 1×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} to 3×10{sup 18} cm{sup −2} and ion flux densities f of (0.4−2)×10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} were used. Nanodot structures were found to evolve on the surface from these ion irradiations, their dimensions however, depend on the specific bombardment conditions. The resulting surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a function of ion fluence, the mean radius, height, and spacing of the dots can be fitted by power-law dependences. In order to determine possible local compositional changes in these nanostructures induced by ion impact, selected samples were prepared for atom probe tomography (APT). The results indicate that by APT the composition of individual InP nanodots evolving under ion bombardment could be examined with atomic spatial resolution. At the InP surface, the values of the In/P concentration ratio are distinctly higher over a distance of ~1 nm and amount to 1.3–1.8. However, several aspects critical for the analyses were identified: (i) because of the small dimensions of these nanostructures a successful tip preparation proved very challenging. (ii) The elemental compositions obtained from APT were found to be influenced pronouncedly by the laser pulse energy; typically, low energies result in the correct stoichiometry whereas high ones lead to an inhomogeneous evaporation from the tips and deviations from the nominal composition. (iii) Depending again on the laser energy, a prolific emission of P{sub n} cluster ions was observed, with n≤11. - Highlights: • Nanodot formation on InP surfaces under Ar{sup +} ion irradiation. • Atom probe tomography of InP: influence of laser pulse energy. • Compositional analysis of individual nanodots with nm spatial resolution. • Abundant emission of P{sub n} cluster ions (n≤11).

  7. Bacterial spore survival after exposure to HZE particle bombardment -implication for the lithopanspermia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Kitamura, H.; Reitz, Guenther

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, bacterial spores (mainly spores of Bacillus subtilis) are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. More re-cently, spores of B. subtilis have been applied for experimental research on the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of life. Since its first postulation by Arrhenius in 1903, the pansper-mia hypothesis has been revisited many-times, e.g. after the discovery of several lunar and Martian meteorites on Earth [1,2]. These information provided intriguing evidence that rocks may naturally be transferred between the terrestrial planets. The scenario of panspermia, now termed "lithopanspermia" involves three basic hypothetical steps: (i) the escape process, i.e. removal to space of biological material, which has survived being lifted from the surface to high altitudes; (ii) interim state in space, i.e., survival of the biological material over time scales comparable with interplanetary or interstellar passage; (iii) the entry process, i.e. nondestruc-tive deposition of the biological material on another planet [2]. In our research, spores of B. subtilis were used to study the effects of galactic cosmic radiation on spore survival and induced mutations. On an interplanetary journey, outside a protective magnetic field, spore-containing rocks would be exposed to bombardment by high-energy charged particle radiation from galac-tic sources and from the sun. Air-dried spore layers on three different host materials (i.e., non-porous igneous rocks (gabbro), quartz, and spacecraft analog material (aluminum)) were irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (Helium and Iron) with a LET (linear energy transfer) ˆ of 2 and 200 keV/Am, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at the National In-stitute of Radiological Sciences, (NIRS), Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project 20B463 "Characterization of heavy ion-induced damage in Bacillus subtilis spores and their global

  8. Experimental studies of the formation of cluster ions formed by corona discharge in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Preben; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Støchkel, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    2O)n and NO3-(H2O)n have been recorded. Large values of n (>100) were observed and the experiment indicates the existence of even larger water clusters. In contrast, only clusters with a maximum of 2 sulfuric acid molecules were observed. Fragmentation studies also revealed that the negative ion HSO...

  9. Influence of ion charge on primary defects creation in crystals irradiated by ions

    CERN Document Server

    Altynov, V A

    2002-01-01

    The model of primary defects formation under ion irradiation of crystals is described. The model is based on suggestion that defects are created as a result of Coulomb repulsion of neighbouring atoms at crystalline lattice ionized by bombarding ions. The changes of average charge of ions and the charge distribution of ions versus the depth of ion penetration to crystal are taken into account. The results of calculations are presented

  10. Convenient purification of gold clusters by co-precipitation for improved sensing of hydrogen peroxide, mercury ions and pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guijian; Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Cai, Yongqing; Liu, Shuhua; Bharathi, M S; Low, Michelle; Yu, Yong; Xie, Jianping; Zheng, Yuangang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2014-06-01

    An effective separation process is developed to remove free protein from the protein-protected gold clusters via co-precipitation with zinc hydroxide on their surface. After dialysis, the purified clusters exhibit an enhanced fluorescence for improved sensitive detection and selective visualization.

  11. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-05

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  12. Production of N{congruent}Z Nuclei with A{approx}100 via Complete Heavy-Ion Fusion Reactions Followed by Cluster Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. La Commara; J. Gomez del Campo; A. D' Onofrio; A. Gadea; M. Glogowski; P. Jarillo-Herrero; N. Belcari; R. Borcea; G. de Angelis; C. Fahlander; M. Gorska; H. Grawe; M. Hellstroem; R. Kirchner; M. Rejmund; V. Roca; E. Roeckl; M. Romano; K. Rykaczewski; K. Schmidt; F. Terrasi

    1999-12-31

    The production of isotopes near {sup 100}Sn has been investigated by using on-line mass separation of evaporation residues produced by heavy-ion induced complete fusion reactions. We measured {beta}-delayed protons and {gamma}-rays, deduced the mass-separated beam intensities for {sup 99}Cd, {sup 100}In, {sup 101}Sn and {sup 102}In, and determined the corresponding production cross-sections {sigma} for {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni reactions followed by emission of nuclear clusters, and for {sup 58}Ni+{sup 50}Cr reactions accompanied by emission of protons, neutrons and {alpha} particles. The results indicate that the {sigma} values for reactions followed by emission of clusters are comparable with those for reactions proceeding through light particle emission. Due to recoil-loss effects in on-line mass separation, the former mechanism is less suitable than the latter one for producing such neutron-deficient nuclei in this kind of experiments.

  13. Soft-landing ion mobility of silver clusters for small-molecule matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and imaging of latent fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Barbara L; Verbeck, Guido F

    2014-08-19

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging is gaining popularity, but matrix effects such as mass spectral interference and damage to the sample limit its applications. Replacing traditional matrices with silver particles capable of equivalent or increased photon energy absorption from the incoming laser has proven to be beneficial for low mass analysis. Not only can silver clusters be advantageous for low mass compound detection, but they can be used for imaging as well. Conventional matrix application methods can obstruct samples, such as fingerprints, rendering them useless after mass analysis. The ability to image latent fingerprints without causing damage to the ridge pattern is important as it allows for further characterization of the print. The application of silver clusters by soft-landing ion mobility allows for enhanced MALDI and preservation of fingerprint integrity.

  14. Thermal dynamics of silver clusters grown on rippled silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Mukul, E-mail: mkbh10@gmail.com [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nirma University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat (India); Ranjan, Mukesh [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nirma University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat (India); Jolley, Kenny; Lloyd, Adam; Smith, Roger [Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, Subroto [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nirma University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat (India)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Low energy oblique angle ion bombardment forms ripple pattern on silicon surface. • The ripple patterns have wavelengths between 20 and 45 nm and correspondingly low height. • Silver nanoparticles have been deposited at an angle of 70° on patterned silicon templates. • The as-deposited np are annealed in vacuo at temperature of 573 K for a time duration of 1 h. • MD simulation is used to model the process and compare the results to the experiment. • Results show that silver clusters grow preferentially along parallel to the rippled surface. • Mobility of silver atoms depends on the site to which they are bonded on this amorphous surface. • MD simulations show contour ordered coalescence which is dependent on ripple periodicity. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have been deposited on silicon rippled patterned templates at an angle of incidence of 70° to the surface normal. The templates are produced by oblique incidence argon ion bombardment and as the fluence increases, the periods and heights of the structures increase. Structures with periods of 20 nm, 35 nm and 45 nm have been produced. Moderate temperature vacuum annealing shows the phenomenon of cluster coalescence following the contour of the more exposed faces of the ripple for the case of 35 nm and 45 nm but not at 20 nm where the silver aggregates into larger randomly distributed clusters. In order to understand this effect, the morphological changes of silver nanoparticles deposited on an asymmetric rippled silica surface are investigated through the use of molecular dynamics simulations for different deposition angles of incidence between 0° and 70° and annealing temperatures between 500 K and 900 K. Near to normal incidence, clusters are observed to migrate over the entire surface but for deposition at 70°, a similar patterning is observed as in the experiment. The random distribution of clusters for the periodicity ≈ of 20 nm is linked to the geometry of the silica

  15. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Chengling Zhu; Shenmin Zhu; Kai Zhang; Zeyu Hui; Hui Pan; Zhixin Chen; Yao Li; Di Zhang; Da-Wei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with...

  16. Increased component isotropy and plasma magnetic compression at sub-ion Larmor scale turbulence in the solar wind as seen by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K.; Sahraoui, F.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Fauvarque, O.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.

    2012-12-01

    The anisotropic nature of solar wind magnetic turbulence fluctuations is investigated scale-by-scale using high cadence in-situ magnetic field measurements from the Cluster and ACE spacecraft missions. The data span five decades in scales from the inertial range to the electron Larmor radius. In contrast to the inertial range, there is a successive increase towards isotropy between parallel and transverse power at scales below the ion Larmor radius, with isotropy being achieved at the electron Larmor radius. In the context of wave-mediated theories of turbulence, we show that this enhancement in magnetic fluctuations parallel to the local mean background field is qualitatively consistent with the magnetic compressibility signature of kinetic Alfvén wave solutions of the linearized Vlasov equation. More generally, we discuss how these results may arise naturally due to the prominent role of the Hall term at sub-ion Larmor scales. Furthermore, computing higher-order statistics, we show that the full statistical signature of the fluctuations at scales below the ion Larmor radius is that of a single isotropic globally scale-invariant process distinct from the anisotropic statistics of the inertial range.(Upper panel) PSD (from Cluster) of the transverse and parallel components spanning the inertial and dissipation ranges. (Lower panel) Ratio of parallel over transverse PSD. Horizontal dot-dashed line indicates a ratio of 1/3 where isotropy in power occurs. Vertical dashed and dashed-dotted lines indicate the ion and electron gyro-radii respectively, Doppler-shifted to spacecraft frequency using the Taylor hypothesis.

  17. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K., E-mail: k.prakrajang@gmail.com [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  18. Physico-chemical and mechanical modifications of polyethylene and polypropylene by ion implantation, micro-wave plasma, electron beam radiation and gamma ray irradiation; Modifications physico-chimiques et mecaniques du polyethylene et du polypropylene par implantation ionique, plasma micro-ondes, bombardement d`electrons et irradiation gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.D.

    1995-03-29

    A polyolefin surface becomes wettable when treated by micro-wave plasma or low-dose nitrogen ion implantation. A short time argon plasma treatment is sufficient to obtain polarizable peroxides on a polyolefin. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, paramagnetic electronic resonance analyses, peroxides decomposition, wettability measurements and infrared active spectra analyses have shown that oxidized structures obtained from different treatment techniques play an important role in the interpretation of surface chemical properties of the polymer. Micro-wave plasma treatment, and in particular argon plasma treatment, yields more polarizable groups than ion implantation and is interesting for grafting. Hardness and elasticity modulus, measured by nano-indentation on a polyolefin, increase with an appropriate ion implantation dose. A 1.4 x 10{sup 17} ions.cm{sup -2} dose can multiply by 15 the hardness of high molecular weight polyethylene, and by 7 the elasticity modulus for a 30 nm depth. The viscous-plastic to quasi-elastic transition is shown. The thickness of the modified layer is over 300 nm. The study of friction between a metal sphere and a polyethylene cupula shows that ion implantation in the polymer creates a reticulated hard and elastic layer which improves its mechanical properties and reduces the erosion rate. Surface treatments on polymers used as biomaterials allow to adapt the surface properties to specific applications. 107 refs., 66 figs., 19 tabs., 4 annexes.

  19. Evaluation of C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for the chemical analysis and imaging of fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Demoranville, Leonard T; Gillen, Greg

    2013-09-10

    The feasibility of using C60(+) cluster primary ion bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60(+) SIMS) for the analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is evaluated. It was found that C60(+) SIMS could be used to detect and image the spatial localization of a number of sebaceous and eccrine components in fingerprints. These analyses were also found to not be hindered by the use of common latent print powder development techniques. Finally, the ability to monitor the depth distribution of fingerprint constituents was found to be possible - a capability which has not been shown using other chemical imaging techniques. This paper illustrates a number of strengths and potential weaknesses of C60(+) SIMS as an additional or complimentary technique for the chemical analysis of fingerprints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural improvement of zinc oxide films produced by ion beam assisted reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehl, D; Wuttig, M [I. Institute of Physics (IA), RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Luysberg, M, E-mail: wuttig@physik.rwth-aachen.d [Ernst Ruska-Zentrum fuer Mikroskopie und Spektroskopie mit Elektronen/IFF, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-05-26

    Reactively sputtered zinc oxide thin films exhibit low crystalline order when deposited on unheated substrates. To improve the structural order, films are usually deposited onto heated substrates at temperatures of about 200-300 {sup 0}C. Nevertheless, techniques that enable room temperature deposition of ZnO films with high structural quality would be advantageous. In this work ion bombardment from an auxiliary ion gun during film growth is employed to improve the crystalline quality. Xe{sup +} ion bombardment under appropriate conditions leads to the growth of films with high crystalline order. Based on our structural investigations employing x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, a growth model is proposed which explains the impact of ion bombardment on the structural evolution. We prove that it is especially the nucleation stage of the growth process which is susceptible to this ion bombardment.

  1. Three novel Cu6S6 cluster-based coordination compounds: synthesis, framework modulation and the sensing of small molecules and Fe(3+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Si-Zhe; Zhou, Rui-Sha; Shao, Jia; Qiu, Xiao-Min; Jia, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-08-07

    Three novel Cu6S6 cluster-based coordination compounds formulated as [Cu(mpymt)3]2 (1), {(CuBr4)[Cu(mpymt)6]}n (2), and {(CuI6)[Cu(mpymt)6]}n (3) (Hmpymt = 4-methylpyrimidine-2-thione), have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structural analysis reveals that compound 1 shows a distorted octahedral core of six copper atoms (Cu6S6) constructed from four α and two β type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts from six mpymt(-) anions. Compound 2 displays an interesting 3D framework constructed from Cu6S6 and Cu4Br4 Cu(i) clusters simultaneously, interestingly, six mpymt(-) with α type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts are involved in the formation of Cu6S6. Compound 3 displays an infinite 1D framework constructed from Cu6S6 and Cu6I6 Cu(i) clusters, notably, four α and two β type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts are involved in the formation of the Cu6S6 cluster, however, only mpymt(-) ligands containing α type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts form the bridged Cu6I6 cluster. The experimental results reveal that halogen ions finely modulate the structural features of compounds 1-3. The fluorescent properties of compounds 1-3 in the solid state and in various solvent emulsions were investigated in detail, the results of which indicate that compounds 1-3 are all highly sensitive naked eye colorimetric sensors for NB, 2-NT and Fe(3+) (NB = nitrobenzene and 2-NT = 2-nitrotoluene).

  2. Ion distribution in quaternary-ammonium-functionalized aromatic polymers: effects on the ionic clustering and conductivity of anion-exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiber, E Annika; Jannasch, Patric

    2014-09-01

    A series of copoly(arylene ether sulfone)s that have precisely two, three, or four quaternary ammonium (QA) groups clustered directly on single phenylene rings along the backbone are studied as anion-exchange membranes. The copolymers are synthesized by condensation polymerizations that involve either di-, tri-, or tetramethylhydroquinone followed by virtually complete benzylic bromination using N-bromosuccinimide and quaternization with trimethylamine. This synthetic strategy allows excellent control and systematic variation of the local density and distribution of QA groups along the backbone. Small-angle X-ray scattering of these copolymers shows extensive ionic clustering, promoted by an increasing density of QA on the single phenylene rings. At an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of 2.1 meq g(-1), the water uptake decreases with the increasing local density of QA groups. Moreover, at moderate IECs at 20 °C, the Br(-) conductivity of the densely functionalized copolymers is higher than a corresponding randomly functionalized polymer, despite the significantly higher water uptake of the latter. Thus, the location of multiple cations on single aromatic rings in the polymers facilitates the formation of a distinct percolating hydrophilic phase domain with a high ionic concentration to promote efficient anion transport, despite probable limitations by reduced ion dissociation. These findings imply a viable strategy to improve the performance of alkaline membrane fuel cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Ultrathin mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets-constructed hierarchical clusters as high rate capability and long life anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengming; Xia, Tian; Wang, Jingping; Lu, Feifei; Xu, Chunbo; Zhang, Xianfa; Huo, Lihua; Zhao, Hui

    2017-06-01

    Herein, Ultrathin mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets-constructed hierarchical clusters (UMCN-HCs) have been successfully synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method followed by a subsequent thermolysis treatment at 600 °C in air. The products consist of cluster-like Co3O4 microarchitectures, which are assembled by numerous ultrathin mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets. When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, UMCN-HCs deliver a high reversible capacity of 1067 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1 after 100 cycles. Even at 2 A g-1, a stable capacity as high as 507 mAh g-1 can be achieved after 500 cycles. The high reversible capacity, excellent cycling stability, and good rate capability of UMCN-HCs may be attributed to their mesoporous sheet-like nanostructure. The sheet-layered structure of UMCN-HCs may buffer the volume change during the lithiation-delithiation process, and the mesoporous characteristic make lithium-ion transfer more easily at the interface between the active electrode and the electrolyte.

  4. Observation of energy-time dispersed ion structures in the magnetosheath by CLUSTER: possible signatures of transient acceleration processes at shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Louarn

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyse energy-time dispersed ion signatures that have been observed by CLUSTER in the dayside magnetosheath. These events are characterized by sudden increases in the ion flux at energies larger than 10 keV. The high energy ions (30 keV are first detected, with the transition to the low energy ions (5 keV lasting about 100 s. These injections are often associated with transient plasma structures of a few minutes in duration, characterized by a hotter, less dense plasma and a diverted flow velocity, thus presenting similarities with "hot flow anomalies". They also involve modifications of the magnetic field direction, suggesting that the shock interacts with a solar wind discontinuity at the time of the event. The injections can originate from the magnetosphere or the shock region. Studying in detail a particular event, we discuss this last hypothesis. We show that the observed energy/time dispersion can be explained by combining a time-of-flight effect with a drift of the source of energetic particles along the shock. We propose that the acceleration results from a Fermi process linked to the interaction of the discontinuity with a quasi-perpendicular shock. This model explains the observed pitch-angle selection of the accelerated particles. The Fermi process acting on the beam of ions reflected from the shock appears to be sufficiently efficient to accelerate over short time scales (less than 30 s particles at energies above 30 keV.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar-wind-magnetosphere interaction; magnetosheath – Space plasma physics (shock waves

  5. Observation of energy-time dispersed ion structures in the magnetosheath by CLUSTER: possible signatures of transient acceleration processes at shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Louarn

    Full Text Available We analyse energy-time dispersed ion signatures that have been observed by CLUSTER in the dayside magnetosheath. These events are characterized by sudden increases in the ion flux at energies larger than 10 keV. The high energy ions (30 keV are first detected, with the transition to the low energy ions (5 keV lasting about 100 s. These injections are often associated with transient plasma structures of a few minutes in duration, characterized by a hotter, less dense plasma and a diverted flow velocity, thus presenting similarities with "hot flow anomalies". They also involve modifications of the magnetic field direction, suggesting that the shock interacts with a solar wind discontinuity at the time of the event. The injections can originate from the magnetosphere or the shock region. Studying in detail a particular event, we discuss this last hypothesis. We show that the observed energy/time dispersion can be explained by combining a time-of-flight effect with a drift of the source of energetic particles along the shock. We propose that the acceleration results from a Fermi process linked to the interaction of the discontinuity with a quasi-perpendicular shock. This model explains the observed pitch-angle selection of the accelerated particles. The Fermi process acting on the beam of ions reflected from the shock appears to be sufficiently efficient to accelerate over short time scales (less than 30 s particles at energies above 30 keV.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar-wind-magnetosphere interaction; magnetosheath – Space plasma physics (shock waves

  6. The spectra of the multicharged argon hollow ions: Observation, modeling and using for diagnostics of the early stage of the heating of clusters by a super high contrast femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Fortov, V. E.; Boldarev, A. S.; Gasilov, V. A.; Chen, L. M.; Zhang, L.; Yan, W. C.; Yuan, D. W.; Mao, J. Y.; Wang, Z. H.; Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Fukuda, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Pirozhkov, A.; Kawase, K.; Shimomura, T.; Kiriyama, H. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bld.2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation) and Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bld.2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Institute of Mathematical Modeling, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miusskaya pl. 4a, Moscow, 125047 (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 Los Alamos (United States); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); and others

    2012-07-11

    A study is made of the ultra-short laser pulse irradiation of Ar cluster targets. Experiments have been performed with large cluster sizes and using very high laser contrasts, which have allowed clear and unambiguous observation of exotic inner-shell transitions in near-neutral Ar ions. The interaction of the main laser pulse with the unperturbed target is a necessary requirement for observing these lines. Our measurements are supported by kinetics calculations in which a very detailed atomic model is used. The calculations predict all of the spectral features found experimentally, and support the notion that the X-ray emission arises from many ion stages of the Ar plasma, from near-neutral through He-like ions, and from a range of plasma temperatures and densities. Differences between X-ray argon clusters excited at the laser-cluster and laser-droplet interactions have been analyzed. X-ray spectral methods have been proposed to determine the parameters of the plasma formed at the early stages of its evolution. It has been shown that the spectra of hollow ions are the most informative in the first moments of the heating of a cluster, whereas the diagnostics of the late stages can be performed using the conventional lines of multicharged ions.

  7. Photon-hadron discrimination with improved clustering for a preshower detector in high energy heavy ion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Susanta Kumar, E-mail: sushant@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Viyogi, Y.P. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2012-11-21

    The fuzzy c-mean clustering algorithm has been applied to the data set consisting of hits in a highly granular photon multiplicity detector installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The clusters obtained using a modification of the algorithm based on the intensity of cells (called weighted fuzzy c-mean algorithm) are used as input in an artificial neural network formalism for photon-hadron discrimination. Results are discussed in terms of the photon reconstruction efficiency and the purity of photon sample and their centrality and pseudorapidity dependence at the LHC energy.

  8. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g−1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g−1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g−1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance. PMID:27181691

  9. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-05-16

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 100 mA g(-1), superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g(-1)). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance.

  10. Structural and thermal effects of ion-irradiation induced defect configurations in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Zhu, Taishan; Ertekin, Elif; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2017-05-01

    Classical molecular dynamics calculations were used to investigate the formation of defects produced during irradiation of energetic ions on silicon. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of defects and defective regions formed through ion irradiation and to establish a connection between the ion irradiation parameters, lattice defect configurations, and the resulting modified lattice thermal conductivity of silicon. The defective regions were characterized according to the total number of defects generated, the size and the density of the defective region, and the longitudinal and radial distribution of defects along the ion impact path. In addition, the clustering of the defects into amorphous pockets is analyzed and the effect of these processing parameters on the properties of the clusters is also studied. Further, the lattice defect configurations produced during continuous bombardment of multiple ions are directly investigated and compared to the single-ion impact results. A range of irradiation parameters including ion species, ion energies, fluence, and beam width have been explored to elucidate the dependence of the resulting defect configurations on these experimental design parameters. High density defective regions are found to be produced by low-energy ions with high atomic number. Analysis of the defects produced under varying beam diameters indicates that the beam diameter, rather than the beam energy, is the more prominent factor in determining the extent of the defective region. We demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of the material is most significantly influenced by the effective diameter of the defective region, making the beam diameter the most influential experimental parameter for tuning the lattice thermal conductivity. A reduction in thermal conductivity of up to 80% from pristine silicon was achieved with the processing parameters used in this work. This study indicates that ion beam irradiation can be a realizable

  11. Sodium ion ordering of Na0.77CoO2 under competing multivacancy cluster, superlattice, and domain formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.-T.; Shu, G. J.; Chu, M.-W.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lee, W. L.; Sheu, H. S.; Chou, F. C.

    2009-10-01

    Hexagonal superlattice formed by sodium multivacancy-cluster ordering in Na0.77CoO2 has been proposed based on synchrotron x-ray Laue-diffraction study on electrochemically fine-tuned single crystals. The title compound sits closely to the proposed lower end of the miscibility gap of x˜0.77-0.82 phase-separated range. The average sodium vacancy-cluster size is estimated to be 4.5 Na vacancies per layer within a large superlattice size of 19a×19a×3c . The exceptionally large Na vacancy-cluster size favors large twinned simple hexagonal superlattice of 19a , in competition with the smaller divacancy, trivacancy, and quadrivacancy clusters formed superlattices of 12a and 13a . Competing electronic correlations are revealed by the observed spin-glasslike magnetic hysteresis below ˜3K and the twin domain, triple domain, and monodomain transformations during thermal cycling between 273 and 373 K.

  12. Evidence Supporting an Early as Well as Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting an intense early bombardment on the Moon in addition to the traditional Late Heavy Bombardment at approx. 4 BY ago include the distribution of N(50) Crater Retention Ages (CRAs) for candidate basins, a variety of absolute age scenarios for both a "young" and an "old" Nectaris age, and the decreasing contrasts in both topographic relief and Bouguer gravity with increasing CRA.

  13. Investigation of the Working Parameters of a Single Magnetron of a Multiple Ion Cluster Source: Determination of the Relative Influence of the Parameters on the Size and Density of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Ion Cluster Source (MICS is the new optimized route of a standard technique based on a sputtering gas aggregation source, the Ion Cluster Source. The single magnetron used in the standard Ion Cluster Source is replaced by three magnetrons inside the aggregation zone, and they are controlled individually in order to fabricate nanoparticles with the desired and tunable chemical composition. Apart from the working parameters of each magnetron, it is also reported that the relation between the working parameters of individual magnetrons is of prime importance for the control of both the size and density of the nanoparticles. The influences of fluxes of the sputtering gas applied to each magnetron, the total gas flux in the aggregation zone, the position in the aggregation zone of Ag magnetron, and the relative position of the magnetrons in the aggregation zone have been studied through the operation of one of the magnetrons loaded with a silver target.

  14. Stable transformation of the oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, using microprojectile bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2003-01-01

    Germinated asexual sporangia, zoospores, and mycelia of Phytophthora infestans were transformed to G418-resistance by microprojectile bombardment. After optimization, an average of 14 transformants/shot were obtained, using 10(6) germinated sporangia and gold particles coated with 1 microg...... of vector. Transformants displayed tandem or simple insertions of vector sequences within chromosomes. Most primary transformants were heterokaryons of transformed and wild-type nuclei, a state which generally persisted for generations, even with G418 selection. Transgenic homokaryons were easily obtained...... from primary transformants through G418 selection of zoospores. To facilitate the optimization of transformation, experiments were performed using a vector containing neomycin phosphotransferase (npt) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) genes fused to oomycete transcriptional regulatory sequences. To indicate...

  15. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  16. Electron-correlation study of Y III-Tc VII ions using a relativistic coupled-cluster theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arghya; Bhowmik, Anal; Nath Dutta, Narendra; Majumder, Sonjoy

    2018-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties, useful for plasma diagnostics and astrophysics, of a few rubidium-like ions are studied here. We choose one of the simplest, but correlationally challenging series where d- and f-orbitals are present in the core and/or valence shells with 4d {}2{D}3/2 as the ground state. We study different correlation characteristics of this series and make precise calculations of electronic structure and rates of electromagnetic transitions. Our calculated lifetimes and transition rates are compared with other available experimental and theoretical values. Radiative rates of vacuum ultraviolet electromagnetic transitions of the long lived Tc6+ ion, useful in several areas of physics and chemistry, are estimated. To the best of our knowledge, there is no literature for most of these transitions.

  17. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The current paper presents a state-of-the-art review in the field of ion implantation of polymers. Numerous published studies of polymers modified by ion beams are analysed. General aspects of ion stopping, latent track formation and changes of structure and composition of organic materials...... are discussed. Related to that, the effects of radiothermolysis, degassing and carbonisation are considered. Specificity of depth distributions of implanted into polymers impurities is analysed and the case of high-fluence implantation is emphasised. Within rather broad topic of ion bombardment, the focus...... is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  18. A new cluster-ion-beam source for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) using the electrospray of a pure ionic liquid under high vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Yukio, E-mail: yukio-fujiwara@aist.go.j [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-8568 (Japan); Saito, Naoaki; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Nakanaga, Taisuke; Ichimura, Shingo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-8568 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Electrospray characteristics were studied using a pure room-temperature molten salt (i.e., an ionic liquid) at pressures around 10{sup -5} Pa as well as at atmospheric pressure. The ionic liquid N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide was tested, which has negligible vapor pressure and high conductivity. During electrospray, the ionic liquid was introduced at a constant flow rate into a stainless-steel capillary (i.d. 30 {mu}m). It was demonstrated that stable electrosprayed currents exceeding {+-}1 {mu}{Alpha} were continuously produced in both positive and negative modes. The electrosprayed currents in a high vacuum were twice those at atmospheric pressure. It was found that gas pressure rose slightly with increasing electrosprayed currents. Residual gas analysis revealed that gas component at negative mode was different from that at positive mode. Experimental results indicate that vacuum electrospray of pure ionic liquids is applicable to a massive-cluster beam source for SIMS.

  19. Electron-bombarded 〈110〉-oriented tungsten tips for stable tunneling electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, T. K.; Abe, T.; Nazriq, N. M. K.; Irisawa, T. [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    A clean tungsten (W) tip apex with a robust atomic plane is required for producing a stable tunneling electron emission under strong electric fields. Because a tip apex fabricated from a wire by aqueous chemical etching is covered by impurity layers, heating treatment in ultra-high vacuum is experimentally known to be necessary. However, strong heating frequently melts the tip apex and causes unstable electron emissions. We investigated quantitatively the tip apex and found a useful method to prepare a tip with stable tunneling electron emissions by controlling electron-bombardment heating power. Careful characterizations of the tip structures were performed with combinations of using field emission I–V curves, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (transmitted Debye-Scherrer and Laue) with micro-parabola capillary, field ion microscopy, and field emission microscopy. Tips were chemically etched from (1) polycrystalline W wires (grain size ∼1000 nm) and (2) long-time heated W wires (grain size larger than 1 mm). Heating by 10-40 W (10 s) was found to be good enough to remove oxide layers and produced stable electron emission; however, around 60 W (10 s) heating was threshold power to increase the tip radius, typically +10 ± 5 nm (onset of melting). Further, the grain size of ∼1000 nm was necessary to obtain a conical shape tip apex.

  20. Influence of particle bombardment on microstructure and internal stresses of refractory metal suicides on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardtke, Ch.; Schilling, W.; Ullmaier, H.

    1991-07-01

    First results on microstructural changes and stress relaxation in thin refractory metal suicide films (TaSi 2 and MoSi 2) caused by particle bombardment are reported. The polycrystalline films had initial tensile stresses of some 10 9 Pa. Exposed to irradiation with Ge ions of 400 keV, both suicides showed a similar stress relaxation behaviour as a function of dose. During room-temperature implantation the initial tensile stress rapidly decreased and turned into compressive stress. Continuous irradiation partly relaxed the compressive stress and resulted in a saturation value of some -10 8 Pa. With increasing implantation temperature, the buildup of compressive stress gradually vanished, leaving only the initial decrease of tensile stress which finally approached zero. Based on microstructural investigations (TEM and X-ray diffraction) it is proposed to explain this behaviour by the combined action of two processes: relaxation of tensile stress by a volume increase due to irradiation-induced amorphization, and Frenkel defect production and relaxation of compressive stress by irradiation-induced densification of amorphous regions and/or Frenkel defect elimination.

  1. Anomalously Strong Effect of the Ion Sign on the Thermochemistry of Hydrogen Bonded Aqueous Clusters of Identical Chemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey B. Nadykto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The sign preference of hydrogen bonded aqueous ionic clusters Χ±(H2Oi (n =1-5, Χ = F; Cl; Br has been investigated using the Density Functional Theory and ab initio MP2 method. The present study indicates the anomalously large difference in formation free energies between cations and anions of identical chemical composition. The effect of vibrational anharmonicity on stepwise Gibbs free energy changes has been investigated, and possible uncertainties associated with the harmonic treatment of vibrational spectra have been discussed.

  2. Efficient and rapid C. elegans transgenesis by bombardment and hygromycin B selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inja Radman

    Full Text Available We report a simple, cost-effective, scalable and efficient method for creating transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans that requires minimal hands-on time. The method combines biolistic bombardment with selection for transgenics that bear a hygromycin B resistance gene on agar plates supplemented with hygromycin B, taking advantage of our observation that hygromycin B is sufficient to kill wild-type C. elegans at very low concentrations. Crucially, the method provides substantial improvements in the success of bombardments for isolating transmitting strains, the isolation of multiple independent strains, and the isolation of integrated strains: 100% of bombardments in a large data set yielded transgenics; 10 or more independent strains were isolated from 84% of bombardments, and up to 28 independent strains were isolated from a single bombardment; 82% of bombardments yielded stably transmitting integrated lines with most yielding multiple integrated lines. We anticipate that the selection will be widely adopted for C. elegans transgenesis via bombardment, and that hygromycin B resistance will be adopted as a marker in other approaches for manipulating, introducing or deleting DNA in C. elegans.

  3. Compositional Evolution of Saturn's Rings Due to Meteoroid Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J.; Estrada, P.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of compositional evolution in planetary ring systems subsequent to meteoroid bombardment. The huge surface area to mass ratio of planetary rings ensures that this is an important process, even with current uncertainties on the meteoroid flux. We develop a new model which includes both direct deposition of extrinsic meteoritic "pollutants", and ballistic transport of the increasingly polluted ring material as impact ejecta. Our study includes detailed radiative transfer modeling of ring particle spectral reflectivities based on refractive indices of realistic constituents. Voyager data have shown that the lower optical depth regions in Saturn's rings (the C ring and Cassini Division) have darker and less red particles than the optically thicken A and B rings. These coupled structural-compositional groupings have never been explained; we present and explore the hypothesis that global scale color and compositional differences in the main rings of Saturn arise naturally from extrinsic meteoroid bombardment of a ring system which was initially composed primarily, but not entirely, of water ice. We find that the regional color and albedo differences can be understood if all ring material was initially identical (primarily water ice, based on other data, but colored by tiny amounts of intrinsic reddish, plausibly organic, absorber) and then evolved entirely by addition and mixing of extrinsic, nearly neutrally colored. plausibly carbonaceous material. We further demonstrate that the detailed radial profile of color across the abrupt B ring - C ring boundary can.constrain key unknown parameters in the model. Using new alternates of parameter values, we estimate the duration of the exposure to extrinsic meteoroid flux of this part of the rings, at least, to be on the order of 10(exp 8) years. This conclusion is easily extended by inference to the Cassini Division and its surroundings as well. This geologically young "age" is compatible

  4. Room-Temperature Growth of SiC Thin Films by Dual-Ion-Beam Sputtering Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Jin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC films were prepared by single and dual-ion-beamsputtering deposition at room temperature. An assisted Ar+ ion beam (ion energy Ei = 150 eV was directed to bombard the substrate surface to be helpful for forming SiC films. The microstructure and optical properties of nonirradicated and assisted ion-beam irradicated films have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and Raman spectra. TEM result shows that the films are amorphous. The films exposed to a low-energy assisted ion-beam irradicated during sputtering from a-SiC target have exhibited smoother and compacter surface topography than which deposited with nonirradicated. The ion-beam irradicated improves the adhesion between film and substrate and releases the stress between film and substrate. With assisted ion-beam irradicated, the density of the Si–C bond in the film has increased. At the same time, the excess C atoms or the size of the sp2 bonded clusters reduces, and the a-Si phase decreases. These results indicate that the composition of the film is mainly Si–C bond.

  5. The ballistic performance of the bombard Mons Meg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Lewtas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bombard Mons Meg, located in Edinburgh Castle, with a diameter of 19 inches (48 cm, was one of the largest calibre cannons ever built. Constructed in 1449 and presented to King James II of Scotland in 1454, Mons Meg was used in both military and ceremonial roles in Scotland until its barrel burst in 1680. This paper examines the history, internal, external and terminal ballistics of the cannon and its shot. The likely muzzle velocity was estimated by varying the propellant type and the cannon profile was investigated to identify weak spots in the design that may have led to its failure. Using the muzzle velocity calculated from the internal ballistics, simulations were performed with granite and sandstone shot for varying launch angle and ground temperature. The likely trajectory and range of the cannonballs are described. The internal and external ballistics informed the initial conditions of the terminal ballistic impact scenarios. The performance of the cannonball against both period and modern targets, in the form of a pseudo-castle wall and a monolithic concrete target, respectively, were simulated and are presented and discussed.

  6. Back-bombardment compensation in microwave thermionic electron guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M. D. Kowalczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of capable, reliable, and cost-effective compact electron beam sources remains a long-standing objective of the efforts to develop the accelerator systems needed for on-site research and industrial applications ranging from electron beam welding to high performance x-ray and gamma ray light sources for element-resolved microanalysis and national security. The need in these applications for simplicity, reliability, and low cost has emphasized solutions compatible with the use of the long established and commercially available pulsed microwave rf sources and L-, S- or X-band linear accelerators. Thermionic microwave electron guns have proven to be one successful approach to the development of the electron sources for these systems providing high macropulse average current beams with picosecond pulse lengths and good emittance out to macropulse lengths of 4–5 microseconds. But longer macropulse lengths are now needed for use in inverse-Compton x-ray sources and other emerging applications. We describe in this paper our approach to extending the usable macropulse current and pulse length of these guns through the use of thermal diffusion to compensate for the increase in cathode surface temperature due to back-bombardment.

  7. Stable Transformation of the Saintpaulia ionantha by Particle Bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzade, Zahra; Ahmadabadi, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    A highly efficient genetic transformation system is essential for a successful genetic manipulation of the African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl.). Developing a particle bombardment-based genetic transformation system for the African violet. A local cultivar of the African violet from Guilan province was used for transformation experiments. The pFF19G and pBin61-Ech42 vectors were used for transient and stable transformation experiments, respectively. The PCR and RT-PCR techniques were used to verify transgene presence and transcript levels in candidate transgenic lines, respectively. Using leaf explants as target tissues, we transferred an endochitinase gene cDNA into African violet. Transgenic plants were regenerated on selection medium at a reasonable frequency (in average, one stable transgenic line per shot). Molecular analysis of transgenic plants by PCR and RT-PCR techniques confirmed successful integration and expression of transgene in several independent transgenic lines. Our results provide an efficient stable transformation system for genetic transformation of African violet.

  8. Transition energies of Rn- and Fr-like actinide ions by relativistic intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled-cluster methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliav, Ephraim, E-mail: ephraim@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Kaldor, Uzi, E-mail: kaldor@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Mean absolute error of 14 calculated La{sup 3+} excitation energies relative to experiment (10{sup 3} cm{sup -1}). The four columns show, from left to right, results for first-order, second-order, intermediate Hamiltonian (XIH) with a large basis and with an even larger basis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excitations of Rn- and Fr-like ions of the four lightest actinides are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relativity and correlation are treated at high level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large, converged basis sets and model spaces are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Agreement with experimentally known energies is 0.1 eV or better. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predictions for unknown transitions are expected to have similar accuracy. - Abstract: The extrapolated intermediate Hamiltonian (XIH) Fock-space coupled cluster method in the 1-hole 1-particle sector is applied to calculate excitation energies of Xe-like La{sup 3+} and the Rn-like actinides Ac{sup 3+}, Th{sup 4+}, Pa{sup 5+} and U{sup 6+}. Large basis sets and model spaces are used, the latter made possible by the XIH scheme. Comparison with experiment for the La ion shows very good agreement, with a mean absolute error of 0.11 eV for 14 excitations in the largest basis (37s33p25d23f14g12h11i6k), lending credence to predicted energies for the actinide ions. Significant Breit term contributions appear, and the DCB Hamiltonian is therefore used. Excellent results are obtained in the one-particle sector, where more experimental values are available. The MAE for 17 transition energies of La{sup 2+} is below 0.01 eV, and 18 levels of the Fr-like actinide ions Ac{sup 2+}, Th{sup 3+} and U{sup 5+} give a MAE of 0.06 eV. Second-order perturbation theory values differ considerably from all-order and experimental energies.

  9. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  10. Reducing the Matrix Effect in Organic Cluster SIMS Using Dynamic Reactive Ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic reactive ionization (DRI) utilizes a reactive molecule, HCl, which is doped into an Ar cluster projectile and activated to produce protons at the bombardment site on the cold sample surface with the presence of water. The methodology has been shown to enhance the ionization of protonated molecular ions and to reduce salt suppression in complex biomatrices. In this study, we further examine the possibility of obtaining improved quantitation with DRI during depth profiling of thin films. Using a trehalose film as a model system, we are able to define optimal DRI conditions for depth profiling. Next, the strategy is applied to a multilayer system consisting of the polymer antioxidants Irganox 1098 and 1010. These binary mixtures have demonstrated large matrix effects, making quantitative SIMS measurement not feasible. Systematic comparisons of depth profiling of this multilayer film between directly using GCIB, and under DRI conditions, show that the latter enhances protonated ions for both components by 4- to ~15-fold, resulting in uniform depth profiling in positive ion mode and almost no matrix effect in negative ion mode. The methodology offers a new strategy to tackle the matrix effect and should lead to improved quantitative measurement using SIMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Back bombardment for dispenser and lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bakr

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The back bombardment (BB effect limits wide usage of thermionic rf guns. The BB effect induces not only ramping-up of a cathode’s temperature and beam current, but also degradation of cavity voltage and beam energy during a macropulse. This paper presents a comparison of the BB effect for the case of dispenser tungsten-base (DC and lanthanum hexaboride (LaB_{6} thermionic rf gun cathodes. For each, particle simulation codes are used to simulate the BB effect and electron beam dynamics in a thermionic rf gun cathode. A semiempirical equation is also used to investigate the stopping range and deposited heat power of BB electrons in the cathode material. A numerical simulation method is used to calculate the change of the cathode temperature and current density during a single macropulse. This is done by solving two differential equations for the rf gun cavity equivalent circuit and one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation. High electron emission and small beam size are required for generation of a high-brightness electron beam, and so in this work the emission properties of the cathode are taken into account. Simulations of the BB effect show that, for a pulse of 6  μs duration, the DC cathode experiences a large change in the temperature compared with LaB_{6}, and a change in current density 6 times higher. Validation of the simulation results is performed using experimental data for beam current beyond the gun exit. The experimental data is well reproduced using the simulation method.

  12. Modification of graphene by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, G.; Ciepielewski, P.; Jagielski, J.; Baranowski, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ion induced defect generation in graphene was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. A single layer graphene membrane produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foil and then transferred on glass substrate was subjected to helium, carbon, nitrogen, argon and krypton ions bombardment at energies from the range 25 keV to 100 keV. A density of ion induced defects and theirs mean size were estimated by using Raman measurements. Increasing number of defects generated by ion with increase of ion mass and decrease of ion energy was observed. Dependence of ion defect efficiency (defects/ion) on ion mass end energy was proportional to nuclear stopping power simulated by SRIM. No correlation between ion defect efficiency and electronic stopping power was observed.

  13. Plasma Cluster Ions Reduce the IgE-Binding Capacity of House Dust Mite Allergens under a Simulated Indoor Environmental Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Takashi; Fukuoka, Norihiko; Hayashi, Takaharu; Nishikawa, Kazuo; Ono, Kazuhisa; Kawamoto, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    A high level of house dust mite (HDM) allergens in a living environment is a risk factor for both sensitization to these allergens and asthmatic attacks. We previously showed that plasma cluster ions (PCIs) impaired the IgE-binding capacity of atomized crude allergens prepared from Japanese cedar pollen and fungus under experimental conditions. We evaluated the capacity of PCIs to impair the IgE-binding capacity of airborne HDM allergens under a simulated indoor environmental condition. For the determination of the effects of PCIs on HDM allergens under an experimental condition, HDM extract was atomized as aqueous mist into a cylindrical experimental apparatus filled with PCIs. For the evaluation of the effects of PCIs under a simulated natural indoor environmental condition, dried HDM allergens were floated as airborne particles in an acryl cubic apparatus in the presence of PCIs. The IgE-binding capacities of the PCI- and sham-treated HDM allergens were analyzed by an ELISA. The IgE-binding capacity of the HDM allergens was significantly impaired after PCI treatment compared to that after sham treatment under both experimental and simulated environmental conditions. The ELISA results demonstrated that the IgE-binding capacities of HDM allergens after PCI treatment showed 68 and 74% reductions compared to those after sham treatment under the experimental and simulated environmental conditions, respectively. PCIs have the capacity to impair the IgE-binding capacity of airborne HDM allergens in a simulated environmental condition. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Laser ablation generation of clusters from As-Te mixtures, As-Te glass nano-layers and from Au-As-Te nano-composites. Quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánová, Vlasta; Prokeš, Lubomír; Slavíček, Pavel; Alberti, Milan; Havel, Josef

    2015-06-15

    Arsenic tellurides have found important applications in various fields of science, but only a few gold-arsenic tellurides have been reported. Laser ablation synthesis (LAS), a suitable method for the generation of new compounds, has been used to generate clusters from As-Te mixtures, an As-Te glass and Au-As-Te nano-composites. Chalcogenide glass nano-layers prepared via Physical Vapour Deposition - thermal evaporation were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). LAS with laser desorption ionisation quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI QIT TOFMS) was used for the generation and analysis of new AuxAsmTen clusters. The stoichiometry of the clusters was determined via isotopic envelope modelling. A simple procedure for the preparation of the Au-As-Te nano-composite was developed. From As-Te mixtures only five binary AsmTen clusters were generated, while from a glass layer 10 binary AsmTen clusters were identified, because during the deposition of the glass the elements reacted with each other to form a complex three-dimensional (3D) structure. Using LAS on the Au-As-Te nano-composite leads to the formation of six unary Ten (n = 1-6), 16 binary (AsmTen and AuxTen), and 31 ternary AuxAsmTen clusters. LAS was demonstrated to be a useful technique for the generation of AuxAsmTen clusters in the gas phase. More AsmTen clusters were generated from the deposited glass layers than from As-Te mixtures. Most of the ternary AuxAsmTen clusters generated from the nano-composite are reported here for the first time. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Non-thermodynamic approach to including bombardment-induced post-cascade redistribution of point defects in dynamic Monte Carlo code

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, V A; Katardjiev, I V

    2003-01-01

    The redistribution of the elements as a result of atomic relocations produced by the ions and the recoils due to the ballistic and transport processes is investigated by making use of a dynamic Monte Carlo code. Phenomena, such as radiation-enhanced diffusion (RED) and bombardment-induced segregation (BIS) triggered by the ion bombardment may also contribute to the migration of atoms within the target. In order to include both RED and BIS in the code, we suggest an approach which is considered as an extension of the binary collision approximation, i.e. it takes place 'simultaneously' with the cascade and acts as a correction to the particle redistribution for low energies. Both RED and BIS models are based on the common approach to treat the transport processes as a result of a random migration of point defects (vacancies and interstitials) according to a probability given by a pre-defined Gaussian. The models are tested and the influence of the diffusion and segregation is illustrated in the cases of 12 keV ...

  16. Computer simulations of material ejection during C60 and Arm bombardment of octane and β-carotene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palka, G.; Kanski, M.; Maciazek, D.; Garrison, B. J.; Postawa, Z.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations are used to investigate material ejection and fragment formation during keV C60 and Arm (m = 60, 101, 205, 366, 872 and 2953) bombardment of organic solids composed from octane and β-carotene molecules at 0° and 45° impact angle. Both systems are found to sputter efficiently. For the octane system, material removal occurs predominantly by ejection of intact molecules, while fragment emission is a significant ejection channel for β-carotene. A difference in the molecular dimensions is proposed to explain this observation. It has been shown that the dependence of the sputtering yield Y on the primary kinetic energy E and the cluster size n can be expressed in a simplified form if represented in reduced units. A linear and nonlinear dependence of the Y/n on the E/n are identified and the position of the transition point from the linear to nonlinear regions depends on the size of the cluster projectile. The impact angle has a minor influence on the shape of the simplified representation.

  17. Ion beam modification of biological materials in nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center on Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2012-07-01

    Ion interaction with biological objects in nanoscale is a novel research area stemming from applications of low-energy ion beams in biotechnology and biomedicine. Although the ion beam applications in biotechnology and biomedicine have achieved great successes, many mechanisms remain unclear and many new applications are to be explored. We have carried out some research on exploring the mechanisms and new applications besides attaining ion beam induction of mutation breeding and gene transformation. In the studies on the mechanisms, we focused our investigations on the direct interaction in nanoscale between ions and biological living materials. Our research topics have included the low-energy ion range in DNA, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on DNA topological form change and mutation, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on the cell envelope and gene transformation, and molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-low-energy ion irradiation of DNA. In the exploration of new applications, we have started experiments on ion irradiation or bombardment, in the nanoscaled depth or area, of human cells for biomedical research. This paper introduces our experiments and reports interesting results.

  18. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF ELECTRON BACK-BOMBARDMENT INDUCED CURRENT INCREASE IN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Sun, Y. [Argonne; Harris, J. R. [AFRL, NM; Lewellen, J. W. [Los Alamos Natl. Lab.

    2016-09-28

    In this paper we derive analytical expressions for the output current of an un-gated thermionic cathode RF gun in the presence of back-bombardment heating. We provide a brief overview of back-bombardment theory and discuss comparisons between the analytical back-bombardment predictions and simulation models. We then derive an expression for the output current as a function of the RF repetition rate and discuss relationships between back-bombardment, fieldenhancement, and output current. We discuss in detail the relevant approximations and then provide predictions about how the output current should vary as a function of repetition rate for some given system configurations.

  19. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  20. Ion thruster charge-exchange plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Gabriel, S. B.; Kitamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    The electron bombardment ion thruster has been under development for a number of years and during this time, studies of the plasmas produced by the thrusters and their interactions with spacecraft have been evaluated, based on available data. Due to diagnostic techniques used and facility effects, there is uncertainty as to the reliability of data from these early studies. This paper presents data on the flow of the charge-exchange plasma produced just downstream of the thruster's ion optics. The 'end-effect' of a cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to determine ion density and directed ion velocity. Results are compared with data obtained from a retarding potential analyzer-Faraday cup.

  1. Energy Reflected from Solid Targets Bombarded keV Protons and Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Lenskjaer, T.; Sidenius, G.

    1976-01-01

    The energy‐reflection coefficient γ has been measured for keV protons impinging on Cu, Au, and Pb and helium impinging on Si, Ag, Ta, and Pb. The results are obtained by entirely independent techniques in three different laboratories. They agree within the stated accuracies of 10%. For a given...

  2. Effects of Argon-Ion Bombardment on the Basal Plan Surface of MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-20

    13 ?5 . d, 4.b S.. i5 I. INTRODUCTION The anisotropy of the MoS 2 crystal lattice is due to its layered, two- dimensional structure . Cleavage...produced by cleaving natural molybdenite crystals in a N2 -filled glove bag and then transferring them to the XPS sample chamber without exposure to...carbon (probably graphitic) that was present as an impurity in the natural molybdenite crystals . On different samples, this carbon peak shifted in a

  3. Structural and quantitative aspects of radical formation after heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusemund, B.; Hoffmann, A.K.; Weiland, B.; Huettermann, J. [Klinikum Homburg (Germany). Fachrichtung Biophysik

    1997-09-01

    In this report the authors present a summary of their recent attempts aiming at clarifying some basic structural and quantitative aspects of free radical formation in DNA constituents and in DNA as well as of product analysis from nucleotide model compounds. (orig./MG)

  4. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF)n. The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y− produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2), where larger clusters with n≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F−(HF)n, and O2−(HF)n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F−(HF)n (n=1–3), the energies for the loss of HF from F−(HF)3, F−(HF)2, and F−(HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy (ECM). These ECM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O2(HF)n]− (n=1–4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O2H–F−(HF)n and O2−H–F(HF)n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O2(HF)4]− separated into O2H and F−(HF)3. PMID:28966900

  5. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y-(HF) n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF) n . The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y - produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y - (HF) n (Y=F, O 2 ), where larger clusters with n ≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F - (HF) n , and O 2 - (HF) n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F - (HF) n ( n =1-3), the energies for the loss of HF from F - (HF) 3 , F - (HF) 2 , and F - (HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy ( E CM ). These E CM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O 2 (HF) n ] - ( n =1-4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O 2 H-F - (HF) n and O 2 - H-F(HF) n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O 2 (HF) 4 ] - separated into O 2 H and F - (HF) 3 .

  6. Transition and post-transition metal ions in borate glasses: Borate ligand speciation, cluster formation, and their effect on glass transition and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möncke, D.; Kamitsos, E. I.; Palles, D.; Limbach, R.; Winterstein-Beckmann, A.; Honma, T.; Yao, Z.; Rouxel, T.; Wondraczek, L.

    2016-09-01

    A series of transition and post-transition metal ion (Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Bi) binary borate glasses was studied with special consideration of the cations impact on the borate structure, the cations cross-linking capacity, and more generally, structure-property correlations. Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies were used for the structural characterization. These complementary techniques are sensitive to the short-range order as in the differentiation of tetrahedral and trigonal borate units or regarding the number of non-bridging oxygen ions per unit. Moreover, vibrational spectroscopy is also sensitive to the intermediate-range order and to the presence of superstructural units, such as rings and chains, or the combination of rings. In order to clarify band assignments for the various borate entities, examples are given from pure vitreous B2O3 to meta-, pyro-, ortho-, and even overmodified borate glass compositions. For binary metaborate glasses, the impact of the modifier cation on the borate speciation is shown. High field strength cations such as Zn2+ enhance the disproportionation of metaborate to polyborate and pyroborate units. Pb2+ and Bi3+ induce cluster formation, resulting in PbOn- and BiOn-pseudophases. Both lead and bismuth borate glasses show also a tendency to stabilize very large superstructural units in the form of diborate polyanions. Far-IR spectra reflect on the bonding states of modifier cations in glasses. The frequency of the measured cation-site vibration band was used to obtain the average force constant for the metal-oxygen bonding, FM-O. A linear correlation between glass transition temperature (Tg) and FM-O was shown for the metaborate glass series. The mechanical properties of the glasses also correlate with the force constant FM-O, though for cations of similar force constant the fraction of tetrahedral borate units (N4) strongly affects the thermal and mechanical properties. For paramagnetic Cu- and Mn-borate glasses, N4 was determined

  7. Ion-Stockmayer clusters: Minima, classical thermodynamics, and variational ground state estimates of Li{sup +}(CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}){sub n} (n = 1–20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curotto, E., E-mail: curotto@arcadia.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038-3295 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Structural optimizations, classical NVT ensemble, and variational Monte Carlo simulations of ion Stockmayer clusters parameterized to approximate the Li{sup +}(CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}){sub n} (n = 1–20) systems are performed. The Metropolis algorithm enhanced by the parallel tempering strategy is used to measure internal energies and heat capacities, and a parallel version of the genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the most important minima. The first solvation sheath is octahedral and this feature remains the dominant theme in the structure of clusters with n ≥ 6. The first “magic number” is identified using the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy, and it marks the completion of the second solvation layer for the lithium ion-nitromethane clusters. It corresponds to the n = 18 system, a solvated ion with the first sheath having octahedral symmetry, weakly bound to an eight-membered and a four-membered ring crowning a vertex of the octahedron. Variational Monte Carlo estimates of the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy reveal that quantum effects further enhance the stability of the n = 18 system relative to its neighbors.

  8. Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In the current report, a design and capabilities of a cluster implantation and deposition apparatus (CIDA) involving two different cluster sources are described. The clusters produced from gas precursors (Ar, N etc.) by PuCluS-2 can be used to study cluster ion implantation in order to develop...... contributions to the theory of cluster stopping in matter as well as for practical applications requiring ultra-shallow implantation and modification of surfaces on the nanoscale. Metal clusters from the magnetron cluster source are of interest for the production of optical sensors to detect specific biological...

  9. Genetic transformation of banana and plantain (Musa spp.) via particle bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sági, L; Panis, B; Remy, S; Schoofs, H; De Smet, K; Swennen, R; Cammue, B P

    1995-05-01

    We have developed a simple protocol to allow the production of transgenic banana plants. Foreign genes were delivered into embryogenic suspension cells using accelerated particles coated with DNA. Bombardment parameters were optimized for a modified particle gun resulting in high levels of transient expression of the beta-glucuronidase gene in both banana and plantain cells. Bombarded banana cells were selected with hygromycin and regenerated into plants. Molecular and histochemical characterization of transformants revealed the stable integration of the transferred genes into the banana genome.

  10. Multi-directional self-ion irradiation of thin gold films: A new strategy for achieving full texture control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seita, Matteo; Muff, Daniel [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Spolenak, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.spolenak@mat.ethz.ch [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Multi-directional self-ion bombardment of Au films. {yields} Extensive selective grain growth leads to single crystal-like films. {yields} Texture rotation is prevented by the multi-directional irradiation process. {yields} Texture rotation rate depends on the film initial defect density. - Abstract: Post-deposition ion bombardment can be employed to convert polycrystalline films into single crystals through a process of selective grain growth. Here we report a new technique that enables selective grain growth in self-ion bombarded gold films - a system in which the formation of large single crystal domains was prevented by the occurrence of ion-induced texture rotation. Our findings suggest that the extent of the texture rotation is a function of the ion fluence and the film initial microstructure.

  11. Modified morphology of graphene sheets by Argon-atom bombardment: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Kai-Wang; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    By a molecular dynamics method, we simulated the process of Argon-atom bombardment on a graphene sheet with 2720 carbon atoms. The results show that, the damage of the bombardment on the graphene sheet depends not only on the incident energy but also on the particle flux density of Argon atoms. To compare and analyze the effect of the incident energy and the particle flux density in the Argon-atom bombardment, we defined the impact factor on graphene sheet by calculating the broken-hole area. The results indicate that, there is an exponential accumulated-damage for the impact of both the incident energy and the particle flux density and there is a critical incident energy ranging from 20-30 eV/atom in Argon-atom bombardment. Different configurations, such as sieve-like and circle-like graphene can be formed by controlling of different particle flux density as the incident energy is more than the critical value. Our results supply a feasible method on fabrication of porous graphene-based materials for gas-storages and molecular sieves, and it also helps to understand the damage mechanism of graphene-based electronic devices under high particle radiation.

  12. Transient expression of GUS in bombarded embryogenic longleaf, loblolly, and eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex M. Diner; Allan Zipf; Rufina Ward; Yinghua Huang; George Brown

    1999-01-01

    Embryogenic tissue cultures derived from immature zygotic embryos of longleaf, loblolly, and eastern white pine were maintained in culture for up to 2 years, then bombarded with gold particles coated with a gene construct containing the GUS reporter gene fused to an adenine methyltransferase promoter from an algal virus. Physiological expression of GUS was observed in...

  13. Direct thermal effects of the Hadean bombardment did not limit early subsurface habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R. E.; Marchi, S.

    2018-03-01

    Intense bombardment is considered characteristic of the Hadean and early Archean eons, yet some detrital zircons indicate that near-surface water was present and thus at least intervals of clement conditions may have existed. We investigate the habitability of the top few kilometers of the subsurface by updating a prior approach to thermal evolution of the crust due to impact heating, using a revised bombardment history, a more accurate thermal model, and treatment of melt sheets from large projectiles (>100 km diameter). We find that subsurface habitable volume grows nearly continuously throughout the Hadean and early Archean (4.5-3.5 Ga) because impact heat is dissipated rapidly compared to the total duration and waning strength of the bombardment. Global sterilization was only achieved using an order of magnitude more projectiles in 1/10 the time. Melt sheets from large projectiles can completely resurface the Earth several times prior to ∼4.2 Ga but at most once since then. Even in the Hadean, melt sheets have little effect on habitability because cooling times are short compared to resurfacing intervals, allowing subsurface biospheres to be locally re-established by groundwater infiltration between major impacts. Therefore the subsurface is always habitable somewhere, and production of global steam or silicate-vapor atmospheres are the only remaining avenues to early surface sterilization by bombardment.

  14. Theoretical simulations of atomic and polyatomic bombardment of an organic overlayer on a metallic substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Krantzman, K D; Delcorte, A; Garrison, B J

    2003-01-01

    Our previous molecular dynamics simulations on initial test systems have laid the foundation for understanding some of the effects of polyatomic bombardment. In this paper, we describe simulations of the bombardment of a more realistic model system, an overlayer of sec-butyl-terminated polystyrene tetramers on a Ag left brace 1 1 1 right brace substrate. We have used this model system to study the bombardment with Xe and SF sub 5 projectiles at kinetic energies ranging from 0.50 to 5.0 keV. SF sub 5 sputters more molecules than Xe, but a higher percentage of these are damaged rather than ejected intact when the bombarding energy is greater than 0.50 keV. Therefore, at energies comparable to experimental values, the efficiency, measured as the yield-to-damage ratio, is greater with Xe than SF sub 5. Stable and intact molecules are generally produced by upward moving substrate atoms, while fragments are produced by the upward and lateral motion of reflected projectile atoms and fragments from the target molecul...

  15. Bombardment of gas molecules on single graphene layer at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, Ramki [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyun [Department of Aerospace and System Engineering and Research Center for Aircraft Parts Technology, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Sung [Future Propulsion Center, Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-09

    Graphite is widely used as a material for rocket-nozzle inserts due to its excellent thermo-physical properties as well as low density. During the operation of rockets, the surface of the graphite nozzle is subjected to very high heat fluxes and the undesirable erosion of the surface occurs due to the bombardment of gas molecules with high kinetic energy, which causes a significant reduction of nozzle performance. However, the understanding and quantification of such bombardment is not satisfactory due to its complexity: The bond breaking-forming happens simultaneously for the carbon atoms of graphene, some gas molecules penetrate through the surface, some of them are reflected from the surface, etc. In the present study, we perform extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the bombardment phenomena in high temperature environment (several thousand Kelvin). Advanced from the previous studies that have focused on the bombardment by light molecules (e.g., H{sub 2}), we will concentrate on the impact by realistic molecules (e.g., CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). LAMMPS is employed for the MD simulations with NVE ensemble and AIREBO potential for graphene. The molecular understanding of the interaction between graphene and highly energetic gas molecules will enable us to design an efficient thermo-mechanical protection system.

  16. Particle bombardment and the genetic enhancement of crops: myths and realities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altpeter, F.; Baisakh, N.; Beachy, R.; Bock, R.; Capell, T.; Christou, P.; Daniell, H.; Datta, K.; Datta, S.; Dix, P.J.; Fauquet, C.; Huang, N.; Kohli, A.; Mooibroek, H.; Nicholson, L.; Nguyen, T.T.; Nugent, G.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Romano, A.; Somers, D.A.; Stoger, E.; Taylor, N.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2005-01-01

    DNA transfer by particle bombardment makes use of physical processes to achieve the transformation of crop plants. There is no dependence on bacteria, so the limitations inherent in organisms such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens do not apply. The absence of biological constraints, at least until DNA

  17. Particle bombardment and subcellular protein localization analysis in the aquatic plant Egeria densa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Osaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle bombardment is a powerful and relatively easy method for transient expression of genes of interest in plant cells, especially those that are recalcitrant to other transformation methods. This method has facilitated numerous analyses of subcellular localization of fluorescent fusion protein constructs. Particle bombardment delivers genes to the first layer of plant tissue. In leaves of higher plants, epidermal cells are the first cell layer. Many studies have used the epidermal cell layer of onion bulb (Allium cepa as the experimental tissue, because these cells are relatively large. However, onion epidermal cells lack developed plastids (i.e., chloroplasts, thereby precluding subcellular localization analysis of chloroplastic proteins. In this study, we developed a protocol for particle bombardment of the aquatic plant Egeria densa, and showed that it is a useful system for subcellular localization analysis of higher plant proteins. E. densa leaflets contain only two cell layers, and cells in the adaxial layer are sufficiently large for observation. The cells in both layers contain well-developed chloroplasts. We fused fluorescent proteins to conventional plant localization signals for the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, peroxisome, and chloroplast, and used particle bombardment to transiently express these fusion constructs in E. densa leaves. The plant subcellular localization signals functioned normally and displayed the expected distributions in transiently transformed E. densa cells, and even chloroplastic structures could be clearly visualized.

  18. Sputtering of solid nitrogen by keV helium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1993-01-01

    Solid nitrogen has become a standard material among the frozen molecular gases for electronic sputtering. We have combined measurements of sputtering yields and energy spectra from nitrogen bombarded by 4-10 keV helium ions. The data show that the erosion is electronic rather than knockon...

  19. Quantitative multielement analysis using high energy particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. J.; Neal, G. F.; Allen, R. O.

    1975-01-01

    Charged particles ranging in energy from 0.8 to 4.0 MeV are used to induce resonant nuclear reactions, Coulomb excitation (gamma-rays), and X-ray emission in both thick and thin targets. Quantitative analysis is possible for elements from Li to Pb in complex environmental samples, although the matrix can severely reduce the sensitivity. It is necessary to use a comparator technique for the gamma-rays while for X-rays an internal standard can be used. A USGS standard rock is analyzed for a total of 28 elements. Water samples can be analyzed either by nebulizing the sample doped with Cs or Y a thin Formvar film or by extracting the sample onto ion exchange resin which is pressed into a pellet.

  20. Ion source design for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The more frequently used design techniques for the components of broad-beam electron bombardment ion sources are discussed. The approach used emphasizes refractory metal cathodes and permanent-magnet multipole discharge chambers. Design procedures and sample calculations are given for the discharge chamber, ion optics, the cathodes, and the magnetic circuit. Hardware designs are included for the isolator, cathode supports, anode supports, pole-piece assembly, and ion-optics supports. A comparison is made between two-grid and three-grid optics. The designs presented are representative of current technology and are adaptable to a wide range of configurations.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J.M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Cancer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Clusters On This Page What is a cancer cluster? ... the number of cancer cases in the suspected cluster Many reported clusters include too few cancer cases ...

  3. Generation of Au(p)Ag(q)Te(r) clusters via laser ablation synthesis using Au-Ag-Te nano-composite as precursor: quadrupole ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawale, Ravi Madhukar; Amato, Filippo; Alberti, Milan; Havel, Josef

    2014-07-30

    Metal tellurides have applications in various fields of science and technology but only a few gold-silver tellurides have been reported. The laser ablation synthesis (LAS) method allows the preparation of nano-materials from solid substrates. Therefore, this method was selected to synthesise some gold-silver tellurides. Laser desorption ionisation quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI QIT TOF MS) was used for the generation of new Au(p)Ag(q)Te(r) clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to characterise the materials. The stoichiometry of the clusters generated was determined via collision-induced dissociation (CID) and modeling of isotopic patterns. Chemisorption of gold and silver nano-particles on tellurium powder led to the formation of a new kind of Au-Ag-Te nano-composite. The LDI of this nano-composite yielded nine unary (Ag(q), Te(r)), 40 binary (Au(p)Te(r) and Ag(p)Te(r)) and 78 ternary clusters. The stoichiometry of these novel Au(p)Ag(q)Te(r) clusters is reported here for the first time. The new Au-Ag-Te nano-composite was found to be a more suitable precursor for the generation of clusters than the mixtures of the elements. TOF MS was shown to be a useful technique for following the generation of gold-silver tellurides. Knowledge of the cluster stoichiometry could accelerate the further development of novel high-tech materials such as chalcogenide glasses. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. On the origin of microcraters on the surface of ion beam bombardedplant cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvadori, M.C.; Teixeira, F.S.; Brown, I.G.

    2005-06-01

    Ion bombardment of plant and bacterial cellular material has recently been used as a tool for the transfer of exogenous DNA macromolecules into the cell interior region. The precise mechanism that leads to the transfer of macromolecules through the cell envelope is not yet clear, however it has been observed that the ion bombardment is accompanied by the formation of ''microcraters'' on the cell wall, and it is possible that these features provide channels for the macromolecule transfer. Thus the nature and origin of the microcraters is of importance to understanding the DNA transfer phenomenon as well as being of fundamental interest. We report here on some scanning electron microscope observations we have made of onion skin cells that have been subjected to electron beam bombardment of sufficiently high power density to damage the cell wall. The damage seen is much less than and different from the microcraters formed subsequent to ion bombardment. We speculate that the microcraters may originate from the explosive release of gas generated in the biomaterial by ion bombardment.

  5. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-25

    The exciton energy deposited in an argon cluster, (Arn ,< n=20>) using VUV radiation is transferred to softly ionize doped water clusters, ((H2O)n, n=1-9) leading to the formation of non-fragmented clusters. Following the initial excitation, electronic energy is channeled to ionize the doped water cluster while evaporating the Ar shell, allowing identification of fragmented and complete water cluster ions. Examination of the photoionization efficiency curve shows that cluster evaporation from excitons located above 12.6 eV are not enough to cool the energized water cluster ion, and leads to their dissociation to (H2O)n-2H+ (protonated) clusters.

  6. Production of High Energy Ions Near an Ion Thruster Discharge Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, I. G.; Goebel, D. M.; Jameson, K. K.; Wirz, R.; Polk, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several researchers have measured ions leaving ion thruster discharge chambers with energies far greater than measured discharge chamber potentials. Presented in this paper is a new mechanism for the generation of high energy ions and a comparison with measured ion spectra. The source of high energy ions has been a puzzle because they not only have energies in excess of measured steady state potentials, but as reported by Goebel et. al. [1], their flux is independent of the amplitude of time dependent plasma fluctuations. The mechanism relies on the charge exchange neutralization of xenon ions accelerated radially into the potential trough in front of the discharge cathode. Previous researchers [2] have identified the importance of charge exchange in this region as a mechanism for protecting discharge cathode surfaces from ion bombardment. This paper is the first to identify how charge exchange in this region can lead to ion energy enhancement.

  7. Role of grain boundary diffusion on ion-induced composition change in alloys at elevated temperatures. [A/sup +/ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Hayashibara, M.; Ohno, H.; Itoh, N. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Crystalline Materials Science)

    1984-05-01

    We prepared nickel specimens which contain gold impurity only near the grain boundaries and measured thermal segregation of gold onto the surface and the change in the composition induced by bombardment with Ar/sup +/ ions. It is found that irradiation causes composition change over a depth much larger than the thickness of the altered layer for Ni-Au alloys. It is also found that when a two-layered Ni-Au film is bombarded with gold atoms from the nickel side at elevated temperatures, the nickel is protected by a thin gold film segregated on the nickel surface.

  8. Dynamics of light clusters in fragmentation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Akira

    2017-11-01

    Clusters are copiously formed in heavy-ion collisions. This has been a challenging problem for transport models which are usually based on single-nucleon motions. Even in molecular dynamics approaches, clusters should be explicitly treated as quantum correlations. I will review how clusters are introduced in antisymmetrized molecular dynamics, and discuss the strong impacts of cluster correlations on reaction dynamics and observables.

  9. Silkworm eggs: An ideal model for studying the biological effects of low energy Ar{sup +} ion interaction in animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling Lin; Liu Xuelan [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu Jiaping, E-mail: jiapingxu@163.com [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230031 (China); You Zhengying; Zhou Jingbo [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Low energy Ar{sup +} ion beam interactions with silkworm eggs. {yields} Ion beam bombardment as a novel method for gene transfer in silkworm. {yields} Provide evidence for studying the mechanisms of ion beam interaction in animals. - Abstract: The object of the current work was to study low energy Ar{sup +} ion beam interactions with silkworm eggs and thus provide further understanding of the mechanisms involved in ion bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into silkworm eggs. In this paper, using low-energy Ar{sup +} ion beam bombardment combined with piggyBac transposon, we developed a novel method to induce gene transfer in silkworm. Using bombardment conditions optimized for egg-incubation (25 keV with ion fluences of 800 x 2.6 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} in dry state under vacuum), vector pBac{l_brace}3 x P3-EGFPaf{r_brace} and helper plasmid pHA3pig were successfully transferred into the silkworm eggs. Our results obtained from by PCR assay and genomic Southern blotting analysis of the G1 generations provide evidence that low-energy ion beam can generate some craters that play a role in acting as pathways of exogenous DNA molecules into silkworm eggs.

  10. Swift heavy ion induced surface and microstructural evolution in metallic glass thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Hysen, E-mail: hysenthomas@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022, Kerala (India); Thomas, Senoy [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022, Kerala (India); Ramanujan, Raju V. [School of Materials Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue 639 798 (Singapore); Avasthi, D.K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Al- Omari, I.A.; Al-Harthi, Salim [Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, Al Khoud, Muscat (Oman); Anantharaman, M.R., E-mail: mraiyer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022, Kerala (India)

    2012-09-15

    Swift heavy ion induced changes in microstructure and surface morphology of vapor deposited Fe-Ni based metallic glass thin films have been investigated by using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Ion beam irradiation was carried out at room temperature with 103 MeV Au{sup 9+} beam with fluences ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The atomic force microscopy images were subjected to power spectral density analysis and roughness analysis using an image analysis software. Clusters were found in the image of as-deposited samples, which indicates that the film growth is dominated by the island growth mode. As-deposited films were amorphous as evidenced from X-ray diffraction; however, high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed a short range atomic order in the samples with crystallites of size around 3 nm embedded in an amorphous matrix. X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-deposited films after irradiation does not show any appreciable changes, indicating that the passage of swift heavy ions stabilizes the short range atomic ordering, or even creates further amorphization. The crystallinity of the as-deposited Fe-Ni based films was improved by thermal annealing, and diffraction results indicated that ion beam irradiation on annealed samples results in grain fragmentation. On bombarding annealed films, the surface roughness of the films decreased initially, then, at higher fluences it increased. The observed change in surface morphology of the irradiated films is attributed to the interplay between ion induced sputtering, volume diffusion and surface diffusion.

  11. Erosion of Be and deposition of C and O due to bombardment with C{sup +} and CO{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, W.; Goldstrass, P.; Linsmeier, Ch. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    The bombardment of Be with 3 and 5 keV C{sup +} and CO{sup +} at normal incidence is investigated experimentally and by computer simulation with the program TRIDYN. The deposited amount of C and O is determined experimentally and found in good agreement with calculated data for C bombardment. Chemical erosion dominates at higher fluences for CO{sup +} bombardment. Calculations are then used to determine the sputter yield of Be at steady state conditions as a function of the plasma edge electron temperature for two C impurity concentrations in the incident D flux, typical for fusion plasmas. The fluence to reach steady state conditions is also investigated. (author)

  12. Successful expression in pollen of various plant species of in vitro synthesized mRNA introduced by particle bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Nishihara, M; Seki, M; Sakamoto, A; Tanaka, K; Irifune, K; Morikawa, H

    1995-05-01

    Gold particles coated with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) mRNA with a 5' cap structure that had been synthesized in vitro were introduced, by use of a pneumatic particle gun, into pollen grains of lily (Lilium longiflorum), freesia (Freesia refracta) and tulip (Tulipa gesneriana). A fluorometric assay for the GUS activity indicated that in vitro synthesized GUS mRNA introduced into these pollen cells by particle bombardment was successfully expressed. GUS activity in extracts of the bombarded lily pollen became detectable fluorometrically within 30 min after bombardment, peaked at 6 h, then gradually decreased. This activity changed as a function of the developmental stage of the pollen cell of lily.

  13. Effect of substrate thickness on ejection of phenylalanine molecules adsorbed on free-standing graphene bombarded by 10 keV C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golunski, M.; Verkhoturov, S. V.; Verkhoturov, D. S.; Schweikert, E. A.; Postawa, Z.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been employed to investigate the effect of substrate thickness on the ejection mechanism of phenylalanine molecules deposited on free-standing graphene. The system is bombarded from the graphene side by 10 keV C60 projectiles at normal incidence and the ejected particles are collected both in transmission and reflection directions. It has been found that the ejection mechanism depends on the substrate thickness. At thin substrates mostly organic fragments are ejected by direct collisions between projectile atoms and adsorbed molecules. At thicker substrates interaction between deforming topmost graphene sheet and adsorbed molecules becomes more important. As this process is gentle and directionally correlated, it leads predominantly to ejection of intact molecules. The implications of the results to a novel analytical approach in Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry based on ultrathin free-standing graphene substrates and a transmission geometry are discussed.

  14. Rehabilitation and construction of bridges damaged in NATo-bombardment of SR Yugoslavia in 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlajić Ljubomir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural engineers from Serbia and nearby countries have long tradition in area of design and construction of bridges. Beside ancient stone bridges from the past centuries, in the second half of the XX century, significant professional and science level in all areas of bridge construction have been achieved. Many of projects from that time have become famous all around the globe and were object of pride for everyone included in realization of those. Regretfully, during seventy eight days, in the period from 24th March till the 10th July 1999, in NATO bombardment of SR Yugoslavia, 44 road, 17 railway and one road railway bridge have been totally or partially destroyed. In this article have been described structural damages, rehabilitation and construction, with short description of characteristic cases of bridges, which have been object of bombardment.

  15. Genetic transformation of Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis (Prasinophyceae, Chlorophyta) using particle bombardment and glass-bead agitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Yingjie; Zheng, Guoting; Qin, Song

    2012-05-01

    Platymonas ( Tetraselmis) subcordiformis is a unicellular marine green alga. It was found to be very sensitive to the herbicide Basta through a sensitivity test indicating it could be employed as a selective agent. The bar gene is a practicable and selectable marker gene. The vector containing the expression cassette of the bar gene was transferred to P. subcordiformis by both particle bombardment and glass-bead agitation and transformants were then selected using Basta. Finally, Southern blotting analysis indicated that the bar gene had been successfully integrated into the nuclear genome of P. subcordiformis using both of the transgenic techniques, with the transformation efficiency of the glass-bead method being slightly higher than that of particle bombardment. This is the first report on stable transformation of P. subcordiformis, and will improve fundamental research and enlarge application of this alga.

  16. Foil analysis of 1.5-GeV proton bombardment of a mercury target

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, L A; Glasgow, D C; Gabriel, T A

    1999-01-01

    The number of reactant nuclei in a series of foils surrounding a container of mercury that has been bombarded by 1.5-GeV protons is calculated and compared with experimental measurements. This procedure is done to aid in the validation of the mercury cross sections used in the design studies of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). It is found that the calculations match the measurements to within the uncertainties inherent in the analysis.

  17. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-12-19

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate in fact contains stable prenucleation ion clusters forming even in undersaturated solution. The cluster formation can be characterized by means of equilibrium thermodynamics, applying a multiple-binding model, which allows for structural preformation. Stable clusters are the relevant species in calcium carbonate nucleation. Such mechanisms may also be important for the crystallization of other minerals.

  18. Probing clustering in excited alpha-conjugate nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borderie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction 40Ca+12C at 25 MeV per nucleon bombarding energy was used to produce α-emission sources. From a careful selection of these sources provided by a complete detection and from comparisons with models of sequential and simultaneous decays, evidence in favor of α-particle clustering from excited 16O, 20Ne and 24Mg is reported.

  19. Probing clustering in excited alpha-conjugate nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borderie, B., E-mail: borderie@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Raduta, Ad.R. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ademard, G.; Rivet, M.F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); De Filippo, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Geraci, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna (Italy); Le Neindre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Ensicaen, Université de Caen, Caen (France); Alba, R.; Amorini, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cardella, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Chatterjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); La Guidara, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Facoltá di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lanzano, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); and others

    2016-04-10

    The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 12}C at 25 MeV per nucleon bombarding energy was used to produce α-emission sources. From a careful selection of these sources provided by a complete detection and from comparisons with models of sequential and simultaneous decays, evidence in favor of α-particle clustering from excited {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg is reported.

  20. Ion-induced desorption from stainless-steel vacuum chambers has been studied with a view to improving the dynamic pressure in the future LEIR ion accumulator ring for the LHC.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice Maximilien

    2002-01-01

    This picture shows part of a vacuum chamber fully equipped with St707 non-evaporable getter (NEG) strips which were bombarded in Linac3 with lead ions at 4.2 MeV/u. A change of the surface morphology is visible where the Pb53+ ions impacted under grazing incidence onto the NEG.

  1. Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yourshaw, Ivan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-07-09

    The diatomic halogen atom-rare gas diatomic complexes KrBr-, XeBr-, and KrCl- are studied in this work by zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy in order to characterize the weak intermolecular diatomic potentials of these species. Also, the ZEKE and threshold photodetachment spectra of the polyatomic clusters ArnBr- (n = 2-9) and ArnI- (n = 2-19) are studied to obtain information about the non-additive effects on the interactions among the atoms. This work is part of an ongoing effort to characterize the pair and many-body potentials of the complete series of rare gas halide clusters. In these studies we obtain information about both the anionic and neutral clusters.

  2. Segregation under low-energy oxygen bombardment in the near-surface region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Kataoka, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We found that a transient region of SIMS profiles was suppressed to less than the native oxide in silicon, with O 2+ bombardment energy of less than 0.2 keV under an incident angle of 0° with respect to the surface normal without oxygen flooding. However, gallium segregated significantly due to oxidation caused by O 2+ bombardment in this condition. We also found that the segregation decreased as the incident angle increased, and that it disappeared at the angle of around 40°, which was verified by comparing SIMS profiles with the HR-RBS profile. These results suggested that the angle of around 40° was the critical angle to prevent segregation. The transient region was almost the same at angles of 0-40°. Therefore, we consider that the energy of 0.2 keV at the angle of around 40° under O 2+ bombardment without oxygen flooding is the optimum SIMS condition for depth profiling in the near-surface region. On the other hand, the profile shift of arsenic depending on the angle was quite different as compared with gallium, but the shift was a minimum at the same critical angle. We expect that more accurate profiles for other impurities can be obtained using this SIMS condition.

  3. Substrate bias effect on crystallinity of polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared by pulsed ion-beam evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Fazlat; Gunji, Michiharu; Yang, Sung-Chae; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Extreme Energy-Density Research Inst., Nagaoka, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    The deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films has been tried by a pulsed ion-beam evaporation method, where high crystallinity and deposition rate have been achieved without heating the substrate. The crystallinity and the deposition rate were improved by applying bias voltage to the substrate, where instantaneous substrate heating might have occurred by ion-bombardment. (author)

  4. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  5. Ion tracking in photocathode rf guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Lewellen

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Projected next-generation linac-based light sources, such as PERL or the TESLA free-electron laser, generally assume, as essential components of their injector complexes, long-pulse photocathode rf electron guns. These guns, due to their design rf pulse durations of many milliseconds to continuous wave, may be more susceptible to ion bombardment damage of their cathodes than conventional rf guns, which typically use rf pulses of microsecond duration. This paper explores this possibility in terms of ion propagation within the gun, and presents a basis for future study of the subject.

  6. N(50) Crater Retention Ages for an Expanded Inventory of Lunar Basins: Evidence for an Early Heavy Bombardment and a Late Heavy Bombardment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert; Burgess, Emily

    2012-01-01

    LOLA topography and LOLA-derived crustal thickness data provide evidence for a population of impact basins on the Moon that is likely a factor 2 larger than the classical lists based on photogeology. Frey (2012) determined N(50) crater retention ages (CRAs) for 83 candidate basins > 300 km in diameter by counting LOLA-identified craters superimposed over the whole area of the basins. For some basins identified in topography or model crustal thickness it is not possible to unambiguously identify the crater rim as is traditionally done. Also, Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs) > 50 km in diameter are recognizable in the mare-filled centers of many basins. Even though these are not apparent in image data, they likely represent buried impact craters superimposed on the basin floor prior to mare infilling and so should be counted in determining the age of the basin. Including these as well as the entire area of the basins improves the statistics, though the error bars are still large when using only craters > 50 km in diameter. The distribution of N(50) CRAs had two distinct peaks which did not depend on whether the basins were named (based on photogeology) or recognized first in topography or crustal thickness data. It also did not depend on basin diameters (both larger and smaller basins made up both peaks) and both peaks persisted even when weaker candidates were excluded. Burgess (2012, unpublished data) redid the counts for 85 basins but improved on the earlier effort by adjusting the counting area where basins overlap. The two peak distribution of N(50) ages was confirmed, with a younger peak at N(50) 40-50 and an older peak at N(50) 80-90 (craters > 50 km diameter per million square km). We suggest this could represent two distinct populations of impactors on the Moon: one producing an Early Heavy Bombardment (EHB) that predates Nectaris and the second responsible for the more widely recognized Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB).

  7. Ion beam technology applications study. [ion impact, implantation, and surface finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Specific perceptions and possible ion beam technology applications were obtained as a result of a literature search and contact interviews with various institutions and individuals which took place over a 5-month period. The use of broad beam electron bombardment ion sources is assessed for materials deposition, removal, and alteration. Special techniques examined include: (1) cleaning, cutting, and texturing for surface treatment; (2) crosslinking of polymers, stress relief in deposited layers, and the creation of defect states in crystalline material by ion impact; and (3) ion implantation during epitaxial growth and the deposition of neutral materials sputtered by the ion beam. The aspects, advantages, and disadvantages of ion beam technology and the competitive role of alternative technologies are discussed.

  8. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate...

  9. Star clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieles, M.

    2006-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of

  10. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  11. Cosmic Bombardment IV: Averting catastrophe in the here-and-now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, L.; Hyde, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Ledebuhr, A.

    1994-09-23

    At the present time, it is at least arguable that large-scale cosmic bombardment has been a major driver of the evolution of the terrestrialbiosphere. The fundamental motivation of the present paper is the (high) likelihood that the advent and rise of the human species hasn`t coincided with the cessation of soft and hard collisions in the Asteroid Belt or in the Oort Cloud, and that we will either stop the cosmic bombardment or it will eventually stop us. In the foregoing, briefly reviewed the prospects for active planetary defenses against cosmic bombardment in the very near-term, employing only technologies which exist now and could be brought-to-bear in a defensive system on a one-decade time-scale. We sketch various means and mechanisms from a physicist`s viewpoint by which such defensive systems might detect threat objects, launch interdiction machinery toward them and operate such machinery in their vicinity to alternately deflect, disperse or vaporize objects in the 0.1-10 km-diameter range, the ones whose size and population constitute the greatest threats to our biosphere. We conclude that active defenses of all types are readily feasible against 0.1 kmdiameter incoming cosmic bomblets and that even complete vaporization-class defenses are feasible against 1 km-diameter class objects of all compositions. When facing Great Extinctors of up to 10 km diameter, the feasible defensive methods depend upon the object`s size and composition. Dispersion defenses are feasible against all threat-classes, as are deflection approaches for bomblets up to {approximately} 10 km diameter; vaporization-level protection is, however, available only against dirty snowballs` of the {approximately} 1--2 km diameter class. Great Extinctors of sizes significantly greater than 10 km diameter challenge contemporary human technology ever more severely; fortunately, they appear to be rare on the several Aeon time-scales over which Sol will shift its spectral class.

  12. Microprojectile Bombardment Transformation of Date Palm Using the Insecticidal Cholesterol Oxidase (ChoA) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Mai A; Saker, Mahmoud M

    2017-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to optimize the transformation system for date palm as a first step toward production of date palm clones resistant to noxious pests. A construct harboring the cholesterol oxidase (ChoA) gene, which renders plant resistance against insect attack, is introduced into embryogenic date palm callus using the PDS-1000/He particle bombardment system. The process involves the establishment of embryogenic callus cultures as well as immature embryo-derived microcalli that are used as target tissues for shooting and optimization of transformation conditions. This chapter in addition explains molecular and histochemical assays conducted to confirm gene integration and expression.

  13. Reducing Back-Bombardment Effect Using Thermionic Cathode in IAE RF Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Murakami, Shio; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Zen, Heishun

    2004-01-01

    We have numerically studied on improvement of electron beam macro-pulse properties from thermionic RF gun [1,2]. Beam properties, such as energy spectrum, macro-pulse duration and emittance were measured with a 2 mm diameter slim thermionic dispenser cathode. Effect of the transverse magnetic field to reduce back-streaming electrons to these properties was studied experimentally. Comparison with measured and numerical results will be discussed. Effect of a non-flat RF input to compensate a decreasing beam energy during macropulse due to a back-bombardment effect will be also presented.

  14. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computer simulations of material ejection during C{sub 60} and Ar{sub m} bombardment of octane and β-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palka, G.; Kanski, M.; Maciazek, D. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Garrison, B.J. [Department of Chemistry, 104 Chemistry Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Postawa, Z., E-mail: zbigniew.postawa@uj.edu.pl [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations are used to investigate material ejection and fragment formation during keV C{sub 60} and Ar{sub m} (m = 60, 101, 205, 366, 872 and 2953) bombardment of organic solids composed from octane and β-carotene molecules at 0° and 45° impact angle. Both systems are found to sputter efficiently. For the octane system, material removal occurs predominantly by ejection of intact molecules, while fragment emission is a significant ejection channel for β-carotene. A difference in the molecular dimensions is proposed to explain this observation. It has been shown that the dependence of the sputtering yield Y on the primary kinetic energy E and the cluster size n can be expressed in a simplified form if represented in reduced units. A linear and nonlinear dependence of the Y/n on the E/n are identified and the position of the transition point from the linear to nonlinear regions depends on the size of the cluster projectile. The impact angle has a minor influence on the shape of the simplified representation.

  16. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  17. Hot-electron influence on L-shell spectra of multicharged Kr ions generated in clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S B; Shlyaptseva, A S; Faenov, A Y; Skobelev, I Y; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Blasco, F; Dorchies, F; Stenz, C; Salin, F; Auguste, T; Dobosz, S; Monot, P; D' Oliveira, P; Hulin, S; Safronova, U I; Fournier, K B

    2002-10-01

    Strong L-shell x-ray emission has been obtained from Kr clusters formed in gas jets and irradiated by 60-500-fs laser pulses. Spectral lines from the F-, Ne- Na-, and Mg-like charge states of Kr have been identified from highly resolved x-ray spectra. Spectral line intensities are used in conjunction with a detailed time-dependent collisional-radiative model to diagnose the electron distribution functions of plasmas formed in various gas jet nozzles with various laser pulse durations. It is shown that L-shell spectra formed by relatively long nanosecond-laser pulses can be well described by a steady-state model without hot electrons when opacity effects are included. In contrast, adequate modeling of L-shell spectra from highly transient and inhomogeneous femtosecond-laser plasmas requires including the influence of hot electrons. It is shown that femtosecond-laser interaction with gas jets from conical nozzles produces plasmas with higher ionization balances than plasmas formed by gas jets from Laval nozzles, in agreement with previous work for femtosecond laser interaction with Ar clusters.

  18. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  19. Real-time scanning tunneling microscopy studies of thin film deposition and ion erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I present my research on the physics of some important processes in the production of thin films. I studied physical vapour deposition (PVD) and thin film modification through ion bombardment using a newly developed, high-speed scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The instrument has

  20. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of low-energy ion-irradiated silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkovsky, Vladimir; Privitera, V.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne

    2009-01-01

     During electron-gun deposition of metal layers on semiconductors, the semiconductor is bombarded with low-energy metal ions creating defects in the outermost surface layer. For many years, it has been a puzzle why deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra of the as-deposited, electron-gun evapor...

  1. Ion beam modifications of defect sub-structure of calcite cleavages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Planar plastic anisotropy has been studied on irradiated calcite cleavages by measurement of micro- hardness. Keywords. Calcite crystals; ion-bombardment; optical microscopy; ... in the near surface composition (Arnold and Peercy 1980). The ultimate physical properties depend on the inherent defects together with those ...

  2. Highly sensitive solids mass spectrometer uses inert-gas ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Mass spectrometer provides a recorded analysis of solid material surfaces and bulk. A beam of high-energy inert-gas ions bombards the surface atoms of a sample and converts a percentage into an ionized vapor. The mass spectrum analyzer separates the vapor ionic constituents by mass-to-charge ratio.

  3. Ion-enhanced growth in planar and structured Mo/Si multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius Johannes Ronald; van den Boogaard, Toine

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale molybdenum/silicon (Mo/Si) multilayer structures are employed as reflective optical elements for wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV, =13.5 nm). When using appropriate ion-beam parameters, Kr+ bombardment and sputtering of a-Si layers is known to suppress layer growth intrinsic

  4. Ultrathin mesoporous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets-constructed hierarchical clusters as high rate capability and long life anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shengming [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Materials Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Heilongjiang University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150080 (China); Xia, Tian, E-mail: xiatian@hlju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Materials Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Heilongjiang University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang, Jingping [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150001 (China); Lu, Feifei [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Materials Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Heilongjiang University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150080 (China); Xu, Chunbo [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Xianfa; Huo, Lihua [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Materials Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Heilongjiang University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150080 (China); Zhao, Hui, E-mail: zhaohui98@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Materials Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Heilongjiang University, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Ultrathin mesoporous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets-constructed hierarchical clusters (UMCN-HCs) have been successfully synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method followed by a subsequent thermolysis treatment. When tested as anode materials for LIBs, UMCN-HCs achieve high reversible capacity, good long cycling life, and rate capability. - Highlights: • UMCN-HCs show high capacity, excellent stability, and good rate capability. • UMCN-HCs retain a capacity of 1067 mAh g{sup −1} after 100 cycles at 100 mA g{sup −1}. • UMCN-HCs deliver a capacity of 507 mAh g{sup −1} after 500 cycles at 2 A g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Herein, Ultrathin mesoporous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets-constructed hierarchical clusters (UMCN-HCs) have been successfully synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method followed by a subsequent thermolysis treatment at 600 °C in air. The products consist of cluster-like Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} microarchitectures, which are assembled by numerous ultrathin mesoporous Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets. When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, UMCN-HCs deliver a high reversible capacity of 1067 mAh g{sup −1} at a current density of 100 mA g{sup −1} after 100 cycles. Even at 2 A g{sup −1}, a stable capacity as high as 507 mAh g{sup −1} can be achieved after 500 cycles. The high reversible capacity, excellent cycling stability, and good rate capability of UMCN-HCs may be attributed to their mesoporous sheet-like nanostructure. The sheet-layered structure of UMCN-HCs may buffer the volume change during the lithiation-delithiation process, and the mesoporous characteristic make lithium-ion transfer more easily at the interface between the active electrode and the electrolyte.

  5. Comparison of electron ionization and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry for the determination of nickel, vanadyl and free-base porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A.J.; Van Berkel, G.J.; Doolittle, F.G.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Fast Atom Bombardment-Mass Spectrometry (FAB-MS) and Electron Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (EI-MS) at 12 and 70 eV, were used to obtain mass spectra of mesoporphyrin IX dimethylester (DME), tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), octaethylporphyrin (OEP), and the metal-loporphyrins, Ni(DME), Ni(TPP), Ni(OEP), VO(TPP), VO(OEP), as well as a VO(II) porphyrin concentrate obtained from the New Albany oil shale bitumen (Mississippian-Devonian). A mixture of dithiothreitol/dithioerythritol (Magic Bullet) was used as the FAB matrix. Greater fragmentation of free-base and metalloporphyrins was observed in FAB mass spectra compared to the EI mass spectra. Adduct ions formed by addition of sulfur and a matrix molecule to the porphyrins were observed. In FAB spectra of the VO(II) complexes, loss of oxygen was noted. The FAB mass spectra of mixtures of VO(II) geoporphyrins are much more complex than corresponding EI mass spectra because of the greater fragmentation and the multiplicity of ions (M{sup +}, M + H, M + 2H, etc.) observed in the FAB mode. Using the matrices investigated, FAB is less suitable for EI for the mass spectrometric analysis of the geoporphyrins.

  6. Reactive ion-plating at low ion energies with an unbalanced magnetron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howson, R.P.; Ja' fer, H.A. (Loughborough Univ. of Technology (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Spencer, A.G. (Loughborough Consultants Ltd. (United Kingdom). Vacuum Coating Group)

    An unbalanced magnetron uses changes in the configuration of the magnetic field, which confines the plasma close to the sputtering cathode, to allow some of it to 'leak' out to impinge on the substrate. A device which can produce ion bombardment of an isolated surface at a bias of over 100 V with a current density of 100 mA cm[sup -2] is described. The dependence of the surface bombardment on process parameters such as magnetron power and gas pressure is reported; a general diminution of the bombardment occurs as the pressure is increased beyond 0.2 Pa, but the effect becomes greater when oxygen replaces argon as the sputtering gas. The operation of the magnetron under conditions using extra electron injection is shown to result in additional ion current, whilst the bias potential is maintained. Reactive sputtering with such a source allows the growing film to be improved in structure whilst the reactive gas is made more reactive which allows a lower partial pressure to be used for the creation of stoichiometric films. Electron injection allows the pressure of the inert sputtering gas to be low, so that operation is possible at pressures giving mean-free paths greater than the source to substrate distance. Line of sight transfer of material having energies appropriate to sputtered material is then possible. (author).

  7. Experiment and analysis on back-bombardment effect in thermionic RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Ikeda, R; Dong, Z W; Masuda, K; Toku, H; Yoshikawa, K; Yamazaki, T

    2001-01-01

    A serious problem for RF guns with thermionic guns is the back-bombardment effect, which makes the operation of the RF guns unstable owing to the instability of the cathode temperature. To find out how to solve the problem, we tried to evaluate the effect of back-bombardment. We have measured the temperature of cathode surface by an infrared radiation thermometer during the generation of electron beams from our S-band thermionic RF gun with 4.5 cavities. As a consequence, it was found that the temperature of cathode surface increased about 15 deg. C while the beam was on. This implies that current density on cathode surface tends to be unstable because the back-streaming electrons give energy to the cathode. We calculated the amount of the energy transfer by means of an energy-balance equation of thermal transport. Then we compared the result with the total energy of back-streaming electrons calculated by a 2-D particle simulation code KUBLAI. By comparison of two results, we could roughly estimate the energy...

  8. Crater densities within young, large craters on Rhea and Dione: Towards understanding the recent Saturnian bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Sanchez-Vahamonde, Carolina; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Kirchoff, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    The cratering flux for the inner Solar System is partially constrained by geochronological measurements of returned lunar samples and martian meteorites combined with cratering studies. For the outer Solar System, minimal constraints on the bombardment history are derived from dynamical simulations, historical observations of cometary impacts onto the gas giants, and cratering studies. Here, in order to specifically resolve the cratering flux experienced by the Saturnian system, we use high resolution Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) data to conduct crater counts on the floors of young, large craters on Rhea and Dione to investigate their relative crater formation age. These two mid-sized moons of Saturn have been shown to have dissimilar crater distributions, which may imply impacts by different populations. Crater diameter and locations of observed small craters between ~100s of meters to ~10s of kilometers within large craters are recorded, where the limit of the smallest crater observable is constrained by the image resolution. Relative crater ages are compared through their cumulative crater density, and populations via the standard R-plot. Ultimately, crater densities within young, large craters on these moons can be compared with crater ages inferred from crystallinity studies using Cassini VIMS data to refine our understanding of the outer Solar System bombardment.

  9. In situ spatial organization of Potato virus A coat protein subunits as assessed by tritium bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratova, L A; Efimov, A V; Dobrov, E N; Fedorova, N V; Hunt, R; Badun, G A; Ksenofontov, A L; Torrance, L; Järvekülg, L

    2001-10-01

    Potato virus A (PVA) particles were bombarded with thermally activated tritium atoms, and the intramolecular distribution of the label in the amino acids of the coat protein was determined to assess their in situ steric accessibility. This method revealed that the N-terminal 15 amino acids of the PVA coat protein and a region comprising amino acids 27 to 50 are the most accessible at the particle surface to labeling with tritium atoms. A model of the spatial arrangement of the PVA coat protein polypeptide chain within the virus particle was derived from the experimental data obtained by tritium bombardment combined with predictions of secondary-structure elements and the principles of packing alpha-helices and beta-structures in proteins. The model predicts three regions of tertiary structure: (i) the surface-exposed N-terminal region, comprising an unstructured N terminus of 8 amino acids and two beta-strands, (ii) a C-terminal region including two alpha-helices, as well as three beta-strands that form a two-layer structure called an abCd unit, and (iii) a central region comprising a bundle of four alpha-helices in a fold similar to that found in tobacco mosaic virus coat protein. This is the first model of the three-dimensional structure of a potyvirus coat protein.

  10. Blackbody-induced radiative dissociation of cationic SF 6 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahinov, I.; Schwalm, D.

    2012-01-01

    The stability of cationic SF5+(SF6)n−1 clusters was investigated by measuring their blackbody-induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates. The clusters were produced in a supersonic expansion ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion-beam trap at room temperature, where their abundances...... and stability of SF6-based clusters....

  11. Harmonic generation in laser-produced plasmas containing atoms, ions and clusters: a review. JMO Series: Attosecond and Strong Field Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    A review of studies of the high-order harmonic generation of laser radiation in laser-produced plasma revealed recent developments in this field. These include new approaches in application of two-colour pumps, generation of extremely broadened harmonics, further developments in harmonic generation in clusters (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes), destructive interference of harmonics from different emitters, new approaches in resonance-induced enhancement of harmonics, applications of high pulse repetition rate lasers for the enhancement of average power of generating harmonics and observation of quantum path signatures, etc. We show that this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range became mature during multiple sets of studies carried out in many laboratories worldwide and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications.

  12. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re at risk of cluster headache. A family history. Having a parent or sibling who has had cluster headache might increase your risk. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  13. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Bergseng, Marta Næss

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  14. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  15. Evolution of ion emission yield of alloys with the nature of the solute. 2: Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, G.; Slodzian, G.

    1977-01-01

    Solid solutions of transition elements in copper, nickel, cobalt, iron, and aluminum matrices were analyzed by observing secondary ion emissions under bombardment with 6.2-keV argon ions. Enchancement of the production of solute-element ions was observed. An ion emission model is proposed according to which the ion yield is governed by the probability of an atom leaving the metal in a preionized state. The energy distribution of the valence electrons of the solute atoms is the bases of the probability calculation.

  16. Comparison of primary monoatomic with primary polyatomic ions for the characterisation of polyesters with static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Royen, Pieter; Taranu, Anca; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS) emerges as one of the most adequate methods for the surface characterisation of polymers with an information depth of essentially one monolayer. The continuing search for increased analytical sensitivity and specificity has led to exploring the use of polyatomic primary ions as an alternative to the traditionally applied monoatomic projectiles. As part of a systematic investigation on polyatomic bombardment of organic and inorganic solids, this paper focuses on selected polyesters. Mass spectra and ion yields are compared for layers deposited on silicon wafers by spincoating solutions with different concentrations of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene adipate) (PBA) and poly(ethylene adipate) (PEA). Accurate mass measurements have been used to support the assignment of the ions and link the composition of the detected ions to the analyte structure. Use of polyatomic projectiles increases the yield of structural ions with a factor of +/-15, +/-30 and +/-10 for PCL, PBA and PEA, respectively, in comparison to bombardment with Ga+ primary ions, while the molecular specificity is improved by the detection of additional high m/z ions. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Evolution of surface morphology of ion sputtered GaAs(1 0 0)

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, D; Chini, T K; Sanyal, M K

    2002-01-01

    In order to explore possible route to fabricate nano-scale semiconductor dots, a series of ion bombardment experiment on GaAs(1 0 0) was undertaken using a high current isotope separator and ion implanter with sup 4 sup 0 Ar sup + ions of an energy of 60 keV incident at an angle of 60 deg. with respect to surface normal. Detailed surface topographical features of the bombarded samples were characterised by atomic force microscopy. To observe the growth of topography with time, the samples were bombarded at a number of doses. At a dose of 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 , no observable topography was developed. At a dose of 2x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 , the topography started to develop in the form of roughness along with islands or dots formation on the crest of waves or hillocks. Similar kind of topography has been observed up to a dose of 1x10 sup 1 sup 8 ions/cm sup 2 , remarkable with the formation of nano-dots with the maximum dimension of a few hundred nanometer. At the dose of 3x10 sup 1 sup 8 ions/c...

  18. About the Clusters Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  19. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: chemical and dynamical effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O. K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.

    2012-04-01

    In order to Improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation upon the nitrogen family (NOy) and ozone (O3), we have modelled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces nitric acid (HNO3) by conversion of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) upon hydrated water clusters H+•(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The introduced chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of NOy during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production of HNO3 with a corresponding loss of N2O5, and ii) a cold season decrease in NOx/NOy-ratio and an increase of O3, in polar regions. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modelled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3 changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the introduced pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOx polar increase in spring-to-summer in the SH, and in spring in the NH. The springtime NOx increase arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. In the southern hemisphere, a statistical significant weakening of the stratospheric jet is altered down to the lower stratosphere, and we argue that it is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by mid-latitude zonal asymmetries in O3 and short-wave heating.

  20. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: Implications for the effect of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O.-K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Santee, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere and in particular upon the nitrogen family and ozone, we have modeled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces HNO3 by conversion of N2O5 upon hydrated water clusters H+·(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of the NOy family during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production and loss of HNO3 and N2O5, respectively, and ii) a cold season decrease and increase in NOx/NOy-ratio and O3, respectively, in the polar regions of both hemispheres. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modeled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOxpolar increase in spring-to-summer in the southern hemisphere, and in spring in the northern hemisphere. The springtime NOxincrease arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. We argue that the weakening of zonal-mean polar winds down to the lower stratosphere, which is statistically significant at the 0.90 level in spring months in the southern hemisphere, is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by the middle and sub-polar latitude zonal asymmetries in O3and short-wave heating.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and ab initio Investigations of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) clusters and MTBE-water clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Tonia M.; Bende, Attila

    2013-03-01

    The structures and energetics of neutral, ionized and protonated methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) clusters and (MTBE)m(H2O)n clusters are investigated by tunable vacuum-UV photoionization mass spectrometry and DFT calculations. While the mass spectra of bare MTBE clusters show unprotonated and protonated clusters ions, the mass spectra of mixed clusters show protonated ions that exhibit magic numbers that correspond to n = m - 2 combinations. Ab initio calculations show that in the larger clusters a multiple proton transfer leads to a protonated water core where all available hydrogen bonds interact with MTBE molecules. The resulting bond structure explains the cluster stability.

  2. Structural improvement of zinc oxide films produced by ion beam assisted reactive sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Köhl, D; Luysberg, M; Wuttig, M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Reactively sputtered Zinc Oxide thin films exhibit low crystalline order when deposited on unheated substrates. To improve the structural order, films are usually deposited onto heated substrates at temperatures of about 200-300 ?C. Nevertheless, techniques that enable room temperature deposition of ZnO films with high structural quality would be advantageous. In this work ion bombardment from an auxiliary ion gun during film growth is employed to improve the crystalline quality. ...

  3. Guided transmission of slow Ne ions through the nanochannels of highly ordered anodic alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2006-01-01

    as a suspended membrane of about 15νm thickness on the aluminium frame to which it belongs. The AlO capillaries were bombarded with 3keV Ne ions. The first results unambiguously show the existence of ion guiding observed at 5° and 7.5° tilt angles of the capillaries compared to the beam direction. To the best...

  4. Preparation and structural characterization of the Ih and the D5h isomers of the endohedral fullerenes Tm3N@C80: icosahedral C80 cage encapsulation of a trimetallic nitride magnetic cluster with three uncoupled Tm3+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tianming; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Beavers, Christine M; Balch, Alan L; Wang, Guangbin; Yee, Gordon T; Shu, Chunying; Xu, Liaosa; Elliott, Bevan; Echegoyen, Luis; Duchamp, James C; Dorn, Harry C

    2008-06-16

    We report an efficient method for the preparation and purification of the Ih and the D5h isomers of Tm3N@C80. Following preparation in a Kratschmer-Huffman electric-arc generator, the Tm3N@C80 isomers were obtained by a chemical separation process followed by a one-stage isomer selective chromatographic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation (pyrenyl, 5PYE column). The HPLC chromatographic retention behavior on a pentabromobenzyl (5PBB) column suggests a charge transfer of approximately 6 electrons; [M3N] 6+@C80(6-) and the chromatographic retention mechanisms of the Ih and the D5h isomers of Tm3N@C80 on both 5PBB and 5PYE columns are discussed. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data demonstrate that the Tm3N cluster has a planar structure but represents a tight fit for trapping the Tm3N cluster inside the I h - and the D 5h -C 80 cages. Specifically, the Tm atoms punch out the cage carbon atoms adjacent to them. The "punched out" effect can be demonstrated by cage radii and pyramidal angles at cage carbon atoms near the Tm atoms. The magnetic susceptibility (chiT) for Tm3N@ Ih -C80 was found to exhibit Curie-Weiss behavior with C = 23.4 emu.K/mol, which is consistent with the calculated value for three uncoupled Tm3+ ions by considering the spin and orbital contributions with no quenching of the orbital angular momentum ( L = 5, S = 1, and J = 6; Ccalcd = 23.3 emu.K/mol). The electrochemical measurements demonstrate that both the Ih and the D5h isomers of Tm3N@C80 have a large electrochemical gap.

  5. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  6. INTERACTION OF SILVER MOLECULAR CLUSTERS, INTRODUCED BY LOW-TEMPERATURE ION EXCHANGE METHOD, WITH NANOPARTICLES OF CdS IN FLUORINE PHOSPHATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Grazhdanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Glasses with metallic and semi-conductive nano-particles appear to be perspective non-linear and luminescent materials of photonics. It was shown in theory that composite optical materials containing semi-conductive CdS-core with Ag shell (or vice versa are optimal for enhancement of non-linear Kerr effect. Interaction of such an ensemble of particles leads to the forming of Ag island structures on the CdS particle, and formation of acanthite Ag2S on the two phases border (CdS-Ag is minimal. In glasses synthesis of CdS quantum dots occurred due to thermal treatment close to glass transition temperature; introduction of silver was realized by low-temperature ion exchange (LIE. The main object of this work is investigation of Ag+ -LIE effect on the growth of CdS nano-particles. Two glasses were explored in this work: without CdS (glass 1 and with CdS (glass 2, processed by LIE at the temperature of 320°С for 10, 20 and 30 minutes and subsequent heat treatment at temperatures of 410°С and 420°С. In case of glass 1, intensive luminescence appears as a result of LIE, and subsequent heat treatment results in surface resonance at λ=410 nm. In case of glass 2, absorbance spectra change appears that is specific for formation of acanthite and weak luminescence shifting to long-wavelength region (from 550 to 700 nm as a result of applying LIE and heat treatment. It indicates the growth of CdS quantum dots. Experiment has shown that quantum efficiency increases to 70% for glass 2 containing CdS quantum dots without LIE, while glass that contains silver shows steep decrease of quantum efficiency to 0%. That decrease is caused by formation of acanthite Ag2S on the surface of CdS quantum dot.

  7. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  8. Fast neutron distributions from Be and C thick targets bombarded with 80 and 160 MeV deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauwels, N.; Laurent, H.; Clapier, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, (IN2P3/CNRS) 91 - Orsay (France); Brandenburg, S.; Beijers, J.P.M.; Zegers, R.G.T. [Kernfysisch Versneller Institute, Groningen (Netherlands); Lebreton, L. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mirea, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucarest (Romania); Saint-Laurent, M.G. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    2000-07-01

    Measured angular and energy distributions of neutrons obtained by bombarding Be and C thick targets with deuterons at 80 and 160 MeV incident energies are reported. The data were obtained using the time-of-flight method. The experimental values are compared with a modelization based on stripping formalization extended for thick targets. (authors)

  9. Sequential Dihydrogen Desorption from Hydride-Protected Atomically Precise Silver Clusters and the Formation of Naked Clusters in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Atanu; Bodiuzzaman, Mohammad; Nag, Abhijit; Jash, Madhuri; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2017-11-28

    We report the formation of naked cluster ions of silver of specific nuclearities, uncontaminated by other cluster ions, derived from monolayer-protected clusters. The hydride and phosphine co-protected cluster, [Ag18(TPP)10H16]2+ (TPP, triphenylphosphine), upon activation produces the naked cluster ion, Ag17+, exclusively. The number of metal atoms present in the naked cluster is almost the same as that in the parent material. Two more naked cluster ions, Ag21+ and Ag19+, were also formed starting from two other protected clusters, [Ag25(DPPE)8H22]3+ and [Ag22(DPPE)8H19]3+, respectively (DPPE, 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane). By systematic fragmentation, naked clusters of varying nuclei are produced from Ag17+ to Ag1+ selectively, with systematic absence of Ag10+, Ag6+, and Ag4+. A seemingly odd number of cluster ions are preferred due to the stability of the closed electronic shells. Sequential desorption of dihydrogen occurs from the cluster ion, Ag17H14+, during the formation of Agn+. A comparison of the pathways in the formation of similar naked cluster ions starting from two differently ligated clusters has been presented. This approach developed bridges the usually distinct fields of gas-phase metal cluster chemistry and solution-phase metal cluster chemistry. We hope that our findings will enrich nanoscience and nanotechnology beyond the field of clusters.

  10. Sputtering of neutral and ionic indium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.; Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Von Nagy-Felsobuki, E.I.

    1993-10-01

    Secondary neutral and secondary ion cluster yields were measured during the sputtering of a polycrystalline indium surface by normally incident {approximately}4 keV Ar{sup +} ions. In the secondary neutral mass spectra, indium clusters as large as In{sub 32} were observed. In the secondary ion mass spectra, indium clusters up to In{sub 18}{sup +} were recorded. Cluster yields obtained from both the neutral and ion channel exhibited a power law dependence on the number of constituent atoms, n, in the cluster, with the exponents measured to be {minus}5.6 and {minus}4. 1, respectively. An abundance drop was observed at n=8, 15, and 16 in both the neutral and ion yield distributions suggesting that the stability of the ion (either secondary ion or photoion) plays a significant role in the observed distributions. In addition, our experiments suggest that unimolecular decomposition of the neutral cluster may also plays an important role in the measured yield distributions.

  11. Influence of energetic ion bombardment on W-C : H coatings deposited with W and WC targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Carvalho, N.M.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Krug, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    Tungsten containing diamond-like carbon (W-C:H) coatings have been produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering using two different target materials. In the first series of coatings, W has been used as target material, and in the second series, WC has been used as target material. In both series of

  12. Engineering the Activity and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth via Substrate Ion Beam Bombardment (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Polym. Compos. 2004, 25, 630−645. (9) De Rosa, I. M.; Sarasini, F.; Sarto, M. S.; Tamburrano, A. EMC impact of advanced carbon fiber/carbon nanotube...Sankaranarayanan, V.; Ramaprabhu, S. Inorganic nanotubes reinforced polyvinylidene fluoride composites as low-cost electromagnetic interference shielding

  13. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Lopaev, D.; Lee, Christopher James; Zoethout, E.; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav; Yakushev, O.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that

  14. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  15. Na Cl-ion pair association in water-DMSO mixtures: Effect of ion pair ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The physical picturethat emerges is that there is a strong contact ion pair (CIP) and strong to moderate solvent separated ion pair(SSIP) in these solutions. Analysis of local ion clusters shows that ions are dominantly solvated by watermolecules. The 12-6-1 potential model predicts running coordination numbers closest to ...

  16. Approximation Clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Approximation Clustering. Clustering within (1+ ε) of the optimum cost. ε is user defined tolerance. For metric spaces even approximating is. hard (below, say 30%). Euclidean k-median in fixed dimension can. be approximated in polynomial time.

  17. Effect of substrate thickness on ejection of phenylalanine molecules adsorbed on free-standing graphene bombarded by 10 keV C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golunski, M. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Krakow (Poland); Verkhoturov, S.V.; Verkhoturov, D.S.; Schweikert, E.A. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Postawa, Z., E-mail: zbigniew.postawa@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Krakow (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Substrate thickness has a prominent effect on the molecular ejection mechanism. • Collisions with projectile atoms leads to molecular ejection at thin substrates. • Interactions with deforming graphene sheet ejects molecules from thicker substrates. • Probability of fragmentation process decreases with the graphene substrate thickness. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been employed to investigate the effect of substrate thickness on the ejection mechanism of phenylalanine molecules deposited on free-standing graphene. The system is bombarded from the graphene side by 10 keV C{sub 60} projectiles at normal incidence and the ejected particles are collected both in transmission and reflection directions. It has been found that the ejection mechanism depends on the substrate thickness. At thin substrates mostly organic fragments are ejected by direct collisions between projectile atoms and adsorbed molecules. At thicker substrates interaction between deforming topmost graphene sheet and adsorbed molecules becomes more important. As this process is gentle and directionally correlated, it leads predominantly to ejection of intact molecules. The implications of the results to a novel analytical approach in Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry based on ultrathin free-standing graphene substrates and a transmission geometry are discussed.

  18. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate corporate social responsibility (CSR) in industrial clusters in the Indian context. We use the definition of CSR as given in the Indian Ministry of Corporate Affairs’ National Voluntary Guidelines (NVGs) for Business Responsibility: ‘the commitment of an enterprise...... sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country....... At the same time, several attempts have been made at promoting the adoption of CSR in MSMEs in Indian industrial clusters. In fact, India has proved to be a kind of laboratory for experimenting with different types of cluster-based CSR and is thus an interesting location in relation to the broader aim...

  19. Anthropogenic perturbations of tropospheric ion composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, G.; Brasseur, G.

    This paper presents a simple model of the vertical distribution of the most abundant positive ions in the troposphere. The model is based on a simple ion chemical scheme, measured rate constants, and observed or calculated atmospheric densities of parent neutral compounds. It suggests that in many cases the most abundant gaseous ions are heavy protonated water cluster ions of pyridine, picoline and lutidine with ammonia molecules attached (pyridinated cluster ions) in the lower troposphere (below 7 km altitude), acetone cluster ions in the upper troposphere (between 7 and 15 km) and methyl cyanide cluster ions above 15 km. The relative abundance of heavy clustered aerosol ions is predicted to be highest near the surface. The model suggests that ion composition could be perturbed as a result of human activities (i.e., increasing emissions of parent neutral species including alkaline compounds), and that in particular, the relative atmospheric abundance of pyridinated water cluster ions is increasing dramatically and should further increase in the future.

  20. ion with phenolate ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) reaction of homoleptic tris-chelated polypyridine ruthenium(II) complexes with phenolate ions is sensitive to the structure of the ligand of the Ru(II) complex as well as of the phenolate ions 1. In recent years 2 the photophysical and photochemical properties of Ru(II) complexes based on ...

  1. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  2. ISOL science at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beene, James R [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Tatum, B Alan [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The Holi eld Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated as a National User Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, producing high quality ISOL beams of short-lived, radioactive nuclei for studies of exotic nuclei, astrophysics research, and various societal applications. The primary driver, the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, produces rare isotopes by bombarding highly refractory targets with light ions. The radioactive isotopes are ionized, formed into a beam, mass selected, injected into the 25-MV Tandem, accelerated, and used in experiments. This article reviews HRIBF and its science.

  3. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  4. Self-consistent versus experimental densities in the ion-ion potential derived using the energy density formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, A.; Vinas, X. (Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia, Univ. Barcelona (Spain)); Diaz, J. (Dept. de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Burjassot (Spain) IFIC, Burjassot (Spain))

    1992-06-01

    We have used the energy density formalism together with Skyrme forces to build up the real part of the ion-ion potential. We have analysed the elastic scattering data for the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca reaction at several bombarding energies including a phenomenological imaginary part. The results obtained using as input the nuclear density derived from electron scattering are compared with those from theoretical semiclassical calculations of different degree of complexity. Finally, we study the role of some properties of the nuclear interactions on some magnitudes that can be compared with the experimental ones. (orig.).

  5. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side. The prob......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side....... The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications...

  6. α-cluster resonances in light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Vladilen; Volya, Alexander; Nurmukhanbetova, Aliya; Nauruzbayev, Dosbol; Rogachev, Grigoriy

    2018-01-01

    Thick target inverse kinematics technique was combined with Time of Flight method to study resonance reactions induced by heavy ions at low energy, to minimize background and to identify various possible nuclear processes in extended target. The 17O, 20Ne spectrum, the cluster and nucleon spectroscopic factors were calculated using cluster-nucleon configuration interaction model.

  7. Ion beam synthesis and characterization of metastable group-IV alloy semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Naoto; Hasegawa, Masataka; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Makita, Yunosuke; Shibata, Hajime [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Katsumata, Hiroshi; Uekusa, Shin-ichiro

    1997-03-01

    New Group-IV metastable alloy semiconductors and their heterostructures based on combinations of C-Si-Ge-Sn are recently attracting interest because of feasible new electronic and optoelectronic application in Si-technology and here research works on synthesis and characterization of the epitaxial heterostructures of Si-C, Si-Sn on Si fabricated by ion implantation together either with ion-beam-induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) or solid phase epitaxial growth (SPEG) have been investigated. Formations of layers of Si{sub 1-y}C{sub y} (y=0.014 at peak concentration) on Si(100) have been performed by high-dose implantation of 17 keV C ions and successive IBIEC with 400 keV Ar or Ge ion bombardments at 300-400degC or SPEG up to 750degC. Crystalline growth by IBIEC has shown a lower growth rate in Si{sub 1-y}C{sub y}/Si than in intrinsic Si due mainly to the strain existence, which was observed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Photoluminescence(PL) measurements have revealed I{sub 1} or G line emissions that are relevant to small vacancy clusters or C pair formation, respectively. The crystalline growth of Si{sub 1-z}Sn{sub z} layers by 110 keV {sup 120}Sn ion implantation (z=0.029 and z=0.058 at peak concentration) into Si(100) followed either by IBIEC or by SPEG has been also investigated. PL emission from both IBIEC-grown and SPEG-grown samples with the lower Sn concentration has shown similar peaks to those by ion-implanted and annealed Si samples with intense I{sub 1} or I{sub 1}-related (Ar) peaks. Present results suggest that IBIEC has a feature for the non-thermal equilibrium fabrication of Si-C and Si-Sn alloy semiconductors. (J.P.N.)

  8. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  9. Saturn’s ring age from bombardment simulation and reflectance fit to Cassini UVIS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Joshua Peter; Esposito, Larry; Bradley, Eric Todd

    2017-10-01

    The age of Saturn’s rings is open question. Our understanding of this question depends heavily on the rate at which infalling meteoritic material impacts the rings, which is a matter of some debate. Recent estimates of this mass flux are between an order of magnitude higher and lower than the estimate given by Cuzzi and Estrada 1998. Given this range, we perform a meteoritic bombardment simulation, using our stochastic Markov-chain based model, which yields fractional-pollution curves over time for the B and C rings of Saturn. Next, using Hapke’s 2012 model for bidirectional reflectance for an intimate mixture of water-ice and pollutant grains, we perform a non-linear least-squares fit to Cassini UVIS data with two free parameters, fractional pollution and surface roughness of the ring particles, with a correction for the optical depth of the rings, to determine the estimated fractional pollution observed by UVIS. We perform this fit with two pollutants, amorphous carbon, and cometary material measured by the Rosetta Alice UV spectrometer of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The fractional pollution value returned by our fit is then used to interpolate ring age along the fractional pollution curves returned by our Markov-chain simulation.

  10. Genetic Transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb. Cultures via Agrobacterium-Mediated and Particle Bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evra Raunie Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L. Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance.

  11. Modeling of evolution of shape of ductile metal disk for isotropic bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Dulustaan R.; Yakovlev, Boris V.; Matveev, Andrei I.; Osipov, Dulustan A.

    2017-11-01

    This work is devoted to a calculation of formation time of a toroidal shape of a flat piece of ductile metal in enrichment of minerals. Gold grains occurring in nature, in most cases, originally have a form of a flat plate (the scaly form). Continuous bombardment of the surface of a piece of gold with surrounding grains of sand during the enrichment of ores in various jigging, separation, and crusher devices results in the piece assuming a toroidal shape. When separating, the shape of the grains in the form of a torus is considered to be the most effective. Therefore, the problem of calculation of the formation time of the toroidal shape of the piece of gold is urgent. In this paper, we propose a physical model for the formation of the toroidal shape of the piece of ductile metal, in which an isotropic, homogeneous flow of particles deforming a plane body (disk) is introduced. Based on the proposed physical model, a mathematical model of evolution of the surface under deformation of a body was developed. A first-order differential equation is obtained with respect to the deformable surface, which is solved by the Runge-Kutta method. As a result of the study, the dependence of the deformed surface on the time was determined.

  12. Electronic and Optical Properties of Aluminum Oxide Before and After Surface Reduction by Ar+ Bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tahir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and optical properties of a-Al2O3 after induced by 3-keV Ar+ sputtering have been studied quantitatively by use of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS spectra. The band gap values of a-Al2O3 was determined from the onset values of the energy loss spectrum to the background level of REELS spectra as a function of time Ar+ bombardment. The bandgap changes from 8.4 eV before sputtering to 6.2 eV after 4 minutes of sputtering.The optical properties of α-Al2O3 thin films have been determined by comparing the experimental cross section obtained from reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy with the theoretical inelastic scattering cross section, deduced from the simulated energy loss function (ELF by using QUEELS-ε(k-REELS software. The peak assignments are based on ELF and compared with reported data on the electronic structure of α-Al2O3 obtained using different techniques. The results demonstrate that the electronic and optical properties before and after surface reduction will provide further understanding in the fundamental properties of α-Al2O3 which will be useful in the design, modeling and analysis of devices applications performance.

  13. Genetic Transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb.) Cultures via Agrobacterium-Mediated and Particle Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Evra Raunie

    2014-01-01

    Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L). Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance. PMID:25295258

  14. Impact spherules as a record of an ancient heavy bombardment of Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B C; Melosh, H J

    2012-05-03

    Impact craters are the most obvious indication of asteroid impacts, but craters on Earth are quickly obscured or destroyed by surface weathering and tectonic processes. Earth’s impact history is inferred therefore either from estimates of the present-day impactor flux as determined by observations of near-Earth asteroids, or from the Moon’s incomplete impact chronology. Asteroids hitting Earth typically vaporize a mass of target rock comparable to the projectile’s mass. As this vapour expands in a large plume or fireball, it cools and condenses into molten droplets called spherules. For asteroids larger than about ten kilometres in diameter, these spherules are deposited in a global layer. Spherule layers preserved in the geologic record accordingly provide information about an impact even when the source crater cannot be found. Here we report estimates of the sizes and impact velocities of the asteroids that created global spherule layers. The impact chronology from these spherule layers reveals that the impactor flux was significantly higher 3.5 billion years ago than it is now. This conclusion is consistent with a gradual decline of the impactor flux after the Late Heavy Bombardment.

  15. ULTRAVIOLET AND INFRARED SPECTRA OF ELECTRON-BOMBARDED SOLID NITROGEN AND METHANE DILUTED IN SOLID NITROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu-Jong; Chuang, Shiang-Jiun; Huang, Tzu-Ping [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, No. 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hui-Fen, E-mail: yjwu@nsrrc.org.tw [Department of Medical and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1 st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-01

    The infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectra of pure solid N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} diluted in solid N{sub 2} (1/100) irradiated with energetic electrons at 10 K were obtained. The IR absorption measurements of the electron-bombarded pure N{sub 2} solid reveal the formation of N{sub 3} and N{sub 3} {sup +}, which was confirmed by the observed electronic transitions A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}<- X {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} of N{sub 3} and A {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} <- X {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup -} of N{sub 3} {sup +}. In the case of N{sub 2} ice containing a small proportion of CH{sub 4}, we have identified the products of irradiated CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} ice, including N{sub 3}, C{sub n} N (n = 1-3), CN{sub 2}, (CN){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}N, HCN{sub 2}, HC{sub 2}N, C(NH){sub 2}, HNC, HCN, CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CN{sup -}, NH{sub 3} {sup +}, and HC{sub 3}N{sup +}. UV absorption measurement of the ice sample was carried out and the possible carriers associated with the observed absorption bands were assigned and discussed.

  16. Characteristics of radiation damage in silicon bombarded with U/sup 235/ fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takibaev, Z.S.; Gorelkinskii, Y.V.; Grishchenko, V.F.; Gerasimenko, N.N.

    1975-10-01

    The ESR method was used in a study of the properties of radiation defects in silicon bombarded with /sup 235/U fission fragments. The source of these fragments was uranium dioxide irradiated, together with silicon, by reactor neutrons. It was established that the main defects generated by fission fragments were tetravacancies (called Si--P3 centers) and centers associated with amorphization (VV centers). An analysis of the distribution function of the concentration of paramagnetic centers demonstrated that individual fission fragments were capable of creating point defects in densities sufficient for the formation of an isolated amorphous region in Si. A continuous amorphous layer near the surface of an Si crystal was observed when the fission fragment density was approx.10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/. An estimate was obtained of the rate of introduction of paramagnetic centers whose average value was approx.10/sup 4/ cm/sup -1/ per fragment. The ESR signal disappeared completely after annealing at approx.600/sup 0/C. (AIP)

  17. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  18. Cluster-inspired Superionic Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hong; Jena, Puru

    Superionic conductors with desirable properties hold the key to the development of next generation of rechargeable metal-ion batteries. In this study, we report a new family of superionic conductors composed by clusters based on the antiperovskite fast-ion conductors. The new lightweight conductor shows larger electrochemical stability window and favorable thermal and mechanical properties, while maintain a high Li+-ionconductivity at room temperature and a low activation energy. We reveal the conduction mechanism of the material by identifying the relation between the orientational symmetry of the cluster rotors and the potential surface felt by the lithium ion. We also find that the mixed phase of the new conductors show further enhanced conductivity.

  19. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric and tandem mass spectrometric studies of some functionalized tetrapyrroles derived from chlorophylls a and b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keely, B.J.; Maxwell, J.R. (Univ. of Bristol (England))

    Fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectra of a number of functionalized tetrapyrroles derived from chlorophylls a and b have been obtained and MS/MS studies used to investigate aspects of the fragmentation behavior of some of them. The application of this approach is demonstrated by the assignment of pheophytin b isolated from a lake sediment where the amount and purity were insufficient for {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies.

  20. Use of monoatomic and polyatomic projectiles for the characterisation of polylactic acid by static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschmans, Bart; Van Royen, Pieter; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2005-01-01

    The application of polyatomic primary ions is a strongly developing branch of static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS), since these projectiles allow a significant increase in the secondary ion yields to be achieved. However, the different limitations and possibilities of certain polyatomic primary ions for use on specific functional classes of samples are still not completely known. This paper compares the use of monoatomic and polyatomic primary ions in S-SIMS for thin layers of polylactic acid (PLA), obtained by spin-coating solutions on silicon wafers. Bombardment with Ga+, Xe+ and SF5+ primary ions allowed the contribution of the projectile mass and number of atoms in the gain in ion yield and molecular specificity (relative importance of high m/z and low m/z signals) to be assessed. Samples obtained by spin-coating solutions with increasing concentration showed that optimal layer thickness depended on the primary ion used. In comparison with the use of Ga+ projectiles, the yield of structural ions increased by a factor of about 1.5 to 2 and by about 7 to 12 when Xe+ and SF5+ primary ion bombardment were applied, respectively. A detailed fragmentation pattern was elaborated to interpret ion signal intensity changes for different projectiles in terms of energy deposition and collective processes in the subsurface, and the internal energy of radical and even-electron precursor ions. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  2. System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, David P.; Browning, James F.

    1998-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  3. Energy dependent ripple growth on Si (100) by N+ ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, D.; Karmakar, P.

    2017-05-01

    The energy dependence of pattern formation on Si (100) surface by N+ ion beam irradiation has been studied. Periodic ripple pattern growth has been found for low energy (5-10 keV) N+ ion bombardment at oblique incidence at a fluence of 7 × 1017 ions/cm2. The wave vector of the ripples is parallel to the ion beam direction which follows the Bradley Harper theory of ripple growth [Bradley et. al, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)]. We also found that the lateral (wavelength) and vertical (roughness) dimensions of the ripples increase with the ion energy. Ion penetration and collision cascade dimensions are calculated by Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). It is found that the roughness is proportional to ion penetration depth whereas the wavelength is proportional to the horizontal width of collision cascade.

  4. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odutemowo, O.S., E-mail: u12052613@tuks.co.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Malherbe, J.B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D.F. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  5. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  6. Structure determination of adipokinetic hormones using fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry; An unknown adipokinetic hormone (AKH-III) from Locusta migratoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heerma, W.; Versluis, C.; Lankhof, H. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Molecular Spectrometry); Oudejans, R.C.H.M.; Kooiman, F.P.; Beenakkers, A.M.T. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Department of Experimental Zoology)

    1991-08-01

    Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry combined with various tandem mass spectrometric techniques and accurate mass measurement were used to elucidate the structure of an unknown biologically active peptide isolated from Locusa migratoria. (author). 23 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 schemes.

  7. Matrix Assisted and/or Laser Desorption Ionization Quadrupole Ion Trap Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of WO3 Clusters Formation in Gas Phase. Nanodiamonds, Fullerene, and Graphene Oxide Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausekar, Mayuri Vilas; Mawale, Ravi Madhukar; Pazdera, Pavel; Havel, Josef

    2018-01-16

    The formation of W x O y+●/-● clusters in the gas phase was studied by laser desorption ionization (LDI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) of solid WO3. LDI produced (WO3) n+ ●/- ● (n = 1-7) clusters. In MALDI, when using nano-diamonds (NDs), graphene oxide (GO), or fullerene (C60) matrices, higher mass clusters were generated. In addition to (WO3) n-● clusters, oxygen-rich or -deficient species were found in both LDI and MALDI (with the total number of clusters exceeding one hundred ≈ 137). This is the first time that such matrices have been used for the generation of(WO3) n+●/-● clusters in the gas phase, while new high mass clusters (WO3) n-● (n = 12-19) were also detected. Graphical Abstract.

  8. Bussines Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiza Pencea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Clusters are complex economic structures in which similar companies, their up-stream and down-stream business partners, universities, research institutes, educational units, various service providers, diverse private and public institutions concentrate geografically, striving to get economies of agglomeration and scale, to capitalize on the resulting spill over effects, to cut costs, to better harness resources, to exchange information and experience, to improve quality, innovation, skills and productivity. By somehow unexpectedly combining competition and cooperation, they form a new, sophisticated stage in the evolution of production structures in quest of higher efficiency. This paper forays into the world of clusters and clusterization, which seem to increasingly capture the interest of businesses, scholars and policy makers. It looks at what clusters are, how they arise, what are their specific features, what benefits and challenges they can generate for companies and for the regions in which they locate and if and how they should be fostered by industrial policy interventions. The conclusion is that clusters can be very important development triggers and therefore they should be encouraged and nurtured by adequate policy measures. They should not only be used as a regular policy tool, but be placed at the very center of the development strategies of emerging economies.

  9. Silkworm eggs: An ideal model for studying the biological effects of low energy Ar + ion interaction in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Lin; Liu, Xuelan; Xu, Jiaping; You, Zhengying; Zhou, Jingbo

    2011-09-01

    The object of the current work was to study low energy Ar + ion beam interactions with silkworm eggs and thus provide further understanding of the mechanisms involved in ion bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into silkworm eggs. In this paper, using low-energy Ar + ion beam bombardment combined with piggyBac transposon, we developed a novel method to induce gene transfer in silkworm. Using bombardment conditions optimized for egg-incubation (25 keV with ion fluences of 800 × 2.6 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 in dry state under vacuum), vector pBac{3 × P3-EGFPaf} and helper plasmid pHA3pig were successfully transferred into the silkworm eggs. Our results obtained from by PCR assay and genomic Southern blotting analysis of the G1 generations provide evidence that low-energy ion beam can generate some craters that play a role in acting as pathways of exogenous DNA molecules into silkworm eggs.

  10. Ion flux and ion distribution function measurements in synchronously pulsed inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brihoum, Melisa; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Joubert, Olivier [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique CNRS, Grenoble Cedex 9, Isere 38054 (France); Gahan, David [Impedans Ltd., Dublin 17 (Ireland); Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Changes in the ion flux and the time-averaged ion distribution functions are reported for pulsed, inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICPs) operated over a range of duty cycles. For helium and argon plasmas, the ion flux increases rapidly after the start of the RF pulse and after about 50 {mu}s reaches the same steady state value as that in continuous ICPs. Therefore, when the plasma is pulsed at 1 kHz, the ion flux during the pulse has a value that is almost independent of the duty cycle. By contrast, in molecular electronegative chlorine/chlorosilane plasmas, the ion flux during the pulse reaches a steady state value that depends strongly on the duty cycle. This is because both the plasma chemistry and the electronegativity depend on the duty cycle. As a result, the ion flux is 15 times smaller in a pulsed 10% duty cycle plasma than in the continuous wave (CW) plasma. The consequence is that for a given synchronous RF biasing of a wafer-chuck, the ion energy is much higher in the pulsed plasma than it is in the CW plasma of chlorine/chlorosilane. Under these conditions, the wafer is bombarded by a low flux of very energetic ions, very much as it would in a low density, capacitively coupled plasma. Therefore, one can extend the operating range of ICPs through synchronous pulsing of the inductive excitation and capacitive chuck-bias, offering new means by which to control plasma etching.

  11. Solar Wind Sputtering Rates of Small Bodies and Ion Mass Spectrometry Detection of Secondary Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Hutcherson, A. C.; Lee, P.; Collier, M. R.; Johnson, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Solar wind interactions with the surfaces of asteroids and small moons eject atoms and molecules from the uppermost several nanometers of regolith grains through a process called sputtering. A small fraction of the sputtered species, called secondary ions, leave the surface in an ionized state, and these are diagnostic of the surface composition. Detection of secondary ions using ion mass spectrometry (IMS) provides a powerful method of analysis due to low backgrounds and high instrument sensitivities. However, the sputtered secondary ion yield and the atomic composition of the surface are not 1-to-1 correlated. Thus, relative yield fractions based on experimental measurements are needed to convert measured spectra to surface composition. Here available experimental results are combined with computationally derived solar wind sputtering yields to estimate secondary ion fluxes from asteroid-sized bodies in the solar system. The Monte Carlo simulation code SDTrimSP is used to estimate the total sputtering yield due to solar wind ion bombardment for a diverse suite of meteorite and lunar soil compositions. Experimentally measured relative secondary ion yields are analyzed to determine the abundance of refractory species (Mg+, Al+, Ca+, and Fe+) relative to Si+, and it is shown that relative abundances indicate whether a body is primitive or has undergone significant geologic reprocessing. Finally, estimates of the sputtered secondary ion fluxes are used to determine the IMS sensitivity required to adequately resolve major element ratios for nominal orbital geometries.

  12. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands......, Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e.......g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco-industrialism...

  13. Study of secondary electron emission from thin carbon targets with swift charged particles: heavy ions, hydrogen ions; Etude experimentale de l`emission electronique secondaire de cibles minces de carbone sous l`impact de projectiles rapides: ions lourds, ions hydrogene (atomiques, moleculaires ou sous forme d`agregats)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billebaud, A.

    1995-07-12

    The main subject of this work is the study of electron emission from the two surfaces of thin solid targets bombarded with swift charged particles. The slowing down of swift ions in matter is mainly due to inelastic interaction with target electrons (ionization, excitation): the energy transfer to target electrons is responsible for the secondary electron emission process. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions of this phenomena are the subject of the first chapter. We focused on secondary electron emission induced by different kind of projectiles on thin carbon foils. In chapter two we describe hydrogen cluster induced electron emission measurement between 40 and 120 keV/proton. These projectiles, composed of several atoms, allowed us to study and highlight collective effects of the electron emission process. We extended our study of electron emission to molecular (H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}) and composite (H{sup -}, H{sup 0}) projectiles at higher energies (<= 2 MeV): we have designed an experimental set-up devoted to electron emission statistics measurements which allowed us to study, among others things, the role of projectile electrons in secondary electron emission. This experiment is described in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter describes new measurements of electron emission induced by energetic (13 MeV/u) and highly charged argon ion provided by the medium energy beam line (SME) of GANIL (Caen), which have been analyzed in the framework of a semi-empirical model of secondary electron emission. This set of experiments brings new results on composite projectile interaction with matter, and on the consequences of high energy deposition in solids. (author).

  14. Ages of Martian basins and their implication for the end of the heavy bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, S. C.; Neukum, G.

    2003-04-01

    Global stratigraphic schemes for planetary bodies are usually based on the most common resurfacing process: the impacts of planetesimals which remain as craters or crater-related features on planetary surfaces. Through this random cratering process, counting of the accumulated number of impact craters on planetary surface units offers a valuable procedure in understanding the chronostratigraphy of a certain object. Recent ground-based observational data indicate a wavy (deviating from a simple power law) size-frequency distribution (SFD) for main belt and near-Earth asteroid populations. Neukum proposed a non-power law SFD for the lunar cratering record (Neukum and Ivanov, 1994). This SFD has kept its shape over a period of more than 4 Gyr. The lunar crater SFD is used to estimate the crater-generating family of projectiles from the lunar crater production function since the imagery of the Moon is the most complete and best investigated among the terrestrial planets. Two lunar crater production functions (PF's) were proposed by W. Hartmann (HPF) and G. Neukum (NPF) (Hartmann and Neukum, 2001). The maximum discrepancy between the HPF and NPF is roughly a factor of 3 for crater diameters near D=6 km. For diameters Dage of these surfaces. The major conclusion is that terrestrial planets are most probably bombarded by a single projectile source, i.e. bodies derived from the asteroid belt. The current understanding of Mars's geologic history is based mainly on crater size-frequency measurements carried out on high-resolution Viking imagery and on an impact chronology model for Mars estimated from observations of planet-crossing asteroids and scaled by the lunar production function, which is the best investigated among terrestrial body surfaces. The similarity to crater size-frequency distributions found in the inner solar system suggests a similar origin of the projectiles, probably mainly stemming from the asteroid belt, and the impact rate Mars has had a lunar

  15. An Archaean heavy bombardment from a destabilized extension of the asteroid belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William F; Vokrouhlický, David; Minton, David; Nesvorný, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Brasser, Ramon; Simonson, Bruce; Levison, Harold F

    2012-05-03

    The barrage of comets and asteroids that produced many young lunar basins (craters over 300 kilometres in diameter) has frequently been called the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB). Many assume the LHB ended about 3.7 to 3.8 billion years (Gyr) ago with the formation of Orientale basin. Evidence for LHB-sized blasts on Earth, however, extend into the Archaean and early Proterozoic eons, in the form of impact spherule beds: globally distributed ejecta layers created by Chicxulub-sized or larger cratering events4. At least seven spherule beds have been found that formed between 3.23 and 3.47 Gyr ago, four between 2.49 and 2.63 Gyr ago, and one between 1.7 and 2.1 Gyr ago. Here we report that the LHB lasted much longer than previously thought, with most late impactors coming from the E belt, an extended and now largely extinct portion of the asteroid belt between 1.7 and 2.1 astronomical units from Earth. This region was destabilized by late giant planet migration. E-belt survivors now make up the high-inclination Hungaria asteroids. Scaling from the observed Hungaria asteroids, we find that E-belt projectiles made about ten lunar basins between 3.7 and 4.1 Gyr ago. They also produced about 15 terrestrial basins between 2.5 and 3.7 Gyr ago, as well as around 70 and four Chicxulub-sized or larger craters on the Earth and Moon, respectively, between 1.7 and 3.7 Gyr ago. These rates reproduce impact spherule bed and lunar crater constraints.

  16. Cometary impact rates on the Moon and planets during the late heavy bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Wiśniowski, T.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The Nice model predicts that the trans-planetary planetesimal disk made a large or even dominant contribution to the cratering in the inner solar system during the late heavy bombardment (LHB). In the presence of evidence that lunar craters and mare basins may be mainly of asteroidal origin, there is a dilemma of the missing comets that is not yet resolved. Aims: We aim to revisit the problem of cometary impact rates on the Moon and the terrestrial planets during the LHB with a flexible model, allowing us to study the influences of physical destruction of comets, the mass of the primordial disk, and the distribution of this mass over the entire size range. Methods: We performed a Monte Carlo study of the dynamics of the cometary LHB projectiles and derive the impact rates by calculating individual collision probabilities for a huge sample of projectile orbits. We used Minimum Orbit Intersection Distances (MOIDs) according to a new scheme introduced here. Different calculations were performed using different models for the physical evolution of comet nuclei and for the properties of the primordial, trans-planetary disk. Results: Based on the capture probability of Jupiter Trojans, we find a best fit radius of the largest LHB comet impacting the Moon for a low-mass primordial disk. For this disk mass, the LHB cratering of the Moon, Mercury and Mars were dominated by asteroids. However, some smaller lunar maria were likely preceded by comet impacts. The volatile delivery to the Earth and Mars by LHB comets was much less than their water inventories. Conclusions: There is no excessive cometary cratering, if the LHB was caused by a late planetary instability in the Nice Model. The Earth and Mars obtained their water very early in their histories. The Noachian water flows on Mars cannot be attributed to the arrival of LHB-related H2O or CO2.

  17. Mixed calcium-magnesium pre-nucleation clusters enrich calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Verch, Andreas; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    It is demonstrated that magnesium and carbonate ions can form pre-nucleation clusters in analogy to calcium carbonate. If a mixed calcium and magnesium solution is brought in contact with carbonate ions, mixed pre-nucleation clusters form. The equilibrium constants for their formation are reported revealing that over the entire range of possible cation mixing ratios, calcium gets enriched over magnesium in the pre-nucleation clusters. This can explain high magnesium contents in amorphous calc...

  18. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. II. Spectral graph analysis of water hydrogen-bonding network and ion aggregate structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-10-01

    Graph theory in mathematics and computer science is the study of graphs that are structures with pairwise connections between any objects. Here, the spectral graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation method are used to describe both morphological variation of ion aggregates in high salt solutions and ion effects on water hydrogen-bonding network structure. From the characteristic value analysis of the adjacency matrices that are graph theoretical representations of ion clusters, ion networks, and water H-bond structures, we obtained the ensemble average eigenvalue spectra revealing intricate connectivity and topology of ion aggregate structure that can be classified as either ion cluster or ion network. We further show that there is an isospectral relationship between the eigenvalue spectra of ion networks in high KSCN solutions and those of water H-bonding networks. This reveals the isomorphic relationship between water H-bond structure and ion-ion network structure in KSCN solution. On the other hand, the ion clusters formed in high NaCl solutions are shown to be graph-theoretically and morphologically different from the ion network structures in KSCN solutions. These observations support the bifurcation hypothesis on large ion aggregate growth mechanism via either ion cluster or ion network formation. We thus anticipate that the present spectral graph analyses of ion aggregate structures and their effects on water H-bonding network structures in high salt solutions can provide important information on the specific ion effects on water structures and possibly protein stability resulting from protein-water interactions.

  19. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. II. Spectral graph analysis of water hydrogen-bonding network and ion aggregate structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-10-21

    Graph theory in mathematics and computer science is the study of graphs that are structures with pairwise connections between any objects. Here, the spectral graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation method are used to describe both morphological variation of ion aggregates in high salt solutions and ion effects on water hydrogen-bonding network structure. From the characteristic value analysis of the adjacency matrices that are graph theoretical representations of ion clusters, ion networks, and water H-bond structures, we obtained the ensemble average eigenvalue spectra revealing intricate connectivity and topology of ion aggregate structure that can be classified as either ion cluster or ion network. We further show that there is an isospectral relationship between the eigenvalue spectra of ion networks in high KSCN solutions and those of water H-bonding networks. This reveals the isomorphic relationship between water H-bond structure and ion-ion network structure in KSCN solution. On the other hand, the ion clusters formed in high NaCl solutions are shown to be graph-theoretically and morphologically different from the ion network structures in KSCN solutions. These observations support the bifurcation hypothesis on large ion aggregate growth mechanism via either ion cluster or ion network formation. We thus anticipate that the present spectral graph analyses of ion aggregate structures and their effects on water H-bonding network structures in high salt solutions can provide important information on the specific ion effects on water structures and possibly protein stability resulting from protein-water interactions.

  20. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c...

  1. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  2. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Svensson, B.G.; Conway, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  3. Coulomb implosion mechanism of negative ion acceleration in laser plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Kando, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Kameshima, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Coulomb implosion mechanism of the negatively charged ion acceleration in laser plasmas is proposed. When a cluster target is irradiated by an intense laser pulse and the Coulomb explosion of positively charged ions occurs, the negative ions are accelerated inward. The maximum energy of negative ions is several times lower than that of positive ions. The theoretical description and Particle-in-Cell simulation of the Coulomb implosion mechanism and the evidence of the negative ion acceleration...

  4. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  5. Sputtering and surface structure modification of gold thin films deposited onto silicon substrates under the impact of 20–160 keV Ar{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammeri, S., E-mail: smammeri@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche Nucléaire d’Alger, B.P. 399, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S. [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie H. Boumediene (USTHB), Faculté de Physique, Laboratoire SNIRM, B.P. 32, El-Alia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Ammi, H.; Dib, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucléaire d’Alger, B.P. 399, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Sputter yields were measured for gold thin films under keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. •RBS analysis was used to derive energy dependence of sputtering yield. •Surface effects under Ar{sup +} ion irradiation were studied by SEM and XRD analyses. -- Abstract: The induced sputtering and surface state modification of Au thin films bombarded by swift Ar{sup +} ions under normal incident angle have been studied over an energy range of (20–160) keV using three complementary techniques: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sputtering yields determined by RBS measurements using a 2 MeV {sup 4}He{sup +} ion beam were found to be consistent with previous data measured within the Ar{sup +} ion energy region E ⩽ 50 keV, which are thus extended to higher bombarding energies. Besides, the SEM and XRD measurements clearly point out that the irradiated Au film surfaces undergo drastic modifications with increasing the Ar{sup +} ion energy, giving rise to the formation of increasingly sized grains of preferred (1 1 1) crystalline orientations. The relevance of different sputtering yield models for describing experimental data is discussed with invoking the observed surface effects induced by the Ar{sup +} ion irradiation.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of weakly bound molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Lisa I-Ching

    1988-11-01

    The infrared spectra of a series of hydrated hydronium cluster ions and of protonated ethane ion are presented. A tandem mass spectrometer is ideally suited to obtaining the spectra of such weakly bound molecular ions. Traditional absorption spectroscopy is not feasible in these situations, so the techniques described in this thesis make use of some consequence of photon absorption with higher sensitivity than simply attenuation of laser power. That consequence is dissociation. By first mass selecting the parent ion under study and then mass selecting the fragment ion formed from dissociation, the near unit detection efficiency of ion counting methods has been used to full advantage.

  7. Ion-induced stress relaxation during the growth of cubic boron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abendroth, B.E.

    2004-08-01

    in this thesis the deposition of cubic boron nitride films by magnetron sputtering is described. The deposition process is analyzed by Langmuir-probe measurement and energy resolved mass spectroscopy. the films are studied by stress measurement, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Discussed are the stress relaxation and the microstructure and bonding characteristics together with the effects of ion bombardement. (HSI)

  8. Cluster Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen

    1999-11-01

    The care of patients with cluster headache has at least two goals: 1) immediately abolishing an ongoing attack and 2) stopping or shortening a bout (a cluster period). The fierceness and the relative brevity of the attacks dictate the use of a fast-acting agent. There are probably three agents fulfilling these criteria: sumatriptan (by subcutaneous injection), oxygen (inhaled through a face mask), and ergotamines (by injection or, perhaps, sublingual tablets). An abundance of data from controlled studies as well as recent clinical experience probably favors sumatriptan as the most effective alternative, the most significant drawback being its high cost. Oxygen inhalation is free of side effects and may be effective but is inconvenient to use. Ergotamines in tablet form act less rapidly, and there are more contraindications to their use. In short-term prophylaxis, however, ergotamine may still be a drug of choice if the timing of the attacks allows planned use of the drug shortly before the attack. If the timing is more irregular, steroids may at least temporarily break a cycle (eg, prednisolone, 60 or 80 mg/d, gradually tapered to zero in 3 to 4 weeks). If more long-lasting prophylaxis is needed or expected, lithium carbonate, 900 mg/d, or verapamil, 360 mg/d, both have reasonable response rates. As for chronic cluster headache, lithium probably will still be the drug of choice. For a very limited group of patients with chronic cluster headache, surgery may be a last resort. The best surgical options are probably radiofrequency rhizotomy or microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

  9. SMART-1 highlights and relevant studies on early bombardment and geological processes on rocky planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foing, B H; Koschny, D; Frew, D; Almeida, M; Zender, J; Heather, D; Peters, S [ESA Research and Scientific Support Department, ESTEC/SCI-S, Postbus 299, 10 ESA Noordwijk (Netherlands); Racca, G D; Marini, A; Stagnaro, L [ESA Scientific Project Department, ESTEC/SCI-PD, Postbus 299, 10 ESA Noordwijk (Netherlands); Josset, J L [Space-X, Space Exploration Institute, Rue Jacquet Droz 1, CH 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Beauvivre, S [Micro-Cameras SA, Neuchatel, Puits-godet 10a, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Grande, M [University of Wales, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kellett, B [Rutherford Appleton Labs, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Huovelin, J [Finnish Meteorology Institute, Helsinki International Airport, Helsinki (Finland); Nathues, A; Mall, U [Max-Planck-Institute for Solar System Research, Lindau (Germany); Ehrenfreund, P [Leiden University, PO Box 9500, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); McCannon, P [ESA Directorate of Technology, ESTEC/TEC, 10 ESA Noordwjik (Netherlands)], E-mail: Bernard.Foing@esa.int

    2008-08-15

    lunar resources. We present here SMART-1 results relevant to the study of the early bombardment and geological processes on rocky planets. Further information and updates on the SMART-1 mission can be found on the ESA Science and Technology web pages, at: http://sci.esa.int/smart-1/.

  10. Post-Hadean transitions in Jack Hills zircon provenance: A signal of the Late Heavy Bombardment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Elizabeth A.; Harrison, T. Mark

    2013-02-01

    system (i.e., Late Heavy Bombardment; 3.95-3.85) may have causal significance.

  11. The Impact Rate on Solar System Satellites During the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-10-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) found that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts was calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). We are calculating impact rates onto the giant planets and their moons in the context of the "Nice II" model (Levison et al. 2011). We find that NK12's assumed influx is an overestimate, by an amount we are quantifying. We will discuss implications for the origin of icy satellites. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Tsiganis, K., Nesvorný, D., Gomes, R., Astron. J. 142, article id. 152 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus 219, 508-510 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  12. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  13. NON-EQUILIBRIUM ELECTRONS IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avestruz, Camille; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Nelson, Kaylea, E-mail: camille.avestruz@yale.edu, E-mail: camille.avestruz@yale.edu [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich measurements of the intracluster medium (ICM) assumes that electrons are in thermal equilibrium with ions in the plasma. However, in the outskirts of galaxy clusters, the electron–ion equilibration timescale can become comparable to the Hubble time, leading to systematic biases in cluster mass estimates and mass-observable scaling relations. To quantify an upper limit of the impact of non-equilibrium electrons, we use a mass-limited sample of simulated galaxy clusters taken from a cosmological simulation with a two-temperature model that assumes the Spitzer equilibration time for the electrons and ions. We show that the temperature bias is more pronounced in more massive and rapidly accreting clusters. For the most extreme case, we find that the bias is of the order of 10% at half of the cluster virial radius and increases to 40% at the edge of the cluster. Gas in filaments is less susceptible to the non-equilibrium effect, leading to azimuthal variations in the temperature bias at large cluster-centric radii. Using mock Chandra observations of simulated clusters, we show that the bias manifests in ultra-deep X-ray observations of cluster outskirts and quantify the resulting biases in hydrostatic mass and cluster temperature derived from these observations. We provide a mass-dependent fitting function for the temperature bias profile, which can be useful for modeling the effect of electron-ion equilibration in galaxy clusters.

  14. Fast atom bombardment mass spectral analysis of three new oxidative products of primaquine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sukesh N.; Dua, V. K.

    2004-03-01

    FAB mass spectrum of 5,5-di-[6-methoxy-8-(4'-amino-1'butyl amino)] quinoline (PI) was recorded in three different concentrations to establish the structure of new oxidative products of primaquine and also the effect of matrix on percentage relative abundance of molecular as well as fragment ions which were demonstrated first time. At three concentrations, three different behaviors of matrix, molecular and fragment ions were observed. At higher concentration (>1 nM) molecular ion behaved as a base peak, but due to side reaction with matrix certain extra peak were also obtained. Thus, the higher concentration was interesting to show the side reaction of analyte with m-nitro-benzyl alcohol (NBA) but not for molecular weight determination. At the lowest concentration (cure of relapsing malaria.

  15. The in situ spatial arrangement of the influenza A virus matrix protein M1 assessed by tritium bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkov, Alexander V.; Goldanskii, Vitalii I.; Baratova, Ludmila A.; Fedorova, Natalia V.; Ksenofontov, Alexander L.; Zhirnov, Oleg P.; Galkin, Alexander V.

    1999-01-01

    Intact influenza A virions were bombarded with thermally activated tritium atoms, and the intramolecular distribution of the label in the matrix protein M1 was analyzed to determine the in situ accessibility of its tryptic fragments. These data were combined with the previously reported x-ray crystal structure of the M1 fragment 2–158 [Sha, B. & Luo, M. (1997) Nat. Struct. Biol. 4, 239–244] and the predicted topology of the C domain (159–252) to propose a model of M1 arrangement in the virus particle. PMID:10393906

  16. Nanoscale topographic pattern formation on Kr{sup +}-bombarded germanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkinson, Joy C.; Madi, Charbel S.; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 9 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The nanoscale pattern formation of Ge surfaces uniformly irradiated by Kr{sup +} ions was studied in a low-contamination environment at ion energies of 250 and 500 eV and at angles of 0 Degree-Sign through 80 Degree-Sign . The authors present a phase diagram of domains of pattern formation occurring as these two control parameters are varied. The results are insensitive to ion energy over the range covered by the experiments. Flat surfaces are stable from normal incidence up to an incidence angle of {theta} = 55 Degree-Sign from normal. At higher angles, the surface is linearly unstable to the formation of parallel-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is parallel to the projection of the ion beam on the surface. For {theta} {>=} 75 Degree-Sign the authors observe perpendicular-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is perpendicular to the ion beam. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those of Madi et al. for Ar{sup +}-irradiated Si but is inconsistent with those of Ziberi et al. for Kr{sup +}-irradiated Ge. The existence of a window of stability is qualitatively inconsistent with a theory based on sputter erosion [R. M. Bradley and J. M. Harper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)] and qualitatively consistent with a model of ion impact-induced mass redistribution [G. Carter and V. Vishnyakov, Phys. Rev. B 54, 17647 (1996)] as well as a crater function theory incorporating both effects [S. A. Norris et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 276 (2011)]. The critical transition angle between stable and rippled surfaces occurs 10 Degree-Sign -15 Degree-Sign above the value of 45 Degree-Sign predicted by the mass redistribution model.

  17. X-ray study of reactive ion etch damage to silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroff, M.; Stuber, M.; Troutt, R.; Gerber, D.; Mittal, S.

    1987-11-01

    Contact resistance measurements, x-ray double-crystal diffraction, and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to evaluate reactive ion etch (RIE) damage to silicon wafers. Wafers were exposed to plasmas at different powers with gas mixtures of CHF3/O2 and O2 only. The CHF3/O2 mixture was typical of a gas mixture used for etching contacts to silicon. The O2 alone was used as a damaging, bombarding gas. Some oxidation of silicon occurs during the O2 bombardment. However, O2 was used to determine the effects of ion bombardment at conditions similar to those that occur during RIE etching of contacts. It has been found that the depth of damage to the underlying silicon increases with cathode bias and that at -550 V the damage is 200-250 Å deep. The damage at -550 V consists of two layers: one is an amorphous and/or polycrystalline silicon layer at the surface 100-125 Å thick. The surface layer contains impurities as a result of the reactive ion etch process. The second single-crystal dilated layer, 100-125 Å thick, lies beneath the amorphous/poly Si layer. The thickness of these layers is the same when either CHF3/O2 or O2 alone are used as the etchant gases.

  18. Synthesis of sputtered thin films in low energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering is a process which gives a highly energetic depositing species. The growing film can be further bombarded with ions of the heavy gas used for sputtering by directing a plasma of it onto the surface. This can be done quite simply by using an unbalanced magnetron. The immersion of an insulating or isolated substrate-film combination in this plasma leads to a self-bias of around 30 V appearing on it's surface and a bombardment of low energy ions of the sputtering gas of several milli-amps per square centimetre. If the residual gas contains a reactive component, to form a compound film, then the gas is made much more reactive and less is needed to form the stoichiometric film. This can take place in a continuously operating system made stable using partial pressure control of the reactive gas with plasma emission monitoring or something similar. It can also be operated when the process of deposition is separated in time from the process of reaction and is repeated to build the film. We have called this process successive-plasma-anodisation (SPA) and it can be achieved by mechanically transferring the substrate between two magnetrons, one to deposit the metal film and one, which is unbalanced, to provide an oxygen plasma. It can also be operated by pulsing the reactive gas under carefully controlled conditions. Examples are given of the synthesis of compound films using low energy ion bombardment with these techniques and it is demonstrated that excellent films of a large range of oxides and nitrides can be made.

  19. Energy Reflection from Gold Bombarded with keV Protons at Various Angles of Incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1976-01-01

    The calorimetric deuterium film method operating at liquid‐helium temperature was used for measuring the energy reflection coefficient γ for 1–10‐keV protons incident on gold at angles of incidence up to 75°. H+2 and H+3 ions were used to obtain the lowest velocities. The growth with angle...

  20. Coulomb implosion mechanism of negative ion acceleration in laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T., E-mail: nakamura.tatsufumi@jaea.go.j [Kansai Photon Science Institute (JAEA), 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fukuda, Y.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Kando, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Kameshima, T.; Pirozhkov, A.S.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Pikuz, T.A.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S.V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute (JAEA), 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2009-07-06

    Coulomb implosion mechanism of the negatively charged ion acceleration in laser plasmas is proposed. When a cluster target is irradiated by an intense laser pulse and the Coulomb explosion of positively charged ions occurs, the negative ions are accelerated inward. The maximum energy of negative ions is several times lower than that of positive ions. We present the theoretical description and Particle-in-Cell simulation results of the Coulomb implosion mechanism, and show the evidence of the negative ion acceleration in the experiments on the high intensity laser pulse interaction with the cluster targets.