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Sample records for cluster ii mission

  1. IntroductionThe Cluster mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fehringer

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission, ESA’s first cornerstone project, together with the SOHO mission, dating back to the first proposals in 1982, was finally launched in the summer of 2000. On 16 July and 9 August, respectively, two Russian Soyuz rockets blasted off from the Russian cosmodrome in Baikonour to deliver two Cluster spacecraft, each into their proper orbit. By the end of August 2000, the four Cluster satellites had reached their final tetrahedral constellation. The commissioning of 44 instruments, both individually and as an ensemble of complementary tools, was completed five months later to ensure the optimal use of their combined observational potential. On 1 February 2001, the mission was declared operational. The main goal of the Cluster mission is to study the small-scale plasma structures in three dimensions in key plasma regions, such as the solar wind, bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail and the auroral zones. With its unique capabilities of three-dimensional spatial resolution, Cluster plays a major role in the International Solar Terrestrial Program (ISTP, where Cluster and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO are the European contributions. Cluster’s payload consists of state-of-the-art plasma instrumentation to measure electric and magnetic fields from the quasi-static up to high frequencies, and electron and ion distribution functions from energies of nearly 0 eV to a few MeV. The science operations are coordinated by the Joint Science Operations Centre (JSOC, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK, and implemented by the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany. A network of eight national data centres has been set up for raw data processing, for the production of physical parameters, and their distribution to end users all over the world. The latest information on the Cluster mission can be found at http://sci.esa.int/cluster/.

  2. IntroductionThe Cluster mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Escoubet

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission, ESA’s first cornerstone project, together with the SOHO mission, dating back to the first proposals in 1982, was finally launched in the summer of 2000. On 16 July and 9 August, respectively, two Russian Soyuz rockets blasted off from the Russian cosmodrome in Baikonour to deliver two Cluster spacecraft, each into their proper orbit. By the end of August 2000, the four Cluster satellites had reached their final tetrahedral constellation. The commissioning of 44 instruments, both individually and as an ensemble of complementary tools, was completed five months later to ensure the optimal use of their combined observational potential. On 1 February 2001, the mission was declared operational. The main goal of the Cluster mission is to study the small-scale plasma structures in three dimensions in key plasma regions, such as the solar wind, bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail and the auroral zones. With its unique capabilities of three-dimensional spatial resolution, Cluster plays a major role in the International Solar Terrestrial Program (ISTP, where Cluster and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO are the European contributions. Cluster’s payload consists of state-of-the-art plasma instrumentation to measure electric and magnetic fields from the quasi-static up to high frequencies, and electron and ion distribution functions from energies of nearly 0 eV to a few MeV. The science operations are coordinated by the Joint Science Operations Centre (JSOC, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK, and implemented by the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany. A network of eight national data centres has been set up for raw data processing, for the production of physical parameters, and their distribution to end users all over the world. The latest information on the Cluster mission can be found at http://sci.esa.int/cluster/.

  3. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    This is the only occasion on which all four of ESA's Cluster II spacecraft will be on display together in Europe. Four Spacecraft, One Mission The unique event takes place near the end of the lengthy assembly and test programme, during which each individual spacecraft is being assembled in sequence, one after the other. Two have already completed their assembly and systems testing and are about to be stored in special containers at IABG prior to shipment to the Baikonur launch site in Kazakhstan next spring. In the case of the other two, flight models 5 and 8, installation of the science payloads has finished, but their exhaustive series of environmental tests at IABG have yet to begin. Following delivery to the launch site next April, the satellites will be launched in pairs in June and July 2000. Two Soyuz rockets, each with a newly designed Fregat upper stage, are being provided by the Russian-French Starsem company. This will be the first time ESA satellites have been launched from the former Soviet Union. Cluster II is a replacement for the original Cluster mission, which was lost during the maiden launch of Ariane 5 in June 1996. ESA, given the mission's importance in its overall strategy in the area of the Sun-Earth connection, decided to rebuild this unique project. ESA member states supported that proposal. On 3 April 1997, the Agency's Science Programme Committee agreed. Cluster II was born. European Teamwork Scientific institutions and industrial enterprises in almost all the 14 ESA member states and the United States are taking part in the Cluster II project. Construction of the eight Cluster / Cluster II spacecraft has been a major undertaking for European industry. Built into each 1200 kg satellite are six propellant tanks, two pressure tanks, eight thrusters, 80 metres of pipework, about 5 km of wiring, 380 connectors and more than 14 000 electrical contacts. All the spacecraft were assembled in the giant clean room at the Friedrichshafen plant of

  4. Massively Clustered CubeSats NCPS Demo Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.; Young, David; Kim, Tony; Houts, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Technologies under development for the proposed Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) will require an un-crewed demonstration mission before they can be flight qualified over distances and time frames representative of a crewed Mars mission. In this paper, we describe a Massively Clustered CubeSats platform, possibly comprising hundreds of CubeSats, as the main payload of the NCPS demo mission. This platform would enable a mechanism for cost savings for the demo mission through shared support between NASA and other government agencies as well as leveraged commercial aerospace and academic community involvement. We believe a Massively Clustered CubeSats platform should be an obvious first choice for the NCPS demo mission when one considers that cost and risk of the payload can be spread across many CubeSat customers and that the NCPS demo mission can capitalize on using CubeSats developed by others for its own instrumentation needs. Moreover, a demo mission of the NCPS offers an unprecedented opportunity to invigorate the public on a global scale through direct individual participation coordinated through a web-based collaboration engine. The platform we describe would be capable of delivering CubeSats at various locations along a trajectory toward the primary mission destination, in this case Mars, permitting a variety of potential CubeSat-specific missions. Cameras on various CubeSats can also be used to provide multiple views of the space environment and the NCPS vehicle for video monitoring as well as allow the public to "ride along" as virtual passengers on the mission. This collaborative approach could even initiate a brand new Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) program for launching student developed CubeSat payloads beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) on future deep space technology qualification missions. Keywords: Nuclear Propulsion, NCPS, SLS, Mars, CubeSat.

  5. THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 × 10 8 yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 × 10 37 W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

  6. THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul, E-mail: antognini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: bird@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: martini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

  7. The Cluster Science Archive and its relevance for multi-missions data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, A.; Escoubet, C. P.; Laakso, H. E.; Perry, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The science data archive of the Cluster mission is a major contribution of the European Space Agency (ESA) to the International Living With a Star program. Known as the Cluster Active Archive (CAA), its availability since 2006 has resulted in a significant increase of the scientific return of this on-going mission. The Cluster science archive (CSA) has been developed in parallel to CAA over the last few years at the European Space Astronomy Center (ESAC) in Madrid, Spain. It is the long-term science archive of the Cluster mission, developed and managed along with all the other ESA science archives. Publicly opened in November 2013, CSA is available in parallel with CAA during a transition period until CAA public closing in early autumn 2014. Our goal here is to present what has been put in place to help geophysicists in their research. We will first talk about some aspects of the CSA user interface (data visualization including particle distribution; user data profiles) and how users can access data remotely (data streaming in Matlab, or via IDL or Python). The second goal is to present unique value added datasets that are now available on the CSA/CAA. These data have been produced by the scientific community, thanks to two EU FP7 projects: ECLAT and MAARBLE. For instance, the polarization and propagation parameters of ULF Pc waves measured by Cluster and Themis (since 2007) are available and cover more than a decade; along with magnetic spectra of Pc waves measured simultaneously by CHAMP and ground-based magnetometers. These data are clearly an outstanding data resource for low frequency waves researchers. Other datasets will be presented to show that CSA/CAA allow much more than downloading Cluster data from a graphical user interface. It's a single point entry that allows studies from micro-scale physics in the tail (e.g. catalogues of dipolarization fronts), to meso- and large-scale M-I coupling studies (e.g. Cluster magnetic footprints based on T96 and TS05

  8. THE TYPE II SUPERNOVA RATE IN z {approx} 0.1 GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE MULTI-EPOCH NEARBY CLUSTER SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, M. L.; Sand, D. J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, C. J.; Pritchet, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Zaritsky, D.; Just, D. W.; Herbert-Fort, S. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hoekstra, H. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sivanandam, S. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Foley, R. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present seven spectroscopically confirmed Type II cluster supernovae (SNe II) discovered in the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey, a supernova survey targeting 57 low-redshift 0.05 < z < 0.15 galaxy clusters with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find the rate of Type II supernovae within R{sub 200} of z {approx} 0.1 galaxy clusters to be 0.026{sup +0.085}{sub -0.018}(stat){sup +0.003}{sub -0.001}(sys) SNuM. Surprisingly, one SN II is in a red-sequence host galaxy that shows no clear evidence of recent star formation (SF). This is unambiguous evidence in support of ongoing, low-level SF in at least some cluster elliptical galaxies, and illustrates that galaxies that appear to be quiescent cannot be assumed to host only Type Ia SNe. Based on this single SN II we make the first measurement of the SN II rate in red-sequence galaxies, and find it to be 0.007{sup +0.014}{sub -0.007}(stat){sup +0.009}{sub -0.001}(sys) SNuM. We also make the first derivation of cluster specific star formation rates (sSFR) from cluster SN II rates. We find that for all galaxy types the sSFR is 5.1{sup +15.8}{sub -3.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(sys) M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }){sup -1}, and for red-sequence galaxies only it is 2.0{sup +4.2}{sub -0.9}(stat) {+-} 0.4(sys) M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }){sup -1}. These values agree with SFRs measured from infrared and ultraviolet photometry, and H{alpha} emission from optical spectroscopy. Additionally, we use the SFR derived from our SNII rate to show that although a small fraction of cluster Type Ia SNe may originate in the young stellar population and experience a short delay time, these results do not preclude the use of cluster SN Ia rates to derive the late-time delay time distribution for SNe Ia.

  9. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. II. EXPANDING THE METALLICITY RANGE FOR OLD CLUSTERS AND UPDATED ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ∼0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = −0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na i, Mg i, Al i, Si i, Ca i, Ti i, Ti ii, Sc ii, V i, Cr i, Mn i, Co i, Ni i, Cu i, Y ii, Zr i, Ba ii, La ii, Nd ii, and Eu ii. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe i, Ca i, Si i, Ni i, and Ba ii. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg i and Zr i. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements.

  10. Integrated-light spectroscopy of globular clusters at the infrared Ca II lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandroff, Taft E.; Zinn, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Integrated-light spectroscopy has been obtained for 27 globular clusters at the Ca II IR triplet. Line strengths and radial velocities have been measured from the spectra. For the well-studied clusters in the sample, the strength of the Ca II lines is very well correlated with previous metallicity estimates. Thus, the triplet is useful as a metallicity indicator in globular cluster integrated-light spectra. The greatly reduced effect of interstellar extinction at these wavelengths (compared to the blue region of the spectrum) has permitted observations of some of the most heavily reddened clusters in the Galaxy. For several such clusters, the Ca II triplet metallicities are in poor agreement with metallicity estimates from IR photometry by Malkan (1981). The strength of an interstellar band at 8621A has been used to estimate the amount of extinction towards these clusters. Using the new metallicity and radial-velocity data, the metallicity distribution, kinematics, and spatial distribution of the disk globular cluster system have been analyzed. Results very similar to those of Zinn (1985) have been found. The relation of the disk globulars to the stellar thick disk is discussed.

  11. ULF wave activity during the 2003 Halloween superstorm: multipoint observations from CHAMP, Cluster and Geotail missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Balasis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine data from a topside ionosphere and two magnetospheric missions (CHAMP, Cluster and Geotail for signatures of ultra low frequency (ULF waves during the exceptional 2003 Halloween geospace magnetic storm, when Dst reached ~−380 nT. We use a suite of wavelet-based algorithms, which are a subset of a tool that is being developed for the analysis of multi-instrument multi-satellite and ground-based observations to identify ULF waves and investigate their properties. Starting from the region of topside ionosphere, we first present three clear and strong signatures of Pc3 ULF wave activity (frequency 15–100 mHz in CHAMP tracks. We then expand these three time intervals for purposes of comparison between CHAMP, Cluster and Geotail Pc3 observations but also to be able to search for Pc4–5 wave signatures (frequency 1–10 mHz into Cluster and Geotail measurements in order to have a more complete picture of the ULF wave occurrence during the storm. Due to the fast motion through field lines in a low Earth orbit (LEO we are able to reliably detect Pc3 (but not Pc4–5 waves from CHAMP. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that ULF wave observations from a topside ionosphere mission are compared to ULF wave observations from magnetospheric missions. Our study provides evidence for the occurrence of a number of prominent ULF wave events in the Pc3 and Pc4–5 bands during the storm and offers a platform to study the wave evolution from high altitudes to LEO. The ULF wave analysis methods presented here can be applied to observations from the upcoming Swarm multi-satellite mission of ESA, which is anticipated to enable joint studies with the Cluster mission.

  12. ESA unveils Spanish antenna for unique space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The newly refurbished antenna, which is located at the Villafranca del Castillo Satellite Tracking Station site (VILSPA) near Madrid, has been selected as the prime communication link with the Cluster II spacecraft. The VIL-1 antenna will play a vital role in ESA's Cluster mission by monitoring and controlling the four spacecraft and by receiving the vast amounts of data that will be returned to Earth during two years of operations. Scheduled for launch in summer 2000, the Cluster quartet will complete the most detailed investigation ever made into the interaction between our pl0anet's magnetosphere - the region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field - and the continuous stream of charged particles emitted by the Sun - the solar wind. This exciting venture is now well under way, following completion of the satellite assembly and test programme and two successful verification flights by the newly developed Soyuz-Fregat launch vehicle. The ESA Flight Acceptance Review Board has accordingly given the go-ahead for final launch preparations at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. VILSPA, ESA and Cluster II Built in 1975, after an international agreement between the European Space Agency and the Spanish government, VILSPA is part of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) Tracking Station Network (ESTRACK). In the last 25 years, VILSPA has supported many ESA and international satellite programmes, including the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), EXOSAT and the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). In addition to supporting the Cluster II mission, it has been designated as the Science Operations Centre for ESA's XMM Newton mission and for the Far-Infrared Space Telescope (FIRST), which is due to launch in 2007. There are now more than half a dozen large dish antennae installed at VILSPA. One of these is the VIL-1 antenna, a 15 metre diameter dish which operates in the S-band radio frequency (1.8 - 2.7 GHz). This antenna has been modernised recently in order

  13. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim; Retzlaff, Jörg; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Schartel, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10 −12 erg s −1 cm −2 (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ 8 and Ω m , yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  14. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Retzlaff, Jörg [ESO, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meisenheimer, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schartel, Norbert [ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10{sup −12} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ {sub 8} and Ω{sub m}, yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  15. Reducing Earth Topography Resolution for SMAP Mission Ground Tracks Using K-Means Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    The K-means clustering algorithm is used to reduce Earth topography resolution for the SMAP mission ground tracks. As SMAP propagates in orbit, knowledge of the radar antenna footprints on Earth is required for the antenna misalignment calibration. Each antenna footprint contains a latitude and longitude location pair on the Earth surface. There are 400 pairs in one data set for the calibration model. It is computationally expensive to calculate corresponding Earth elevation for these data pairs. Thus, the antenna footprint resolution is reduced. Similar topographical data pairs are grouped together with the K-means clustering algorithm. The resolution is reduced to the mean of each topographical cluster called the cluster centroid. The corresponding Earth elevation for each cluster centroid is assigned to the entire group. Results show that 400 data points are reduced to 60 while still maintaining algorithm performance and computational efficiency. In this work, sensitivity analysis is also performed to show a trade-off between algorithm performance versus computational efficiency as the number of cluster centroids and algorithm iterations are increased.

  16. Calix[4]arene supported clusters: a dimer of [Mn(III)Mn(II)] dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Stephanie M; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D; Beavers, Christine M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphinate ligands allow for the transformation of a calix[4]arene supported [Mn(III)(2)Mn(II)(2)] tetramer cluster motif into an unusual [Mn(III)Mn(II)](2) dimer of dimers; the clusters self-assemble in the crystal to form bi-layer arrays reminiscent of the typical packing of calixarene solvates....

  17. Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Wada, Kei [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fukuyama, Keiichi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sako, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sako@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys{sup 295} and His{sup 261}. •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His{sup 261}, which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys{sup 295}, is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys{sup 295}, we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys{sup 295} substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys{sup 295} indirectly and His{sup 261} together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster.

  18. Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Wada, Kei; Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys 295 and His 261 . •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His 261 , which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys 295 , is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys 295 , we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys 295 substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys 295 indirectly and His 261 together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster

  19. Cluster-collision frequency. II. Estimation of the collision rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadon, A.S.; Marlow, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster-collision rates, including effects of cluster morphology and long-range intermolecular forces, are calculated. Identical pairs of icosahedral or dodecahedral carbon tetrachloride clusters of 13, 33, and 55 molecules in two different relative orientations were discussed in the preceding paper [Phys. Rev. A 43, 5483 (1991)]: long-range interaction energies were derived based upon (i) exact calculations of the iterated, or many-body, induced-dipole interaction energies for the clusters in two fixed relative orientations; and (ii) bulk, or continuum descriptions (Lifshitz--van der Waals theory), of spheres of corresponding masses and diameters. In this paper, collision rates are calculated according to an exact description of the rates for small spheres interacting via realistic potentials. Utilizing the interaction energies of the preceding paper, several estimates of the collision rates are given by treating the discrete clusters in fixed relative orientations, by computing rotationally averaged potentials for the discrete clusters, and by approximating the clusters as continuum spheres. For the discrete, highly symmetric clusters treated here, the rates using the rotationally averaged potentials closely approximate the fixed-orientation rates and the values of the intercluster potentials for cluster surface separations under 2 A have negligible effect on the overall collision rates. While the 13-molecule cluster-collision rate differs by 50% from the rate calculated as if the cluster were bulk matter, the two larger cluster-collision rates differ by less than 15% from the macroscopic rates, thereby indicating the transition of microscopic to macroscopic behavior

  20. Stakeholder Orientation in Cruise Lines’ Mission Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Penco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with the extant management literature, mission statements are crucial for the sustainability and growth of any firms and have been considered to be a tool for the strategic management process. Despite the considerable attention awarded to this theme, the role of the mission statement in the strategic management of tourism firms has not been sufficiently highlighted. The present paper tries to bridge this literature gap and aims to (i analyze the content of mission statements; and (ii investigate the stakeholder orientation of cruise line mission statements. We apply a content analysis method to analyze the mission statements of 44 cruise lines, employing three different perspectives: (1 the inclusion of stakeholder groups; (2 mentions of specific “mission” components; (3 reference to four goals usually assigned to mission statements. The analysis was performed using the software package QDA-Miner. The results suggest that it is possible to identify four clusters of firms that present similar content in their mission statements, and that cruise companies tend to reserve a major attention to customers. This contribution presents some valuable research implications mainly useful for researchers and academics, but also maybe of benefit to professionals and investors.

  1. VARIABLE STARS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. NGC 1786

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Smith, Horace A.; De Lee, Nathan; Catelan, Márcio; Pritzl, Barton J.; Borissova, Jura

    2012-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the variable stars in Large Magellanic Cloud globular clusters. The primary goal of this series is to study how RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to their counterparts in Oosterhoff I/II systems. In this paper, we present the results of our new time-series B–V photometric study of the globular cluster NGC 1786. A total of 65 variable stars were identified in our field of view. These variables include 53 RR Lyraes (27 RRab, 18 RRc, and 8 RRd), 3 classical Cepheids, 1 Type II Cepheid, 1 Anomalous Cepheid, 2 eclipsing binaries, 3 Delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables, and 2 variables of undetermined type. Photometric parameters for these variables are presented. We present physical properties for some of the RR Lyrae stars, derived from Fourier analysis of their light curves. We discuss several different indicators of Oosterhoff type which indicate that the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 1786 is not as clear cut as what is seen in most globular clusters.

  2. Probing dark matter with star clusters: a dark matter core in the ultra-faint dwarf Eridanus II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contenta, Filippo; Balbinot, Eduardo; Petts, James A.; Read, Justin I.; Gieles, Mark; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Delorme, Maxime; Gualandris, Alessia

    2018-05-01

    We present a new technique to probe the central dark matter (DM) density profile of galaxies that harnesses both the survival and observed properties of star clusters. As a first application, we apply our method to the `ultra-faint' dwarf Eridanus II (Eri II) that has a lone star cluster ˜45 pc from its centre. Using a grid of collisional N-body simulations, incorporating the effects of stellar evolution, external tides and dynamical friction, we show that a DM core for Eri II naturally reproduces the size and the projected position of its star cluster. By contrast, a dense cusped galaxy requires the cluster to lie implausibly far from the centre of Eri II (>1 kpc), with a high inclination orbit that must be observed at a particular orbital phase. Our results, therefore, favour a DM core. This implies that either a cold DM cusp was `heated up' at the centre of Eri II by bursty star formation or we are seeing an evidence for physics beyond cold DM.

  3. GEOSTAR-II: A Prototype Water Vapor Imager/Sounder for the Path Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Tanner, Alan; Harding, Dennis; Owen, Heather; Soria, Mary; ODwyer, Ian; Ruf, Christopher; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development and progress of the GeoSTAR-II risk reduction activity for the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey PATH Mission. The activity directly addresses areas of technical risk including the system design, low noise receiver production, sub-array development, signal distribution and digital signal processing.

  4. Second Stage (S-II) Plays Key Role in Apollo missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph of the Saturn V Second Stage (S-II) clearly shows the cluster of five powerful J-2 engines needed to boost the Apollo spacecraft into earth orbit following first stage separation. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  5. Multi-Mission SDR, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless transceivers used for NASA space missions have traditionally been highly custom and mission specific. Programs such as the GRC Space Transceiver Radio...

  6. European Space Agency announces contest to "Name the Cluster Quartet"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    1. Contest rules The European Space Agency (ESA) is launching a public competition to find the most suitable names for its four Cluster II space weather satellites. The quartet, which are currently known as flight models 5, 6, 7 and 8, are scheduled for launch from Baikonur Space Centre in Kazakhstan in June and July 2000. Professor Roger Bonnet, ESA Director of Science Programme, announced the competition for the first time to the European Delegations on the occasion of the Science Programme Committee (SPC) meeting held in Paris on 21-22 February 2000. The competition is open to people of all the ESA member states (*). Each entry should include a set of FOUR names (places, people, or things from history, mythology, or fiction, but NOT living persons). Contestants should also describe in a few sentences why their chosen names would be appropriate for the four Cluster II satellites. The winners will be those which are considered most suitable and relevant for the Cluster II mission. The names must not have been used before on space missions by ESA, other space organizations or individual countries. One winning entry per country will be selected to go to the Finals of the competition. The prize for each national winner will be an invitation to attend the first Cluster II launch event in mid-June 2000 with their family (4 persons) in a 3-day trip (including excursions to tourist sites) to one of these ESA establishments: ESRIN (near Rome, Italy): winners from France, Ireland, United Kingdom, Belgium. VILSPA (near Madrid, Spain): winners from The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Finland. ESTEC (near Amsterdam, The Netherlands): winners from Germany, Denmark, Switzerland, Austria. ESOC (in the Rhine Valley, Germany): winners from Italy, Spain , Portugal. During the first Cluster II launch event (June 2000) the chosen four names for the spacecraft will be announced. The grand prize will be: * a trip for the winner and family (4 people) to Paris where ESA's headquarters are

  7. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  8. The Globular Cluster NGC 6402 (M14). II. Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Peña, C.; Catelan, M.; Grundahl, F.; Stephens, A. W.; Smith, H. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present time-series BVI photometry for the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6402 (M14). The data consist of ∼137 images per filter, obtained using the 0.9 and 1.0 m SMARTS telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The images were obtained during two observing runs in 2006–2007. The image-subtraction package ISIS, along with DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME, was used to perform crowded-field photometry and search for variable stars. We identified 130 variables, eight of which are new discoveries. The variable star population is comprised of 56 ab-type RR Lyrae stars, 54 c-type RR Lyrae, 6 type II Cepheids, 1 W UMa star, 1 detached eclipsing binary, and 12 long-period variables. We provide Fourier decomposition parameters for the RR Lyrae, and discuss the physical parameters and photometric metallicity derived therefrom. The M14 distance modulus is also discussed, based on different approaches for the calibration of the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. The possible presence of second-overtone RR Lyrae in M14 is critically addressed, with our results arguing against this possibility. By considering all of the RR Lyrae stars as members of the cluster, we derive =0.589 {{d}}{{a}}{{y}}{{s}}. This, together with the position of the RR Lyrae stars of both Bailey types in the period–amplitude diagram, suggests an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the cluster. Such an intermediate Oosterhoff type is much more commonly found in nearby extragalactic systems, and we critically discuss several other possible indications that may point to an extragalactic origin for this cluster. Based on observations obtained with the 0.9 m and 1 m telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile, operated by the SMARTS consortium.

  9. The Double Star mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Double Star Programme (DSP was first proposed by China in March, 1997 at the Fragrant Hill Workshop on Space Science, Beijing, organized by the Chinese Academy of Science. It is the first mission in collaboration between China and ESA. The mission is made of two spacecraft to investigate the magnetospheric global processes and their response to the interplanetary disturbances in conjunction with the Cluster mission. The first spacecraft, TC-1 (Tan Ce means "Explorer", was launched on 29 December 2003, and the second one, TC-2, on 25 July 2004 on board two Chinese Long March 2C rockets. TC-1 was injected in an equatorial orbit of 570x79000 km altitude with a 28° inclination and TC-2 in a polar orbit of 560x38000 km altitude. The orbits have been designed to complement the Cluster mission by maximizing the time when both Cluster and Double Star are in the same scientific regions. The two missions allow simultaneous observations of the Earth magnetosphere from six points in space. To facilitate the comparison of data, half of the Double Star payload is made of spare or duplicates of the Cluster instruments; the other half is made of Chinese instruments. The science operations are coordinated by the Chinese DSP Scientific Operations Centre (DSOC in Beijing and the European Payload Operations Service (EPOS at RAL, UK. The spacecraft and ground segment operations are performed by the DSP Operations and Management Centre (DOMC and DSOC in China, using three ground station, in Beijing, Shanghai and Villafranca.

  10. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  11. 15th Cluster workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Laakso, Harri; Escoubet, C. Philippe; The Cluster Active Archive : Studying the Earth’s Space Plasma Environment

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000 the ESA Cluster mission has been investigating the small-scale structures and processes of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. This book contains presentations made at the 15th Cluster workshop held in March 2008. It also presents several articles about the Cluster Active Archive and its datasets, a few overview papers on the Cluster mission, and articles reporting on scientific findings on the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause and the magnetotail.

  12. Variable Stars in Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Clusters. II. NGC 1786

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Márcio; Pritzl, Barton J.; De Lee, Nathan; Borissova, Jura

    2012-12-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the variable stars in Large Magellanic Cloud globular clusters. The primary goal of this series is to study how RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to their counterparts in Oosterhoff I/II systems. In this paper, we present the results of our new time-series B-V photometric study of the globular cluster NGC 1786. A total of 65 variable stars were identified in our field of view. These variables include 53 RR Lyraes (27 RRab, 18 RRc, and 8 RRd), 3 classical Cepheids, 1 Type II Cepheid, 1 Anomalous Cepheid, 2 eclipsing binaries, 3 Delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables, and 2 variables of undetermined type. Photometric parameters for these variables are presented. We present physical properties for some of the RR Lyrae stars, derived from Fourier analysis of their light curves. We discuss several different indicators of Oosterhoff type which indicate that the Oosterhoff classification of NGC 1786 is not as clear cut as what is seen in most globular clusters. Based on observations taken with the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium and observations taken at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  13. The BIOPAN experiment MARSTOX II of the FOTON M-3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, P.; Moeller, R.; Rabbow, E.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.; Meyer, C.; Lammer, H.; Douki, T.; Cadet, J.

    2008-09-01

    The experiment MARSTOX II on FOTON M-3 mission (September 14 - 26, 2007) was a further step in the study of the Responses of Organisms to the Martian Environment (ROME) which already started with first ground-based experiments in Mars simulation chambers and with the space experiment MARSTOX I, flown in 2005 in the ESA facility BIOPAN (Fig. 1) on FOTON M-2. The survivability of bacterial spores of B. subtilis, a well-characterized model system for highly resistant microorganisms, was investigated under the extreme environmental conditions as they exist on the surface of Mars. By use of exterrestrial UV radiation and cut-off filters the photoprotection and potential UV-phototoxicity of different minerals of the Martian soil were investigated.In MARSTOX II two further aspects were addressed (i) the influence of different concentrations of dust in the Martian atmosphere, which change the solar irradiance on the surface significantly compared to vacuum exposure under the same conditions (experiment parts 'DUST MARS' and 'DUST SPACE'), and (ii) the survivability of spores under martian atmosphere and pressure exposed to a mars-like spectral irradiance compared to vacuum exposure under the same conditions (experiment parts 'MIXED MARS' and 'MIXED SPACE') (Fig. 2 and 3). After exposure to space during the FOTON M-3 mission the sample analysis was performed at CEA in Grenoble, F, and at DLR in Cologne, D, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the space simulation facilities at DLR. As biological endpoints in these investigations survival and UV-induced DNAphotoproducts were analysed.From the results of MARSTOX II the following conclusions can be drawn: (i) Spores mixed with martian soil analogue are protected only to a low degree against UV radiation. The protective effect of several defined layers of spores mixed with Martian soil analogue were quantified. (ii) The two investigated martian soil analogues, MRS07 (47

  14. Comparative Study of Optical and RF Communication Systems for a Mars Mission - Part II. Unified Value Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Layland, J.; Lesh, J.; Wilson, K.; Sue, M.; Rascoe, D.; Lansing, F.; Wilhelm, M.; Harcke, L.; Chen, C.; hide

    1997-01-01

    In this Par-II report of the Advanced Communications Benefits study, two critical metrics for comparing the benefits of utilizing X-band, Ka-band and Optical frequencies for supporting generic classes of Martian exploration missions have been evaluated.

  15. Photoproduced fluorescent Au(I)@(Ag2/Ag3)-thiolate giant cluster: an intriguing sensing platform for DMSO and Pb(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Jana, Jayasmita; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-01-14

    Synergistic evolution of fluorescent Au(I)@(Ag2/Ag3)-thiolate core-shell particles has been made possible under the Sun in presence of the respective precursor coinage metal compounds and glutathione (GSH). The green chemically synthesized fluorescent clusters are giant (∼600 nm) in size and robust. Among all the common water miscible solvents, exclusively DMSO exhibits selective fluorescence quenching (Turn Off) because of the removal of GSH from the giant cluster. Again, only Pb(II) ion brings back the lost fluorescence (Turn On) leaving aside all other metal ions. This happens owing to the strong affinity of the sulfur donor of DMSO for Pb(II). Thus, employing the aqueous solution containing the giant cluster, we can detect DMSO contamination in water bodies at trace level. Besides, a selective sensing platform has emerged out for Pb(II) ion with a detection limit of 14 × 10(-8) M. Pb(II) induced fluorescence recovery is again vanished by I(-) implying a promising route to sense I(-) ion.

  16. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. THE EFFECTS OF CLUSTER SIZE AND DYNAMICAL STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that magnetic fields from radio jets and lobes powered by their central super massive black holes can be an important source of magnetic fields in the galaxy clusters. This is Paper II in a series of studies where we present self-consistent high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus. We studied 12 different galaxy clusters with virial masses ranging from 1 x 10 14 to 2 x 10 15 M sun . In this work, we examine the effects of the mass and merger history on the final magnetic properties. We find that the evolution of magnetic fields is qualitatively similar to those of previous studies. In most clusters, the injected magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence during the cluster formation process with hierarchical mergers, while the amplification history and the magnetic field distribution depend on the cluster formation and magnetism history. This can be very different for different clusters. The total magnetic energies in these clusters are between 4 x 10 57 and 10 61 erg, which is mainly decided by the cluster mass, scaling approximately with the square of the total mass. Dynamically older relaxed clusters usually have more magnetic fields in their ICM. The dynamically very young clusters may be magnetized weakly since there is not enough time for magnetic fields to be amplified.

  17. [The mission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Moreno, J; Blanch Mon, A

    2000-01-01

    After having made a historical review of the concept of mission statement, of evaluating its importance (See Part I), of describing the bases to create a mission statement from a strategic perspective and of analyzing the advantages of this concept, probably more important as a business policy (See Parts I and II), the authors proceed to analyze the mission statement in health organizations. Due to the fact that a mission statement is lacking in the majority of health organizations, the strategy of health organizations are not exactly favored; as a consequence, neither are its competitive advantage nor the development of its essential competencies. After presenting a series of mission statements corresponding to Anglo-Saxon health organizations, the authors highlight two mission statements corresponding to our social context. The article finishes by suggesting an adequate sequence for developing a mission statement in those health organizations having a strategic sense.

  18. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections

  19. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department's research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department's laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B ampersand R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department's appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R ampersand D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R ampersand D performers chosen to execute the Department's missions

  20. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  1. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, P. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Telles, E. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua Jose Cristino, 77, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Nigoche-Netro, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA), Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Carrasco, E. R., E-mail: plagos@astro.up.pt, E-mail: etelles@on.br, E-mail: nigoche@iaa.es, E-mail: rcarrasco@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory/AURA, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  2. CA II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. III. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF 14 CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Marcionni, N. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grocholski, A. J., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: nmarcionni@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: svillanova@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s{sup −1}, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at −1.1 and −0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age–metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  3. Report of the Secretary of Defense Task Force on DoD Nuclear Weapons Management. Phase II: Review of the DoD Nuclear Mission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schlesinger, James R; Carns, Michael P; Crouch, II, J. D; Gansler, Jacques S; Giambastiani, Jr., Edmund P; Hamre, John J; Miller, Franklin C; Williams, Christopher A; Blackwell, Jr, James A

    2008-01-01

    ...). This report covers Phase II findings and recommendations. In Phase II, the Task Force found that the lack of interest in and attention to the nuclear mission and nuclear deterrence, as discussed in our Phase I report, go well beyond the Air...

  4. Structural insights into the light-driven auto-assembly process of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5-cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Bommer, Martin; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hussein, Rana; Yano, Junko; Dau, Holger; Kern, Jan; Dobbek, Holger; Zouni, Athina

    2017-07-18

    In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven splitting of water at a protein-bound Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster, the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). In the photosynthetic organisms, the light-driven formation of the WOC from dissolved metal ions is a key process because it is essential in both initial activation and continuous repair of PSII. Structural information is required for understanding of this chaperone-free metal-cluster assembly. For the first time, we obtained a structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus without the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. Surprisingly, cluster-removal leaves the positions of all coordinating amino acid residues and most nearby water molecules largely unaffected, resulting in a pre-organized ligand shell for kinetically competent and error-free photo-assembly of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. First experiments initiating (i) partial disassembly and (ii) partial re-assembly after complete depletion of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster agree with a specific bi-manganese cluster, likely a di-µ-oxo bridged pair of Mn(III) ions, as an assembly intermediate.

  5. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  6. Countdown for the Cluster quartet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    the first pair of Clusters on 15 July will be covered live also on the Internet by ESA at http://clusterlaunch.esa.int and also by Spaceflight Now at http://spaceflightnow.com Note for editors. ESA's Cluster II mission will study the complex interaction between the Sun and Earth in unprecedented detail. For the first time, four satellites will fly in close formation above the Earth's poles, studying the magnetic field around our planet and its continual battle with the energetic particles of the solar wind. This groundbreaking mission to explore the magnetosphere and provide the first small-scale, three-dimensional 'map' of near-Earth space is one of the key Cornerstones in ESA's Horizons 2000 long term science programme. For more information on the winning entries, visit the ESA Science Website at: http://sci.esa.int/cluster/competition For interviews with the winners up to 10 July, 2000, please contact: Martine Caparros, tel:+31 71 565 3183, fax: +31 71 565 4101, E-mail: mcaparro@estec.esa.nl Further information on the Cluster II mission - including regular updates from Baikonur - can be found on the Internet at: http://sci.esa.int/cluster/ ESA Communication Department, Media Relations Office Tel: +33(0)1. 53.69.7155 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69 7690 Further information on ESA at http://www.esa.int

  7. Dynamical processes in space: Cluster results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Escoubet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available After 12 years of operations, the Cluster mission continues to successfully fulfil its scientific objectives. The main goal of the Cluster mission, comprised of four identical spacecraft, is to study in three dimensions small-scale plasma structures in key plasma regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, plasmasphere and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied from 20 km to 36 000 km to study the scientific regions of interest at different scales. Since summer 2005, new multi-scale constellations have been implemented, wherein three spacecraft (C1, C2, C3 are separated by 10 000 km, while the fourth one (C4 is at a variable distance ranging between 20 km and 10 000 km from C3. Recent observations were conducted in the auroral acceleration region with the spacecraft separated by 1000s km. We present highlights of the results obtained during the last 12 years on collisionless shocks, magnetopause waves, magnetotail dynamics, plasmaspheric structures, and the auroral acceleration region. In addition, we highlight Cluster results on understanding the impact of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME on the Earth environment. We will also present Cluster data accessibility through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS, and the Cluster Active Archive (CAA, which was implemented to provide a permanent and public archive of high resolution Cluster data from all instruments.

  8. A MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, LluIs; Miquel, Ramon; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Ihara, Yutaka; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Marriner, John; Molla, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z ≤ 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37 +0.17+0.01 -0.12-0.01 ) SNur h 2 and (0.55 +0.13+0.02 -0.11-0.01 ) SNur h 2 (SNux = 10 -12 L -1 xsun yr -1 ) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31 +0.18+0.01 -0.12-0.01 ) SNur h 2 and (0.49 +0.15+0.02 -0.11-0.01 ) SNur h 2 in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04 +1.99+0.07 -1.11-0.04 ) SNur h 2 and (0.36 +0.84+0.01 -0.30-0.01 ) SNur h 2 in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94 +1.31+0.043 -0.91-0.015 and 3.02 +1.31+0.062 -1.03-0.048 , for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r L = [(0.49 +0.15 -0.14 )+(0.91 +0.85 -0.81 ) x z] SNuB h 2 . A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most three hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are hostless to be (9.4 +8.3 -5.1 )%.

  9. Early results from the Whisper instrument on Cluster: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decreau, P.M.E.; Fergeau, P.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Whisper instrument yields two data sets: (i) the electron density determined via the relaxation sounder, and (ii) the spectrum of natural plasma emissions in the frequency band 2-80 kHz. Both data sets allow for the three-dimensional exploration of the magnetosphere by the Cluster mission...... the drift velocity of density structures. Wave observations are also of crucial interest for studying small-scale structures, as demonstrated in an example in the fore-shock region. Early results from the Whisper instrument are very encouraging, and demonstrate that the four-point Cluster measurements...... largely overcomes the limited telemetry allocation. The natural emissions are usually related to the plasma frequency, as identified by the sounder, and the combination of an active sounding operation and a passive survey operation provides a time resolution for the total density determination of 2.2 s...

  10. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  11. 75 FR 43919 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia: Third City Stop Added to the Trade Mission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... and Dhahran; and Networking receptions in two cities of the trade mission. Proposed Mission Timetable... Saudi Arabia: Third City Stop Added to the Trade Mission Itinerary AGENCY: International Trade... expansion at Jubail Industrial City II with around 20 petrochemical and infrastructure projects worth more...

  12. Cluster and THEMIS observations of the magnetosphere dayside boundaries in preparation for the SMILE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Dimmock, A. P.; Walsh, B.; Sibeck, D. G.; Berchem, J.; Nykyri, K.; Turc, L.; Read, A.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Wang, C.; Sembay, S.; Kuntz, K. D.; Dai, L.; Li, L.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.; Laakso, H. E.; Zheng, J.; Rebuffat, D.

    2016-12-01

    Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission, in collaboration between ESA and Chinese Academy of Science. Its objective is to observe the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, soft X-Ray images of the magnetosheath and polar cusps, and UV images of global auroral distributions. The observations of the cusps and magnetosheath with the X-ray imager are possible through the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In preparation for the mission, we need to determine the cusp's morphology, motion and in situ properties (density, velocity, temperature) that are expected to be observed by the spacecraft. To do so, we have selected a series of cusp crossings by the Cluster spacecraft that can be used to simulate X-ray emissions across the width of the cusp for different IMF orientations. In view of the well-known cusp ion dispersions, we expect that X ray emissions peak near the equatorial boundary of the cusp for southward IMF Bz, but near the poleward boundary of the cusp for northward IMF Bz. We also employ Cluster cusp observations during storms to predict X-ray emissions to be expected for periods of high solar wind fluxes. In addition, we use THEMIS observations from January 2008 to July 2015 for moderate (nsw*vsw 4.9x10^8 /cm^2s) solar wind fluxes to investigate X-rays emitted by the magnetosheath and to determine their variation as a function of distance from the subsolar point along the Sun-Earth line and along the flanks of the magnetosphere. We will show that high solar wind fluxes greatly enhance soft X-ray emissions, not only because solar wind fluxes increases but also because the emission region moves deeper within the Earth's exosphere.

  13. Planning for Planetary Science Mission Including Resource Prospecting, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in computer-aided mission planning can enhance mission operations and science return for surface missions to Mars, the Moon, and beyond. While the...

  14. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca ii triplet spectroscopy of open clusters. II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R ~ 8000) in the infrared region Ca ii triplet lines (~8500 Å) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca ii lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain ⟨Vr⟩ = 48.6 ± 3.4, -58.4 ± 6.8, 26.0 ± 4.3, and -65.3 ± 3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [ Fe/H ] = -0.25 ± 0.14 and -0.15 ± 0.18 for NGC 559 and NGC 7245, respectively. Berkeley 23 has low metallicity, [ Fe/H ] = -0.42 ± 0.13, which is similar to other open clusters in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. In contrast, we derived high metallicity ([ Fe/H ] = +0.43 ± 0.15) for NGC 6603, which places this system among the most metal-rich known open clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first determination of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for these clusters, except NGC 6603, for which radial velocities had been previously determined. We have also analysed ten stars in the line of sight to King 1. Because of the large dispersion obtained in both radial velocity and metallicity, we cannot be sure that we have sampled true cluster members. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  15. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  16. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-439 Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense... Bomb Increment II (SDB II) DoD Component Air Force Joint Participants Department of the Navy Responsible Office References SAR Baseline (Production...Mission and Description Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) is a joint interest United States Air Force (USAF) and Department of the Navy

  17. Creation of a 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and investigation of its functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, B К; Davletshina, L N; Seibert, M; Rubin, A B

    2018-01-01

    Extraction of Mn cations from the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Ca-depleted PSII membranes (PSII[-Ca,4Mn]) by reductants like hydroquinone (H 2 Q) occurs with lower efficiency at acidic pH (2Mn/reaction center [RC] are extracted at pH5.7) than at neutral pH (3Mn/RC are extracted at pH6.5) [Semin et al. Photosynth. Res. 125 (2015) 95]. Fe(II) also extracts Mn cations from PSII(-Ca,4Mn), but only 2Mn/RC at pH6.5, forming a heteronuclear 2Mn/2Fe cluster [Semin and Seibert, J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 48 (2016) 227]. Here we investigated the efficiency of Mn extraction by Fe(II) at acidic pH and found that Fe(II) cations can extract only 1Mn/RC from PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes at pH 5.7, forming a 3Mn/1Fe cluster. Also we found that the presence of Fe cations in a heteronuclear cluster (2Mn/2Fe) increases the resistance of the remaining Mn cations to H 2 Q action, since H 2 Q can extract Mn cations from homonuclear Mn clusters of PSII(-Ca,4Mn) and PSII(-Ca,2Mn) membranes but not from the heteronuclear cluster in PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) membranes. H 2 Q also cannot extract Mn from PSII membranes obtained by incubation of PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes with Fe(II) cations at pH5.7, which suggests the formation of a heteronuclear 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the OEC. Functional activity of PSII with a 3Mn/1Fe cluster was investigated. PSII preparations with a 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the OEC are able to photoreduce the exogenous electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, possibly due to incomplete oxidation of water molecules as is the case with PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) samples. However, in the contrast to PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) samples PSII(-Ca,3Mn,1Fe) membranes can evolve O 2 at a low rate in the presence of exogenous Ca 2+ (at about 27% of the rate of O 2 evolution in native PSII membranes). The explanation for this phenomenon (either water splitting and production of molecular O 2 by the 3Mn/1Fe cluster or apparent O 2 evolution due to minor contamination of PSII(3Mn,1Fe) samples with PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes

  18. Rapid Automated Mission Planning System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is an automated UAS mission planning system that will rapidly identify emergency (contingency) landing sites, manage contingency routing, and...

  19. Molecules based on M(v) (M=Mo, W) and Ni(II) ions: a new class of trigonal bipyramidal cluster and confirmation of SMM behavior for the pentadecanuclear molecule {NiII[NiII(tmphen)(MeOH)]6[Ni(H2O)3]2[micro-CN]30[WV(CN)3]6}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfiger, Matthew G; Zhao, Hanhua; Prosvirin, Andrey; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Dunbar, Kim R

    2009-07-14

    The preparation, single crystal X-ray crystallography, and magnetic properties are reported for four new clusters based on [M'V(CN)8]3- octacyanometallates (M'=Mo, W). Reactions of [M'V(CN)8]3- with mononuclear NiII ions in the presence of the tmphen blocking ligand (tmphen=3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) in a 2:3:6 ratio, respectively, lead to the formation of the trigonal bipyramidal clusters [NiII(tmphen)2]3[M'V(CN)8]2. Analogous reactions with the same starting materials performed in a 2:3:2 ratio, respectively, produce pentadecanuclear clusters of the type {NiII[NiII(tmphen)(MeOH)]6[Ni(H2O)3]2[micro-CN]30[WV(CN)3]6}. The W2Ni3 (1) and Mo2Ni3(2) pentanuclear clusters and the W6Ni9 (3) and Mo6Ni9 (4) pentadecanuclear molecules are isostructural to each other and crystallize in the space groups P2(1)/c and R3 respectively. Magnetic measurements indicate that the ground states for the trigonal bipyamidal clusters are S=4 as a consequence of ferromagnetic coupling with JW-Ni=9.5 cm(-1), JMo-Ni=10 cm(-1). The pentadecanuclear clusters exhibit ferromagnetic coupling as well, which leads to S=12 ground states (JW-Ni=12 cm(-1), JMo-Ni=12.2 cm(-1)). Reduced magnetization studies on the W-Ni analogues support the conclusion that they exhibit a negative axial anisotropy term; the fits give D values of -0.24 cm(-1) for the W2Ni3 cluster and D=-0.04 cm(-1)for the W6Ni9 cluster. AC susceptibility measurements indicate the beginning of an out-of-phase signal for the W2Ni3 and the W6Ni9 compounds, but detailed low temperature studies on small crystals by the microSQUID technique indicate that only the pentadecanuclear cluster exhibits hysteresis in accord with SMM behavior. Neither Mo cluster reveals any evidence for slow paramagnetic relaxation at low temperatures.

  20. Mesoscale structure of a morning sector ionospheric shear flow region determined by conjugate Cluster II and MIRACLE ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    Full Text Available We analyse a conjunction event of the Cluster II spacecraft with the MIRACLE ground-based instrument net-work in northern Fennoscandia on 6 February 2001, between 23:00 and 00:00 UT. Shortly after the spacecraft were located at perigee, the Cluster II satellites’ magnetic footpoints move northwards over Scandinavia and Svalbard, almost perfectly aligned with the central chain of the IMAGE magnetometer network, and cross a morning sector ionospheric shear zone during this passage. In this study we focus on the mesoscale structure of the ionosphere. Ionospheric conductances, true horizontal currents, and field-aligned currents (FAC are calculated from the ground-based measurements of the IMAGE magnetometers and the STARE coherent scatter radar, using the 1-D method of characteristics. An excellent agreement between these results and the FAC observed by Cluster II is reached after averaging the Cluster measurements to mesoscales, as well as between the location of the convection reversal boundary (CRB, as observed by STARE and by the Cluster II EFW instrument. A sheet of downward FAC is observed in the vicinity of the CRB, which is mainly caused by the positive divergence of the electric field there. This FAC sheet is detached by 0.5°–2° of latitude from a more equatorward downward FAC sheet at the poleward flank of the westward electrojet. This latter FAC sheet, as well as the upward FAC at the equatorward flank of the jet, are mainly caused by meridional gradients in the ionospheric conductances, which reach up to 25 S in the electrojet region, but only ~ 5 S poleward of it, with a minimum at the CRB. Particle measurements show that the major part of the downward FAC is carried by upward flowing electrons, and only a small part by downward flowing ions. The open-closed field line boundary is found to be located 3°–4° poleward of the CRB, implying significant errors if the latter is used as a proxy of the former.

    Key words

  1. Mesoscale structure of a morning sector ionospheric shear flow region determined by conjugate Cluster II and MIRACLE ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse a conjunction event of the Cluster II spacecraft with the MIRACLE ground-based instrument net-work in northern Fennoscandia on 6 February 2001, between 23:00 and 00:00 UT. Shortly after the spacecraft were located at perigee, the Cluster II satellites’ magnetic footpoints move northwards over Scandinavia and Svalbard, almost perfectly aligned with the central chain of the IMAGE magnetometer network, and cross a morning sector ionospheric shear zone during this passage. In this study we focus on the mesoscale structure of the ionosphere. Ionospheric conductances, true horizontal currents, and field-aligned currents (FAC are calculated from the ground-based measurements of the IMAGE magnetometers and the STARE coherent scatter radar, using the 1-D method of characteristics. An excellent agreement between these results and the FAC observed by Cluster II is reached after averaging the Cluster measurements to mesoscales, as well as between the location of the convection reversal boundary (CRB, as observed by STARE and by the Cluster II EFW instrument. A sheet of downward FAC is observed in the vicinity of the CRB, which is mainly caused by the positive divergence of the electric field there. This FAC sheet is detached by 0.5°–2° of latitude from a more equatorward downward FAC sheet at the poleward flank of the westward electrojet. This latter FAC sheet, as well as the upward FAC at the equatorward flank of the jet, are mainly caused by meridional gradients in the ionospheric conductances, which reach up to 25 S in the electrojet region, but only ~ 5 S poleward of it, with a minimum at the CRB. Particle measurements show that the major part of the downward FAC is carried by upward flowing electrons, and only a small part by downward flowing ions. The open-closed field line boundary is found to be located 3°–4° poleward of the CRB, implying significant errors if the latter is used as a proxy of the former.Key words. Ionosphere

  2. Metallicity Variations in the Type II Globular Cluster NGC 6934

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A. F.; Yong, D.; Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; Lundquist, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Chené, A.-N.; Da Costa, G.; Asplund, M.; Jerjen, H.

    2018-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope photometric survey of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) has revealed a peculiar “chromosome map” for NGC 6934. In addition to a typical sequence, similar to that observed in Type I GCs, NGC 6934 displays additional stars on the red side, analogous to the anomalous Type II GCs, as defined in our previous work. We present a chemical abundance analysis of four red giants in this GC. Two stars are located on the chromosome map sequence common to all GCs, and another two lie on the additional sequence. We find (i) star-to-star Fe variations, with the two anomalous stars being enriched by ∼0.2 dex. Because of our small-size sample, this difference is at the ∼2.5σ level. (ii) There is no evidence for variations in the slow neutron-capture abundances over Fe, at odds with what is often observed in anomalous Type II GCs, e.g., M 22 and ω Centauri (iii) no large variations in light elements C, O, and Na, compatible with locations of the targets on the lower part of the chromosome map where such variations are not expected. Since the analyzed stars are homogeneous in light elements, the only way to reproduce the photometric splits on the sub-giant (SGB) and the red giant (RGB) branches is to assume that red RGB/faint SGB stars are enhanced in [Fe/H] by ∼0.2. This fact corroborates the spectroscopic evidence of a metallicity variation in NGC 6934. The observed chemical pattern resembles only partially the other Type II GCs, suggesting that NGC 6934 might belong either to a third class of GCs, or be a link between normal Type I and anomalous Type II GCs. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and Gemini Telescope at Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope.

  3. Synthesis, Structure and Electrochemistry of Tetranuclear Oxygen-Centered Copper(II) Clusters with Acetylacetone and Benz-pyrazole Hydrolyzed Derivatives as Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafazadeh, Rasoul; Willis, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Two copper(II) clusters Cu(4)OCl(6)(pyrazole)4, 1, and Cu(4)OBr(6)(Br-pyrazole)4, 2, have been synthesized by reacting acetylacetone and benzohydrazide (1:1 ratio) with CuX(2) (X = Cl for 1 and X= Br for 2) in methanol solutions. The structures of both clusters have been established by X-ray crystallography. The clusters contain four Cu, one O, six μ(2)-X atoms, and four pyrazole ligands. The pyrazoles was prepared in situ by the reaction of acetylacetone with benzohydrazide in methanol under reflux. In 2, the methine hydrogens of the pyrazole ligands have been replaced by bromine atoms. The four copper atoms encapsulate the central O atom in a tetrahedral arrangement. All copper atoms are five-coordinate and have similar coordination environments with slightly distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of the clusters 1 and 2 show a one-electron quasi-reversible reduction wave in the region 0.485 to 0.731 V, and a one-electron quasi-reversible oxidation wave in the region 0.767 to 0.898 V. In 1, one irreversible oxidative response is observed on the positive of side of the voltammogram at 1.512 V and this can be assigned to Cu(II) to Cu(III) oxidation.

  4. Stellar activity with LAMOST - II. Chromospheric activity in open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang-Song; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2018-05-01

    We use the LAMOST spectra of member stars in Pleiades, M34, Praesepe, and Hyades to study how chromospheric activity varies as a function of mass and rotation at different age. We measured excess equivalent widths of H α, H β, and Ca II K based on estimated chromospheric contributions from old and inactive field dwarfs, and excess luminosities are obtained by normalizing bolometric luminosity, for more than 700 late-type stars in these open clusters. Results indicate two activity sequences in cool spot coverage and H α excess emission among GK dwarfs in Pleiades and M dwarfs in Praesepe and Hyades, paralleling with well-known rotation sequences. A weak dependence of chromospheric emission on rotation exists among ultrafast rotators in saturated regime with Rossby number Ro ≲ 0.1. In the unsaturated regime, chromospheric and coronal emission show similar dependence on Ro, but with a shift towards larger Ro, indicating chromospheric emission gets easily saturated than coronal emission, and/or convective turnover time-scales based on X-ray data do not work well with chromospheric emission. More interestingly, our analysis shows fully convective slow rotators obey the rotation-chromospheric activity relation similar to hotter stars, confirming the previous finding. We found correlations among H α, H β, and Ca II K emissions, in which H α losses are more important than Ca II K for cooler and more active stars. In addition, a weak correlation is seen between chromospheric emission and photospheric activity that shows dependence on stellar spectral type and activity level, which provides some clues on how spot configuration varies as a function of mass and activity level.

  5. A novel dumbbell-like polyoxometalate assembled of copper(II)-disubstituted monovacant keggin polyoxoanions with a tetranuclear copper cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hao; Xu, Xiao; Ju, Wei-Wei; Wan, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Dun-Ru; Xu, Yan

    2014-03-17

    A dimeric Keggin polyoxometalate, [Cu(bpy)(μ2-OH)]4[(H2O)(bpy)2HPW11Cu2O39]2·2CH3CH2OH·10H2O (1), constructed from two dicopper(II)-substituted monovacant Keggin polyoxoanions bridged by a Cu4 cluster, has been hydrothermally synthesized. Magnetic analysis indicates predominantly an antiferromagnetic interaction between copper(II) centers. Compound 1 also shows very high catalytic activity for the esterification of phosphoric acid with equimolar lauryl alcohol to monoalkyl phosphate ester.

  6. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s −1 . This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment

  7. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  8. Analysis of plasmaspheric plumes: CLUSTER and IMAGE observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Darrouzet

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasmaspheric plumes have been routinely observed by CLUSTER and IMAGE. The CLUSTER mission provides high time resolution four-point measurements of the plasmasphere near perigee. Total electron density profiles have been derived from the electron plasma frequency identified by the WHISPER sounder supplemented, in-between soundings, by relative variations of the spacecraft potential measured by the electric field instrument EFW; ion velocity is also measured onboard these satellites. The EUV imager onboard the IMAGE spacecraft provides global images of the plasmasphere with a spatial resolution of 0.1 RE every 10 min; such images acquired near apogee from high above the pole show the geometry of plasmaspheric plumes, their evolution and motion. We present coordinated observations of three plume events and compare CLUSTER in-situ data with global images of the plasmasphere obtained by IMAGE. In particular, we study the geometry and the orientation of plasmaspheric plumes by using four-point analysis methods. We compare several aspects of plume motion as determined by different methods: (i inner and outer plume boundary velocity calculated from time delays of this boundary as observed by the wave experiment WHISPER on the four spacecraft, (ii drift velocity measured by the electron drift instrument EDI onboard CLUSTER and (iii global velocity determined from successive EUV images. These different techniques consistently indicate that plasmaspheric plumes rotate around the Earth, with their foot fully co-rotating, but with their tip rotating slower and moving farther out.

  9. Development of the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) for Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jack; Christensen, John L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) is a new technique for measuring electric fields in space by detecting the effect on weak beams of test electrons. This U.S. portions of the technique, flight hardware, and flight software were developed for the Cluster mission under this contract. Dr. Goetz Paschmann of the Max Planck Institute in Garching, Germany, was the Principle Investigator for Cluster EDI. Hardware for Cluster was developed in the U.S. at the University of New Hampshire, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, and University of California, San Diego. The Cluster satellites carrying the original EDI instruments were lost in the catastrophic launch failure of first flight of the Arianne-V rocket in 1996. Following that loss, NASA and ESA approved a rebuild of the Cluster mission, for which all four satellites were successfully launched in the Summer of 2000. Limited operations of EDI were also obtained on the Equator-S satellite, which was launched in December, 1997. A satellite failure caused a loss of the Equator-S mission after only 5 months, but these operations were extremely valuable in learning about the characteristics and operations of the complex EDI instrument. The Cluster mission, satellites, and instruments underwent an extensive on-orbit commissioning phase in the Fall of 2000, carrying over through January 2001. During this period all elements of the instruments were checked and careful measurements of inter-experiments interferences were made. EDI is currently working exceptionally well in orbit. Initial results verify that all aspects of the instrument are working as planned, and returning highly valuable scientific information. The first two papers describing EDI on-orbit results have been submitted for publication in April, 2001. The principles of the EDI technique, and its implementation on Cluster are described in two papers by Paschmann et al., attached as Appendices A and B. The EDI presentation at the formal Cluster Commissioning

  10. Photometric and Spectroscopic Survey of the Cluster [DBS2003] 156 Associated with the H II Region G331.1-0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, M. C.; Ortiz, R.; Abraham, Z.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2016-05-01

    The Norma section of the Milky Way is especially interesting because it crosses three spiral arms: Sagittarius-Carina, Scutum-Crux and the Norma arm itself. Distance determinations of embedded young stellar clusters can contribute to define the spiral structure in this part of the Galaxy. However, spectrophotometric distances were obtained for only a few of these clusters in Norma. We present a photometric and spectroscopic study in the NIR of the [DBS2003] 156 stellar cluster, associated with the H II region G331.1-0.5. We aim to find the ionizing sources of the H II region and determine its distance. The cluster was observed in the J, H, and {K}{{s}} bands and eight potential massive stars were chosen among the detected sources according to color criteria; subsequent spectroscopy of these candidates was performed with the Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrometer spectrograph attached to the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research 4.1 m telescope. We identified and classified spectroscopically four early-type stars: IRS 176 (O8 V), IRS 308 (O-type), IRS 310 (O6 V), and IRS 71 (B1 Iab). Based on the proximity of IRS 176 and 308 with the radio continuum emission peaks and their relative positions with respect to the warm dust mid-infrared emission, we concluded that these two stars are the main ionizing sources of the H ii region G331.1-0.5. The mean spectrophotometric distance of IRS 176 and 310 of 3.38 ± 0.58 kpc is similar to that obtained in a previous work for two early-type stars of the neighbor cluster [DBS2003] 157 of 3.29 ± 0.58 kpc. The narrow range of radial velocities of radio sources in the area of the clusters [DBS2003] 156 and 157 and their similar visual extinction indicate that these clusters are physically associated. A common distance of 3.34 ± 0.34 kpc is derived for the system [DBS2003] 156 and 157. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR), a joint project of the Ministério de Ci

  11. STAR CLUSTERS IN M31. II. OLD CLUSTER METALLICITIES AND AGES FROM HECTOSPEC DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Rose, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise spectroscopic data on the M31 globular cluster (GC) system, obtained with the Hectospec multifiber spectrograph on the 6.5 m MMT. More than 300 clusters have been observed at a resolution of 5 A and with a median S/N of 75 per A, providing velocities with a median uncertainty of 6 km s -1 . The primary focus of this paper is the determination of mean cluster metallicities, ages, and reddenings. Metallicities were estimated using a calibration of Lick indices with [Fe/H] provided by Galactic GCs. These match well the metallicities of 24 M31 clusters determined from Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams, the differences having an rms of 0.2 dex. The metallicity distribution is not generally bimodal, in strong distinction with the bimodal Galactic globular distribution. Rather, the M31 distribution shows a broad peak, centered at [Fe/H] = -1, possibly with minor peaks at [Fe/H] = -1.4, -0.7, and -0.2, suggesting that the cluster systems of M31 and the Milky Way had different formation histories. Ages for clusters with [Fe/H] > - 1 were determined using the automatic stellar population analysis program EZ A ges. We find no evidence for massive clusters in M31 with intermediate ages, those between 2 and 6 Gyr. Moreover, we find that the mean ages of the old GCs are remarkably constant over about a decade in metallicity (-0.95∼< [Fe/H] ∼<0.0).

  12. Diametrical clustering for identifying anti-correlated gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M; Roshan, Usman

    2003-09-01

    Clustering genes based upon their expression patterns allows us to predict gene function. Most existing clustering algorithms cluster genes together when their expression patterns show high positive correlation. However, it has been observed that genes whose expression patterns are strongly anti-correlated can also be functionally similar. Biologically, this is not unintuitive-genes responding to the same stimuli, regardless of the nature of the response, are more likely to operate in the same pathways. We present a new diametrical clustering algorithm that explicitly identifies anti-correlated clusters of genes. Our algorithm proceeds by iteratively (i). re-partitioning the genes and (ii). computing the dominant singular vector of each gene cluster; each singular vector serving as the prototype of a 'diametric' cluster. We empirically show the effectiveness of the algorithm in identifying diametrical or anti-correlated clusters. Testing the algorithm on yeast cell cycle data, fibroblast gene expression data, and DNA microarray data from yeast mutants reveals that opposed cellular pathways can be discovered with this method. We present systems whose mRNA expression patterns, and likely their functions, oppose the yeast ribosome and proteosome, along with evidence for the inverse transcriptional regulation of a number of cellular systems.

  13. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Rebusco, P.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cappelluti, N.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Maryland U., Baltimore County; Reimer, O.; /SLAC /Palermo Observ.; Boehringer, H.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; /Palermo Observ.

    2010-10-27

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  14. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE SWIFT/BAT ERA. II. 10 MORE CLUSTERS DETECTED ABOVE 15 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajello, M.; Reimer, O.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are Bullet, A85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters, we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters' emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and A3667), we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law-like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10 -12 erg cm -2 s -1 as detected in previous studies. For A3667, the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT ∼ 13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely a thermal origin.

  15. The Centaurus cluster of galaxies. II. The bimodal-velocity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, J.R.; Currie, M.J.; Dickens, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series that describes an extensive study of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The paper concerns the bimodal velocity distribution of the galaxies in the cluster. The likely location of the two main cluster components is discussed. The data strongly favours the hypothesis that the two components lie within the same cluster. (UK)

  16. Quantum dynamics of small H2 and D2 clusters in the large cage of structure II clathrate hydrate: Energetics, occupancy, and vibrationally averaged cluster structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastianelli, Francesco; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko

    2008-12-01

    We report diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations of the quantum translation-rotation (T-R) dynamics of one to five para-H2 (p-H2) and ortho-D2 (o-D2) molecules inside the large hexakaidecahedral (51264) cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate, which was taken to be rigid. These calculations provide a quantitative description of the size evolution of the ground-state properties, energetics, and the vibrationally averaged geometries, of small (p-H2)n and (o-D2)n clusters, n=1-5, in nanoconfinement. The zero-point energy (ZPE) of the T-R motions rises steeply with the cluster size, reaching 74% of the potential well depth for the caged (p-H2)4. At low temperatures, the rapid increase of the cluster ZPE as a function of n is the main factor that limits the occupancy of the large cage to at most four H2 or D2 molecules, in agreement with experiments. Our DMC results concerning the vibrationally averaged spatial distribution of four D2 molecules, their mean distance from the cage center, the D2-D2 separation, and the specific orientation and localization of the tetrahedral (D2)4 cluster relative to the framework of the large cage, agree very well with the low-temperature neutron diffraction experiments involving the large cage with the quadruple D2 occupancy.

  17. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - Young clusters in H II regions of M83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, R.C.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, J.K.; Stecher, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    UV images of M83 at 1540 and 2360 A reveal 18 compact sources that are associated with H II regions. E(B - V) values were estimated individually from the observed UV and optical colors and the Galactic UV extinction curve, using theoretical flux distributions. The dereddened colors are consistent with ages up to 3 x 10 to the 6th yr. A maximum possible age of 6.5 x 10 to the 6th yr is obtained assuming foreground reddening only. The distribution of observed colors is consistent with the Galactic reddening curve but not with enhanced far-UV extinction, as in the LMC 30 Dor curve. The H-alpha fluxes suggest either that dust within the H II regions absorbs up to 70 percent of the Lyman continuum radiation or that a similar fraction of the H-alpha flux is below the surface brightness detection limit. Cluster mass estimates depend on the range of stellar masses present but are probably in the range 10,000-100,000 solar masses. 25 refs

  18. In search of empty space: the Cluster mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Alan

    1990-01-01

    Using four spacecraft, orbiting the earth, in the formation of a regular tetrahedron, European scientists will study the auroras around the planet caused by variations in the Sun's magnetic field. These cluster satellites will also study supernovae from their interplanetary position and the plasma of space surrounding us on the Earth. A growing understanding of the plasma dynamics is hoped to assist in the study of nuclear fusion. (UK)

  19. Lunar Exploration Missions Since 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S. J. (Editor); Gaddis, L. R.; Joy, K. H.; Petro, N. E.

    2017-01-01

    The announcement of the Vision for Space Exploration in 2004 sparked a resurgence in lunar missions worldwide. Since the publication of the first "New Views of the Moon" volume, as of 2017 there have been 11 science-focused missions to the Moon. Each of these missions explored different aspects of the Moon's geology, environment, and resource potential. The results from this flotilla of missions have revolutionized lunar science, and resulted in a profoundly new emerging understanding of the Moon. The New Views of the Moon II initiative itself, which is designed to engage the large and vibrant lunar science community to integrate the results of these missions into new consensus viewpoints, is a direct outcome of this impressive array of missions. The "Lunar Exploration Missions Since 2006" chapter will "set the stage" for the rest of the volume, introducing the planetary community at large to the diverse array of missions that have explored the Moon in the last decade. Content: This chapter will encompass the following missions: Kaguya; ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun); Chang’e-1; Chandrayaan-1; Moon Impact Probe; Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO); Lunar Crater Observation Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); Chang’e-2; Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL); Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE); Chang’e-3.

  20. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  1. 4C radio sources in clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHardy, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of a complete sample of 4C and 4CT radio sources in Abell clusters with the Cambridge One-Mile telescope are analysed. It is concluded that radio sources are strongly concentrated towards the cluster centres and are equally likely to be found in clusters of any richness. The probability of a galaxy of a given absolute magnitude producing a source above a given luminosity does not depend on cluster membership. 4C and 4CT radio sources in clusters, selected at 178 MHz, occur preferentially in Bautz-Morgan (BM) class 1 clusters, whereas those selected at 1.4 GHz do not. The most powerful radio source in the cluster is almost always associated with the optically brightest galaxy. The average spectrum of 4C sources in the range 408 to 1407 MHz is steeper in BM class 1 than in other classes. Spectra also steepen with cluster richness. the morphology of 4C sources in clusters depends strongly on BM class and, in particular, radio-trail sources occur only in BM classes II, II-III and III. (author)

  2. Context-Sensitive Augmented Reality for Mission Operations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current NASA missions to the International Space Station (ISS) are heavily dependent upon ground controllers to assist crew members in performing routine operations...

  3. Army Aviation and the Mission Command Warfighting Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    information systems , processes and procedures, optimize facilities and equipment, and build understanding of the networks that link the headquarters...however further publication or sale of copyrighted images is not permissible. ii REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188...Command System , Mission Command Information Systems , Training, Mission Training Complex 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  4. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  5. Automated clustering procedure for TJ-II experimental signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, N.; Vega, J.; Dormido, R.; Farias, G.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Sanchez, J.; Santos, M.; Pajares, G.

    2006-01-01

    Databases in fusion experiments are made up of thousands of signals. For this reason, data analysis must be simplified by developing automatic mechanisms for fast search and retrieval of specific data in the waveform database. In particular, a method for finding similar waveforms would be very helpful. The term 'similar' implies the use of proximity measurements in order to quantify how close two signals are. In this way, it would be possible to define several categories (clusters) and to classify the waveforms according to them, where this classification can be a starting point for exploratory data analysis in large databases. The clustering process is divided in two stages. The first one is feature extraction, i.e., to choose the set of properties that allow us to encode as much information as possible concerning a signal. The second one establishes the number of clusters according to a proximity measure

  6. Weighing galaxy clusters with gas. II. On the origin of hydrostatic mass bias in ΛCDM galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke; Yu, Liang; Lau, Erwin T.; Rudd, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of galaxy clusters as cosmological probes hinges on our ability to measure their masses accurately and with high precision. Hydrostatic mass is one of the most common methods for estimating the masses of individual galaxy clusters, which suffer from biases due to departures from hydrostatic equilibrium. Using a large, mass-limited sample of massive galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, in this work we show that in addition to turbulent and bulk gas velocities, acceleration of gas introduces biases in the hydrostatic mass estimate of galaxy clusters. In unrelaxed clusters, the acceleration bias is comparable to the bias due to non-thermal pressure associated with merger-induced turbulent and bulk gas motions. In relaxed clusters, the mean mass bias due to acceleration is small (≲ 3%), but the scatter in the mass bias can be reduced by accounting for gas acceleration. Additionally, this acceleration bias is greater in the outskirts of higher redshift clusters where mergers are more frequent and clusters are accreting more rapidly. Since gas acceleration cannot be observed directly, it introduces an irreducible bias for hydrostatic mass estimates. This acceleration bias places limits on how well we can recover cluster masses from future X-ray and microwave observations. We discuss implications for cluster mass estimates based on X-ray, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and gravitational lensing observations and their impact on cluster cosmology.

  7. GLACE: freezing the environment of line--emitting cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintos--Castro, I.; Sánchez--Portal, M.; Cepa, J.; Povi, M.; Santos, J.; Altieri, B.; Bongiovanni, A.; Ederoclite, A.; Oteo, I.; Pérez García, A.; Pérez--Martínez, R.; Polednikova, J.; Ramón--Pérez, M.

    2015-05-01

    GLACE is performing a survey of emission-line galaxies in clusters with the main aim of studying the effect of the environment in the star formation activity. The innovation of this work is the use of tunable filters in scan mode to obtain low resolution spectra of the desired emission lines. Although the survey is in its initial stage, we have analysed two line datasets in two different clusters: Hα in Cl0024 at z=0.4 and [O II] in RXJ1257 at z = 0.9. The first is a well known intermediate redshift cluster that has been used to test the observational strategy. We reached the planned SFRs and we could deblend the [N II] component, thus being able to discriminate the AGN population from the star-forming galaxies. Also the spectral resolution is allowing us to exploit the data for dynamical analysis. The second target is a recently discovered cluster, that we have studied regarding its FIR and [O II] emission. The [O II] observations are revealing a fainter and less massive sample, when compared with the FIR emitters, showing two different populations of star-forming galaxies. The cluster emitters have shown that no evident correlation exist between the SFR (or sSFR) and the environment. Nevertheless, we have found that both samples, FIR- and [O II]-emitters, are concentrated in the areas of intermediate to even high local density. Additionally, we explored the morphological properties of the cluster galaxies using the non-parametric galSVM code.

  8. Mars Hybrid Propulsion System Trajectory Analysis. Part II; Cargo Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture in which both chemical and electric propulsion systems are used to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By combining chemical and electrical propulsion into a single spaceship and applying each where it is more effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper shows the feasibility of the hybrid transportation architecture to pre-deploy cargo to Mars and Phobos in support of the Evolvable Mars Campaign crew missions. The analysis shows that the hybrid propulsion stage is able to deliver all of the current manifested payload to Phobos and Mars through the first three crew missions. The conjunction class trajectory also allows the hybrid propulsion stage to return to Earth in a timely fashion so it can be reused for additional cargo deployment. The 1,100 days total trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to deliver cargo to Mars every other Earth-Mars transit opportunity. For the first two Mars surface mission in the Evolvable Mars Campaign, the short trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to be reused for three round-trip journeys to Mars, which matches the hybrid propulsion stage's designed lifetime for three round-trip crew missions to the Martian sphere of influence.

  9. Multi-Modal Neurodiagnostic Tool for Exploration Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a critical requirement for a neurodiagnostic tool that can be used to monitor the behavioral health of the crew during long duration exploration missions....

  10. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste, Italy 12Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535, Sotuh Africa 13Physics Department, University of Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535, South Africa 14South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box...IFTy cluster comparison project (Sembolini et al., 2015): a study of the latest state-of- the-art hydrodynamical codes using simulated galaxy clusters as a testbed for theories of galaxy formation. Simulations are indis- pensable tools in the interpretation...

  11. Cluster and SOHO - a joint endeavor by ESA and NASA to address problems in solar, heliospheric, and space plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Domingo, V.; Shawhan, S.D.; Bohlin, D.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA/ESA Solar-Terrestrial Science Program, which consists of the four-spacecraft cluster mission and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), is examined. It is expected that the SOHO spacecraft will be launched in 1995 to study solar interior structure and the physical processes associated with the solar corona. The SOHO design, operation, data, and ground segment are discussed. The Cluster mission is designed to study small-scale structures in the earth's plasma environment. The Soviet Union is expected to contribute two additional spacecraft, which will be similar to Cluster in instrumentation and design. The capabilities, mission strategy, spacecraft design, payload, and ground segment of Cluster are discussed. 19 references

  12. Ca II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. I. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, M. C.; Claria, J. J.; Grocholski, A. J.; Geisler, D.; Sarajedini, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained near-infrared spectra covering the Ca II triplet lines for a large number of stars associated with 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters using the VLT + FORS2. These data compose the largest available sample of SMC clusters with spectroscopically derived abundances and velocities. Our clusters span a wide range of ages and provide good areal coverage of the galaxy. Cluster members are selected using a combination of their positions relative to the cluster center as well as their location in the color-magnitude diagram, abundances, and radial velocities (RVs). We determine mean cluster velocities to typically 2.7 km s -1 and metallicities to 0.05 dex (random errors), from an average of 6.4 members per cluster. By combining our clusters with previously published results, we compile a sample of 25 clusters on a homogeneous metallicity scale and with relatively small metallicity errors, and thereby investigate the metallicity distribution, metallicity gradient, and age-metallicity relation (AMR) of the SMC cluster system. For all 25 clusters in our expanded sample, the mean metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.96 with σ = 0.19. The metallicity distribution may possibly be bimodal, with peaks at ∼-0.9 dex and -1.15 dex. Similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the SMC cluster system gives no indication of a radial metallicity gradient. However, intermediate age SMC clusters are both significantly more metal-poor and have a larger metallicity spread than their LMC counterparts. Our AMR shows evidence for three phases: a very early (>11 Gyr) phase in which the metallicity reached ∼-1.2 dex, a long intermediate phase from ∼10 to 3 Gyr in which the metallicity only slightly increased, and a final phase from 3 to 1 Gyr ago in which the rate of enrichment was substantially faster. We find good overall agreement with the model of Pagel and Tautvaisiene, which assumes a burst of star formation at 4 Gyr. Finally, we find that the mean RV of the cluster system

  13. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE IRAC DARK FIELD. II. MID-INFRARED SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, J. E.; Surace, J. A.; Yan, L.; Thompson, D.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Hora, J. L.; Gorjian, V.

    2009-01-01

    We present infrared (IR) luminosities, star formation rates (SFR), colors, morphologies, locations, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) properties of 24 μm detected sources in photometrically detected high-redshift clusters in order to understand the impact of environment on star formation (SF) and AGN evolution in cluster galaxies. We use three newly identified z = 1 clusters selected from the IRAC dark field; the deepest ever mid-IR survey with accompanying, 14 band multiwavelength data including deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging and deep wide-area Spitzer MIPS 24 μm imaging. We find 90 cluster members with MIPS detections within two virial radii of the cluster centers, of which 17 appear to have spectral energy distributions dominated by AGNs and the rest dominated by SF. We find that 43% of the star-forming sample have IR luminosities L IR > 10 11 L sun (luminous IR galaxies). The majority of sources (81%) are spirals or irregulars. A large fraction (at least 25%) show obvious signs of interactions. The MIPS-detected member galaxies have varied spatial distributions as compared to the MIPS-undetected members with one of the three clusters showing SF galaxies being preferentially located on the cluster outskirts, while the other two clusters show no such trend. Both the AGN fraction and the summed SFR of cluster galaxies increase from redshift zero to one, at a rate that is a few times faster in clusters than over the same redshift range in the field. Cluster environment does have an effect on the evolution of both AGN fraction and SFR from redshift one to the present, but does not affect the IR luminosities or morphologies of the MIPS sample. SF happens in the same way regardless of environment making MIPS sources look the same in the cluster and field, however the cluster environment does encourage a more rapid evolution with time as compared to the field.

  14. Evolution of clustered storage

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Vyvre, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The session actually featured two presentations: * Evolution of clustered storage by Lance Hukill, Quantum Corporation * ALICE DAQ - Usage of a Cluster-File System: Quantum StorNext by Pierre Vande Vyvre, CERN-PH the second one prepared at short notice by Pierre (thanks!) to present how the Quantum technologies are being used in the ALICE experiment. The abstract to Mr Hukill's follows. Clustered Storage is a technology that is driven by business and mission applications. The evolution of Clustered Storage solutions starts first at the alignment between End-users needs and Industry trends: * Push-and-Pull between managing for today versus planning for tomorrow * Breaking down the real business problems to the core applications * Commoditization of clients, servers, and target devices * Interchangeability, Interoperability, Remote Access, Centralized control * Oh, and yes, there is a budget and the "real world" to deal with This presentation will talk through these needs and trends, and then ask the question, ...

  15. Constraining dark energy with clusters: Complementarity with other probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Carlos; Huterer, Dragan; Frieman, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    The Figure of Merit Science Working Group recently forecast the constraints on dark energy that will be achieved prior to the Joint Dark Energy Mission by ground-based experiments that exploit baryon acoustic oscillations, type Ia supernovae, and weak gravitational lensing. We show that cluster counts from ongoing and near-future surveys should provide robust, complementary dark energy constraints. In particular, we find that optimally combined optical and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect cluster surveys should improve the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit for pre-Joint Dark Energy Mission projects by a factor of 2 even without prior knowledge of the nuisance parameters in the cluster mass-observable relation. Comparable improvements are achieved in the forecast precision of parameters specifying the principal component description of the dark energy equation of state parameter, as well as in the growth index γ. These results indicate that cluster counts can play an important complementary role in constraining dark energy and modified gravity even if the associated systematic errors are not strongly controlled.

  16. An observational study of disk-population globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armandroff, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Integrated-light spectroscopy was obtained for twenty-seven globular clusters at the Ca II infrared triplet. Line strengths and radial velocities were measured from the spectra. For the well-studied clusters in the sample, the strength of the CA II lines is very well correlated with previous metallicity estimates obtained using a variety of techniques. The greatly reduced effect of interstellar extinction at these wavelengths compared to the blue region of the spectrum has permitted observations of some of the most heavily reddened clusters in the Galaxy. For several such clusters, the Ca II triplet metallicities are in poor agreement with metallicity estimates from infrared photometry by Malkan. Color-magnitude diagrams were constructed for six previously unstudied metal-rich globular clusters and for the well-studied cluster 47 Tuc. The V magnitudes of the horizontal branch stars in the six clusters are in poor agreement with previous estimates based on secondary methods. The horizontal branch morphologies and reddenings of the program clusters were also determined. Using the improved set of metallicities, radial velocities, and distance moduli, the spatial distribution, kinematics, and metallicity distribution of the Galactic globulars were analyzed. The revised data supports Zinn's conclusion that the metal-rich clusters form a highly flattened, rapidly rotating disk system, while the metal-poor clusters make up the familiar, spherically distributed, slowly rotating halo population. The scale height, metallicity distribution, and kinematics of the metal-rich globulars are in good agreement with those of the stellar thick disk. Luminosity functions were constructed, and no significant difference is found between disk and halo samples. Metallicity gradients seem to be present in the disk cluster system. The implications of these results for the formation and evol

  17. Randomised trial on episodic cluster headache with an angiotensin II receptor blocker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronvik, Erling; Wienecke, Troels; Monstad, Inge

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the angiotensin II receptor antagonist candesartan as prophylactic medication in patients with episodic cluster headache. METHODS: This study comprised a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-designed trial performed in seven cen...... the candesartan and placebo group was not significant with the pre-planned non-parametric ranking test, but a post-hoc exact Poisson test, which takes into account the temporal properties of the data, revealed a significant result ( P  ...... (primary efficacy variable) during the three-week treatment period was reduced from 14.3 ± 9.2 attacks in week 1 to 5.6 ± 7.0 attacks in week 3 (-61%) in the candesartan group and from 16.8 ± 14.1 attacks in week 1 to 10.5 ± 11.3 attacks in week 3 (-38%) in the placebo group. The difference between...

  18. Planck 2015 results: XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present cluster counts and corresponding cosmological constraints from the Planck full mission data set. Our catalogue consists of 439 clusters detected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal down to a signal-to-noise ratio of 6, and is more than a factor of 2 larger than the 2013 Planck clus...

  19. 75 FR 21598 - Energy and Infrastructure Mission to Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Riyadh and Dhahran; and Networking receptions in two cities of the trade mission. Proposed Mission... (Sipchem) complex, which will produce synthetic fibers. The planned expansion at Jubail Industrial City II.... Among Saudi Arabia's super-projects are as many as six ``economic cities,'' to be completed by the year...

  20. Subaru Weak-Lensing Survey II: Multi-Object Spectroscopy and Cluster Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamana, Takashi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ellis, Richard S.; Massey, Richard J.; Refregier, Alexandre; Taylor, James E.

    2009-08-01

    We present the first results of a multi-object spectroscopic campaign to follow up cluster candidates located via weak lensing. Our main goals are to search for spatial concentrations of galaxies that are plausible optical counterparts of the weak-lensing signals, and to determine the cluster redshifts from those of member galaxies. Around each of 36 targeted cluster candidates, we obtained 15-32 galaxy redshifts. For 28 of these targets, we confirmed a secure cluster identification, with more than five spectroscopic galaxies within a velocity of ±3000km s-1. This includes three cases where two clusters at different redshifts are projected along the same line-of-sight. In 6 of the 8 unconfirmed targets, we found multiple small galaxy concentrations at different redshifts, each containing at least three spectroscopic galaxies. The weak-lensing signal around those systems was thus probably created by the projection of groups or small clusters along the same line-of-sight. In both of the remaining two targets, a single small galaxy concentration was found. In some candidate super-cluster systems, we found additional evidence of filaments connecting the main density peak to an additional nearby structure. For a subsample of our most cleanly measured clusters, we investigated the statistical relation between their weak-lensing mass (MNFW, σSIS) and the velocity dispersion of their member galaxies (σv), comparing our sample with optically and X-ray selected samples from the literature. Our lensing-selected clusters are consistent with σv = σSIS, with a similar scatter to that of optically and X-ray selected clusters. We also derived an empirical relation between the cluster mass and the galaxy velocity dispersion, M200E(z) = 11.0 × 1014 × (σv/1000km s-1)3.0 h-1 Modot, which is in reasonable agreement with predictions of N-body simulations in the Λ CDM cosmology.

  1. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (...

  2. Apollo 16 astronauts in Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, participates in extravehicular activity (EVA) training in bldg 5 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). In the right background is Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. They are inside the Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator (31046); Mattingly (right foreground) and Duke (right backgroung) in the Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator for EVA simulation and training. Astronaut John W. Young, commander, can be seen in the left background (31047).

  3. The THEMIS Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, J. L

    2009-01-01

    The THEMIS mission aims to determine the trigger and large-scale evolution of substorms by employing five identical micro-satellites which line up along the Earth's magnetotail to track the motion of particles, plasma, and waves from one point to another and for the first time, resolve space-time ambiguities in key regions of the magnetosphere on a global scale. The primary goal of THEMIS is to elucidate which magnetotail process is responsible for substorm onset at the region where substorm auroras map: (i) local disruption of the plasma sheet current (current disruption) or (ii) the interaction of the current sheet with the rapid influx of plasma emanating from reconnection. The probes also traverse the radiation belts and the dayside magnetosphere, allowing THEMIS to address additional baseline objectives. This volume describes the mission, the instrumentation, and the data derived from them.

  4. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins. PMID:20887859

  5. The Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey II - Planetary Nebulae kinematics within 200 kpc of the cluster core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiniello, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Arnaboldi, M.; Tortora, C.; Coccato, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Gerhard, O.; Iodice, E.; Spavone, M.; Cantiello, M.; Peletier, R.; Paolillo, M.; Schipani, P.

    2018-06-01

    We present the largest and most spatially extended planetary nebulae (PNe) catalogue ever obtained for the Fornax cluster. We measured velocities of 1452 PNe out to 200 kpc in the cluster core using a counter-dispersed slitless spectroscopic technique with data from FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). With such an extended spatial coverage, we can study separately the stellar haloes of some of the cluster main galaxies and the intracluster light. In this second paper of the Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey, we identify and classify the emission-line sources, describe the method to select PNe, and calculate their coordinates and velocities from the dispersed slitless images. From the PN 2D velocity map, we identify stellar streams that are possibly tracing the gravitational interaction of NGC 1399 with NGC 1404 and NGC 1387. We also present the velocity dispersion profile out to ˜200 kpc radii, which shows signatures of a superposition of the bright central galaxy and the cluster potential, with the latter clearly dominating the regions outside R ˜ 1000 arcsec (˜100 kpc).

  6. Cluster analysis technique for assessing variability in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp accessions from Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajayi Abiola Toyin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability among 10 accessions of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp was studied by the use of 13 qualitative and 13 quantitative traits. From the results on qualitative traits, dendrogram grouped the 10 accessions into two major clusters, 1 and 2.Cluster 1 had 3 accessions and cluster 2 had 2 sub-clusters (I and II, having 2 accessions in sub-cluster I and 5 accessions in sub-cluster II. The dendrogram revealed two major clusters, 1 and 2, for quantitative data, for the 10 accessions. At distance of 4 and 6, cluster 1 had two sub-clusters (I and II, with sub-cluster I having 5 accessions, sub-cluster II having 4 accessions while cluster 2 had only 1 accession. This study made the observation that identification of the right agro-morphological traits of high discriminating capacity is essential, before embarking on any genetic diversity; as it was revealed that some traits discriminated more efficiently among the accessions than others. A group of accessions, which are NGSA1, NGSA2, NGSA3, NGSA4, NGSA7, NGSA9 and NGSA10, was identified as being different from the others for number of seeds per pod, pod length, plant height, peduncle length, seed weight and number of pods per plant. These accessions may be good for cowpea improvement programs.

  7. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  8. Asteroid Rendezvous Mission Design Using Multiobjective Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-zhong Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new preliminary trajectory design method for asteroid rendezvous mission using multiobjective optimization techniques is proposed. This method can overcome the disadvantages of the widely employed Pork-Chop method. The multiobjective integrated launch window and multi-impulse transfer trajectory design model is formulated, which employes minimum-fuel cost and minimum-time transfer as two objective functions. The multiobjective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO is employed to locate the Pareto solution. The optimization results of two different asteroid mission designs show that the proposed approach can effectively and efficiently demonstrate the relations among the mission characteristic parameters such as launch time, transfer time, propellant cost, and number of maneuvers, which will provide very useful reference for practical asteroid mission design. Compared with the PCP method, the proposed approach is demonstrated to be able to provide much more easily used results, obtain better propellant-optimal solutions, and have much better efficiency. The MOPSO shows a very competitive performance with respect to the NSGA-II and the SPEA-II; besides a proposed boundary constraint optimization strategy is testified to be able to improve its performance.

  9. Trusteeship: shared mission for religious and laity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, W L

    1981-03-01

    Serving as a trustee requires commitment to a particular congregation's spirit or charism and to the health care apostolate. Vatican Council II urges that laypersons take the responsibility to share with religious as partners in furthering the Church's mission.

  10. Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: Cluster science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, J.-B.; Bonaldi, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Hagstotz, S.; Diego, J. M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Grandis, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ferraro, S.; Tramonte, D.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Basu, K.; Battye, R. A.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greenslade, J.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maffei, B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Roman, M.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.

    2018-04-01

    We examine the cosmological constraints that can be achieved with a galaxy cluster survey with the future CORE space mission. Using realistic simulations of the millimeter sky, produced with the latest version of the Planck Sky Model, we characterize the CORE cluster catalogues as a function of the main mission performance parameters. We pay particular attention to telescope size, key to improved angular resolution, and discuss the comparison and the complementarity of CORE with ambitious future ground-based CMB experiments that could be deployed in the next decade. A possible CORE mission concept with a 150 cm diameter primary mirror can detect of the order of 50,000 clusters through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). The total yield increases (decreases) by 25% when increasing (decreasing) the mirror diameter by 30 cm. The 150 cm telescope configuration will detect the most massive clusters (>1014 Msolar) at redshift z>1.5 over the whole sky, although the exact number above this redshift is tied to the uncertain evolution of the cluster SZE flux-mass relation; assuming self-similar evolution, CORE will detect 0~ 50 clusters at redshift z>1.5. This changes to 800 (200) when increasing (decreasing) the mirror size by 30 cm. CORE will be able to measure individual cluster halo masses through lensing of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with a 1-σ sensitivity of 4×1014 Msolar, for a 120 cm aperture telescope, and 1014 Msolar for a 180 cm one. From the ground, we estimate that, for example, a survey with about 150,000 detectors at the focus of 350 cm telescopes observing 65% of the sky would be shallower than CORE and detect about 11,000 clusters, while a survey with the same number of detectors observing 25% of sky with a 10 m telescope is expected to be deeper and to detect about 70,000 clusters. When combined with the latter, CORE would reach a limiting mass of M500 ~ 2‑3 × 1013 Msolar and detect 220,000 clusters (5 sigma detection limit

  11. Communications and Media: Grade 7. Cluster II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 7, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Communications and Media." It is divided into six units: advertising, film and photography, radio and television, journalism and publishing, library and periodicals, and transocean communications. Each unit is introduced by a statement of the topic, the…

  12. Topology in two dimensions. II - The Abell and ACO cluster catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plionis, Manolis; Valdarnini, Riccardo; Coles, Peter

    1992-09-01

    We apply a method for quantifying the topology of projected galaxy clustering to the Abell and ACO catalogues of rich clusters. We use numerical simulations to quantify the statistical bias involved in using high peaks to define the large-scale structure, and we use the results obtained to correct our observational determinations for this known selection effect and also for possible errors introduced by boundary effects. We find that the Abell cluster sample is consistent with clusters being identified with high peaks of a Gaussian random field, but that the ACO shows a slight meatball shift away from the Gaussian behavior over and above that expected purely from the high-peak selection. The most conservative explanation of this effect is that it is caused by some artefact of the procedure used to select the clusters in the two samples.

  13. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  14. Cluster Analysis of Maize Inbred Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiban Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of diversity among inbred lines is important for heterosis breeding. Sixty maize inbred lines were evaluated for their eight agro morphological traits during winter season of 2011 to analyze their genetic diversity. Clustering was done by average linkage method. The inbred lines were grouped into six clusters. Inbred lines grouped into Clusters II had taller plants with maximum number of leaves. The cluster III was characterized with shorter plants with minimum number of leaves. The inbred lines categorized into cluster V had early flowering whereas the group into cluster VI had late flowering time. The inbred lines grouped into the cluster III were characterized by higher value of anthesis silking interval (ASI and those of cluster VI had lower value of ASI. These results showed that the inbred lines having widely divergent clusters can be utilized in hybrid breeding programme.

  15. In-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy with MIMOS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, Iris, E-mail: fleischi@uni-mainz.de; Klingelhoefer, Goestar [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany); Morris, Richard V. [NASA Johnson Space Center (United States); Schroeder, Christian [University of Bayreuth and University of Tuebingen (Germany); Rodionov, Daniel [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany); Souza, Paulo A. de [Tasmanian ICT Centre (Australia); Collaboration: MIMOS II Team

    2012-03-15

    The miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer MIMOS II was developed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. Two MIMOS II instruments were successfully deployed on the martian surface as payload elements of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and have returned data since landing in January 2004. Moessbauer spectroscopy has made significant contributions to the success of the MER mission, in particular identification of iron-bearing minerals formed through aqueous weathering processes. As a field-portable instrument and with backscattering geometry, MIMOS II provides an opportunity for non-destructive in-situ investigations for a range of applications. For example, the instrument has been used for analyses of archaeological artifacts, for air pollution studies and for in-field monitoring of green rust formation. A MER-type MIMOS II instrument is part of the payload of the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission, scheduled for launch in November 2011, with the aim of exploring the composition of the martian moon Phobos. An advanced version of the instrument, MIMOS IIA, that incorporates capability for elemental analyses, is currently under development.

  16. Constraining hydrostatic mass bias of galaxy clusters with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Naomi; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2018-04-01

    Gas motions in galaxy clusters play important roles in determining the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) and in the constraint of cosmological parameters via X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect observations of galaxy clusters. The Hitomi measurements of gas motions in the core of the Perseus Cluster have provided new insights into the physics in galaxy clusters. The XARM mission, equipped with the Resolve X-ray micro-calorimeter, will continue Hitomi's legacy by measuring ICM motions through Doppler shifting and broadening of emission lines in a larger number of galaxy clusters, and at larger radii. In this work, we investigate how well we can measure bulk and turbulent gas motions in the ICM with XARM, by analyzing mock XARM simulations of galaxy clusters extracted from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We assess how photon counts, spectral fitting methods, multiphase ICM structure, deprojections, and region selection affect the measurements of gas motions. We first show that XARM is capable of recovering the underlying spherically averaged turbulent and bulk velocity profiles for dynamically relaxed clusters to within ˜50% with a reasonable amount of photon counts in the X-ray emission lines. We also find that there are considerable azimuthal variations in the ICM velocities, where the velocities measured in a single azimuthal direction can significantly deviate from the true value even in dynamically relaxed systems. Such variation must be taken into account when interpreting data and developing observing strategies. We will discuss the prospect of using the upcoming XARM mission to measure non-thermal pressure and to correct for the hydrostatic mass bias of galaxy clusters. Our results are broadly applicable for future X-ray missions, such as Athena and Lynx.

  17. Constraining hydrostatic mass bias of galaxy clusters with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Naomi; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2018-06-01

    Gas motions in galaxy clusters play important roles in determining the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) and in the constraint of cosmological parameters via X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect observations of galaxy clusters. The Hitomi measurements of gas motions in the core of the Perseus Cluster have provided new insights into the physics in galaxy clusters. The XARM mission, equipped with the Resolve X-ray micro-calorimeter, will continue Hitomi's legacy by measuring ICM motions through Doppler shifting and broadening of emission lines in a larger number of galaxy clusters, and at larger radii. In this work, we investigate how well we can measure bulk and turbulent gas motions in the ICM with XARM, by analyzing mock XARM simulations of galaxy clusters extracted from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We assess how photon counts, spectral fitting methods, multiphase ICM structure, deprojections, and region selection affect the measurements of gas motions. We first show that XARM is capable of recovering the underlying spherically averaged turbulent and bulk velocity profiles for dynamically relaxed clusters to within ˜50% with a reasonable amount of photon counts in the X-ray emission lines. We also find that there are considerable azimuthal variations in the ICM velocities, where the velocities measured in a single azimuthal direction can significantly deviate from the true value even in dynamically relaxed systems. Such variation must be taken into account when interpreting data and developing observing strategies. We will discuss the prospect of using the upcoming XARM mission to measure non-thermal pressure and to correct for the hydrostatic mass bias of galaxy clusters. Our results are broadly applicable for future X-ray missions, such as Athena and Lynx.

  18. The Spartan 1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruddace, Raymond G.; Fritz, G. G.; Shrewsberry, D. J.; Brandenstein, D. J.; Creighton, D. C.; Gutschewski, G.; Lucid, S. W.; Nagel, J. M.; Fabian, J. M.; Zimmerman, D.

    1989-01-01

    The first Spartan mission is documented. The Spartan program, an outgrowth of a joint Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) development effort, was instituted by NASA for launching autonomous, recoverable payloads from the space shuttle. These payloads have a precise pointing system and are intended to support a wide range of space-science observations and experiments. The first Spartan, carrying an NRL X-ray astronomy instrument, was launched by the orbiter Discovery (STS51G) on June 20, 1985 and recovered successfully 45 h later, on June 22. During this period, Spartan 1 conducted a preprogrammed series of observations of two X-ray sources: the Perseus cluster of galaxies and the center of our galaxy. The mission was successful from both on engineering and a scientific viewpoint. Only one problem was encountered, the attitude control system (ACS) shut down earlier than planned because of high attitude control system gas consumption. A preplanned emergency mode then placed Spartan 1 into a stable, safe condition and allowed a safe recovery. The events are described of the mission and presents X-ray maps of the two observed sources, which were produced from the flight data.

  19. From collisions to clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    -principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong enough...... control. As a consequence, the clusters show very dynamic ion pair structure, which differs from both the static structure optimisation calculations and the equilibrium first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In some of the simulation runs, water mediates the proton transfer by acting as a proton...... to overcome the possible initial non-optimal collision orientations. No post-collisional cluster break up is observed. The reasons for the efficient clustering are (i) the proton transfer reaction which takes place in each of the collision simulations and (ii) the subsequent competition over the proton...

  20. Assessment of genetic divergence in tomato through agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Q.; Saleem, M.Y.; Hameed, A.; Asghar, M.

    2014-01-01

    For the improvement of qualitative and quantitative traits, existence of variability has prime importance in plant breeding. Data on different morphological and reproductive traits of 47 tomato genotypes were analyzed for correlation,agglomerative hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) to select genotypes and traits for future breeding program. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive association between yield and yield components like fruit diameter, single fruit weight and number of fruits plant-1. Principal component (PC) analysis depicted first three PCs with Eigen-value higher than 1 contributing 81.72% of total variability for different traits. The PC-I showed positive factor loadings for all the traits except number of fruits plant-1. The contribution of single fruit weight and fruit diameter was highest in PC-1. Cluster analysis grouped all genotypes into five divergent clusters. The genotypes in cluster-II and cluster-V exhibited uniform maturity and higher yield. The D2 statistics confirmed highest distance between cluster- III and cluster-V while maximum similarity was observed in cluster-II and cluster-III. It is therefore suggested that crosses between genotypes of cluster-II and cluster-V with those of cluster-I and cluster-III may exhibit heterosis in F1 for hybrid breeding and for selection of superior genotypes in succeeding generations for cross breeding programme. (author)

  1. MAPS OF MASSIVE CLUMPS IN THE EARLY STAGE OF CLUSTER FORMATION: TWO MODES OF CLUSTER FORMATION, COEVAL OR NON-COEVAL?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Aya E.; Saito, Masao; Mauersberger, Rainer; Kawabe, Ryohei [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Kurono, Yasutaka; Naoi, Takahiro, E-mail: ahiguchi@alma.cl [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-10

    We present maps of seven young massive molecular clumps within five target regions in C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) line emission, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. These clumps, which are not associated with clusters, lie at distances between 0.7 and 2.1 kpc. We find C{sup 18}O clumps with radii of 0.5-1.7 pc, masses of 470-4200 M{sub Sun }, and velocity widths of 1.4-3.3 km s{sup -1}. All of the clumps are massive and approximately in virial equilibrium, suggesting they will potentially form clusters. Three of our target regions are associated with H II regions (CWHRs), while the other two are unassociated with H II regions (CWOHRs). The C{sup 18}O clumps can be classified into two morphological types: CWHRs with a filamentary or shell-like structure and spherical CWOHRs. The two CWOHRs have systematic velocity gradients. Using the publicly released WISE database, Class I and Class II protostellar candidates are identified within the C{sup 18}O clumps. The fraction of Class I candidates among all YSO candidates (Class I+Class II) is {>=}50% in CWHRs and {<=}50% in CWOHRs. We conclude that effects from the H II regions can be seen in (1) the spatial distributions of the clumps: filamentary or shell-like structure running along the H II regions; (2) the velocity structures of the clumps: large velocity dispersion along shells; and (3) the small age spreads of YSOs. The small spreads in age of the YSOs show that the presence of H II regions tends to trigger coeval cluster formation.

  2. Summary Report on Phase I and Phase II Results From the 3D Printing in Zero-G Technology Demonstration Mission. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, T. J.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2018-01-01

    In-space manufacturing seeks to develop the processes, skill sets, and certification architecture needed to provide a rapid response manufacturing capability on long-duration exploration missions. The first 3D printer on the Space Station was developed by Made in Space, Inc. and completed two rounds of operation on orbit as part of the 3D Printing in Zero-G Technology Demonstration Mission. This Technical Publication provides a comprehensive overview of the technical objections of the mission, the two phases of hardware operation conducted on orbit, and the subsequent detailed analysis of specimens produced. No engineering significant evidence of microgravity effects on material outcomes was noted. This technology demonstration mission represents the first step in developing a suite of manufacturing capabilities to meet future mission needs.

  3. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  4. Cosmology, Clusters and Calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2005-01-01

    I will review the current state of Cosmology with Clusters and discuss the application of microcalorimeter arrays to this field. With the launch of Astro-E2 this summer and a slew of new missions being developed, microcalorimeters are the next big thing in x-ray astronomy. I will cover the basics and not-so-basic concepts of microcalorimeter designs and look at the future to see where this technology will go.

  5. Megapixel Longwave Infrared SLS FPAs for High Spatial Resolution Earth Observing Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth observing missions like NASA's LANDSAT Data Continuity Mission - Thermal Infrared Sensor (LDCM-TIRS) require greater spatial resolution of the earth than the ~...

  6. In-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy with MIMOS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, Iris; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Morris, Richard V.; Schröder, Christian; Rodionov, Daniel; Souza, Paulo A. de

    2012-01-01

    The miniaturized Mössbauer spectrometer MIMOS II was developed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. Two MIMOS II instruments were successfully deployed on the martian surface as payload elements of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and have returned data since landing in January 2004. Mössbauer spectroscopy has made significant contributions to the success of the MER mission, in particular identification of iron-bearing minerals formed through aqueous weathering processes. As a field-portable instrument and with backscattering geometry, MIMOS II provides an opportunity for non-destructive in-situ investigations for a range of applications. For example, the instrument has been used for analyses of archaeological artifacts, for air pollution studies and for in-field monitoring of green rust formation. A MER-type MIMOS II instrument is part of the payload of the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission, scheduled for launch in November 2011, with the aim of exploring the composition of the martian moon Phobos. An advanced version of the instrument, MIMOS IIA, that incorporates capability for elemental analyses, is currently under development.

  7. Euclid Mission: Mapping the Geometry of the Dark Universe. Mission and Consortium Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Euclid concept: (1) High-precision survey mission to map the geometry of the Dark Universe (2) Optimized for two complementary cosmological probes: (2a) Weak Gravitational Lensing (2b) Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (2c) Additional probes: clusters, redshift space distortions, ISW (3) Full extragalactic sky survey with 1.2m telescope at L2: (3a) Imaging: (3a-1) High precision imaging at visible wavelengths (3a-2) Photometry/Imaging in the near-infrared (3b) Near Infrared Spectroscopy (4) Synergy with ground based surveys (5) Legacy science for a wide range of in astronomy

  8. Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Robotic Science Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — C3 Propulsion's Hybrid Propulsion Technology will be applied to a NASA selected Sample Return Mission. Phase I will demonstrate Proof-of-Principle and Phase II will...

  9. The W40 region in the gould belt: An embedded cluster and H II region at the junction of filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Kumar, M. S. N. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 s/n Porto (Portugal); Bachiller, Rafael [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Samal, M. R. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille), UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Pirogov, L., E-mail: kshitiz@tifr.res.in [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Uljanov str., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 μm H{sub 2} narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ∼34' × 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pc—matching well with the extent of radio emission—with a peak density of 650 pc{sup –2}. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass—126 M {sub ☉} and 71 M {sub ☉} for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H{sub 2} narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)—followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even

  10. ATCA observations of the MACS-Planck Radio Halo Cluster Project. II. Radio observations of an intermediate redshift cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Aviles, G.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Ferrari, C.; Venturi, T.; Democles, J.; Dallacasa, D.; Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Arnaud, M.; Aghanim, N.; Brown, S.; Douspis, M.; Hurier, J.; Intema, H. T.; Langer, M.; Macario, G.; Pointecouteau, E.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources whose origins are investigated through multi-wavelength studies of cluster samples. We investigate the presence of diffuse radio emission in a sample of seven galaxy clusters in the largely unexplored intermediate redshift range (0.3 http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A94

  11. Star clusters and K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jessie; Barentsen, Geert; Cody, Ann Marie

    2018-01-01

    The K2 survey has expanded the Kepler legacy by using the repurposed spacecraft to observe over 20 star clusters. The sample includes open and globular clusters at all ages, including very young (1-10 Myr, e.g. Taurus, Upper Sco, NGC 6530), moderately young (0.1-1 Gyr, e.g. M35, M44, Pleiades, Hyades), middle-aged (e.g. M67, Ruprecht 147, NGC 2158), and old globular clusters (e.g. M9, M19, Terzan 5). K2 observations of stellar clusters are exploring the rotation period-mass relationship to significantly lower masses than was previously possible, shedding light on the angular momentum budget and its dependence on mass and circumstellar disk properties, and illuminating the role of multiplicity in stellar angular momentum. Exoplanets discovered by K2 in stellar clusters provides planetary systems ripe for modeling given the extensive information available about their ages and environment. I will review the star clusters sampled by K2 across 16 fields so far, highlighting several characteristics, caveats, and unexplored uses of the public data set along the way. With fuel expected to run out in 2018, I will discuss the closing Campaigns, highlight the final target selection opportunities, and explain the data archive and TESS-compatible software tools the K2 mission intends to leave behind for posterity.

  12. Directional clustering in highest energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Haim; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    An unexpected degree of small-scale clustering is observed in highest-energy cosmic ray events. Some directional clustering can be expected due to purely statistical fluctuations for sources distributed randomly in the sky. This creates a background for events originating in clustered sources. We derive analytic formulas to estimate the probability of random cluster configurations, and use these formulas to study the strong potential of the HiRes, Auger, Telescope Array and EUSO-OWL-AirWatch facilities for deciding whether any observed clustering is most likely due to nonrandom sources. For a detailed comparison to data, our analytical approach cannot compete with Monte Carlo simulations, including experimental systematics. However, our derived formulas do offer two advantages: (i) easy assessment of the significance of any observed clustering, and most importantly, (ii) an explicit dependence of cluster probabilities on the chosen angular bin size

  13. Adaptive Resource Estimation and Visualization for Planning Robotic Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future human exploration missions will include remotely operated rovers performing surface exploration and science, as well as free-flyers to reduce the need...

  14. Dynamical evolution of galaxies in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostriker, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In addition to the processes involved in the evolution of star clusters, there are three kinds of processes that are peculiar to, or far more important in, galaxy clusters than in star clusters: galaxy interactions with gas, high-velocity tidal interactions, and accretion and cannibalism. The latter is discussed at some length; analytical calculations for the apparent luminosity evolution of the first brightest galaxy and the apparent luminosity evolution of M 12 are described, along with the numerical simulation of cluster evolution. It appears that many of the notable features of centrally condensed clusters of galaxies, particularly the presence of very luminous but low-surface-brightness central cD systems, can be understood in terms of a straightforward dynamical theory of galactic cannibalism. It is possible to maintain the hypothesis that dynamical evolution gradually transforms Bautz--Morgan III clusters to type II systems or type I systems. 36 references, 5 figures

  15. Modelling of Krn+ Clusters. II. Photoabsorption Spectra of Small Clusters (n=2 - 5)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalus, R.; Paidarová, Ivana; Hrivňák, D.; Gadea, F. X.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 298, 1/3 (2004), s. 155-166 ISSN 0301-0104 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/1204 Grant - others:Barrande Program(XE) 2003-024-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : krypton * rare gases * cluster ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.316, year: 2004

  16. Nuclear thermal rocket clustering: 1, A summary of previous work and relevant issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    A general review of the technical merits of nuclear thermal rocket clustering is presented. A summary of previous analyses performed during the Rover program is presented and used to assess clustering in the context of projected Space Exploration Initiative missions. A number of technical issues are discussed including cluster reliability, engine-out operation, neutronic coupling, shutdown core power generation, shutdown reactivity requirements, reactor kinetics, and radiation shielding. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Going Beyond Einstein with the Constellation-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation-X mission will address the questions: "What happens to matter close to a black hole?" and "What is Dark Energy?" These questions are central to the NASA Beyond Einstein Program, where Constellation-X plays a central role. The mission will address these questions by using high throughput X-ray spectroscopy to observe the effects of strong gravity close to the event horizon of black holes, and to observe the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies in order to precisely determine Cosmological parameters. To achieve these primary science goals requires a factor of 25-100 increase in sensitivity for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy.'The mission will also perform routine high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of faint 2nd extended X-ray source populations. This will provide diagnostic information such as density, elemental abundances, velocity; and ionization state for a wide range of astrophysical problems, including new constraints on the Neutron Star equation of state.

  18. Intracluster light at the Frontier - II. The Frontier Fields Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Mireia; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2018-02-01

    Multiwavelength deep observations are a key tool to understand the origin of the diffuse light in clusters of galaxies: the intracluster light (ICL). For this reason, we take advantage of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) survey to investigate the properties of the stellar populations of the ICL of its six massive intermediate redshift (0.3 1015 M⊙) clusters is formed by the stripping of MW-like objects that have been accreted at z < 1, in agreement with current simulations. We do not find any significant increase in the fraction of light of the ICL with cosmic time, although the redshift range explored is narrow to derive any strong conclusion. When exploring the slope of the stellar mass density profile, we found that the ICL of the HFF clusters follows the shape of their underlying dark matter haloes, in agreement with the idea that the ICL is the result of the stripping of galaxies at recent times.

  19. BES-II fast data reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Gang; Zhang Jiawen; Guo Yiqing; Zhang Shaoqiang; Zhao Dixin

    2002-01-01

    The BES-II fast data reconstruction is reported. Based on PC FARM and/or a 'Distributed Clustered Linux PC System', BES-II fast data reconstruction system is set up. With this system the BES-II data can be fully reconstructed in about 20 minutes after data collection. It takes only 12 minutes to fully reconstruct 30000 events, collected with BES-II detector at BEPC Collider, with a P III-800 PC. The detector performance can be examined based on fully reconstructed data in about 20 minutes after data taking in the BES-II experiment

  20. Six-Axis Force-Torque Transducer for Mars 2018 Mission, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A transducer element that is hearty enough for a Mars lander mission needs to be developed so that a six-axis force and torque transducer is possible. The technical...

  1. OSO 8 X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies. II - Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. W.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An observational description of X-ray clusters of galaxies is given based on OSO 8 X-ray results for spatially integrated spectra of 20 such clusters and various correlations obtained from these results. It is found from a correlation between temperature and velocity dispersion that the X-ray core radius should be less than the galaxy core radius or, alternatively, that the polytropic index is about 1.1 for most of the 20 clusters. Analysis of a correlation between temperature and emission integral yields evidence that more massive clusters accumulate a larger fraction of their mass as intracluster gas. Galaxy densities and optical morphology, as they correlate with X-ray properties, are reexamined for indications as to how mass injection by galaxies affects the density structure of the gas. The physical arguments used to derive iron abundances from observed equivalent widths of iron line features in X-ray spectra are critically evaluated, and the associated uncertainties in abundances derived in this manner are estimated to be quite large.

  2. Modeling of correlated data with informative cluster sizes: An evaluation of joint modeling and within-cluster resampling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhiwei; Qu, Yanping; Chen, Zhen; Albert, Paul S

    2017-08-01

    Joint modeling and within-cluster resampling are two approaches that are used for analyzing correlated data with informative cluster sizes. Motivated by a developmental toxicity study, we examined the performances and validity of these two approaches in testing covariate effects in generalized linear mixed-effects models. We show that the joint modeling approach is robust to the misspecification of cluster size models in terms of Type I and Type II errors when the corresponding covariates are not included in the random effects structure; otherwise, statistical tests may be affected. We also evaluate the performance of the within-cluster resampling procedure and thoroughly investigate the validity of it in modeling correlated data with informative cluster sizes. We show that within-cluster resampling is a valid alternative to joint modeling for cluster-specific covariates, but it is invalid for time-dependent covariates. The two methods are applied to a developmental toxicity study that investigated the effect of exposure to diethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

  3. Yellow supergiants in open clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowell, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Superluminous giant stars (SLGs) have been reported in young globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These stars appear to be in the post-asymptotic-giant-branch phase of evolution. This program was an investigation of galactic SLG candidates in open clusters, which are more like the LMC young globular clusters. These were chosen because luminosity, mass, and age determinations can be made for members since cluster distances and interstellar reddenings are known. Color magnitude diagrams were searched for candidates, using the same selection criteria as for SLGs in the LMC. Classification spectra were obtained of 115 program stars from McGraw-Hill Observatory and of 68 stars from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Chile. These stars were visually classified on the MK system using spectral scans of standard stars taken at the respective observations. Published information was combined with this program's data for 83 stars in 30 clusters. Membership probabilities were assigned to these stars, and the clusters were analyzed according to age. It was seen that the intrinsically brightest supergiants are found in the youngest clusters. With increasing cluster age, the absolute luminosities attained by the supergiants decline. Also, it appears that the evolutionary tracks of luminosity class II stars are more similar to those of class I than of class III

  4. Trajectory Design Considerations for Exploration Mission 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Timothy F.; Gutkowski, Jeffrey P.; Batcha, Amelia L.; Williams, Jacob; Pedrotty, Samuel M.

    2018-01-01

    Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will be the first mission to send an uncrewed Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to cislunar space in the fall of 2019. EM-1 was originally conceived as a lunar free-return mission, but was later changed to a Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO) mission as a precursor to the Asteroid Redirect Mission. To understand the required mission performance (i.e., propellant requirement), a series of trajectory optimization runs was conducted using JSC's Copernicus spacecraft trajectory optimization tool. In order for the runs to be done in a timely manner, it was necessary to employ a parallelization approach on a computing cluster using a new trajectory scan tool written in Python. Details of the scan tool are provided and how it is used to perform the scans and post-process the results. Initially, a scan of daily due east launched EM-1 DRO missions in 2018 was made. Valid mission opportunities are ones that do not exceed the useable propellant available to perform the required burns. The initial scan data showed the propellant and delta-V performance patterns for each launch period. As questions were raised from different subsystems (e.g., power, thermal, communications, flight operations, etc.), the mission parameters or data that were of interest to them were added to the scan output data file. The additional data includes: (1) local launch and landing times in relation to sunrise and sunset, (2) length of eclipse periods during the in-space portion of the mission, (3) Earth line of sight from cislunar space, (4) Deep Space Network field of view looking towards cislunar space, and (5) variation of the downrange distance from Earth entry interface to splashdown. Mission design trades can also be performed based on the information that the additional data shows. For example, if the landing is in darkness, but the recovery operations team desires a landing in daylight, then an analysis is performed to determine how to change the mission design

  5. Study of II Galactic quadrant of Milky Way Galaxy using open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Devendra; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Baliyan, Kiran Singh; Yadav, Ramakant Singh; Durgapal, Alok

    2018-04-01

    We have made UBV I CCD observations for the open clusters Teutsch 1, Riddle 4 and Czernik 6 using 1.04-m Sampurnanand telescope located at the ARIES observatory (Manora peak, Nainital, India). We have used 2MASS JHKS data for the clusters Teutsch 126, Teutsch 54 and Czernik 3. For the estimation of fundamental parameters, we have plotted radial density profiles, colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams. Using these inputs, we have studied the structure of Milky Way Galaxy in the second Galactic quadrant. We have considered the open clusters that are younger than 1 Gyrs and lay in the longitude range from 90 to 180 deg. Our study shows that up to 3.5 Kpc, the Galactic disc bends towards the southern hemisphere while after 3.5 Kpc it bends towards the northern hemisphere. The distribution of reddening with longitude and age shows a decreasing trend with the longitude and age of the clusters. Our study also indicates that younger clusters have more reddening than older ones.

  6. Intrinsic alignment in redMaPPer clusters - II. Radial alignment of satellites towards cluster centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Jin; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Freeman, Peter E.; Chen, Yen-Chi; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli

    2018-03-01

    We study the orientations of satellite galaxies in redMaPPer clusters constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at 0.1 measurement methods (re-Gaussianization, de Vaucouleurs, and isophotal shapes), which trace galaxy light profiles at different radii. The measured SA signal depends on these shape measurement methods. We detect the strongest SA signal in isophotal shapes, followed by de Vaucouleurs shapes. While no net SA signal is detected using re-Gaussianization shapes across the entire sample, the observed SA signal reaches a statistically significant level when limiting to a subsample of higher luminosity satellites. We further investigate the impact of noise, systematics, and real physical isophotal twisting effects in the comparison between the SA signal detected via different shape measurement methods. Unlike previous studies, which only consider the dependence of SA on a few parameters, here we explore a total of 17 galaxy and cluster properties, using a statistical model averaging technique to naturally account for parameter correlations and identify significant SA predictors. We find that the measured SA signal is strongest for satellites with the following characteristics: higher luminosity, smaller distance to the cluster centre, rounder in shape, higher bulge fraction, and distributed preferentially along the major axis directions of their centrals. Finally, we provide physical explanations for the identified dependences and discuss the connection to theories of SA.

  7. Performance of small cluster surveys and the clustered LQAS design to estimate local-level vaccination coverage in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Andrea; Riera-Montes, Margarita; Nackers, Fabienne; Roederer, Thomas; Koudika, Marie Hortense; Sekkenes, Johanne; Taconet, Aurore; Fermon, Florence; Touré, Albouhary; Grais, Rebecca F; Checchi, Francesco

    2012-10-12

    Estimation of vaccination coverage at the local level is essential to identify communities that may require additional support. Cluster surveys can be used in resource-poor settings, when population figures are inaccurate. To be feasible, cluster samples need to be small, without losing robustness of results. The clustered LQAS (CLQAS) approach has been proposed as an alternative, as smaller sample sizes are required. We explored (i) the efficiency of cluster surveys of decreasing sample size through bootstrapping analysis and (ii) the performance of CLQAS under three alternative sampling plans to classify local VC, using data from a survey carried out in Mali after mass vaccination against meningococcal meningitis group A. VC estimates provided by a 10 × 15 cluster survey design were reasonably robust. We used them to classify health areas in three categories and guide mop-up activities: i) health areas not requiring supplemental activities; ii) health areas requiring additional vaccination; iii) health areas requiring further evaluation. As sample size decreased (from 10 × 15 to 10 × 3), standard error of VC and ICC estimates were increasingly unstable. Results of CLQAS simulations were not accurate for most health areas, with an overall risk of misclassification greater than 0.25 in one health area out of three. It was greater than 0.50 in one health area out of two under two of the three sampling plans. Small sample cluster surveys (10 × 15) are acceptably robust for classification of VC at local level. We do not recommend the CLQAS method as currently formulated for evaluating vaccination programmes.

  8. Dairy Herd Mastitis Program in Argentina: Farm Clusters and Effects on Bulk Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vissio1*, SA Dieser2, CG Raspanti2, JA Giraudo1, CI Bogni2, LM Odierno2 and AJ Larriestra1

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been conducted to characterize dairy farm clusters according to mastitis control program practiced among small and medium dairy producer from Argentina, and also to evaluate the effect of such farm cluster patterns on bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC. Two samples of 51 (cross-sectional and 38 (longitudinal herds were selected to identify farm clusters and study the influence of management on monthly BMSCC, respectively. The cross-sectional sample involved the milking routine and facilities assessment of each herd visited. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to find the most discriminating farm attributes in the cross sectional sample. Afterward, the herd cluster typologies were identified in the longitudinal sample. Herd monthly BMSCC average was evaluated during 12 months fitting a linear mixed model. Two clusters were identified, the farms in the Cluster I applied a comprehensive mastitis program in opposite to Cluster II. Post-dipping, dry cow therapy and milking machine test were routinely applied in Cluster I. In the longitudinal study, 14 out of 38 dairy herds were labeled as Cluster I and the rest were assigned to Cluster II. Significant difference in BMSCC was found between cluster I and II (60,000 cells/mL. The present study showed the relevance and potential impact of promoting mastitis control practices among small and medium sized dairy producers in Argentina.

  9. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  10. Metallothionein Zn(2+)- and Cu(2+)-clusters from first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Per Junior; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2012-01-01

    Detailed electronic structures of Zn(ii) and Cu(ii) clusters from metallothioneins (MT) have been obtained using density functional theory (DFT), in order to investigate how oxidative stress-caused Cu(ii) intermediates affect Zn-binding to MT and cooperatively lead to Cu(i)MT. The inferred accura...

  11. Old star clusters: Bench tests of low mass stellar models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaris M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Old star clusters in the Milky Way and external galaxies have been (and still are traditionally used to constrain the age of the universe and the timescales of galaxy formation. A parallel avenue of old star cluster research considers these objects as bench tests of low-mass stellar models. This short review will highlight some recent tests of stellar evolution models that make use of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved old star clusters. In some cases these tests have pointed to additional physical processes efficient in low-mass stars, that are not routinely included in model computations. Moreover, recent results from the Kepler mission about the old open cluster NGC6791 are adding new tight constraints to the models.

  12. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.

    2011-01-01

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that LCLS-II only

  13. A mission executor for an autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh-Jeng; Wilkinson, Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School has been conducting research into the design and testing of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). One facet of this research is to incrementally design a software architecture and implement it in an advanced testbed, the AUV II. As part of the high level architecture, a Mission Executor is being constructed using CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) version 5.0. The Mission Executor is an expert system designed to oversee progress from the AUV launch point to a goal area and back to the origin. It is expected that the executor will make informed decisions about the mission, taking into account the navigational path, the vehicle subsystem health, and the sea environment, as well as the specific mission profile which is downloaded from an offboard mission planner. Heuristics for maneuvering, avoidance of uncharted obstacles, waypoint navigation, and reaction to emergencies (essentially the expert knowledge of a submarine captain) are required. Many of the vehicle subsystems are modeled as objects using the CLIPS Object Oriented Language (COOL) embedded in CLIPS 5.0. Also, truth maintenance is applied to the knowledge base to keep configurations updated.

  14. The MUSIC of galaxy clusters - II. X-ray global properties and scaling relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, V.; Sembolini, F.; De Petris, M.; Valdarnini, R.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present the X-ray properties and scaling relations of a large sample of clusters extracted from the Marenostrum MUltidark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) data set. We focus on a sub-sample of 179 clusters at redshift z ˜ 0.11, with 3.2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ mass. We employed the X-ray photon simulator PHOX to obtain synthetic Chandra observations and derive observable-like global properties of the intracluster medium (ICM), as X-ray temperature (TX) and luminosity (LX). TX is found to slightly underestimate the true mass-weighted temperature, although tracing fairly well the cluster total mass. We also study the effects of TX on scaling relations with cluster intrinsic properties: total (M500 and gas Mg,500 mass; integrated Compton parameter (YSZ) of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) thermal effect; YX = Mg,500 TX. We confirm that YX is a very good mass proxy, with a scatter on M500-YX and YSZ-YX lower than 5 per cent. The study of scaling relations among X-ray, intrinsic and SZ properties indicates that simulated MUSIC clusters reasonably resemble the self-similar prediction, especially for correlations involving TX. The observational approach also allows for a more direct comparison with real clusters, from which we find deviations mainly due to the physical description of the ICM, affecting TX and, particularly, LX.

  15. Performance of small cluster surveys and the clustered LQAS design to estimate local-level vaccination coverage in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minetti Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of vaccination coverage at the local level is essential to identify communities that may require additional support. Cluster surveys can be used in resource-poor settings, when population figures are inaccurate. To be feasible, cluster samples need to be small, without losing robustness of results. The clustered LQAS (CLQAS approach has been proposed as an alternative, as smaller sample sizes are required. Methods We explored (i the efficiency of cluster surveys of decreasing sample size through bootstrapping analysis and (ii the performance of CLQAS under three alternative sampling plans to classify local VC, using data from a survey carried out in Mali after mass vaccination against meningococcal meningitis group A. Results VC estimates provided by a 10 × 15 cluster survey design were reasonably robust. We used them to classify health areas in three categories and guide mop-up activities: i health areas not requiring supplemental activities; ii health areas requiring additional vaccination; iii health areas requiring further evaluation. As sample size decreased (from 10 × 15 to 10 × 3, standard error of VC and ICC estimates were increasingly unstable. Results of CLQAS simulations were not accurate for most health areas, with an overall risk of misclassification greater than 0.25 in one health area out of three. It was greater than 0.50 in one health area out of two under two of the three sampling plans. Conclusions Small sample cluster surveys (10 × 15 are acceptably robust for classification of VC at local level. We do not recommend the CLQAS method as currently formulated for evaluating vaccination programmes.

  16. Algorithms of maximum likelihood data clustering with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giada, Lorenzo; Marsili, Matteo

    2002-12-01

    We address the problem of data clustering by introducing an unsupervised, parameter-free approach based on maximum likelihood principle. Starting from the observation that data sets belonging to the same cluster share a common information, we construct an expression for the likelihood of any possible cluster structure. The likelihood in turn depends only on the Pearson's coefficient of the data. We discuss clustering algorithms that provide a fast and reliable approximation to maximum likelihood configurations. Compared to standard clustering methods, our approach has the advantages that (i) it is parameter free, (ii) the number of clusters need not be fixed in advance and (iii) the interpretation of the results is transparent. In order to test our approach and compare it with standard clustering algorithms, we analyze two very different data sets: time series of financial market returns and gene expression data. We find that different maximization algorithms produce similar cluster structures whereas the outcome of standard algorithms has a much wider variability.

  17. Mission Mars India's quest for the red planet

    CERN Document Server

    Lele, Ajey

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the book is to find an answer to the rationale behind the human quest for the Mars exploration. As a comprehensive assessment for this query is undertaken, it is realized that the basic question ‘Why Mars?’ seeks various responses from technological, economic and geopolitical to strategic perspectives. The book is essentially targeted to understand India’s desire to reach Mars. In the process, it also undertakes some implicit questioning of Mars programmes of various other states essentially to facilitate the setting up of the context for an assessment.   The book is divided into two parts: Part I: This covers both science and politics associated with Mars missions in global scenario and discusses the salient features of various Mars Missions undertaken by various countries. Part II: This provides details in regards to India’s Mars Mission.

  18. LMFBR operational safety: the EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Allen, N.L.; Dean, E.M.; Fryer, R.M.; Larson, H.A.; Lehto, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has evolved from that of a small LMFBR demonstration plant to a major irradiation-test facility. Because of that evolution, many operational-safety issues have been encountered. The paper describes the EBR-II operational-safety experience in four areas: protection-system design, safety-document preparation, tests of off-normal reactor conditions, and tests of elements with breached cladding

  19. METALS IN THE ICM: WITNESSES OF CLUSTER FORMATION AND EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Lovisari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The baryonic composition of galaxy clusters and groups is dominated by a hot, X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM. The mean metallicity of the ICM has been found to be roughly 0.3 ÷ 0.5 times the solar value, therefore a large fraction of this gas cannot be of purely primordial origin. Indeed, the distribution and amount of metals in the ICM is a direct consequence of the past history of star formation in the cluster galaxies and of the processes responsible for the injection of enriched material into the ICM. We here shortly summarize the current views on the chemical enrichment, focusing on the observational evidence in terms of metallicity measurements in clusters, spatial metallicity distribution and evolution, and expectations from future missions.

  20. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interactive Data Language (IDL) is a standard tool used by many researchers in observational fields. Present day Sun-Earth Connection missions like SOHO, or...

  1. The globular cluster system of NGC 1316. II. The extraordinary object SH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtler, T.; Kumar, B.; Bassino, L. P.; Dirsch, B.; Romanowsky, A. J.

    2012-07-01

    Context. SH2 has been described as an isolated HII-region, located about 6.5' south of the nucleus of NGC 1316 (Fornax A), a merger remnant in the the outskirts of the Fornax cluster of galaxies. Aims: We give a first, preliminary description of the stellar content and environment of this remarkable object. Methods: We used photometric data in the Washington system and HST photometry from the Hubble Legacy Archive for a morphological description and preliminary aperture photometry. Low-resolution spectroscopy provides radial velocities of the brightest star cluster in SH2 and a nearby intermediate-age cluster. Results: SH2 is not a normal HII-region, ionized by very young stars. It contains a multitude of star clusters with ages of approximately 108 yr. A ring-like morphology is striking. SH2 seems to be connected to an intermediate-age massive globular cluster with a similar radial velocity, which itself is the main object of a group of fainter clusters. Metallicity estimates from emission lines remain ambiguous. Conclusions: The present data do not yet allow firm conclusions about the nature or origin of SH2. It might be a dwarf galaxy that has experienced a burst of extremely clustered star formation. We may witness how globular clusters are donated to a parent galaxy. Based on observations taken at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, under the programmes 082.B-0680, on observations taken at the Interamerican Observatory, Cerro Tololo, Chile. Furthermore based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST, PI: A. Sandage, Prop.ID: 7504), and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star clusters distances and extinctions. II. (Buckner+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, A. S. M.; Froebrich, D.

    2015-04-01

    Until now, it has been impossible to observationally measure how star cluster scaleheight evolves beyond 1Gyr as only small samples have been available. Here, we establish a novel method to determine the scaleheight of a cluster sample using modelled distributions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. This allows us to determine the scaleheight with a 25% accuracy for samples of 38 clusters or more. We apply our method to investigate the temporal evolution of cluster scaleheight, using homogeneously selected sub-samples of Kharchenko et al. (MWSC, 2012, Cat. J/A+A/543/A156, 2013, J/A+A/558/A53 ), Dias et al. (DAML02, 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl), WEBDA, and Froebrich et al. (FSR, 2007MNRAS.374..399F, Cat. J/MNRAS/374/399). We identify a linear relationship between scaleheight and log(age/yr) of clusters, considerably different from field stars. The scaleheight increases from about 40pc at 1Myr to 75pc at 1Gyr, most likely due to internal evolution and external scattering events. After 1Gyr, there is a marked change of the behaviour, with the scaleheight linearly increasing with log(age/yr) to about 550pc at 3.5Gyr. The most likely interpretation is that the surviving clusters are only observable because they have been scattered away from the mid-plane in their past. A detailed understanding of this observational evidence can only be achieved with numerical simulations of the evolution of cluster samples in the Galactic disc. Furthermore, we find a weak trend of an age-independent increase in scaleheight with Galactocentric distance. There are no significant temporal or spatial variations of the cluster distribution zero-point. We determine the Sun's vertical displacement from the Galactic plane as Z⊙=18.5+/-1.2pc. (1 data file).

  3. Emblem for the second manned Skylab mission, Skylab 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This is the emblem for the second manned Skylab mission. It will be a mission of up to 56 days. The patch symbolizes the main objectives of the flight. The central figure, adapted from one by Leonardo da Vinci, illustrates the proportions of the human form and suggests the many studies of man himself to be conducted in the zero-gravity environment of space. This drawing is superimposed on two hemispheres representing the two additional main areas of research - studies of the Sun and the development of techniques for survey of the Earth's resources. The left hemisphere show the Sun as it will be seen in the red light radiated by hydrogen atoms in the solar atmosphere. The right hemisphere is intended to suggest the studies of Earth resources to be conducted on Skylab. Although the patch denotes this mission as Skylab II, it is actually consided to be the Skylab III mission.

  4. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Advisory Mission in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts today completed a nuclear security advisory mission in France. The mission was carried out at the request of the French Government. The scope of the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) follow-up mission included France’s responses to the recommendations of the initial mission in 2011, the regulatory framework for the security of nuclear material and facilities as well as computer security. The IPPAS team also reviewed the country’s implementation of the 2005 Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM). As part of the review, the team visited the Georges Besse II uranium enrichment plant at the Tricastin nuclear site in Pierrelatte, south-eastern France. The team observed that the nuclear security regime in France is robust and well-established, and incorporates the fundamental principles of the amended CPPNM. The team provided recommendations and suggestions to support France in enhancing and sustaining nuclear security. Good practices were identified that can serve as examples to other IAEA Member States to help strengthen their nuclear security activities.

  5. Cost/Performance Ratio Achieved by Using a Commodity-Based Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center acquired a commodity cluster based on Intel Corporation processors to compare its performance with a traditional UNIX cluster in the execution of aeropropulsion applications. Since the cost differential of the clusters was significant, a cost/performance ratio was calculated. After executing a propulsion application on both clusters, the researchers demonstrated a 9.4 cost/performance ratio in favor of the Intel-based cluster. These researchers utilize the Aeroshark cluster as one of the primary testbeds for developing NPSS parallel application codes and system software. The Aero-shark cluster provides 64 Intel Pentium II 400-MHz processors, housed in 32 nodes. Recently, APNASA - a code developed by a Government/industry team for the design and analysis of turbomachinery systems was used for a simulation on Glenn's Aeroshark cluster.

  6. OSART mission highlights 2001-2003. Operational safety practices in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States in enhancing the operational safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Careful design and high quality of construction are prerequisites for a safe nuclear power plant. However, a plant's safety depends ultimately on the ability and conscientiousness of the operating personnel and on the plant programmes, processes and working methods. An OSART mission compares a facility's operational performance with IAEA Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The OSART reviews are available to all countries with nuclear power plants in operation, but also approaching operation, commissioning or in earlier stages of construction (Pre-OSART). Most countries have participated in the programme by hosting one or more OSART missions or by making experts available to participate in missions. Operational safety missions can also be part of the design review missions of nuclear power plants and are known as Safety Review Missions (SRMs). Teams that review only a few specific areas or a specific issue are called Expert missions. Follow-up visits are a standard part of the OSART programme and are conducted between 12 to 18 months following the OSART mission. This report continues the practice of summarizing mission results so that all the aspects of OSART missions, Pre-OSART missions and OSART good practices are to be found in one document. It also includes the results of follow-up visits. Attempts have been made in this report to highlight the most significant findings while retaining as much of the vital background information as possible. This report is in three parts: Part I summarizes the most significant observations made during the missions and follow-up visits between 2001 and 2003; Part II, in chronological order, reviews the major strengths and opportunities for improvement identified during each OSART mission and summarizes the follow-up visits performed

  7. Triggered cluster formation in the RMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Zeng; Smith, Michael D.

    An investigation based on data from the spatially complete 2MASS Survey reveals that a remarkable burst of clustered star formation is taking place throughout the south-east quadrant of the Rosette Molecular Cloud. Compact clusters are forming in a multi-seeded mode, in parallel and at various places. In addition, sparse aggregates of embedded young stars are extensively distributed. Here we present the primary results and implications for high-mass and clustered star formation in this giant molecular cloud. In particular, we incorporate for the first time the birth of medium to low-mass stars into the scenario of sequential formation of OB clusters. Following the emergence of the young OB cluster NGC 2244, a variety of manifestations of forming clusters of medium to high mass appear in the vicinity of the swept-up layer of the H II region as well as further into the molecular cloud. The embedded clusters appear to form in a structured manner, which suggests they follow tracks laid out by the decay of macroturbulence. We address the possible origins of the turbulence. This leads us to propose a tree model to interpret the neat spatial distribution of clusters within a large section of the Rosette complex. Prominent new generation OB clusters are identified at the root of the tree pattern.

  8. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J

    2011-11-16

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that

  9. Argonne National Lab gets Linux network teraflop cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Linux NetworX, Salt Lake City, Utah, has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP). The cluster, named "Jazz" by Argonne, is designed to provide optimum performance for multiple disciplines such as chemistry, physics and reactor engineering and will be used by the entire scientific community at the Lab" (1 page).

  10. MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND INFRARED CLUSTERS IN THE S247, S252, AND BFS52 REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Saito, Hiro; Nakamura, Fumitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Hosei University, Fujimi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Nishimura, Atsushi; Kimura, Kimihiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Hideo, E-mail: ikura@u-gakugei.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-05-01

    We present results of the observations carried out toward the S247, S252, and BFS52 H II regions with various molecular lines using the 1.85 m radio telescope and the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. There are at least 11 young infrared clusters (IR clusters) within the observed region. We found that there are two velocity components in {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1), and also that their spatial distributions show an anti-correlation. The IR clusters are located at their interfaces, suggesting that two distinct clouds with different velocities are colliding with each other, which may have induced the cluster formation. Based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0) and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations, we identified 16 clumps in and around the three H II regions. Eleven of the clumps are associated with the IR clusters and the other five clumps are not associated with any known young stellar objects. We investigated variations in the velocity dispersions of the 16 clumps as a function of the distance from the center of the clusters or the clumps. Clumps with clusters tend to have velocity dispersions that increase with distance from the cluster center, while clumps without clusters show a flat velocity dispersion over the clump extents. A {sup 12}CO outflow has been found in some of the clumps with IR clusters but not in the other clumps, supporting a strong relation of these clumps to the broader velocity dispersion region. We also estimated a mean star formation efficiency of {approx}30% for the clumps with IR clusters in the three H II regions.

  11. The young star cluster population of M51 with LEGUS - II. Testing environmental dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Matteo; Adamo, A.; Calzetti, D.; Reina-Campos, M.; Colombo, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Chandar, R.; Dale, D. A.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Fumagalli, M.; Johnson, K. E.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Östlin, G.; Shabani, F.; Smith, L. J.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2018-06-01

    It has recently been established that the properties of young star clusters (YSCs) can vary as a function of the galactic environment in which they are found. We use the cluster catalogue produced by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) collaboration to investigate cluster properties in the spiral galaxy M51. We analyse the cluster population as a function of galactocentric distance and in arm and inter-arm regions. The cluster mass function exhibits a similar shape at all radial bins, described by a power law with a slope close to -2 and an exponential truncation around 105 M⊙. While the mass functions of the YSCs in the spiral arm and inter-arm regions have similar truncation masses, the inter-arm region mass function has a significantly steeper slope than the one in the arm region, a trend that is also observed in the giant molecular cloud mass function and predicted by simulations. The age distribution of clusters is dependent on the region considered, and is consistent with rapid disruption only in dense regions, while little disruption is observed at large galactocentric distances and in the inter-arm region. The fraction of stars forming in clusters does not show radial variations, despite the drop in the H2 surface density measured as a function of galactocentric distance. We suggest that the higher disruption rate observed in the inner part of the galaxy is likely at the origin of the observed flat cluster formation efficiency radial profile.

  12. From antinode clusters to node clusters: the concentration-dependent transition of floaters on a standing Faraday wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-05-01

    A hydrophilic floating sphere that is denser than water drifts to an amplitude maximum (antinode) of a surface standing wave. A few identical floaters therefore organize into antinode clusters. However, beyond a transitional value of the floater concentration ϕ, we observe that the same spheres spontaneously accumulate at the nodal lines, completely inverting the self-organized particle pattern on the wave. From a potential energy estimate we show (i) that at low ϕ antinode clusters are energetically favorable over nodal ones and (ii) how this situation reverses at high ϕ, in agreement with the experiment.

  13. MSFC Skylab electrical power systems mission evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of the Skylab electrical power system are discussed. The electrical systems for the airlock module of the orbital workshop and the Apollo telescope mount are described. Skylab is considered an integral laboratory, however, both cluster and module hardware distinct sections are included. Significant concept and requirement evolution, testing, and modifications resulting from tests are briefly summarized to aid in understanding the launch configuration description and the procedures and performance discussed for in-orbit operation. Specific problems encountered during Skylab orbital missions are analyzed.

  14. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  15. STS-61 mission director's post-mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    To ensure the success of the complex Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, STS-61, NASA established a number of independent review groups to assess management, design, planning, and preparation for the mission. One of the resulting recommendations for mission success was that an overall Mission Director be appointed to coordinate management activities of the Space Shuttle and Hubble programs and to consolidate results of the team reviews and expedite responses to recommendations. This report presents pre-mission events important to the experience base of mission management, with related Mission Director's recommendations following the event(s) to which they apply. All Mission Director's recommendations are presented collectively in an appendix. Other appendixes contain recommendations from the various review groups, including Payload Officers, the JSC Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Section, JSC EVA Management Office, JSC Crew and Thermal Systems Division, and the STS-61 crew itself. This report also lists mission events in chronological order and includes as an appendix a post-mission summary by the lead Payload Deployment and Retrieval System Officer. Recommendations range from those pertaining to specific component use or operating techniques to those for improved management, review, planning, and safety procedures.

  16. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  17. Clustered supernovae versus the gaseous disk and halo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiles, C.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of clustered supernovae on the two-dimensional porosity parameter Q(2D) and the rates M of mass injection of both hot and cold gas into the halo are reconsidered. The effects of high-absolute value z, low-density extension of the neutral gas layer are theoretically calculated and the distribution of H-alpha luminosities of extragalactic H II regions is observationally determined. These results are used to estimate the birth rate of star clusters having N supernovae as a function of N. A Galaxy-wide average of Q(2D) roughly 0.30 is obtained, corresponding to an area filling factor of 0.23. Area filling factors and mass injection rates into the halo due to breakthrough bubbles with large N are calculated for different types of galaxy. The calculations are related to the area covered by H I 'holes' and the area covered by giant H II regions. The effects of supernova clusters that are too small to produce breakthrough bubbles are discussed. 53 refs

  18. Clustering in Hilbert simplex geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Frank

    2017-04-03

    Clustering categorical distributions in the probability simplex is a fundamental primitive often met in applications dealing with histograms or mixtures of multinomials. Traditionally, the differential-geometric structure of the probability simplex has been used either by (i) setting the Riemannian metric tensor to the Fisher information matrix of the categorical distributions, or (ii) defining the information-geometric structure induced by a smooth dissimilarity measure, called a divergence. In this paper, we introduce a novel computationally-friendly non-Riemannian framework for modeling the probability simplex: Hilbert simplex geometry. We discuss the pros and cons of those three statistical modelings, and compare them experimentally for clustering tasks.

  19. THE MASSIVE AND DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY. II. INITIAL SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF z ∼ 1 GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED FROM 10,000 deg2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Gettings, Daniel P.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy of galaxy clusters which were identified as part of an all-sky search for high-redshift galaxy clusters, the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS). The initial phase of MaDCoWS combined infrared data from the all-sky data release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select probable z ∼ 1 clusters of galaxies over an area of 10,000 deg 2 . Our spectroscopy confirms 19 new clusters at 0.7 < z < 1.3, half of which are at z > 1, demonstrating the viability of using WISE to identify high-redshift galaxy clusters. The next phase of MaDCoWS will use the greater depth of the AllWISE data release to identify even higher redshift cluster candidates

  20. On the Nature of Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. II. The Case of Cetus II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Blair C.; Jerjen, Helmut; Kim, Dongwon; Schirmer, Mischa

    2018-04-01

    We obtained deep Gemini GMOS-S g, r photometry of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidate Cetus II with the aim of providing stronger constraints on its size, luminosity, and stellar population. Cetus II is an important object in the size–luminosity plane, as it occupies the transition zone between dwarf galaxies and star clusters. All known objects smaller than Cetus II (r h ∼ 20 pc) are reported to be star clusters, while most larger objects are likely dwarf galaxies. We found a prominent excess of main-sequence stars in the color–magnitude diagram of Cetus II, best described by a single stellar population with an age of 11.2 Gyr, metallicity of [Fe/H] = ‑1.28 dex, an [α/Fe] = 0.0 dex at a heliocentric distance of 26.3 ± 1.2 kpc. As well as being spatially located within the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, these properties are well matched to the Sagittarius galaxy’s Population B stars. Interestingly, like our recent findings on the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidate Tucana V, the stellar field in the direction of Cetus II shows no evidence of a concentrated overdensity despite tracing the main sequence for over six magnitudes. These results strongly support the picture that Cetus II is not an ultra-faint stellar system in the Milky Way halo, but made up of stars from the Sagittarius tidal stream.

  1. The Structure of the Young Star Cluster NGC 6231. II. Structure, Formation, and Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Sills, Alison; Gromadzki, Mariusz; Medina, Nicolás; Borissova, Jordanka; Kurtev, Radostin

    2017-12-01

    The young cluster NGC 6231 (stellar ages ˜2-7 Myr) is observed shortly after star formation activity has ceased. Using the catalog of 2148 probable cluster members obtained from Chandra, VVV, and optical surveys (Paper I), we examine the cluster’s spatial structure and dynamical state. The spatial distribution of stars is remarkably well fit by an isothermal sphere with moderate elongation, while other commonly used models like Plummer spheres, multivariate normal distributions, or power-law models are poor fits. The cluster has a core radius of 1.2 ± 0.1 pc and a central density of ˜200 stars pc-3. The distribution of stars is mildly mass segregated. However, there is no radial stratification of the stars by age. Although most of the stars belong to a single cluster, a small subcluster of stars is found superimposed on the main cluster, and there are clumpy non-isotropic distributions of stars outside ˜4 core radii. When the size, mass, and age of NGC 6231 are compared to other young star clusters and subclusters in nearby active star-forming regions, it lies at the high-mass end of the distribution but along the same trend line. This could result from similar formation processes, possibly hierarchical cluster assembly. We argue that NGC 6231 has expanded from its initial size but that it remains gravitationally bound.

  2. Stigmergy based behavioural coordination for satellite clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Howard; Palmer, Phil

    2010-04-01

    Multi-platform swarm/cluster missions are an attractive prospect for improved science return as they provide a natural capability for temporal, spatial and signal separation with further engineering and economic advantages. As spacecraft numbers increase and/or the round-trip communications delay from Earth lengthens, the traditional "remote-control" approach begins to break down. It is therefore essential to push control into space; to make spacecraft more autonomous. An autonomous group of spacecraft requires coordination, but standard terrestrial paradigms such as negotiation, require high levels of inter-spacecraft communication, which is nontrivial in space. This article therefore introduces the principals of stigmergy as a novel method for coordinating a cluster. Stigmergy is an agent-based, behavioural approach that allows for infrequent communication with decisions based on local information. Behaviours are selected dynamically using a genetic algorithm onboard. supervisors/ground stations occasionally adjust parameters and disseminate a "common environment" that is used for local decisions. After outlining the system, an analysis of some crucial parameters such as communications overhead and number of spacecraft is presented to demonstrate scalability. Further scenarios are considered to demonstrate the natural ability to deal with dynamic situations such as the failure of spacecraft, changing mission objectives and responding to sudden bursts of high priority tasks.

  3. A High-Order CFS Algorithm for Clustering Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyu Bu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Internet of Everything such as Internet of Things, Internet of People, and Industrial Internet, big data is being generated. Clustering is a widely used technique for big data analytics and mining. However, most of current algorithms are not effective to cluster heterogeneous data which is prevalent in big data. In this paper, we propose a high-order CFS algorithm (HOCFS to cluster heterogeneous data by combining the CFS clustering algorithm and the dropout deep learning model, whose functionality rests on three pillars: (i an adaptive dropout deep learning model to learn features from each type of data, (ii a feature tensor model to capture the correlations of heterogeneous data, and (iii a tensor distance-based high-order CFS algorithm to cluster heterogeneous data. Furthermore, we verify our proposed algorithm on different datasets, by comparison with other two clustering schemes, that is, HOPCM and CFS. Results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in clustering heterogeneous data.

  4. Silver Biocide Analysis & Control Device, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rapid, accurate measurement and process control of silver ion biocide concentrations in future space missions is needed. The purpose of the Phase II program is to...

  5. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models - II. Galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-04-01

    We study the z = 0 properties of clusters (and large groups) of galaxies within the context of interacting and non-interacting quintessence cosmological models, using a series of adiabatic SPH simulations. Initially, we examine the average properties of groups and clusters, quantifying their differences in ΛCold Dark Matter (ΛCDM), uncoupled Dark Energy (uDE) and coupled Dark Energy (cDE) cosmologies. In particular, we focus upon radial profiles of the gas density, temperature and pressure, and we also investigate how the standard hydrodynamic equilibrium hypothesis holds in quintessence cosmologies. While we are able to confirm previous results about the distribution of baryons, we also find that the main discrepancy (with differences up to 20 per cent) can be seen in cluster pressure profiles. We then switch attention to individual structures, mapping each halo in quintessence cosmology to its ΛCDM counterpart. We are able to identify a series of small correlations between the coupling in the dark sector and halo spin, triaxiality and virialization ratio. When looking at spin and virialization of dark matter haloes, we find a weak (5 per cent) but systematic deviation in fifth force scenarios from ΛCDM.

  6. Genetic Diversity and Relationships of Neolamarckia cadamba (Roxb. Bosser progenies through cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Preethi Shree

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity analysis was conducted for biometric attributes in 20 progenies of Neolamarckia cadamba. The application of D2 clustering technique in Neolamarckia cadamba genetic resources resolved the 20 progenies into five clusters. The maximum intra cluster distance was shown by the cluster II. The maximum inter cluster distance was recorded between cluster III and V which indicated the presence of wider genetic distance between Neolamarckia cadamba progenies. Among the growth attributes, volume (36.84 % contributed maximum towards genetic divergence followed by bole height, basal diameter, tree height, number of branches in Neolamarckia cadamba progenies.

  7. Psychological and behavioral changes during confinement in a 520-day simulated interplanetary mission to mars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Basner

    Full Text Available Behavioral health risks are among the most serious and difficult to mitigate risks of confinement in space craft during long-duration space exploration missions. We report on behavioral and psychological reactions of a multinational crew of 6 healthy males confined in a 550 m(3 chamber for 520 days during the first Earth-based, high-fidelity simulated mission to Mars. Rest-activity of crewmembers was objectively measured throughout the mission with wrist-worn actigraphs. Once weekly throughout the mission crewmembers completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Profile of Moods State short form (POMS, conflict questionnaire, the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT-B, and series of visual analogue scales on stress and fatigue. We observed substantial inter-individual differences in the behavioral responses of crewmembers to the prolonged mission confinement and isolation. The crewmember with the highest average POMS total mood disturbance score throughout the mission also reported symptoms of depression in 93% of mission weeks, which reached mild-to-moderate levels in >10% of mission weeks. Conflicts with mission control were reported five times more often than conflicts among crewmembers. Two crewmembers who had the highest ratings of stress and physical exhaustion accounted for 85% of the perceived conflicts. One of them developed a persistent sleep onset insomnia with ratings of poor sleep quality, which resulted in chronic partial sleep deprivation, elevated ratings of daytime tiredness, and frequent deficits in behavioral alertness. Sleep-wake timing was altered in two other crewmembers, beginning in the first few months of the mission and persisting throughout. Two crewmembers showed neither behavioral disturbances nor reports of psychological distress during the 17-month period of mission confinement. These results highlight the importance of identifying behavioral, psychological, and biological markers of characteristics that

  8. Nuclear Electric Propulsion mission engineering study covering the period April 1971 to January 1973. Volume II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-03-01

    The results of a mission engineering analysis of nuclear-thermionic electric propulsion spacecraft for unmanned interplanetary and geocentric missions are summarized. Critical technologies assessed are associated with the development of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and the impact of its availability on future space programs. Specific areas of investigation include outer planet and comet rendezvous mission analysis, NEP Stage design for geocentric and interplanetary missions NEP system development cost and unit costs, and technology requirements for NEP Stage development. A multi-mission NEP Stage can be developed to perform both multiple geocentric and interplanetary missions. Development program costs for a 1983 launch would be of the order of $275 M, including hardware and reactor development, flight system hardware, and mission support. Recurring unit costs for flight NEP systems would be of the order of $25 M for a 120kWe NEP Stage. Identified pacing NEP technology requirements are the development of 20,000 full power hour ion thrusters and thermionic reactor, and the development of related power conditioning. The resulting NEP Stage design provides both inherent reliability and high payload mass capability. High payload mass capability can be translated into both low payload cost and high payload reliability. NEP Stage and payload integration is compatible with the Space Shuttle

  9. Closed-Loop Pure Oxygen Static Feed Fuel Cell for Lunar Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to address the NASA lunar mission, DESC proposes to develop a proton exchange membrane (PEM) closed-loop pure oxygen fuel cell for application to lunar...

  10. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-07

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4

  11. Dynamics, Chemical Abundances, and ages of Globular Clusters in the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; NGVS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamics, metallicities, and ages of globular clusters (GCs) in the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), a deep, multi-band (u, g, r, i, z, and Ks), wide-field (104 deg2) imaging survey carried out using the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and MegaCam imager. GC candidates were selected from the NGVS survey using photometric and image morphology criteria and these were followed up with deep, medium-resolution, multi-object spectroscopy using the Keck II 10-m telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph. The primary spectroscopic targets were candidate GC satellites of dwarf elliptical (dE) and ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Virgo cluster. While many objects were confirmed as GC satellites of Virgo dEs and UDGs, many turned out to be non-satellites based on their radial velocity and/or positional mismatch any identifiable Virgo cluster galaxy. We have used a combination of spectral characteristics (e.g., presence of absorption vs. emission lines), new Gaussian mixture modeling of radial velocity and sky position data, and a new extreme deconvolution analysis of ugrizKs photometry and image morphology, to classify all the objects in our sample into: (1) GC satellites of dE galaxies, (2) GC satellites of UDGs, (3) intra-cluster GCs (ICGCs) in the Virgo cluster, (4) GCs in the outer halo of the central cluster galaxy M87, (5) foreground Milky Way stars, and (6) distant background galaxies. We use these data to study the dynamics and dark matter content of dE and UDGs in the Virgo cluster, place important constraints on the nature of dE nuclei, and study the origin of ICGCs versus GCs in the remote M87 halo.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF and NASA/STScI.

  12. Overview of the LARES Mission: orbit, error analysis and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    LARES (LAser RElativity Satellite), is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) mission to be launched beginning of 2012 with the new European launch vehicle, VEGA; the launch opportunity was provided by the European Space Agency (ESA). LARES is a laser ranged satellite; it will be launched into a nearly circular orbit, with an altitude of 1450 km and an inclination of 69.5 degrees. The goal of the mission is the measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect with an uncertainty of few percent; such a small uncertainty will be achieved using LARES data together with data from the LAGEOS I (NASA) and LAGEOS II (NASA and ASI) satellites, and because GRACE mission (NASA-CSR and DLR-GFZ) is improving Earth's gravity field models. This paper describes LARES experiment along with the principal error sources affecting the measurement. Furthermore, some engineering aspects of the mission, in particular the structure and materials of the satellite (designed in order to minimize the non-gravitational perturbations), are described.

  13. A PSF photometry tool for NASA's Kepler, K2, and TESS missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Jose Vinicius De Miranda; Barentsen, Geert; Hedges, Christina L.; Gully-Santiago, Michael A.; Cody, Ann Marie; Montet, Ben

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Kepler and K2 missions have impacted all areas of astrophysics in unique and important ways by delivering high-precision time series data on asteroids, stars, and galaxies. For example, both the official Kepler pipeline and the various community-owned pipelines have been successful at discovering a myriad of transiting exoplanets around a wide range of stellar types. However, the existing pipelines tend to focus on studying isolated stars using simple aperture photometry, and often perform sub-optimally in crowded fields where objects are blended. To address this issue, we present a Point Spread Function (PSF) photometry toolkit for Kepler and K2 which is able to extract light curves from crowded regions, such as the Beehive Cluster, the Lagoon Nebula, and the M67 globular cluster, which were all recently observed by Kepler. We present a detailed discussion on the theory, the practical use, and demonstrate our tool on various levels of crowding. Finally, we discuss the future use of the tool on data from the TESS mission. The code is open source and available on GitHub as part of the PyKE toolkit for Kepler/K2 data analysis.

  14. Stromvil Photometry of Clusters II. The Open Cluster M67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. P.; Philip, A. G. D.; Straižys, V.

    1998-12-01

    Use of the Stromgren four-color photometric system with the addition of three filters (P, Z, S) of the Vilnius system allows classifying all the types of stars, even in the presence of significant reddening by interstellar dust (Strai\\v{z}ys et al, 1996). With this Stromvil system we have begun a long-term observational program on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, (see Philip et al,1996). The Loral 2K by 2K CCD, prepared by M. Lesser of the University of Arizona CCD Lab, gives as high as 90% quantum efficiency in most of the filters and notably 65% at the u filter. To demonstrate the degree of success so far attained in this CCD Stromvil System, we present preliminary results on the open cluster M67. We will compare some of our photometry with the CCD results of B. A. Twarog (1987) and the photoelectric photometry of Nissen et al. (1987). REFERENCES Nissen, P.E., Twarog, B.A., and Crawford, D.L. 1987, A.J. 93,634 Philip, A.G. Davis, Boyle, R.P., Strai\\v{z}ys, V. 1996, Baltic Astronomy,5,445 Strai\\v{z}ys, V., Crawford, D.L., Philip, A.G.Davis 1996, Baltic Astronomy, 5,83 Twarog, B.A. 1987, A.J. 93,647

  15. STS-61 Space Shuttle mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The STS-61 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report summarizes the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission as well as the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) systems performance during the fifty-ninth flight of the Space Shuttle Program and fifth flight of the Orbiter vehicle Endeavour (OV-105). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET designated as ET-60; three SSME's which were designated as serial numbers 2019, 2033, and 2017 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRB's which were designated BI-063. The RSRM's that were installed in each SRB were designated as 360L023A (lightweight) for the left SRB, and 360L023B (lightweight) for the right SRB. This STS-61 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report fulfills the Space Shuttle Program requirement as documented in NSTS 07700, Volume 8, Appendix E. That document requires that each major organizational element supporting the Program report the results of its hardware evaluation and mission performance plus identify all related in-flight anomalies. The primary objective of the STS-61 mission was to perform the first on-orbit servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope. The servicing tasks included the installation of new solar arrays, replacement of the Wide Field/Planetary Camera I (WF/PC I) with WF/PC II, replacement of the High Speed Photometer (HSP) with the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR), replacement of rate sensing units (RSU's) and electronic control units (ECU's), installation of new magnetic sensing systems and fuse plugs, and the repair of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrometer (GHRS). Secondary objectives were to perform the requirements of the IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC), the IMAX Camera, and the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) Calibration Test.

  16. ON THE HEATING EFFICIENCY DERIVED FROM OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG SUPER STAR CLUSTERS IN M82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Torres-Campos, Ana; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Melo, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    Here, we discuss the mechanical feedback that massive stellar clusters provide to the interstellar medium of their host galaxy. We apply an analytic theory developed in a previous study for M82-A1 to a sample of 10 clusters located in the central zone of the starburst galaxy M82, all surrounded by compact and dense H II regions. We claim that the only way that such H II regions can survive around the selected clusters, is if they are embedded into a high-pressure ISM and if the majority of their mechanical energy is lost within the star cluster volume via strong radiative cooling. The latter implies that these clusters have a low heating efficiency, η, and evolve in the bimodal hydrodynamic regime. In this regime, the shock-heated plasma in the central zones of a cluster becomes thermally unstable, loses its pressure and is accumulated there, whereas the matter injected by supernovae and stellar winds outside this volume forms a high-velocity outflow-the star cluster wind. We calculated the heating efficiency for each of the selected clusters and found that in all cases it does not exceed 10%. Such low heating efficiency values imply a low mechanical energy output and the impact that the selected clusters provide to the ISM of M82 is thus much smaller than what one would expect using stellar cluster synthetic models.

  17. Shaken Snow Globes: Kinematic Tracers of the Multiphase Condensation Cascade in Massive Galaxies, Groups, and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, M.; McDonald, M.; Hamer, S. L.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.; Gendron-Marsolais, M.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Edge, A. C.; Werner, N.; Tozzi, P.; Sun, M.; Stone, J. M.; Tremblay, G. R.; Hogan, M. T.; Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Yu, H.; Biffi, V.; Planelles, S.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel method to constrain turbulence and bulk motions in massive galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters, exploring both simulations and observations. As emerged in the recent picture of top-down multiphase condensation, hot gaseous halos are tightly linked to all other phases in terms of cospatiality and thermodynamics. While hot halos (∼107 K) are perturbed by subsonic turbulence, warm (∼104 K) ionized and neutral filaments condense out of the turbulent eddies. The peaks condense into cold molecular clouds (runs, and is corroborated by the combined Hitomi and new Integral Field Unit measurements in the Perseus cluster. The ensemble multiphase gas distributions (from the UV to the radio band) are characterized by substantial spectral line broadening (σ v,los ≈ 100–200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) with a mild line shift. On the other hand, pencil-beam detections (as H I absorption against the AGN backlight) sample the small-scale clouds displaying smaller broadening and significant line shifts of up to several 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1 (for those falling toward the AGN), with increased scatter due to the turbulence intermittency. We present new ensemble σ v,los of the warm Hα+[N II] gas in 72 observed cluster/group cores: the constraints are consistent with the simulations and can be used as robust proxies for the turbulent velocities, in particular for the challenging hot plasma (otherwise requiring extremely long X-ray exposures). Finally, we show that the physically motivated criterion C ≡ t cool/t eddy ≈ 1 best traces the condensation extent region and the presence of multiphase gas in observed clusters and groups. The ensemble method can be applied to many available spectroscopic data sets and can substantially advance our understanding of multiphase halos in light of the next-generation multiwavelength missions.

  18. The Globular Cluster NGC 6402 (M14). II. Variable Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contreras Peña, C.; Catelan, M.; Grundahl, F.

    2018-01-01

    approaches for the calibration of the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. The possible presence of second-overtone RR Lyrae in M14 is critically addressed, with our results arguing against this possibility. By considering all of the RR Lyrae stars as members of the cluster, we derive =0.589 {{d...

  19. Spectroscopic Analyses of Neutron Capture Elements in Open Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Julia E.

    The evolution of elements as a function or age throughout the Milky Way disk provides strong constraints for galaxy evolution models, and on star formation epochs. In an effort to provide such constraints, we conducted an investigation into r- and s-process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 near infrared survey. To obtain data for neutron capture abundance analysis, we conducted a long-term observing campaign spanning three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-meter telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (SES, R(lambda/Deltalambda) ˜60,000). The SES provides a wavelength range of ˜1400 A, making it uniquely suited to investigate a number of other important chemical abundances as well as the neutron capture elements. For this study, we derive abundances for 18 elements covering four nucleosynthetic families- light, iron-peak, neutron capture and alpha-elements- for ˜30 open clusters within 6 kpc of the Sun with ages ranging from ˜80 Myr to ˜10 Gyr. Both equivalent width (EW) measurements and spectral synthesis methods were employed to derive abundances for all elements. Initial estimates for model stellar atmospheres- effective temperature and surface gravity- were provided by the APOGEE data set, and then re-derived for our optical spectra by removing abundance trends as a function of excitation potential and reduced width log(EW/lambda). With the exception of Ba II and Zr I, abundance analyses for all neutron capture elements were performed by generating synthetic spectra from the new stellar parameters. In order to remove molecular contamination, or blending from nearby atomic features, the synthetic spectra were modeled by a best-fit Gaussian to the observed data. Nd II shows a slight enhancement in all cluster stars, while other neutron capture elements follow solar abundance trends. Ba II shows a large cluster-to-cluster abundance spread

  20. Satellite cluster flight using on-off cyclic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Gurfil, Pini

    2015-01-01

    Nano-satellite clusters and disaggregated satellites are new concepts in the realm of distributed satellite systems, which require complex cluster management - mainly regulating the maximal and minimal inter-satellite distances on time scales of years - while utilizing simple on-off propulsion systems. The simple actuators and long time scales require judicious astrodynamical modeling coupled with specialized orbit control. This paper offers a satellite cluster orbit control law which works for long time scales in a perturbed environment while utilizing fixed-magnitude thrusters. The main idea is to design a distributed controller which balances the fuel consumption among the satellites, thus mitigating the effect of differential drag perturbations. The underlying methodology utilizes a cyclic control algorithm based on a mean orbital elements feedback. Stability properties of the closed-loop cyclic control system do not adhere to the classical Lyapunov stability theory, so an effort is made to define and implement a suitable stability theory of noncompact equilibria sets. A state selection scheme is proposed for efficiently establishing a low Earth orbit cluster. Several simulations, including a real mission study, and several comparative investigations, are performed to show the strengths of the proposed control law.

  1. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF LOW-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES. II. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ON GALAXY GROWTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlee, David W.; Martini, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters provide powerful laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, particularly the origin of correlations of morphology and star formation rate (SFR) with density. We construct visible to MIR spectral energy distributions of galaxies in eight low-redshift (z * (>99% confidence) with no dependence on R/R 200 or projected local density at fixed mass. A merged sample of galaxies from the five best measured clusters shows (SFR)∝(R/R 200 ) 1.1±0.3 for galaxies with R/R 200 ≤ 0.4. A decline in the fraction of SFGs toward the cluster center contributes most of this effect, but it is accompanied by a reduction in (SFR) for SFGs with R ≤ 0.1 R 200 . The increase in the fraction of SFGs toward larger R/R 200 and the isolation of SFGs with reduced SFRs near the cluster center are consistent with the truncation of star formation by ram-pressure stripping, as is the tendency for more massive SFGs to have higher SFRs. We conclude that stripping is more likely than slower processes to drive the properties of SFGs with R 200 in clusters. We also find that galaxies near the cluster center are more massive than galaxies farther out in the cluster at ∼3.5σ, which suggests that dynamical relaxation significantly impacts the distribution of cluster galaxies as the clusters evolve.

  2. Status of the Megha-Tropiques Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, M.; Roca, R.; French Megha-Tropiques Science Team

    2011-12-01

    The Megha-Tropiques mission is an Indo-French mission built by the Centre National d'Études Spatiales and the Indian Space Research Organisation due to launch in September 2011. Megha means cloud in Sanskrit and Tropiques is the French for tropics. The major innovation of MT is to bring together a suite of complementary instruments on a dedicated orbit that strongly improves the sampling of the water cycle elements. Indeed the low inclination on the equator (20°) combined to the elevated height of the orbit (865km) provides unique observing capabilities with up to 6 over-passes per day. The scientific objective of the mission concerns i) Atmospheric energy budget in the inter-tropical zone and at system scale (radiation, latent heat, . . . ) ii) Life cycle of Mesoscale Convective Complexes in the Tropics (over Oceans and Continents) and iii) Monitoring and assimilation for Cyclones, Monsoons, Meso-scale Convective Systems forecasting. These scientific objectives are achieved thanks to the following payload: SCARAB : wide band instrument for inferring longwave and shortwave outgoing fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (cross track scanning, 40 km resolution at nadir); SAPHIR: microwave sounder for water vapour sounding: 6 channels in the WV absorption band at 183.31 GHz. (cross track, 10 km) and MADRAS: microwave imager for precipitation: channels at 18, 23, 37, 89 and 157 GHz, H and V polarisations. (conical swath,<10 km to 40 km). In this presentation, a rapid overview of the Mission will be given as well as a first status depending on the actual launch of the satellite.

  3. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  4. Planning For Multiple NASA Missions With Use Of Enabling Radioisotope Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.G. Johnson; K.L. Lively; C.C. Dwight

    2013-02-01

    Since the early 1960’s the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have provided radioisotope power systems (RPS) to NASA as an enabling technology for deep space and various planetary missions. They provide reliable power in situations where solar and/or battery power sources are either untenable or would place an undue mass burden on the mission. In the modern era of the past twenty years there has been no time that multiple missions have been considered for launching from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the same year. The closest proximity of missions that involved radioisotope power systems would be that of Galileo (October 1989) and Ulysses (October 1990). The closest that involved radioisotope heater units would be the small rovers Spirit and Opportunity (May and July 2003) used in the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) mission. It can be argued that the rovers sent to Mars in 2003 were essentially a special case since they staged in the same facility and used a pair of small launch vehicles (Delta II). This paper examines constraints on the frequency of use of radioisotope power systems with regard to launching them from Kennedy Space Center using currently available launch vehicles. This knowledge may be useful as NASA plans for its future deep space or planetary missions where radioisotope power systems are used as an enabling technology. Previous descriptions have focused on single mission chronologies and not analyzed the timelines with an emphasis on multiple missions.

  5. The NIDS Cluster: Scalable, Stateful Network Intrusion Detection on Commodity Hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, Brian L; Vallentin, Matthias; Sommer, Robin; Lee, Jason; Leres, Craig; Paxson, Vern; Tierney, Brian

    2007-09-19

    In this work we present a NIDS cluster as a scalable solution for realizing high-performance, stateful network intrusion detection on commodity hardware. The design addresses three challenges: (i) distributing traffic evenly across an extensible set of analysis nodes in a fashion that minimizes the communication required for coordination, (ii) adapting the NIDS's operation to support coordinating its low-level analysis rather than just aggregating alerts; and (iii) validating that the cluster produces sound results. Prototypes of our NIDS cluster now operate at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley. In both environments the clusters greatly enhance the power of the network security monitoring.

  6. Assessing clustering strategies for Gaussian mixture filtering a subsurface contaminant model

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Bo

    2016-02-03

    An ensemble-based Gaussian mixture (GM) filtering framework is studied in this paper in term of its dependence on the choice of the clustering method to construct the GM. In this approach, a number of particles sampled from the posterior distribution are first integrated forward with the dynamical model for forecasting. A GM representation of the forecast distribution is then constructed from the forecast particles. Once an observation becomes available, the forecast GM is updated according to Bayes’ rule. This leads to (i) a Kalman filter-like update of the particles, and (ii) a Particle filter-like update of their weights, generalizing the ensemble Kalman filter update to non-Gaussian distributions. We focus on investigating the impact of the clustering strategy on the behavior of the filter. Three different clustering methods for constructing the prior GM are considered: (i) a standard kernel density estimation, (ii) clustering with a specified mixture component size, and (iii) adaptive clustering (with a variable GM size). Numerical experiments are performed using a two-dimensional reactive contaminant transport model in which the contaminant concentration and the heterogenous hydraulic conductivity fields are estimated within a confined aquifer using solute concentration data. The experimental results suggest that the performance of the GM filter is sensitive to the choice of the GM model. In particular, increasing the size of the GM does not necessarily result in improved performances. In this respect, the best results are obtained with the proposed adaptive clustering scheme.

  7. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF LOW-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES. II. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ON GALAXY GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atlee, David W.; Martini, Paul, E-mail: atlee@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Laboratory, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    Galaxy clusters provide powerful laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, particularly the origin of correlations of morphology and star formation rate (SFR) with density. We construct visible to MIR spectral energy distributions of galaxies in eight low-redshift (z < 0.3) clusters and use them to measure stellar masses and SFRs as a function of environment. A partial correlation analysis indicates that the SFRs of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) depend strongly on M{sub *} (>99% confidence) with no dependence on R/R{sub 200} or projected local density at fixed mass. A merged sample of galaxies from the five best measured clusters shows (SFR){proportional_to}(R/R{sub 200}){sup 1.1{+-}0.3} for galaxies with R/R{sub 200} {<=} 0.4. A decline in the fraction of SFGs toward the cluster center contributes most of this effect, but it is accompanied by a reduction in (SFR) for SFGs with R {<=} 0.1 R{sub 200}. The increase in the fraction of SFGs toward larger R/R{sub 200} and the isolation of SFGs with reduced SFRs near the cluster center are consistent with the truncation of star formation by ram-pressure stripping, as is the tendency for more massive SFGs to have higher SFRs. We conclude that stripping is more likely than slower processes to drive the properties of SFGs with R < 0.4 R{sub 200} in clusters. We also find that galaxies near the cluster center are more massive than galaxies farther out in the cluster at {approx}3.5{sigma}, which suggests that dynamical relaxation significantly impacts the distribution of cluster galaxies as the clusters evolve.

  8. Maqarin natural analogue project: Phase IV. Reconnaissance mission report (April 28 to May 7, 1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.A.T.

    2000-08-01

    Final planning of the Technical Proposal for Phase IV of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Project was preceded by a ten day Reconnaissance Mission to the Jordan sites. The main objective of this mission was to: i) allow new organisations within the project to become familiar with the geological context of the Maqarin and Central Jordan sites and also to appreciate the prevailing technical and logistical limitations, ii) carry out limited field investigations, and iii) based on the experience from these two points, provide the opportunity to finalise the Maqarin Phase IV Technical Proposal. This report details the results of the mission

  9. Maqarin natural analogue project: Phase IV. Reconnaissance mission report (April 28 to May 7, 1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    Final planning of the Technical Proposal for Phase IV of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Project was preceded by a ten day Reconnaissance Mission to the Jordan sites. The main objective of this mission was to: i) allow new organisations within the project to become familiar with the geological context of the Maqarin and Central Jordan sites and also to appreciate the prevailing technical and logistical limitations, ii) carry out limited field investigations, and iii) based on the experience from these two points, provide the opportunity to finalise the Maqarin Phase IV Technical Proposal. This report details the results of the mission.

  10. Bipolar H II regions produced by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Anthony; Lomax, Oliver; Balfour, Scott; Mège, Pierre; Zavagno, Annie; Deharveng, Lise

    2018-05-01

    We suggest that bipolar H II regions may be the aftermath of collisions between clouds. Such a collision will produce a shock-compressed layer, and a star cluster can then condense out of the dense gas near the center of the layer. If the clouds are sufficiently massive, the star cluster is likely to contain at least one massive star, which emits ionizing radiation, and excites an H II region, which then expands, sweeping up the surrounding neutral gas. Once most of the matter in the clouds has accreted onto the layer, expansion of the H II region meets little resistance in directions perpendicular to the midplane of the layer, and so it expands rapidly to produce two lobes of ionized gas, one on each side of the layer. Conversely, in directions parallel to the midplane of the layer, expansion of the H II region stalls due to the ram pressure of the gas that continues to fall towards the star cluster from the outer parts of the layer; a ring of dense neutral gas builds up around the waist of the bipolar H II region, and may spawn a second generation of star formation. We present a dimensionless model for the flow of ionized gas in a bipolar H II region created according to the above scenario, and predict the characteristics of the resulting free-free continuum and recombination-line emission. This dimensionless model can be scaled to the physical parameters of any particular system. Our intention is that these predictions will be useful in testing the scenario outlined above, and thereby providing indirect support for the role of cloud-cloud collisions in triggering star formation.

  11. Cluster size matters: Size-driven performance of subnanometer clusters in catalysis, electrocatalysis and Li-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the strongly size-dependent performance of subnanometer cluster based catalysts in 1) heterogeneous catalysis, 2) electrocatalysis and 3) Li-air batteries. The experimental studies are based on I. fabrication of ultrasmall clusters with atomic precision control of particle size and their deposition on oxide and carbon based supports; II. test of performance, III. in situand ex situ X-ray characterization of cluster size, shape and oxidation state; and IV.electron microscopies. Heterogeneous catalysis. The pronounced effect of cluster size and support on the performance of the catalyst (catalyst activity and the yield of Cn products) will be illustrated on the example of nickel and cobalt clusters in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Electrocatalysis. The study of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on size-selected palladium clusters supported on ultrananocrystalline diamond show pronounced size effects. While Pd4 clusters show no reaction, Pd6 and Pd17 clusters are among the most active catalysts known (in in terms of turnover rate per Pd atom). The system (soft-landed Pd4, Pd6, or Pd17 clusters on an UNCD Si coated electrode) shows stable electrochemical potentials over several cycles, and the characterization of the electrodes show no evidence for evolution or dissolution of either the support Theoretical calculations suggest that this striking difference may be a demonstration that bridging Pd-Pd sites, which are only present in three-dimensional clusters, are active for the oxygen evolution reaction in Pd6O6. Li-air batteries. The studies show that sub-nm silver clusters have dramatic size-dependent effect on the lowering of the overpotential, charge capacity, morphology of the discharge products, as well as on the morphology of the nm size building blocks of the discharge products. The results suggest that by precise control of the active surface sites on the cathode, the performance of Li-air cells can be significantly improved

  12. Implementation Options for the PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, C. Les; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael; Stone, Nobie

    2014-01-01

    The PROPEL ("Propulsion using Electrodynamics") flight demonstration mission concept will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether (EDT) for generating thrust, which will allow the propulsion system to overcome the limitations of the rocket equation. The mission concept has been developed by a team of government, industry, and academia partners led by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). PROPEL is being designed for versatility of the EDT system with multiple end users in mind and to be flexible with respect to platform. Previously, we reported on a comprehensive mission design for PROPEL with a mission duration of six months or longer with multiple mission goals including demonstration of significant boost, deboost, inclination change, and drag make-up activities. To explore a range of possible configurations, primarily driven by cost considerations, other mission concept designs have been pursued. In partnership with the NASA's Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Program, NASA MSFC Leadership, and the MSFC Advanced Concepts Office, a mission concept design was developed for a near-term EDT propulsion flight validation mission. The Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion Study (ETPS) defined an EDT propulsion system capable of very large delta-V for use on future missions developed by NASA, DoD, and commercial customers. To demonstrate the feasibility of an ETPS, the study focused on a space demonstration mission concept design with configuration of a pair of tethered satellite busses, one of which is the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The HTV would fly its standard ISS resupply mission. When resupply mission is complete, the ISS reconfigures and releases the HTV to perform the EDT experiment at safe orbital altitudes below the ISS. Though the focus of this particular mission concept design addresses a scenario involving the HTV or a similar vehicle, the propulsion system's capability is relevant to a number of applications, as noted above

  13. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  14. Vacuum-Compatible Multi-Axis Manipulator/Machining Center for Long-Duration Space Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has many needs for maintenance and repair technologies for long-duration human space missions. We propose to continue developing a compact, portable,...

  15. Even-Odd Differences and Shape Deformation of Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Hidetoshi, Nishioka; Yoshio, Takahashi; Department of Physics, Konan University; Faculty of General Education, Yamagata University

    1994-01-01

    The relation between even-odd difference of metal cluster and the deformation of equilibrium shape is studied in terms of two different models; (i) tri-axially deformed harmonic oscillator model, (ii) rectangular box model. Having assumed the matter density ρ kept constant for different shapes of a cluster, we can determine the equilibrium shape both for the two models. The enhancement of HOMO-LUMO gap is obtained and it is ascribed to Jahn-Teller effect. Good agreement of the calculated resu...

  16. Cataloging the Praesepe Cluster: Identifying Interlopers and Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Madeline R.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mann, Andrew; Douglas, Stephanie

    2018-01-01

    We present radial velocity measurements from an ongoing survey of the Praesepe open cluster using the WIYN 3.5m Telescope. Our target stars include 229 early-K to mid-M dwarfs with proper motion memberships that have been observed by the repurposed Kepler mission, K2. With this survey, we will provide a well-constrained membership list of the cluster. By removing interloping stars and determining the cluster binary frequency we can avoid systematic errors in our analysis of the K2 findings and more accurately determine exoplanet properties in the Praesepe cluster. Obtaining accurate exoplanet parameters in open clusters allows us to study the temporal dimension of exoplanet parameter space. We find Praesepe to have a mean radial velocity of 34.09 km/s and a velocity dispersion of 1.13 km/s, which is consistent with previous studies. We derive radial velocity membership probabilities for stars with ≥3 radial velocity measurements and compare against published membership probabilities. We also identify radial velocity variables and potential double-lined spectroscopic binaries. We plan to obtain more observations to determine the radial velocity membership of all the stars in our sample, as well as follow up on radial velocity variables to determine binary orbital solutions.

  17. Whole genome sequence analysis of Geitlerinema sp. FC II unveils competitive edge of the strain in marine cultivation system for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchu, Navish Kumar; Khater, Shradha; Patil, Sonal; Nagle, Vinod; Das, Gautam; Bhadra, Bhaskar; Sapre, Ajit; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2018-03-05

    A filamentous cyanobacteria, Geitlerinema sp. FC II, was isolated from marine algae culture pond at Reliance Industries Limited (RIL), India. The 6.7 Mb draft genome of FC II encodes for 6697 protein coding genes. Analysis of the whole genome sequence revealed presence of nif gene cluster, supporting its capability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. FC II genome contains two variants of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductases (SQR), which is a crucial elector donor in cyanobacterial metabolic processes. FC II is characterized by the presence of multiple CRISPR- Cas (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindrome Repeats - CRISPR associated proteins) clusters, multiple variants of genes encoding photosystem reaction centres, biosynthetic gene clusters of alkane, polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides. Presence of these pathways will help FC II in gaining an ecological advantage over other strains for biomass production in large scale cultivation system. Hence, FC II may be used for production of biofuel and other industrially important metabolites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Innovative Applications of DoD Propulsion Technology for Low-Cost Satellite Missions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing to leverage the Missile Defense Agency investments in high-performance propulsion systems for low-cost space missions with large Dv requirements,...

  19. The Euclid mission design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Giuseppe D.; Laureijs, René; Stagnaro, Luca; Salvignol, Jean-Christophe; Lorenzo Alvarez, José; Saavedra Criado, Gonzalo; Gaspar Venancio, Luis; Short, Alex; Strada, Paolo; Bönke, Tobias; Colombo, Cyril; Calvi, Adriano; Maiorano, Elena; Piersanti, Osvaldo; Prezelus, Sylvain; Rosato, Pierluigi; Pinel, Jacques; Rozemeijer, Hans; Lesna, Valentina; Musi, Paolo; Sias, Marco; Anselmi, Alberto; Cazaubiel, Vincent; Vaillon, Ludovic; Mellier, Yannick; Amiaux, Jérôme; Berthé, Michel; Sauvage, Marc; Azzollini, Ruyman; Cropper, Mark; Pottinger, Sabrina; Jahnke, Knud; Ealet, Anne; Maciaszek, Thierry; Pasian, Fabio; Zacchei, Andrea; Scaramella, Roberto; Hoar, John; Kohley, Ralf; Vavrek, Roland; Rudolph, Andreas; Schmidt, Micha

    2016-07-01

    Euclid is a space-based optical/near-infrared survey mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by observing the geometry of the Universe and on the formation of structures over cosmological timescales. Euclid will use two probes of the signature of dark matter and energy: Weak gravitational Lensing, which requires the measurement of the shape and photometric redshifts of distant galaxies, and Galaxy Clustering, based on the measurement of the 3-dimensional distribution of galaxies through their spectroscopic redshifts. The mission is scheduled for launch in 2020 and is designed for 6 years of nominal survey operations. The Euclid Spacecraft is composed of a Service Module and a Payload Module. The Service Module comprises all the conventional spacecraft subsystems, the instruments warm electronics units, the sun shield and the solar arrays. In particular the Service Module provides the extremely challenging pointing accuracy required by the scientific objectives. The Payload Module consists of a 1.2 m three-mirror Korsch type telescope and of two instruments, the visible imager and the near-infrared spectro-photometer, both covering a large common field-of-view enabling to survey more than 35% of the entire sky. All sensor data are downlinked using K-band transmission and processed by a dedicated ground segment for science data processing. The Euclid data and catalogues will be made available to the public at the ESA Science Data Centre.

  20. Constraints on H(0) from globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of canonical stellar evolutionary computations, the maximum age of the globular clusters is suggested to be near either 14 Gyr or 18 Gyr, depending on how (O/Fe) varies with (Fe/H) in the cluster stars. The lower estimate requires that H(0) = 65 km/s/Mpc or less, for all Omega(0) = O or greater, if the standard Big-Bang cosmological theory is correct - while the higher age value similarly constrains the Hubble constant to be smaller than 46 km/s/Mpc. Some reduction in the upper limit to cluster ages and a consequent increase in H(0) may be expected if helium diffusion is important in Population II stars; nevertheless, values of H(0) greater than 75 km/s/Mpc still appear to be precluded unless the cosmological constant is nonzero. 51 refs

  1. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: M62 (NGC 6266), THE MOST RR LYRAE-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE GALAXY?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, R.; Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.; Kuehn, C. A.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present new time-series CCD photometry, in the B and V bands, for the moderately metal-rich ([Fe/H] ≅ -1.3) Galactic globular cluster M62 (NGC 6266). The present data set is the largest obtained so far for this cluster and consists of 168 images per filter, obtained with the Warsaw 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory and the 1.3 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, in two separate runs over the time span of 3 months. The procedure adopted to detect the variable stars was the optimal image subtraction method (ISIS v2.2), as implemented by Alard. The photometry was performed using both ISIS and Stetson's DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We have identified 245 variable stars in the cluster fields that have been analyzed so far, of which 179 are new discoveries. Of these variables, 133 are fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab), 76 are first overtone (RRc) pulsators, 4 are type II Cepheids, 25 are long-period variables (LPVs), 1 is an eclipsing binary, and 6 are not yet well classified. Such a large number of RR Lyrae stars places M62 among the top two most RR Lyrae-rich (in the sense of total number of RR Lyrae stars present) globular clusters known in the Galaxy, second only to M3 (NGC 5272) with a total of 230 known RR Lyrae stars. Since this study covers most but not all of the cluster area, it is not unlikely that M62 is in fact the most RR Lyrae-rich globular cluster in the Galaxy. In like vein, thanks to the time coverage of our data sets, we were also able to detect the largest sample of LPVs known so far in a Galactic globular cluster. We analyze a variety of Oosterhoff type indicators for the cluster, including mean periods, period distribution, Bailey diagrams, and Fourier decomposition parameters (as well as the physical parameters derived therefrom). All of these indicators clearly show that M62 is an Oosterhoff type I system. This is in good agreement with the moderately high metallicity of the cluster, in spite of its

  2. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  3. Theoretical study of the magnetic behavior of hexanuclear Cu(II) and Ni(II) polysiloxanolato complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eliseo; Cano, Joan; Alvarez, Santiago; Caneschi, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante

    2003-06-04

    A theoretical density functional study of the exchange coupling in hexanuclear polysiloxanolato-bridged complexes of Cu(II) and Ni(II) is presented. By calculating the energies of three different spin configurations, we can obtain estimates of the first-, second-, and third-neighbor exchange coupling constants. The study has been carried out for the complete structures of the Cu pristine cluster and of the chloroenclathrated Ni complex as well as for the hypotethical pristine Ni compound and for magnetically dinuclear analogues M(2)Zn(4) (M = Cu, Ni).

  4. Cluster in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Jolene S.; Fazakerley, Andrew N.; Marklund, Gorun; Dandouras, Iannis; Christopher, Ivar W.; Kistler, Lynn; Lucek, Elizabeth; Masson, Arnaud; Taylor, Matthew G.; Mutel, Robert L.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Due to a fortuitous evolution of the Cluster orbit, the Cluster spacecraft penetrated for the first time in its mission the heart of Earth's auroral acceleration region (AAR) in December 2009 and January 2010. During this time a special AAR campaign was carried out by the various Cluster instrument teams with special support from ESA and NASA facilities. We present some of the first multi-spacecraft observations of the waves, particles and fields made during that campaign. The Cluster spacecraft configuration during these AAR passages was such that it allowed us to explore the differences in the signatures of waves, particles, and fields on the various spacecraft in ways not possible with single spacecraft. For example, one spacecraft was more poleward than the other three (C2), one was at higher altitude (C1), and one of them (0) followed another (C4) through the AAR on approximately the same track but delayed by three minutes. Their separations were generally on the order of a few thousand km or less and occasionally two of them were lying along the same magnetic field line. We will show some of the first analyses of the data obtained during the AAR campaign, where upward and downward current regions, and the waves specifically associated with those regions, as well as the auroral cavities, were observed similarly and differently on the various spacecraft, helping us to explore the spatial, as well as the temporal, aspects of processes occurring in the AAR.

  5. The COSPIX Mission: Focusing on the Energetic and Obscured Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, P.; Goldwurm, A.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Beckmann, V; Arnaud, M.; Barcons, X.; Bomans, D.; Caballero, I.; Carrera, F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Tracing the formation and evolution of all supermassive black holes, including the obscured ones, understanding how black holes influence their surroundings and how matter behaves under extreme conditions, are recognized as key science objectives to be addressed by the next generation of instruments. These are the main goals of the COSPIX proposal, made to ESA in December 2010 in the context of its call for selection of the M3 mission. In addition, COSPIX, will also provide key measurements on the non thermal Universe, particularly in relation to the question of the acceleration of particles, as well as on many other fundamental questions as for example the energetic particle content of clusters of galaxies. COSPIX is proposed as an observatory operating from 0.3 to more than 100 keV. The payload features a single long focal length focusing telescope offering an effective area close to ten times larger than any scheduled focusing mission at 30 keV, an angular resolution better than 20 arcseconds in hard X-rays, and polarimetric capabilities within the same focal plane instrumentation. In this paper, we describe the science objectives of the mission, its baseline design, and its performances, as proposed to ESA.

  6. The Chang'e 3 Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlai; Liu, Jianjun; Ren, Xin; Zuo, Wei; Tan, Xu; Wen, Weibin; Li, Han; Mu, Lingli; Su, Yan; Zhang, Hongbo; Yan, Jun; Ouyang, Ziyuan

    2015-07-01

    The Chang'e 3 (CE-3) mission was implemented as the first lander/rover mission of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP). After its successful launch at 01:30 local time on December 2, 2013, CE-3 was inserted into an eccentric polar lunar orbit on December 6, and landed to the east of a 430 m crater in northwestern Mare Imbrium (19.51°W, 44.12°N) at 21:11 on December 14, 2013. The Yutu rover separated from the lander at 04:35, December 15, and traversed for a total of 0.114 km. Acquisition of science data began during the descent of the lander and will continue for 12 months during the nominal mission. The CE-3 lander and rover each carry four science instruments. Instruments on the lander are: Landing Camera (LCAM), Terrain Camera (TCAM), Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC), and Moon-based Ultraviolet Telescope (MUVT). The four instruments on the rover are: Panoramic Camera (PCAM), VIS-NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), Active Particle induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), and Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR). The science objectives of the CE-3 mission include: (1) investigation of the morphological features and geological structures of and near the landing area; (2) integrated in-situ analysis of mineral and chemical composition of and near the landing area; and (3) exploration of the terrestrial-lunar space environment and lunar-based astronomical observations. This paper describes the CE-3 objectives and measurements that address the science objectives outlined by the Comprehensive Demonstration Report of Phase II of CLEP. The CE-3 team has archived the initial science data, and we describe data accessibility by the science community.

  7. Kernel method for clustering based on optimal target vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Leonardo; Marinazzo, Daniele; Pellicoro, Mario; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2006-01-01

    We introduce Ising models, suitable for dichotomic clustering, with couplings that are (i) both ferro- and anti-ferromagnetic (ii) depending on the whole data-set and not only on pairs of samples. Couplings are determined exploiting the notion of optimal target vector, here introduced, a link between kernel supervised and unsupervised learning. The effectiveness of the method is shown in the case of the well-known iris data-set and in benchmarks of gene expression levels, where it works better than existing methods for dichotomic clustering

  8. Rapid molecular evolution across amniotes of the IIS/TOR network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Suzanne E; Bronikowski, Anne M; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Reding, Dawn M; Addis, Elizabeth A; Flagel, Lex E; Janzen, Fredric J; Schwartz, Tonia S

    2015-06-02

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling and target of rapamycin (IIS/TOR) network regulates lifespan and reproduction, as well as metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. Despite its vital role in health, comparative analyses of IIS/TOR have been limited to invertebrates and mammals. We conducted an extensive evolutionary analysis of the IIS/TOR network across 66 amniotes with 18 newly generated transcriptomes from nonavian reptiles and additional available genomes/transcriptomes. We uncovered rapid and extensive molecular evolution between reptiles (including birds) and mammals: (i) the IIS/TOR network, including the critical nodes insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), exhibit divergent evolutionary rates between reptiles and mammals; (ii) compared with a proxy for the rest of the genome, genes of the IIS/TOR extracellular network exhibit exceptionally fast evolutionary rates; and (iii) signatures of positive selection and coevolution of the extracellular network suggest reptile- and mammal-specific interactions between members of the network. In reptiles, positively selected sites cluster on the binding surfaces of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), and insulin receptor (INSR); whereas in mammals, positively selected sites clustered on the IGF2 binding surface, suggesting that these hormone-receptor binding affinities are targets of positive selection. Further, contrary to reports that IGF2R binds IGF2 only in marsupial and placental mammals, we found positively selected sites clustered on the hormone binding surface of reptile IGF2R that suggest that IGF2R binds to IGF hormones in diverse taxa and may have evolved in reptiles. These data suggest that key IIS/TOR paralogs have sub- or neofunctionalized between mammals and reptiles and that this network may underlie fundamental life history and physiological differences between these amniote sister clades.

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A MASSIVE RED-SEQUENCE-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER AT z = 1.34 IN THE SpARCS-SOUTH CLUSTER SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Gillian; Demarco, Ricardo; Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H. K. C.; Lacy, Mark; Surace, Jason; Gilbank, David; Blindert, Kris; Hoekstra, Henk; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gladders, Michael D.; Lonsdale, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a z'-passband imaging survey, consisting of deep (z' ≅ 24 AB) observations made from both hemispheres using the CFHT 3.6 m and CTIO 4 m telescopes. The survey was designed with the primary aim of detecting galaxy clusters at z > 1. In tandem with pre-existing 3.6 μm observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope SWIRE Legacy Survey, SpARCS detects clusters using an infrared adaptation of the two-filter red-sequence cluster technique. The total effective area of the SpARCS cluster survey is 41.9 deg 2 . In this paper, we provide an overview of the 13.6 deg 2 Southern CTIO/MOSAIC II observations. The 28.3 deg 2 Northern CFHT/MegaCam observations are summarized in a companion paper by Muzzin et al. In this paper, we also report spectroscopic confirmation of SpARCS J003550-431224, a very rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.335, discovered in the ELAIS-S1 field. To date, this is the highest spectroscopically confirmed redshift for a galaxy cluster discovered using the red-sequence technique. Based on nine confirmed members, SpARCS J003550-431224 has a preliminary velocity dispersion of 1050 ± 230 km s -1 . With its proven capability for efficient cluster detection, SpARCS is a demonstration that we have entered an era of large, homogeneously selected z > 1 cluster surveys.

  10. Solvable single-species aggregation-annihilation model for chain-shaped cluster growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Jianhong; Lin Zhenquan; Zheng Yizhuang; Chen Xiaoshuang; Lu Wei

    2007-01-01

    We propose a single-species aggregation-annihilation model, in which an aggregation reaction between two clusters produces an active cluster and an annihilation reaction produces an inert one. By means of the mean-field rate equation, we respectively investigate the kinetic scaling behaviours of three distinct systems. The results exhibit that: (i) for the general aggregation-annihilation system, the size distribution of active clusters consistently approaches the conventional scaling form; (ii) for the system with the self-degeneration of the cluster's activities, it takes the modified scaling form; and (iii) for the system with the self-closing of active clusters, it does not scale. Moreover, the size distribution of inert clusters with small size takes a power-law form, while that of large inert clusters obeys the scaling law. The results also show that all active clusters will eventually transform into inert ones and the inert clusters of any size can be produced by such an aggregation-annihilation process. This model can be used to mimic the chain-shaped cluster growth and can provide some useful predictions for the kinetic behaviour of the system

  11. Aqueous solvation of Mg(ii) and Ca(ii): A Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of microhydrated gas phase clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Pimentel, C. I.; Amaro-Estrada, J. I.; Hernández-Cobos, J.; Saint-Martin, H.; Ramírez-Solís, A.

    2018-04-01

    The hydration features of [Mg(H2O)n ] 2 + and [Ca(H2O)n ] 2 + clusters with n = 3-6, 8, 18, and 27 were studied by means of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level of theory. For both ions, it is energetically more favorable to have all water molecules in the first hydration shell when n ≤ 6, but stable lower coordination average structures with one water molecule not directly interacting with the ion were found for Mg2+ at room temperature, showing signatures of proton transfer events for the smaller cation but not for the larger one. A more rigid octahedral-type structure for Mg2+ than for Ca2+ was observed in all simulations, with no exchange of water molecules to the second hydration shell. Significant thermal effects on the average structure of clusters were found: while static optimizations lead to compact, spherically symmetric hydration geometries, the effects introduced by finite-temperature dynamics yield more prolate configurations. The calculated vibrational spectra are in agreement with infrared spectroscopy results. Previous studies proposed an increase in the coordination number (CN) from six to eight water molecules for [Ca(H2O)n ] 2 + clusters when n ≥ 12; however, in agreement with recent measurements of binding energies, no transition to a larger CN was found when n > 8. Moreover, the excellent agreement found between the calculated extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy spectra for the larger cluster and the experimental data of the aqueous solution supports a CN of six for Ca2+.

  12. Argonne Natl Lab receives TeraFLOP Cluster Linux NetworX

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    " Linux NetworX announced today it has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP)" (1/2 page).

  13. More Planets in the Hyades Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    A few weeks ago, Astrobites reported on a Neptune-sized planet discovered orbiting a star in the Hyades cluster. A separate study submitted at the same time, however, reveals that there may be even more planets lurking in this system.Thanks, KeplerArtists impression of the Kepler spacecraft and the mapping of the fields of the current K2 mission. [NASA]As we learn about the formation and evolution of planets outside of our own solar system, its important that we search for planets throughout different types of star clusters; observing both old and young clusters, for instance, can tell us about planets in different stages of their evolutionary histories. Luckily for us, we have a tool that has been doing exactly this: the Kepler mission.In true holiday spirit, Kepler is the gift that just keeps on giving. Though two of its reaction wheels have failed, Kepler now as its reincarnation, K2 just keeps detecting more planet transits. Whats more, detailed analysis of past Kepler/K2 data with ever more powerful techniques as well as the addition of high-precision parallaxes for stars from Gaia in the near future ensures that the Kepler data set will continue to reveal new exoplanet transits for many years to come.Image of the Hyades cluster, a star cluster that is only 800 million years old. [NASA/ESA/STScI]Hunting in the Young HyadesTwo studies using K2 data were recently submitted on exoplanet discoveries around EPIC 247589423 in the Hyades cluster, a nearby star cluster that is only 800 million years old. Astrobites reported on the first study in October and discussed details about the newly discovered mini-Neptune presented in that study.The second study, led by Andrew Mann (University of Texas at Austin and NASA Hubble Fellow at Columbia University), was published this week. This study presented a slightly different outcome: the authors detect the presence of not just the one, but three exoplanets orbiting EPIC 247589423.New DiscoveriesMann and collaborators searched

  14. POPULATION PARAMETERS OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. NEW INSIGHTS FROM EXTENDED MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFFS IN SEVEN STAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Puzia, Thomas H.; Chandar, Rupali

    2011-01-01

    We discuss new photometry from high-resolution images of seven intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr) star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We fit color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with several different sets of theoretical isochrones and determine systematic uncertainties for population parameters when derived using any one set of isochrones. The cluster CMDs show several interesting features, including extended main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) regions, narrow red giant branches, and clear sequences of unresolved binary stars. We show that the extended MSTOs are not caused by photometric uncertainties, contamination by field stars, or the presence of binary stars. Enhanced helium abundances in a fraction of cluster stars are also ruled out as the reason for the extended MSTOs. Quantitative comparisons with simulations indicate that the MSTO regions are better described by a spread in ages than by a bimodal age distribution, although we cannot formally rule out the latter for the three lowest-mass clusters in our sample (which have masses lower than ∼3 x 10 4 M sun ). This conclusion differs from that of some previous works which suggested that the age distribution in massive clusters in our sample is bimodal. This suggests that any secondary star formation occurred in an extended fashion rather than through short bursts. We discuss these results in the context of the nature of multiple stellar populations in star clusters.

  15. Clustering redshifts: a new window through the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scottez, Vivien L.

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of this thesis are to validate, consolidate and develop a new method to measure the redshift distribution of a sample of galaxies. Where current methods - spectroscopic and photometric redshifts - rely on the study of the spectral energy distribution of extragalactic sources, the approach presented here is based on the clustering properties of galaxies. Indeed clustering of galaxies caused by gravity gives them a particular spatial - and angular - distribution. In this clustering redshift approach, we use this particular property between a galaxies sample of unknown redshifts and a galaxies sample of reference to reconstruct the redshift distribution of the unknown population. Thus, possible systematics in this approach should be independent of those existing in other methods. This new method responds to a real need from the scientific community in the context of large dark imaging experiments such as the Euclid mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). After introducing the general scientific context and having highlighted the crucial role of distance measurements in astronomy, I present the statistical tools generally used to study the large scale structure of the Universe as well as their modification to infer redshift distributions. After validating this approach on a particular type of extragalactic objects, I generalized its application to all types of galaxies. Then, I explored the precision and some systematic effects by conducting an ideal case study. Thus, I performed a real case study. I also pushed further this analysis and found that the reference sample used in the measurement does not need to have the same limiting magnitude than the population of unknown redshift. This property is a great advantage for the use of this approach in the context of large imaging dark energy experiments like the Euclid space mission. Finally, I summarize my main results and present some of my future projects. (author)

  16. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The data analysis tool of choice for many Sun-Earth Connection missions is the Interactive Data Language (IDL) by ITT VIS. The increasing amount of data produced by these missions and the increasing complexity of image processing algorithms requires access to higher computing power. Parallel computing is a cost-effective way to increase the speed of computation, but algorithms oftentimes have to be modified to take advantage of parallel systems. Enhancing IDL to work on clusters gives scientists access to increased performance in a familiar programming environment. The goal of this project was to enable IDL applications to benefit from both computing clusters as well as graphics processing units (GPUs) for accelerating data analysis tasks. The tool suite developed in this project enables scientists now to solve demanding data analysis problems in IDL that previously required specialized software, and it allows them to be solved orders of magnitude faster than on conventional PCs. The tool suite consists of three components: (1) TaskDL, a software tool that simplifies the creation and management of task farms, collections of tasks that can be processed independently and require only small amounts of data communication; (2) mpiDL, a tool that allows IDL developers to use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) inside IDL for problems that require large amounts of data to be exchanged among multiple processors; and (3) GPULib, a tool that simplifies the use of GPUs as mathematical coprocessors from within IDL. mpiDL is unique in its support for the full MPI standard and its support of a broad range of MPI implementations. GPULib is unique in enabling users to take advantage of an inexpensive piece of hardware, possibly already installed in their computer, and achieve orders of magnitude faster execution time for numerically complex algorithms. TaskDL enables the simple setup and management of task farms on compute clusters. The products developed in this project have the

  17. Advising China, 1924-1948: The Role of Military Culture in Foreign Advisory Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    part of Ludendorff’s ultra-nationalist circle, which had participated in Adolf Hitler’s failed Beer Hall Putsch in 1923. 73 The advisers... Sour ce: Charles F. Romanus and Riley Sunderland, United States Army in World War II, China-Burma-India Theater: Stilwell’s Mission to China

  18. THE SECOND SURVEY OF THE MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD BY NANTEN. II. STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Akiko; Mizuno, Yoji; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Onishi, Toshikazu; Fukui, Yasuo; Fillipovic, Miroslav D.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Kim, Sungeun; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We studied star formation activities in the molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We have utilized the second catalog of 272 molecular clouds obtained by NANTEN to compare the cloud distribution with signatures of massive star formation including stellar clusters, and optical and radio H II regions. We find that the molecular clouds are classified into three types according to the activities of massive star formation: Type I shows no signature of massive star formation; Type II is associated with relatively small H II region(s); and Type III with both H II region(s) and young stellar cluster(s). The radio continuum sources were used to confirm that Type I giant molecular clouds (GMCs) do not host optically hidden H II regions. These signatures of massive star formation show a good spatial correlation with the molecular clouds in the sense that they are located within ∼100 pc of the molecular clouds. Among possible ideas to explain the GMC types, we favor that the types indicate an evolutionary sequence; i.e., the youngest phase is Type I, followed by Type II, and the last phase is Type III, where the most active star formation takes place leading to cloud dispersal. The number of the three types of GMCs should be proportional to the timescale of each evolutionary stage if a steady state of massive star and cluster formation is a good approximation. By adopting the timescale of the youngest stellar clusters, 10 Myr, we roughly estimate the timescales of Types I, II, and III to be 6 Myr, 13 Myr, and 7 Myr, respectively, corresponding to a lifetime of 20-30 Myr for the GMCs with a mass above the completeness limit, 5 x 10 4 M sun .

  19. Fingerprinting dark energy. II. Weak lensing and galaxy clustering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin; Amendola, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of dark energy is a central task of cosmology. To go beyond a cosmological constant, we need to introduce at least an equation of state and a sound speed and consider observational tests that involve perturbations. If dark energy is not completely homogeneous on observable scales, then the Poisson equation is modified and dark matter clustering is directly affected. One can then search for observational effects of dark energy clustering using dark matter as a probe. In this paper we exploit an analytical approximate solution of the perturbation equations in a general dark energy cosmology to analyze the performance of next-decade large-scale surveys in constraining equation of state and sound speed. We find that tomographic weak lensing and galaxy redshift surveys can constrain the sound speed of the dark energy only if the latter is small, of the order of c s < or approx. 0.01 (in units of c). For larger sound speeds the error grows to 100% and more. We conclude that large-scale structure observations contain very little information about the perturbations in canonical scalar field models with a sound speed of unity. Nevertheless, they are able to detect the presence of cold dark energy, i.e. a dark energy with nonrelativistic speed of sound.

  20. MASSIVE CLUSTERS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF NGC 1365: CLUSTER FORMATION AND GAS DYNAMICS IN GALACTIC BARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Galliano, Emmanuel; Alloin, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Cluster formation and gas dynamics in the central regions of barred galaxies are not well understood. This paper reviews the environment of three 10 7 M sun clusters near the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the barred spiral NGC 1365. The morphology, mass, and flow of H I and CO gas in the spiral and barred regions are examined for evidence of the location and mechanism of cluster formation. The accretion rate is compared with the star formation rate to infer the lifetime of the starburst. The gas appears to move from inside corotation in the spiral region to looping filaments in the interbar region at a rate of ∼6 M sun yr -1 before impacting the bar dustlane somewhere along its length. The gas in this dustlane moves inward, growing in flux as a result of the accretion to ∼40 M sun yr -1 near the ILR. This inner rate exceeds the current nuclear star formation rate by a factor of 4, suggesting continued buildup of nuclear mass for another ∼0.5 Gyr. The bar may be only 1-2 Gyr old. Extrapolating the bar flow back in time, we infer that the clusters formed in the bar dustlane outside the central dust ring at a position where an interbar filament currently impacts the lane. The ram pressure from this impact is comparable to the pressure in the bar dustlane, and both are comparable to the pressure in the massive clusters. Impact triggering is suggested. The isothermal assumption in numerical simulations seems inappropriate for the rarefaction parts of spiral and bar gas flows. The clusters have enough lower-mass counterparts to suggest they are part of a normal power-law mass distribution. Gas trapping in the most massive clusters could explain their [Ne II] emission, which is not evident from the lower-mass clusters nearby.

  1. Organization of co-occurring Axis II features in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchfield, Kenneth L; Clarkin, John F; Levy, Kenneth N; Kernberg, Otto F

    2008-06-01

    Considerable heterogeneity exists in the comorbid Axis II features that frequently accompany borderline personality disorder (BPD). These features have potential to be meaningfully organized, relate to specific BPD presentation, and have implications for treatment process and outcome. The present study explored patterns of Axis II comorbidity in order to identify subtypes of BPD. A well-defined sample of 90 patients diagnosed with BPD was recruited as part of an RCT study. Participants were administered the International Personality Disorder Examination (Loranger, 1999) to diagnose BPD and assess comorbid Axis II features. Other measures were also administered to assess aspects of current work and relationship functioning, symptomatology, and self-concept. Q-factoring was used to develop subtypes based on commonly occurring Axis II profiles, identifying three: Cluster A (elevated paranoid and schizotypal features), Cluster B (elevated narcissistic and histrionic features), and Cluster C (elevated avoidant and obsessive-compulsive features). An additional factor analysis revealed two dimensions underlying the comorbid features identifiable as: extraversion versus introversion and antagonism versus constraint. Validity of these two maps of comorbidity was explored in terms of the BPD criteria themselves, as well as on work and relationship functioning, identity diffusion, views of self and others, positive and negative affect, behavioural dyscontrol, and symptomatic distress. Clinically meaningful subtypes can be identified for BPD based on co-occurring Axis II features. Further research is needed to replicate and further establish base-rates of these subtypes as well as their differential implications for treatment.

  2. The PIP-II Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burov, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Chase, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Chakravarty, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Chen, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dixon, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Edelen, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Holmes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kazakov, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Klebaner, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kourbanis, I. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Leveling, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Melnychuk, O. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Neuffer, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nicol, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ostiguy, J. -F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pasquinelli, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Passarelli, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ristori, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pellico, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Patrick, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Prost, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rakhno, I. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Saini, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schappert, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Shemyakin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Steimel, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Scarpine, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vivoli, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Warner, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yakovlev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ostroumov, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Conway, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II) encompasses a set of upgrades and improvements to the Fermilab accelerator complex aimed at supporting a world-leading neutrino program over the next several decades. PIP-II is an integral part of the strategic plan for U.S. High Energy Physics as described in the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) report of May 2014 and formalized through the Mission Need Statement approved in November 2015. As an immediate goal, PIP-II is focused on upgrades to the Fermilab accelerator complex capable of providing proton beam power in excess of 1 MW on target at the initiation of the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNF/DUNE) program, currently anticipated for the mid- 2020s. PIP-II is a part of a longer-term goal of establishing a high-intensity proton facility that is unique within the world, ultimately leading to multi-MW capabilities at Fermilab....

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cool-core clusters with Chandra obs. (Andrade-Santos+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Santos, F.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Lovisari, L.; Vikhlinin, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Murray, S. S.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Democles, J.; Kraft, R.; Mazzotta, P.; Bohringer, H.; Chon, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Clarke, T. E.; Borgani, S.; David, L.; Douspis, M.; Pointecouteau, E.; Dahle, H.; Brown, S.; Aghanim, N.; Rasia, E.

    2018-02-01

    The main goal of this work is to compare the fraction of cool-core (CC) clusters in X-ray-selected and SZ-selected samples. The first catalog of 189 SZ clusters detected by the Planck mission was released in early 2011 (Planck Collaboration 2011, VIII/88/esz). A Chandra XVP (X-ray Visionary Program--PI: Jones) and HRC Guaranteed Time Observations (PI: Murray) combined to form the Chandra-Planck Legacy Program for Massive Clusters of Galaxies. For each of the 164 ESZ Planck clusters at z<=0.35, we obtained Chandra exposures sufficient to collect at least 10000 source counts. The X-ray sample used here is an extension of the Voevodkin & Vikhlinin (2004ApJ...601..610V) sample. This sample contains 100 clusters and has an effective redshift depth of z<0.3. All have Chandra observations. Of the 100 X-ray-selected clusters, 49 are also in the ESZ sample, and 47 are in the HIFLUGCS (Reiprich & Boehringer 2002ApJ...567..716R) catalog. (2 data files).

  4. RTNS-II 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    RTNS-II was built to provide a deuterium-tritium neutron source for the study of fusion neutron effects. In the quest to apply fusion to commercial power production, the specific mission of RTNS-II is threefold: to acquire direct engineering data for near-term confinement experiments and for materials that will see moderate neutron dose in future reactor systems; to measure production rates of transmutants and to develop appropriate radiation-resistant instrumentation for fusion systems; and to study the radiation-induced property changes caused by fusion neutrons. RTNS-II comprises two independent sources of 14-MeV neutrons. This is the third annual report summarizing irradiation experiments at RTNS-II. It covers calendar year 1983, and includes reports of all irradiation results, both fusion and non-fusion related. These comprise both secondary (or ''add-on'') and primary irradiations. Each summary article has been submitted by the investigator and has been altered only to meet the style and format requirements of this report

  5. Mission operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Redefining the approach and philosophy that operations management uses to define, develop, and implement space missions will be a central element in achieving high efficiency mission operations for the future. The goal of a cost effective space operations program cannot be realized if the attitudes and methodologies we currently employ to plan, develop, and manage space missions do not change. A management philosophy that is in synch with the environment in terms of budget, technology, and science objectives must be developed. Changing our basic perception of mission operations will require a shift in the way we view the mission. This requires a transition from current practices of viewing the mission as a unique end product, to a 'mission development concept' built on the visualization of the end-to-end mission. To achieve this change we must define realistic mission success criteria and develop pragmatic approaches to achieve our goals. Custom mission development for all but the largest and most unique programs is not practical in the current budget environment, and we simply do not have the resources to implement all of our planned science programs. We need to shift our management focus to allow us the opportunity make use of methodologies and approaches which are based on common building blocks that can be utilized in the space, ground, and mission unique segments of all missions.

  6. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM of galaxy clusters to outer regions observed with Suzaku. The observed temperature dropped by about ~30% from the central region to the virial radius of the clusters. The derived entropy profile agreed with the expectation from simulations within r500, while the entropy profile in r > r500 indicated a flatter slope than the simulations. This would suggest that the cluster outskirts were out of hydrostatic equilibrium. As for the metallicity, we studied the metal abundances from O to Fe up to ~0.5 times the virial radius of galaxy groups and clusters. Comparing the results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II to Ia supernovae is estimated to be ~3.5. We also calculated not only Fe, but also O and Mg mass-to-light ratios (MLRs with K-band luminosity. The MLRs in the clusters had a similar feature.

  7. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE λ ORIONIS CLUSTER. II. DISKS AROUND SOLAR-TYPE AND LOW-MASS STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Jesus; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, L.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Luhman, K. L.; Stauffer, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar-type and the low-mass stellar population of the young (∼5 Myr) λ Orionis cluster. Combining optical and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 M sun to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with 'evolved disks' (with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and 'transitional disk' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ∼6% for K-type stars (R C - J C - J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the λ Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as ∼5 Myr.

  8. Clusters of galaxies associated with quasars. I. 3C 206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, E.; Yee, H.K.C.; Green, R.F.; Kinman, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Multislit spectroscopy and three-color CCD photometry of the galaxies in the cluster associated with the quasar 3C 206 (PKS 0837-12) at z = 0.198 are presented. This cluster is the richest environment of any low-redshift quasar observed in an Abell richness class 1 cluster. The cluster has a very flattened structure and a very concentrated core about the quasar. Most of the galaxies in this field have colors and luminosities consistent with normal galaxies at this redshift. The background-corrected blue fraction of galaxies is consistent with values for other rich clusters. The existence of several blue galaxies in the concentrated cluster core is an anomaly for a region of such high galaxy density, however, suggesting the absence of a substantial intracluster medium. This claim is supported by the Fanaroff-Riley (1974) class II morphology of the radio source. The velocity dispersion calculated from 11 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members is 500 + or - 110 km/s, which is slightly lower than the average for Abell class 1 clusters. A high frequency of interaction between the quasar host galaxy and cluster core members at low relative velocities, and a low intracluster gas pressure, may comprise a favorable environment for quasar activity. The properties of the cluster of galaxies associated with 3C 206 are consistent with this model. 59 refs

  9. A cluster expansion model for predicting activation barrier of atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Tafizur; Jaipal, M.; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a procedure based on cluster expansion models for predicting the activation barrier of atomic processes encountered while studying the dynamics of a material system using the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method. Starting with an interatomic potential description, a mathematical derivation is presented to show that the local environment dependence of the activation barrier can be captured using cluster interaction models. Next, we develop a systematic procedure for training the cluster interaction model on-the-fly, which involves: (i) obtaining activation barriers for handful local environments using nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations, (ii) identifying the local environment by analyzing the NEB results, and (iii) estimating the cluster interaction model parameters from the activation barrier data. Once a cluster expansion model has been trained, it is used to predict activation barriers without requiring any additional NEB calculations. Numerical studies are performed to validate the cluster expansion model by studying hop processes in Ag/Ag(100). We show that the use of cluster expansion model with KMC enables efficient generation of an accurate process rate catalog

  10. K-AP: Generating specified K clusters by efficient Affinity Propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-12-01

    The Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck (2007) provides an understandable, nearly optimal summary of a data set. However, it suffers two major shortcomings: i) the number of clusters is vague with the user-defined parameter called self-confidence, and ii) the quadratic computational complexity. When aiming at a given number of clusters due to prior knowledge, AP has to be launched many times until an appropriate setting of self-confidence is found. The re-launched AP increases the computational cost by one order of magnitude. In this paper, we propose an algorithm, called K-AP, to exploit the immediate results of K clusters by introducing a constraint in the process of message passing. Through theoretical analysis and experimental validation, K-AP was shown to be able to directly generate K clusters as user defined, with a negligible increase of computational cost compared to AP. In the meanwhile, K-AP preserves the clustering quality as AP in terms of the distortion. K-AP is more effective than k-medoids w.r.t. the distortion minimization and higher clustering purity. © 2010 IEEE.

  11. Observations of low mass stars in clusters: some constraints and puzzles for stellar evolution theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The author attempts to: (i) discuss some of the data which are available for testing the theory of evolution of low mass stars; and (ii) point out some problem areas where observations and theory do not seem to agree very well. He concentrates on one particular aspect, namely the study of star clusters and especially their colour-magnitude (CM) diagrams. Star clusters provide large samples of stars at the same distance and with the same age, and the CM diagram gives the easiest way of comparing theoretical predictions with observations, although crucial evidence is also provided by spectroscopic abundance analyses and studies of variable stars. Since this is primarily a review of observational data it is natural to divide it into two parts: (i) galactic globular clusters, and (ii) old and intermediate-age open clusters. Some additional evidence comes from Local Group galaxies, especially now that CM diagrams which reach the old main sequence are becoming available. For each class of cluster successive stages of evolution from the main sequence, up the hydrogen-burning red giant branch, and through the helium-burning giant phase are considered. (Auth.)

  12. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model

  13. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T. [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dawson, J. R. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus, Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay, TAS 7005 (Australia); Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H. [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Mizuno, A., E-mail: fukui@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ∼20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  14. A cluster-bethe-lattice approach to spin-waves in dilute ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzberg, J.B.; Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Falicov, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The spin-wave spectra of a dilute ferromagnet within the cluster-bethe-lattice approximation is studied. Short range order effects for the alloy are included. A study of finite size clusters connected at their edges to Bethe lattices of the same coordination number allows one to determine:(i) the stability condition for the magnetic system; (ii) the continuum spin-wave local density of states and (iii) the existence of localized states below and above the continuum states

  15. Designing Mission Operations for the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Glen G.; Beerer, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, to understand the internal structure and thermal evolution of the Moon, offered unique challenges to mission operations. From launch through end of mission, the twin GRAIL orbiters had to be operated in parallel. The journey to the Moon and into the low science orbit involved numerous maneuvers, planned on tight timelines, to ultimately place the orbiters into the required formation-flying configuration necessary. The baseline GRAIL mission is short, only 9 months in duration, but progressed quickly through seven very unique mission phases. Compressed into this short mission timeline, operations activities and maneuvers for both orbiters had to be planned and coordinated carefully. To prepare for these challenges, development of the GRAIL Mission Operations System began in 2008. Based on high heritage multi-mission operations developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin, the GRAIL mission operations system was adapted to meet the unique challenges posed by the GRAIL mission design. This paper describes GRAIL's system engineering development process for defining GRAIL's operations scenarios and generating requirements, tracing the evolution from operations concept through final design, implementation, and validation.

  16. Weak Lensing by Galaxy Clusters: from Pixels to Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The story of the origin and evolution of our Universe is told, equivalently, by space-time itself and by the structures that grow inside of it. Clusters of galaxies are the frontier of bottom-up structure formation. They are the most massive objects to have collapsed at the present epoch. By that virtue, their abundance and structural parameters are highly sensitive to the composition and evolution of the Universe. The most common probe of cluster cosmology, abundance, uses samples of clusters selected by some observable. Applying a mass-observable relation (MOR), cosmological parameters can be constrained by comparing the sample to predicted cluster abundances as a function of observable and redshift. Arguably, however, cluster probes have not yet entered the era of per cent level precision cosmology. The primary reason for this is our imperfect understanding of the MORs. The overall normalization, the slope of mass vs. observable, the redshift evolution, and the degree and correlation of intrinsic scatters of observables at fixed mass have to be constrained for interpreting abundances correctly. Mass measurement of clusters by means of the differential deflection of light from background sources in their gravitational field, i.e. weak lensing, is a powerful approach for achieving this. This thesis presents new methods for and scientific results of weak lensing measurements of clusters of galaxies. The former include, on the data reduction side, (i) the correction of CCD images for non-linear effects due to the electric fields of accumulated charges and (ii) a method for masking artifact features in sets of overlapping images of the sky by comparison to the median image. Also, (iii) I develop a method for the selection of background galaxy samples based on their color and apparent magnitude that includes a new correction for contamination with cluster member galaxies. The main scientific results are the following. (i) For the Hubble Frontier Field cluster RXC J

  17. Weak Lensing by Galaxy Clusters: from Pixels to Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, Daniel [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    The story of the origin and evolution of our Universe is told, equivalently, by space-time itself and by the structures that grow inside of it. Clusters of galaxies are the frontier of bottom-up structure formation. They are the most massive objects to have collapsed at the present epoch. By that virtue, their abundance and structural parameters are highly sensitive to the composition and evolution of the Universe. The most common probe of cluster cosmology, abundance, uses samples of clusters selected by some observable. Applying a mass-observable relation (MOR), cosmological parameters can be constrained by comparing the sample to predicted cluster abundances as a function of observable and redshift. Arguably, however, cluster probes have not yet entered the era of per cent level precision cosmology. The primary reason for this is our imperfect understanding of the MORs. The overall normalization, the slope of mass vs. observable, the redshift evolution, and the degree and correlation of intrinsic scatters of observables at fixed mass have to be constrained for interpreting abundances correctly. Mass measurement of clusters by means of the differential deflection of light from background sources in their gravitational field, i.e. weak lensing, is a powerful approach for achieving this. This thesis presents new methods for and scientific results of weak lensing measurements of clusters of galaxies. The former include, on the data reduction side, (i) the correction of CCD images for non-linear effects due to the electric fields of accumulated charges and (ii) a method for masking artifact features in sets of overlapping images of the sky by comparison to the median image. Also, (iii) I develop a method for the selection of background galaxy samples based on their color and apparent magnitude that includes a new correction for contamination with cluster member galaxies. The main scientific results are the following. (i) For the Hubble Frontier Field cluster RXC J

  18. Evolution of Orion Mission Design for Exploration Mission 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkowski, Jeffrey P.; Dawn, Timothy F.; Jedrey, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The evolving mission design and concepts of NASA’s next steps have shaped Orion into the spacecraft that it is today. Since the initial inception of Orion, through the Constellation Program, and now in the Exploration Mission frame-work with the Space Launch System (SLS), each mission design concept and pro-gram goal have left Orion with a set of capabilities that can be utilized in many different mission types. Exploration Missions 1 and 2 (EM-1 and EM-2) have now been at the forefront of the mission design focus for the last several years. During that time, different Design Reference Missions (DRMs) were built, analyzed, and modified to solve or mitigate enterprise level design trades to ensure a viable mission from launch to landing. The resulting DRMs for EM-1 and EM-2 were then expanded into multi-year trajectory scans to characterize vehicle performance as affected by variations in Earth-Moon geometry. This provides Orion’s subsystems with stressing reference trajectories to help design their system. Now that Orion has progressed through the Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews (PDR and CDR), there is a general shift in the focus of mission design from aiding the vehicle design to providing mission specific products needed for pre-flight and real time operations. Some of the mission specific products needed include, large quantities of nominal trajectories for multiple monthly launch periods and abort options at any point in the mission for each valid trajectory in the launch window.

  19. Testing the accuracy of clustering redshifts with simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottez, V.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Mellier, Y.

    2018-03-01

    We explore the accuracy of clustering-based redshift inference within the MICE2 simulation. This method uses the spatial clustering of galaxies between a spectroscopic reference sample and an unknown sample. This study give an estimate of the reachable accuracy of this method. First, we discuss the requirements for the number objects in the two samples, confirming that this method does not require a representative spectroscopic sample for calibration. In the context of next generation of cosmological surveys, we estimated that the density of the Quasi Stellar Objects in BOSS allows us to reach 0.2 per cent accuracy in the mean redshift. Secondly, we estimate individual redshifts for galaxies in the densest regions of colour space ( ˜ 30 per cent of the galaxies) without using the photometric redshifts procedure. The advantage of this procedure is threefold. It allows: (i) the use of cluster-zs for any field in astronomy, (ii) the possibility to combine photo-zs and cluster-zs to get an improved redshift estimation, (iii) the use of cluster-z to define tomographic bins for weak lensing. Finally, we explore this last option and build five cluster-z selected tomographic bins from redshift 0.2 to 1. We found a bias on the mean redshift estimate of 0.002 per bin. We conclude that cluster-z could be used as a primary redshift estimator by next generation of cosmological surveys.

  20. Computer graphics aid mission operations. [NASA missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeletic, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The application of computer graphics techniques in NASA space missions is reviewed. Telemetric monitoring of the Space Shuttle and its components is discussed, noting the use of computer graphics for real-time visualization problems in the retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission. The use of the world map display for determining a spacecraft's location above the earth and the problem of verifying the relative position and orientation of spacecraft to celestial bodies are examined. The Flight Dynamics/STS Three-dimensional Monitoring System and the Trajectroy Computations and Orbital Products System world map display are described, emphasizing Space Shuttle applications. Also, consideration is given to the development of monitoring systems such as the Shuttle Payloads Mission Monitoring System and the Attitude Heads-Up Display and the use of the NASA-Goddard Two-dimensional Graphics Monitoring System during Shuttle missions and to support the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. Three-dimensional tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination network based on a 1,3-alternate calix[4]arene derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Ju, Hui Yeong; Park, Ki Min; Moon, ASuk Hee; Kang, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Polynuclear coordination polymers can exhibit more intriguing network topologies and better functionalities than those of common complexes because they have metal-cluster nodes for the construction of multidimensional frameworks and the potential applications induced by collaborative activities between metal ions. New tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination polymer 1 based on 1,3-alternate calix arene derivative (H_4 CTA) with four carboxyl pendant arms has been synthesized by the solvo thermal reaction at 110 .deg. C for 2 days. Compound 1 shows a 3-D framework consisting of tetranuclear Cd(II) cluster core as a metal-cluster node and 1,3-alternate H_4CTA as a multidentate linker. The coordination polymer 1 displays intense blue emission, implying that this tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination polymer could be a suitable material in the area of luminescence research

  2. Spots and the Activity of Stars in the Hyades Cluster from Observations with the Kepler Space Telescope (K2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2018-03-01

    Observations of the K2 mission (continuing the program of the Kepler Space Telescope) are used to estimate the spot coverage S (the fractional area of spots on the surface of an active star) for stars of the Hyades cluster. The analysis is based on data on the photometric variations of 47 confirmed single cluster members, together with their atmospheric parameters, masses, and rotation periods. The resulting values of S for these Hyades objects are lower than those stars of the Pleiades cluster (on average, by Δ S 0.05-0.06). A comparison of the results of studies of cool, low-mass dwarfs in the Hyades and Pleiades clusters, as well as the results of a study of 1570 M stars from the main field observed in the Kepler SpaceMission, indicates that the Hyades stars are more evolved than the Pleiades stars, and demonstrate lower activity. The activity of seven solar-type Hyades stars ( S = 0.013 ± 0.006) almost approaches the activity level of the present-day Sun, and is lower than the activity of solar-mass stars in the Pleiades ( S = 0.031 ± 0.003). Solar-type stars in the Hyades rotate faster than the Sun ( = 8.6 d ), but slower than similar Pleiades stars.

  3. SLS Launched Missions Concept Studies for LUVOIR Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's "Enduring Quests Daring Visions" report calls for an 8- to 16-meter Large UV-Optical-IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission to enable ultra-high-contrast spectroscopy and coronagraphy. AURA's "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earth" report calls for a 12-meter class High-Definition Space Telescope to pursue transformational scientific discoveries. The multi-center ATLAST Team is working to meet these needs. The MSFC Team is examining potential concepts that leverage the advantages of the SLS (Space Launch System). A key challenge is how to affordably get a large telescope into space. The JWST design was severely constrained by the mass and volume capacities of its launch vehicle. This problem is solved by using an SLS Block II-B rocket with its 10-m diameter x 30-m tall fairing and 45 mt payload to SE-L2. Previously, two development study cycles produced a detailed concept called ATLAST-8. Using ATLAST-8 as a point of departure, this paper reports on a new ATLAST-12 concept. ATLAST-12 is a 12-meter class segmented aperture LUVOIR with an 8-m class center segment. Thus, ATLAST-8 is now a de-scope option.

  4. SLS launched missions concept studies for LUVOIR mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2015-09-01

    NASA's "Enduring Quests Daring Visions" report calls for an 8- to 16-m Large UV-Optical-IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission to enable ultra-high-contrast spectroscopy and coronagraphy. AURA's "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earth" report calls for a 12-m class High-Definition Space Telescope to pursue transformational scientific discoveries. The multi-center ATLAST Team is working to meet these needs. The MSFC Team is examining potential concepts that leverage the advantages of the SLS (Space Launch System). A key challenge is how to affordably get a large telescope into space. The JWST design was severely constrained by the mass and volume capacities of its launch vehicle. This problem is solved by using an SLS Block II-B rocket with its 10-m diameter x 30-m tall fairing and estimated 45 mt payload to SE-L2. Previously, two development study cycles produced a detailed concept called ATLAST-8. Using ATLAST-8 as a point of departure, this paper reports on a new ATLAST-12 concept. ATLAST-12 is a 12-m class segmented aperture LUVOIR with an 8-m class center segment. Thus, ATLAST-8 is now a de-scope option.

  5. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Clusters of galaxies in SDSS-III (Wen+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.; Liu, F. S.

    2012-06-01

    Wen et al. (2009, Cat. J/ApJS/183/197) identified 39668 galaxy clusters from the SDSS DR6 by the discrimination of member galaxies of clusters using photometric redshifts of galaxies. Wen & Han (2011ApJ...734...68W) improved the method and successfully identified the high-redshift clusters from the deep fields of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Wide survey, the CHFT Deep survey, the Cosmic Evolution Survey, and the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey. Here, we follow and improve the algorithm to identify clusters from SDSS-III (SDSS Data Release 8; Aihara et al. 2011ApJS..193...29A, see Cat. II/306). (1 data file).

  7. Identification of an unusual type II thioesterase in the dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ying; Bai, Silei; Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Liyuan [National Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Han, Li; Huang, Xueshi [Institute of Microbial Pharmaceuticals, College of Life and Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); He, Jing, E-mail: hejingjj@mail.hzau.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-04-22

    Dithiolopyrrolone group antibiotics characterized by an electronically unique dithiolopyrrolone heterobicyclic core are known for their antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal and antitumor activities. Recently the biosynthetic gene clusters for two dithiolopyrrolone compounds, holomycin and thiomarinol, have been identified respectively in different bacterial species. Here, we report a novel dithiolopyrrolone biosynthetic gene cluster (aut) isolated from Streptomyces thioluteus DSM 40027 which produces two pyrrothine derivatives, aureothricin and thiolutin. By comparison with other characterized dithiolopyrrolone clusters, eight genes in the aut cluster were verified to be responsible for the assembly of dithiolopyrrolone core. The aut cluster was further confirmed by heterologous expression and in-frame gene deletion experiments. Intriguingly, we found that the heterogenetic thioesterase HlmK derived from the holomycin (hlm) gene cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus significantly improved heterologous biosynthesis of dithiolopyrrolones in Streptomyces albus through coexpression with the aut cluster. In the previous studies, HlmK was considered invalid because it has a Ser to Gly point mutation within the canonical Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of thioesterases. However, gene inactivation and complementation experiments in our study unequivocally demonstrated that HlmK is an active distinctive type II thioesterase that plays a beneficial role in dithiolopyrrolone biosynthesis. - Highlights: • Cloning of the aureothricin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces thioluteus DSM 40027. • Identification of the aureothricin gene cluster by heterologous expression and in-frame gene deletion. • The heterogenetic thioesterase HlmK significantly improved dithiolopyrrolones production of the aureothricin gene cluster. • Identification of HlmK as an unusual type II thioesterase.

  8. Identification of an unusual type II thioesterase in the dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics biosynthetic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Ying; Bai, Silei; Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Liyuan; Han, Li; Huang, Xueshi; He, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dithiolopyrrolone group antibiotics characterized by an electronically unique dithiolopyrrolone heterobicyclic core are known for their antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal and antitumor activities. Recently the biosynthetic gene clusters for two dithiolopyrrolone compounds, holomycin and thiomarinol, have been identified respectively in different bacterial species. Here, we report a novel dithiolopyrrolone biosynthetic gene cluster (aut) isolated from Streptomyces thioluteus DSM 40027 which produces two pyrrothine derivatives, aureothricin and thiolutin. By comparison with other characterized dithiolopyrrolone clusters, eight genes in the aut cluster were verified to be responsible for the assembly of dithiolopyrrolone core. The aut cluster was further confirmed by heterologous expression and in-frame gene deletion experiments. Intriguingly, we found that the heterogenetic thioesterase HlmK derived from the holomycin (hlm) gene cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus significantly improved heterologous biosynthesis of dithiolopyrrolones in Streptomyces albus through coexpression with the aut cluster. In the previous studies, HlmK was considered invalid because it has a Ser to Gly point mutation within the canonical Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of thioesterases. However, gene inactivation and complementation experiments in our study unequivocally demonstrated that HlmK is an active distinctive type II thioesterase that plays a beneficial role in dithiolopyrrolone biosynthesis. - Highlights: • Cloning of the aureothricin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces thioluteus DSM 40027. • Identification of the aureothricin gene cluster by heterologous expression and in-frame gene deletion. • The heterogenetic thioesterase HlmK significantly improved dithiolopyrrolones production of the aureothricin gene cluster. • Identification of HlmK as an unusual type II thioesterase.

  9. Clustering Measurements of broad-line AGNs: Review and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Krumpe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial effort, the precise physical processes that lead to the growth of super-massive black holes in the centers of galaxies are still not well understood. These phases of black hole growth are thought to be of key importance in understanding galaxy evolution. Forthcoming missions such as eROSITA, HETDEX, eBOSS, BigBOSS, LSST, and Pan-STARRS will compile by far the largest ever Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs catalogs which will allow us to measure the spatial distribution of AGNs in the universe with unprecedented accuracy. For the first time, AGN clustering measurements will reach a level of precision that will not only allow for an alternative approach to answering open questions in AGN and galaxy co-evolution but will open a new frontier, allowing us to precisely determine cosmological parameters. This paper reviews large-scale clustering measurements of broad line AGNs. We summarize how clustering is measured and which constraints can be derived from AGN clustering measurements, we discuss recent developments, and we briefly describe future projects that will deliver extremely large AGN samples which will enable AGN clustering measurements of unprecedented accuracy. In order to maximize the scientific return on the research fields of AGN and galaxy evolution and cosmology, we advise that the community develops a full understanding of the systematic uncertainties which will, in contrast to today’s measurement, be the dominant source of uncertainty.

  10. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. II. DATA DESCRIPTION AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Balcells, Marc; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jogee, Shardha; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ∼50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (∼1.75 Mpc or 1 0 ) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin 2 . The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ∼73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described

  11. In situ tetrazole templated chair-like decanuclear azido-cobalt(II) SMM containing both tetra- and octa-hedral Co(II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhu; Gao, Song; Sato, Osamu

    2015-01-14

    An azido-bridged chair-like decanuclear cluster: [Co(II)10(bzp)8(Metz)2(N3)18]·4MeOH·3H2O (1, bzp = 2-benzoylpyridine and HMetz = 5-methyl-1H-tetrazole) was prepared with in situ tetrazolate anions as templates in a sealed system. 1 containing both octahedral and tetrahedral Co(II) ions exhibited slow relaxation of magnetization with an effective barrier of 26 K under an applied dc field of 1 kOe.

  12. Galaxy Mission Completes Four Star-Studded Years in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer is celebrating its fourth year in space with some of M81's 'hottest' stars. In a new ultraviolet image, the magnificent M81 spiral galaxy is shown at the center. The orbiting observatory spies the galaxy's 'sizzling young starlets' as wisps of bluish-white swirling around a central golden glow. The tints of gold at M81's center come from a 'senior citizen' population of smoldering stars. 'This is a spectacular view of M81,' says Dr. John Huchra, of the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass. 'When we proposed to observe this galaxy with GALEX we hoped to see globular clusters, open clusters, and young stars...this view is everything that we were hoping for.' The image is one of thousands gathered so far by GALEX, which launched April 28, 2003. This mission uses ultraviolet wavelengths to measure the history of star formation 80 percent of the way back to the Big Bang. The large fluffy bluish-white material to the left of M81 is a neighboring galaxy called Holmberg IX. This galaxy is practically invisible to the naked human eye. However, it is illuminated brilliantly in GALEX's wide ultraviolet eyes. Its ultraviolet colors show that it is actively forming young stars. The bluish-white fuzz in the space surrounding M81 and Holmberg IX is new star formation triggered by gravitational interactions between the two galaxies. Huchra notes that the active star formation in Holmberg IX is a surprise, and says that more research needs to be done in light of the new findings from GALEX. 'Some astronomers suspect that the galaxy Holmberg IX is the result of a galactic interaction between M81 and another neighboring galaxy M82,' says Huchra. 'This particular galaxy is especially important because there are a lot of galaxies like Holmberg IX around our Milky Way galaxy. By understanding how Holmberg IX came to be, we hope to understand how all the little galaxies surrounding the Milky Way developed.' 'Four years after GALEX

  13. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; hide

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  14. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  15. The Zeus Mission Study — An application of automated collaborative design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyotte, Romain; Love, Stanley G.; Peterson, Craig E.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the Zeus Mission Study was threefold. As an element of a graduate course in spacecraft system engineering, its purpose was primarily educational — to allow the students to apply their knowledge in a real mission study. The second purpose was to investigate the feasibility of applying advanced technology (the power antenna and solar electric propulsion concepts) to a challenging mission. Finally, the study allowed evaluation of the benefits of using quality-oriented techniques (Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Taguchi Methods) for a mission study. To encourage innovation, several constraints were placed on the study from the onset. While the primary goal was to place at least one lander on Europa, the additional constraint of no nuclear power sources posed an additional challenge, particularly when coupled with the mass constraints imposed by using a Delta II class launch vehicle. In spite of these limitations, the team was able to develop a mission and spacecraft design capable of carrying three simple, lightweight, yet capable landers. The science return will more than adequately meet the science goals established QFD was used to determine the optimal choice of instrumentation. The lander design was selected from several competing lander concepts, including rovers. The carrier design was largely dictated by the needs of the propulsion system required to support the mission, although the development of a Project Trades Model (PTM) in software allowed for rapid recalculation of key system parameters as changes were made. Finally, Taguchi Methods (Design of Experiments) were used in conjunction with the PTM allowing for some limited optimization of design features.

  16. DETECTION OF SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS FROM KEPLER PHOTOMETRY OF THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6819

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Basu, Sarbani; Bruntt, Hans; Mosser, BenoIt; Barban, Caroline; Goupil, Marie-Jo; Stevens, Ian R.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Hekker, Saskia; Brown, Timothy M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Arentoft, Torben; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Ballot, Jerome; GarcIa, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita

    2010-01-01

    Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance, and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819-one of the four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation, Δν, and the frequency of maximum oscillation power, ν max . We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about 2 orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the calcium cofactor to the manganese cluster in photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinco, Roehl M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Along with Mn, calcium and chloride ions are necessary cofactors for oxygen evolution in Photosystem II (PS II). To further test and verify whether Ca is close to the Mn cluster, the authors substituted strontium for Ca and probed from the Sr point of view for any nearby Mn. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Sr-reactivated PS II indicates major differences between the intact and NH2OH-treated samples. In intact samples, the Fourier transform of the Sr EXAFS shows a Fourier peak that is missing in inactive samples. This peak II is best simulated by two Mn neighbors at a distance of 3.5 Angstrom, confirming the proximity of Ca (Sr) cofactor to the Mn cluster. In addition, polarized Sr EXAFS on oriented Sr-reactivated samples shows this peak II is dichroic: large magnitude at 10 degrees (angle between the PS II membrane normal and the x-ray electric field vector) and small at 80 degrees. Analysis of the dichroism yields the relative angle between the Sr-Mn vector and membrane normal (23 degrees ± 4 degrees), and the isotropic coordination number for these layered samples. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has also been employed to assess the degree of similarity between the manganese cluster in PS II and a family of synthetic manganese complexes containing the distorted cubane [Mn4O3X] core (X = benzoate, acetate, methoxide, hydroxide, azide, fluoride, chloride or bromide). In addition, Mn4O3Cl complexes containing three or six terminal Cl ligands at three of the Mn were included in this study. The EXAFS method detects the small changes in the core structures as X is varied in this series, and serves to exclude these distorted cubanes of C3v symmetry as a topological model for the Mn catalytic cluster. The sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the amino acids cysteine, methionine, their corresponding oxidized forms cystine and methionine sulfoxide, and

  18. Protostar Evolution in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Michael Allan

    2018-01-01

    We present our preliminary analysis of the protostars within the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). We developed a pipeline to identify protostars in the ONC using the IRAC instrument aboard Spitzer. We verified our photometric measurements with the catalog provided by Megeath et al. (2012). We then classified the protostar evolution stages (0/I, Flatt, II, and III) based on their spectral slope.

  19. [Myanmar mission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfandari, B; Persichetti, P; Pelissier, P; Martin, D; Baudet, J

    2004-06-01

    The authors report the accomplishment of humanitarian missions in plastic surgery performed by a small team in town practice in Yangon, about their 3 years experience in Myanmar with 300 consultations and 120 surgery cases. They underline the interest of this type of mission and provide us their reflexion about team training, the type of relation with the country where the mission is conducted and the type of right team.

  20. Detection of secondary structure elements in proteins by hydrophobic cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, S; Mornon, J P; Henrissat, B

    1992-10-01

    Hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) is a protein sequence comparison method based on alpha-helical representations of the sequences where the size, shape and orientation of the clusters of hydrophobic residues are primarily compared. The effectiveness of HCA has been suggested to originate from its potential ability to focus on the residues forming the hydrophobic core of globular proteins. We have addressed the robustness of the bidimensional representation used for HCA in its ability to detect the regular secondary structure elements of proteins. Various parameters have been studied such as those governing cluster size and limits, the hydrophobic residues constituting the clusters as well as the potential shift of the cluster positions with respect to the position of the regular secondary structure elements. The following results have been found to support the alpha-helical bidimensional representation used in HCA: (i) there is a positive correlation (clearly above background noise) between the hydrophobic clusters and the regular secondary structure elements in proteins; (ii) the hydrophobic clusters are centred on the regular secondary structure elements; (iii) the pitch of the helical representation which gives the best correspondence is that of an alpha-helix. The correspondence between hydrophobic clusters and regular secondary structure elements suggests a way to implement variable gap penalties during the automatic alignment of protein sequences.

  1. Chandrayaan-2: India's First Soft-landing Mission to Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylswamy, Annadurai; Krishnan, A.; Alex, T. K.; Rama Murali, G. K.

    2012-07-01

    . Mission Elements:, On board segment of Chandrayaan-2 mission consists of a lunar Orbiter and a lunar Lander-Rover. The orbiter for Chandrayaan-2 mission is similar to that of Chandrayaan-1 from structural and propulsion aspects. Based on a study of various mission management and trajectory options, such as, separation of the Lander-Rover module in Earth Parking Orbit (EPO) or in lunar transfer trajectory (LTT) or in lunar polar orbit (LPO), the option of separating of this module at LTT, after required midcourse corrections, was selected as this offers an optimum mass and overall mission management advantage. The orbiter propulsion system will be used to transfer Orbiter-Lander-Rover composite from EPO to LTT. On reaching LTT, the Lander-Rover module will be separated from the orbiter module. The Lander-Rover and Orbiter modules are configured with individual propulsion and housekeeping systems. The indigenously developed Geostationary Satellite Launch Vehicle GSLV (Mk-II) will be used for this mission. The most critical aspect of its feasibility was an accurate evaluation of the scope for taking a 3200kg lift off mass into EPO. A Lander-Rover mass of 1270kg (including the propellant for soft landing) will provide sufficient margin for such a lift off within the capability of flight proven GSLV (Mk-II) for the EPO. Mission Scenario: ,GSLV (Mk-II) will launch the Lunar Orbiter coupled to the Lunar Lander-Rover into EPO (170 x 16980 km) following which the Orbiter will boost the orbit from EPO to LTT where the two modules will be separated. Both of them will make their independent journey towards moon and reach lunar polar orbit independently. The orbiter module will be initially placed in a circular polar orbit (200km) and the Lander-Rover module descends towards the lunar surface. After landing, a motorized rover with robotic arm and scientific instruments would be released on to the lunar surface. Although the exact landing location is yet to be finalized, a high

  2. Three-dimensional tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination network based on a 1,3-alternate calix[4]arene derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Ju, Hui Yeong; Park, Ki Min [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, ASuk Hee [Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Kyungnam College of Inform ation and Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Jin [Div. of cience Education, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Polynuclear coordination polymers can exhibit more intriguing network topologies and better functionalities than those of common complexes because they have metal-cluster nodes for the construction of multidimensional frameworks and the potential applications induced by collaborative activities between metal ions. New tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination polymer 1 based on 1,3-alternate calix arene derivative (H{sub 4} CTA) with four carboxyl pendant arms has been synthesized by the solvo thermal reaction at 110 .deg. C for 2 days. Compound 1 shows a 3-D framework consisting of tetranuclear Cd(II) cluster core as a metal-cluster node and 1,3-alternate H{sub 4}CTA as a multidentate linker. The coordination polymer 1 displays intense blue emission, implying that this tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination polymer could be a suitable material in the area of luminescence research.

  3. IAEA completes third mission to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA-led team of international experts has completed its third mission, at the invitation of the Government of Japan. This follow-up mission continued to share the lessons learned from the effects of the July 2007 earthquake of the Kashiwazaki- Kariwa nuclear power plant. The mission received further evidence confirming the findings of previous missions regarding the safe performance of the plant during and after the earthquake. The mission found that there is consensus in the scientific community about the causes of the unexpectedly large ground motions experienced at the plant site during the July 2007 earthquake and, consequently, it has been possible to identify the precautions needed to be taken in relation to possible future events. These precautions were based on extensive studies and assessments conducted by a number of specialized institutions and experts in different fields. The necessary upgrades and actions were consequently defined and are being implemented by the Japanese utility for both safety and non-safety related components at the nuclear power plant. The lessons learned from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa experience has also contributed to the development of IAEA Safety Standards related to seismic safety. These standards are expected to be released shortly. The mission's report will be provided to the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and will be made publicly available in January 2009. The IAEA conducted two previous missions to the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP in August 2007 and January/February 2008. The experience from recent strong seismic events and the lessons learned through the missions to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP have led to the establishment of an International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC) at the IAEA that is working as a focal point for seismic safety- related information about nuclear installations. Related Resources: (1) January 2008 IAEA Report: Follow-up IAEA Mission in Relation to the Findings and Lessons

  4. The system design of TRIO cinema Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ho; Seon, Jongho; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lin, Robert; Parks, George; Tindall, Craig; Horbury, T. S.; Larson, Davin; Sample, John

    TRIO (Triplet Ionospheric Observatory) CINEMA ( Cubesat for Ion, Neutral, Electron, MAg-netic fields) is a space science mission with three identical cubesats. The main scientific objec-tives are a multi-observation of ionospheric ENA (Energetic Neutral Atom) imaging, ionospheric signature of suprathermal electrons and ions and complementary measurements of magnetic fields for particle data. For this, Main payloads consist of a suprathermal electron, ion, neutral (STEIN) instrument and a 3-axis magnetometer of magnetoresistive sensors. The CINEMA is a 3-unit CubeSat, which translates to a 10 cm x 10 cm x 30 cm in volume and no more than four kilograms in mass. An attitude control system (ACS) uses torque coils, a sun sensor and the magnetometers and spin CINEMA spcaecraft 4 rpm with the spin axis perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. CINEMA will be placed into a high inclination low earth orbit that crosses the auroral zone and cusp. Three institutes are collaborating to develop CINEMA cubesats: i) two cubesats by Kyung Hee University (KHU) under their World Class University (WCU) program, ii) one cubesat by UC Berkeley under the NSF support, and iii) three magnetometers are provide by Imperial College, respectively. In this paper, we describe the system design and their performance of TR IO cinema mission. TRIO cinema's development of miniature in-strument and spacecraft spinning operation will play an important role for future nanosatellite space missions

  5. Business analysis: The commercial mission of the International Asteroid Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mission of the International Asteroid Mission (IAM) is providing asteroidal resources to support activities in space. The short term goal is to initiate IAM by mining a near-Earth, hydrous carbonaceous chondrite asteroid to service the nearer-term market of providing cryogenic rocket fuel in low lunar orbit (LLO). The IAM will develop and contract for the building of the transportation vehicles and equipment necessary for this undertaking. The long-term goal is to expand operations by exploiting asteroids in other manners, as these options become commercially viable. The primary business issues are what revenue can be generated from the baseline mission, how much will the mission cost, and how funding for this mission can be raised. These issues are addressed.

  6. THE FATE OF DWARF GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AND THE ORIGIN OF INTRACLUSTER STARS. II. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Hugo; Barai, Paramita; Brito, William

    2012-01-01

    We combine an N-body simulation algorithm with a subgrid treatment of galaxy formation, mergers, and tidal destruction, and an observed conditional luminosity function Φ(L|M), to study the origin and evolution of galactic and extragalactic light inside a cosmological volume of size (100 Mpc) 3 , in a concordance ΛCDM model. This algorithm simulates the growth of large-scale structures and the formation of clusters, the evolution of the galaxy population in clusters, the destruction of galaxies by mergers and tides, and the evolution of the intracluster light (ICL). We find that destruction of galaxies by mergers dominates over destruction by tides by about an order of magnitude at all redshifts. However, tidal destruction is sufficient to produce ICL fractions f ICL that are sufficiently high to match observations. Our simulation produces 18 massive clusters (M cl > 10 14 M ☉ ) with values of f ICL ranging from 1% to 58% at z = 0. There is a weak trend of f ICL to increase with cluster mass. The bulk of the ICL (∼60%) is provided by intermediate galaxies of total masses 10 11 -10 12 M ☉ and stellar masses 6 × 10 8 M ☉ to 3 × 10 10 M ☉ that were tidally destroyed by even more massive galaxies. The contribution of low-mass galaxies to the ICL is small and the contribution of dwarf galaxies is negligible, even though, by numbers, most galaxies that are tidally destroyed are dwarfs. Tracking clusters back in time, we find that their values of f ICL tend to increase over time, but can experience sudden changes that are sometimes non-monotonic. These changes occur during major mergers involving clusters of comparable masses but very different intracluster luminosities. Most of the tidal destruction events take place in the central regions of clusters. As a result, the ICL is more centrally concentrated than the galactic light. Our results support tidal destruction of intermediate-mass galaxies as a plausible scenario for the origin of the ICL.

  7. Special resonances in two- and three-cluster systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, M.

    1979-01-01

    In the framework of Schmid's N-cluster theory the resonance theory of Wildermuth-Benoehr is extended to three clusters. This three-cluster resonance model is solved in a mathematically exact formalism. The main topic of this formalism is the asymptotic behaviour of the full three-body-resolvent in the differential directions of the six-dimensional position space of the Jacobi coordinates. The scattering amplitudes and cross sections in all two-body channels and breakup are explicitly presented. Furthermore a very illustrative kinematical three-body model, the so called 'three-body-neb', is developed. Special regards in this connection are devoted to the analysis of possible interference possibilities of the main three-body-resonance with other resonance types of the three-body model. In a further section the Pauli-resonances are studied i) in the Wildermuth resonating group theory, ii) in Schmid's simulation models. It is shown under which circumstances Pauli-resonances may be positive energy bound states. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF THE LITHIUM DEPLETION BOUNDARY AND AGE OF THE SOUTHERN OPEN CLUSTER BLANCO 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cargile, P. A.; James, D. J.; Jeffries, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a spectroscopic study of the very low mass members of the Southern open cluster Blanco 1 using the Gemini-N telescope. We obtained intermediate resolution (R ∼ 4400) GMOS spectra for 15 cluster candidate members with I ∼ 14-20 mag, and employed a series of membership criteria-proximity to the cluster's sequence in an I/I - K s color-magnitude diagram (CMD), kinematics agreeing with the cluster systemic motion, magnetic activity as a youth indicator-to classify 10 of these objects as probable cluster members. For these objects, we searched for the presence of the Li I 6708 A feature to identify the lithium depletion boundary (LDB) in Blanco 1. The I/I - K s CMD shows a clear mass segregation in the Li distribution along the cluster sequence; namely, all higher mass stars are found to be Li poor, while lower mass stars are found to be Li rich. The division between Li-poor and Li-rich (i.e., the LDB) in Blanco 1 is found at I = 18.78 ± 0.24 and I - K s = 3.05 ± 0.10. Using current pre-main-sequence evolutionary models, we determine an LDB age of 132 ± 24 Myr. Comparing our derived LDB age to upper-main-sequence isochrone ages for Blanco 1, as well as for other open clusters with identified LDBs, we find good chronometric consistency when using stellar evolution models that incorporate a moderate degree of convective core overshoot.

  9. Gas expulsion vs gas retention in young stellar clusters II: effects of cooling and mass segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2018-05-01

    Gas expulsion or gas retention is a central issue in most of the models for multiple stellar populations and light element anti-correlations in globular clusters. The success of the residual matter expulsion or its retention within young stellar clusters has also a fundamental importance in order to understand how star formation proceeds in present-day and ancient star-forming galaxies and if proto-globular clusters with multiple stellar populations are formed in the present epoch. It is usually suggested that either the residual gas is rapidly ejected from star-forming clouds by stellar winds and supernova explosions, or that the enrichment of the residual gas and the formation of the second stellar generation occur so rapidly, that the negative stellar feedback is not significant. Here we continue our study of the early development of star clusters in the extreme environments and discuss the restrictions that strong radiative cooling and stellar mass segregation provide on the gas expulsion from dense star-forming clouds. A large range of physical initial conditions in star-forming clouds which include the star-forming cloud mass, compactness, gas metallicity, star formation efficiency and effects of massive stars segregation are discussed. It is shown that in sufficiently massive and compact clusters hot shocked winds around individual massive stars may cool before merging with their neighbors. This dramatically reduces the negative stellar feedback, prevents the development of the global star cluster wind and expulsion of the residual and the processed matter into the ambient interstellar medium. The critical lines which separate the gas expulsion and the gas retention regimes are obtained.

  10. The WHISPER Relaxation Sounder and the CLUSTER Active Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Rauch, J. L.; Vallières, X.; Rochel, A.; Kougblénou, S.; Lointier, G.; Facskó, G.; Canu, P.; Darrouzet, F.; Masson, A.

    The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) instrument is part of the Wave Experiment Consortium (WEC) of the CLUSTER mission. With the help of the long double sphere antennae of the Electric Field and Wave (EFW) instrument and the Digital Wave Processor (DWP), it delivers active (sounding) and natural (transmitter off) electric field spectra, respectively from 4 to 82 kHz, and from 2 to 80 kHz. These frequency ranges have been chosen to include the electron plasma frequency, which is closely related to the total electron density, in most of the regions encountered by the CLUSTER spacecraft. Presented here is an overview of the WHISPER data products available in the CLUSTER Active Archive (CAA). The instrument and its performance are first recalled. The way the WHISPER products are obtained is then described, with particular attention being paid to the density determination. Both sounding and natural measurements are commonly used in this process, which depends on the ambient plasma regime. This is illustrated using drawings similar to the Bryant plots commonly used in the CLUSTER master science plan. These give a clear overview of typical density values and the parts of the orbits where they are obtained. More information on the applied software or on the quality/reliability of the density determination can also be highlighted.

  11. A mission to Mercury and a mission to the moons of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Two Advanced Design Projects were completed this academic year at Penn State - a mission to the planet Mercury and a mission to the moons of Mars (Phobos and Deimos). At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into six groups and given their choice of missions. Once a mission was chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These designs were then evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into two separate mission scenarios. To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form two mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission team so that communication and exchange of information would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Lewis Research Center Advanced Projects Office. Robotic planetary missions throughout the solar system can be considered valuable precursors to human visits and test beds for innovative technology. For example, by studying the composition of the Martian moons, scientists may be able to determine if their resources may be used or synthesized for consumption during a first human visit.

  12. High-resolution tomography of positron emitters with clustered pinhole SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goorden, Marlies C; Beekman, Freek J [Section of Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.c.goorden@tudelft.nl

    2010-03-07

    State-of-the-art small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) enables sub-half-mm resolution imaging of radio-labelled molecules. Due to severe photon penetration through pinhole edges, current multi-pinhole SPECT is not suitable for high-resolution imaging of photons with high energies, such as the annihilation photons emitted by positron emitting tracers (511 keV). To deal with this edge penetration, we introduce here clustered multi-pinhole SPECT (CMP): each pinhole in a cluster has a narrow opening angle to reduce photon penetration. Using simulations, CMP is compared with (i) a collimator with traditional pinholes that is currently used for sub-half-mm imaging of SPECT isotopes (U-SPECT-II), and (ii), like (i) but with collimator thickness adapted to image high-energy photons (traditional multi-pinhole SPECT, TMP). At 511 keV, U-SPECT-II is able to resolve the 0.9 mm rods of an iteratively reconstructed Jaszczak-like capillary hot rod phantom, and while TMP only leads to small improvements, CMP can resolve rods as small as 0.7 mm. Using a digital tumour phantom, we show that CMP resolves many details not assessable with standard USPECT-II and TMP collimators. Furthermore, CMP makes it possible to visualize uptake of positron emitting tracers in sub-compartments of a digital mouse striatal brain phantom. This may open up unique possibilities for analysing processes such as those underlying the function of neurotransmitter systems. Additional potential of CMP may include (i) the imaging of other high-energy single-photon emitters (e.g. I-131) and (ii) localized imaging of positron emitting tracers simultaneously with single photon emitters, with an even better resolution than coincidence PET.

  13. Towards a Multi-Mission, Airborne Science Data System Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, D. J.; Hardman, S.; Law, E.; Freeborn, D.; Kay-Im, E.; Lau, G.; Oswald, J.

    2011-12-01

    . A principal goal is to provide support for the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) instrument which will produce over 700,000 soundings over the life of their three-year mission. The cost to purchase and operate a cluster-based system in order to generate Level 2 Full Physics products from this data was prohibitive. Through an evaluation of cloud computing solutions, Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) was selected for the CARVE deployment. As the ACCE infrastructure is developed and extended to form an infrastructure for airborne missions, the experience of working with CARVE has provided a number of lessons learned and has proven to be important in reinforcing the unique aspects of airborne missions and the importance of the ACCE infrastructure in developing a cost effective, flexible multi-mission capability that leverages emerging capabilities in cloud computing, workflow management, and distributed computing.

  14. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in REXCESS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, L.; Bruch, S.; Donahue, M.

    2009-01-01

    Most galaxy clusters contain a Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) which is larger than the other cluster ellipticals and has a more extended profile. In the hierarchical model, the BCG forms through many galaxy mergers in the crowded center of the cluster, and thus its properties give insight into the assembly of the cluster as a whole. In this project, we are working with the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) team (Boehringer et al 2007) to study BCGs in 33 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters, 0.055 < z < 0.183. We are imaging the BCGs in R band at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) in Chile. In this poster, we discuss our methods and give preliminary measurements of the BCG magnitudes, morphology, and stellar mass. We compare these BCG properties with the properties of their host clusters, particularly of the X-ray emitting gas.

  15. a Search for New Physics with the Beacon Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Shao, Michael; Girerd, André; Lane, Benjamin

    The primary objective of the Beyond Einstein Advanced Coherent Optical Network (BEACON) mission is a search for new physics beyond general relativity by measuring the curvature of relativistic space-time around the Earth. This curvature is characterized by the Eddington parameter γ — the most fundamental relativistic gravity parameter and a direct measure for the presence of new physical interactions. BEACON will achieve an accuracy of 1 × 10-9 in measuring the parameter γ, thereby going a factor of 30,000 beyond the present best result involving the Cassini spacecraft. Secondary mission objectives include: (i) a direct measurement of the "frame-dragging" and geodetic precessions in the Earth's rotational gravitomagnetic field, to 0.05% and 0.03% accuracy respectively, (ii) the first measurement of gravity's nonlinear effects on light and the corresponding second order spatial metric's effects to 0.01% accuracy. BEACON will lead to robust advances in tests of fundamental physics — this mission could discover a violation or extension of general relativity and/or reveal the presence of an additional long range interaction in physics. It will provide crucial information to separate modern scalar-tensor theories of gravity from general relativity, probe possible ways for gravity quantization, and test modern theories of cosmological evolution.

  16. The success of the Uttarakhand Cluster: a case study of organisational change towards disability inclusive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grills, Nathan; Varghese, Jubin; Hughes, Nicole; Jolly, Tamara; Kumar, Robert

    2016-08-02

    Persons with disability are often marginalised and excluded from international development efforts. This case study reviews the success of Uttarakhand Cluster of development NGOs in changing organisational behaviour towards being disability inclusive in their development (DID) activities. A triangulation of qualitative research methods was used, including key informant interviews, focus group discussions and review of textual data. The results synthesise data into Kotter's framework for organisational change, explaining the different stages of change experienced by the Cluster as it moved towards DID. Development of a disability mission, sharing of capacity and resources, and presence of disability champions were key in the organisations' transition towards DID. This case study demonstrates that the Cluster, a low - cost network, was able to drive organisational change and promote DID.

  17. Using Getting To Outcomes to facilitate the use of an evidence-based practice in VA homeless programs: a cluster-randomized trial of an implementation support strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; McCarthy, Sharon; Hannah, Gordon; Byrne, Thomas Hugh; Smelson, David A

    2017-03-09

    Incorporating evidence-based integrated treatment for dual disorders into typical care settings has been challenging, especially among those serving Veterans who are homeless. This paper presents an evaluation of an effort to incorporate an evidence-based, dual disorder treatment called Maintaining Independence and Sobriety Through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking-Veterans Edition (MISSION-Vet) into case management teams serving Veterans who are homeless, using an implementation strategy called Getting To Outcomes (GTO). This Hybrid Type III, cluster-randomized controlled trial assessed the impact of GTO over and above MISSION-Vet Implementation as Usual (IU). Both conditions received standard MISSION-Vet training and manuals. The GTO group received an implementation manual, training, technical assistance, and data feedback. The study occurred in teams at three large VA Medical Centers over 2 years. Within each team, existing sub-teams (case managers and Veterans they serve) were the clusters randomly assigned. The trial assessed MISSION-Vet services delivered and collected via administrative data and implementation barriers and facilitators, via semi-structured interview. No case managers in the IU group initiated MISSION-Vet while 68% in the GTO group did. Seven percent of Veterans with case managers in the GTO group received at least one MISSION-Vet session. Most case managers appreciated the MISSION-Vet materials and felt the GTO planning meetings supported using MISSION-Vet. Case manager interviews also showed that MISSION-Vet could be confusing; there was little involvement from leadership after their initial agreement to participate; the data feedback system had a number of difficulties; and case managers did not have the resources to implement all aspects of MISSION-Vet. This project shows that GTO-like support can help launch new practices but that multiple implementation facilitators are needed for successful execution of a complex evidence

  18. Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm Based on K-Means Clustering for Multiobjective Optimal Power Flow Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liling Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved multiobjective ABC algorithm based on K-means clustering, called CMOABC, is proposed. To fasten the convergence rate of the canonical MOABC, the way of information communication in the employed bees’ phase is modified. For keeping the population diversity, the multiswarm technology based on K-means clustering is employed to decompose the population into many clusters. Due to each subcomponent evolving separately, after every specific iteration, the population will be reclustered to facilitate information exchange among different clusters. Application of the new CMOABC on several multiobjective benchmark functions shows a marked improvement in performance over the fast nondominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II, the multiobjective particle swarm optimizer (MOPSO, and the multiobjective ABC (MOABC. Finally, the CMOABC is applied to solve the real-world optimal power flow (OPF problem that considers the cost, loss, and emission impacts as the objective functions. The 30-bus IEEE test system is presented to illustrate the application of the proposed algorithm. The simulation results demonstrate that, compared to NSGA-II, MOPSO, and MOABC, the proposed CMOABC is superior for solving OPF problem, in terms of optimization accuracy.

  19. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey of the Disk Cluster Population of M31. II. Advanced Camera for Surveys Pointings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienke, O. K.; Hodge, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a survey of star clusters in M31 based on archival images from the Hubble Space Telescope. Paper I reported results from images obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and this paper reports results from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The ACS survey has yielded a total of 339 star clusters, 52 of which—mostly globular clusters—were found to have been cataloged previously. As for the previous survey, the luminosity function of the clusters drops steeply for absolute magnitudes fainter than MV = -3 the implied cluster mass function has a turnover for masses less than a few hundred solar masses. The color-integrated magnitude diagram of clusters shows three significant features: (1) a group of very red, luminous objects: the globular clusters, (2) a wide range in color for the fainter clusters, representing a considerable range in age and reddening, and (3) a maximum density of clusters centered approximately at V = 21, B - V = 0.30, V - I = 0.50, where there are intermediate-age, intermediate-mass clusters with ages close to 500 million years and masses of about 2000 solar masses. We give a brief qualitative interpretation of the distribution of clusters in the CMDs in terms of their formation and destruction rates. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for research in astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  20. Deep Impact Delta II Launch Vehicle Cracked Thick Film Coating on Electronic Packages Technical Consultation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Kichak, Robert A.; Piascik, Robert S.; Leidecker, Henning W.; Wilson, Timmy R.

    2009-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft was launched on a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on January 12, 2005. Prior to the launch, the Director of the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OS&MA) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) lead a team to render an independent opinion on the rationale for flight and the risk code assignments for the hazard of cracked Thick Film Assemblies (TFAs) in the E-packages of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Deep Impact Mission. The results of the evaluation are contained in this report.

  1. Asteroid retrieval missions enabled by invariant manifold dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Joan Pau; García Yárnoz, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Near Earth Asteroids are attractive targets for new space missions; firstly, because of their scientific importance, but also because of their impact threat and prospective resources. The asteroid retrieval mission concept has thus arisen as a synergistic approach to tackle these three facets of interest in one single mission. This paper reviews the methodology used by the authors (2013) in a previous search for objects that could be transported from accessible heliocentric orbits into the Earth's neighbourhood at affordable costs (or Easily Retrievable Objects, a.k.a. EROs). This methodology consisted of a heuristic pruning and an impulsive manoeuvre trajectory optimisation. Low thrust propulsion on the other hand clearly enables the transportation of much larger objects due to its higher specific impulse. Hence, in this paper, low thrust retrieval transfers are sought using impulsive trajectories as first guesses to solve the optimal control problem. GPOPS-II is used to transcribe the continuous-time optimal control problem to a nonlinear programming problem (NLP). The latter is solved by IPOPT, an open source software package for large-scale NLPs. Finally, a natural continuation procedure that increases the asteroid mass allows to find out the largest objects that could be retrieved from a given asteroid orbit. If this retrievable mass is larger than the actual mass of the asteroid, the asteroid retrieval mission for this particular object is said to be feasible. The paper concludes with an updated list of 17 EROs, as of April 2016, with their maximum retrievable masses by means of low thrust propulsion. This ranges from 2000 tons for the easiest object to be retrieved to 300 tons for the least accessible of them.

  2. Recent developments of the quantum chemical cluster approach for modeling enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegbahn, Per E M; Himo, Fahmi

    2009-06-01

    The quantum chemical cluster approach for modeling enzyme reactions is reviewed. Recent applications have used cluster models much larger than before which have given new modeling insights. One important and rather surprising feature is the fast convergence with cluster size of the energetics of the reactions. Even for reactions with significant charge separation it has in some cases been possible to obtain full convergence in the sense that dielectric cavity effects from outside the cluster do not contribute to any significant extent. Direct comparisons between quantum mechanics (QM)-only and QM/molecular mechanics (MM) calculations for quite large clusters in a case where the results differ significantly have shown that care has to be taken when using the QM/MM approach where there is strong charge polarization. Insights from the methods used, generally hybrid density functional methods, have also led to possibilities to give reasonable error limits for the results. Examples are finally given from the most extensive study using the cluster model, the one of oxygen formation at the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

  3. Bomber Deterrence Missions: Criteria To Evaluate Mission Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    international security, the practice of general deterrence usually occurs when nations feel insecure , suspicious or even hostility towards them but...both a deterrence and assurance mission even though it was not planned or advertised as such. Since the intent of this mission was partly perceived

  4. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemi, Ahmad [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-08-11

    The objective of this is to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I, II, and III (tensile, shear, and out-of-plane) propagation of multiple fractures and fracture clusters to accurately predict geothermal reservoir stimulation using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB). Effective development of enhanced geothermal systems can significantly benefit from improved modeling of hydraulic fracturing. In geothermal reservoirs, where the temperature can reach or exceed 350oC, thermal and poro-mechanical processes play an important role in fracture initiation and propagation. In this project hydraulic fracturing of hot subsurface rock mass will be numerically modeled by extending the virtual multiple internal bond theory and implementing it in a finite element code, WARP3D, a three-dimensional finite element code for solid mechanics. The new constitutive model along with the poro-thermoelastic computational algorithms will allow modeling the initiation and propagation of clusters of fractures, and extension of pre-existing fractures. The work will enable the industry to realistically model stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. The project addresses the Geothermal Technologies Office objective of accurately predicting geothermal reservoir stimulation (GTO technology priority item). The project goal will be attained by: (i) development of the VMIB method for application to 3D analysis of fracture clusters; (ii) development of poro- and thermoelastic material sub-routines for use in 3D finite element code WARP3D; (iii) implementation of VMIB and the new material routines in WARP3D to enable simulation of clusters of fractures while accounting for the effects of the pore pressure, thermal stress and inelastic deformation; (iv) simulation of 3D fracture propagation and coalescence and formation of clusters, and comparison with laboratory compression tests; and (v) application of the model to interpretation of injection experiments (planned by our

  5. Whisper, a resonance sounder and wave analyser: Performances and perspectives for the Cluster mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decreau, P.M.E.; Fergeau, P.; KrannoselsKikh, V.

    1997-01-01

    The WHISPER sounder on the Cluster spacecraft is primarily designed to provide an absolute measurement of the total plasma density within the range 0.2-80 cm(-3). This is achieved by means of a resonance sounding technique which has already proved successful in the regions to be explored. The wav...... in the electron foreshock and solar wind, to investigations about small-scale structures via density and high-frequency emission signatures, and to the analysis of the non-thermal continuum in the magnetosphere....

  6. Metal cluster compounds - chemistry and importance; clusters containing isolated main group element atoms, large metal cluster compounds, cluster fluxionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, B.

    1988-01-01

    This part of the review on metal cluster compounds deals with clusters containing isolated main group element atoms, with high nuclearity clusters and metal cluster fluxionality. It will be obvious that main group element atoms strongly influence the geometry, stability and reactivity of the clusters. High nuclearity clusters are of interest in there own due to the diversity of the structures adopted, but their intermediate position between molecules and the metallic state makes them a fascinating research object too. These both sites of the metal cluster chemistry as well as the frequently observed ligand and core fluxionality are related to the cluster metal and surface analogy. (author)

  7. Towards Development of Clustering Applications for Large-Scale Comparative Genotyping and Kinship Analysis Using Y-Short Tandem Repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seman, Ali; Sapawi, Azizian Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2015-06-01

    Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are genetic markers with practical applications in human identification. However, where mass identification is required (e.g., in the aftermath of disasters with significant fatalities), the efficiency of the process could be improved with new statistical approaches. Clustering applications are relatively new tools for large-scale comparative genotyping, and the k-Approximate Modal Haplotype (k-AMH), an efficient algorithm for clustering large-scale Y-STR data, represents a promising method for developing these tools. In this study we improved the k-AMH and produced three new algorithms: the Nk-AMH I (including a new initial cluster center selection), the Nk-AMH II (including a new dominant weighting value), and the Nk-AMH III (combining I and II). The Nk-AMH III was the superior algorithm, with mean clustering accuracy that increased in four out of six datasets and remained at 100% in the other two. Additionally, the Nk-AMH III achieved a 2% higher overall mean clustering accuracy score than the k-AMH, as well as optimal accuracy for all datasets (0.84-1.00). With inclusion of the two new methods, the Nk-AMH III produced an optimal solution for clustering Y-STR data; thus, the algorithm has potential for further development towards fully automatic clustering of any large-scale genotypic data.

  8. The Impact of Mission Duration on a Mars Orbital Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Dale; Earle, Kevin; Cirillo, Bill; Jones, Christopher; Klovstad, Jordan; Grande, Melanie; Stromgren, Chel

    2017-01-01

    Performance alone is insufficient to assess the total impact of changing mission parameters on a space mission concept, architecture, or campaign; the benefit, cost, and risk must also be understood. This paper examines the impact to benefit, cost, and risk of changing the total mission duration of a human Mars orbital mission. The changes in the sizing of the crew habitat, including consumables and spares, was assessed as a function of duration, including trades of different life support strategies; this was used to assess the impact on transportation system requirements. The impact to benefit is minimal, while the impact on cost is dominated by the increases in transportation costs to achieve shorter total durations. The risk is expected to be reduced by decreasing total mission duration; however, large uncertainty exists around the magnitude of that reduction.

  9. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  10. Logistics Needs for Potential Deep Space Mission Scenarios Post Asteroid Crewed Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Pedro, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A deep-space mission has been proposed to identify and redirect an asteroid to a distant retrograde orbit around the moon, and explore it by sending a crew using the Space Launch System and the Orion spacecraft. The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), which represents the third segment of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), could be performed on EM-3 or EM-4 depending on asteroid return date. Recent NASA studies have raised questions on how we could progress from current Human Space Flight (HSF) efforts to longer term human exploration of Mars. This paper will describe the benefits of execution of the ARM as the initial stepping stone towards Mars exploration, and how the capabilities required to send humans to Mars could be built upon those developed for the asteroid mission. A series of potential interim missions aimed at developing such capabilities will be described, and the feasibility of such mission manifest will be discussed. Options for the asteroid crewed mission will also be addressed, including crew size and mission duration.

  11. Where Water is Oxidized to Dioxygen: Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Cluster from X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-10-24

    Light-driven oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and cyanobacteria iscatalyzed within photosystem II (PS II) by a Mn4Ca cluster. Although the cluster has been studied by many different methods, the structure and the mechanism have remained elusive. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and EXAFS studies have been particularly useful in probing the electronic and geometric structure, and the mechanism of the water oxidation reaction. Recent progress, reviewed here, includes polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of PS II single crystals. Analysis of those results has constrained the Mn4Ca cluster geometry to a setof three similar high-resolution structures. The structure of the cluster from the present study is unlike either the 3.0 or 3.5 Angstrom-resolution X-ray structures or other previously proposed models. The differences between the models derived from X-rayspectroscopy and crystallography are predominantly because of damage to the Mn4Ca cluster by X-rays under the conditions used for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. X-ray spectroscopy studies are also used for studying the changes in the structure of the Mn4Ca catalytic center as it cycles through the five intermediate states known as the Si-states (i=0-4). The electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster has been studied more recently using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS), in addition to the earlier X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy methods. These studies are revealing that the assignment of formaloxidation states is overly simplistic. A more accurate description should consider the charge density on the Mn atoms that includes the covalency of the bonds and delocalization of the charge over the cluster. The geometric and electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster in the S-states derived from X-ray spectroscopy are leading to a detailed understanding of the mechanism of the O-O bond formation during the photosynthetic water

  12. THE FATE OF DWARF GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AND THE ORIGIN OF INTRACLUSTER STARS. II. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Hugo [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Barai, Paramita [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Brito, William [Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Quebec, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-09-20

    We combine an N-body simulation algorithm with a subgrid treatment of galaxy formation, mergers, and tidal destruction, and an observed conditional luminosity function {Phi}(L|M), to study the origin and evolution of galactic and extragalactic light inside a cosmological volume of size (100 Mpc){sup 3}, in a concordance {Lambda}CDM model. This algorithm simulates the growth of large-scale structures and the formation of clusters, the evolution of the galaxy population in clusters, the destruction of galaxies by mergers and tides, and the evolution of the intracluster light (ICL). We find that destruction of galaxies by mergers dominates over destruction by tides by about an order of magnitude at all redshifts. However, tidal destruction is sufficient to produce ICL fractions f{sub ICL} that are sufficiently high to match observations. Our simulation produces 18 massive clusters (M{sub cl} > 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) with values of f{sub ICL} ranging from 1% to 58% at z = 0. There is a weak trend of f{sub ICL} to increase with cluster mass. The bulk of the ICL ({approx}60%) is provided by intermediate galaxies of total masses 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} and stellar masses 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} that were tidally destroyed by even more massive galaxies. The contribution of low-mass galaxies to the ICL is small and the contribution of dwarf galaxies is negligible, even though, by numbers, most galaxies that are tidally destroyed are dwarfs. Tracking clusters back in time, we find that their values of f{sub ICL} tend to increase over time, but can experience sudden changes that are sometimes non-monotonic. These changes occur during major mergers involving clusters of comparable masses but very different intracluster luminosities. Most of the tidal destruction events take place in the central regions of clusters. As a result, the ICL is more centrally concentrated than the galactic light. Our results

  13. Origins of ultra-diffuse galaxies in the Coma cluster - II. Constraints from their stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Alabi, Adebusola; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean; Pandya, Viraj; Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Bellstedt, Sabine; Wasserman, Asher; Stone, Maria B.; Okabe, Nobuhiro

    2018-06-01

    In this second paper of the series we study, with new Keck/DEIMOS spectra, the stellar populations of seven spectroscopically confirmed ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma cluster. We find intermediate to old ages (˜ 7 Gyr), low metallicities ([Z/H]˜ - 0.7 dex) and mostly super-solar abundance patterns ([Mg/Fe] ˜ 0.13 dex). These properties are similar to those of low-luminosity (dwarf) galaxies inhabiting the same area in the cluster and are mostly consistent with being the continuity of the stellar mass scaling relations of more massive galaxies. These UDGs' star formation histories imply a relatively recent infall into the Coma cluster, consistent with the theoretical predictions for a dwarf-like origin. However, considering the scatter in the resulting properties and including other UDGs in Coma, together with the results from the velocity phase-space study of the Paper I in this series, a mixed-bag of origins is needed to explain the nature of all UDGs. Our results thus reinforce a scenario in which many UDGs are field dwarfs that become quenched through their later infall onto cluster environments, whereas some UDGs could be be genuine primordial galaxies that failed to develop due to an early quenching phase. The unknown proportion of dwarf-like to primordial-like UDGs leaves the enigma of the nature of UDGs still open.

  14. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  15. Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Observations of Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Earth's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Akhavan-Tafti, M.; Poh, G.; Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Gershman, D. J.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    A major discovery by the Cluster mission and the previous generation of science missions is the presence of earthward and tailward moving magnetic flux ropes in the Earth's plasma sheet. However, the lack of high-time resolution plasma measurements severely limited progress concerning the formation and evolution of these reconnection generated structures. We use high-time resolution magnetic and electric field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission's first tail season to investigate: 1) the distribution of flux rope diameters relative to the local ion and electron inertial lengths; 2) the internal force balance sustaining these structures; and 3) the magnetic connectivity of the flux ropes to the Earth and/or the interplanetary medium; 4) the specific entropy of earthward moving flux ropes and the possible effect of "buoyancy" on how deep they penetrate into the inner magnetosphere; and 5) evidence for coalescence of adjacent flux ropes and/or the division of existing flux ropes through the formation of secondary X-lines. The results of these initial analyses will be discussed in terms of their implications for reconnection-driven magnetospheric dynamics and substorms.

  16. Optimal colour quality of LED clusters based on memory colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Kevin; Ryckaert, Wouter R; Pointer, Michael R; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2011-03-28

    The spectral power distributions of tri- and tetrachromatic clusters of Light-Emitting-Diodes, composed of simulated and commercially available LEDs, were optimized with a genetic algorithm to maximize the luminous efficacy of radiation and the colour quality as assessed by the memory colour quality metric developed by the authors. The trade-off of the colour quality as assessed by the memory colour metric and the luminous efficacy of radiation was investigated by calculating the Pareto optimal front using the NSGA-II genetic algorithm. Optimal peak wavelengths and spectral widths of the LEDs were derived, and over half of them were found to be close to Thornton's prime colours. The Pareto optimal fronts of real LED clusters were always found to be smaller than those of the simulated clusters. The effect of binning on designing a real LED cluster was investigated and was found to be quite large. Finally, a real LED cluster of commercially available AlGaInP, InGaN and phosphor white LEDs was optimized to obtain a higher score on memory colour quality scale than its corresponding CIE reference illuminant.

  17. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters II. Sersic 159-03

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    In a series of papers we investigate far-infrared emission from rich galaxy clusters. Maps have been obtained by ISO at 60 mu m, 100 mu m, 135 mu m, and 200 mu m using the PHT-C camera. Ground based imaging and spectroscopy were also acquired. Here we present the results for the cooling flow...

  18. Indexing, Query Processing, and Clustering of Spatio-Temporal Text Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Anders

    With the increasing mobile use of the web from geo-positioned devices, the Internet is increasingly acquiring a spatial aspect, with still more types of content being geo-tagged. As a result of this development, a wide range of location-aware queries and applications have emerged. The large amounts...... of data available coupled with the increasing number of location-aware queries calls for efficient indexing and query processing techniques. This dissertation investigates how to manage geo-tagged text content to support these workloads in three specific areas: (i) grouping of spatio-textual objects, (ii......, the grouping of spatio-textual objects is done without considering query locations, and a clustering approach is proposed that takes into account both the spatial and textual attributes of the objects. The technique expands clusters based on a proposed quality function that enables clusters of arbitrary shape...

  19. Clustering of contacts relevant to the spread of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiong; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Kenward, Michael G; Melegaro, Alessia; Jit, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Infectious disease spread depends on contact rates between infectious and susceptible individuals. Transmission models are commonly informed using empirically collected contact data, but the relevance of different contact types to transmission is still not well understood. Some studies select contacts based on a single characteristic such as proximity (physical/non-physical), location, duration or frequency. This study aimed to explore whether clusters of contacts similar to each other across multiple characteristics could better explain disease transmission. Individual contact data from the POLYMOD survey in Poland, Great Britain, Belgium, Finland and Italy were grouped into clusters by the k medoids clustering algorithm with a Manhattan distance metric to stratify contacts using all four characteristics. Contact clusters were then used to fit a transmission model to sero-epidemiological data for varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in each country. Across the five countries, 9-15 clusters were found to optimise both quality of clustering (measured using average silhouette width) and quality of fit (measured using several information criteria). Of these, 2-3 clusters were most relevant to VZV transmission, characterised by (i) 1-2 clusters of age-assortative contacts in schools, (ii) a cluster of less age-assortative contacts in non-school settings. Quality of fit was similar to using contacts stratified by a single characteristic, providing validation that single stratifications are appropriate. However, using clustering to stratify contacts using multiple characteristics provided insight into the structures underlying infection transmission, particularly the role of age-assortative contacts, involving school age children, for VZV transmission between households. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Formation of stable products from cluster-cluster collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanova, Denitsa; Grigoryan, Valeri G; Springborg, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of stable products from copper cluster-cluster collisions is investigated by using classical molecular-dynamics simulations in combination with an embedded-atom potential. The dependence of the product clusters on impact energy, relative orientation of the clusters, and size of the clusters is studied. The structures and total energies of the product clusters are analysed and compared with those of the colliding clusters before impact. These results, together with the internal temperature, are used in obtaining an increased understanding of cluster fusion processes

  1. Consumer preference in ranking walking function utilizing the walking index for spinal cord injury II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, M; Ditunno, P; Ditunno, J F; Marino, R J; Scivoletto, G; Lam, T; Loffree, J; Tamburella, F; Leiby, B

    2011-12-01

    Blinded rank ordering. To determine consumer preference in walking function utilizing the walking Index for spinal cord injury II (WISCI II) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)from the Canada, the Italy and the United States of America. In all, 42 consumers with incomplete SCI (25 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar) from Canada (12/42), Italy (14/42) and the United States of America (16/42) ranked the 20 levels of the WISCI II scale by their individual preference for walking. Subjects were blinded to the original ranking of the WISCI II scale by clinical scientists. Photographs of each WISCI II level used in a previous pilot study were randomly shuffled and rank ordered. Percentile, conjoint/cluster and graphic analyses were performed. All three analyses illustrated consumer ranking followed a bimodal distribution. Ranking for two levels with physical assistance and two levels with a walker were bimodal with a difference of five to six ranks between consumer subgroups (quartile analysis). The larger cluster (N=20) showed preference for walking with assistance over the smaller cluster (N=12), whose preference was walking without assistance and more devices. In all, 64% (27/42) of consumers ranked WISCI II level with no devices or braces and 1 person assistance higher than multiple levels of the WISCI II requiring no assistance. These results were unexpected, as the hypothesis was that consumers would rank independent walking higher than walking with assistance. Consumer preference for walking function should be considered in addition to objective measures in designing SCI trials that use significant improvement in walking function as an outcome measure.

  2. The O/OREOS Mission - Astrobiology in Low Earth Orbit. [Astrobiology in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Ricco, A. J.; Squires, D.; Kitts, C.; Agasid, E.; Bramall, N.; Bryson, K.; Chittenden, J.; Conley, C.; Cook, A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The O/OREOS (Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses) nanosatellite is the first science demonstration spacecraft and flight mission of the NASA Astrobiology Small- Payloads Program (ASP). O/OREOS was launched successfully on November 19, 2010, to a high-inclination (72 deg), 650-km Earth orbit aboard a US Air Force Minotaur IV rocket from Kodiak, Alaska. O/OREOS consists of 3 conjoined cubesat (each 1000 cu cm) modules: (i) a control bus; (ii) the Space Environment Survivability of Living Organisms (SESLO) experiment; and (iii) the Space Environment Viability of Organics (SEVO) experiment. Among the innovative aspects of the O/OREOS mission are a real-time analysis of the photostability of organics and biomarkers and the collection of data on the survival and metabolic activity for microorganisms at 3 times during the 6-month mission. We report on the spacecraft characteristics, payload capabilities, and present operational phase and flight data from the O/OREOS mission. The science and technology rationale of O/OREOS supports NASA0s scientific exploration program by investigating the local space environment as well as space biology relevant to Moon and Mars missions. It also serves as a precursor for experiments on small satellites, the International Space Station (ISS), future free-flyers and lunar surface exposure facilities.

  3. Near-IR search for lensed supernovae behind galaxy clusters. II. First detection and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Goobar, A.; Paech, K.; Stanishev, V.; Amanullah, R.; Dahlén, T.; Jönsson, J.; Kneib, J. P.; Lidman, C.; Limousin, M.; Mörtsell, E.; Nobili, S.; Richard, J.; Riehm, T.; von Strauss, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. Powerful gravitational telescopes in the form of massive galaxy clusters can be used to enhance the light collecting power over a limited field of view by about an order of magnitude in flux. This effect is exploited here to increase the depth of a survey for lensed supernovae at near-IR wavelengths. Methods. We present a pilot supernova search programme conducted with the ISAAC camera at VLT. Lensed galaxies behind the massive clusters A1689, A1835, and AC114 were observed for a tot...

  4. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio [Richland, WA; Calapristi, Augustin J [West Richland, WA; Crow, Vernon L [Richland, WA; Hetzler, Elizabeth G [Kennewick, WA; Turner, Alan E [Kennewick, WA

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  5. Proceedings from the 2nd International Symposium on Formation Flying Missions and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Topics discussed include: The Stellar Imager (SI) "Vision Mission"; First Formation Flying Demonstration Mission Including on Flight Nulling; Formation Flying X-ray Telescope in L2 Orbit; SPECS: The Kilometer-baseline Far-IR Interferometer in NASA's Space Science Roadmap Presentation; A Tight Formation for Along-track SAR Interferometry; Realization of the Solar Power Satellite using the Formation Flying Solar Reflector; SIMBOL-X : Formation Flying for High-Energy Astrophysics; High Precision Optical Metrology for DARWIN; Close Formation Flight of Micro-Satellites for SAR Interferometry; Station-Keeping Requirements for Astronomical Imaging with Constellations of Free-Flying Collectors; Closed-Loop Control of Formation Flying Satellites; Formation Control for the MAXIM Mission; Precision Formation Keeping at L2 Using the Autonomous Formation Flying Sensor; Robust Control of Multiple Spacecraft Formation Flying; Virtual Rigid Body (VRB) Satellite Formation Control: Stable Mode-Switching and Cross-Coupling; Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF) System Design, Mission Capabilities, and Testbed Development; Navigation Algorithms for Formation Flying Missions; Use of Formation Flying Small Satellites Incorporating OISL's in a Tandem Cluster Mission; Semimajor Axis Estimation Strategies; Relative Attitude Determination of Earth Orbiting Formations Using GPS Receivers; Analysis of Formation Flying in Eccentric Orbits Using Linearized Equations of Relative Motion; Conservative Analytical Collision Probabilities for Orbital Formation Flying; Equations of Motion and Stability of Two Spacecraft in Formation at the Earth/Moon Triangular Libration Points; Formations Near the Libration Points: Design Strategies Using Natural and Non-Natural Ares; An Overview of the Formation and Attitude Control System for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Formation Flying Interferometer; GVE-Based Dynamics and Control for Formation Flying Spacecraft; GNC System Design for a New Concept of X

  6. Young Cluster Berkeley 59: Properties, Evolution, and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Neelam; Pandey, A. K.; Samal, Manash R.; Battinelli, Paolo; Ogura, K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.; Singh, H. P.

    2018-01-01

    Berkeley 59 is a nearby (∼1 kpc) young cluster associated with the Sh2-171 H II region. We present deep optical observations of the central ∼2.5 × 2.5 pc2 area of the cluster, obtained with the 3.58 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. The V/(V–I) color–magnitude diagram manifests a clear pre-main-sequence (PMS) population down to ∼0.2 M ⊙. Using the near-infrared and optical colors of the low-mass PMS members, we derive a global extinction of A V = 4 mag and a mean age of ∼1.8 Myr, respectively, for the cluster. We constructed the initial mass function and found that its global slopes in the mass ranges of 0.2–28 M ⊙ and 0.2–1.5 M ⊙ are ‑1.33 and ‑1.23, respectively, in good agreement with the Salpeter value in the solar neighborhood. We looked for the radial variation of the mass function and found that the slope is flatter in the inner region than in the outer region, indicating mass segregation. The dynamical status of the cluster suggests that the mass segregation is likely primordial. The age distribution of the PMS sources reveals that the younger sources appear to concentrate close to the inner region compared to the outer region of the cluster, a phenomenon possibly linked to the time evolution of star-forming clouds. Within the observed area, we derive a total mass of ∼103 M ⊙ for the cluster. Comparing the properties of Berkeley 59 with other young clusters, we suggest it resembles more closely the Trapezium cluster.

  7. Nuclear clustering - a cluster core model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Selvi, G.; Nandhini, N.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear clustering, similar to other clustering phenomenon in nature is a much warranted study, since it would help us in understanding the nature of binding of the nucleons inside the nucleus, closed shell behaviour when the system is highly deformed, dynamics and structure at extremes. Several models account for the clustering phenomenon of nuclei. We present in this work, a cluster core model study of nuclear clustering in light mass nuclei

  8. Integrating Data Clustering and Visualization for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV) and the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis CA 95616, USA,; nternational Research Training Group ``Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets,' ' University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA; Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA,; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA,; All authors are with the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; Keranen, Soile V. E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Knowles, David W.; Malik, Jitendra; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-05-12

    The recent development of methods for extracting precise measurements of spatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image data opens the way for new analyses of the complex gene regulatory networks controlling animal development. We present an integrated visualization and analysis framework that supports user-guided data clustering to aid exploration of these new complex datasets. The interplay of data visualization and clustering-based data classification leads to improved visualization and enables a more detailed analysis than previously possible. We discuss (i) integration of data clustering and visualization into one framework; (ii) application of data clustering to 3D gene expression data; (iii) evaluation of the number of clusters k in the context of 3D gene expression clustering; and (iv) improvement of overall analysis quality via dedicated post-processing of clustering results based on visualization. We discuss the use of this framework to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries and temporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns are controlled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  9. Reassessment of planetary protection requirements for Venus missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, J.; Riemer, R.; Smith, D.; Rummel, J.

    In 2005 the US Space Studies Board SSB was asked by NASA to reexamine the planetary protection requirements for spacecraft missions to Venus In particular the SSB was tasked to 1 Assess the surface and atmospheric environments of Venus with respect to their ability to support the survival and growth of Earth-origin microbial contamination by future spacecraft missions and 2 Provide recommendations related to planetary protection issues associated with the return to Earth of samples from Venus The task group established by the SSB to address these issues assessed the known aspects of the present-day environment of Venus and the ability of Earth organisms to survive in the physical and chemical conditions found on the planet s surface or in the clouds in the planet s atmosphere As a result of its deliberations the task group found compelling evidence against there being significant dangers of forward or reverse biological contamination as a result of contact between a spacecraft and the surface of Venus or the clouds in the atmosphere of Venus regardless of the current unknowns The task group did however conclude that Venus is a body of interest relative to the process of chemical evolution and the origin of life As a result the task group endorses NASA s current policy of subjecting missions to Venus to the requirements imposed by planetary protection Category II rather than the less restrictive Category I recommended by COSPAR

  10. SERPENS CLUSTER B AND VV SER OBSERVED WITH HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION AT 70, 160, AND 350 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Paul; Dunham, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on diffraction-limited observations in the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter of the Cluster B region of Serpens (G3-G6 Cluster) and of the Herbig Be star to the south, VV Ser. The observations were made with the Spitzer/MIPS instrument in fine-scale mode at 70 μm, in a normal mapping mode at 160 μm (VV Ser only), and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II) camera at 350 μm (Cluster B only). We use these data to define the spectral energy distributions of the tightly grouped members of Cluster B, many of whose spectral energy distribution (SED)'s peak in the FIR. We compare our results to those of the c2d survey of Serpens and to published models for the FIR emission from VV Ser. We find that values of L bol and T bol calculated with our new photometry show only modest changes from previous values, and that most source SED classifications remain unchanged.

  11. USING Hα MORPHOLOGY AND SURFACE BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS TO AGE-DATE STAR CLUSTERS IN M83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Mutchler, Max; Stankiewicz, Matt; Bond, Howard E.; Chandar, Rupali; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaleida, Catherine; Calzetti, Daniela; Saha, Abhijit; O'Connell, Robert; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We use new WFC3 observations of the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of Hα emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than τ ∼ 10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (τ V 10 Myr) clusters. A by-product of this study is the identification of 22 'single-star' H II regions in M83, with central stars having ages ∼4 Myr.

  12. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  13. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  14. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE LINE OF SIGHT TO BACKGROUND QUASARS. III. MULTI-OBJECT SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, H.; Barrientos, L. F.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I.; López, S.; Lira, P.; Maureira, M. J.; Gilbank, D. G.; Ellingson, E.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight lines taken from López et al. The targets were selected based on the presence of an intervening Mg II absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance 71 -1 Mpc from the QSO sight line (a p hotometric hit ) . The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 Å. Our aim was three-fold: (1) to identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, (2) to confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and (3) to determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. In this way, we are able to characterize the absorption systems associated with cluster members. Our main findings are as follows. (1) We identified 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts between 0.2509 ≤ z gal ≤ 1.0955, up to an impact parameter of 142 h 71 -1 kpc and a maximum velocity difference of 280 km s –1 . (2) We spectroscopically confirmed 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z –1 from galaxy clusters/groups, in addition to two new ones related to galaxy group environments. These numbers imply efficiencies of 71% in finding such systems with MOS spectroscopy. This is a remarkable result since we defined a photometric hit as those cluster-absorber pairs having a redshift difference Δz = 0.1. The general population of our confirmed absorbing galaxies have luminosities L B ∼L B * and mean rest-frame colors (R c – z') typical of S cd galaxies. From this sample, absorbing cluster galaxies hosting weak absorbers are consistent with lower star formation activity than the rest, which produce strong absorption and agree with typical Mg II absorbing galaxies found in the literature. Our spectroscopic confirmations lend support to the selection of

  15. Evolution of rotating star clusters at the inelastic-collision stage. II. Dynamics of a disk of gas and stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a gas--star disk embedded in a dense, mildly oblate (flattening epsilon-c or approx. =0.2--0.3 the stable disk will survive for at least half the cluster evolution time. The possibility of a thin disk of stars existing inside a dense star cluster is considered. For small epsilon-c and for disk member stars having > or approx. =0.04 the mass of the cluster members, collisions between cluster and disk stars will have no effect on the disk evolution prior to instability

  16. Ground Contact Model for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Way, David

    2012-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2) has been successful in simulating the flight of launch vehicles and entry bodies on earth and other planets. POST 2 has been the primary simulation tool for the Entry Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of numerous Mars lander missions such as Mars Pathfinder in 1997, the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (MER-A and MER-B) in 2004, Mars Phoenix lander in 2007, and it is now the main trajectory simulation tool for Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) in 2012. In all previous missions, the POST 2 simulation ended before ground impact, and a tool other than POST 2 simulated landing dynamics. It would be ideal for one tool to simulate the entire EDL sequence, thus avoiding errors that could be introduced by handing off position, velocity, or other fight parameters from one simulation to the other. The desire to have one continuous end-to-end simulation was the motivation for developing the ground interaction model in POST 2. Rover landing, including the detection of the postlanding state, is a very critical part of the MSL mission, as the EDL landing sequence continues for a few seconds after landing. The method explained in this paper illustrates how a simple ground force interaction model has been added to POST 2, which allows simulation of the entire EDL from atmospheric entry through touchdown.

  17. Electric propulsion options for 10 kW class earth space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M. J.; Curran, Francis M.

    1989-01-01

    Five and 10 kW ion and arcjet propulsion system options for a near-term space demonstration experiment have been evaluated. Analyses were conducted to determine first-order propulsion system performance and system component mass estimates. Overall mission performance of the electric propulsion systems was quantified in terms of the maximum thrusting time, total impulse, and velocity increment capability available when integrated onto a generic spacecraft under fixed mission model assumptions. Maximum available thrusting times for the ion-propelled spacecraft options, launched on a DELTA II 6920 vehicle, range from approximately 8,600 hours for a 4-engine 10 kW system to more than 29,600 hours for a single-engine 5 kW system. Maximum total impulse values and maximum delta-v's range from 1.2x10(7) to 2.1x10(7) N-s, and 3550 to 6200 m/s, respectively. Maximum available thrusting times for the arcjet propelled spacecraft launched on the DELTA II 6920 vehicle range from approximately 528 hours for the 6-engine 10 kW hydrazine system to 2328 hours for the single-engine 5 kW system. Maximum total impulse values and maximum delta-v's range from 2.2x10(6) to 3.6x10(6) N-s, and approximately 662 to 1072 m/s, respectively.

  18. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST/ACS Coma cluster survey. II. (Hammer+, 2010)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, D.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Hoyos, C.; den Brok, M.; Balcells, M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Carter, D.; Guzman, R.; Peletier, R. F.; Smith, R. J.; Graham, A. W.; Trentham, N.; Peng, E.; Puzia, T. H.; Lucey, J. R.; Jogee, S.; Aguerri, A. L.; Batcheldor, D.; Bridges, T. J.; Chiboucas, K.; Davies, J. I.; Del Burgo, C.; Erwin, P.; Hornschemeier, A.; Hudson, M. J.; Huxor, A.; Jenkins, L.; Karick, A.; Khosroshahi, H.; Kourkchi, E.; Komiyama, Y.; Lotz, J.; Marzke, R. O.; Marinova, I.; Matkovic, A.; Merritt, D.; Miller, B. W.; Miller, N. A.; Mobasher, B.; Mouhcine, M.; Okamura, S.; Percival, S.; Phillipps, S.; Poggianti, B. M.; Price, J.; Sharples, R. M.; Tully, R. B.; Valentijn, E.

    2010-01-01

    This data release contains catalogs for the ACS Images in F475W and F814W bands of 25 fields in the Coma cluster of galaxies. Each field is about 202x202arcsec. Please see the release notes for further details. (25 data files).

  20. The STEREO Mission

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The STEREO mission uses twin heliospheric orbiters to track solar disturbances from their initiation to 1 AU. This book documents the mission, its objectives, the spacecraft that execute it and the instruments that provide the measurements, both remote sensing and in situ. This mission promises to unlock many of the mysteries of how the Sun produces what has become to be known as space weather.

  1. Designing future dark energy space missions. II. Photometric redshift of space weak lensing optimized surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvel, S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Bernstein, G.; Ilbert, O.; Jelinsky, P.; Milliard, B.; Ealet, A.; Schimd, C.; Dahlen, T.; Arnouts, S.

    2011-08-01

    Context. With the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe, different observational probes have been proposed to investigate the presence of dark energy, including possible modifications to the gravitation laws by accurately measuring the expansion of the Universe and the growth of structures. We need to optimize the return from future dark energy surveys to obtain the best results from these probes. Aims: A high precision weak-lensing analysis requires not an only accurate measurement of galaxy shapes but also a precise and unbiased measurement of galaxy redshifts. The survey strategy has to be defined following both the photometric redshift and shape measurement accuracy. Methods: We define the key properties of the weak-lensing instrument and compute the effective PSF and the overall throughput and sensitivities. We then investigate the impact of the pixel scale on the sampling of the effective PSF, and place upper limits on the pixel scale. We then define the survey strategy computing the survey area including in particular both the Galactic absorption and Zodiacal light variation accross the sky. Using the Le Phare photometric redshift code and realistic galaxy mock catalog, we investigate the properties of different filter-sets and the importance of the u-band photometry quality to optimize the photometric redshift and the dark energy figure of merit (FoM). Results: Using the predicted photometric redshift quality, simple shape measurement requirements, and a proper sky model, we explore what could be an optimal weak-lensing dark energy mission based on FoM calculation. We find that we can derive the most accurate the photometric redshifts for the bulk of the faint galaxy population when filters have a resolution ℛ ~ 3.2. We show that an optimal mission would survey the sky through eight filters using two cameras (visible and near infrared). Assuming a five-year mission duration, a mirror size of 1.5 m and a 0.5 deg2 FOV with a visible pixel

  2. MRP (materiel requirements planning) II implementation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, D

    1994-05-01

    Manufacturing resource planning (MRP II) is a powerful and effective business planning template on which to build a continuous improvement culture. MRP II, when successfully implemented, encourages a disciplined yet nonthreatening environment centered on measurement and accountability. From the education that accompanies an MRP II implementation, the employees can better understand the vision and mission of the organization. This common goal keeps everyone's energy directed toward the same final objective. The Raymond Corporation is a major materiels handling equipment manufacturer headquartered in Greene, New York, with class "A" MRP II manufacturing facilities in Greene and Brantford, Ontario and an aftermark distribution facility in East Syracuse, New York. Prior to the implementation of MRP II in its Greene plant (from 1988 through 1990) good intentions and hard work were proving to be less than necessary to compete in the global market. Certified class "A" in February 1990. The Raymond Corporation has built a world-class organization from these foundations.

  3. Electronic structure and electric fields gradients of crystalline Sn(II) and Sn(IV) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, J.; Guenzburger, D.

    1991-01-01

    The electronic structures of clusters representing crystalline compounds of Sn(II) and Sn(IV) were investigated, employing the first-principles Discrete Variational method and Local Density theory. Densities of states and related parameters were obtained and compared with experimental measurements and with results from band structure calculations. Effects of cluster size and of cluster truncated bonds are discussed. Electric field gradients at the Sn nucleus were calculated; results are analysed in terms of charge distribution and chemical bonding in the crystals. (author)

  4. A NEW CENSUS OF THE VARIABLE STAR POPULATION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 2419

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Criscienzo, M.; Greco, C.; Ripepi, V.; Dall' Ora, M.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Clementini, G.; Federici, L.; Di Fabrizio, L.

    2011-01-01

    We present B, V, and I CCD light curves for 101 variable stars belonging to the globular cluster NGC 2419, 60 of which are new discoveries, based on data sets obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, the Subaru telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample includes 75 RR Lyrae stars (38 RRab, 36 RRc, and one RRd), one Population II Cepheid, 12 SX Phoenicis variables, two δ Scuti stars, three binary systems, five long-period variables, and three variables of uncertain classification. The pulsation properties of the RR Lyrae variables are close to those of Oosterhoff type II clusters, consistent with the low metal abundance and the cluster horizontal branch morphology, disfavoring (but not totally ruling out) an extragalactic hypothesis for the origin of NGC 2419. The observed properties of RR Lyrae and SX Phoenicis stars are used to estimate the cluster reddening and distance, using a number of different methods. Our final value is μ 0 (NGC 2419) = 19.71 ± 0.08 mag (D = 87.5 ± 3.3 kpc), with E(B - V) = 0.08 ± 0.01 mag, [Fe/H] = -2.1 dex on the Zinn and West metallicity scale, and a value of M V that sets μ 0 (LMC) = 18.52 mag. This value is in good agreement with the most recent literature estimates of the distance to NGC 2419.

  5. Cluster-cluster correlations and constraints on the correlation hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Gott, J. R., III

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that galaxies cluster around clusters at least as strongly as they cluster around galaxies imposes constraints on the hierarchy of correlation amplitudes in hierachical clustering models. The distributions which saturate these constraints are the Rayleigh-Levy random walk fractals proposed by Mandelbrot; for these fractal distributions cluster-cluster correlations are all identically equal to galaxy-galaxy correlations. If correlation amplitudes exceed the constraints, as is observed, then cluster-cluster correlations must exceed galaxy-galaxy correlations, as is observed.

  6. Verbal and Visual Memory Impairments in Bipolar I and II Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae Hyon; Kim, Ji Sun; Chang, Jae Seung; Oh, Sung Hee; Her, Ju Young; Cho, Hyun Sang; Park, Tae Sung; Shin, Soon Young; Ha, Kyooseob

    2012-12-01

    To compare verbal and visual memory performances between patients with bipolar I disorder (BD I) and patients with bipolar II disorder (BD II) and to determine whether memory deficits were mediated by impaired organizational strategies. Performances on the Korean-California Verbal Learning Test (K-CVLT) and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (ROCF) in 37 patients with BD I, 46 patients with BD II and 42 healthy subjects were compared. Mediating effects of impaired organization strategies on poor delayed recall was tested by comparing direct and mediated models using multiple regression analysis. Both patients groups recalled fewer words and figure components and showed lower Semantic Clustering compared to controls. Verbal memory impairment was partly mediated by difficulties in Semantic Clustering in both subtypes, whereas the mediating effect of Organization deficit on the visual memory impairment was present only in BD I. In all mediated models, group differences in delayed recall remained significant. Our findings suggest that memory impairment may be one of the fundamental cognitive deficits in bipolar disorders and that executive dysfunctions can exert an additional influence on memory impairments.

  7. CONSTRAINING CLUSTER PHYSICS WITH THE SHAPE OF X-RAY CLUSTERS: COMPARISON OF LOCAL X-RAY CLUSTERS VERSUS ΛCDM CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent simulations of cluster formation have demonstrated that condensation of baryons into central galaxies during cluster formation can drive the shape of the gas distribution in galaxy clusters significantly rounder out to their virial radius. These simulations generally predict stellar fractions within cluster virial radii that are ∼2-3 times larger than the stellar masses deduced from observations. In this paper, we compare ellipticity profiles of simulated clusters performed with varying input physics (radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback) to the cluster ellipticity profiles derived from Chandra and ROSAT observations, in an effort to constrain the fraction of gas that cools and condenses into the central galaxies within clusters. We find that local relaxed clusters have an average ellipticity of ε = 0.18 ± 0.05 in the radial range of 0.04 ≤ r/r 500 ≤ 1. At larger radii r > 0.1r 500 , the observed ellipticity profiles agree well with the predictions of non-radiative simulations. In contrast, the ellipticity profiles of simulated clusters that include dissipative gas physics deviate significantly from the observed ellipticity profiles at all radii. The dissipative simulations overpredict (underpredict) ellipticity in the inner (outer) regions of galaxy clusters. By comparing simulations with and without dissipative gas physics, we show that gas cooling causes the gas distribution to be more oblate in the central regions, but makes the outer gas distribution more spherical. We find that late-time gas cooling and star formation are responsible for the significantly oblate gas distributions in cluster cores, but the gas shapes outside of cluster cores are set primarily by baryon dissipation at high redshift (z ≥ 2). Our results indicate that the shapes of X-ray emitting gas in galaxy clusters, especially at large radii, can be used to place constraints on cluster gas physics, making it potential probes of the history of baryonic

  8. VEGA Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    VEGA (mission) is a combined spacecraft mission to VENUS and COMET HALLEY. It was launched in the USSR at the end of 1984. The mission consisted of two identical spacecraft VEGA 1 and VEGA 2. VEGA is an acronym built from the words `Venus' and `Halley' (`Galley' in Russian spelling). The basic design of the spacecraft was the same as has been used many times to deliver Soviet landers and orbiter...

  9. Multipolar moments of weak lensing signal around clusters. Weighing filaments in harmonic space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, C.; Gavazzi, R.; Codis, S.; Pichon, C.; Peirani, S.; Dubois, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Upcoming weak lensing surveys such as Euclid will provide an unprecedented opportunity to quantify the geometry and topology of the cosmic web, in particular in the vicinity of lensing clusters. Aims: Understanding the connectivity of the cosmic web with unbiased mass tracers, such as weak lensing, is of prime importance to probe the underlying cosmology, seek dynamical signatures of dark matter, and quantify environmental effects on galaxy formation. Methods: Mock catalogues of galaxy clusters are extracted from the N-body PLUS simulation. For each cluster, the aperture multipolar moments of the convergence are calculated in two annuli (inside and outside the virial radius). By stacking their modulus, a statistical estimator is built to characterise the angular mass distribution around clusters. The moments are compared to predictions from perturbation theory and spherical collapse. Results: The main weakly chromatic excess of multipolar power on large scales is understood as arising from the contraction of the primordial cosmic web driven by the growing potential well of the cluster. Besides this boost, the quadrupole prevails in the cluster (ellipsoidal) core, while at the outskirts, harmonic distortions are spread on small angular modes, and trace the non-linear sharpening of the filamentary structures. Predictions for the signal amplitude as a function of the cluster-centric distance, mass, and redshift are presented. The prospects of measuring this signal are estimated for current and future lensing data sets. Conclusions: The Euclid mission should provide all the necessary information for studying the cosmic evolution of the connectivity of the cosmic web around lensing clusters using multipolar moments and probing unique signatures of, for example, baryons and warm dark matter.

  10. Discovery of Multiseeded Multimode Formation of Embedded Clusters in the Rosette Molecular Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Zeng; Smith, Michael D.

    2005-02-01

    An investigation based on data from the spatially complete Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) reveals that a remarkable burst of clustered star formation is taking place throughout the southeast quadrant of the Rosette Molecular Cloud. Compact clusters are forming in a multiseeded mode, in parallel and at various places. In addition, sparse aggregates of embedded young stars are extensively distributed. In this study we report the primary results and implications for high-mass and clustered star formation in giant molecular clouds. In particular, we incorporate for the first time the birth of medium- to low-mass stars into the scenario of sequential formation of OB clusters. Following the emergence of the young OB cluster NGC 2244, a variety of manifestations of forming clusters of medium to high mass appears in the vicinity of the swept-up layer of the H II region as well as farther into the molecular cloud. The embedded clusters appear to form in a structured manner, which suggests they follow tracks laid out by the decay of macroturbulence. We address the possible origins of the turbulence. This leads us to propose a tree model to interpret the neat spatial distribution of clusters within a large section of the Rosette complex. Prominent new-generation OB clusters are identified at the root of the tree pattern.

  11. Adding a Mission to the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: 1) Command and control and mission management for the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite and the Polar Free Flyer mission in 2017 2) Data acquisition via a Polar Receptor Network (PRN) for S-NPP, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the Department of Defense (DoD) 3) Data routing over a global fiber Wide Area Network (WAN) for S-NPP, JPSS-1, Polar Free Flyer, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN, which includes several Earth Observing System [EOS] missions), MetOp for the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) 4) Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 With this established infrastructure and existing suite of missions, the CGS

  12. Dating the Tidal Disruption of Globular Clusters with GAIA Data on Their Stellar Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sownak; Ginsburg, Idan; Loeb, Abraham

    2018-05-01

    The Gaia mission promises to deliver precision astrometry at an unprecedented level, heralding a new era for discerning the kinematic and spatial coordinates of stars in our Galaxy. Here, we present a new technique for estimating the age of tidally disrupted globular cluster streams using the proper motions and parallaxes of tracer stars. We evolve the collisional dynamics of globular clusters within the evolving potential of a Milky Way-like halo extracted from a cosmological ΛCDM simulation and analyze the resultant streams as they would be observed by Gaia. The simulations sample a variety of globular cluster orbits, and account for stellar evolution and the gravitational influence of the disk of the Milky Way. We show that a characteristic timescale, obtained from the dispersion of the proper motions and parallaxes of stars within the stream, is a good indicator for the time elapsed since the stream has been freely expanding away due to the tidal disruption of the globular cluster. This timescale, in turn, places a lower limit on the age of the cluster. The age can be deduced from astrometry using a modest number of stars, with the error on this estimate depending on the proximity of the stream and the number of tracer stars used.

  13. Convex Clustering: An Attractive Alternative to Hierarchical Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary K.; Chi, Eric C.; Ranola, John Michael O.; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal in cluster analysis is to discover natural groupings of objects. The field of cluster analysis is crowded with diverse methods that make special assumptions about data and address different scientific aims. Despite its shortcomings in accuracy, hierarchical clustering is the dominant clustering method in bioinformatics. Biologists find the trees constructed by hierarchical clustering visually appealing and in tune with their evolutionary perspective. Hierarchical clustering operates on multiple scales simultaneously. This is essential, for instance, in transcriptome data, where one may be interested in making qualitative inferences about how lower-order relationships like gene modules lead to higher-order relationships like pathways or biological processes. The recently developed method of convex clustering preserves the visual appeal of hierarchical clustering while ameliorating its propensity to make false inferences in the presence of outliers and noise. The solution paths generated by convex clustering reveal relationships between clusters that are hidden by static methods such as k-means clustering. The current paper derives and tests a novel proximal distance algorithm for minimizing the objective function of convex clustering. The algorithm separates parameters, accommodates missing data, and supports prior information on relationships. Our program CONVEXCLUSTER incorporating the algorithm is implemented on ATI and nVidia graphics processing units (GPUs) for maximal speed. Several biological examples illustrate the strengths of convex clustering and the ability of the proximal distance algorithm to handle high-dimensional problems. CONVEXCLUSTER can be freely downloaded from the UCLA Human Genetics web site at http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/ PMID:25965340

  14. Spatial distribution of H II regions in NGC 4321

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.; Hodge, P.; Kennicutt, R.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of 286 H II regions in the giant Sc Virgo Cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4321 is used to analyze some aspects of this galaxy's spiral structure. The H II region distribution is rectified to face-on by least-squares fitting to a logarithmic spiral, and the radial distribution, the across-arm distribution, and the along-arm distribution of H II regions are determined. Comparison of the circular distribution with a simple shock wave model of the density wave theory does not clearly support the model. Arm 1 shows no obvious structure, and arm 2, although it has a clear peak, does not show the expected asymmetrical distribution. Agreement is reasonably good, however, with the somewhat more elaborate density wave model of Bash. Tests for clumping of the H II regions were negative

  15. New Wolf-Rayet stars in Galactic open clusters - Sher 1 and the giant H II region core Westerlund 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.; Potter, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Two new Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars were found in open clusters: a WN4 star in the O9 cluster Sher 1 and a WN7 star in the O7 cluster Westerlund 2. This confirms a previous trend, namely that fainter, hotter WN stars tend to be older than brighter, cooler WN stars. This may be a consequence of evolution via extreme mass loss.

  16. VELOCITY-RESOLVED [C ii] EMISSION AND [C ii]/FIR MAPPING ALONG ORION WITH HERSCHEL *,**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Teyssier, D.; Etxaluze, M.; Goldsmith, P.F.; Ossenkopf, V.; Gerin, M.; Bergin, E.A.; Black, J.H.; Cernicharo, J.; Cuadrado, S.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Fuente, A.; Hacar, A.; Lis, D.C.; Marcelino, N.; Melnick, G.J.; Müller, H.S.P.; Persson, C.; Pety, J.; Röllig, M.; Schilke, P.; Simon, R.; Snell, R.L.; Stutzki, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first ~7.5′×11.5′ velocity-resolved (~0.2 km s−1) map of the [C ii] 158 μm line toward the Orion molecular cloud 1 (OMC 1) taken with the Herschel/HIFI instrument. In combination with far-infrared (FIR) photometric images and velocity-resolved maps of the H41α hydrogen recombination and CO J=2-1 lines, this data set provides an unprecedented view of the intricate small-scale kinematics of the ionized/PDR/molecular gas interfaces and of the radiative feedback from massive stars. The main contribution to the [C ii] luminosity (~85 %) is from the extended, FUV-illuminated face of the cloud (G0>500, nH>5×103 cm−3) and from dense PDRs (G≳104, nH≳105 cm−3) at the interface between OMC 1 and the H ii region surrounding the Trapezium cluster. Around ~15 % of the [C ii] emission arises from a different gas component without CO counterpart. The [C ii] excitation, PDR gas turbulence, line opacity (from [13C ii]) and role of the geometry of the illuminating stars with respect to the cloud are investigated. We construct maps of the L[C ii]/LFIR and LFIR/MGas ratios and show that L[C ii]/LFIR decreases from the extended cloud component (~10−2–10−3) to the more opaque star-forming cores (~10−3–10−4). The lowest values are reminiscent of the “[C ii] deficit” seen in local ultra-luminous IR galaxies hosting vigorous star formation. Spatial correlation analysis shows that the decreasing L[C ii]/LFIR ratio correlates better with the column density of dust through the molecular cloud than with LFIR/MGas. We conclude that the [C ii] emitting column relative to the total dust column along each line of sight is responsible for the observed L[C ii]/LFIR variations through the cloud. PMID:26568638

  17. VELOCITY-RESOLVED [C ii] EMISSION AND [C ii]/FIR MAPPING ALONG ORION WITH HERSCHEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Teyssier, D; Etxaluze, M; Goldsmith, P F; Ossenkopf, V; Gerin, M; Bergin, E A; Black, J H; Cernicharo, J; Cuadrado, S; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Fuente, A; Hacar, A; Lis, D C; Marcelino, N; Melnick, G J; Müller, H S P; Persson, C; Pety, J; Röllig, M; Schilke, P; Simon, R; Snell, R L; Stutzki, J

    2015-10-10

    We present the first ~7.5'×11.5' velocity-resolved (~0.2 km s -1 ) map of the [C ii] 158 μ m line toward the Orion molecular cloud 1 (OMC 1) taken with the Herschel /HIFI instrument. In combination with far-infrared (FIR) photometric images and velocity-resolved maps of the H41 α hydrogen recombination and CO J =2-1 lines, this data set provides an unprecedented view of the intricate small-scale kinematics of the ionized/PDR/molecular gas interfaces and of the radiative feedback from massive stars. The main contribution to the [C ii] luminosity (~85 %) is from the extended, FUV-illuminated face of the cloud ( G 0 >500, n H >5×10 3 cm -3 ) and from dense PDRs ( G ≳10 4 , n H ≳10 5 cm -3 ) at the interface between OMC 1 and the H ii region surrounding the Trapezium cluster. Around ~15 % of the [C ii] emission arises from a different gas component without CO counterpart. The [C ii] excitation, PDR gas turbulence, line opacity (from [ 13 C ii]) and role of the geometry of the illuminating stars with respect to the cloud are investigated. We construct maps of the L [C ii]/ L FIR and L FIR / M Gas ratios and show that L [C ii]/ L FIR decreases from the extended cloud component (~10 -2 -10 -3 ) to the more opaque star-forming cores (~10 -3 -10 -4 ). The lowest values are reminiscent of the "[C ii] deficit" seen in local ultra-luminous IR galaxies hosting vigorous star formation. Spatial correlation analysis shows that the decreasing L [C ii]/ L FIR ratio correlates better with the column density of dust through the molecular cloud than with L FIR / M Gas . We conclude that the [C ii] emitting column relative to the total dust column along each line of sight is responsible for the observed L [C ii]/ L FIR variations through the cloud.

  18. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. II. Effects of reaction dimensionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The black dot damage features which develop in iron at low temperatures exhibit significant mobility during in situ irradiation experiments via a series of discrete, intermittent, long range hops. By incorporating this mobility into cluster dynamics models, the temperature dependence of such damage structures can be explained with a surprising degree of accuracy. Such motion, however, is one dimensional in nature. This aspect of the physics has not been fully considered in prior models. This article describes one dimensional reaction kinetics in the context of cluster dynamics and applies them to the black dot problem. This allows both a more detailed description of the mechanisms by which defects execute irradiation-induced hops while allowing a full examination of the importance of kinetic assumptions in accurately assessing the development of this irradiation microstructure. Results are presented to demonstrate whether one dimensional diffusion alters the dependence of the defect population on factors such as temperature and defect hop length. Finally, the size of interstitial loops that develop is shown to depend on the extent of the reaction volumes between interstitial clusters, as well as the dimensionality of these interactions.

  19. Far infrared filters for the Galileo-Jupiter and other missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, J. S.; Hunneman, R.; Whatley, A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the development of FIR multilayer interference filters for the net flux radiometer and photopolarizing radiometer to be carried on board the Galileo mission to Jupiter is reported. The multilayer interference technique has been extended to the region above 40 microns by the use of PbTe/II-VI materials in hard-coated combination, with the thickest layers composed of CdSe QWOT at 74 microns and PbTe QWOT. Improvements have also been obtained in filters below 20 microns on the basis of the Chebyshev stack design. A composite filter cutting on steeply at 40 microns has been designed which employs a thin crystal quartz substrate, shorter wavelength absorption in ZnS and As2S3 thin films, and supplementary multilayer interference. Finally, absorptive filters have been developed based on II-VI compounds in multilayer combination with KRS-5 (or 6) on a KRS-5 (or 6) substrate

  20. ART OF THE POSSIBLE: SECURING AIR FORCE SPACE COMMAND MISSION SYSTEMS FOR THE WARFIGHTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-23

    that traverse Tier III, II, and I CSSPs across all services and pay bonuses equal to civilian and contractor counterparts. In regards to...cybersecurity attack-surface. With Department of Defense (DOD) networks and mission systems undergoing nearly 250,000 attacks a day , AFSPC must take immediate...compliant cybersecurity controls across all weapon systems, not all non-compliant controls contribute equally to the cyber-attack surface and overall

  1. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  2. Subtypes of borderline personality disorder patients: a cluster-analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Maaike L; Feenstra, Dine J; Bales, Dawn L; de Vos, Jasmijn; Lucas, Zwaan; Verheul, Roel; Luyten, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The borderline personality disorder (BPD) population is notably heterogeneous, and this has potentially important implications for intervention. Identifying distinct subtypes of patients may represent a first step in identifying which treatments work best for which individuals. A cluster-analysis on dimensional personality disorder (PD) features, as assessed with the SCID-II, was performed on a sample of carefully screened BPD patients ( N  = 187) referred for mentalization-based treatment. The optimal cluster solution was determined using multiple indices of fit. The validity of the clusters was explored by investigating their relationship with borderline pathology, symptom severity, interpersonal problems, quality of life, personality functioning, attachment, and trauma history, in addition to demographic and clinical features. A three-cluster solution was retained, which identified three clusters of BPD patients with distinct profiles. The largest cluster ( n  = 145) consisted of patients characterized by "core BPD" features, without marked elevations on other PD dimensions. A second "Extravert/externalizing" cluster of patients ( n  = 27) was characterized by high levels of histrionic, narcissistic, and antisocial features. A third, smaller "Schizotypal/paranoid" cluster ( n  = 15) consisted of patients with marked schizotypal and paranoid features. Patients in these clusters showed theoretically meaningful differences in terms of demographic and clinical features. Three meaningful subtypes of BPD patients were identified with distinct profiles. Differences were small, even when controlling for severity of PD pathology, suggesting a strong common factor underlying BPD. These results may represent a stepping stone toward research with larger samples aimed at replicating the findings and investigating differential trajectories of change, treatment outcomes, and treatment approaches for these subtypes. The study was retrospectively registered 16 April 2010

  3. Parker Solar Probe: A NASA Mission to Touch the Sun: Mission Status Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    The newly renamed, Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission will be the first mission to fly into the low solar corona, revealing how the corona is heated and the solar wind and energetic particles are accelerated, solving fundamental mysteries that have been top priority science goals since such a mission was first proposed in 1958. The scale and concept of such a mission has been revised at intervals since that time, yet the core has always been a close encounter with the Sun. The primary science goal of the Parker Solar Probe mission is to determine the structure and dynamics of the Sun's coronal magnetic field, understand how the solar corona and wind are heated and accelerated, and determine what mechanisms accelerate and transport energetic particles. PSP uses an innovative mission design, significant technology development and a risk-reducing engineering development to meet the science objectives. In this presentation, we provide an update on the progress of the Parker Solar Probe mission as we prepare for the July 2018 launch.

  4. X-ray emission from clusters and groups of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent major advances in x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of clusters have allowed the determination of their mass and mass profile out to approximately 1/2 the virial radius. In rich clusters, most of the baryonic mass is in the gas phase, and the ratio of mass in gas/stars varies by a factor of 2-4. The baryonic fractions vary by a factor of approximately 3 from cluster to cluster and almost always exceed 0.09 h50-[3/2] and thus are in fundamental conflict with the assumption of Omega = 1 and the results of big bang nucleosynthesis. The derived Fe abundances are 0.2-0.45 solar, and the abundances of O and Si for low redshift systems are 0.6-1.0 solar. This distribution is consistent with an origin in pure type II supernova. The amount of light and energy produced by these supernovae is very large, indicating their importance in influencing the formation of clusters and galaxies. The lack of evolution of Fe to a redshift of z approximately 0.4 argues for very early enrichment of the cluster gas. Groups show a wide range of abundances, 0.1-0.5 solar. The results of an x-ray survey indicate that the contribution of groups to the mass density of the universe is likely to be larger than 0.1 h50-2. Many of the very poor groups have large x-ray halos and are filled with small galaxies whose velocity dispersion is a good match to the x-ray temperatures.

  5. Spectroscopic and electrochemical study of polynuclear clusters from ruthenium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriano, C.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of the trinuclear clusters [Ru sub(3) O (CH sub(3) CO sub(2)) sub(4) L sub(3)] where L = imidazole, pyridine or pyrazine type of ligands, was investigated based on spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. These complexes are of great interest from the point of view of their electronic and redox properties, providing multisite species for electron transfer processes. They were isolated in solid state, and characterized by means of elementary analyses and infrared spectra. The electrochemical behaviour in acetonitrile solution was typically reversible; the cyclic voltammograms exhibited a series of four or five mono electronic waves ascribed to the sucessive Ru sup(IV) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) / Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III)/ --- Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) redox couples. The differences between the successive redox potentials were about 1 V, indicating strong metal-metal interaction in the trinuclear Ru sub(3) centre. The E values were strongly sensitive to the nature of the N-heterocyclic ligand, increasing with the pi-acceptor properties of the pyridine and pyrazine derivatives, but in a much less pronounced way in the case of the imidazole derivatives. Resonance Raman studies for the pyrazine cluster showed selective intensification of the vibrational modes of the Ru-pyrazine chromophore, and the trinuclear centre, using excitation wavelengths coinciding with the metal-to-pyrazine and metal-metal bands, respectively. (author)

  6. On the interaction of the PKS B1358–113 radio galaxy with the A1836 cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Ł.; Simionescu, A.; Hagino, K. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Szostek, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Ostrowski, M. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ulica Orla 171, 30-244 Kraków (Poland); Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Werner, N. [KIPAC, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Madejski, G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Begelman, M. C., E-mail: stawarz@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate M-dot {sub acc}∼2×10{sup −4} M-dot {sub Edd}∼0.02 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L {sub j} ∼ (1-6) × 10{sup –3} L {sub Edd} ∼ (0.5-3) × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as τ{sub j} ∼ 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E {sub tot} ∼ (2-8) × 10{sup 60} erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range M{sub sh}∼2--4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on

  7. The GEOFLOW experiment missions in the Fluid Science Laboratory on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker, Gerold; Carpy, Rodrigo; Fabritius, Gerd; Dettmann, Jan; Minster, Olivier; Winter, Josef; Ranebo, Hans; Dewandre, Thierry; Castiglione, Luigi; Mazzoni, Stefano; Egbers, Christoph; Futterer, Birgit

    The GEOFLOW I experiment has been successfully performed on the International Space Sta-tion (ISS) in 2008 in the Columbus module in order to study the stability, pattern formation and transition to turbulence in a viscous incompressible fluid layer enclosed in two concentric co-rotating spheres subject to a radial temperature gradient and a radial volumetric force field. The objective of the study is the experimental investigation of large scale astrophysical and geophysical phenomena in spherical geometry stipulated by rotation, thermal convections and radial gravity fields. These systems include earth outer core or mantle convection, differen-tial rotation effects in the sun, atmosphere of gas planets as well as a variety of engineering applications. The GEOFLOW I experimental instrument consists of an experiment insert for operation in the Fluid Science Laboratory, which is part of the Columbus Module of the ISS. It was first launched in February 2008 together with Columbus Module on STS 122, operated periodically for 9 month and returned to ground after 14 month on orbit with STS 119. The primary objective was the experimental modelling of outer earth core convection flow. In order to allow for variations of the characteristic scaling for different physical phenomena, the experiment was designed and qualified for a total of nine flights to the ISS, with ground refurbishment and geometrical or fluid modification after each mission. The second mission of GEOFLOW (II) is currently under preparation in terms of hardware refurbishment and modification, as well as science parameter development in order to allow use of a new experimental model fluid with a strongly temperature dependent viscosity, a adaptation of the experimental thermal parameter range in order to provide a representative model for earth mantle convection. The GEOFLOW II instrument is foreseen to be launched with the second mission of the Eu-ropean Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). The flight to ISS

  8. Lifting to cluster-tilting objects in higher cluster categories

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Pin

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we consider the $d$-cluster-tilted algebras, the endomorphism algebras of $d$-cluster-tilting objects in $d$-cluster categories. We show that a tilting module over such an algebra lifts to a $d$-cluster-tilting object in this $d$-cluster category.

  9. DSN Beowulf Cluster-Based VLBI Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogstad, Stephen P.; Jongeling, Andre P.; Finley, Susan G.; White, Leslie A.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Clark, John E.; Goodhart, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) requires a broadband VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) correlator to process data routinely taken as part of the VLBI source Catalogue Maintenance and Enhancement task (CAT M&E) and the Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations task (TEMPO). The data provided by these measurements are a crucial ingredient in the formation of precision deep-space navigation models. In addition, a VLBI correlator is needed to provide support for other VLBI related activities for both internal and external customers. The JPL VLBI Correlator (JVC) was designed, developed, and delivered to the DSN as a successor to the legacy Block II Correlator. The JVC is a full-capability VLBI correlator that uses software processes running on multiple computers to cross-correlate two-antenna broadband noise data. Components of this new system (see Figure 1) consist of Linux PCs integrated into a Beowulf Cluster, an existing Mark5 data storage system, a RAID array, an existing software correlator package (SoftC) originally developed for Delta DOR Navigation processing, and various custom- developed software processes and scripts. Parallel processing on the JVC is achieved by assigning slave nodes of the Beowulf cluster to process separate scans in parallel until all scans have been processed. Due to the single stream sequential playback of the Mark5 data, some ramp-up time is required before all nodes can have access to required scan data. Core functions of each processing step are accomplished using optimized C programs. The coordination and execution of these programs across the cluster is accomplished using Pearl scripts, PostgreSQL commands, and a handful of miscellaneous system utilities. Mark5 data modules are loaded on Mark5 Data systems playback units, one per station. Data processing is started when the operator scans the Mark5 systems and runs a script that reads various configuration files and then creates an experiment-dependent status database

  10. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  11. Dense Fe cluster-assembled films by energetic cluster deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, D.L.; Yamada, H.; Hihara, T.; Uchida, T.; Sumiyama, K.

    2004-01-01

    High-density Fe cluster-assembled films were produced at room temperature by an energetic cluster deposition. Though cluster-assemblies are usually sooty and porous, the present Fe cluster-assembled films are lustrous and dense, revealing a soft magnetic behavior. Size-monodispersed Fe clusters with the mean cluster size d=9 nm were synthesized using a plasma-gas-condensation technique. Ionized clusters are accelerated electrically and deposited onto the substrate together with neutral clusters from the same cluster source. Packing fraction and saturation magnetic flux density increase rapidly and magnetic coercivity decreases remarkably with increasing acceleration voltage. The Fe cluster-assembled film obtained at the acceleration voltage of -20 kV has a packing fraction of 0.86±0.03, saturation magnetic flux density of 1.78±0.05 Wb/m 2 , and coercivity value smaller than 80 A/m. The resistivity at room temperature is ten times larger than that of bulk Fe metal

  12. A new photoactive Ru(II)tris(2,2'-bipyridine) templated Zn(II) benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate metal organic framework: structure and photophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Christi L; Wojtas, Lukasz; Gao, Wen-Yang; Ma, Shengqian; Larsen, Randy W

    2015-03-28

    It has now been demonstrated that Ru(ii)tris(2,2'-bipyridine) (RuBpy) can be utilized to template the formation of new metal organic framework (MOF) materials containing crystallographically resolved RuBpy clusters with unique photophysical properties. Two such materials, RWLC-1 and RWLC-2, have now been reported from our laboratory and are composed of RuBpy encapsulated in MOFs composed of Zn(ii) ions and 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene ligands (C. L. Whittington, L. Wojtas and R. W. Larsen, Inorg. Chem., 2014, 53, 160-166). Here, a third RuBpy templated photoactive MOF is described (RWLC-3) that is derived from the reaction between Zn(ii) ions and 1,4-dicarboxybenzene in the presence of RuBpy. Single Crystal X-ray diffraction studies determined the position of RuBpy cations within the crystal lattice. The RWLC-3 structure is described as a 2-fold interpenetrated pillared honeycomb network (bnb) containing crystallographically resolved RuBpy clusters. The two bnb networks are weakly interconnected. The encapsulated RuBpy exhibits two emission decay lifetimes (τ-fast = 120 ns, τ-slow = 453 ns) and a bathochromic shift in the steady state emission spectrum relative to RuBpy in ethanol.

  13. STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE HERCULES CLUSTER: Hα IMAGING OF A2151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedres, Bernabe; Iglesias-Paramo, Jorge; VIlchez, Jose Manuel; Reverte, Daniel; Petropoulou, Vasiliki; Hernandez-Fernandez, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of an Hα imaging survey of galaxies in the central regions of the A2151 cluster. A total of 50 sources were detected in Hα, from which 41 were classified as secure members of the cluster and 2 as likely members based on spectroscopic and photometric redshift considerations. The remaining seven galaxies were classified as background contaminants and thus excluded from our study on the Hα properties of the cluster. The morphologies of the 43 Hα selected galaxies range from grand design spirals and interacting galaxies to blue compacts and tidal dwarfs or isolated extragalactic H II regions, spanning a range of magnitudes of -21 ≤ M B ≤ -12.5 mag. From these 43 galaxies, 7 have been classified as active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates. These AGN candidates follow the L(Hα) versus M B relationship of the normal galaxies, implying that the emission associated with the nuclear engine has a rather secondary impact on the total Hα emission of these galaxies. A comparison with the clusters Coma and A1367 and a sample of field galaxies has shown the presence of cluster galaxies with L(Hα) lower than expected for their M B , a consequence of the cluster environment. This fact results in differences in the L(Hα) versus EW(Hα) and L(Hα) distributions of the clusters with respect to the field, and in cluster-to-cluster variations of these quantities, which we propose are driven by a global cluster property as the total mass. In addition, the cluster Hα emitting galaxies tend to avoid the central regions of the clusters, again with different intensity depending on the cluster total mass. For the particular case of A2151, we find that most Hα emitting galaxies are located close to the regions with the higher galaxy density, offset from the main X-ray peak. Overall, we conclude that both the global cluster environment and the cluster merging history play a non-negligible role in the integral star formation properties of

  14. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor M. Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard LCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant ($Lambda$ and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM, structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging.Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang,hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics.The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions:the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulenceare developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thusour review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clustersis to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses.New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopeswill come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities,we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  15. Logistics Needs for Potential Deep Space Mission Scenarios Post Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Pedro, Jr.; Shultz, Eric; Mattfeld, Bryan; Stromgren, Chel; Goodliff, Kandyce

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is currently being explored as the next step towards deep space human exploration, with the ultimate goal of reaching Mars. NASA is currently investigating a number of potential human exploration missions, which will progressively increase the distance and duration that humans spend away from Earth. Missions include extended human exploration in cis-lunar space which, as conceived, would involve durations of around 60 days, and human missions to Mars, which are anticipated to be as long as 1000 days. The amount of logistics required to keep the crew alive and healthy for these missions is significant. It is therefore important that the design and planning for these missions include accurate estimates of logistics requirements. This paper provides a description of a process and calculations used to estimate mass and volume requirements for crew logistics, including consumables, such as food, personal items, gasses, and liquids. Determination of logistics requirements is based on crew size, mission duration, and the degree of closure of the environmental control life support system (ECLSS). Details are provided on the consumption rates for different types of logistics and how those rates were established. Results for potential mission scenarios are presented, including a breakdown of mass and volume drivers. Opportunities for mass and volume reduction are identified, along with potential threats that could possibly increase requirements.

  16. Aromatic Polyketide GTRI-02 is a Previously Unidentified Product of the act Gene Cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changsheng; Ichinose, Koji; Choi, Young Hae; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2017-07-18

    The biosynthesis of aromatic polyketides derived from type II polyketide synthases (PKSs) is complex, and it is not uncommon that highly similar gene clusters give rise to diverse structural architectures. The act biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an archetypal type II PKS. Here we show that the act BGC also specifies the aromatic polyketide GTRI-02 (1) and propose a mechanism for the biogenesis of its 3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2H)-one backbone. Polyketide 1 was also produced by Streptomyces sp. MBT76 after activation of the act-like qin gene cluster by overexpression of the pathway-specific activator. Mining of this strain also identified dehydroxy-GTRI-02 (2), which most likely originated from dehydration of 1 during the isolation process. This work shows that even extensively studied model gene clusters such as act of S. coelicolor can still produce new chemistry, offering new perspectives for drug discovery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. SPATIAL CLUSTER AND OUTLIER IDENTIFICATION OF GEOCHEMICAL ASSOCIATION OF ELEMENTS: A CASE STUDY IN JUIRUI COPPER MINING AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Thanh NGUYEN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial clusters and spatial outliers play an important role in the study of the spatial distribution patterns of geochemical data. They characterize the fundamental properties of mineralization processes, the spatial distribution of mineral deposits, and ore element concentrations in mineral districts. In this study, a new method for the study of spatial distribution patterns of multivariate data is proposed based on a combination of robust Mahalanobis distance and local Moran’s Ii. In order to construct the spatial matrix, the Moran's I spatial correlogram was first used to determine the range. The robust Mahalanobis distances were then computed for an association of elements. Finally, local Moran’s Ii statistics was used to measure the degree of spatial association and discover the spatial distribution patterns of associations of Cu, Au, Mo, Ag, Pb, Zn, As, and Sb elements including spatial clusters and spatial outliers. Spatial patterns were analyzed at six different spatial scales (2km, 4 km, 6 km, 8 km, 10 km and 12 km for both the raw data and Box-Cox transformed data. The results show that identified spatial cluster and spatial outlier areas using local Moran’s Ii and the robust Mahalanobis accord the objective reality and have a good conformity with known deposits in the study area.

  18. End of mission report on seismic safety review mission for Belene NPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Mohammadioun, B.; Schneider, H.; Serva, L.

    1995-01-01

    Upon the invitation of the Bulgarian government through the Committee for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy and within the framework of the implementation of the Technical Cooperation project BUL/9/012 related to site and seismic of NPPs, a mission visited Sofia 3 - 7 July 1995. The mission constituted a follow-up of the interim review of subjects related to tectonic stability and seismic hazard characterization of the site which was performed in September 1993. The main objective of the mission was the final review of the subjects already reviewed in September 1993 as well as issues related to geotechnical engineering and foundation safety. The main terms of reference of the present mission was to verify the implementation of the recommendations of the Site Safety Review Mission of June 1990. This document gives findings on geology-tectonics, seismology and foundation safety. In the end conclusions and recommendations of the mission are presented

  19. Developmental Decline in the MicroRNA 199a (miR-199a)/miR-214 Cluster in Human Fetal Lung Promotes Type II Cell Differentiation by Upregulating Key Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ritu; Benlhabib, Houda; Guo, Wei; Lerma Cervantes, Connie B; Mendelson, Carole R

    2018-06-01

    The major surfactant protein, SP-A (a product of the SFTPA gene), serves as a marker of type II pneumocyte differentiation and surfactant synthesis. SFTPA expression in cultured human fetal lung (HFL) epithelial cells is upregulated by hormones that increase cyclic AMP (cAMP) and activate TTF-1/NKX2.1 and NF-κB. To further define mechanisms for type II cell differentiation and induction of SP-A, we investigated roles of microRNAs (miRNAs). Using microarray to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in HFL epithelial cells during type II cell differentiation in culture, we observed that members of the miRNA 199a (miR-199a)/miR-214 cluster were significantly downregulated during differentiation. Validated and predicted targets of miR-199a-3p/miR-199a-5p and miR-214, which serve roles in type II cell differentiation (COX-2, NF-κB p50/p65, and CREB1), and the CREB1 target, C/EBPβ, were coordinately upregulated. Accordingly, overexpression of miR-199a-5p, miR-199a-3p, or miR-214 mimics in cultured HFL epithelial cells decreased COX-2, NF-κB p50/p65, CREB1, and C/EBPβ proteins, with an associated inhibition of SP-A expression. Interestingly, overexpression of the EMT factor, ZEB1, which declines during cAMP-induced type II cell differentiation, increased pri-miR-199a and reduced the expression of the targets NF-κB/p50 and COX-2. Collectively, these findings suggest that the developmental decline in miR-199a/miR-214 in HFL causes increased expression of critical targets that enhance type II cell differentiation and SP-A expression. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project. II. Samples and X-Ray Data Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Ebeling, H.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the measurements of the galaxy cluster mass functions at z ≈ 0.05 and z ≈ 0.5 using high-quality Chandra observations of samples derived from the ROSAT PSPC All-Sky and 400 deg2 surveys. We provide a full reference for the data analysis procedures, present updated calibration of relati...... at a fixed mass threshold, e.g., by a factor of 5.0 ± 1.2 at M 500 = 2.5 × 1014 h –1 M sun between z = 0 and 0.5. This evolution reflects the growth of density perturbations, and can be used for the cosmological constraints complementing those from the distance-redshift relation....

  1. Are clusters of dietary patterns and cluster membership stable over time? Results of a longitudinal cluster analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthouwer, Michel Jean Louis; Oenema, Anke; Soetens, Katja; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2014-11-01

    Developing nutrition education interventions based on clusters of dietary patterns can only be done adequately when it is clear if distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived and reproduced over time, if cluster membership is stable, and if it is predictable which type of people belong to a certain cluster. Hence, this study aimed to: (1) identify clusters of dietary patterns among Dutch adults, (2) test the reproducibility of these clusters and stability of cluster membership over time, and (3) identify sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. This study had a longitudinal design with online measurements at baseline (N=483) and 6 months follow-up (N=379). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed, followed by a K-means cluster analysis. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. At baseline and follow-up, a comparable three-cluster solution was derived, distinguishing a healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy dietary pattern. Male and lower educated participants were significantly more likely to have a less healthy dietary pattern. Further, 251 (66.2%) participants remained in the same cluster, 45 (11.9%) participants changed to an unhealthier cluster, and 83 (21.9%) participants shifted to a healthier cluster. Men and people living alone were significantly more likely to shift toward a less healthy dietary pattern. Distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived. Yet, cluster membership is unstable and only few sociodemographic factors were associated with cluster membership and cluster transition. These findings imply that clusters based on dietary intake may not be suitable as a basis for nutrition education interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Group sequential designs for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayling, Michael J; Wason, James Ms; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-10-01

    The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design has received substantial attention in recent years. Although various extensions to the original design have been proposed, no guidance is available on the design of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. In an individually randomised trial setting, group sequential methods can provide notable efficiency gains and ethical benefits. We address this by discussing how established group sequential methodology can be adapted for stepped-wedge designs. Utilising the error spending approach to group sequential trial design, we detail the assumptions required for the determination of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. We consider early stopping for efficacy, futility, or efficacy and futility. We describe first how this can be done for any specified linear mixed model for data analysis. We then focus on one particular commonly utilised model and, using a recently completed stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial, compare the performance of several designs with interim analyses to the classical stepped-wedge design. Finally, the performance of a quantile substitution procedure for dealing with the case of unknown variance is explored. We demonstrate that the incorporation of early stopping in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designs could reduce the expected sample size under the null and alternative hypotheses by up to 31% and 22%, respectively, with no cost to the trial's type-I and type-II error rates. The use of restricted error maximum likelihood estimation was found to be more important than quantile substitution for controlling the type-I error rate. The addition of interim analyses into stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials could help guard against time-consuming trials conducted on poor performing treatments and also help expedite the implementation of efficacious treatments. In future, trialists should consider incorporating early stopping of some kind into

  3. B plant mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This report further develops the mission for B Plant originally defined in WHC-EP-0722, ''System Engineering Functions and Requirements for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First Issue.'' The B Plant mission analysis will be the basis for a functional analysis that breaks down the B Plant mission statement into the necessary activities to accomplish the mission. These activities are the product of the functional analysis and will then be used in subsequent steps of the systems engineering process, such as identifying requirements and allocating those requirements to B Plant functions. The information in this mission analysis and the functional and requirements analysis are a part of the B Plant technical baseline

  4. The KMOS Cluster Survey (KCS). II. The Effect of Environment on the Structural Properties of Massive Cluster Galaxies at Redshift 1.39 < z < 1.61

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Stott, John P.; Bender, Ralf; Galametz, Audrey; Wilman, David J.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Prichard, Laura J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Wegner, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present results on the structural properties of massive passive galaxies in three clusters at 1.39 R-band sizes of these galaxies are a factor of ∼2–3 smaller than their local counterparts. The slopes of the relation between the stellar mass and the light-weighted size are consistent with recent studies in clusters and the field. Their mass-weighted sizes are smaller than the rest-frame R-band sizes, with an average mass-weighted to light-weighted size ratio that varies between ∼0.45 and 0.8 among the clusters. We find that the median light-weighted size of the passive galaxies in the two more evolved clusters is ∼24% larger than that for field galaxies, independent of the use of circularized effective radii or semimajor axes. These two clusters also show a smaller size ratio than the less evolved cluster, which we investigate using color gradients to probe the underlying {M}* /{L}{{{H}}160} gradients. The median color gradients are ∇z ‑ H ∼ ‑0.4 mag dex‑1, twice the local value. Using stellar populations models, these gradients are best reproduced by a combination of age and metallicity gradients. Our results favor the minor merger scenario as the dominant process responsible for the observed galaxy properties and the environmental differences at this redshift. The environmental differences support that clusters experience accelerated structural evolution compared to the field, likely via an epoch of enhanced minor merger activity during cluster assembly. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; program IDs: 092.A-0210; 093.A-0051; 094.A-0578; 095.A-0137(A); 096.A-0189(A); 097.A-0332(A)). This work is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA HST, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 13687, as well as with the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury

  5. Missions to Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, D. V.; Baines, K. H.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Chassefiere, E.; Chin, G.; Crisp, D.; Esposito, L. W.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Lellouch, E.; Moroz, V. I.; Nagy, A. F.; Owen, T. C.; Oyama, K.-I.; Russell, C. T.; Taylor, F. W.; Young, R. E.

    2002-10-01

    Venus has always been a fascinating objective for planetary studies. At the beginning of the space era Venus became one of the first targets for spacecraft missions. Our neighbour in the solar system and, in size, the twin sister of Earth, Venus was expected to be very similar to our planet. However, the first phase of Venus spacecraft exploration in 1962-1992 by the family of Soviet Venera and Vega spacecraft and US Mariner, Pioneer Venus, and Magellan missions discovered an entirely different, exotic world hidden behind a curtain of dense clouds. These studies gave us a basic knowledge of the conditions on the planet, but generated many more questions concerning the atmospheric composition, chemistry, structure, dynamics, surface-atmosphere interactions, atmospheric and geological evolution, and the plasma environment. Despite all of this exploration by more than 20 spacecraft, the "morning star" still remains a mysterious world. But for more than a decade Venus has been a "forgotten" planet with no new missions featuring in the plans of the world space agencies. Now we are witnessing the revival of interest in this planet: the Venus Orbiter mission is approved in Japan, Venus Express - a European orbiter mission - has successfully passed the selection procedure in ESA, and several Venus Discovery proposals are knocking at the doors of NASA. The paper presents an exciting story of Venus spacecraft exploration, summarizes open scientific problems, and builds a bridge to the future missions.

  6. Clusters and how to make it work : Cluster Strategy Toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manickam, Anu; van Berkel, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Clusters are the magic answer to regional economic development. Firms in clusters are more innovative; cluster policy dominates EU policy; ‘top-sectors’ and excellence are the choice of national policy makers; clusters are ‘in’. But, clusters are complex, clusters are ‘messy’; there is no clear

  7. Cluster dynamics at different cluster size and incident laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Tara; Bernardinello, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    X-ray emission spectra from aluminum clusters of diameter -0.4 μm and gold clusters of dia. ∼1.25 μm are experimentally studied by irradiating the cluster foil targets with 1.06 μm laser, 10 ns (FWHM) at an intensity ∼10 12 W/cm 2 . Aluminum clusters show a different spectra compared to bulk material whereas gold cluster evolve towards bulk gold. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of cluster dimension, laser wavelength and pulse duration. PIC simulations are performed to study the behavior of clusters at higher intensity I≥10 17 W/cm 2 for different size of the clusters irradiated at different laser wavelengths. Results indicate the dependence of cluster dynamics on cluster size and incident laser wavelength

  8. Constraints on Ωm and σ8 from the potential-based cluster temperature function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrick, Christian; Pace, Francesco; Bartelmann, Matthias; Roncarelli, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The abundance of galaxy clusters is in principle a powerful tool to constrain cosmological parameters, especially Ωm and σ8, due to the exponential dependence in the high-mass regime. While the best observables are the X-ray temperature and luminosity, the abundance of galaxy clusters, however, is conventionally predicted as a function of mass. Hence, the intrinsic scatter and the uncertainties in the scaling relations between mass and either temperature or luminosity lower the reliability of galaxy clusters to constrain cosmological parameters. In this article, we further refine the X-ray temperature function for galaxy clusters by Angrick et al., which is based on the statistics of perturbations in the cosmic gravitational potential and proposed to replace the classical mass-based temperature function, by including a refined analytic merger model and compare the theoretical prediction to results from a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. Although we find already a good agreement if we compare with a cluster temperature function based on the mass-weighted temperature, including a redshift-dependent scaling between mass-based and spectroscopic temperature yields even better agreement between theoretical model and numerical results. As a proof of concept, incorporating this additional scaling in our model, we constrain the cosmological parameters Ωm and σ8 from an X-ray sample of galaxy clusters and tentatively find agreement with the recent cosmic microwave background based results from the Planck mission at 1σ-level.

  9. Going beyond clustering in MD trajectory analysis: an application to villin headpiece folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Rajan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in computing technology have enabled microsecond long all-atom molecular dynamics (MD simulations of biological systems. Methods that can distill the salient features of such large trajectories are now urgently needed. Conventional clustering methods used to analyze MD trajectories suffer from various setbacks, namely (i they are not data driven, (ii they are unstable to noise and changes in cut-off parameters such as cluster radius and cluster number, and (iii they do not reduce the dimensionality of the trajectories, and hence are unsuitable for finding collective coordinates. We advocate the application of principal component analysis (PCA and a non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS method to reduce MD trajectories and overcome the drawbacks of clustering. To illustrate the superiority of nMDS over other methods in reducing data and reproducing salient features, we analyze three complete villin headpiece folding trajectories. Our analysis suggests that the folding process of the villin headpiece is structurally heterogeneous.

  10. Text Clustering Algorithm Based on Random Cluster Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays clustering has become a popular text mining algorithm, but the huge data can put forward higher requirements for the accuracy and performance of text mining. In view of the performance bottleneck of traditional text clustering algorithm, this paper proposes a text clustering algorithm with random features. This is a kind of clustering algorithm based on text density, at the same time using the neighboring heuristic rules, the concept of random cluster is introduced, which effectively reduces the complexity of the distance calculation.

  11. Cluster computing for lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coddington, P.D.; Williams, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    main application is lattice QCD calculations. We have a number of programs for generating and analysing lattice QCD configurations. These programs are written in a data parallel style using Fortran 90 array syntax. Initially they were run on the CM-5 by using CM Fortran compiler directives for specifying data distribution among the processors of the parallel machine. It was a simple task to convert these codes to use the equivalent directives for High Performance Fortran (HPF), which is a standard, portable data parallel language that can be used on clusters. We have used the Portland Group HPF compiler (PGHPF), which offers good support for cluster computing. We benchmarked our codes on a number of different types of machine, before eventually deciding to purchase a large cluster from Sun Microsystems, which was installed at Adelaide University in June 2000. With a peak performance of 144 GFlops, it is currently the fastest computer in Australia. The machine is a new product from Sun, known as a Sun Technical Compute Farm (TCF). It consists of a cluster of Sun E420R workstations, each of which has four 450MHz UltraSPARC II processors, with a peak speed of 3.6 GFlops per workstation. The NCFLGT cluster consists of 40 E420R workstations, giving a total of 160 processors, 160 GBytes of memory, 640 MBytes of cache memory, and 720 GBytes of disk. The standard Sun TCF product comes with either Fast or Gigabit Ethernet, with an option for using a very high-bandwidth, low-latency SCI network targeted at parallel computing applications. For most parallel lattice QCD codes, Ethernet does not offer a low enough communications latency, while SCI is very expensive and is overkill for our applications. We therefore decided upon a third-party solution for the network, and will soon be installing a high-speed Myrinet 2000 network. Currently we only have very preliminary performance results for our lattice QCD codes, which look quite promising. We will present detailed performance

  12. METAL DEFICIENCY IN CLUSTER STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT Z = 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentino, F.; Daddi, E.; Strazzullo, V.; Gobat, R.; Bournaud, F.; Juneau, S.; Zanella, A. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Onodera, M.; Carollo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich Wolfgang-Pauli-strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Renzini, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Arimoto, N., E-mail: francesco.valentino@cea.fr [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the environmental effect on the metal enrichment of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the farthest spectroscopically confirmed and X-ray-detected cluster, CL J1449+0856 at z = 1.99. We combined Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 G141 slitless spectroscopic data, our thirteen-band photometry, and a recent Subaru/Multi-object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up to constrain the physical properties of SFGs in CL J1449+0856 and in a mass-matched field sample. After a conservative removal of active galactic nuclei, stacking individual MOIRCS spectra of 6 (31) sources in the cluster (field) in the mass range 10 ≤ log(M/M{sub ⊙}) ≤ 11, we find a ∼4σ lower [N ii]/Hα ratio in the cluster than in the field. Stacking a subsample of 16 field galaxies with Hβ and [O iii] in the observed range, we measure an [O iii]/Hβ ratio fully compatible with the cluster value. Converting these ratios into metallicities, we find that the cluster SFGs are up to 0.25 dex poorer in metals than their field counterparts, depending on the adopted calibration. The low metallicity in cluster sources is confirmed using alternative indicators. Furthermore, we observe a significantly higher Hα luminosity and equivalent width in the average cluster spectrum than in the field. This is likely due to the enhanced specific star formation rate; even if lower dust reddening and/or an uncertain environmental dependence on the continuum-to-nebular emission differential reddening may play a role. Our findings might be explained by the accretion of pristine gas around galaxies at z = 2 and from cluster-scale reservoirs, possibly connected with a phase of rapid halo mass assembly at z > 2 and of a high galaxy merging rate.

  13. On clusters and clustering from atoms to fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, PJ

    1993-01-01

    This book attempts to answer why there is so much interest in clusters. Clusters occur on all length scales, and as a result occur in a variety of fields. Clusters are interesting scientifically, but they also have important consequences technologically. The division of the book into three parts roughly separates the field into small, intermediate, and large-scale clusters. Small clusters are the regime of atomic and molecular physics and chemistry. The intermediate regime is the transitional regime, with its characteristics including the onset of bulk-like behavior, growth and aggregation, a

  14. C II 158 ??bservations of a Sample of Late-type Galaxies from the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, K.; Volk, H.; Heinrichsen, I.; Hippelein, H.; Metcalfe, L.; Pierini, D.; Popescu, C.; Tuffs, R.; Xu, C.

    1999-01-01

    We have observed 19 Virgo cluster spiral galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) obtaining spectra around the [CII] 157.741 ??ine structure line.

  15. Source location of chorus emissions observed by Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  16. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  17. SAC-C mission, an example of international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, F.; Alonso, C.; Hofmann, C.; Nollmann, I.

    In comp liance with the objectives established in the National Space Program, Argentina in Space 1997-2008 ((Plan Espacial Nacional, Argentina en el Espacio 1997-2008), the National Commission on Space Activities (Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales - CONAE) undertook the design, construction, and launching of the SAC-C satellite in close collaboration with NASA. The purpose of this Mission is to carry out observations of interest both for the USA and Argentina, thus contributing effectively to NASA's Earth Science Program and to CONAE's National Space Program. The SAC-C is an international Earth observing satellite mission conceived as a partnership between CONAE and NASA, with additional support in instrumentation and satellite development from the Danish DSRI, the Italian ASI, the French CNES and the Brazilian INPE. A Delta II rocket successfully launched it on November 21st, 2000, from Vandenberg AFB, California, USA. Ten instruments on board the SAC-C perform different studies related to the ground and sea ecosystems, the atmosphere and the geomagnetic field. There are also technological experiments for determination of the satellite attitude and velocity as well as for the studies of the influence of space radiation on advanced electronic components . The inclusion of SAC-C in the AM Constellation, jointly with NASA satellites Landsat 7, EO 1 and Terra, is another example of important international cooperation which synergies the output of any single Mission. The Constellation has been working since March 2001 as a single mission and several cooperative activities have been undertaken including several jointly sponsored technical workshops and collaborative spacecraft navigation experiments. A flight campaign of the NASA AVIRIS instrument was performed in Argentine during January and February 2001, for calibration of SAC-C and EO 1 cameras and the development of joint scientific works. In Cordoba Space Center a jointly operated ground GPS reference

  18. X-ray emission from clusters and groups of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Recent major advances in x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of clusters have allowed the determination of their mass and mass profile out to ≈1/2 the virial radius. In rich clusters, most of the baryonic mass is in the gas phase, and the ratio of mass in gas/stars varies by a factor of 2–4. The baryonic fractions vary by a factor of ≈3 from cluster to cluster and almost always exceed 0.09 h50−[3/2] and thus are in fundamental conflict with the assumption of Ω = 1 and the results of big bang nucleosynthesis. The derived Fe abundances are 0.2–0.45 solar, and the abundances of O and Si for low redshift systems are 0.6–1.0 solar. This distribution is consistent with an origin in pure type II supernova. The amount of light and energy produced by these supernovae is very large, indicating their importance in influencing the formation of clusters and galaxies. The lack of evolution of Fe to a redshift of z ≈ 0.4 argues for very early enrichment of the cluster gas. Groups show a wide range of abundances, 0.1–0.5 solar. The results of an x-ray survey indicate that the contribution of groups to the mass density of the universe is likely to be larger than 0.1 h50−2. Many of the very poor groups have large x-ray halos and are filled with small galaxies whose velocity dispersion is a good match to the x-ray temperatures. PMID:9419327

  19. Artificial intelligence for multi-mission planetary operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.; Lawson, Denise L.; James, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to an automated system called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP). SHARP is designed to demonstrate automated health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The SHARP system combines conventional computer science methodologies with artificial intelligence techniques to produce an effective method for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems. The system performs real-time analysis of spacecraft and other related telemetry, and is also capable of examining data in historical context. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager II spacecraft is the initial focus for evaluation of the prototype in a real-time operations setting during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August, 1989. The preliminary results of the SHARP project and plans for future application of the technology are discussed.

  20. Spectroscopy of chromospheric lines of giants in the globular cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Hartmann, Lee; Smith, Graeme H.; Rodgers, A. W.; Roberts, W. H.; Zucker, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of chromospheric transitions (Mg II, H-alpha, and Ca II K) from two red giants (A31 and A59) in the globular cluster NGC 6572 were made with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and the coude spectrograph of the 1.9 m telescope at the Mount Stromlo Observatory. These measurements give evidence for chromospheric activity and outward motions within the atmospheres. The surface flux of the Mg II emission is comparable to that in disk population giants of similar (B-V) color. The Mg II profiles are asymmetric, which is most likely caused by absorption in an expanding stellar atmosphere and/or by possible interstellar features. Notches are found in the core of the H-alpha line of A59, which are similar to those found in Cepheids. This suggests that shocks are present in the atmosphere of A59 and indicates that hydrodynamic phenomena are influencing the levvel of chromospheric emission and producing upper atmospheric motions which may lead to mass loss.

  1. MetaABC--an integrated metagenomics platform for data adjustment, binning and clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chien-Hao; Hsu, Ming-Tsung; Wang, Tse-Yi; Chiang, Sufeng; Cheng, Jen-Hao; Weng, Francis C; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Wang, Daryi; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2011-08-15

    MetaABC is a metagenomic platform that integrates several binning tools coupled with methods for removing artifacts, analyzing unassigned reads and controlling sampling biases. It allows users to arrive at a better interpretation via series of distinct combinations of analysis tools. After execution, MetaABC provides outputs in various visual formats such as tables, pie and bar charts as well as clustering result diagrams. MetaABC source code and documentation are available at http://bits2.iis.sinica.edu.tw/MetaABC/ CONTACT: dywang@gate.sinica.edu.tw; hktsai@iis.sinica.edu.tw Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Cluster and principal component analysis based on SSR markers of Amomum tsao-ko in Jinping County of Yunnan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengli; Lei, En; Meng, Hengling; Wang, Tiantao; Xie, Linyan; Shen, Dong; Xianwang, Zhou; Lu, Bingyue

    2017-08-01

    Amomum tsao-ko is a commercial plant that used for various purposes in medicinal and food industries. For the present investigation, 44 germplasm samples were collected from Jinping County of Yunnan Province. Clusters analysis and 2-dimensional principal component analysis (PCA) was used to represent the genetic relations among Amomum tsao-ko by using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Clustering analysis clearly distinguished the samples groups. Two major clusters were formed; first (Cluster I) consisted of 34 individuals, the second (Cluster II) consisted of 10 individuals, Cluster I as the main group contained multiple sub-clusters. PCA also showed 2 groups: PCA Group 1 included 29 individuals, PCA Group 2 included 12 individuals, consistent with the results of cluster analysis. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide information on genetic relationship of Amomum tsao-ko germplasm resources in main producing areas, also provide a theoretical basis for the protection and utilization of Amomum tsao-ko resources.

  3. Differential pattern of semantic memory organization between bipolar I and II disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae Seung; Choi, Sungwon; Ha, Kyooseob; Ha, Tae Hyon; Cho, Hyun Sang; Choi, Jung Eun; Cha, Boseok; Moon, Eunsoo

    2011-06-01

    Semantic cognition is one of the key factors in psychosocial functioning. The aim of this study was to explore the differences in pattern of semantic memory organization between euthymic patients with bipolar I and II disorders using the category fluency task. Study participants included 23 euthymic subjects with bipolar I disorder, 23 matched euthymic subjects with bipolar II disorder and 23 matched control subjects. All participants were assessed for verbal learning, recall, learning strategies, and fluency. The combined methods of hierarchical clustering and multidimensional scaling were used to compare the pattern of semantic memory organization among the three groups. Quantitative measures of verbal learning, recall, learning strategies, and fluency did not differ between the three groups. A two-cluster structure of semantic memory organization was identified for the three groups. Semantic structure was more disorganized in the bipolar I disorder group compared to the bipolar II disorder. In addition, patients with bipolar II disorder used less elaborate strategies of semantic memory organization than those of controls. Compared to healthy controls, strategies for categorization in semantic memory appear to be less knowledge-based in patients with bipolar disorders. A differential pattern of semantic memory organization between bipolar I and II disorders indicates a higher risk of cognitive abnormalities in patients with bipolar I disorder compared to patients with bipolar II disorder. Exploring qualitative nature of neuropsychological domains may provide an explanatory insight into the characteristic behaviors of patients with bipolar disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GibbsCluster: unsupervised clustering and alignment of peptide sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Alvarez, Bruno; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    motif characterizing each cluster. Several parameters are available to customize cluster analysis, including adjustable penalties for small clusters and overlapping groups and a trash cluster to remove outliers. As an example application, we used the server to deconvolute multiple specificities in large......-scale peptidome data generated by mass spectrometry. The server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GibbsCluster-2.0....

  5. Redetermination of (d-penicillaminatolead(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Schell

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title coordination polymer, [Pb(C5H9NO2S]n {systematic name: catena-poly[(μ-2-amino-3-methyl-3-sulfidobutanoatolead(II]}, the d-penicillaminate ligand coordinates to the metal ion in an N,S,O-tridentate mode. The S atom acts as a bridge to two neighbouring PbII ions, thereby forming a double thiolate chain. Moreover, the coordinating carboxylate O atom forms bridges to the PbII ions in the adjacent chain. The overall coordination sphere of the PbII ion can be described as a highly distorted pentagonal bipyramid with a void in the equatorial plane between the long Pb—S bonds probably occupied by the stereochemically active inert electron pair. The amino H atoms form N—H...S and N—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a cluster of four complex units, giving rise to an R44(16 ring lying in the ab plane. The crystal structure of the title compound has been reported previously [Freeman et al. (1974. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun. pp. 366–367] but the atomic coordinates have not been deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (refcode DPENPB. Additional details of the hydrogen bonding are presented here.

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Neutrophilic Iron(II Oxidizer Genomes for Candidate Genes in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomei He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular electron transfer (EET is recognized as a key biochemical process in circumneutral pH Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB. In this study, we searched for candidate EET genes in 73 neutrophilic FeOB genomes, among which 43 genomes are complete or close-to-complete and the rest have estimated genome completeness ranging from 5 to 91%. These neutrophilic FeOB span members of the microaerophilic, anaerobic phototrophic, and anaerobic nitrate-reducing FeOB groups. We found that many microaerophilic and several anaerobic FeOB possess homologs of Cyc2, an outer membrane cytochrome c originally identified in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The “porin-cytochrome c complex” (PCC gene clusters homologous to MtoAB/PioAB are present in eight FeOB, accounting for 19% of complete and close-to-complete genomes examined, whereas PCC genes homologous to OmbB-OmaB-OmcB in Geobacter sulfurreducens are absent. Further, we discovered gene clusters that may potentially encode two novel PCC types. First, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC3” encodes a porin, an extracellular and a periplasmic cytochrome c with remarkably large numbers of heme-binding motifs. Second, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC4” encodes a porin and three periplasmic multiheme cytochromes c. A conserved inner membrane protein (IMP encoded in PCC3 and PCC4 gene clusters might be responsible for translocating electrons across the inner membrane. Other bacteria possessing PCC3 and PCC4 are mostly Proteobacteria isolated from environments with a potential niche for Fe(II oxidation. In addition to cytochrome c, multicopper oxidase (MCO genes potentially involved in Fe(II oxidation were also identified. Notably, candidate EET genes were not found in some FeOB, especially the anaerobic ones, probably suggesting EET genes or Fe(II oxidation mechanisms are different from the searched models. Overall, based on current EET models, the search extends our understanding of bacterial EET and

  7. Solar Probe Plus: A NASA Mission to Touch the SunMission Status Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, N. J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar Probe Plus (SPP), currently in Phase D, will be the first mission to fly into the low solar corona, revealing how the corona is heated and the solar wind and energetic particles are accelerated, solving fundamental mysteries that have been top priority science goals since such a mission was first proposed in 1958. The scale and concept of such a mission has been revised at intervals since that time, yet the core has always been a close encounter with the Sun. The primary science goal of the Solar Probe Plus mission is to determine the structure and dynamics of the Sun's coronal magnetic field, understand how the solar corona and wind are heated and accelerated, and determine what mechanisms accelerate and transport energetic particles. SPP uses an innovative mission design, significant technology development and a risk-reducing engineering development to meet the SPP science objectives. In this presentation, we provide an update on the progress of the Solar Probe Plus mission as we prepare for the July 2018 launch.

  8. OGLE II Eclipsing Binaries In The LMC: Analysis With Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, Edward J.; Prsa, A.; Guinan, E. F.; DeGeorge, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Eclipsing Binaries (EBs) via Artificial Intelligence (EBAI) Project is applying machine learning techniques to elucidate the nature of EBs. Previously, Prsa, et al. applied artificial neural networks (ANNs) trained on physically-realistic Wilson-Devinney models to solve the light curves of the 1882 detached EBs in the LMC discovered by the OGLE II Project (Wyrzykowski, et al.) fully automatically, bypassing the need for manually-derived starting solutions. A curious result is the non-monotonic distribution of the temperature ratio parameter T2/T1, featuring a subsidiary peak noted previously by Mazeh, et al. in an independent analysis using the EBOP EB solution code (Tamuz, et al.). To explore this and to gain a fuller understanding of the multivariate EBAI LMC observational plus solutions data, we have employed automatic clustering and advanced visualization (CAV) techniques. Clustering the OGLE II data aggregates objects that are similar with respect to many parameter dimensions. Measures of similarity for example, could include the multidimensional Euclidean Distance between data objects, although other measures may be appropriate. Applying clustering, we find good evidence that the T2/T1 subsidiary peak is due to evolved binaries, in support of Mazeh et al.'s speculation. Further, clustering suggests that the LMC detached EBs occupying the main sequence region belong to two distinct classes. Also identified as a separate cluster in the multivariate data are stars having a Period-I band relation. Derekas et al. had previously found a Period-K band relation for LMC EBs discovered by the MACHO Project (Alcock, et al.). We suggest such CAV techniques will prove increasingly useful for understanding the large, multivariate datasets increasingly being produced in astronomy. We are grateful for the support of this research from NSF/RUI Grant AST-05-75042 f.

  9. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  10. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  11. Comparison of Bayesian clustering and edge detection methods for inferring boundaries in landscape genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safner, T.; Miller, M.P.; McRae, B.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Manel, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, techniques available for identifying clusters of individuals or boundaries between clusters using genetic data from natural populations have expanded rapidly. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate these different techniques. We used spatially-explicit simulation models to compare three spatial Bayesian clustering programs and two edge detection methods. Spatially-structured populations were simulated where a continuous population was subdivided by barriers. We evaluated the ability of each method to correctly identify boundary locations while varying: (i) time after divergence, (ii) strength of isolation by distance, (iii) level of genetic diversity, and (iv) amount of gene flow across barriers. To further evaluate the methods' effectiveness to detect genetic clusters in natural populations, we used previously published data on North American pumas and a European shrub. Our results show that with simulated and empirical data, the Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms outperformed direct edge detection methods. All methods incorrectly detected boundaries in the presence of strong patterns of isolation by distance. Based on this finding, we support the application of Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms for boundary detection in empirical datasets, with necessary tests for the influence of isolation by distance. ?? 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  12. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  13. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 550 E. Tyler Mall, Room PSF-686 (P.O. Box 871404), Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA (United States); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia); Knezek, Patricia M., E-mail: karen.knierman@asu.edu, E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu, E-mail: tveach@asu.edu, E-mail: cgroppi@asu.edu, E-mail: mullan@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au, E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu [WIYN Consortium, Inc., 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 {mu}m [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous H{alpha} sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter H{alpha} source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation.

  14. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher; Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Knezek, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio ∼4: 1 occurring ∼200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and Hα narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 μm [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous Hα sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter Hα source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation

  15. Synergies Between the Kepler, K2 and TESS Missions with the PLATO Mission (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2017-01-01

    Two transit survey missions will have been flown by NASA prior to the launch of ESA's PLATO Mission in 2026, laying the groundwork for exoplanet discovery via the transit method. The Kepler Mission, which launched in 2009, collected data on its 100+ square degree field of view for four years before failure of a reaction wheel ended its primary mission. The results from Kepler include 2300+ confirmed or validated exoplanets, 2200+ planetary candidates, 2100+ eclipsing binaries. Kepler also revolutionized the field of asteroseismology by measuring the pressure mode oscillations of over 15000 solar-like stars spanning the lifecycle of such stars from hydrogen-burning dwarfs to helium-burning red giants. The re-purposed Kepler Mission, dubbed K2, continues to observe fields of view in and near the ecliptic plane for 80 days each, significantly broadening the scope of the astrophysical investigations as well as discovering an additional 156 exoplanets to date. The TESS mission will launch in 2017 to conduct an all-sky survey for small exoplanets orbiting stars 10X closer and 100X brighter than Kepler exoplanet host stars, allowing for far greater follow-up and characterization of their masses as well as their sizes for at least 50 small planets. Future assets such as James Webb Space Telescope, and ground-based assets such as ESOs Very Large Telescope (VLT) array, the Exremely Large Telescope (ELT), and the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be able to characterize the atmospheric composition and properties of these small planets. TESS will observe each 24 X 96 field of view for 30 days and thereby cover first the southern and then the northern hemisphere over 13 pointings during each year of the primary mission. The pole-most camera will observe the James Webb continuous viewing zone for one year in each hemisphere, permitting much longer period planets to be detected in this region. The PLATO mission will seek to detect habitable Earth-like planets with an instrument

  16. EUCLID mission design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Oswald; Ergenzinger, Klaus; Tuttle, Sean; Vaillon, L.; Johann, Ulrich

    2017-11-01

    EUCLID, a medium-class mission candidate of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Program, currently in Definition Phase (Phase A/B1), shall map the geometry of the Dark Universe by investigating dark matter distributions, the distance-redshift relationship, and the evolution of cosmic structures. EUCLID consists of a 1.2 m telescope and two scientific instruments for ellipticity and redshift measurements in the visible and nearinfrared wavelength regime. We present a design concept of the EUCLID mission which is fully compliant with the mission requirements. Preliminary concepts of the spacecraft and of the payload including the scientific instruments are discussed.

  17. Mission operations technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsi, Giulio

    In the last decade, the operation of a spacecraft after launch has emerged as a major component of the total cost of the mission. This trend is sustained by the increasing complexity, flexibility, and data gathering capability of the space assets and by their greater reliability and consequent longevity. The trend can, however, be moderated by the progressive transfer of selected functions from the ground to the spacecraft and by application, on the ground, of new technology. Advances in ground operations derive from the introduction in the mission operations environment of advanced microprocessor-based workstations in the class of a few million instructions per second and from the selective application of artificial intelligence technology. In the last few years a number of these applications have been developed, tested in operational settings and successfully demonstrated to users. Some are now being integrated in mission operations facilities. An analysis of mission operations indicates that the key areas are: concurrent control of multiple missions; automated/interactive production of command sequences of high integrity at low cost; automated monitoring of spacecraft health and automated aides for fault diagnosis; automated allocation of resources; automated processing of science data; and high-fidelity, high-speed spacecraft simulation. Examples of major advances in selected areas are described.

  18. Testing lowered isothermal models with direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - II. Multimass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuten, M.; Zocchi, A.; Gieles, M.; Hénault-Brunet, V.

    2017-09-01

    Lowered isothermal models, such as the multimass Michie-King models, have been successful in describing observational data of globular clusters. In this study, we assess whether such models are able to describe the phase space properties of evolutionary N-body models. We compare the multimass models as implemented in limepy (Gieles & Zocchi) to N-body models of star clusters with different retention fractions for the black holes and neutron stars evolving in a tidal field. We find that multimass models successfully reproduce the density and velocity dispersion profiles of the different mass components in all evolutionary phases and for different remnants retention. We further use these results to study the evolution of global model parameters. We find that over the lifetime of clusters, radial anisotropy gradually evolves from the low- to the high-mass components and we identify features in the properties of observable stars that are indicative of the presence of stellar-mass black holes. We find that the model velocity scale depends on mass as m-δ, with δ ≃ 0.5 for almost all models, but the dependence of central velocity dispersion on m can be shallower, depending on the dark remnant content, and agrees well with that of the N-body models. The reported model parameters, and correlations amongst them, can be used as theoretical priors when fitting these types of mass models to observational data.

  19. Liquid Effluents Program mission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    Systems engineering is being used to identify work to cleanup the Hanford Site. The systems engineering process transforms an identified mission need into a set of performance parameters and a preferred system configuration. Mission analysis is the first step in the process. Mission analysis supports early decision-making by clearly defining the program objectives, and evaluating the feasibility and risks associated with achieving those objectives. The results of the mission analysis provide a consistent basis for subsequent systems engineering work. A mission analysis was performed earlier for the overall Hanford Site. This work was continued by a ''capstone'' team which developed a top-level functional analysis. Continuing in a top-down manner, systems engineering is now being applied at the program and project levels. A mission analysis was conducted for the Liquid Effluents Program. The results are described herein. This report identifies the initial conditions and acceptable final conditions, defines the programmatic and physical interfaces and sources of constraints, estimates the resources to carry out the mission, and establishes measures of success. The mission analysis reflects current program planning for the Liquid Effluents Program as described in Liquid Effluents FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan

  20. Numerical simulation support to the ESA/THOR mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, F.; Servidio, S.; Perri, S.; Perrone, D.; De Marco, R.; Marcucci, M. F.; Daniele, B.; Bruno, R.; Camporeale, E.

    2016-12-01

    THOR is a spacecraft concept currently undergoing study phase as acandidate for the next ESA medium size mission M4. THOR has been designedto solve the longstanding physical problems of particle heating andenergization in turbulent plasmas. It will provide high resolutionmeasurements of electromagnetic fields and particle distribution functionswith unprecedented resolution, with the aim of exploring the so-calledkinetic scales. We present the numerical simulation framework which is supporting the THOR mission during the study phase. The THOR teamincludes many scientists developing and running different simulation codes(Eulerian-Vlasov, Particle-In-Cell, Gyrokinetics, Two-fluid, MHD, etc.),addressing the physics of plasma turbulence, shocks, magnetic reconnectionand so on.These numerical codes are being used during the study phase, mainly withthe aim of addressing the following points:(i) to simulate the response of real particle instruments on board THOR, byemploying an electrostatic analyser simulator which mimics the response ofthe CSW, IMS and TEA instruments to the particle velocity distributions ofprotons, alpha particle and electrons, as obtained from kinetic numericalsimulations of plasma turbulence.(ii) to compare multi-spacecraft with single-spacecraft configurations inmeasuring current density, by making use of both numerical models ofsynthetic turbulence and real data from MMS spacecraft.(iii) to investigate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis indifferent configurations of plasma turbulence

  1. Enabling the First Interstellar Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, P.

    2017-12-01

    All propulsion systems that leave the Earth are based on chemical reactions. Chemical reactions, at best, have an efficiency compared to rest mass of 10-10 (or about 1eV per bond). All the mass in the universe converted to chemical reactions would not propel even a single proton to relativistic speeds. While chemistry will get us to Mars it will not allow interstellar capability in any reasonable mission time. Barring new physics we are left with few realistic solutions. None of our current propulsion systems, including nuclear, are capable of the relativistic speeds needed for exploring the many nearby stellar systems and exo-planets. However recent advances in photonics and directed energy systems now allow us to realize what was only a decade ago, simply science fiction, namely the ability to seriously conceive of and plan for relativistic flight. From fully-functional gram-level wafer-scale spacecraft capable of speeds greater than c/4 that could reach the nearest star in 20 years to spacecraft for large missions capable of supporting human life with masses more than 105 kg (100 tons) for rapid interplanetary transit that could reach speeds of greater than 1000 km/s can be realized. With this technology spacecraft can be propelled to speeds currently unimaginable. Photonics, like electronics, and unlike chemical propulsion is an exponential technology with a current double time of about 20 months. This is the key. The cost of such a system is amortized over the essentially unlimited number of launches. In addition, the same photon driver can be used for many other purposes including beamed energy to power high Isp ion engines, remote asteroid composition analysis and planetary defense. This would be a profound change in human capability with enormous implications. Known as Starlight we are now in a NASA Phase II study. The FY 2017 congressional appropriations request directs NASA to study the feasibility of an interstellar mission to coincide with the 100th

  2. Integrated Human-Robotic Missions to the Moon and Mars: Mission Operations Design Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Andrew; Lee, Young; Korth, David; LeBlanc, Troy

    2007-01-01

    For most of the history of space exploration, human and robotic programs have been independent, and have responded to distinct requirements. The NASA Vision for Space Exploration calls for the return of humans to the Moon, and the eventual human exploration of Mars; the complexity of this range of missions will require an unprecedented use of automation and robotics in support of human crews. The challenges of human Mars missions, including roundtrip communications time delays of 6 to 40 minutes, interplanetary transit times of many months, and the need to manage lifecycle costs, will require the evolution of a new mission operations paradigm far less dependent on real-time monitoring and response by an Earthbound operations team. Robotic systems and automation will augment human capability, increase human safety by providing means to perform many tasks without requiring immediate human presence, and enable the transfer of traditional mission control tasks from the ground to crews. Developing and validating the new paradigm and its associated infrastructure may place requirements on operations design for nearer-term lunar missions. The authors, representing both the human and robotic mission operations communities, assess human lunar and Mars mission challenges, and consider how human-robot operations may be integrated to enable efficient joint operations, with the eventual emergence of a unified exploration operations culture.

  3. GRACE Status at Mission End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapley, B. D.; Flechtner, F. M.; Watkins, M. M.; Bettadpur, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    The twin satellites of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) were launched on March 17, 2002 and have operated for nearly 16 years. The mission objectives are to observe the spatial and temporal variations of the Earth's mass through its effects on the gravity field at the GRACE satellite altitude. The mass changes observed are related to both the changes within the solid earth and the change within and between the Erath system components. A significant cause of the time varying mass is water motion and the GRACE mission has provided a continuous decade long measurement sequence which characterizes the seasonal cycle of mass transport between the oceans, land, cryosphere and atmosphere; its inter-annual variability; and the climate driven secular, or long period, mass transport signals. The fifth reanalysis on the mission data set, the RL05 data, were released in mid-2013. With the planned launch of GRACE Follow-On in early 2018, plans are underway for a reanalysis that will be consistent with the GRACE FO processing standards. The mission is entering the final phases of its operation life with mission end expected to occur in early 2018. The current mission operations strategy emphasizes extending the mission lifetime to obtain an overlap with the GRACE FO. This presentation will review the mission status and the projections for mission lifetime, describe the current operations philosophy and its impact on the science data, discuss the issues related to achieving the GRACE and GRACE FO connection and discuss issues related to science data products during this phase of the mission period.

  4. Planck intermediate results. VI. The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planck Collaboration, [Unknown; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to its full sky coverage. One of the SZ candidates detected inthe early months of the mission near to the signal-to-noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was

  5. Proof tests of irradiated and unirradiated EBR-II subassembly ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Chopra, P.S.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1977-01-01

    A series of dynamic pressure tests have been conducted within EBR-II subassembly ducts. The tests were designed to simulate bursting of a driver-fuel element in a cluster of such elements at their burnup limit during off-normal conditions in EBR-II. The major objective of the tests was to assure that such failure, which might cause rapid release of stored fission gas, would not deform or otherwise damage subassembly ducts in a way that would hinder movement of a control rod. The test results are described

  6. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country...... of this handbook, which focuses on the role of CSR in MSMEs. Hence we contribute to the literature on CSR in industrial clusters and specifically CSR in Indian industrial clusters by investigating the drivers of CSR in India’s industrial clusters....

  7. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  8. A Multilevel Gamma-Clustering Layout Algorithm for Visualization of Biological Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruz, Tomas; Lucas, Christoph; Laule, Oliver; Zimmermann, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of large complex networks has become an indispensable part of systems biology, where organisms need to be considered as one complex system. The visualization of the corresponding network is challenging due to the size and density of edges. In many cases, the use of standard visualization algorithms can lead to high running times and poorly readable visualizations due to many edge crossings. We suggest an approach that analyzes the structure of the graph first and then generates a new graph which contains specific semantic symbols for regular substructures like dense clusters. We propose a multilevel gamma-clustering layout visualization algorithm (MLGA) which proceeds in three subsequent steps: (i) a multilevel γ-clustering is used to identify the structure of the underlying network, (ii) the network is transformed to a tree, and (iii) finally, the resulting tree which shows the network structure is drawn using a variation of a force-directed algorithm. The algorithm has a potential to visualize very large networks because it uses modern clustering heuristics which are optimized for large graphs. Moreover, most of the edges are removed from the visual representation which allows keeping the overview over complex graphs with dense subgraphs. PMID:23864855

  9. The Dimanganese(II) Site of Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (MIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) use a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor, Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet}, in their homodimeric NrdF ({beta}2) subunit to initiate reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The structure of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} form of NrdF is an important component in understanding O{sub 2}-mediated formation of the active metallocofactor, a subject of much interest because a unique flavodoxin, NrdI, is required for cofactor assembly. Biochemical studies and sequence alignments suggest that NrdF and NrdI proteins diverge into three phylogenetically distinct groups. The only crystal structure to date of a NrdF with a fully ordered and occupied dimanganese site is that of Escherichia coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, prototypical of the enzymes from actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, representative of the enzymes from a second group, from Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The structures of the metal clusters in the {beta}2 dimer are distinct from those observed in E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF. These differences illustrate the key role that solvent molecules and protein residues in the second coordination sphere of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} cluster play in determining conformations of carboxylate residues at the metal sites and demonstrate that diverse coordination geometries are capable of serving as starting points for Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly in class Ib RNRs.

  10. Detection of protein complex from protein-protein interaction network using Markov clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochieng, P J; Kusuma, W A; Haryanto, T

    2017-01-01

    Detection of complexes, or groups of functionally related proteins, is an important challenge while analysing biological networks. However, existing algorithms to identify protein complexes are insufficient when applied to dense networks of experimentally derived interaction data. Therefore, we introduced a graph clustering method based on Markov clustering algorithm to identify protein complex within highly interconnected protein-protein interaction networks. Protein-protein interaction network was first constructed to develop geometrical network, the network was then partitioned using Markov clustering to detect protein complexes. The interest of the proposed method was illustrated by its application to Human Proteins associated to type II diabetes mellitus. Flow simulation of MCL algorithm was initially performed and topological properties of the resultant network were analysed for detection of the protein complex. The results indicated the proposed method successfully detect an overall of 34 complexes with 11 complexes consisting of overlapping modules and 20 non-overlapping modules. The major complex consisted of 102 proteins and 521 interactions with cluster modularity and density of 0.745 and 0.101 respectively. The comparison analysis revealed MCL out perform AP, MCODE and SCPS algorithms with high clustering coefficient (0.751) network density and modularity index (0.630). This demonstrated MCL was the most reliable and efficient graph clustering algorithm for detection of protein complexes from PPI networks. (paper)

  11. Overview of Mission Design for NASA Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Nathan; Landau, Damon; McElrath, Timothy; Lantoine, Gregory; Lam, Try; McGuire, Melissa; Burke, Laura; Martini, Michael; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    Part of NASA's new asteroid initiative would be a robotic mission to capture a roughly four to ten meter asteroid and redirect its orbit to place it in translunar space. Once in a stable storage orbit at the Moon, astronauts would then visit the asteroid for science investigations, to test in space resource extraction, and to develop experience with human deep space missions. This paper discusses the mission design techniques that would enable the redirection of a 100-1000 metric ton asteroid into lunar orbit with a 40-50 kW Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) system.

  12. Emerging Massive Star Clusters Revealed: High-Resolution Imaging of NGC 4449 from the Radio to the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reines, Amy E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Goss, W. M.

    2008-06-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of embedded massive clusters in the nearby (3.9 Mpc) starburst galaxy NGC 4449 in an effort to uncover the earliest phases of massive cluster evolution. By combining high-resolution imaging from the radio to the ultraviolet, we reveal these clusters to be in the process of emerging from their gaseous and dusty birth cocoons. We use Very Large Array (VLA) observations at centimeter wavelengths to identify young clusters surrounded by ultra-dense H II regions, detectable via their production of thermal free-free radio continuum. Ultraviolet, optical and infrared observations are obtained from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope archives for comparison. We detect 39 compact radio sources toward NGC 4449 at 3.6 cm using the highest resolution (1farcs3) and sensitivity (~12 μJy) VLA image of the galaxy to date. We reliably identify 13 thermal radio sources and derive their physical properties using both nebular emission from the H II regions and spectral energy distribution fitting to the stellar continuum. These radio-detected clusters have ages lsim5 Myr and stellar masses of order 104 M sun. The measured extinctions are quite low: 12 of the 13 thermal radio sources have A V lsim 1.5, while the most obscured source has A V ≈ 4.3. By combining results from the nebular and stellar emission, we find an I-band excess that is anti-correlated with cluster age and an apparent mass-age correlation. Additionally, we find evidence that local processes such as supernovae and stellar winds likely play an important role in triggering the current bursts of star formation within NGC 4449.

  13. Support Policies in Clusters: Prioritization of Support Needs by Cluster Members According to Cluster Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcin Salıngan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Economic development has always been a moving target. Both the national and local governments have been facing the challenge of implementing the effective and efficient economic policy and program in order to best utilize their limited resources. One of the recent approaches in this area is called cluster-based economic analysis and strategy development. This study reviews key literature and some of the cluster based economic policies adopted by different governments. Based on this review, it proposes “the cluster life cycle” as a determining factor to identify the support requirements of clusters. A survey, designed based on literature review of International Cluster support programs, was conducted with 30 participants from 3 clusters with different maturity stage. This paper discusses the results of this study conducted among the cluster members in Eskişehir- Bilecik-Kütahya Region in Turkey on the requirement of the support to foster the development of related clusters.

  14. Mission requirements for a manned earth observatory. Task 2: Reference mission definition and analyiss, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The mission requirements and conceptual design of manned earth observatory payloads for the 1980 time period are discussed. Projections of 1980 sensor technology and user data requirements were used to formulate typical basic criteria pertaining to experiments, sensor complements, and reference missions. The subjects discussed are: (1) mission selection and prioritization, (2) baseline mission analysis, (3) earth observation data handling and contingency plans, and (4) analysis of low cost mission definition and rationale.

  15. DISCOVERY OF A POSSIBLY SINGLE BLUE SUPERGIANT STAR IN THE INTRA-CLUSTER REGION OF VIRGO CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Youichi; Hota, Ananda [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-04-20

    IC 3418 is a dwarf irregular galaxy falling into the Virgo cluster, and a 17 kpc long trail is seen behind the galaxy, which is considered to have formed due to ram pressure stripping. The trail contains compact knots and diffuse blobs of ultraviolet and blue optical emission and, thus, it is a clear site of recent star formation but in an unusual environment, surrounded by a million degree intra-cluster medium. We report on our optical spectroscopy of a compact source in the trail, SDSS J122952.66+112227.8, and show that the optical spectrum is dominated by emission from a massive blue supergiant star. If confirmed, our report would mark the farthest star with spectroscopic observation. We interpret that a massive O-type star formed in situ in the trail has evolved recently out of the main sequence into this blue supergiant phase, and now lacks any detectable spectral sign of its associated H II region. We argue that turbulence within the ram pressure striped gaseous trail may play a dominant role for the star formation within such trails.

  16. DISCOVERY OF A POSSIBLY SINGLE BLUE SUPERGIANT STAR IN THE INTRA-CLUSTER REGION OF VIRGO CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Youichi; Hota, Ananda

    2013-01-01

    IC 3418 is a dwarf irregular galaxy falling into the Virgo cluster, and a 17 kpc long trail is seen behind the galaxy, which is considered to have formed due to ram pressure stripping. The trail contains compact knots and diffuse blobs of ultraviolet and blue optical emission and, thus, it is a clear site of recent star formation but in an unusual environment, surrounded by a million degree intra-cluster medium. We report on our optical spectroscopy of a compact source in the trail, SDSS J122952.66+112227.8, and show that the optical spectrum is dominated by emission from a massive blue supergiant star. If confirmed, our report would mark the farthest star with spectroscopic observation. We interpret that a massive O-type star formed in situ in the trail has evolved recently out of the main sequence into this blue supergiant phase, and now lacks any detectable spectral sign of its associated H II region. We argue that turbulence within the ram pressure striped gaseous trail may play a dominant role for the star formation within such trails.

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SECONDARY BUBBLE CLUSTER PRODUCED BY AN ELECTROHYDRAULIC SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Qin, Jun; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of the secondary bubble cluster produced by an electrohydraulic lithotripter using high-speed imaging and passive cavitation detection techniques. The results showed that (i) the discrepancy of the collapse time between near a flat rigid boundary and in a free field of the secondary bubble cluster was not as significant as that by the primary one; (ii) the secondary bubble clusters were small but in a high bubble density and nonuniform in distribution, and they did not expand and aggregate significantly near a rigid boundary; and (iii) the corresponding bubble collapse was weaker with few microjet formation and bubble rebound. By applying a strong suction flow near the electrode tip, the production of the secondary shock wave (SW) and induced bubble cluster could be disturbed significantly, but without influence on the primary ones. Consequently, stone fragmentation efficiency was reduced from 41.2 ± 7.1% to 32.2 ± 3.5% after 250 shocks (p <0.05). Altogether, these observations suggest that the secondary bubble cluster produced by an electrohydraulic lithotripter may contribute to its ability for effective stone fragmentation. PMID:22390990

  18. Clusters and how to make it work : toolkit for cluster strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manickam, Anu; van Berkel, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Clusters are the magic answer to regional economic development. Firms in clusters are more innovative; cluster policy dominates EU policy; ‘top-sectors’ and excellence are the choice of national policy makers; clusters are ‘in’. But, clusters are complex, clusters are ‘messy’; there is no clear

  19. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario; Schmeja, Stefan; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction (∼60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of ∼2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last ∼5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was formed first

  20. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/Vehicle Design Options for Future NASA Missions to the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; Mcguire, Melissa L.; Beke, Erik G.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides a unique propulsion capability to planners/designers of future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to its high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight ratio (approximately 3-10), the NTR can also be configured as a 'dual mode' system capable of generating electrical power for spacecraft environmental systems, communications, and enhanced stage operations (e.g., refrigeration for long-term liquid hydrogen storage). At present the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) is examining a variety of mission applications for the NTR ranging from an expendable, single-burn, trans-lunar injection (TLI) stage for NASA's First Lunar Outpost (FLO) mission to all propulsive, multiburn, NTR-powered spacecraft supporting a 'split cargo-piloted sprint' Mars mission architecture. Each application results in a particular set of requirements in areas such as the number of engines and their respective thrust levels, restart capability, fuel operating temperature and lifetime, cryofluid storage, and stage size. Two solid core NTR concepts are examined -- one based on NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor (NDR) technology, and a second concept which utilizes a ternary carbide 'twisted ribbon' fuel form developed by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The NDR and CIS concepts have an established technology database involving significant nuclear testing at or near representative operating conditions. Integrated systems and mission studies indicate that clusters of two to four 15 to 25 klbf NDR or CIS engines are sufficient for most of the lunar and Mars mission scenarios currently under consideration. This paper provides descriptions and performance characteristics for the NDR and CIS concepts, summarizes NASA's First Lunar Outpost and Mars mission scenarios, and describes characteristics for representative cargo and piloted vehicles compatible with a

  1. Community College Mission: A '60s Mission Looking at a Y2K World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Bernard H.

    Although the world has changed considerably in the past three decades, community colleges and their guiding missions have largely not adapted to changing conditions. College mission statements tend to be unfocused documents that provide overly broad goals. In the business world, the mission statements of effective companies are brief, crisp, and…

  2. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Holland, Stephen T. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Breeveld, Alice A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Brown, Peter J., E-mail: siegel@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: blp14@psu.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: sholland@stsci.edu, E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: grbpeter@yahoo.com [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  3. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  4. AWIPS II Application Development, a SPoRT Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Jason E.; Smith, Matthew; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is deploying its next-generation decision support system, called AWIPS II (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II). NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several software 'plug-ins' to extend the capabilities of AWIPS II. SPoRT aims to continue its mission of improving short-term forecasts by providing NASA and NOAA products on the decision support system used at NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs). These products are not included in the standard Satellite Broadcast Network feed provided to WFOs. SPoRT has had success in providing support to WFOs as they have transitioned to AWIPS II. Specific examples of transitioning SPoRT plug-ins to WFOs with newly deployed AWIPS II systems will be presented. Proving Ground activities (GOES-R and JPSS) will dominate SPoRT's future AWIPS II activities, including tool development as well as enhancements to existing products. In early 2012 SPoRT initiated the Experimental Product Development Team, a group of AWIPS II developers from several institutions supporting NWS forecasters with innovative products. The results of the team's spring and fall 2013 meeting will be presented. Since AWIPS II developers now include employees at WFOs, as well as many other institutions related to weather forecasting, the NWS has dealt with a multitude of software governance issues related to the difficulties of multiple remotely collaborating software developers. This presentation will provide additional examples of Research-to-Operations plugins, as well as an update on how governance issues are being handled in the AWIPS II developer community.

  5. The GALAH survey: chemical tagging of star clusters and new members in the Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Janez; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Freeman, Ken; Buder, Sven; Traven, Gregor; De Silva, Gayandhi M.; Sharma, Sanjib; Asplund, Martin; Duong, Ly; Lin, Jane; Lind, Karin; Martell, Sarah; Simpson, Jeffrey D.; Stello, Dennis; Zucker, Daniel B.; Zwitter, Tomaž; Anguiano, Borja; Da Costa, Gary; D'Orazi, Valentina; Horner, Jonathan; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Lewis, Geraint; Munari, Ulisse; Nataf, David M.; Ness, Melissa; Reid, Warren; Schlesinger, Katie; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Wyse, Rosemary

    2018-02-01

    The technique of chemical tagging uses the elemental abundances of stellar atmospheres to 'reconstruct' chemically homogeneous star clusters that have long since dispersed. The GALAH spectroscopic survey - which aims to observe one million stars using the Anglo-Australian Telescope - allows us to measure up to 30 elements or dimensions in the stellar chemical abundance space, many of which are not independent. How to find clustering reliably in a noisy high-dimensional space is a difficult problem that remains largely unsolved. Here, we explore t-distributed stochastic neighbour embedding (t-SNE) - which identifies an optimal mapping of a high-dimensional space into fewer dimensions - whilst conserving the original clustering information. Typically, the projection is made to a 2D space to aid recognition of clusters by eye. We show that this method is a reliable tool for chemical tagging because it can: (i) resolve clustering in chemical space alone, (ii) recover known open and globular clusters with high efficiency and low contamination, and (iii) relate field stars to known clusters. t-SNE also provides a useful visualization of a high-dimensional space. We demonstrate the method on a data set of 13 abundances measured in the spectra of 187 000 stars by the GALAH survey. We recover seven of the nine observed clusters (six globular and three open clusters) in chemical space with minimal contamination from field stars and low numbers of outliers. With chemical tagging, we also identify two Pleiades supercluster members (which we confirm kinematically), one as far as 6° - one tidal radius away from the cluster centre.

  6. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  7. Large-Scale Multi-Dimensional Document Clustering on GPU Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Zhang, Yongpeng [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Document clustering plays an important role in data mining systems. Recently, a flocking-based document clustering algorithm has been proposed to solve the problem through simulation resembling the flocking behavior of birds in nature. This method is superior to other clustering algorithms, including k-means, in the sense that the outcome is not sensitive to the initial state. One limitation of this approach is that the algorithmic complexity is inherently quadratic in the number of documents. As a result, execution time becomes a bottleneck with large number of documents. In this paper, we assess the benefits of exploiting the computational power of Beowulf-like clusters equipped with contemporary Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) as a means to significantly reduce the runtime of flocking-based document clustering. Our framework scales up to over one million documents processed simultaneously in a sixteennode GPU cluster. Results are also compared to a four-node cluster with higher-end GPUs. On these clusters, we observe 30X-50X speedups, which demonstrates the potential of GPU clusters to efficiently solve massive data mining problems. Such speedups combined with the scalability potential and accelerator-based parallelization are unique in the domain of document-based data mining, to the best of our knowledge.

  8. Membership determination of open clusters based on a spectral clustering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Hua

    2018-06-01

    We present a spectral clustering (SC) method aimed at segregating reliable members of open clusters in multi-dimensional space. The SC method is a non-parametric clustering technique that performs cluster division using eigenvectors of the similarity matrix; no prior knowledge of the clusters is required. This method is more flexible in dealing with multi-dimensional data compared to other methods of membership determination. We use this method to segregate the cluster members of five open clusters (Hyades, Coma Ber, Pleiades, Praesepe, and NGC 188) in five-dimensional space; fairly clean cluster members are obtained. We find that the SC method can capture a small number of cluster members (weak signal) from a large number of field stars (heavy noise). Based on these cluster members, we compute the mean proper motions and distances for the Hyades, Coma Ber, Pleiades, and Praesepe clusters, and our results are in general quite consistent with the results derived by other authors. The test results indicate that the SC method is highly suitable for segregating cluster members of open clusters based on high-precision multi-dimensional astrometric data such as Gaia data.

  9. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  10. Prospects for AGN Science using the ART-XC on the SRG Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    The enhanced hard X-ray sensitivity provided by the Astronomical Roentgen Telescope to the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission facilitates the detection of heavily obscured and other hard-spectrum cosmic X-ray sources. The SRG all-sky survey will obtain large, statistically-well-defined samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) including a significant population of local heavily-obscured AGN. In anticipation of the SRG all-sky survey, we investigate the prospects for refining the bright end of the AGN luminosity function and determination of the local black hole mass function and comparing the spatial distribution of AGN with large-scale structure defined by galaxy clusters and groups. Particular emphasis is placed on studies of the deep survey Ecliptic Pole regions.

  11. Mission operations update for the restructured Earth Observing System (EOS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angelita Castro; Chang, Edward S.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) will provide a comprehensive long term set of observations of the Earth to the Earth science research community. The data will aid in determining global changes caused both naturally and through human interaction. Understanding man's impact on the global environment will allow sound policy decisions to be made to protect our future. EOS is a major component of the Mission to Planet Earth program, which is NASA's contribution to the U.S. Global Change Research Program. EOS consists of numerous instruments on multiple spacecraft and a distributed ground system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the major ground system developed to support EOS. The EOSDIS will provide EOS spacecraft command and control, data processing, product generation, and data archival and distribution services for EOS spacecraft. Data from EOS instruments on other Earth science missions (e.g., Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)) will also be processed, distributed, and archived in EOSDIS. The U.S. and various International Partners (IP) (e.g., the European Space Agency (ESA), the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan, and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA)) participate in and contribute to the international EOS program. The EOSDIS will also archive processed data from other designated NASA Earth science missions (e.g., UARS) that are under the broad umbrella of Mission to Planet Earth.

  12. Intelligent Mission Controller Node

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perme, David

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the Intelligent Mission Controller Node (IMCN) project was to improve the process of translating mission taskings between real-world Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C41...

  13. Operating and test experience of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    EBR-II has operated for 27 years, the longest for any Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) power plant. During that time, much has been learned about successful LMR operation and design. The basic lesson is that conservatism in design can pay significant dividends in operating reliability. Furthermore, such conservatism need not mean high cost. The EBR-II system emphasizes simplicity, minimizing the number of valves in the heat transport system, for example, and simplifying the primary heat-transport-system layout. Another lesson is that emphasizing reliability of the steam generating system at the sodium-water interface (by using duplex tubes in the case of EBR-II) has been well worth the higher initial costs; no problems with leakage have been encountered in EBR-II's operating history. Locating spent fuel storage in the primary tank and providing for decay heat removal by natural connective flow have also been contributors to EBR-II's success. The ability to accommodate loss of forced cooling or loss of heat sink passively has resulted in benefits for simplification, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and in not requiring the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. Also, the 'piped-pool' arrangement minimizes thermal stress to the primary tank and enhances natural convective flow. These benefits have been realized through a history of operation that has seen EBR-II evolve through four major phases in its test programs, culminating in its present mission as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype. (author)

  14. Life support approaches for Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, A. E.; Ewert, M. K.; Hanford, A. J.

    Life support approaches for Mars missions are evaluated using an equivalent system mass (ESM) approach, in which all significant costs are converted into mass units. The best approach, as defined by the lowest mission ESM, depends on several mission parameters, notably duration, environment and consequent infrastructure costs, and crew size, as well as the characteristics of the technologies which are available. Generally, for the missions under consideration, physicochemical regeneration is most cost effective. However, bioregeneration is likely to be of use for producing salad crops for any mission, for producing staple crops for medium duration missions, and for most food, air and water regeneration for long missions (durations of a decade). Potential applications of in situ resource utilization need to be considered further.

  15. Department of Energy mission plan for the civilian radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    Volume I is the Mission Plan itself, Volume II is a 700+-page collection of public comments on the Draft Mission Plan, and Volume III contains DOE responses to the public comments. Taken as a whole, the document illustrates the development of an agency approach to solving a problem, and the extent to which public input may or may not influence that approach. The Mission Plan itself is DOE's clear statement of how it proposes to go about selecting a permanent site for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste: spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants and high-level waste produced in reprocessing both civilian and military nuclear materials. Since this program is focused upon site selection based to a large extent upon geologic factors important in inhibiting the release of radionuclides for a long interval of time, it is of considerable interest to see how DOE has organized the necessary geologic investigations, and to what extent it proposes to concentrate on the geologic aspects. A key element in the high-level waste disposal program is public confidence in the process. If the public perceives that DOE is continuing investigations at one or more sites when substantial evidence shows that the site(s) are not geologically favorable, then public confidence in the program will disappear. It remains to be seen whether this Mission Plan will be considered the planning document for a successful, carefully organized program of geological input to public policy or merely an element in a record of bureaucratic failure

  16. Scalability analysis of the synchronizability for ring or chain networks with dense clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jun-An; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Juan; Lü, Jinhu

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that most real-world complex networks, such as the Internet and the World Wide Web, are evolving networks. An interesting fundamental question is: how do some important functions or dynamical behaviors of complex networks evolve with increasing network scale? This paper aims at investigating the scalability of the synchronizability for ring or chain networks with dense clusters as the network size increases. We discover some interesting phenomena as follows: (i) the synchronizability of ring or chain networks with clusters decreases with increasing network scale regardless of the inner structures of all communities; (ii) for the same network scale, the network synchronizability decreases more quickly with increasing number of cluster blocks than with increasing number of nodes within the cluster block; (iii) the number of rings or chains has a much more significant influence on the network synchronizability than the size of the rings or chains. Our results indicate that network synchronizability can be maintained with increasing network scale by avoiding ring and chain structures. (paper)

  17. Mission of Mercy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humenik, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Some dentists prefer solo charity work, but there is much to be said for collaboration within the profession in reaching out to those who are dentally underserved. Mission of Mercy (MOM) programs are regularly organized across the country for this purpose. This article describes the structure, reach, and personal satisfaction to be gained from such missions.

  18. Single-cluster dynamics for the random-cluster model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Y.; Qian, X.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    We formulate a single-cluster Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the random-cluster model. This algorithm is a generalization of the Wolff single-cluster method for the q-state Potts model to noninteger values q>1. Its results for static quantities are in a satisfactory agreement with those

  19. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Electroconducting Properties of a 1D Mixed-Valence Cu(I–Cu(II Coordination Polymer with a Dicyclohexyl Dithiocarbamate Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakatani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new mixed-valence Cu(I–Cu(II 1D coordination polymer, [CuI4CuIIBr4(Cy2dtc2]n, with an infinite chain structure is synthesized by the reaction of Cu(Cy2dtc2 (Cy2dtc− = dicyclohexyl dithiocarbamate, C13H22NS2 with CuBr·S(CH32. The as-synthesized polymer consists of mononuclear copper(II units of CuII(Cy2dtc2 and tetranuclear copper(I cluster units, CuI4Br4. In the cluster unit, all the CuI ions have distorted trigonal pyramidal coordination geometries, and the CuI–CuI or CuI–CuII distances between the nearest copper ions are shorter than the sum of van der Waals radii for Cu–Cu.

  20. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power (≥330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission (∼11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030

  1. Refining a complex diagnostic construct: subtyping Dysthymia with the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K; Defife, Jared; Westen, Drew

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether meaningful subtypes of Dysthymic patients could be identified when grouping them by similar personality profiles. A random, national sample of psychiatrists and clinical psychologists (n=1201) described a randomly selected current patient with personality pathology using the descriptors in the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-II (SWAP-II), completed assessments of patients' adaptive functioning, and provided DSM-IV Axis I and II diagnoses. We applied Q-factor cluster analyses to those patients diagnosed with Dysthymic Disorder. Four clusters were identified-High Functioning, Anxious/Dysphoric, Emotionally Dysregulated, and Narcissistic. These factor scores corresponded with a priori hypotheses regarding diagnostic comorbidity and level of adaptive functioning. We compared these groups to diagnostic constructs described and empirically identified in the past literature. The results converge with past and current ideas about the ways in which chronic depression and personality are related and offer an enhanced means by which to understand a heterogeneous diagnostic category that is empirically grounded and clinically useful. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Optics industry in Spain: a cluster approach to increasing competitiveness through collaboration in R&D and innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Andrés F.

    2011-10-01

    The optics industry in Spain pooled together to create the Southern European Cluster in Photonics and Optics - SECPhO, founded in April 2009, with the mission to help the sector increase competitiveness, specially through collaboration. From 10 founding members, SECPhO no incorporates over 40 members, which is nearly 40% of the optics industry in the region. From the beginning of operations the cluster has focused on three strategic challenges: R&D+i and Productivity, Visibility and Internationalization, and Betterment and Retention of Talent. A brief summary of the clusters activities is given. In this article, the focus will be on R&D and innovation, through industry driven collaborative initiatives and the tools and actions that lead to successful partnerships. Topics discussed in this work are will be a cluster's role in promoting strategic change, the value chain approach to partnerships, international collaboration in projects and specific cluster activities. Some practical examples of initiatives relating to effective collaboration are described, focusing on one of the mayor challenges of our time: the greening of the planet. Examples will be addressed in smart cities, efficient LASER applications and lightweight optical sensors for civil security. In all cases the collaboration between the public and private sectors is shown.

  3. clusterMaker: a multi-algorithm clustering plugin for Cytoscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris John H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the post-genomic era, the rapid increase in high-throughput data calls for computational tools capable of integrating data of diverse types and facilitating recognition of biologically meaningful patterns within them. For example, protein-protein interaction data sets have been clustered to identify stable complexes, but scientists lack easily accessible tools to facilitate combined analyses of multiple data sets from different types of experiments. Here we present clusterMaker, a Cytoscape plugin that implements several clustering algorithms and provides network, dendrogram, and heat map views of the results. The Cytoscape network is linked to all of the other views, so that a selection in one is immediately reflected in the others. clusterMaker is the first Cytoscape plugin to implement such a wide variety of clustering algorithms and visualizations, including the only implementations of hierarchical clustering, dendrogram plus heat map visualization (tree view, k-means, k-medoid, SCPS, AutoSOME, and native (Java MCL. Results Results are presented in the form of three scenarios of use: analysis of protein expression data using a recently published mouse interactome and a mouse microarray data set of nearly one hundred diverse cell/tissue types; the identification of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae; and the cluster analysis of the vicinal oxygen chelate (VOC enzyme superfamily. For scenario one, we explore functionally enriched mouse interactomes specific to particular cellular phenotypes and apply fuzzy clustering. For scenario two, we explore the prefoldin complex in detail using both physical and genetic interaction clusters. For scenario three, we explore the possible annotation of a protein as a methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase within the VOC superfamily. Cytoscape session files for all three scenarios are provided in the Additional Files section. Conclusions The Cytoscape plugin cluster

  4. Beyond Hydrodynamic Modeling of AGN Heating in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsiang-Yi Karen

    proposed work will elucidate the poorly understood CR and anisotropic transport processes in the weakly collisional ICM and shed light on the long-standing mystery of AGN heating in CC clusters. Our investigation, which incorporates plasma effects into fluid models and provides physical foundation for cosmological simulations, will serve as an important bridge between physics on both micro and macro scales. This study will enable robust modeling of the radio-mode feedback of AGN in cosmological simulations of cluster and galaxy formation. It will also directly impact observational studies of clusters including NASA missions such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, Astro-H/Hitomi, Fermi, HST, and Planck.

  5. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  6. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 3: Ground real-time mission operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The payloads tentatively planned to fly on the first two Spacelab missions were analyzed to examine the cost relationships of providing mission operations support from onboard vs the ground-based Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The quantitative results indicate that use of a POCC, with data processing capability, to support real-time mission operations is the most cost effective case.

  7. Mean-cluster approach indicates cell sorting time scales are determined by collective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrici, Carine P.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-03-01

    Cell migration is essential to cell segregation, playing a central role in tissue formation, wound healing, and tumor evolution. Considering random mixtures of two cell types, it is still not clear which cell characteristics define clustering time scales. The mass of diffusing clusters merging with one another is expected to grow as td /d +2 when the diffusion constant scales with the inverse of the cluster mass. Cell segregation experiments deviate from that behavior. Explanations for that could arise from specific microscopic mechanisms or from collective effects, typical of active matter. Here we consider a power law connecting diffusion constant and cluster mass to propose an analytic approach to model cell segregation where we explicitly take into account finite-size corrections. The results are compared with active matter model simulations and experiments available in the literature. To investigate the role played by different mechanisms we considered different hypotheses describing cell-cell interaction: differential adhesion hypothesis and different velocities hypothesis. We find that the simulations yield normal diffusion for long time intervals. Analytic and simulation results show that (i) cluster evolution clearly tends to a scaling regime, disrupted only at finite-size limits; (ii) cluster diffusion is greatly enhanced by cell collective behavior, such that for high enough tendency to follow the neighbors, cluster diffusion may become independent of cluster size; (iii) the scaling exponent for cluster growth depends only on the mass-diffusion relation, not on the detailed local segregation mechanism. These results apply for active matter systems in general and, in particular, the mechanisms found underlying the increase in cell sorting speed certainly have deep implications in biological evolution as a selection mechanism.

  8. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Enrique Agustin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.