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Sample records for cluster alpha methanotrophs

  1. Dipole oscillation modes in $\\alpha$-clustering light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    He, W B; Cao, X G; Cai, X Z; Zhang, G Q

    2016-01-01

    The alpha cluster states are discussed in an extended quantum molecular dynamics (EQMD) model frame. Different alpha cluster structures are studied in details, such as $^8$Be two-alpha cluster structure, $^{12}$C triangle structure, $^{12}$C chain structure, $^{16}$O chain structure, $^{16}$O kite structure, and $^{16}$O square structure. The properties like width of wave packets for different alpha clusters, momentum distribution, and the binding energy among alpha clusters are studied. It is also discussed how the $\\alpha$ cluster degree of freedom affects nuclear collective vibrations. The different $\\alpha$ cluster configurations in $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O have corresponding characteristic spectra of GDR and the coherence of different alpha clusters's dipole oscillation are described in details. The number and centroid energies of peaks in the GDR spectra can be reasonably explained by the geometrical and dynamical symmetries of $\\alpha$-clustering configurations. The GDR can be regarded as a very effective...

  2. Alpha-cluster model of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosin, Zbigniew; Kallunkathariyil, Jinesh [Jagiellonian University, M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Blocki, Jan [NCBJ, Theoretical Physics Division (BP2), Swierk (Poland); Lukasik, Jerzy; Pawlowski, Piotr [IFJ PAN, Krakow (Poland)

    2016-05-15

    The description of a nuclear system in its ground state and at low excitations based on the equation of state (EoS) around normal density is presented. In the expansion of the EoS around the saturation point, additional spin polarization terms are taken into account. These terms, together with the standard symmetry term, are responsible for the appearance of the α-like clusters in the ground-state configurations of the N=Z even-even nuclei. At the nuclear surface these clusters can be identified as alpha particles. A correction for the surface effects is introduced for atomic nuclei. Taking into account an additional interaction between clusters the binding energies and sizes of the considered nuclei are very accurately described. The limits of the EoS parameters are established from the properties of the α, {sup 3}He and t particles. (orig.)

  3. Extreme alpha-clustering in the 18O nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Goldberg, V Z; Brown, S; Robson, D; Crisp, A M; Cottle, P D; Fu, C; Giles, J; Green, B W; Kemper, K W; Lee, K; Roeder, B T; Tribble, R E

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the 18O nucleus at excitation energies above the alpha decay threshold was studied using 14C+alpha resonance elastic scattering. A number of states with large alpha reduced widths have been observed, indicating that the alpha-cluster degree of freedom plays an important role in this N not equal Z nucleus. However, the alpha-cluster structure of this nucleus is very different from the relatively simple pattern of strong alpha-cluster quasi-rotational bands in the neighboring 16O and 20Ne nuclei. A 0+ state with an alpha reduced width exceeding the single particle limit was identified at an excitation energy of 9.9+/-0.3 MeV. We discuss evidence that states of this kind are common in light nuclei and give possible explanations of this feature.

  4. Exploration and prediction of interactions between methanotrophs and heterotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michiel; Hoefman, Sven; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Boon, Nico; De Vos, Paul; De Baets, Bernard; Heylen, Kim; Waegeman, Willem

    2013-12-01

    Methanotrophs can form the basis of a methane-driven food web on which heterotrophic microorganisms can feed. In return, these heterotrophs can stimulate growth of methanotrophs in co-culture by providing growth additives. However, only a few specific interactions are currently known. We incubated nine methanotrophs with 25 heterotrophic strains in a pairwise miniaturized co-cultivation setup. Through principal component analysis and k-means clustering, methanotrophs and heterotrophs could be grouped according to their interaction behaviour, suggesting strain-dependent methanotroph-heterotroph complementarity. Co-cultivation significantly enhanced the growth parameters of three methanotrophs. This was most pronounced for Methylomonas sp. M5, with a threefold increase in maximum density and a fourfold increase in maximum increase in density in co-culture with Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG 19424. In contrast, co-cultivation with Methylobacterium radiotolerans LMG 2269 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa LMG 12228 inhibited growth of most methanotrophs. Functional genomic analysis suggested the importance of vitamin metabolism for co-cultivation success. The generated data set was then successfully exploited as a proof-of-principle for predictive modelling of co-culture responses based on other interactions of the same heterotrophs and methanotrophs, yielding values of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 upon 50% missing values for the maximum increase in density parameter. As such, these modelling-based tools were shown to hold great promise in reducing the amount of data that needs to be generated when conducting large co-cultivation studies.

  5. Molecular analysis of the pmo (particulate methane monooxygenase) operons from two type II methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B; McDonald, I R; Finch, R; Stafford, G P; Nielsen, A K; Murrell, J C

    2000-03-01

    The particulate methane monooxygenase gene clusters, pmoCAB, from two representative type II methanotrophs of the alpha-Proteobacteria, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis sp. strain M, have been cloned and sequenced. Primer extension experiments revealed that the pmo cluster is probably transcribed from a single transcriptional start site located 300 bp upstream of the start of the first gene, pmoC, for Methylocystis sp. strain M. Immediately upstream of the putative start site, consensus sequences for sigma(70) promoters were identified, suggesting that these pmo genes are recognized by sigma(70) and negatively regulated under low-copper conditions. The pmo genes were cloned in several overlapping fragments, since parts of these genes appeared to be toxic to the Escherichia coli host. Methanotrophs contain two virtually identical copies of pmo genes, and it was necessary to use Southern blotting and probing with pmo gene fragments in order to differentiate between the two pmoCAB clusters in both methanotrophs. The complete DNA sequence of one copy of pmo genes from each organism is reported here. The gene sequences are 84% similar to each other and 75% similar to that of a type I methanotroph of the gamma-Proteobacteria, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The derived proteins PmoC and PmoA are predicted to be highly hydrophobic and consist mainly of transmembrane-spanning regions, whereas PmoB has only two putative transmembrane-spanning helices. Hybridization experiments showed that there are two copies of pmoC in both M. trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis sp. strain M, and not three copies as found in M. capsulatus Bath.

  6. Biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by methanotrophic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Awadhesh K; Vishwakarma, Pranjali; Upadhyay, S N; Tripathi, Anil K; Prasana, H C; Dubey, Suresh K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory incubation experiments were carried out to assess the potential of methanotrophic culture for degrading TCE. Measurements of the growth rate and TCE degradation showed that the methanotrophs not only grew in presence of TCE but also degraded TCE. The rate of TCE degradation was found to be 0.19 ppm h(-1). The reverse transcriptase-PCR test was conducted to quantify expression of pmoA and mmoX genes. RT-PCR revealed expression of pmoA gene only. This observation provides evidence that the pmoA gene was functionally active for pMMO enzyme during the study. The diversity of the methanotrophs involved in TCE degradation was assessed by PCR amplification, cloning, restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis of pmoA genes. Results suggested the occurrence of nine different phylotypes belonging to Type II methanotrophs in the enriched cultures. Out of the nine, five clustered with, genera Methylocystis and rest got clustered in to a separate group.

  7. $\\alpha$-cluster ANCs for nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, M L; Koshchiy, E; Baby, L T; Belarge, J; Kemper, K W; Kuchera, A N; Santiago-Gonzalez, D

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many important $\\alpha$-particle induced reactions for nuclear astrophysics may only be measured using indirect techniques due to small cross sections at the energy of interest. One of such indirect technique, is to determine the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) for near threshold resonances extracted from sub-Coulomb $\\alpha$-transfer reactions. This approach provides a very valuable tool for studies of astrophysically important reaction rates since the results are practically model independent. However, the validity of the method has not been directly verified. Purpose. The aim of this letter is to verify the technique using the $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^{20}$Ne reaction as a benchmark. The $^{20}$Ne nucleus has a well known $1^-$ state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV with a width of 28 eV. Reproducing the known value with this technique is an ideal opportunity to verify the method. Method. The 1$^-$ state at 5.79 MeV is studied using the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^...

  8. A dynamical $\\alpha$-cluster model of $^{16}$O

    CERN Document Server

    Halcrow, C J; Manton, N S

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the low-lying spectrum of the $^{16}$O nucleus using an $\\alpha$-cluster model which includes the important tetrahedral and square configurations. Our approach is motivated by the dynamics of $\\alpha$-particle scattering in the Skyrme model. We are able to replicate the large energy splitting that is observed between states of identical spin but opposite parities, as well as introduce states that were previously not found in other cluster models, such as a $0^-$ state. We also provide a novel interpretation of the first excited state of $^{16}$O and make predictions for the energies of $6^-$ states that have yet to be observed experimentally.

  9. Probing surface distribution of $\\alpha$-cluster in $^{20}$Ne via $\\alpha$-transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of the $\\alpha$-cluster development in bound states has not been obtained yet although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of $\\alpha$-transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. We aim to verify the development of the $\\alpha$-cluster structure from observables. As the first application, it is argued to extract the spatial information of the cluster structure of the $^{20}$Ne nucleus in its ground state through the cross section of the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,~$d$)$^{20}$Ne. For the analysis of the transfer reaction, we work with the coupled-channels Born approximation (CCBA) approach, in which the breakup effect of $^6$Li is explicitly taken into account by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) based on the three-body $\\alpha + d + {}^{16}$O mo...

  10. Alpha-clustered hypernuclei and chiral SU(3) dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hiyama, Emiko; Kaiser, Norbert; Weise, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Light hypernuclei with an $\\alpha$ cluster substructure of the core nucleus are studied using an accurate cluster approach (the Hyper-THSR wave function) in combination with a density-dependent $\\Lambda$ hyperon-nuclear interaction derived from chiral SU(3) effective field theory. This interaction includes important two-pion exchange processes involving $\\Sigma N$ intermediate states and associated three-body mechanisms as well as effective mass and surface terms arising in a derivative expansion of the in-medium $\\Lambda$ self-energy. Applications and calculated results are presented and discussed for $_\\Lambda^9$Be and $^{13}_\\Lambda$C. Furthermore, the result of the lightest $\\alpha$ clustered hypernucleus, $^5_{\\Lambda}$He using realistic $ab initio$ four nucleon density is shown.

  11. XMM-Newton Observation of the {\\alpha} Persei Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott J; Syal, Megan Bruck

    2013-01-01

    We report on the analysis of an archival observation of part of the {\\alpha} Persei cluster obtained with XMM-Newton. We detected 102 X-ray sources in the band 0.3-8.0 keV, of which 39 of them are associated with the cluster as evidenced by appropriate magnitudes and colors from 2MASS photometry. We extend the X-ray Luminosity Distribution (XLD) for M dwarfs, to add to the XLD found for hotter dwarfs from spatially extensive surveys of the whole cluster by ROSAT. Some of the hotter stars are identified as a background, possible slightly older group of stars at a distance of approximately 500 pc.

  12. alpha-cluster states of sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Po nucleus and realistic alpha-particle potential

    CERN Document Server

    Baktybaev, K

    2002-01-01

    The alpha-nuclear potential is obtained from a double-folding procedure and boson interacting model is investigated in this article. Half-life and alpha-branching ratios for the member of the ground state band in sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Po are deduced using an alpha-cluster model. (author)

  13. Alpha-cluster preformation factor within cluster-formation model for odd-A and odd-odd heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh Ahmed, Saad M.

    2017-06-01

    The alpha-cluster probability that represents the preformation of alpha particle in alpha-decay nuclei was determined for high-intensity alpha-decay mode odd-A and odd-odd heavy nuclei, 82 work. Our previous successful determination of phenomenological values of alpha-cluster preformation factors for even-even nuclei motivated us to expand the work to cover other types of nuclei. The formation energy of interior alpha cluster needed to be derived for the different nuclear systems with considering the unpaired-nucleon effect. The results showed the phenomenological value of alpha preformation probability and reflected the unpaired nucleon effect and the magic and sub-magic effects in nuclei. These results and their analyses presented are very useful for future work concerning the calculation of the alpha decay constants and the progress of its theory.

  14. 3$\\alpha$-cluster structure and monopole transition in $^{12}$C and $^{14}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    3$\\alpha$-cluster structures and monopole transitions of $0^+$ states in $^{12}$C and $^{14}$C were investigated with $3\\alpha$- and $^{10}$Be+$\\alpha$-cluster models. A gas-like $3\\alpha$ state and a bending-chain $3\\alpha$ state were obtained in the $0^+_2$ and $0^+_3$ states of $^{12}$C, respectively. In $^{14}$C, a linear-chain 3$\\alpha$ structure is found in the $0^+_4$ state near the $^{10}$Be+$\\alpha$ threshold, but a cluster gas-like state does not appear because valence neutrons attract $\\alpha$ clusters and suppress spatial development of 3$\\alpha$ clustering. It was found that the linear-chain state in $^{14}$C is stabilized against the bending and $\\alpha$ escaping modes by valence neutrons. The monopole transition strengths in $^{12}$C are enhanced by $3\\alpha$-cluster developing, whereas, those in $^{14}$C are not enhanced so much because of the tight binding of $\\alpha$ clusters by valence neutrons.

  15. Giant Dipole Resonance as a Fingerprint of $\\alpha$ Clustering Configurations in $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O

    CERN Document Server

    He, W B; Cao, X G; Cai, X Z; Zhang, G Q

    2014-01-01

    It is studied how the $\\alpha$ cluster degrees of freedom, such as $\\alpha$ clustering configurations close to the $\\alpha$ decay threshold in $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O, including the linear chain, triangle, square, kite, and tetrahedron, affect nuclear collective vibrations with a microscopic dynamical approach, which can describe properties of nuclear ground states well across the nuclide chart and reproduce the standard giant dipole resonance (GDR) of $^{16}$O quite nicely. It is found that the GDR spectrum is highly fragmented into several apparent peaks due to the $\\alpha$ structure. The different $\\alpha$ cluster configurations in $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O have corresponding characteristic spectra of GDR. The number and centroid energies of peaks in the GDR spectra can be reasonably explained by the geometrical and dynamical symmetries of $\\alpha$ clustering configurations. Therefore, the GDR can be regarded as a very effective probe to diagnose the different $\\alpha$ cluster configurations in light nuclei.

  16. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  17. The methanol dehydrogenase gene, mxaF, as a functional and phylogenetic marker for proteobacterial methanotrophs in natural environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Lau

    Full Text Available The mxaF gene, coding for the large (α subunit of methanol dehydrogenase, is highly conserved among distantly related methylotrophic species in the Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. It is ubiquitous in methanotrophs, in contrast to other methanotroph-specific genes such as the pmoA and mmoX genes, which are absent in some methanotrophic proteobacterial genera. This study examined the potential for using the mxaF gene as a functional and phylogenetic marker for methanotrophs. mxaF and 16S rRNA gene phylogenies were constructed based on over 100 database sequences of known proteobacterial methanotrophs and other methylotrophs to assess their evolutionary histories. Topology tests revealed that mxaF and 16S rDNA genes of methanotrophs do not show congruent evolutionary histories, with incongruencies in methanotrophic taxa in the Methylococcaceae, Methylocystaceae, and Beijerinckiacea. However, known methanotrophs generally formed coherent clades based on mxaF gene sequences, allowing for phylogenetic discrimination of major taxa. This feature highlights the mxaF gene's usefulness as a biomarker in studying the molecular diversity of proteobacterial methanotrophs in nature. To verify this, PCR-directed assays targeting this gene were used to detect novel methanotrophs from diverse environments including soil, peatland, hydrothermal vent mussel tissues, and methanotroph isolates. The placement of the majority of environmental mxaF gene sequences in distinct methanotroph-specific clades (Methylocystaceae and Methylococcaceae detected in this study supports the use of mxaF as a biomarker for methanotrophic proteobacteria.

  18. Superdeformation and alpha - cluster structure in 35Cl

    CERN Document Server

    Bisoi, Abhijit; Sarkar, S; Ray, S; Basu, M Roy; Kanjilal, Debasmita; Nag, Somnath; Kumar, K Selva; Goswami, A; Madhavan, N; Muralithar, S; Bhowmik, R K

    2013-01-01

    A superdeformed (SD) band has been identified in a non - alpha - conjugate nucleus 35Cl. It crosses the negative parity ground band above 11/2- and becomes the yrast at 15/2-. Lifetimes of all relevant states have been measured to follow the evolution of collectivity. Enhanced B(E2), B(E1) values as well as energetics provide evidences for superdeformation and existence of parity doublet cluster structure in an odd-A nucleus for the first time in A = 40 region. Large scale shell model calculations assign (sd)16(pf)3 as the origin of these states. Calculated spectroscopic factors correlate the SD states in 35Cl to those in 36Ar.

  19. Alpha particle clusters and their condensation in nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Röpke, Gerd; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Yamada, Taiichi

    2016-12-01

    In this article we review the present status of α clustering in nuclear systems. First of all, an important aspect is condensation in nuclear matter. Like for pairing, quartetting in matter is at the root of similar phenomena in finite nuclei. Cluster approaches for finite nuclei are shortly recapitulated in historical order. The α container model, recently been proposed by Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR), will be outlined and the ensuing condensate aspect of the Hoyle state at 7.65 MeV in 12C is investigated in some detail. A special case will be made with respect to the very accurate reproduction of the inelastic form factor from the ground to Hoyle state with the THSR description. The extended volume will be deduced. New developments concerning excitations of the Hoyle state will be discussed. After 15 years since the proposal of the α condensation concept a critical assessment of this idea will be given. Alpha gas states in other nuclei like 16O and 13C will be considered. An important aspect is the experimental evidence, both present and future ones. The THSR wave function can also describe configurations of one α particle on top of a doubly magic core. The cases of 20Ne and 212Po will be investigated.

  20. Alpha cluster states and molecular orbitals in sd-shell nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Creative Research Institution Sousei Research Department, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Furutachi, N. [Meme Media Laboratory, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kanada-En' yo, Y. [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    The alpha-clustering and molecular-orbitals of {sup 22}Ne and F isotopes are investigated based on antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The observed candidates for the alpha cluster state of {sup 22}Ne are understood as the molecular-orbital states and alpha+{sup 18}O di-nuclei states. The presence of the molecular-orbital states in the O and F isotopes and the drastic reduction of their excitation energy near the neutron-drip line are predicted.

  1. Pre-Equilibrium Alpha-Particle Emission as a Probe to Explore Alpha Clustering in Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, V. L.; Fotina, O. V.; Gramegna, F.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Sambi, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.

    Experimental data of the double-differential spectra of light particles emitted at pre-equilibrium stage of nuclear processes were obtained at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro for the heavy-ion reactions 130 and 250 MeV 16O + 116Sn. Light charged particles were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues in order to avoid unwanted competing mechanisms. The experimental data were collected in a wide angular range from 29 to 82 degrees in the laboratory system. Theoretical model was developed in order to describe simultaneously evaporative and pre-equilibrium emission of the light particles in heavy-ion reactions. Griffin exciton model was used for the description of the pre-equilibrium stage of the compound nucleus formation, while the equilibrium evaporation processes were analyzed in the framework of the statistical theory of heavy-ion reactions. Experimental data were compared with the results of the model calculations and new approach was suggested to take into account alpha cluster formation in the projectile nucleus by measuring and analyzing pre-equilibrium alpha-particle spectra.

  2. Nuclear alpha-clustering, superdeformation, and molecular resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear alpha-clustering has been the subject of intense study since the advent of heavy-ion accelerators. Looking back for more than 40 years we are able today to see the connection between quasimolecular resonances in heavy-ion collisions and extremely deformed states in light nuclei. For example superdeformed bands have been recently discovered in light N=Z nuclei such as $^{36}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{48}$Cr, and $^{56}$Ni by $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. The search for strongly deformed shapes in N=Z nuclei is also the domain of charged-particle spectroscopy, and our experimental group at IReS Strasbourg has studied a number of these nuclei with the charged particle multidetector array {\\sc Icare} at the {\\sc Vivitron} Tandem facility in a systematical manner. Recently the search for $\\gamma$-decays in $^{24}$Mg has been undertaken in a range of excitation energies where previously nuclear molecular resonances were found in $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C collisions. The breakup reaction $^{24}$Mg$+^{12}$C has been investigate...

  3. Lyman Alpha Emitters in the Hierarchically Clustering Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    We present a new theoretical model for the luminosity functions (LFs) of Lyman alpha (Lya) emitting galaxies in the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation. We extend a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation that reproduces a number of observations for local galaxies, without changing the original model parameters but introducing a physically-motivated modelling to describe the escape fraction of Lya photons from host galaxies (f_esc). Though a previous study using a hierarchical clustering model simply assumed a constant and universal value of f_esc, we incorporate two new effects on f_esc: extinction by interstellar dust and galaxy-scale outflow induced as a star formation feedback. It is found that the new model nicely reproduces all the observed Lya LFs of the Lya emitters (LAEs) at different redshifts in z ~ 3--6. Our model predicts that galaxies with strong outflows and f_esc ~ 1 are dominant in the observed LFs, which is consistent with available observations while the simple universal f_esc model ...

  4. Stability of {sup 248–254}Cf isotopes against alpha and cluster radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P., E-mail: drkpsanthosh@gmail.com; Biju, R.K.

    2013-07-15

    Stability of {sup 248–254}Cf nuclei against alpha and cluster emissions is studied within our Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). It is found that these nuclei are stable against light clusters (except alpha particles) and unstable against heavy cluster (A{sub 2}≥40) emissions. For heavy cluster emissions the daughter nuclei lead to doubly magic {sup 208}Pb or the neighbouring one. The effects of quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations of parent nuclei, daughter nuclei and emitted cluster on half lives are also studied. The computed alpha decay half life values (including quadrupole deformation β{sub 2}) are in close agreement with experimental data. Inclusion of quadrupole deformation reduces the height and width of the barrier (increases the barrier penetrability) and hence half life decreases. -- Highlights: •{sup 248–254}Cf parents are stable against light clusters (except alpha particles) and are unstable against heavy clusters ({sup 46}Ar, {sup 48,50}Ca etc.). •For the case of heavy cluster emissions the daughter nuclei are doubly magic {sup 208}Pb or neighbouring one. •The alpha decay half lives are in agreement with experimental data. •The cluster decay half lives decrease with the inclusion of quadrupole deformation.

  5. Clustering of galaxies near damped Lyman-alpha systems with (z) = 2.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. M

    1993-01-01

    The galaxy two-point correlation function, xi, at (z) = 2.6 is determined by comparing the number of Ly-alpha-emitting galaxies in narrowband CCD fields selected for the presence of damped L-alpha absorption to their number in randomly selected control fields. Comparisons between the presented determination of (xi), a density-weighted volume average of xi, and model predictions for (xi) at large redshifts show that models in which the clustering pattern is fixed in proper coordinates are highly unlikely, while better agreement is obtained if the clustering pattern is fixed in comoving coordinates. Therefore, clustering of Ly-alpha-emitting galaxies around damped Ly-alpha systems at large redshifts is strong. It is concluded that the faint blue galaxies are drawn from a parent population different from normal galaxies, the presumed offspring of damped Ly-alpha systems.

  6. Pre-equilibrium {\\alpha}-particle emission as a probe to study {\\alpha}-clustering in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fotina, O V; Eremenko, D O; Platonov, S Yu; Yuminov, O A; Kravchuk, V L; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Cinausero, M; D'Agostino, M; Bruno, M; Baiocco, G; Morelli, L; Degerlier, M; Casini, G; Barlini, S; Valdrè, S; Piantelli, S; Pasquali, G; Bracco, A; Camera, F; Wieland, O; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Giaz, A; Corsi, A

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical approach was developed to describe secondary particle emission in heavy ion collisions, with special regards to pre-equilibrium {\\alpha}-particle production. Griffin's model of non-equilibrium processes is used to account for the first stage of the compound system formation, while a Monte Carlo statistical approach was used to describe the further decay from a hot source at thermal equilibrium. The probabilities of neutron, proton and {\\alpha}-particle emission have been evaluated for both the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium stages of the process. Fission and {\\gamma}-ray emission competition were also considered after equilibration. Effects due the possible cluster structure of the projectile which has been excited during the collisions have been experimentally evidenced studying the double differential cross sections of p and {\\alpha}-particles emitted in the E=250MeV 16O +116Sn reaction. Calculations within the present model with different clusterization probabilities have been compared to th...

  7. Clustering of Ly alpha emitters at z approximate to 4.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovac, Katarina; Somerville, Rachel S.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Wang, JunXian

    2007-01-01

    We present the clustering properties of 151 Ly alpha-emitting galaxies at z approximate to 4.5 selected from the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our catalog covers an area of 36'; 36' observed with five narrowband filters. We assume that the angular correlation function w(theta) is well repres

  8. Clustering of Ly alpha emitters at z approximate to 4.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovac, Katarina; Somerville, Rachel S.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Wang, JunXian

    2007-01-01

    We present the clustering properties of 151 Ly alpha-emitting galaxies at z approximate to 4.5 selected from the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our catalog covers an area of 36'; 36' observed with five narrowband filters. We assume that the angular correlation function w(theta) is well

  9. Stability of 248-254^Cf isotopes against alpha and cluster radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P

    2013-01-01

    Stability of 248-254^Cf nuclei against alpha and cluster emission is studied within our Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). It is found that these nuclei are stable against light clusters (except alpha particle) and instable against heavy cluster emissions. For heavy cluster emissions the daughter nuclei lead to doubly magic 208^Pb or neighbouring one. The effect of quadrapole and hexadecapole deformations of parent nuclei, daughter nuclei and emitted cluster on half lives are also studied. The computed alpha decay half life values (with including quadrupole deformation {\\beta}2) are in close agreement with experimental data. Inclusion of quadrupole deformation reduces the height and width of the barrier (increases the barrier penetrability) and hence half life decreases.

  10. Alpha clustering in $^{28}$Si probed through the identification of high-lying $0^+$ states

    CERN Document Server

    Adsley, P; Cseh, J; Dimitriova, S S; Brummer, J W; Li, K C W; Marin-Lambarri, D J; Lukyanov, K; Kheswa, N Y; Neveling, R; Papka, P; Pellegri, L; Pesudo, V; Pool, L C; Riczu, G; Smit, F D; van Zyl, J J; Zemlyanaya, E

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of nuclear structure in alpha-conjugate nuclei have long been associated with alpha clustering, including the existence of superdeformed bands. In this paper, an alpha-particle inelastic scattering experiment investigating the location of $0^+$ states in $^{28}$Si is reported in an attempt to locate possible cluster states. The results are compared to a semi-microscopic model which shows good agreement with the data, and supports the assignment of a newly discovered $0^+$ state as the band-head of a previously observed superdeformed band in $^{28}$Si

  11. The X-ray properties of the young open cluster around alpha Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randich, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Prosser, C. F.; Stauffer, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The observations of the 50 Myr old alpha Persei open cluster, performed by the Rosat's position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC), are discussed. The X-ray observations cover an area of about 10 sq deg. A total of 160 X-ray sources were detected. The comparison between the X-ray luminosity distribution functions of the alpha Persei sample and the Pleiades indicated that F and G-type stars in the alpha Persei are more X-ray luminous than their older counterparts in the Pleiades. No significant difference was found between the distributions of the K and M-type dwarfs in the two clusters.

  12. Peculiarities of {\\alpha}-element abundances in Galactic open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Marsakov, V A; Koval', V V; Shpigel', L V

    2016-01-01

    A catalog compiling the parameters of 346 open clusters, including their metallicities, positions, ages, and velocities has been composed. The elements of the Galactic orbits for 272 of the clusters have been calculated. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances, [el/Fe], for 14 elements synthesized in various nuclear processes averaged over data from 109 publications are presented for 90 clusters. Since no systematic effects distorting the relative abundances of the studied elements in these clusters have been found, these difference suggest real differences between clusters with high, elongated orbits and field stars. In particular, this supports the earlier conclusion, based on an analysis of the elements of the Galactic orbits, that some clusters formed as a result of interactions between high-velocity, metal-poor clouds and the interstellar medium of the Galactic thin disk. On average, clusterswith high, elongated orbits and metallicities ${\\rm [Fe/H]} - 0.1$ formed as a result of interact...

  13. Mapping of the {alpha}{sub 4} subunit gene (GABRA4) to human chromosome 4 defines an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 1} gene cluster: Further evidence that modern GABA{sub a} receptor gene clusters are derived from an ancestral cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, P.J.; Farb, D.H.; Russek, S.J. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We demonstrated previously that an {alpha}{sub 1}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} gene cluster of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor is located on human chromosome 5q34-q35 and that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene cluster probably spawned clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 15. Here, we report that the {alpha}{sub 4} gene (GABRA4) maps to human chromosome 4p14-q12, defining a cluster comprising the {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 4}, {beta}{sub 1}, and {gamma}{sub 1} genes. The existence of an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 4 and an {alpha}{sub 1}-{alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 5 provides further evidence that the number of ancestral GABA{sub A} receptor subunit genes has been expanded by duplication within an ancestral gene cluster. Moreover, if duplication of the {alpha} gene occurred before duplication of the ancestral gene cluster, then a heretofore undiscovered subtype of a subunit should be located on human chromosome 15q11-q13 within an {alpha}{sub 5}-{alpha}{sub x}-{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}{sub 3} gene cluster at the locus for Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Alpha decay and cluster decay of some neutron-rich actinide nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M CARMEL VIGILA BAI; R NITHYA AGNES

    2017-03-01

    Nuclei in the actinide region are good in exhibiting cluster radioactivity. In the present work, the half-lives of $\\alpha$-decay and heavy cluster emission from certain actinide nuclei have been calculated using cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model ($\\bf{CYEM}$). Our model has a cubic potential for the overlapping region which is smoothly connected by a Yukawa plus exponential potential for the region after separation. The computed half-lives are compared with those of other theoretical models and are found to be in good agreement with each other. In this work, we have also studied the deformation effects on half-lives of cluster decay. These deformation effects lower the half-life values and it is also found that the neutron-rich parent nuclei slow down the cluster decay process. Geiger–Nuttal plots for various clusters are found to be linear and most of the emitted clusters are $\\alpha$-like nuclei.

  15. Alpha cluster states in light nuclei populated through the (6Li,d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borello-Lewin, Thereza; Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F. [Universita di Catania (Italy). Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Lab. Nazionali del Sud; Ukita, Gilberto Mitsuo [Universidade de Santo Amaro (UNISA), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Psicologia

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The alpha cluster correlation is an important concept in the nuclear physics of light nuclei. The main purpose of the research program in progress is the investigation of the alpha clustering phenomenon in (x{alpha}) and(x{alpha}+{nu}) nuclei through the ({sup 6}Li,d) alpha transfer reaction. In fact, there is scarce experimental information on the subject, in particular associated with resonant states predicted near (x{alpha}) and (x{alpha}+{nu}) thresholds. Measurements of the {sup 12},{sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,d) {sup 16},{sup 17}O reactions, at an incident energy of 25.5 MeV, have been performed employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge Split-Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. The work is under way and an experimental energy resolution of 30 keV was obtained. Near the (4{alpha}) breakup threshold in {sup 16}O, three narrow alpha resonances, not previously measured, were detected, revealing important {alpha} + {sup 12}C(G.S.) components. One of these resonances corresponds to the known 0{sup +} state at 15.1 MeV[5] of excitation that has probably, according to Funaki et al., the gas like configuration of the 4{alpha} condensate state, with a very dilute density and a large component of {alpha} + {sup 12}C(Hoyle) configuration. As was already mentioned, our experimental information points to the necessity of including the {alpha} + {sup 12}C(G.S.) component in the wave function. (author)

  16. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.

  17. WARM GAS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER. I. DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} ABSORBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joo Heon; Putman, Mary E.; Bryan, Greg L. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Thom, Christopher [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21211 (United States); Chen, Hsiao-Wen, E-mail: jhyoon@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The first systematic study of the warm gas (T = 10{sup 4-5} K) distribution across a galaxy cluster is presented using multiple background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster. We detect 25 Ly{alpha} absorbers (N{sub HI} = 10{sup 13.1-15.4} cm{sup -2}) in the Virgo velocity range toward 9 of 12 QSO sightlines observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph, with a cluster impact parameter range of 0.36-1.65 Mpc (0.23-1.05 R{sub vir}). Including 18 Ly{alpha} absorbers previously detected by STIS or GHRS toward 7 of 11 background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster, we establish a sample of 43 absorbers toward a total of 23 background probes for studying the incidence of Ly{alpha} absorbers in and around the Virgo Cluster. With these absorbers, we find (1) warm gas is predominantly in the outskirts of the cluster and avoids the X-ray-detected hot intracluster medium (ICM). Also, Ly{alpha} absorption strength increases with cluster impact parameter. (2) Ly{alpha}-absorbing warm gas traces cold H I-emitting gas in the substructures of the Virgo Cluster. (3) Including the absorbers associated with the surrounding substructures, the warm gas covering fraction (100% for N{sub HI} > 10{sup 13.1} cm{sup -2}) is in agreement with cosmological simulations. We speculate that the observed warm gas is part of large-scale gas flows feeding the cluster both in the ICM and galaxies.

  18. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  19. Alpha-cluster Condensations in Nuclei and Experimental Approaches for their Studies

    CERN Document Server

    von Oertzen, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    The formation of alpha-clusters in nuclei close to the decay thresholds is discussed. These states can be considered to be boson-condensates, which are formed in a second order phase transition in a mixture of nucleons and alpha-particles. The de Broglie wavelength of the alpha-particles is larger than the nuclear diameter, therefore the coherent properties of the alpha-particles give particular effects for the study of such states. The states are above the thresholds thus the enhanced emission of multiple-alphas into the same direction is observed. The probability for the emission of multiple-alphas is not described by Hauser-Feshbach theory for compound nucleus decay.

  20. Stability of 244-260Fm isotopes against alpha and cluster radioactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh; R K Biju; Sabina Sahadevan

    2009-12-01

    Taking Coulomb and proximity potentials as the interacting barrier we have studied the cold valley in the radioactive decay of 244-260Fm isotopes. It is found that in addition to alpha particle minima, other minima occur at S, Ar and Ca clusters. We have computed the half-lives and other characteristics of different clusters emitted from these parents treating parent, daughter and emitted cluster as spheres. Our study reveals that most of these parents are unstable against alpha and heavy cluster (46Ar, 48,50Ca) emissions and stable against light cluster emission, except 8Be from 244-248Fm isotopes. The most probable clusters from these parents are predicted to be 46Ar, 48,50Ca which indicate the role of doubly or near doubly magic clusters ( = 20, = 28) and also stress the role of doubly magic 208Pb daughter. The computed half-lives for alpha decay are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is found that the presence of neutron excess in the parent nuclei slows down the cluster decay process. The effect of quadrupole (2) and hexadecapole (4) deformations of parent and fragments on half-lives are also studied. It is found that inclusion of 2 and 4 reduces the height and shape of the barrier (increases barrier penetrability) and hence the half-life decreases.

  1. Distribution and diversity of Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs in geothermal and acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Christine E; Smirnova, Angela V; Graham, Jaime M; Stott, Matthew B; Khadka, Roshan; Moore, Tim R; Grasby, Stephen E; Strack, Maria; Dunfield, Peter F

    2014-06-01

    Recently, methanotrophic members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia have been described, but little is known about their distribution in nature. We surveyed methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs and acidic wetlands via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were found in samples covering a broad temperature range (22.5-81.6°C), but only in acidic conditions (pH 1.8-5.0) and only in geothermal environments, not in acidic bogs or fens. Phylogenetically, three 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters of putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were observed. Those detected in high-temperature geothermal samples (44.1-81.6°C) grouped with known thermoacidiphilic 'Methylacidiphilum' isolates. A second group dominated in moderate-temperature geothermal samples (22.5-40.1°C) and a representative mesophilic methanotroph from this group was isolated (strain LP2A). Genome sequencing verified that strain LP2A possessed particulate methane monooxygenase, but its 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to 'Methylacidiphilum infernorum' strain V4 was only 90.6%. A third group clustered distantly with known methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia. Using pmoA-gene targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, two geothermal soil profiles showed a dominance of LP2A-like pmoA sequences in the cooler surface layers and 'Methylacidiphilum'-like pmoA sequences in deeper, hotter layers. Based on these results, there appears to be a thermophilic group and a mesophilic group of methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia. However, both were detected only in acidic geothermal environments.

  2. Probing clustering in excited alpha-conjugate nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borderie, B., E-mail: borderie@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Raduta, Ad.R. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ademard, G.; Rivet, M.F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); De Filippo, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Geraci, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna (Italy); Le Neindre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Ensicaen, Université de Caen, Caen (France); Alba, R.; Amorini, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cardella, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Chatterjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); La Guidara, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Facoltá di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lanzano, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); and others

    2016-04-10

    The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 12}C at 25 MeV per nucleon bombarding energy was used to produce α-emission sources. From a careful selection of these sources provided by a complete detection and from comparisons with models of sequential and simultaneous decays, evidence in favor of α-particle clustering from excited {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg is reported.

  3. Seasonal Variation in Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial Methanotrophs in Five Temperate Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Md Sainur; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Lakes are significant sources of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Within these systems, methanotrophs consume CH4 and act as a potential biofilter mitigating the emission of this potent greenhouse gas. However, it is still not well understood how spatial and temporal variation in environmental parameters influence the abundance, diversity, and community structure of methanotrophs in lakes. To address this gap in knowledge, we collected water samples from three depths (surface, middle, and bottom) representing oxic to suboxic or anoxic zones of five different Swedish lakes in winter (ice-covered) and summer. Methanotroph abundance was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and a comparison to environmental variables showed that temperature, season as well as depth, phosphate concentration, dissolved oxygen, and CH4 explained the observed variation in methanotroph abundance. Due to minimal differences in methane concentrations (0.19 and 0.29 μM for summer and winter, respectively), only a weak and even negative correlation was observed between CH4 and methanotrophs, which was possibly due to usage of CH4. Methanotrophs were present at concentrations ranging from 105 to 106 copies/l throughout the oxic (surface) and suboxic/anoxic (bottom) water mass of the lakes, but always contributed less than 1.3% to the total microbial community. Relative methanotroph abundance was significantly higher in winter than in summer and consistently increased with depth in the lakes. Phylogenetic analysis of pmoA genes in two clone libraries from two of the ice-covered lakes (Ekoln and Ramsen) separated the methanotrophs into five distinct clusters of Methylobacter sp. (Type I). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the pmoA gene further revealed significant differences in methanotrophic communities between lakes as well as between winter and summer while there were no significant differences between water layers. The study provides new

  4. Ionization-cluster distributions of alpha-particles in nanometric volumes of propane: measurement and calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardo, L; Colautti, P; Conte, V; Baek, W Y; Grosswendt, B; Tornielli, G

    2002-12-01

    The probability of the formation of ionization clusters by primary alpha-particles at 5.4 MeV in nanometric volumes of propane was studied experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the distance between the center line of the particle beam and the center of the target volume. The volumes were of cylindrical shape, 3.7 mm in diameter and height. As the investigations were performed at gas pressures of 300 Pa and 350 Pa, the dimensions of the target volume were equivalent to 20.6 nm or 24.0 nm in a material of density 1.0 g/cm(3). The dependence of ionization-cluster formation on distance was studied up to values equivalent to about 70 nm. To validate the measurements, a Monte Carlo model was developed which allows the experimental arrangement and the interactions of alpha-particles and secondary electrons in the counter gas to be properly simulated. This model is supplemented by a mathematical formulation of cluster size formation in nanometric targets. The main results of our study are (i) that the mean ionization-cluster size in the delta-electron cloud of an alpha-particle track segment, decreases as a function of the distance between the center line of the alpha-particle beam and the center of the sensitive target volume to the power of 2.6, and (ii) that the mean cluster size in critical volumes and the relative variance of mean cluster size due to delta-electrons are invariant at distances greater than about 20 nm. We could imagine that the ionization-cluster formation in nanometric volumes might in future provide the physical basis for a redefinition of radiation quality.

  5. Developmental expression and gene/enzyme identifications in the alpha esterase gene cluster of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, P M; de Q Robin, G C; Court, L N; Dorrian, S J; Russell, R J; Oakeshott, J G

    2003-10-01

    Here we show how the 10 genes of the alpha esterase cluster of Drosophila melanogaster have diverged substantially in their expression profiles. Together with previously described sequence divergence this suggests substantial functional diversification. By peptide mass fingerprinting and in vitro gene expression we have also shown that two of the genes encode the isozymes EST9 (formerly ESTC) and EST23. EST9 is the major 'alpha staining' esterase in zymograms of gut tissues in feeding stages while orthologues of EST23 confer resistance to organophosphorus insecticides in other higher Diptera. The results for EST9 and EST23 concur with previous suggestions that the products of the alpha esterase cluster function in digestion and detoxification of xenobiotic esters. However, many of the other genes in the cluster show developmental or tissue-specific expression that seems inconsistent with such roles. Furthermore, there is generally poor correspondence between the mRNA expression patterns of the remaining eight genes and isozymes previously characterized by standard techniques of electrophoresis and staining, suggesting that the alpha cluster might only account for a small minority of the esterase isozyme profile.

  6. The impact of temperature fluctuations on the large scale clustering of the Ly$\\alpha$ forest

    CERN Document Server

    Greig, Bradley; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    We develop a semi-analytic method for assessing the impact of the large scale IGM temperature fluctuations expected following He${\\rm\\,{\\scriptstyle II}}$ reionization on three dimensional clustering measurements of the Ly$\\alpha$ forest. Our methodology builds upon the existing large volume, mock Ly$\\alpha$ forest survey simulations presented by Greig et al. (2011) by including a prescription for a spatially inhomogeneous ionising background, temperature fluctuations induced by patchy He${\\rm\\,{\\scriptstyle II}}$ photo-heating and the clustering of quasars. This approach enables us to achieve a dynamic range within our semi-analytic model substantially larger than currently feasible with computationally expensive, fully numerical simulations. The results agree well with existing numerical simulations, with large scale temperature fluctuations introducing a scale dependent increase in the spherically averaged 3D Ly$\\alpha$ forest power spectrum of up to 20-30 per cent at wavenumbers $k\\sim0.02$ Mpc$^{-1}$. Al...

  7. Methanotrophs Contribute to Peatland Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N2) fixation is potentially an important N input mechanism to peatland ecosystems, but the extent of this process may have been underestimated because of the methods traditionally used inhibit the activity of methanothrophs. We examined the linkage of methane (CH4) oxidation and N2 fixation using 15N2 technique. Dominant flark and hummock Sphagnum species were collected from twelve pristine peatlands in Siikajoki, Finland, which varied in age from 200 to 2,500 y due to the postglacial rebound. The mosses were incubated in a two-day field 15N2 and 13CH4 pulse labelling experiment and the incorporation of 15N2 and 13CH4 in biomass was measured with Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The rates of Sphagnum-associated N2 fixation (0.1-2.9 g N m-2 y-1) were up to 10 times the current N deposition rates. Methane-induced N2 fixation contributed to over 1/3 of moss-associated N2 fixation in younger stages, but was switched off in old successional stages, despite active CH4 oxidation in these stages. Both the N2 fixation rates and the methanotrophic contribution to N2 fixation during peatland succession were primarily constrained by phosphorus availability. Previously overlooked methanotrophic N contribution may explain rapid peat and N accumulation during fen stages of peatland development. Reference. Larmola T., Leppänen S.M., Tuittila E.-S, Aarva M., Merilä P., Fritze H., Tiirola M. (2014) Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111 (2): 734-739.

  8. Search for H alpha emitters in Galaxy Clusters with Tunable Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Martinez, Ricardo; Cepa, Jordi; Bongiovanni, Angel; Garcia, Ana Perez; 10.1007/978-3-642-11250-8

    2010-01-01

    The studies of the evolution of galaxies in Galaxy Clusters have as a traditional complication the difficulty in establishing cluster membership of those sources detected in the field of view. The determination of spectroscopic redshifts involves long exposure times when it is needed to reach the cluster peripherical regions of/or clusters at moderately large redshifts, while photometric redshifts often present uncertainties too large to offer significant conclusions. The mapping of the cluster of galaxies with narrow band tunable filters makes it possible to reach large redshifts intervals with an accuracy high enough to establish the source membership of those presenting emission/absorption lines easily identifiable, as H alpha. Moreover, the wavelength scan can include other lines as [NII], [OIII] or $H_{\\beta}$ allowing to distinguish those sources with strong stellar formation activity and those with an active galactic nuclei. All this makes it possible to estimate the stellar formation rate of the galax...

  9. Electromagnetic selection rules in the triangular alpha-cluster model of 12C

    CERN Document Server

    Stellin, G; Vitturi, A

    2015-01-01

    After recapitulating the procedure to find the bands and the states occurring in the $\\mathcal{D}_{3h}$ alpha-cluster model of $^{12}$C in which the clusters are placed at the vertexes of an equilateral triangle, we obtain the selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. While the alpha cluster structure leads to the cancellation of E1 transitions, the approximations carried out in deriving the roto-vibrational hamiltonian lead to the disappearance of M1 transitions. Furthermore, although in general the lowest active modes are E2, E3, $\\cdots$ and M2, M3, $\\cdots$, the cancellation of M2, M3 and M5 transitions between certain bands also occurs, as a result of the application of group theoretical techniques drawn from molecular physics. These implications can be very relevant for the spectroscopic analysis of $\\gamma$-ray spectra of $^{12}$C.

  10. Anti-cluster Decay and Anti-alpha Decay of Antimatter nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2015-01-01

    A broad extension of periodic system into the sector of antimatter could be possible sometimes in a remote future. We expect that anti-alpha spontaneous emission from an antimatter nucleus will have the same Q-value and half-life as alpha emission from the corresponding mirror nucleus. This is the consequence of the invariance of binding energy as well as of the surface and Coulomb energy when passing from matter to antimatter nuclei with the the same mass number and the same atomic number. The Q-values and half-lives of all measured up to now 27 cluster radioactivities are given together with Q-values and half-lives of the most important competitor --- $\\alpha$ decay. The lightest anti-alpha emitter, $^8\\bar{Be}$, will have a very short half-life of about $81.9\\cdot 10^{-18}$ s.

  11. Total alpha-globin gene cluster deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, J.A.; Haruyama, A.Z.; Chu, B.M. [Kapiolani Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Most {alpha}-thalassemias [Thal] are due to large deletions. In Southeast Asians, the (--{sup SEA}) double {alpha}-globin gene deletion is common, 3 (--{sup Tot}) total {alpha}-globin cluster deletions are known: Filipino (--{sup Fil}), Thai (--{sup Thai}), and Chinese (--{sup Chin}). In a Hawaii Thal project, provisional diagnosis of {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygotes was based on microcytosis, normal isoelectric focusing, and no iron deficiency. One in 10 unselected Filipinos was an {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygote, 2/3 of these had a (--{sup Tot}) deletion: a {var_sigma}-cDNA probe consistently showed fainter intensity of the constant 5.5 kb {var_sigma}{sub 2} BamHI band, with no heterzygosity for {var_sigma}-globin region polymorphisms; {alpha}-cDNA or {var_sigma}-cDNA probes showed no BamHI or BglII bands diagnostic of the (--{sup SEA}) deletion; bands for the (-{alpha}) {alpha}-Thal-2 single {alpha}-globin deletions were only seen in Hb H cases. A reliable monoclonal anti-{var_sigma}-peptide antibody test for the (--{sup SEA}) deletion was always negative in (--{sup Tot}) samples. Southern digests with the Lo probe, a gift from D. Higgs of Oxford Univ., confirmed that 49 of 50 (--{sup Tot}) chromosomes in Filipinos were (--{sup Fil}). Of 20 {alpha}-Thal-1 hydrops born to Filipinos, 11 were (--{sup Fil}/--{sup SEA}) compound heterozygotes; 9 were (--{sup SEA}/--{sup SEA}) homozygotes, but none was a (--{sup Fil}/--{sup Fil}).

  12. Methane source strength and energy flow shape methanotrophic communities in oxygen-methane counter-gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sascha; Lüke, Claudia; Frenzel, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The role of microbial diversity for ecosystem functioning has become an important subject in microbial ecology. Recent work indicates that microbial communities and microbial processes can be very sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances. However, to what extent microbial communities may change upon, resist to, or overcome disturbances might differ depending on substrate availability. We used soil from an Italian rice field in gradient microcosms, and analysed the response of methanotrophic communities to an NH4 (+) pulse as a potential disturbance under two different CH4 source strengths. We found a significant influence of source strength, i.e. the energy flow through the methanotrophic community, while NH4 (+) had no effect. Our data suggest that historical contingencies, i.e. nitrogen fertilization, led to an ammonium-tolerant MOB community. Methanotrophs were able to oxidize virtually all CH4 diffusing into the oxic-anoxic boundary layer regardless of NH4 (+) addition. Total and active methanotrophic communities were assessed by a pmoA-specific microarray. From the reservoir of dormant methanotrophs, different species became active with Methylobacter and an environmental cluster affiliated with paddy soils being indicative for high CH4 source strength. Thus, a microbial seed bank is an important prerequisite to maintain functioning in a fluctuating environment.

  13. The Detailed Chemical Properties of M31 Star Clusters I. Fe, Alpha and Light Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, J E; Cohen, J

    2014-01-01

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the alpha elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters in M31, which were obtained from high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR$>60$) echelle spectra of their integrated light. All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high resolution integrated light abundance analysis of globular clusters. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The globular clusters are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc $<$ R$_{\\rm M31}$ $<$ 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H]$\\sim-1.6$ for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive globular cluster in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The alpha-element ratios are generally similar to Milky Way globular cluster and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at l...

  14. \\alpha-clustering effects in dissipative 12C+12C reactions at 95 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Baiocco, G; Gulminelli, F; D'Agostino, M; Bruno, M; Abbondanno, U; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Carboni, S; Casini, G; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, M Degerlier F; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Olmi, A; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Raduta, Ad R

    2013-01-01

    Dissipative 12C+12C reactions at 95 MeV are fully detected in charge with the GARFIELD and RCo apparatuses at LNL. A comparison to a dedicated Hauser-Feshbach calculation allows to select events which correspond, to a large extent, to the statistical evaporation of highly excited 24Mg, as well as to extract information on the isotopic distribution of the evaporation residues in coincidence with their complete evaporation chain. Residual deviations from a statistical behaviour are observed in \\alpha yields and attributed to the persistence of cluster correlations well above the 24Mg threshold for 6 \\alpha's decay.

  15. Alpha chymotrypsin coated clusters of Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biocatalysis in low water media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Joyeeta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes in low water containing non aqueous media are useful for organic synthesis. For example, hydrolases in such media can be used for synthetic purposes. Initial work in this area was carried out with lyophilized powders of enzymes. These were found to have poor activity. Drying (removing bulk water by precipitation turned out to be a better approach. As enzymes in such media are heterogeneous catalysts, spreading these precipitates over a large surface gave even better results. In this context, nanoparticles with their better surface to volume ratio provide obvious advantage. Magnetic nanoparticles have an added advantage of easy separation after the reaction. Keeping this in view, alpha chymotrypsin solution in water was precipitated over a stirred population of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in n-propanol. This led to alpha chymotrypsin activity coated over clusters of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These preparations were found to have quite high transesterification activity in low water containing n-octane. Results Precipitation of alpha chymotrypsin over a stirred suspension of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (3.6 nm diameter led to the formation of enzyme coated clusters of nanoparticles (ECCNs. These clusters were also magnetic and their hydrodynamic diameter ranged from 1.2- 2.6 microns (as measured by dynamic light scattering. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, showed that these clusters had highly irregular shapes. Transesterification assay of various clusters in anhydrous n-octane led to optimization of concentration of nanoparticles in suspension during precipitation. Optimized design of enzyme coated magnetic clusters of nanoparticles (ECCN 3 showed the highest initial rate of 465 nmol min-1 mg-1protein which was about 9 times higher as compared to the simple precipitates with an initial rate of 52 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein. Circular Dichroism (CD(with a spinning cell accessory showed that secondary structure content of the alpha

  16. How many-body correlations and $\\alpha$-clustering shape $^6$He

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Navratil, Petr; Hupin, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    The Borromean $^6$He nucleus is an exotic system characterized by two `halo' neutrons orbiting around a compact $^4$He (or $\\alpha$) core, in which the binary subsystems are unbound. The simultaneous reproduction of its small binding energy and extended matter and point-proton radii has been a challenge for {\\em ab initio} theoretical calculations based on traditional bound-state methods. Using soft nucleon-nucleon interactions based on chiral effective field theory potentials, we show that supplementing the model space with $^4$He+$n$+$n$ cluster degrees of freedom largely solves this issue. We analyze the role played by the $\\alpha$-clustering and many-body correlations, and study the dependence of the energy spectrum on the resolution scale of the interaction.

  17. Effective field theory of Bose-Einstein condensation of $\\alpha$ clusters and Nambu-Goldstone-Higgs states in $^{12}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Y; Yamanaka, Y; Ohkubo, S

    2014-01-01

    An effective field theory of $\\alpha$ cluster condensation is formulated as a spontaneously broken symmetry in quantum field theory to understand the raison d'\\^etre and nature of the Hoyle and $\\alpha$ cluster states in $^{12}$C. The Nambu-Goldstone and Higgs mode operators in infinite systems are replaced with a pair of canonical operators whose Hamiltonian gives rise to discrete energy states in addition to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes excited states. The calculations reproduce well the experimental spectrum of the $\\alpha$ cluster states. The existence of the Nambu-Goldstone-Higgs states is demonstrated.

  18. Molecular Analysis of the pmo (Particulate Methane Monooxygenase) Operons from Two Type II Methanotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Bettina; McDonald, Ian R.; Finch, Ruth; Stafford, Graham P.; Nielsen, Allan K.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2000-01-01

    The particulate methane monooxygenase gene clusters, pmoCAB, from two representative type II methanotrophs of the α-Proteobacteria, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis sp. strain M, have been cloned and sequenced. Primer extension experiments revealed that the pmo cluster is probably transcribed from a single transcriptional start site located 300 bp upstream of the start of the first gene, pmoC, for Methylocystis sp. strain M. Immediately upstream of the putative start site, co...

  19. Characterization of the proposed 4-{\\alpha} cluster state candidate in 16O

    CERN Document Server

    Li, K C W; Adsley, P; Papka, P; Smit, F D; Brümmer, J W; Diget, C Aa; Freer, M; Harakeh, M N; Kokalova, Tz; Nemulodi, F; Pellegri, L; Rebeiro, B; Swartz, J A; Triambak, S; van Zyl, J J; Wheldon, C

    2016-01-01

    The $\\mathrm{^{16}O}(\\alpha, \\alpha^{\\prime})$ reaction was studied at $\\theta_{lab} = 0^\\circ$ at an incident energy of $\\textrm{E}_{lab}$ = 200 MeV using the K600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS. Proton and $\\alpha$-decay from the natural parity states were observed in a large-acceptance silicon-strip detector array at backward angles. The coincident charged particle measurements were used to characterize the decay channels of the $0_{6}^{+}$ state in $\\mathrm{^{16}O}$ located at $E_{x} = 15.097(5)$ MeV. This state is identified by several theoretical cluster calculations to be a good candidate for the 4-$\\alpha$ cluster state. The results of this work suggest the presence of a previously unidentified resonance at $E_{x}\\approx15$ MeV that does not exhibit a $0^{+}$ character. This unresolved resonance may have contaminated previous observations of the $0_{6}^{+}$ state.

  20. Salinity Affects the Composition of the Aerobic Methanotroph Community in Alkaline Lake Sediments from the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongcui; Liu, Yongqin; Dumont, Marc; Conrad, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Lakes are widely distributed on the Tibetan Plateau, which plays an important role in natural methane emission. Aerobic methanotrophs in lake sediments reduce the amount of methane released into the atmosphere. However, no study to date has analyzed the methanotroph community composition and their driving factors in sediments of these high-altitude lakes (>4000 m). To provide new insights on this aspect, the abundance and composition in the sediments of six high-altitude alkaline lakes (including both freshwater and saline lakes) on the Tibetan Plateau were studied. The quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and 454-pyrosequencing methods were used to target the pmoA genes. The pmoA gene copies ranged 10(4)-10(6) per gram fresh sediment. Type I methanotrophs predominated in Tibetan lake sediments, with Methylobacter and uncultivated type Ib methanotrophs being dominant in freshwater lakes and Methylomicrobium in saline lakes. Combining the pmoA-pyrosequencing data from Tibetan lakes with other published pmoA-sequencing data from lake sediments of other regions, a significant salinity and alkalinity effect (P = 0.001) was detected, especially salinity, which explained ∼25% of methanotroph community variability. The main effect was Methylomicrobium being dominant (up to 100%) in saline lakes only. In freshwater lakes, however, methanotroph composition was relatively diverse, including Methylobacter, Methylocystis, and uncultured type Ib clusters. This study provides the first methanotroph data for high-altitude lake sediments (>4000 m) and shows that salinity is a driving factor for the community composition of aerobic methanotrophs.

  1. Gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs dominate cold methane seeps in floodplains of West Siberian rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshkin, Igor Y; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Lüke, Claudia; Glagolev, Mikhail V; Filippov, Illiya V; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2014-10-01

    A complex system of muddy fluid-discharging and methane (CH4)-releasing seeps was discovered in a valley of the river Mukhrinskaya, one of the small rivers of the Irtysh Basin, West Siberia. CH4 flux from most (90%) of these gas ebullition sites did not exceed 1.45 g CH4 h(-1), while some seeps emitted up to 5.54 g CH4 h(-1). The δ(13)C value of methane released from these seeps varied between -71.1 and -71.3‰, suggesting its biogenic origin. Although the seeps were characterized by low in situ temperatures (3.5 to 5°C), relatively high rates of methane oxidation (15.5 to 15.9 nmol CH4 ml(-1) day(-1)) were measured in mud samples. Fluorescence in situ hybridization detected 10(7) methanotrophic bacteria (MB) per g of mud (dry weight), which accounted for up to 20.5% of total bacterial cell counts. Most (95.8 to 99.3%) methanotroph cells were type I (gammaproteobacterial) MB. The diversity of methanotrophs in this habitat was further assessed by pyrosequencing of pmoA genes, encoding particulate methane monooxygenase. A total of 53,828 pmoA gene sequences of seep-inhabiting methanotrophs were retrieved and analyzed. Nearly all of these sequences affiliated with type I MB, including the Methylobacter-Methylovulum-Methylosoma group, lake cluster 2, and several as-yet-uncharacterized methanotroph clades. Apparently, microbial communities attenuating methane fluxes from these local but strong CH4 sources in floodplains of high-latitude rivers have a large proportion of potentially novel, psychrotolerant methanotrophs, thereby providing a challenge for future isolation studies. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Analytic view at alpha clustering in even-even heavy nuclei near magic numbers 82 and 126

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Saad M.S. [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Selangor (Malaysia); University of Malaya, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); University of Malaya, Quantum Science Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yahaya, Redzuwan; Radiman, Shahidan; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Selangor (Malaysia); Kassim, Hasan Abu; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin [University of Malaya, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); University of Malaya, Quantum Science Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-02-01

    Most studies on the determination of the alpha-decay preformation factor have used decay formulae. The preformation factor is known to contain abundant information on the nuclear structure. The successful determination of the preformation factor through the cluster formation model (CFM) motivates this study to determine the factor for nuclei near the magic numbers and present results in an analytic study based on different comparisons and observations. The difference between preformation factors obtained from CFM and from the decay formula method is significant. The formula method is used for the entire process of alpha decay as a transition between two states, whereas CFM is applied for the initial state of alpha formation. The preformation factor obtained using CFM and clusterization state representation was first compared with that obtained from the decay formula. Results were used to investigate alpha formation in even-even heavy nuclei, including 72 < Z < 92 and 92 < N < 142, near the magic numbers Z = 82 and N = 126. The values of the preformation factor were discussed and explained in detail according to the clusterization state representation to describe the most possible states of ground-state nuclei. The alpha clustering described through CFM is found to be consistent with that described using the decay formula for the open-shell nuclei of N < 126. The presence of more nucleons in the open-shell nuclei results in lower probability for alpha clustering and lower value of the preformation factor. However, few nucleons beyond the closed shell can cause higher probability for alpha clustering and larger value of the preformation factor. The maximum and minimum of the alpha-cluster formation occur in the nucleus of the double-shell closure (with N = 126 and Z = 82) and in the nucleus of two protons and two neutrons more. This formation probability is sensitive to the subshells, leading to the possibility of more clusterization states, including core-cluster

  3. Isoscalar Giant Resonance Strengths in $^{32}$S and possible excitations of superdeformed and $^{28}$Si + $\\alpha$ cluster bandheads

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, M; Sakaguchi, H; Akimune, H; Fujiwara, M; Garg, U; Hara, K; Hashimoto, H; Hoffman, J; Kawabata, T; Kawase, K; Murakami, T; Nakanishi, K; Nayak, B K; Terashima, S; Uchida, M; Yasuda, Y; Yosoi, M

    2013-01-01

    Isoscalar giant resonances and low spin states in $^{32}$S have been measured with inelastic $\\alpha$ scattering at extremely forward angles including zero degrees at E$_{\\alpha}$ = 386 MeV. By applying the multipole decomposition analysis, various excited states are classified according to their spin and parities (J$^{\\pi}$), and are discussed in relation to the super deformed and $^{28}$Si + $\\alpha$ cluster bands.

  4. Molecular resonance phenomena and alpha-clustering recent progress and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2004-01-01

    The connection between molecular resonance phenomena in light heavy-ion collisions, alpha-clustering and extremely deformed states in light $\\alpha$-like nuclei is discussed. For example, the superdeformed bands recently discovered in light N=Z nuclei such as $^{36}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{48}$Cr, and $^{56}$Ni by $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy may have a special link with resonant states in collisions with $\\alpha$-like nuclei. The resonant reactions involving identical bosons such as $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C, $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O $^{24}$Mg+$^{24}$Mg and $^{28}$Si+$^{28}$Si are of interest. For instance, a butterfly mode of vibration of the J$^{\\pi}$ = 38$^{+}$ resonance of $^{28}$Si+$^{28}$Si has been discovered in recent particle $\\gamma$-ray angular correlations measurements. The search for signatures of strongly deformed shapes and clustering in light N=Z nuclei is also the domain of charged particle spectroscopy. The investigation of $\\gamma$-decays in $^{24}$Mg has been undertaken for excitation energies where previously n...

  5. Tetrahedral shape and surface density wave of $^{16}$O caused by $\\alpha$-cluster correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    $\\alpha$-cluster correlations in the $0^+_1$ and $3^-_1$ states of $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O are studied using the method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics, with which nuclear structures are described from nucleon degrees of freedom without assuming existence of clusters. The intrinsic states of $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O have triangle and tetrahedral shapes, respectively, because of the $\\alpha$-cluster correlations. These shapes can be understood as spontaneous symmetry breaking of rotational invariance, and the resultant surface density oscillation is associated with density wave (DW) caused by the instability of Fermi surface with respect to particle-hole correlations with the wave number $\\lambda=3$. $^{16}$O($0^+_1$) and $^{16}$O($3^-_1$) are regarded as a set of parity partners constructed from the rigid tetrahedral intrinsic state, whereas $^{12}$C($0^+_1$) and $^{12}$C($3^-_1$) are not good parity partners as they have triangle intrinsic states of different sizes with significant shape fluctuation because...

  6. Modelling the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    that heterotrophs and nitrifiers co-existed with methanotrophs in the biofilm. Heterotrophic biomass grew on soluble polymers formed by the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifier populations developed because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. Based on these experimental...

  7. High diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal soils affected by high methane fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas 25 times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils act as source, but also as biological filter for methane release to the atmosphere. For long time, volcanic/geothermal soils has been considered inhospitable for methanotrophic microorganisms, but new extremophile methanotrophs belonging to Verrucomicrobia were identified in three different areas (Pozzuoli, Italy; Hell's Gate, New Zealand; Kamchatka, Russia), explaining anomalous behaviours in methane leakages of several geothermal/volcanic sites. Our aim was to increase the knowledge of the relationship between methane emissions from volcanic/geothermal areas and biological methane oxidation, by investigating a geothermal site of Pantelleria island (Italy). Pantelleria Island hosts a high enthalpy geothermal system characterized by high temperature, high CH4 and very low H2S fluxes. Such characteristics are reflected in potentially great supply of methane for methanotrophs and scarce presence of inhibitors of their activity (H2S and NH3) in the Pantelleria soils. Potential methanotrophic activity within these soils was already evidenced by the CH4/CO2 ratio of the flux measurements which was lower than that of the respective fumarolic manifestations indicating a loss of CH4 during the gas travel towards the earth's surface. In this study laboratory incubation experiments using soils sampled at Favara Grande, the main hydrothermal area of Pantelleria, showed very high methane consumption rates (up to 9500 ng CH4 h-1 g-1). Furthermore, microbiological and culture-independent molecular analyses allowed to detect the presence of methanotrophs affiliated to Gamma- and Alpha-Proteobacteria and to the newly discovered acidothermophilic methanotrophs Verrucomicrobia. Culturable methanotrophic Alpha-proteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated by

  8. Investigating the alpha-clustering on the surface of $^{120}$Sn via ($p$,$p\\alpha$) reaction and the validity of the factorization approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The $^{120}$Sn($p$,$p\\alpha$)$^{116}$Cd reaction at 392 MeV is investigated with the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA) framework. We show that this reaction is very peripheral mainly because of the strong absorption of $\\alpha$ by the reaction residue $^{116}$Cd, and the $\\alpha$-clustering on the nuclear surface can be probed clearly. We investigate also the validity of the so-called factorization approximation that has frequently been used so far. It is shown that the kinematics of $\\alpha$ in the nuclear interior region is significantly affected by the distortion of $^{116}$Cd, but it has no effect on the reaction observables because of the strong absorption in that region.

  9. The role of cluster mergers and travelling shocks in shaping the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function at $\\bf z\\sim0.2$: `sausage' and `toothbrush' clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Röttgering, Huub J A; van Weeren, Reinout J

    2013-01-01

    The most extreme cluster mergers can lead to massive cluster-wide travelling shock waves. The CIZA J2242.8+5301 ('sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`toothbrush') clusters ($z\\sim0.2$) host enormous radio-emitting shocks with simple geometry. We investigate the role of mergers and shocks in shaping the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function, using custom-made narrow-band filters matching the cluster redshifts mounted on the INT. We surveyed $\\sim0.28$ deg$^2$ for each cluster and found $181$ line emitters in the `sausage' (volume of $3.371\\times10^3$ Mpc$^3$ for H$\\alpha$ at $z=0.1945$) and $141$ in the `toothbrush' ($4.546\\times10^3$ Mpc$^3$ for H$\\alpha$ at $z=0.225$), out of which $49$ (`sausage') and $30$ (`toothbrush') are expected to be H$\\alpha$. We build luminosity functions for the field-of-view down to an average limiting star formation rate of $0.14$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$, find good agreement with field luminosity functions at $z=0.2$, but significant differences between the shapes of the luminosity functions...

  10. The widths of the {alpha} decaying states of {sup 12}C within the three-cluster model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, D.V.; Jensen, A.S.; Fynbo, H.O.U

    2003-05-05

    We estimate the widths of the alpha decaying states of {sup 12}C (1{sup +}, 1{sup -}, 1{sup -1}, 2{sup +}, 2{sup -}, 3{sup -}, and 4{sup +}) within the three-alpha cluster model. We solve the Faddeev equations using the hyperspheric approach and calculate the decisive effective hyper-radial barriers. We calculate the widths in the WKB approximation and compare with experimental data.

  11. Diversity of methanotroph communities in a basalt aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, D T; Reed, D W; Petzke, L M; Igoe, A L; Delwiche, M E; Roberto, F F; McKinley, J P; Whiticar, M J; Colwell, F S

    2004-06-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria play an important role in global cycling of carbon and co-metabolism of contaminants. Methanotrophs from pristine regions of the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA; Idaho, USA) were studied in order to gain insight into the native groundwater communities' genetic potential to carry out TCE co-metabolism. Wells were selected that were proximal to a TCE plume believed to be undergoing natural attenuation. Methane concentrations ranged from 1 to >1000 nM. Carbon isotope ratios and diversity data together suggest that the SRPA contains active communities of methanotrophs that oxidize microbially produced methane. Microorganisms removed from groundwater by filtration were used as inocula for enrichments or frozen immediately and DNA was subsequently extracted for molecular characterization. Primers that specifically target methanotroph 16S rRNA genes or genes that code for subunits of soluble or particulate methane monooxygenase, mmoX and pmoA, respectively, were used to characterize the indigenous methanotrophs via PCR, cloning, RFLP analysis, and sequencing. Type I methanotroph clones aligned with Methylomonas, Methylocaldum, and Methylobacter sequences and a distinct 16S rRNA phylogenetic lineage grouped near Methylobacter. The majority of clone sequences in type II methanotroph 16S rRNA, pmoA, and mmoX gene libraries grouped closely with sequences in the Methylocystis genus. A subset of the type II methanotroph clones from the aquifer had sequences that aligned most closely to Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis spp., known TCE-co-metabolizing methanotrophs.

  12. Diversity of methanotrophs in a simulated modified biocover reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zifang Chi; Wenjing Lu; Hongtao Wang; Yan Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A simulated landfill biocover microcosm consisting of a modifying ceramsite material and compost were investigated.Results show that the mixture can improve the material porosity and achieve a stable and highly efficient (100%) methane oxidation over an extended operating period.The diversity of the methanotrophic community in the microcosm was assessed.Type Ⅰ methanotrophs were enhanced in the microcosm due to the increased air diffusion and distribution,whereas the microbial diversity and population density of type Ⅱ methanotrophs were not significantly affected.Moreover,the type Ⅰ methanotrophic community structure significantly varied with the reactor height,whereas that of type Ⅱ methanotrophic communities did not exhibit a spatial variation.Phylogenetic analysis showed that type Ⅰ methanotroph-based nested polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) resulted in the detection of eight different populations,most of which are related to Methylobacter sp.,whereas that of type Ⅱ resulted in the detection of nine different populations,most of which are related to Methylocystaceae.Methanotrophic community analysis also indicated that a number of new methanotrophic genera not closely related to any known methanotrophic populations were present.

  13. Unified description of the proton, alpha, cluster decays and spontaneously fissions half- life

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht

    2016-01-01

    Some time ago the possibility of classical (without Gamow tunneling) universal description of radioactive nuclei decay was demonstrated. Such possibility is basis on the classical interpretation of Bohmian Psi-field reality in Bohmian-Chetaev mechanics and the hypothesis for the presence of dissipative forces, generated from the Gryzinski translational precession of the charged particles spin, in Langevin- Kramers diffusion mechanism. In this paper is present an unified model of proton, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity and spontaneous fission half-life as explicit function which depends on the total decay energy and kinetic energy, the number of protons and neutrons of daughter product, the number of protons and neutrons of mother nuclei and from a set) unknown digital parameters. The Half- lifes of the 573 nuclei taken from NuDat database together with the recent experimental data from Oganessian provide a basis for discovering the explicit form of the Kramers solution of Langevin type equation in a framew...

  14. Methanotrophic activity and diversity of methanotrophs in volcanic geothermal soils at Pantelleria (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-10-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic or geothermal soils are not only a source of methane, but are also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated at about 2.5 Mg a-1 (t a-1). Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values of up to 59.2 nmol g-1 soil d.w. h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile, the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer, and values greater than 6.23 nmol g-1 h-1 were still detected up to a depth of 13 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still detectable consumption at 80 °C (> 1.25 nmol g-1 h-1) was recorded. The soil total DNA extracted from the three samples was probed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers, targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected at sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not at FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site (FAV2) pointed to a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs, distantly related to Methylocaldum-Metylococcus genera, and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures under a methane

  15. The clustering of Lyman alpha emitters at z=7: implications for reionization and host halo masses

    CERN Document Server

    Sobacchi, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    The Ly$\\alpha$ line of high-redshift galaxies has emerged as a powerful probe of both early galaxy evolution and the epoch of reionization (EoR). Motivated by the upcoming wide-field survey with the Subaru Hyper Supreme-Cam (HSC), we study the angular correlation function (ACF) of narrow-band selected, $z\\approx7$ LAEs. The clustering of LAEs is determined by both: (i) their typical host halo masses, $\\bar{M}_{\\rm h}$; (ii) the absorption due to a patchy EoR, characterized by an average neutral fraction of the IGM, $\\bar{x}_{\\rm HI}$. We bracket the allowed LAE ACF by exploring extreme scenarios for both the intrinsic Ly$\\alpha$ emission and the morphology of cosmic ionized patches in physical EoR models. Current LAE ACF measurements imply that the Universe is mostly ionized at $z\\approx7$, with $\\bar{x}_{\\rm HI}\\lesssim0.5$ (1-$\\sigma$) even for an extremely conservative model of intrinsic emission. The upcoming Ultra Deep campaign with the HSC could improve on these constraints by tens of percent, or $\\bar{...

  16. Probable alpha and $14$^C cluster emission from hyper Ac nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study on the probability for the emission of 4^He and 14^C cluster from hyper ${207-234}^$Ac and non-strange normal ${207-234}^$Ac nuclei are performed for the first time using our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The predicted half lives show that hyper ${207-234}^$Ac nuclei are unstable against 4^He emission and 14^C emission from hyper ${217-228}^$Ac are favorable for measurement. Our study also show that hyper ${207-234}^$Ac are stable against hyper 4^He and 14^C emission. The role of neutron shell closure (N=126) in hyper 214^Fr daughter and role of proton/ neutron shell closure (Z =82, N =126) in hyper 210^Bi daughter are also revealed. As hyper-nuclei decays to normal nuclei by mesonic/non-mesonic decay and since most of the predicted half lives for 4^He and 14^C emission from normal Ac nuclei are favourable for measurement, we presume that alpha and 14^C cluster emission from hyper Ac nuclei can be detected in laboratory in a cascade (two-step) process.

  17. Probable alpha and {sup 14}C cluster emission from hyper Ac nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P. [Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur (India)

    2013-10-15

    A systematic study on the probability for the emission of {sup 4}He and {sup 14}C cluster from hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 207-234}Ac and non-strange normal {sup 207-234}Ac nuclei are performed for the first time using our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The predicted half lives show that hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 207-234}Ac nuclei are unstable against {sup 4}He emission and {sup 14}C emission from hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 217-228}Ac are favorable for measurement. Our study also show that hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 207-234}Ac are stable against hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He and {sub {Lambda}}{sup 14}C emission. The role of neutron shell closure (N = 126) in hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 214}Fr daughter and role of proton/neutron shell closure (Z {approx} 82, N = 126) in hyper {sub {Lambda}}{sup 210}Bi daughter are also revealed. As hyper-nuclei decays to normal nuclei by mesonic/non-mesonic decay and since most of the predicted half lives for {sup 4}He and {sup 14}C emission from normal Ac nuclei are favourable for measurement, we presume that alpha and {sup 14}C cluster emission from hyper Ac nuclei can be detected in laboratory in a cascade (two-step) process. (orig.)

  18. Recovery of paddy soil methanotrophs from long term drought

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collet, S.; Reim, A.; Ho, A.; Frenzel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Air-dried paddy soils stored for 1–18 years were used to examine the resistance of methanotrophs to drought. Older air-dried soils representing longer-lasting drought events reduced methanotrophic diversity, and adversely affected methane oxidation rate after re-wetting. In early incubations the typ

  19. Cosmological parameters from combining the Lyman-alpha forest with CMB, galaxy clustering and SN constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Seljak, U; McDonald, P; Seljak, Uros; Slosar, Anze; Donald, Patrick Mc

    2006-01-01

    We combine the Ly-alpha forest power spectrum (LYA) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and high resolution spectra with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) including 3-year WMAP, supernovae (SN) and galaxy clustering constraints to derive new constraints on cosmological parameters. The existing LYA power spectrum analysis is supplemented by constraints on the mean flux decrement derived using a principal component analysis for quasar continua, which improves the LYA constraints on the linear power. The joint analysis reduces the errors on all parameters and prefers the simplest 6 parameter cosmological model. We find some tension between the WMAP3 and LYA power spectrum amplitudes, at the ~2 sigma level, which is partially alleviated by the inclusion of other observations: we find sigma_8=0.85+-0.02 compared to sigma_8=0.80+-0.03 without LYA. For the slope we find n_s=0.965+-0.012. We find no evidence for running of the spectral index, dn/dln k=-0.020+-0.012, in agreement with inflation. The limits on...

  20. [Culturable psychrotolerant methanotrophic bacteria in landfill cover soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallistova, A Iu; Montonen, L; Jurgens, G; Munster, U; Kevbrina, M V; Nozhevnikova, A N

    2014-01-01

    Methanotrophs closely related to psychrotolerant members of the genera Methylobacter and Methylocella were identified in cultures enriched at 10@C from landfill cover soil samples collected in the period from April to November. Mesophilic methanotrophs of the genera Methylobacter and Methylosinus were found in cultures enriched at 20 degrees C from the same cover soil samples. A thermotolerant methanotroph related to Methylocaldum gracile was identified in the culture enriched at 40 degrees C from a sample collected in May (the temperature of the cover soil was 11.5-12.5 degrees C). In addition to methanotrophs, methylobacteria of the genera Methylotenera and Methylovorus and members of the genera Verrucomicrobium, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Dokdonella, Candidatus Protochlamydia, and Thiorhodospira were also identified in the enrichment cultures. A methanotroph closely related to the psychrotolerant species Methylobacter tundripaludum (98% sequence identity of 16S r-RNA genes with the type strain SV96(T)) was isolated in pure culture. The introduction of a mixture of the methanotrophic enrichments, grown at 15 degrees C, into the landfill cover soil resulted in a decrease in methane emission from the landfill surface in autumn (October, November). The inoculum used was demonstrated to contain methanotrophs closely related to Methylobacter tundripaludum SV96.

  1. Clustering Pre-equilibrium Model Analysis for Nucleon-induced Alpha-particle Spectra up to 200 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Y.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The clustering exciton model of Iwamoto and Harada is applied to the analysis of pre-equilibrium (N, xα energy spectra for medium-to-heavy nuclei up to 200 MeV. In this work, we calculate alpha-particle formation factors without any approximations that appear in the original model. The clustering process is also considered in both the primary and second pre-equilibrium emissions. We optimize the exciton and the clustering model parameters simultaneously by looking at the experimental (N, xN and (N, xα energy spectra. The experimental alpha-particle spectra are well reproduced with a unique set of clustering model parameters, which is independent of incident neutrons/protons. The present analysis also implies that the clustering model parameter is not so different between the medium and heavy nuclei. Our calculations reproduce experimental data generally well up to the incident energy of ~150 MeV, but underestimations are seen above this energy.

  2. Sucrose metabolism in halotolerant methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Sergey Y; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2015-04-01

    Sucrose accumulation has been observed in some methylotrophic bacteria utilizing methane, methanol, or methylated amines as a carbon and energy source. In this work, we have investigated the biochemical pathways for sucrose metabolism in the model halotolerant methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The genes encoding sucrose-phosphate synthase (Sps), sucrose-phosphate phosphatase (Spp), fructokinase (FruK), and amylosucrase (Ams) were co-transcribed and displayed similar expression levels. Functional Spp and Ams were purified after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Recombinant Spp exhibited high affinity for sucrose-6-phosphate and stayed active at very high levels of sucrose (K i  = 1.0 ± 0.6 M). The recombinant amylosucrase obeyed the classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the reactions of sucrose hydrolysis and transglycosylation. As a result, the complete metabolic network for sucrose biosynthesis and re-utilization in the non-phototrophic organism was reconstructed for the first time. Comparative genomic studies revealed analogous gene clusters in various Proteobacteria, thus indicating that the ability to produce and metabolize sucrose is widespread among prokaryotes.

  3. Diversity and distribution of methanotrophic archaea at cold seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Katrin; Lösekann, Tina; Boetius, Antje; Kort, Renate; Amann, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigated by using 16S rRNA-based methods the distribution and biomass of archaea in samples from (i) sediments above outcropping methane hydrate at Hydrate Ridge (Cascadia margin off Oregon) and (ii) massive microbial mats enclosing carbonate reefs (Crimea area, Black Sea). The archaeal diversity was low in both locations; there were only four (Hydrate Ridge) and five (Black Sea) different phylogenetic clusters of sequences, most of which belonged to the methanotrophic archaea (ANME). ANME group 2 (ANME-2) sequences were the most abundant and diverse sequences at Hydrate Ridge, whereas ANME-1 sequences dominated the Black Sea mats. Other seep-specific sequences belonged to the newly defined group ANME-3 (related to Methanococcoides spp.) and to the Crenarchaeota of marine benthic group B. Quantitative analysis of the samples by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that ANME-1 and ANME-2 co-occurred at the cold seep sites investigated. At Hydrate Ridge the surface sediments were dominated by aggregates consisting of ANME-2 and members of the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus branch (DSS) (ANME-2/DSS aggregates), which accounted for >90% of the total cell biomass. The numbers of ANME-1 cells increased strongly with depth; these cells accounted 1% of all single cells at the surface and more than 30% of all single cells (5% of the total cells) in 7- to 10-cm sediment horizons that were directly above layers of gas hydrate. In the Black Sea microbial mats ANME-1 accounted for about 50% of all cells. ANME-2/DSS aggregates occurred in microenvironments within the mat but accounted for only 1% of the total cells. FISH probes for the ANME-2a and ANME-2c subclusters were designed based on a comparative 16S rRNA analysis. In Hydrate Ridge sediments ANME-2a/DSS and ANME-2c/DSS aggregates differed significantly in morphology and abundance. The relative abundance values for these subgroups were remarkably different at Beggiatoa sites (80% ANME-2a, 20

  4. Diversity and Distribution of Methanotrophic Archaea at Cold Seeps†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Katrin; Lösekann, Tina; Boetius, Antje; Kort, Renate; Amann, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigated by using 16S rRNA-based methods the distribution and biomass of archaea in samples from (i) sediments above outcropping methane hydrate at Hydrate Ridge (Cascadia margin off Oregon) and (ii) massive microbial mats enclosing carbonate reefs (Crimea area, Black Sea). The archaeal diversity was low in both locations; there were only four (Hydrate Ridge) and five (Black Sea) different phylogenetic clusters of sequences, most of which belonged to the methanotrophic archaea (ANME). ANME group 2 (ANME-2) sequences were the most abundant and diverse sequences at Hydrate Ridge, whereas ANME-1 sequences dominated the Black Sea mats. Other seep-specific sequences belonged to the newly defined group ANME-3 (related to Methanococcoides spp.) and to the Crenarchaeota of marine benthic group B. Quantitative analysis of the samples by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that ANME-1 and ANME-2 co-occurred at the cold seep sites investigated. At Hydrate Ridge the surface sediments were dominated by aggregates consisting of ANME-2 and members of the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus branch (DSS) (ANME-2/DSS aggregates), which accounted for >90% of the total cell biomass. The numbers of ANME-1 cells increased strongly with depth; these cells accounted 1% of all single cells at the surface and more than 30% of all single cells (5% of the total cells) in 7- to 10-cm sediment horizons that were directly above layers of gas hydrate. In the Black Sea microbial mats ANME-1 accounted for about 50% of all cells. ANME-2/DSS aggregates occurred in microenvironments within the mat but accounted for only 1% of the total cells. FISH probes for the ANME-2a and ANME-2c subclusters were designed based on a comparative 16S rRNA analysis. In Hydrate Ridge sediments ANME-2a/DSS and ANME-2c/DSS aggregates differed significantly in morphology and abundance. The relative abundance values for these subgroups were remarkably different at Beggiatoa sites (80% ANME-2a, 20

  5. A large H$\\alpha$ survey of star formation in relaxed and merging galaxy cluster environments at $z\\sim0.15-0.3$

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Afonso, Ana; Alegre, Lara; Calhau, João; Santos, Sergio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from the largest H$\\alpha$ survey of star formation and AGN activity in galaxy clusters. Using 9 different narrow band filters, we select $>3000$ H$\\alpha$ emitters within $19$ clusters and their larger scale environment over a total volume of $1.3\\times10^5$ Mpc$^3$. The sample includes both relaxed and merging clusters, covering the $0.15-0.31$ redshift range and spanning from $5\\times10^{14}$ $M_{\\odot}$ to $30\\times10^{14}$ $M_{\\odot}$. We find that the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function (LF) for merging clusters has a higher characteristic density $\\phi^*$ compared to relaxed clusters. $\\phi^*$ drops from cluster core to cluster outskirts for both merging and relaxed clusters, with the merging cluster values $\\sim0.3$ dex higher at each projected radius. The characteristic luminosity $L^*$ drops over the $0.5-2.0$ Mpc distance from the cluster centre for merging clusters and increases for relaxed objects. Among disturbed objects, clusters hosting large-scale shock waves (traced by...

  6. Alpha decay chains study for the recently observed superheavy element Z=117 within the Isospin Cluster Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Sushil

    2011-01-01

    The recently observed $\\alpha$-decay chains $^{293-294}117$ were produced by the fusion reactions with target $^{249}Bk$ and projectile $^{48}Ca$ at Dubna in Russia. The reported cross-sections for the mentioned reaction are $\\sigma=0.5(+1.1,-0.4)$pb and $\\sigma$=1.3(+1.5,-0.6)$pb$ at $E^{*}=35MeV$ and $E^{*}=39MeV$, respectively. The Q-values of $\\alpha$-decay and the half-lives $Log_{10}T^{\\alpha}_{1/2}$(s) are calculated for the $\\alpha$-decay chains of $^{293-294}117$ nuclei, within the framework of Isospin Cluster Model (ICM). In the ICM model the proximity energy is improved by using the isospin dependent radius of parent, daughter and alpha particle. The binding energy $B(A_{i}, Z_{i})$ (i=1,2) of any nucleus of mass number A and atomic number Z was obtained from a phenomenological and more genaralized BW formula given by \\cite{samanta02}. The calculated results in ICM are compared with the experimental results and other theoretical Macro-Microscopic(M-M), RMF(with NL3 and SFU Gold forces parameter) mo...

  7. The importance of methanotrophic activity in geothermal soils of Pantelleria island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Methane is a major contributor to the greenhouse effect, its atmospheric concentration being more than doubled since the XIX century. Every year 22 Tg of methane are released to the atmosphere from several natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include geothermal/volcanic areas but the estimation of the total methane emission from these areas is currently not well defined since the balance between emission through degassing and microbial oxidation within the soils is not well known. Microbial oxidation in soils contributes globally for about 3-9% to the removal of methane from the atmosphere and recent studies evidenced methanotrophic activity also in soils of volcanic/geothermal areas despite their harsh environmental conditions (high temperatures, low pH and high concentrations of H2S and NH3). Methanotrophs are a diverse group of bacteria that are able to metabolize methane as their only source of carbon and energy and are found within the Alpha and Gamma classes of Proteobacteria and within the phylum Verrucomicrobia. Our purpose was to study the interaction between methanotrophic communities and the methane emitted from the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission has been previously estimated in about 2.5 t/a. Laboratory incubation experiments with soil samples from Favara Grande showed methane consumption values of up to 9500 ng g-1 dry soil per hour while soils collected outside the geothermal area consume less than 6 ng g-1 h-1. The maximum consumption was measured in the shallowest part of the soil profile (1-3 cm) and high values (>100 ng g-1 h-1) were maintained up to a depht of 15 cm. Furthermore, the highest consumption was measured at 37°C, and a still recognizable consumption (>20 ng g-1 h-1) at 80°C, with positive correlation with the methane concentration in the incubation atmosphere. These results can be considered a clear evidence of the presence of methanotrophs that

  8. Clustering and lifetime of Lyman Alpha Emitters in the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Anne; Müller, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We calculate Lyman Alpha Emitter (LAE) angular correlation functions (ACFs) at $z\\simeq6.6$ and the fraction of lifetime (for the 100 Myrs preceding $z\\simeq6.6$) galaxies spend as Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) with/without Lyman Alpha (Ly\\alpha) emission using a model that combines SPH cosmological simulations (GADGET-2), dust attenuation and a radiative transfer code (pCRASH). The ACFs are a powerful tool that significantly narrows the 3D parameter space allowed by LAE Ly$\\alpha$ and UV luminosity functions (LFs) alone. With this work, we simultaneously constrain the escape fraction of ionizing photons $f_{esc}=0.05-0.5$, the mean fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) $\\leq 0.01$ and the dust-dependent ratio of the escape fractions of Ly$\\alpha$ and UV continuum photons $f_\\alpha/f_c=0.6-1.2$. Our results show that reionization has the largest impact on the amplitude of the ACFs, and its imprints are clearly distinguishable from those of $f_{esc}$ and $f_\\alpha/f_c$. We also show that...

  9. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer H. A. Timmers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., “trace methane oxidation”. In turn, ANME can produce methane, but only during net methane oxidation (i.e., enzymatic back flux. Net AOM is exergonic when coupled to an external electron acceptor such as sulfate (ANME-1, ANME-2abc, and ANME-3, nitrate (ANME-2d, or metal (oxides. In this review, the reversibility of the methanogenesis pathway and essential differences between ANME and methanogens are described by combining published information with domain based (metagenome comparison of archaeal methanotrophs and selected archaea. These differences include abundances and special structure of methyl coenzyme M reductase and of multiheme cytochromes and the presence of menaquinones or methanophenazines. ANME-2a and ANME-2d can use electron acceptors other than sulfate or nitrate for AOM, respectively. Environmental studies suggest that ANME-2d are also involved in sulfate-dependent AOM. ANME-1 seem to use a different mechanism for disposal of electrons and possibly are less versatile in electron acceptors use than ANME-2. Future research will shed light on the molecular basis of reversal of the methanogenic pathway and electron transfer in different ANME types.

  10. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., “trace methane oxidation”). In turn, ANME can produce methane, but only during net methane oxidation (i.e., enzymatic back flux). Net AOM is exergonic when coupled to an external electron acceptor such as sulfate (ANME-1, ANME-2abc, and ANME-3), nitrate (ANME-2d), or metal (oxides). In this review, the reversibility of the methanogenesis pathway and essential differences between ANME and methanogens are described by combining published information with domain based (meta)genome comparison of archaeal methanotrophs and selected archaea. These differences include abundances and special structure of methyl coenzyme M reductase and of multiheme cytochromes and the presence of menaquinones or methanophenazines. ANME-2a and ANME-2d can use electron acceptors other than sulfate or nitrate for AOM, respectively. Environmental studies suggest that ANME-2d are also involved in sulfate-dependent AOM. ANME-1 seem to use a different mechanism for disposal of electrons and possibly are less versatile in electron acceptors use than ANME-2. Future research will shed light on the molecular basis of reversal of the methanogenic pathway and electron transfer in different ANME types. PMID:28154498

  11. Environmental evidence for net methane production and oxidation in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lloyd, Karen; Teske, Andreas; Alperin, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Uncultured ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea are often assumed to be obligate methanotrophs that are incapable of net methanogenesis, and are therefore used as proxies for anaerobic methane oxidation in many environments in spite of uncertainty regarding their metabolic capabilities...

  12. Atomistic Simulations of Helium Clustering and Grain Boundary Reconstruction in Alpha-Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation and clustering of He atoms at Σ3 <110> {112} and Σ73b<110>{661} grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc Fe, as well as their effects on GB reconstruction, have been investigated using atomic-level computer simulations. The accumulation of He atoms and the evolution of the GB structure all depend on local He concentration, temperature and the original GB structure. At a local He concentration of 1%, small He clusters are formed in the Σ3 GB, accompanied by the emission of single self-interstitial Fe atoms (SIAs). At a He concentration of 5%, a large number of SIAs are emitted from He clusters in the Σ3 GB and collect at the periphery of these clusters. The SIAs eventually form <100> dislocation loops between two He clusters. It is likely that impurities may promote the formation of <100> loops and enhance their stabilities in α-Fe. At a He concentration of 10%, the large number of emitted SIAs are able to rearrange themselves, forming a new GB plane within the Σ3 GB, which results in self-healing of the GB and leads to GB migration. In contrast to the Σ3 GB, He clusters are mainly formed along the GB dislocation lines in the Σ73b, and the emitted SIAs accumulate at the cores of the GB dislocations, leading to the climb of the dislocations within the GB plane. As compared to bulk Fe, a higher number density of clusters form at GBs, but the average cluster size is smaller. The product of cluster density and average cluster size is roughly constant at a given He level, and is about the same in bulk and GB regions and varies linearly with the He concentration.

  13. Elastic $\\alpha$-$^{12}$C scattering at low energies in cluster effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Shung-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    The elastic $\\alpha$-$^{12}$C scattering at low energies is studied employing an effective field theory in which the $\\alpha$ and $^{12}$C states are treated as elementary like fields. We discuss scales of the theory at stellar energy region that the ${}^{12}$C($\\alpha$, $\\gamma$)$^{16}$O process occurs, and then obtain an expression of the elastic scattering amplitudes in terms of effective range parameters. Using experimental data of the phase shifts for $l=0,1,2$ channels at low energies, for which the resonance regions are avoided, we fix values of the parameters and find that the phase shifts at the low energies are well reproduced by using three effective range parameters for each channel. Furthermore, we discuss problems and uncertainties of the present approach when the amplitudes are extrapolated to the stellar energy region.

  14. A giant Ly$\\alpha$ nebula in the core of an X-ray cluster at $z=1.99$: implications for early energy injection

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, F; Finoguenov, A; Strazzullo, V; Brun, A M C Le; Vignali, C; Bournaud, F; Dickinson, M; Renzini, A; Béthermin, M; Zanella, A; Gobat, R; Cimatti, A; Elbaz, D; Onodera, M; Pannella, M; Sargent, M T; Arimoto, N; Carollo, M; Starck, J-L

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of a giant $\\gtrsim$100 kpc Ly$\\alpha$ nebula detected in the core of the X-ray emitting cluster CL J1449+0856 at $z=1.99$ through Keck/LRIS narrow-band imaging. This detection extends the known relation between Ly$\\alpha$ nebulae and overdense regions of the Universe to the dense core of a $5-7\\times10^{13}$ M$_{\\odot}$ cluster. The most plausible candidates to power the nebula are two Chandra-detected AGN host cluster members. Given the physical conditions of the Ly$\\alpha$-emitting gas and the possible interplay with the X-ray phase, we argue that the Ly$\\alpha$ nebula would be short-lived ($\\lesssim10$ Myr) if not continuously replenished with cold gas at a rate of $\\gtrsim1000$ Myr. Cooling from the X-ray phase is disfavored as the replenishing mechanism, primarily because of the high Ly$\\alpha$ to X-ray luminosity ratio ($L_{\\mathrm{Ly\\alpha}}/L_{\\mathrm{X}} \\approx0.3$), $\\gtrsim10-1000\\times$ higher than in local cool-core clusters. Cosmological cold flows are disfavored by cu...

  15. Members of the methanotrophic genus Methylomarinum inhabit inland mud pots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle T. Fradet

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Proteobacteria capable of converting the greenhouse gas methane to biomass, energy, and carbon dioxide represent a small but important sink in global methane inventories. Currently, 23 genera of methane oxidizing (methanotrophic proteobacteria have been described, although many are represented by only a single validly described species. Here we describe a new methanotrophic isolate that shares phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic relatedness with the marine methanotroph Methylomarinum vadi. However, the new isolate derives from a terrestrial saline mud pot at the northern terminus of the Eastern Pacific Rise (EPR. This new cultivar expands our knowledge of the ecology of Methylomarinum, ultimately towards a fuller understanding of the role of this genus in global methane cycling.

  16. With the alpha-cluster model to explain the change of separating energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lun-Dong; GUO Jian-You; FANG Xiang-Zheng

    2009-01-01

    It was supposed that, the nucleus was composed of α -cluster, pn-pair, and nn-pair. The reciprocity of the α-cluster, pn-pair, and nn-pair caused the regular change of the separating energy to separate the nn-pair in the exotic nuclei. The regular change was that the separating energy was high behind low to separate the nn-pair in the light and exotic nuclei. This phenomenon must had more profound physical meaning.

  17. Phylogenetic and biochemical characterization of a novel cluster of intracellular fungal alpha-amylase enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaaij, R. M.; Janecek, S.; van der Maarel, M. J. E. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Janeček, Š.

    2007-01-01

    Currently known fungal alpha-amylases are well-characterized extracellular enzymes that are classified into glycoside hydrolase subfamily GH13_1. This study describes the identification, and phylogenetic and biochemical analysis of novel intracellular fungal a-amylases. The phylogenetic analysis sho

  18. Large-scale clustering of Lyman-alpha emission intensity from SDSS/BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, Rupert A C; Zheng, Zheng; Bolton, Adam; Dawson, Kyle S; Peterson, Jeffrey B; York, Donald G; Eisenstein, Daniel; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel; Delubac, Timothée; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, José; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H; Yèche, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) We detect the large-scale structure of Lya emission in the Universe at redshifts z=2-3.5 by measuring the cross-correlation of Lya surface brightness with quasars in SDSS/BOSS. We use a million spectra targeting Luminous Red Galaxies at z, the amplitude of mass fluctuations, and the quasar and Lya emission bias factors. Using known values, we infer (b_alpha/3) = (3.9 +/- 0.9) x 10^-21 erg/s cm^-2 A^-1 arcsec^-2, where b_alpha is the Lya emission bias factor. If the dominant sources of Lya emission are star forming galaxies, we infer rho_SFR = (0.28 +/- 0.07) (3/b_alpha) /yr/Mpc^3 at z=2-3.5. For b_alpha=3, this value is a factor of 21-35 above previous estimates from individually detected Lya emitters, although consistent with the total rho_SFR derived from dust-corrected, continuum UV surveys. 97% of the Lya emission in the Universe at these redshifts is therefore undetected in previous surveys of Lya emitters. Our measurement is much greater than seen from stacking analyses of faint halos surroun...

  19. Construction of the astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway in a methanotrophic bacterium Methylomonas sp. strain 16a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rick W; Yao, Henry; Stead, Kristen; Wang, Tao; Tao, Luan; Cheng, Qiong; Sharpe, Pamela L; Suh, Wonchul; Nagel, Eva; Arcilla, Dennis; Dragotta, Dominic; Miller, Edward S

    2007-04-01

    Methylomonas sp. strain 16a is an obligate methanotrophic bacterium that uses methane or methanol as the sole carbon source. An effort was made to engineer this organism for astaxanthin production. Upon expressing the canthaxanthin gene cluster under the control of the native hps promoter in the chromosome, canthaxanthin was produced as the main carotenoid. Further conversion to astaxanthin was carried out by expressing different combinations of crtW and crtZ genes encoding the beta-carotenoid ketolase and hydroxylase. The carotenoid intermediate profile was influenced by the copy number of these two genes under the control of the hps promoter. Expression of two copies of crtZ and one copy of crtW led to the accumulation of a large amount of the mono-ketolated product adonixanthin. On the other hand, expression of two copies of crtW and one copy of crtZ resulted in the presence of non-hydroxylated carotenoid canthaxanthin and the mono-hydroxylated adonirubin. Production of astaxanthin as the predominant carotenoid was obtained in a strain containing two complete sets of carotenoid biosynthetic genes. This strain had an astaxanthin titer ranging from 1 to 2.4 mg g(-1) of dry cell biomass depending on the growth conditions. More than 90% of the total carotenoid was astaxanthin, of which the majority was in the form of E-isomer. This result indicates that it is possible to produce astaxanthin with desirable properties in methanotrophs through genetic engineering.

  20. B lymphocytes induce the formation of follicular dendritic cell clusters in a lymphotoxin alpha-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y X; Huang, G; Wang, Y; Chaplin, D D

    1998-04-06

    Lymphotoxin (LT)alpha is expressed by activated T cells, especially CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells, and by activated B and natural killer cells, but the functions of this molecule in vivo are incompletely defined. We have previously shown that follicular dendritic cell (FDC) clusters and germinal centers (GCs) are absent from the peripheral lymphoid tissues of LTalpha-deficient (LTalpha-/-) mice. LTalpha-/- mice produce high levels of antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)M, but very low levels of IgG after immunization with sheep red blood cells. We show here that LTalpha-expressing B cells are essential for the recovery of primary, secondary, and memory humoral immune responses in LTalpha-/- mice. It is not necessary for T cells to express LTalpha to support these immune functions. Importantly, LTalpha-expressing B cells alone are essential and sufficient for the formation of FDC clusters. Once these clusters are formed by LTalpha-expressing B cells, then LTalpha-deficient T cells can interact with B cells to generate GCs and productive class-switched antibody responses. Thus, B cells themselves provide an essential signal that induces and maintains the lymphoid microenvironment essential for GC formation and class-switched Ig responses.

  1. Description of alpha decay and cluster radioactivity in the dinuclear system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklin, S. N.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    A unified description of cluster radioactivity and α-decay of cold nuclei in the dinuclear system model is proposed. Quantum dynamical fluctuations along the charge (mass) asymmetry coordinate determine the spectroscopic factor, and tunneling along the relative distance coordinate determines the penetrability of the barrier of the nucleus-nucleus interaction potential. A new method for calculating the spectroscopic factor is proposed. The hindrance factors for the orbital angular momentum transfer are studied. A potential reason for the half-life to deviate from the Geiger-Nuttall law in α-decays of neutron-deficient nuclei 194, 196Rn is found. The fine structure of α-decays of U and Th isotopes is predicted and characterized. The model is used to describe α-decays from the rotational band of even-even nuclei. The known half-lives in the regions of "lead" and "tin" radioactivities are reproduced well, and the most probable cluster yields are predicted. The cluster decay of excited nuclei is discussed. The relation of cluster radioactivity to spontaneous fission and highly deformed nuclear states is analyzed.

  2. The Detailed Chemical Properties of M31 Star Clusters. I. Fe, Alpha and Light Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-01

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ~ - 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab Z. Abdallah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U and Lower (KB-L brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces.

  4. Aquatic plant surface as a niche for methanotrophs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko eYoshida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential local CH4 sink in various plant parts as a boundary environment of CH4 emission and consumption. By comparing CH4 consumption activities in cultures inoculated with parts from 39 plant species, we observed significantly higher consumption of CH4 associated with aquatic plants than other emergent plant parts such as woody plant leaves, macrophytic marine algae, and sea grass. In situ activity of CH4 consumption by methanotrophs associated with different species of aquatic plants was in the range of 3.7 – 37 μmol⋅h-1⋅g-1 dry weight, which was ca 5.7-370 fold higher than epiphytic CH4 consumption in submerged parts of emergent plants. The qPCR-estimated copy numbers of the particulate methane monooxygenase-encoding gene pmoA were variable among the aquatic plants and ranged in the order of 105 to 107 copies⋅g-1 dry weight, which correlated with the observed CH4 consumption activities. Phylogenetic identification of methanotrophs on aquatic plants based on the pmoA sequence analysis revealed a predominance of diverse gammaproteobacterial type-I methanotrophs, including a phylotype of a possible plant-associated methanotroph with the closest identity (86-89% to Methylocaldum gracile.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of {alpha}zirconium (IV) hydrogenphosphate containing metallic copper clusters; Sintese e caracterizacao de {alpha}-fosfato de zirconio(IV) contendo agregados de cobre metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Alexilda Oliveira de [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Itapetinga, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Estudos Basicos e Instrumentais; Rangel, Maria do Carmo [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Fisico-Quimica; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica]. E-mail: alexilda@uesb.br

    2005-02-01

    The {alpha}-zirconium (IV) hydrogenphosphate ({alpha}-ZrP) has received great attention in the last years due to its properties like ion exchange, intercalation, ionic conductivity and catalytic activity. This work reports a method to produce metallic copper clusters on {alpha}-ZrP to be used as catalysts in petrochemical processes. It was found that the solids were non-crystalline regardless of the uptake of copper and the reduction. The specific surface area increased as a consequence of the increase of the interlayer distance to accept the copper ions between the layers. During the reduction, big clusters of copper (0,5-11{mu}) with different sizes and shapes were produced. (author)

  6. M/L, H-alpha Rotation Curves, and HI Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals: I. Data

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, N P; Herter, T; Giovanelli, R; Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Herter, Terry; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    A survey of 329 nearby galaxies (redshift z < 0.045) has been conducted to study the distribution of mass and light within spiral galaxies over a range of environments. The 18 observed clusters and groups span a range of richness, density, and X-ray temperature, and are supplemented by a set of 30 isolated field galaxies. Optical spectroscopy taken with the 200-inch Hale Telescope provides separately resolved H-alpha and [NII] major axis rotation curves for the complete set of galaxies, which are analyzed to yield velocity widths and profile shapes, extents and gradients. HI line profiles provide an independent velocity width measurement and a measure of HI gas mass and distribution. I-band images are used to deconvolve profiles into disk and bulge components, to determine global luminosities and ellipticities, and to check morphological classification. These data are combined to form a unified data set ideal for the study of the effects of environment upon galaxy evolution.

  7. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, S B; Guzmán, F; Di Marco, A; García, F; Rodríguez, O; Gonçalves, M

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the effective liquid drop model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer (VMAS) and Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient (WW). The calculated half lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. These comparisons show that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified, theoretical framework. A table listing the predicted half-life values, tau sub c , is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear breakup such that -7.30 -17.0, where tau is the total half life of the parent nucleus.

  8. Cluster structure of neutron-rich 10Be and 14C via resonant alpha scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Kolata, J. J.; Mittig, W.; AT-TPC Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-rich ^{10} Be and ^{14} C nuclei were studied via resonant α scattering of radioactive 6 He and ^{10} Be beams, respectively, produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (pAT-TPC) was used as a thick gaseous α target to induce resonant scattering and as a device to track reacted particles inside the target, providing continuous excitation functions and angular distributions over a wide range of energies and angles. The experimental results indicate a melting phenomenon of α clusters in the 4+ rotational member of the ^{10} Be ground state and a linear chain alignment of three α clusters in ^{14} C excited states, as recently predicted by an anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics calculation.

  9. Alpha clustering in Ti isotopes: 40,44,48Ca + α resonant scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Sam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements were made of the 4He(40,44,48Ca,α resonant scattering reactions at 180° and up to Ec.m. ~ 11.5MeV, using the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics technique. These measurements are discussed, with a focus on assessing their usefulness for investigating α-clustering in medium mass 44,48,52Ti nuclei.

  10. Probing the statistical decay and alpha-clustering effects in 12c+12c and 14n+10b reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, Luca; Agostino, M D; Bruno, M; Gulminelli, F; Cinausero, M; Degerlier, M; Fabris, D; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Casini, G; Gelli, N; Lopez, A; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Valdre', S

    2013-01-01

    An experimental campaign has been undertaken at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, in order to progress in our understanding of the statistical properties of light nuclei at excitation energies above particle emission threshold, by measuring exclusive data from fusion-evaporation reactions. A first reaction 12C+12C at 7.9 AMeV beam energy has been measured, using the GARFIELD+Ring Counter experimental setup. Fusion-evaporation events have been exclusively selected. The comparison to a dedicated Hauser-Feshbach calculation allows us to give constraints on the nuclear level density at high excitation energy for light systems ranging from C up to Mg. Out-of-equilibrium emission has been evidenced and attributed both to entrance channel effects favoured by the cluster nature of reaction partners and, in more dissipative events, to the persistence of cluster correlations well above the 24Mg threshold for 6 alphas decay. The 24Mg compound nucleus has been studied with a new measurement 14N + 10B at 5.7 AM...

  11. Effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on the activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K; Tate, Kevin R; Kolipaka, Gokul; Hedley, Carolyn B; Macdonald, Catriona A; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on methane oxidation and the methanotrophic communities in soils from three different New Zealand sites. Methane oxidation was measured in soils from two pine (Pinus radiata) forests and one shrubland (mainly Kunzea ericoides var. ericoides) and three adjacent permanent pastures. The methane oxidation rate was consistently higher in the pine forest or shrubland soils than in the adjacent pasture soils. A combination of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and stable isotope probing (SIP) analyses of these soils revealed that different methanotrophic communities were active in soils under the different vegetations. The C18 PLFAs (signature of type II methanotrophs) predominated under pine and shrublands, and C16 PLFAs (type I methanotrophs) predominated under pastures. Analysis of the methanotrophs by molecular methods revealed further differences in methanotrophic community structure under the different vegetation types. Cloning and sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the particulate methane oxygenase gene (pmoA) from different samples confirmed the PLFA-SIP results that methanotrophic bacteria related to type II methanotrophs were dominant in pine forest and shrubland, and type I methanotrophs (related to Methylococcus capsulatus) were dominant in all pasture soils. We report that afforestation and reforestation of pastures caused changes in methane oxidation by altering the community structure of methanotrophic bacteria in these soils.

  12. Modelling of the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    . It indicated that the most influential factors were those related to the biofilm (i.e. density; solid volume fraction; thickness). This suggests that in order to improve the model, further research is needed in the field of biofilm structure and composition. (C) 1997 IAWQ. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.......A model describing the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm is presented. This model involves simultaneous growth of methanotrophs, heterotrophs and nitrifiers. Heterotrophic biomass grows on soluble polymers which arise from the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifiers develop...... because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. A comparison of this model with experimental data showed that the biofilm growth, methane removal, oxygen consumption, product formation and biofilm detachment could be fitted well. Parameter estimation yielded a maximum growth rate...

  13. Recurrence and frequency of disturbance have cumulative effect on methanotrophic activity, abundance, and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eHo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by two-fold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a ‘tipping point’ where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency.

  14. Recurrence and Frequency of Disturbance have Cumulative Effect on Methanotrophic Activity, Abundance, and Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Adrian; van den Brink, Erik; Reim, Andreas; Krause, Sascha M B; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2015-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II) were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by twofold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter) methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis) methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a 'tipping point' where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency.

  15. Methanotrophic bacteria in oilsands tailings ponds of northern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi-Mehrabad, Alireza; He, Zhiguo; Tamas, Ivica; Sharp, Christine E; Brady, Allyson L; Rochman, Fauziah F; Bodrossy, Levente; Abell, Guy CJ; Penner, Tara; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Dunfield, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    We investigated methanotrophic bacteria in slightly alkaline surface water (pH 7.4–8.7) of oilsands tailings ponds in Fort McMurray, Canada. These large lakes (up to 10 km2) contain water, silt, clay and residual hydrocarbons that are not recovered in oilsands mining. They are primarily anoxic and produce methane but have an aerobic surface layer. Aerobic methane oxidation was measured in the surface water at rates up to 152 nmol CH4 ml−1 water d−1. Microbial diversity was investigated via pyrotag sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA genes, as well as by analysis of methanotroph-specific pmoA genes using both pyrosequencing and microarray analysis. The predominantly detected methanotroph in surface waters at all sampling times was an uncultured species related to the gammaproteobacterial genus Methylocaldum, although a few other methanotrophs were also detected, including Methylomonas spp. Active species were identified via 13CH4 stable isotope probing (SIP) of DNA, combined with pyrotag sequencing and shotgun metagenomic sequencing of heavy 13C-DNA. The SIP-PCR results demonstrated that the Methylocaldum and Methylomonas spp. actively consumed methane in fresh tailings pond water. Metagenomic analysis of DNA from the heavy SIP fraction verified the PCR-based results and identified additional pmoA genes not detected via PCR. The metagenome indicated that the overall methylotrophic community possessed known pathways for formaldehyde oxidation, carbon fixation and detoxification of nitrogenous compounds but appeared to possess only particulate methane monooxygenase not soluble methane monooxygenase. PMID:23254511

  16. ZFIRE: Galaxy Cluster Kinematics, H$\\alpha$ Star Formation Rates, and Gas-Phase Metallicities of XMM-LSS J02182-05102 at z=1.6233

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Kim-Vy H; Yuan, Tiantian; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Glazebrook, Karl; Kewley, Lisa J; Momcheva, Ivelina; Papovich, Casey J; Quadri, Ryan; Rudnick, Greg; Saintonge, Amélie; Spitler, Lee R; Straatman, Caroline; Tomczak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We spectroscopically survey the galaxy cluster XMM-LSS J02182-05102 (hereafter IRC 0218) using LRIS (optical) and MOSFIRE (near-infrared) on Keck I as part of the ZFIRE survey. IRC 0218 has a narrow redshift range of $1.612cluster redshift and velocity dispersion are $z_{\\rm cl}=1.6233\\pm0.0003$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm cl}=254\\pm50$ km s$^{-1}$. We reach NIR line sensitivities of $\\sim0.3\\times10^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ that, combined with multi-wavelength photometry, provide extinction-corrected H$\\alpha$ star formation rates (SFR), gas phase metallicities from [NII]/H$\\alpha$, and stellar masses. We measure an integrated H$\\alpha$ SFR of $\\sim325{\\rm M}_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ (26 members; R$_{\\rm proj}<2$ Mpc) and show that the elevated star formation in the cluster core (R$_{\\rm proj}<0.25$ Mpc) is driven by the concentration of star-forming members, but the average SFR per H$\\alpha$-detected galaxy is half th...

  17. Recovery of methanotrophs from disturbance: population dynamics, evenness and functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Adrian; Lüke, Claudia; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Biodiversity is claimed to be essential for ecosystem functioning, but is threatened by anthropogenic disturbances. Prokaryotes have been assumed to be functionally redundant and virtually inextinguishable. However, recent work indicates that microbes may well be sensitive to environmental disturbance. Focusing on methane-oxidizing bacteria as model organisms, we simulated disturbance-induced mortality by mixing native with sterilized paddy soil in two ratios, 1:4 and 1:40, representing moderate and severe die-offs. Disturbed microcosms were compared with an untreated control. Recovery of activity and populations was followed over 4 months by methane uptake measurements, pmoA-qPCR, pmoA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. Diversity and evenness of methanotrophs decreased in disturbed microcosms, but functioning was not compromised. We consistently observed distinctive temporal shifts between type I and type II methanotrophs, and a rapid population growth leading to even higher cell numbers comparing disturbed microcosms with the control. Overcompensating mortality suggested that population size in the control was limited by competition with other bacteria. Overall, methanotrophs showed a remarkable ability to compensate for die-offs.

  18. Feasibility of atmospheric methane removal using methanotrophic biotrickling filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Semrau, Jeremy D. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential {proportional_to}23 times that of carbon dioxide. Here, we describe the modeling of a biotrickling filtration system composed of methane-consuming bacteria, i.e., methanotrophs, to assess the utility of these systems in removing methane from the atmosphere. Model results indicate that assuming the global average atmospheric concentration of methane, 1.7 ppmv, methane removal is ineffective using these methanotrophic biofilters as the methane concentration is too low to enable cell survival. If the concentration is increased to 500-6,000 ppmv, however, similar to that found above landfills and in concentrated animal feeding operations (factory farms), 4.98-35.7 tons of methane can be removed per biofilter per year assuming biotrickling filters of typical size (3.66 m in diameter and 11.5 m in height). Using reported ranges of capital, operational, and maintenance costs, the cost of the equivalent ton of CO{sub 2} removal using these systems is $90-$910 ($2,070-$20,900 per ton of methane), depending on the influent concentration of methane and if heating is required. The use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible and, provided that either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive. (orig.)

  19. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Guzman, F.; Dimarco, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Rodriguez, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Instituto Superior de Ciencias e Tecnologia Nucleares, La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer with Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient V{sub MAS}/WW. The calculated half-lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for the proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. Results have shown that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified theoretical framework. A Table listing the predicted half-life values, {tau}{sub c} is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear break-up such that -7.30 <{approx_equal} log{sub 10} {tau}{sub c} [S] <{approx_equal} 27.50 and log {sub 10}({tau}/{tau}{sub c}) > -17.0, where {tau} is the total half-life of the parent nucleus. (author)

  20. Quantum-chemical analysis of thermodynamics of two-dimensional cluster formation of alpha-amino acids at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Fomina, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Aksenenko, E V; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2009-12-31

    The semiempirical quantum-chemical PM3 method is used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of clusterization of the S-form of alpha-amino acids with the general composition C(n)H(2n+1)CHNH(2)COOH (n = 5-15) at 278 and 298 K. It is shown that six stable conformations of monomers exist, for which the thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and Gibbs' energy) of the formation and absolute entropy are calculated. The correlation dependencies of the calculated parameters on the alkyl chain length are found to be linear. The structures of the monomers are used to build larger clusters (dimers, tetramers, hexamers). For all small clusters (comprised of two to six molecules), the thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated. It is shown that for tetramers and hexamers the enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs' energy of clusterization are linearly dependent on the alkyl chain length, whereas for the dimers these dependencies are stepwise. The thermodynamic characteristics of clusterization of associates tilted by angles of 9 and 30 degrees with respect to the normal to the interface are calculated. It is shown that the 30 degrees angle orientation is more energetically advantageous for this class of compounds. The geometric parameters of the unit cell characteristic for the infinite 2D film which corresponds to the most advantageous conformation of the monomer were calculated using the PM3 parametrization to be a = 4.57-4.71 A and b = 5.67-5.75 A, with the angle between the axes theta = 100-103 degrees . These values agree well with the available experimental data. Spontaneous clusterization of alpha-amino acids at the air/water interface at 278 K takes place if the alkyl chain length exceeds 11-12 carbon atoms, whereas for 298 K this clusterization threshold corresponds to 13-14 carbon atoms in the alkyl chain, also in agreement with the experimental data.

  1. M/L, H-alpha Rotation Curves, and HI Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals: II. Evidence for Galaxy Infall

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, N P; Giovanelli, R; Herter, T; Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry

    2004-01-01

    We have conducted a study of optical and HI properties of spiral galaxies (size, luminosity, H-alpha flux distribution, circular velocity, HI gas mass) to explore the role of gas stripping as a driver of morphological evolution in clusters. We find a strong correlation between the spiral and S0 fractions within clusters, and the spiral fraction scales tightly with cluster X-ray gas luminosity. We explore young star formation and identify spirals that are (1) asymmetric, with truncated H-alpha emission and HI gas reservoirs on the leading edge of the disk, on a first pass through the dense intracluster medium in the cores of rich clusters; (2) strongly HI deficient and stripped, with star formation confined to the inner 5 kpc/h and 3 disk scale lengths; (3) reddened, extremely HI deficient and quenched, where star formation has been halted across the entire disk. We propose that these spirals are in successive stages of morphological transformation, between infalling field spirals and cluster S0s, and that the...

  2. Causal and synthetic associations of variants in the SERPINA gene cluster with alpha1-antitrypsin serum levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Andri Thun

    Full Text Available Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12. But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410, suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1% and low-frequent (MAF 1-5% variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273 was successful (P<0.0001, as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57. Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397, associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in the SERPINA gene

  3. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Gian Andri; Kumar, Ashish; Obeidat, Ma'en; Zorzetto, Michele; Haun, Margot; Curjuric, Ivan; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Jackson, Victoria E.; Albrecht, Eva; Ried, Janina S.; Teumer, Alexander; Lopez, Lorna M.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Enroth, Stefan; Bossé, Yohan; Hao, Ke; Timens, Wim; Gyllensten, Ulf; Polasek, Ozren; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Sandford, Andrew J.; Deary, Ian J.; Koch, Beate; Reischl, Eva; Schulz, Holger; Hui, Jennie; James, Alan L.; Rochat, Thierry; Russi, Erich W.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Strachan, David P.; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.; Dahl, Morten; Fallgaard Nielsen, Sune; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Kronenberg, Florian; Luisetti, Maurizio; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs) >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = −0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10−12). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1%) and low-frequent (MAF 1–5%) variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z) variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273) was successful (P<0.0001), as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57). Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397), associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in

  4. Selective grazing of methanotrophs by protozoa in a rice field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Jun; Frenzel, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Biological methane oxidation is a key process in the methane cycle of wetland ecosystems. The methanotrophic biomass may be grazed by protozoa, thus linking the methane cycle to the soil microbial food web. In the present study, the edibility of different methanotrophs for soil protozoa was compared. The number of methanotroph-feeding protozoa in a rice field soil was estimated by determining the most-probable number (MPN) using methanotrophs as food bacteria; naked amoebae and flagellates were the dominant protozoa. Among ten methanotrophic strains examined as a food source, seven yielded a number of protozoa comparable with the yield with Escherichia coli [10(4) MPN (g soil dry weight)(-1)], and three out of four Methylocystis spp. yielded significantly fewer numbers [10(2)-10(3) MPN (g soil dry weight)(-1)]. The lower edibility of the Methylocystis spp. was not explained either by their growth phase or by harmful effects on protozoa. Incubation of the soil under methane resulted in a higher number of protozoa actively grazing on methanotrophs, especially on the less-edible group. Protozoa isolated from the soil demonstrated a grazing preference on the different methanotrophs consistent with the results of MPN counts. The results indicate that selective grazing by protozoa may be a biological factor affecting the methanotrophic community in a wetland soil.

  5. TCE degradation in a methanotrophic attached-film bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennell, D.; Nelson, Y.M.; Underhill, S.E.; White, T.E.; Jewell, W.J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Agricultural and Biological Engineering)

    1993-09-20

    Trichloroethene was degraded in expanded-bed bioreactors operated with mixed-culture methanotrophic attached films. Biomass concentrations of 8 to 75 g volatile solids (VS) per liter static bed (L[sub sb]) were observed. Batch TCE degradation rates at 35C followed the Michaelis-Menten model, and a maximum TCE degradation rate (q[sub max]) of 10.6 mg TCE/gVS [center dot] day and a half velocity coefficient (K[sub s]) of 2.8 mg TCE/L were predicted. Continuous-flow kinetics also followed the Michaelis-Menten model, but other parameters may be limiting, such as dissolved copper and dissolved methane-q[sub max] and K[sub s] were 2.9 mg TCE/gVS [center dot] day and 1.5 mg TCE/L, respectively, at low copper concentrations (0.003 to 0.006 mg Cu/L). The maximum rates decreased substantially with small increases in dissolved copper. Methane consumption during continuous-flow operation varied from 23 to 1,200 g CH[sub 4]/g TCE degraded. Increasing the influent dissolved methane concentration from 0.01 mg/L to 5.4 mg/L reduced the TCE degradation rate by nearly an order of magnitude at 21C. Exposure of biofilms to 1.4 mg/L tetrachloroethene (PCE) at 35C resulted in the loss of methane utilization ability. Tests with methanotrophs grown on granular activated carbon indicated that lower effluent TCE concentrations could be obtained. The low efficiencies of TCE removal and low degradation rates obtained at 35C suggest that additional improvements will be necessary to make methanotrophic TCE treatment attractive.

  6. Genes and enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis in halotolerant methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) is a widely distributed compatible solute accumulated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms to prevent osmotic stress in highly saline environments. Ectoine as a highly water keeping compound stabilizing biomolecules and whole cells can be used in scientific work, cosmetics, and medicine. Detailed understanding of the organization/regulation of the ectoine biosynthetic pathway in various producers is an active area of research. Here we review current knowledge on some genetic and enzymatic aspects of ectoine biosynthesis in halophilic and halotolerant methanotrophs. By using PCR methodology, the genes coding for the specific enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis, diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), DABA acetyltransferase (EctA), and ectoine synthase (EctC), were identified in several methanotrophic species. Organization of these genes in either ectABC or ectABC-ask operons, the latter additionally encoding aspartate kinase isozyme (Ask), correlated well with methanotroph halotolerance and intracellular ectoine level. A new gene, ectR1 encoding the MarR-like transcriptional regulatory protein EctR1, negatively controlling transcription of ectoine biosynthetic genes was found upstream of ectABC-ask operon in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The ectR-like genes were also found in halotolerant methanol utilizers Methylophaga alcalica and Methylophaga thalassica as well as in several genomes of nonmethylotrophic species. The His(6)-tagged DABA acetyltransferases from Mm. alcaliphilum, M. alcalica, and M. thalassica were purified and the enzyme properties were found to correlate with the ecophysiologies of these bacteria. All these discoveries should be very helpful for better understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of this important natural compound, and for the targeted metabolic engineering of its producers.

  7. Spatial patterns of methane oxidation and methanotrophic diversity in landfill cover soils of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zi-Fang; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic CH4 oxidation is an important CH4 sink in landfills. To investigate the distribution and community diversity of methanotrophs and link with soil characteristics and operational parameters (e.g., concentrations of O2, CH4), cover soil samples were collected at different locations and depths from the Mengzi semi-aerobic landfill (SAL) in Yunnan Province of southern China. Specific PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and realtime PCR were used to examine methanotrophs in the landfill cover soils. The results showed that different locations did harbor distinct methanotroph communities. Methanotrophs were more abundant in areas near the venting pipes because of the higher O2 concentrations. The depth of 20-25 cm, where the ratio of the CH4 to O2 was within the range from 1.3 to 8.6, was more conducive to the growth of CH4-oxidizing bacteria. Type II methanotrophs dominated in all samples compared with Type I methanotrophs, as evidenced by the high ratio of Type II to Type I methanotrophic copy numbers (from 1.76 to 11.60). The total copy numbers of methanotrophs detected were similar to other ecosystems, although the CH4 concentration was much higher in SAL cover soil. Methylobacter and Methylocystis were the most abundant Type I and Type II methanotrophs genera, respectively, in the Mengzi SAL. The results suggested that SALs could provide a special environment with both high concentrations of CH4 and O2 for methanotrophs, especially around the vertical venting pipes.

  8. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSharp

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium Methylacidiphilum infernorum strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo, ‘universal’ pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, Methylacidiphilum fixes carbon autotrophically, and uses methane only for energy generation. As a result, techniques used to detect methanotrophs in the environment such as 13CH4-stable isotope probing (SIP and pmoA-targeted PCR do not detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, and they may have been overlooked in previous environmental studies. We developed a modified SIP technique to identify active methanotrophic verrucomicrobia in the environment by labelling with 13CO2 and 13CH4, individually and in combination. Testing the protocol in M. infernorum strain V4 resulted in assimilation of 13CO2 but not 13CH4, verifying its autotrophic lifestyle. To specifically detect methanotrophs (as opposed to other autotrophs via 13CO2-SIP, a quantitative PCR (qPCR assay specific for verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes was developed and used in combination with SIP. Incubation of an acidic, high-temperature geothermal soil with 13CH4 + 12CO2 caused little shift in the density distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes relative to controls. However, labelling with 13CO2 in combination with 12CH4 or 13CH4 induced a strong shift in the distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes towards the heavy DNA fractions. The modified SIP technique demonstrated that the primary methanotrophs active in the soil were autotrophs and belonged to the Verrucomicrobia. This is the first demonstration of autotrophic, non-proteobacterial methanotrophy in situ, and provides a tool to detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in other ecosystems.

  9. Photometric and H-alpha studies of two extreme mass-ratio short period contact binaries in the direction of open cluster Praesepe

    CERN Document Server

    Rukmini, J

    2016-01-01

    We present the high precession photometric studies in V band and spectroscopic studies centered around H-alpha line for two extreme mass-ratio short period contact binaries ASAS J082243+1927.0 (V1) and ASAS J085710+1856.8 (V2). The variables in study are in the direction of open cluster Praesepe. From the light curve analysis V1 was found to be a low mass-ratio over-contact binary of A-type, with a mass ratio q 0.121 and fill-out factor f 72%, and V2 was found to be a low mass contact binary of W-type, with a mass-ratio q 1.29 and fill-out factor f 11% (marginal contact). The study of H-alpha absorption line profile of both the variables shows variation in equivalent widths (EWs) with orbital phases. The mean EWs of the H-alpha line were obtained as 1.6+or-0.13 A and 1.18+or-0.12 A for V1 and V2 respectively. The variation of H-alpha absorption with respect to phase is explained to be due to chromospheric activity in V1, as evident from the O Connell effect and that due to chromospheric flares, winds or photo...

  10. Clustering effect of {sup 12}C fragmentation in p+{sup 12}C, {alpha}+{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N+{sup 12}C reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Hisashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Ono, Akira

    1997-05-01

    In general, self-conjugate 4n-nuclei have anomalous excited states with the excitation energy 10-15 MeV, which are recognized to be generated by the change of the structure from the shell-model-like one into the cluster one due to the activation of the clustering degrees of freedom. In AMD (Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics) fermic nature of nucleons is treated exactly, because the wave function of A-body system is antisymmetrized by a Slater determinant. Hence Pauli principle has been fully incorporated in AMD. As a result, it was concluded that the features of {sup 12}C fragmentation are originated from the activation of alpha-cluster degrees of freedom by indicating the excitation energy spectra of {sup 12}C before its breakup at the dynamical stage. Excitation energy spectrum before {sup 12}C breakup into any fragments consists of two components. One distributes in the range 7-15 MeV and the other in the range above 15 MeV. Accordingly, the features is related to those excited states excited states of {sup 12}C that is considered to have the cluster structure. (G.K.)

  11. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate.

  12. Faddeev calculation of 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems using alpha alpha resonating-group method kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Suzuki, Y; Baye, D; Sparenberg, J M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out Faddeev calculations of three-alpha (3 alpha) and two-alpha plus Lambda (alpha alpha Lambda) systems, using two-cluster resonating-group method kernels. The input includes an effective two-nucleon force for the alpha alpha resonating-group method and a new effective Lambda N force for the Lambda alpha interaction. The latter force is a simple two-range Gaussian potential for each spin-singlet and triplet state, generated from the phase-shift behavior of the quark-model hyperon-nucleon interaction, fss2, by using an inversion method based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Owing to the exact treatment of the Pauli-forbidden states between the clusters, the present three-cluster Faddeev formalism can describe the mutually related, alpha alpha, 3 alpha and alpha alpha Lambda systems, in terms of a unique set of the baryon-baryon interactions. For the three-range Minnesota force which describes the alpha alpha phase shifts quite accurately, the ground-state and excitation energies of 9Be Lambda are...

  13. Using H-alpha Morphology and Surface Brightness Fluctuations to Age-Date Star Clusters in M83

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, Bradley C; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaleida, Catherine; Mutchler, Max; Calzetti, Daniela; Saha, Abhijit; O'Connell, Robert; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J; Dopita, Michael A; Frogel, Jay A; Hall, Donald N B; Holtzman, Jon A; Kimble, Randy A; McCarthy, Patrick J; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joseph I; Trauger, John T; Walker, Alistair R; Windhorst, Rogier A; Young, Erick T; 10.1088/0004-637X/729/2/78

    2011-01-01

    We use new WFC3 observations of the nearby grand design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of Halpha emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than tau ~10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (tau 10 Myr) clusters. A by-product of this study is the identification of 22 "single-star" HII regions in M83, with central stars having ages ~4 Myr.

  14. M/L, H-alpha Rotation Curves, and HI Measurements for 329 Nearby Cluster and Field Spirals: III. Evolutionin Fundamental Galaxy Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, N P; Giovanelli, R; Herter, T; Vogt, Nicole P.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Herter, Terry

    2004-01-01

    We have conducted a study of optical and HI properties of spiral galaxies (size, luminosity, H-alpha flux distribution, circular velocity, HI gas mass) to investigate causes (e.g., nature versus nurture) for variation within the cluster environment. We find HI deficient cluster galaxies to be offset in Fundamental Plane space, with disk scale lengths decreased by a factor of 25%. This may be a relic of early galaxy formation, caused by the disk coalescing out of a smaller, denser halo (e.g., higher concentration index) or by truncation of the hot gas envelope due to the enhanced local density of neighbors, though we cannot completely rule out the effect of the gas stripping process. The spatial extent of H-alpha flux and the B-band radius also decreases, but only in early type spirals, suggesting that gas removal is less efficient within steeper potential wells (or that stripped late type spirals are quickly rendered unrecognizable). We find no significant trend in stellar mass-to-light ratios or circular vel...

  15. The active methanotrophic community in a wetland from the High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Christiane; Hestnes, Anne Grethe; Svenning, Mette Marianne; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The dominant terminal process of carbon mineralization in most freshwater wetlands is methanogenesis. With methane being an important greenhouse gas, the predicted warming of the Arctic may provide a positive feedback. However, the amount of methane released to the atmosphere may be controlled by the activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) living in the oxic surface layer of wetlands. Previously, methanotrophs have been isolated and identified by genetic profiling in High Arctic wetlands showing the presence of only a few genotypes. Two isolates from Solvatnet (Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen; 79°N) are available: Methylobacter tundripaludum (type I) and Methylocystis rosea (type II), raising the question whether the low diversity is a cultivation effect. We have revisited Solvatnet applying stable isotope probing (SIP) with (13) C-labelled methane. 16S rRNA profiling revealed active type I methanotrophs including M. tundripaludum, while no active type II methanotrophs were identified. These results indicate that the extant M. tundripaludum is an active methane oxidizer at its locus typicus; furthermore, Methylobacter seems to be the dominant active genus. Diversity of methanotrophs was low as compared, e.g. to wetland rice fields in the Mediterranean. This low diversity suggests a high vulnerability of Arctic methanotroph communities, which deserves more attention.

  16. Influence of light intensity on methanotrophic bacterial activity in Petit Saut Reservoir, French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumestre, J F; Guézennec, J; Galy-Lacaux, C; Delmas, R; Richard, S; Labroue, L

    1999-02-01

    One year after impoundment in January 1994, methanotrophic bacteria in Petit Saut Reservoir (French Guiana) were active at the oxic-anoxic interface. This activity was revealed by the sudden extinction of diffusive methane emission (600 metric tons of CH4. day-1 for the whole lake surface area, i.e., 360 km2). Lifting of inhibition was suspected. After reviewing the potential inhibitors of this physiological guild (O2, NH4+, sulfides) and considering the similarities with nitrifiers, we suggest that sunlight influenced the methanotrophic bacteria. On the basis of phospholipid analysis, only a type II methanotrophic community was identified in the lake. Both growth and methanotrophic activity of an enriched culture, obtained in the laboratory, were largely inhibited by illumination over 150 microeinsteins. m-2. s-1. These results were confirmed on a pure culture of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3B. In situ conditions showed that water transparency was quite stable in 1994 and 1995 and that the oxycline moved steadily deeper until January 1995. Considering the mean illumination profile during this period, we showed that removal of methanotrophic growth inhibition could only occur below a 2-m depth. The oxycline reached this level in October 1994, allowing methanotrophic bacteria to develop and to consume the entire methane emission 4 months later.

  17. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Ferrarotti, Ilaria

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onse...

  18. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this

  19. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Production and Trichloroethylene Degradation by a Type I Methanotroph, Methylomonas methanica 68-1

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Sung-Cheol; Bowman, John P.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A methanotroph (strain 68-1), originally isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer, was identified as the type I methanotroph Methylomonas methanica on the basis of intracytoplasmic membrane ultrastructure, phospholipid fatty acid profile, and 16S rRNA signature probe hybridization. Strain 68-1 was found to oxidize naphthalene and TCE via a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and thus becomes the first type I methanotroph known to be able to produce this enzyme. The specif...

  20. Genomic and physiological analysis of carbon storage in the verrucomicrobial methanotroph "Ca. Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum" SolV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fouad eKhadem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Candidatus Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV is a verrucomicrobial methanotroph that can grow in extremely acidic environments at high temperature. Strain SolV fixes carbon dioxide (CO2 via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle with methane as energy source, a trait so far very unusual in methanotrophs. In this study, the ability of Ca. M. fumariolicum to store carbon was explored by genome analysis, physiological studies and electron microscopy. When cell cultures were depleted for nitrogen, glycogen storage was clearly observed in cytoplasmic storage vesicles by electron microscopy. After cessation of growth, the dry weight kept increasing and the bacteria were filled up almost entirely by glycogen. This was confirmed by biochemical analysis, which showed that glycogen accumulated to 36% of the total dry weight of the cells. When methane was removed from the culture, this glycogen was consumed within 47 days. During the period of glycogen consumption, the bacteria kept their viability high when compared to bacteria without glycogen (from cultures growing exponentially. The latter bacteria lost viability already after a few days when starved for methane. Analysis of the draft genome of Ca. M. fumariolicum SolV demonstrated that all known genes for glycogen storage and degradation were present and also transcribed. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes showed that they form a separate cluster with Ca. M. infernorum V4, and the most closely related other sequences only have an identity of 40%. This study presents the first physiological evidence of glycogen storage in the phylum Verrucomicrobia and indicates that carbon storage is important for survival at times of methane starvation.

  1. Ionization Cluster Size Distributions Created by Low Energy Electrons and Alpha Particles in Nanometric Track Segment in Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Bantsar, Aliaksandr

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with nanometric targets is a field of interest for many branches of science such as: radiology, oncology, radiation protection and nanoelectronics. A new experimental technique known as nanodosimetry has been developed for the qualitative as well as quantitative description of these types of interactions. The work presented here is a contribution to this development, namely by further improvement of the new experimental technique called the Jet Counter, originally developed at the Andrzej So{\\l}tan Institute for Nuclear Studies. The Jet Counter is a unique device in the world for studying the interaction of low energy electrons with nanometer targets in the range 2-10 nm (in unit density). The basic experimental result is the frequency distribution of ionization cluster size produced by ionizing particles in a gaseous (nitrogen or propane) nanometric track segment. The first experimental data on the frequency distribution of ionization cluster size produced by low energy ...

  2. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection.

  3. Atomic-scale Modeling of Interactions of Helium, Vacancies and Helium-vacancy Clusters with Screw Dislocations in Alpha-Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2010-05-01

    The interactions of He and vacancy defects with <111> screw dislocations in alpha-Fe are modeled using molecular statics, molecular dynamics and transition state energy determinations. The formation energies and binding energies of interstitial He atoms, vacancies and He-vacancy clusters near and within dislocations in alpha-Fe are determined at various locations relative to the dislocation core. Using the dimer transition state method the migration energies and trajectories of the He and vacancy defects near and within the screw dislocation are also determined. Both interstitial He atoms and single vacancies are attracted to and trapped in the dislocation core region, and they both migrate along the dislocation line with a migration energy of about 0.4 eV, which is about half the migration energy of vacancies in the perfect crystal and about five times the migration energy for interstitial He in the perfect crystal. Divacancies and He-divacancy complexes have migration properties within the dislocation core that are similar to those in the perfect crystal, although the stability of these defects within the dislocation may be somewhat less than in the perfect crystal.

  4. Line Strengths in Early-Type Cluster Galaxies at z=0.33: Implications for alpha/Fe, Nitrogen and the Histories of E/S0s

    CERN Document Server

    Kelson, D D; Franx, M; Van Dokkum, P G; Kelson, Daniel D.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Franx, Marijn

    2006-01-01

    [Heavily Abbreviated] In this paper we analyze previously published spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios of E/S0 galaxies in the rich cluster CL1358+62 at z=0.33, and introduce techniques for fitting stellar population models to the data. Here we focus on the 19 E and S0 galaxies with an homogeneous set of eight blue Lick indices. We explore the galaxy properties using six-parameter stellar population models from the literature, and describe an approach for fitting the models differentially, such that the largest systematic errors are avoided. We find: (1) no differences between the stellar population parameters of Es and S0s, at fixed sigma; (2) the stars in the Es and S0s are uniformly old, consistent with previously published results using M/L ratios; (3) a significant correlation of [Z/H] with sigma, in a manner consistent with the observed B-V colors of the galaxies; (4) no significant correlation of [alpha/Fe] with sigma; and (5) a significant anti-correlation of [alpha/N] with [Z/H], which we inter...

  5. Succession of methanotrophs in oxygen-methane counter-gradients of flooded rice paddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sascha; Lüke, Claudia; Frenzel, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Little is known about population dynamics and contribution of specific taxa to methane oxidation in flooded rice paddies. In this article we investigate the succession of methanotrophs in oxygen-methane counter-gradients. We used a gradient microcosm system that simulates oxic-anoxic interfaces of a water-saturated paddy soils, and measured pmoA-based (gene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase) terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles at both the transcription (mRNA) and the population (DNA) levels. The DNA T-RFLP profiles indicated that the methanotrophic community present clearly differed from the active methanotrophic community. We observed a succession of the methanotrophic community over time without any direct effect of pore water chemistry on the community structure. Both the total population and the active subpopulation changed with time, whereas methane oxidation rates remained nearly constant. Hence, we suggest that a diverse microbial seed bank of methanotrophs is important in maintaining the function in a dynamic ecosystem.

  6. Changes in methane oxidation activity and methanotrophic community composition in saline alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Silva, Nancy; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J

    2014-05-01

    The soil of the former Lake Texcoco is a saline alkaline environment where anthropogenic drainage in some areas has reduced salt content and pH. Potential methane (CH4) consumption rates were measured in three soils of the former Lake Texcoco with different electrolytic conductivity (EC) and pH, i.e. Tex-S1 a >18 years drained soil (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 8.5), Tex-S2 drained for ~10 years (EC 9.0 dS m(-1), pH 10.3) and the undrained Tex-S3 (EC 84.8 dS m(-1), pH 10.3). An arable soil from Alcholoya (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 6.7), located nearby Lake Texcoco was used as control. Methane oxidation in the soil Tex-S1 (lowest EC and pH) was similar to that in the arable soil from Alcholoya (32.5 and 34.7 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively). Meanwhile, in soils Tex-S2 and Tex-S3, the potential CH4 oxidation rates were only 15.0 and 12.8 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively. Differences in CH4 oxidation were also related to changes in the methane-oxidizing communities in these soils. Sequence analysis of pmoA gene showed that soils differed in the identity and number of methanotrophic phylotypes. The Alcholoya soil and Tex-S1 contained phylotypes grouped within the upland soil cluster gamma and the Jasper Ridge, California JR-2 clade. In soil Tex-S3, a phylotype related to Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum was detected.

  7. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia in sickle cell disease patients from Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lecointe, Altheia; Smith, Erskine; Romana, Marc; Gilbert, Marie-Georges; Charles, Waveney P; Saint-Martin, Christian; Kéclard, Lisiane

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the frequency of beta(S) haplotypes in 163 sickle cell disease patients from Trinidad. The alpha(3.7) globin gene deletion status was also studied with an observed gene frequency of 0.17. Among the 283 beta(S) chromosomes analyzed, the Benin haplotype was the most prevalent (61.8%) followed by Bantu (17.3%), Senegal (8.5%), Cameroon (3.5%), and Arab-Indian (3.2%), while 5.7% of them were atypical. This beta(S) haplotypes distribution differed from those previously described in other Caribbean islands (Jamaica, Guadeloupe, and Cuba), in agreement with the known involvement of the major colonial powers (Spain, France, and Great Britain) in the slave trade in Trinidad and documented an Indian origin of the beta(S) gene.

  8. Covalently Bound Clusters of Alpha-Substituted PDI-Rival Electron Acceptors to Fullerene for Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghe; Zhao, Donglin; Schneider, Alexander M; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-06-15

    A cluster type of electron acceptor, TPB, bearing four α-perylenediimides (PDIs), was developed, in which the four PDIs form a cross-like molecular conformation while still partially conjugated with the BDT-Th core. The blend TPB:PTB7-Th films show favorable morphology and efficient charge dissociation. The inverted solar cells exhibited the highest PCE of 8.47% with the extraordinarily high Jsc values (>18 mA/cm(2)), comparable with those of the corresponding PC71BM/PTB7-Th-based solar cells.

  9. Growth of {alpha}' clusters and associated changes in magnetic properties in a duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shek, C.H. [Dept. of Physics and Materials Science, City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China)

    2001-07-16

    The phase separation of ferrite in duplex stainless steels during thermal ageing has been widely studied due to the extensive use as a structural material in hostile environments [1-6]. Nevertheless, the associated change of magnetic properties is not investigated in detail. In fact, from the results reported in the following, the change in magnetic properties of the ferrite with ageing may be the basis of a simple non-destructive test for monitoring the 475 C embrittlement of this class of materials. In this investigation, we studied the kinetics of the growth of the {alpha}' particles and the change in magnetic properties by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and ac susceptibility ({chi}{sub ac}) measurement, respectively. The material used was a duplex stainless steel with composition 25.6Cr-8.06Ni-0.048C-0.52Si-1.56Mn-Fe (balance). The steel samples were solution-treated (ST) at either 1050 C or 1200 C prior to ageing at 500 C. The ageing duration ranged from 10 to 3000 h. SAXS was done with CuK{sub {alpha}} radiation on an Rigaku diffractometer. An ac susceptometer with an applied field at 606 Hz was used for measuring the ac susceptibility from room temperature down to approximately 78 K. The measured susceptibilities were complex quantities, but only the component in-phase with the applied field was shown in the result because the imaginary part was negligibly small for all the samples examined under the conditions specified above. (orig.)

  10. Síntese e caracterização de alfa-fosfato de zircônio(IV contendo agregados de cobre metálico Synthesis and characterization of alpha-zirconium (IV hydrogenphosphate containing metallic copper clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexilda Oliveira de Souza

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The alpha-zirconium (IV hydrogenphosphate (alpha-ZrP has received great attention in the last years due to its properties like ion exchange, intercalation, ionic conductivity and catalytic activity. This work reports a method to produce metallic copper clusters on alpha-ZrP to be used as catalysts in petrochemical processes. It was found that the solids were non-crystalline regardless of the uptake of copper and the reduction. The specific surface area increased as a consequence of the increase of the interlayer distance to accept the copper ions between the layers. During the reduction, big clusters of copper (0,5-11µ with different sizes and shapes were produced.

  11. Fly ash application in nutrient poor agriculture soils: impact on methanotrophs population dynamics and paddy yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Pandey, Vimal Chandra

    2013-03-01

    There are reports that the application of fly ash, compost and press mud or a combination thereof, improves plant growth, soil microbial communities etc. Also, fly ash in combination with farmyard manure or other organic amendments improves soil physico-chemical characteristics, rice yield and microbial processes in paddy fields. However, the knowledge about the impact of fly ash inputs alone or in combination with other organic amendments on soil methanotrophs number in paddy soils is almost lacking. We hypothesized that fly ash application at lower doses in paddy agriculture soil could be a potential amendment to elevate the paddy yields and methanotrophs number. Here we demonstrate the impact of fly ash and press mud inputs on number of methanotrophs, antioxidants, antioxidative enzymatic activities and paddy yields at agriculture farm. The impact of amendments was significant for methanotrophs number, heavy metal concentration, antioxidant contents, antioxidant enzymatic activities and paddy yields. A negative correlation was existed between higher doses of fly ash-treatments and methanotrophs number (R(2)=0.833). The content of antioxidants and enzymatic activities in leaves of higher doses fly ash-treated rice plants increased in response to stresses due to heavy metal toxicity, which was negatively correlated with rice grain yield (R(2)=0.944) and paddy straw yield (R(2)=0.934). A positive correlation was noted between heavy metals concentrations and different antioxidant and enzymatic activities across different fly ash treated plots.The data of this study indicate that heavy metal toxicity of fly ash may cause oxidative stress in the paddy crop and the antioxidants and related enzymes could play a defensive role against phytotoxic damages. We concluded that fly ash at lower doses with press mud seems to offer the potential amendments to improving soil methanotrophs population and paddy crop yields for the nutrient poor agriculture soils.

  12. Nutrient amendments in soil DNA stable isotope probing experiments reduce the observed methanotroph diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Singer, Andrew C; Thompson, Ian P; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-02-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) can be used to analyze the active bacterial populations involved in a process by incorporating 13C-labeled substrate into cellular components such as DNA. Relatively long incubation times are often used with laboratory microcosms in order to incorporate sufficient 13C into the DNA of the target organisms. Addition of nutrients can be used to accelerate the processes. However, unnatural concentrations of nutrients may artificially change bacterial diversity and activity. In this study, methanotroph activity and diversity in soil was examined during the consumption of 13CH4 with three DNA-SIP experiments, using microcosms with natural field soil water conditions, the addition of water, and the addition of mineral salts solution. Methanotroph population diversity was studied by targeting 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. Clone library analyses, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and pmoA microarray hybridization analyses were carried out. Most methanotroph diversity (type I and type II methanotrophs) was observed in non-amended SIP microcosms. Although this treatment probably best reflected the in situ environmental conditions, one major disadvantage of this incubation was that the incorporation of 13CH4 was slow and some cross-feeding of 13C occurred, thereby leading to labeling of nonmethanotroph microorganisms. Conversely, microcosms supplemented with mineral salts medium exhibited rapid consumption of 13CH4, resulting in the labeling of a less diverse population of only type I methanotrophs. DNA-SIP incubations using water-amended microcosms yielded faster incorporation of 13C into active methanotrophs while avoiding the cross-feeding of 13C.

  13. Shifts in identity and activity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments in response to temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux to the atmosphere is mitigated via microbial CH4 oxidation in sediments and water. As arctic temperaturesincrease, understanding the effects of temperature on the activity and identity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments is importantto predicting future CH4 emissions. We used DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), andpyrosequencing analyses to identify and characterize methanotrophic communities active at a range of temperatures (4°C, 10°C,and 21°C) in sediments (to a depth of 25 cm) sampled from Lake Qalluuraq on the North Slope of Alaska. CH4 oxidation activitywas measured in microcosm incubations containing sediments at all temperatures, with the highest CH4 oxidation potential of37.5 mol g1 day1 in the uppermost (depth, 0 to 1 cm) sediment at 21°C after 2 to 5 days of incubation. Q-PCR of pmoA and ofthe 16S rRNA genes of type I and type II methanotrophs, and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in 13C-labeled DNA obtained bySIP demonstrated that the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter, Methylomonas, and Methylosoma dominated carbon acquisitionfrom CH4 in the sediments. The identity and relative abundance of active methanotrophs differed with the incubation temperature.Methylotrophs were also abundant in the microbial community that derived carbon from CH4, especially in the deeper sediments(depth, 15 to 20 cm) at low temperatures (4°C and 10°C), and showed a good linear relationship (R0.82) with the relativeabundances of methanotrophs in pyrosequencing reads. This study describes for the first time how methanotrophiccommunities in arctic lake sediments respond to temperature variations.

  14. Effect of earthworms on the community structure of active methanotrophic bacteria in a landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héry, Marina; Singer, Andrew C; Kumaresan, Deepak; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Prosser, Jim I; Thompson, Ian P; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, landfills are the primary anthropogenic source of methane emissions. Methanotrophic bacteria present in landfill biocovers can significantly reduce methane emissions via their capacity to oxidize up to 100% of the methane produced. Several biotic and abiotic parameters regulate methane oxidation in soil, such as oxygen, moisture, methane concentration and temperature. Earthworm-mediated bioturbation has been linked to an increase in methanotrophy in a landfill biocover soil (AC Singer et al., unpublished), but the mechanism of this trophic interaction remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine the composition of the active methanotroph community and to investigate the interactions between earthworms and bacteria in this landfill biocover soil where the methane oxidation activity was significantly increased by the earthworms. Soil microcosms were incubated with 13C-CH4 and with or without earthworms. DNA and RNA were extracted to characterize the soil bacterial communities, with a particular emphasis on methanotroph populations, using phylogenetic (16S ribosomal RNA) and functional methane monooxygenase (pmoA and mmoX) gene probes, coupled with denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis, clone libraries and pmoA microarray analyses. Stable isotope probing (SIP) using 13C-CH4 substrate allowed us to link microbial function with identity of bacteria via selective recovery of 'heavy' 13C-labelled DNA or RNA and to assess the effect of earthworms on the active methanotroph populations. Both types I and II methanotrophs actively oxidized methane in the landfill soil studied. Results suggested that the earthworm-mediated increase in methane oxidation rate in the landfill soil was more likely to be due to the stimulation of bacterial growth or activity than to substantial shifts in the methanotroph community structure. A Bacteroidetes-related bacterium was identified only in the active bacterial community of earthworm-incubated soil but

  15. Soluble cytochromes from the marine methanotroph Methylomonas sp. strain A4.

    OpenAIRE

    DiSpirito, A A; Lipscomb, J. D.; Lidstrom, M E

    1990-01-01

    Soluble c-type cytochromes are central to metabolism of C1 compounds in methylotrophic bacteria. In order to characterize the role of c-type cytochromes in methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs), we have purified four different cytochromes, cytochromes c-554, c-553, c-552, and c-551, from the marine methanotroph Methylomonas sp. strain A4. The two major species, cytochromes c-554 and c-552, were monoheme cytochromes and accounted for 57 and 26%, respectively, of the soluble c-heme. The ap...

  16. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a-1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g-1 dry soil h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g-1 h-1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g-1 h-1) was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic methanotrophs

  17. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  18. Group-specific quantification of methanotrophs in landfill gas-purged laboratory biofilters by tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Einola, Juha; Heinonen, Mirja; Kulomaa, Markku; Rintala, Jukka

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyse methanotrophs in two laboratory landfill biofilters at different biofilter depths and at temperatures which mimicked the boreal climatic conditions. Both biofilters were dominated by type I methanotrophs. The biofilter depth profiles showed that type I methanotrophs occurred in the upper layer, where relatively high O(2) and low CH(4) concentrations were present, whereas type II methanotrophs were mostly distributed in the zone with high CH(4) and low O(2) concentrations. The number of type I methanotrophic cells declined when the temperature was raised from 15 degrees C to 23 degrees C, but increased when lowered to 5 degrees C. A slight decrease in type II methanotrophs was also observed when the temperature was raised from 15 degrees C to 23 degrees C, whereas cell numbers remained constant when lowered to 5 degrees C. The results indicated that low temperature conditions favored both type I and type II methanotrophs in the biofilters.

  19. Small gold species supported on alumina. A computational study of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001) using an embedded-cluster approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasluzov, Vladimir A. [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Shulimovich, Tatyana V.; Shor, Aleksey M. [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Bukhtiyarov, Valery I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Roesch, Notker [Department Chemie and Catalysis Research Center, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    We calculated the structures of and analyzed the bonding in adsorption complexes of small gold species Au{sub n} on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), n=1-6, and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001), n=1-5. We applied a scalar-relativistic gradient-corrected density functional (DF) method to cluster models of the support that were embedded in an extended elastic polarizable environment (EPE). The shortest Au-O distances, 204-211 pm, are consistent with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) data for gold clusters on alumina surfaces. The calculated total adsorption energies increase with cluster nuclearity, up to n=4, but drop for larger adsorbed species. In the gas phase, these small gold clusters exhibit a planar structure which they keep, oriented parallel to the surface, as adsorbates on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001). Unfavorable energy contributions result for larger clusters as their planar shape is notably distorted by the interaction with the support which amounts to 0.5-1.5 eV. On {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001), also the larger gold clusters retain their intrinsic planar structure as they adsorb oriented perpendicular to the surface. The corresponding adsorption energies are slightly smaller, 0.3-1.2 eV. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. [Effect of operational modes on community structure of type I methanotroph in the cover soil of municipal solid waste landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; He, Pin-Jing; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming

    2008-10-01

    Type I methanotroph is crucial for methane oxidization and it responses fast to the changes in environment. In this study, 16S rDNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) gene fingerprint technology was applied to investigate the effect of operational modes, i. e. high-density polyethylene liner (HDPE) isolation or subsurface irrigation of landfill leachate and vegetation, on community structure and diversity of type I methanotroph in soils covering municipal solid waste landfill. 16S rDNA based phylogenetic analysis reveals type I methanotroph in all tested soils belongs to Methylobacter. According to Shannon-Wiener diversity index and principal component analysis, landfill leachate subsurface irrigation and vegetation have more impact on type I methanotroph community structure and diversity than HDPE liner isolation does, and they reduce type I methanotroph diversity. Leachate irrigation is supposed to inhibit the growth of Methylobacter population. Community structure of type I methanotroph in landfill cover soil isolated by HDPE, i.e. invaded by landfill gas, shifts during long-term gas interference. When cover age is 1.5 years old, Shannon-Wiener diversity index of type I methanotroph reaches its maximum.

  1. Methanotrophic production of copolymer, poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate), with high hydroxyvalerate content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type II methanotrophic bacteria are a promising production platform for PHA biopolymers. These bacteria are known to produce pure poly-3-hydroxybutyrate homopolymer. We describe the production of a wide range of PHB-co-HV co-polymers by the co-feeding of methane and valerate. The ratio of HB to HV m...

  2. Intracellular PHB conversion in a type II methanotroph studied by 13 C NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecherskaya, M.; Dijkema, C.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Poly-g-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation under aerobic conditions via incorporation of [13C-2]acetate as a cosubstrate and its intracellular degradation under anaerobic conditions in a Type II methanotroph was studied by 13C NMR. During PHB synthesis in the presence of labelled acetate, low levels of

  3. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Rehab Z.

    2014-09-23

    Abdallah RZ, Adel M, Ouf A, Sayed A, Ghazy MA, Alam I, Essack M, Lafi FF, Bajic VB, El-Dorry H and Siam R (2014) Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface. Front. Microbiol. 5:487. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00487

  4. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M. Baesman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5 medium via methane oxidation.

  5. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, Shaun M; Miller, Laurence G; Wei, Jeremy H; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D; Summons, Roger E; Welander, Paula V; Oremland, Ronald S

    2015-06-23

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO₂ with some CH₄ present. The δ(13)CH₄ value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively (12)C-enriched CO₂ suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  6. Methanotrophic community dynamics in a seasonally anoxic fjord: Saanich Inlet, British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Torres-Beltrán

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs play disproportionate roles in nutrient and climate active trace gas cycling including nitrous oxide and methane, in the ocean. OMZs are currently expanding due to climate change making it increasingly important to identify microbial controls on trace gas cycling at the individual, population and community levels. Here we present a two-year survey of the microbial community along seasonal redox gradients in Saanich Inlet focused on identifying microbial agents driving methane oxidation. Although methanotrophs were rare, we identified three uncultivated groups affiliated with particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO encoding phylogenetic groups (OPU, and methanotrophic symbionts as primary drivers of methane oxidation in Saanich Inlet. Distribution and activity patterns for these three groups were consistent with niche partitioning that became increasingly resolved during water column stratification. Moreover co-occurrence analysis combined with multi-level indicator species analysis revealed significant correlations between operational taxonomic units affiliated with Methylophaga, Methylophilales, SAR324, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes with OPUs and methanotrophic symbiont groups. Taken together these observations shed new light on the composition, dynamics, and potential interspecific interactions of microbes associated with CH4 cycling in the Saanich Inlet water column, provide a baseline for comparison between coastal and open ocean OMZs and support the potential role of OPUs, and methanotrophic symbiont groups as a widely distributed pelagic sink for CH4 along continental margins.

  7. Methane oxidation and molecular characterization of methanotrophs from a former mercury mine impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, Shaun; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  8. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpirito, Alan A.; Zahn, James A.; Graham, David W.; Kim, Hyung J.; Alterman, Michail; Larive, Cynthia

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  9. Effect of Mineral Nutrients on the Kinetics of Methane Utilization by Methanotrophs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiesen, Anette; Arvin, Erik; Broholm, Kim

    1993-01-01

    The effect of different mineral nutrients on the kinetics of methane biodegradation by a mixed culture of methanotrophic bacteria was studied. The substrate factors examined were ammonia, iron, copper, manganese, phosphate, and sulphide. The presence of iron in the growth medium had a strong effect...

  10. Identification of Methanotrophic Biomarker Lipids in the Symbiont-Containing Gills of Seep Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Zahiralis, K. D.; Klein, H. P.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Mussels collected from hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico grow with methane as sole carbon and energy source due to a symbiotic association with methane-oxidizing bacteria. Transmission electron micrographs of mussel gills show cells with stacked intracytoplasmic membranes similar to type I methanotrophic bacteria. Methanotrophs are known to synthesize several types of cyclic triterpenes, hopanoids and methyl sterols, as well as unique monounsaturated fatty acid, double bond positional isomers that serve as biomarkers for this group. Lipid analysis of dissected mussels demonstrated the presence of these biomarkers predominantly in the gill tissue with much smaller amounts in mantle and remaining body tissues. Gill tissue contained 1150 micrograms/g dry wt. of hopanepolyol derivatives and diplopterol while the mantle tissue contained only 17 micrograms/g. The C16 monounsaturated fatty acids (16:1) characteristic of type I methanotrophic membranes dominated the gill tissue making up 53% of the total while only 5% 16:1 was present in the mantle tissue. The methyl sterol distribution was more dispersed. The predominant sterol in all tissues was cholesterol with lesser amounts of other desmethyl and 4-methyl sterols. The gill and mantle tissues contained 3461 micrograms (17% methyl) and 2750 micrograms (5% methyl) sterol per gm dry wt., respectively. Methyl sterol accounted for 44% of the sterol esters isolated from the gill, suggesting active demethylation of the methanotrophic sterols in this tissue. The use of lipid biomarkers could provide an effective means for identifying host-symbiont relationships.

  11. Ammonium addition inhibits 13C-methane incorporation into methanotroph membrane lipids in a freshwater sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nold, s.c.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Pel, R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ammonium addition on the species composition and activity of freshwater methane oxidizing bacteria, intact sediment cores were labeled with (CH4)-C-13 and incubated under ambient and elevated ammonium concentrations. After 7 days, methanotroph activity was assessed by qu

  12. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, Wako Branch at RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 812-8581 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8578 (Japan); Komatsubara, T. [Department of Physics, Tsukuba University, Ibaraki, 305-8571 (Japan); Kato, S. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Khiem, Le H. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy for Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on alpha-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  13. 极端环境下嗜热酸甲烷营养细菌研究进展%Advances in thermoacidophilic methanotrophs from extreme environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勇; 郑袁明; 张丽梅; 贺纪正

    2009-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play an important role in the biogeochemical carbon cycle and in controlling global climate change, by converting methane to carbon dioxide or biomass. Although these bacteria have been isolated from a variety of environments, most of which grow best at neutral pH (5-8) and moderate temperature ranges (20-35℃). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, methanotrophs are classified into type I and type II, which belong to the gamma- and alpha-Proteobacteria, respectively. Very recently, three independent studies have isolated methane-oxidizing microorganisms from extreme thermoacidophilic environments with pH values of approximately 1 and temperatures higher than 50℃, these nonproteobacterial strains were all identified as members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia. These new and unusual studies will undoubtedly expand the known phylogenetic and functional diversity of methanotrophs, also indicate that novel methane oxidizing pathways and mechanisms could exist in the methanotrophs. This review illustrates the latest advances in thermoacidophilic methanotrophs, based on the recent three reports on methane oxidation in the extreme environments.%甲烷营养细菌能够将温室气体甲烷(CH4)转化为CO2或生物质,在碳生物地球化学循环及缓解由温室气体导致的全球气候变化方面发挥着重要的作用.甲烷营养细菌生存的条件范围较为广泛,但在中性pH (5~8)和中温(20~35℃)范围内生长最佳.系统进化分析认为,它们均属于γ-或α-变形菌门(Proteobacteria).最近3项独立完成的研究从极端热酸(pH接近1,温度高于50℃)环境中分离获得了具有甲烷氧化(营养)功能的微生物,经鉴定均属于疣微菌门(Verrucomicrobia).这些全新的、不同于以往的研究结果不仅是对现有关于甲烷营养细菌生态学认知的进一步拓展,同时也暗示着可能存在着新型的、由微生物介导的CH4氧化途径与机制. 因此,特

  14. Methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Purification and properties of a three-component system with high specific activity from a type II methanotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B G; Froland, W A; Dege, J E; Lipscomb, J D

    1989-06-15

    Methane monooxygenase has been purified from the Type II methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. As observed for methane monooxygenase isolated from Type I methanotrophs, three protein components are required: a 39.7-kDa NADH reductase containing 1 mol each of FAD and a [2Fe-2S] cluster, a 15.8-kDa protein factor termed component B that contains no metals or cofactors, and a 245-kDa hydroxylase which appears to contain an oxo- or hydroxo-bridged binuclear iron cluster. Through the use of stabilizing reagents, the hydroxylase is obtained in high yield and exhibits a specific activity 8-25-fold greater than reported for previous preparations. The component B and reductase exhibit 1.5- and 4-fold greater specific activity, respectively. Quantitation of the hydroxylase oxo-bridged cluster using EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopies reveals that the highest specific activity preparations (approximately 1700 nmol/min/mg) contain approximately 2 clusters/mol. In contrast, hydroxylase preparations exhibiting a wide range of specific activities below 500 nmol/min/mg contain approximately 1 cluster/mol on average. Efficient turnover coupled to NADH oxidation requires all three protein components. However, both alkanes and alkenes are hydroxylated by the chemically reduced hydroxylase under single turnover conditions in the absence of component B and the reductase. Neither of these components catalyzes hydroxylation individually nor do they significantly affect the yield of hydroxylated product from the chemically reduced hydroxylase. Hydroxylase reduced only to the mixed valent [Fe(II).Fe(III)] state is unreactive toward O2 and yields little hydroxylated product on single turnover. This suggests that the catalytically active species is the fully reduced form. The data presented here provide the first evidence based on catalysis that the site of the monooxygenation reaction is located on the hydroxylase. It thus appears likely that the oxo-bridged iron cluster is capable of

  15. Low energy emulsion-based fermentation enabling accelerated methane mass transfer and growth of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-accumulating methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jaewook; Kim, Minkyu; Pan, Ming; Criddle, Craig S; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2016-05-01

    Methane is a low-cost feedstock for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate biopolymers, but methanotroph fermentations are limited by the low solubility of methane in water. To enhance mass transfer of methane to water, vigorous mixing or agitation is typically used, which inevitably increases power demand and operational costs. This work presents a method for accelerating methane mass transfer without agitation by growing methanotrophs in water-in-oil emulsions, where the oil has a higher solubility for methane than water does. In systems without agitation, the growth rate of methanotrophs in emulsions is five to six times that of methanotrophs in the medium-alone incubations. Within seven days, cells within the emulsions accumulate up to 67 times more P3HB than cells in the medium-alone incubations. This is achieved due to the increased interfacial area of the aqueous phase, and accelerated methane diffusion through the oil phase.

  16. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales.

  17. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.

    1985-08-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references.

  18. Selection of Type I and Type II Methanotrophic Proteobacteria in a Fluidized Bed Reactor under Non-Sterile Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Selection of Type I and Type II methanotrophic proteobacteria in a fluidized bed reactor under...laboratory- scale fluidized bed reactor was initially inoculated with a Type II Methylocystis-like dominated culture. At elevated levels of dissolved...personal copy Selection of Type I and Type II methanotrophic proteobacteria in a fluidized bed reactor under non-sterile conditions Andrew R. Pfluger a, Wei

  19. A metagenomic study of methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haverkamp Thomas HA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane oxidizing prokaryotes in marine sediments are believed to function as a methane filter reducing the oceanic contribution to the global methane emission. In the anoxic parts of the sediments, oxidation of methane is accomplished by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME living in syntrophy with sulphate reducing bacteria. This anaerobic oxidation of methane is assumed to be a coupling of reversed methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. Where oxygen is available aerobic methanotrophs take part in methane oxidation. In this study, we used metagenomics to characterize the taxonomic and metabolic potential for methane oxidation at the Tonya seep in the Coal Oil Point area, California. Two metagenomes from different sediment depth horizons (0-4 cm and 10-15 cm below sea floor were sequenced by 454 technology. The metagenomes were analysed to characterize the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic taxa at the two sediment depths. To gain insight into the metabolic potential the metagenomes were searched for marker genes associated with methane oxidation. Results Blast searches followed by taxonomic binning in MEGAN revealed aerobic methanotrophs of the genus Methylococcus to be overrepresented in the 0-4 cm metagenome compared to the 10-15 cm metagenome. In the 10-15 cm metagenome, ANME of the ANME-1 clade, were identified as the most abundant methanotrophic taxon with 8.6% of the reads. Searches for particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA, marker genes for aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of methane respectively, identified pmoA in the 0-4 cm metagenome as Methylococcaceae related. The mcrA reads from the 10-15 cm horizon were all classified as originating from the ANME-1 clade. Conclusions Most of the taxa detected were present in both metagenomes and differences in community structure and corresponding metabolic potential between the two samples were mainly

  20. Methanotrophic communities in aerobic soils with different stages of natural reforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kuznetsova, Tatyana

    2017-04-01

    The land use and management has a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles of biogenic elements and the Earth's climate. Deforestation is known to change the soil from a net sink for CH4 to a net source as a result of alteration in the activity and composition of the methanotrophic communities. At the same time, the recovery of ecosystems after their withdrawal from agricultural use is poorly understood. Currently, in Russia, the former arable lands occupy about 20% of the territory and more than half of them are not used in agriculture since the early 90-s. Here, soil CH4 oxidation rates and associated methanotrophic communities were examined in a chronosequence of gray forest soils, Moscow region, Russia, consisting of cropland soils, soils at the different stages under postagrogenic forest regenerating, and in a mature native forest. CH4 concentrations were measured by GC and several chemical (pH, total C and N, NH4 -N and NO3 -N) and physical (moisture content, porosity, water-filled pore space and bulk density) soil properties were evaluated. Methane oxidation rates were significantly influenced by reforestation and the regenerating soils have the potential to reach those of the native forest. In fallow, shrublands and young forest soil CH4-oxidation rates were significantly higher as compared with cropland, but not fully stabilized even after 25 years of reforestation. To examine whether changes in CH4-oxidation rate were linked to a shift in the microbial community, we have analyzed soil methanotrophic communities by cloning and sequencing of particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) using the primer pair A189-mb650. Based on the relative proportion of the clones it was shown the dominance Type II related and uncultured methanotrophs in forest soils. Both Type I and Type II methanotrophs were found in arable and postagrogenic soils, and the relative abundance of Type II methanotrophs increased with the age of regeneration and recovered after 15

  1. Towards Solvation of a Chiral Alpha-Hydroxy Ester: Broadband Chirp and Narrow Band Cavity Fouirier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Methyl Lactate-Water Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Javix; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Jaeger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2013-06-01

    Methyl lactate (ML), a chiral alpha-hydroxy ester, has attracted much attention as a prototype system in studies of chirality transfer,[1] solvation effects on chiroptical signatures,[2] and chirality recognition.[3] It has multiple functional groups which can serve both as a hydrogen donor and acceptor. By applying rotational spectroscopy and high level ab initio calculations, we examine the delicate competition between inter- and intramolecular hydrogen-bonding in the ML-water clusters. Broadband rotational spectra obtained with a chirp Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer, reveal that the insertion conformations are the most favourable ones in the binary and ternary solvated complexes. In the insertion conformations, the water molecule(s) inserts itself (themselves) into the existing intramolecular hydrogen-bonded ring formed between the alcoholic hydroxyl group and the oxygen of the carbonyl group of ML. The final frequency measurements have been carried out using a cavity based FTMW instrument where internal rotation splittings due to the ester methyl group have also been detected. A number of insertion conformers with subtle structural differences for both the binary and ternary complexes have been identified theoretically. The interconversion dynamics of these conformers and the identification of the most favorable conformers will be discussed. 1. C. Merten, Y. Xu, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 2073 -2076. 2. M. Losada, Y. Xu, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, 9, 3127-3135; Y. Liu, G. Yang, M. Losada, Y. Xu, J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 132, 234513/1-11. 3. A. Zehnacker, M. Suhm, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 6970 - 6992.

  2. Hydrology is reflected in the functioning and community composition of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a boreal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljanen, Henri M P; Saari, Anne; Krause, Sascha; Lensu, Anssi; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; Bodelier, Paul L E; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2011-03-01

    In lake ecosystems a major proportion of methane (CH(4) ) emissions originate from the littoral zone, which can have a great spatial variability in hydrology, soil quality and vegetation. Hitherto, spatial heterogeneity and the effects it has on functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands have been poorly understood. A diagnostic microarray based on the particulate methane monooxygenase gene coupled with geostatistics was used to analyse spatial patterns of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a eutrophic boreal lake (Lake Kevätön, Eastern Finland). The wetland had a hydrology gradient with a mean water table varying from -8 to -25 cm. The wettest area, comprising the highest CH(4) oxidation, had the highest abundance and species richness of methanotrophs. A high water table favoured the occurrence of type Ib methanotrophs, whereas types Ia and II were found under all moisture conditions. Thus the spatial heterogeneity in functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands is highly dependent on the water table, which in turn varies spatially in relation to the geomorphology of the wetland. We suggest that changes in water levels resulting from regulation of lakes and/or global change will affect the abundance, activity and diversity of methanotrophs, and consequently CH(4) emissions from such systems. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Continuous biosynthesis of epoxypropane in a methanotrophic attached-films reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jia-Ying; Cui, Jun-Ru; Chen, Jian-Bo; Li, Shu-Ben; Xia, Chun-Gu

    2002-01-01

    Using a fluidized bed as immobilization system, mixed culture methanotrophic attached-films were developed on diatomite particles. The Methane Monooxygenase (MMO) activity was found to increase obviously as soon as the lag phase ended. Greater than 90% of the MMO activity in the bed was attached. Biofilm concentration of 3.3-3.7 mg dry weight cell/g DS was observed. Batch experiments were performed to explore the possibility of producing epoxypropane by a cooxidation process. The effect of methane on the oxidation of propene to epoxypropane and the effect of propene on the growth of methanotroph were also studied. In continuous experiments, optimum mixed gaseous substrates (methane: 35%; propene: 20%; oxygen: 45%) were continuously circulated through the fluidized bed reactor to remove product. Initial epoxypropane productivity was 110-150 mumol/d. The bioreactor operated continuously for 25 d without obvious loss of epoxypropane productivity.

  4. Potential of pmoA amplicon pyrosequencing for methanotroph diversity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Claudia; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-09-01

    We analyzed the potential of pmoA amplicon pyrosequencing compared to that of Sanger sequencing with paddy soils as a model environment. We defined operational taxonomic unit (OTU) cutoff values of 7% and 18%, reflecting methanotrophic species and major phylogenetic pmoA lineages, respectively. Major lineages were already well covered by clone libraries; nevertheless, pyrosequencing provided a higher level of diversity at the species level.

  5. Expanding the verrucomicrobial methanotrophic world: description of three novel species of Methylacidimicrobium gen. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Teeseling, Muriel C F; Pol, Arjan; Harhangi, Harry R; van der Zwart, Sietse; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M; van Niftrik, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia have been found in geothermal environments characterized by high temperatures and low pH values. However, it has recently been hypothesized that methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia could be present under a broader range of environmental conditions. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of three new species of mesophilic acidophilic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs from a volcanic soil in Italy. The three new species showed 97% to 98% 16S rRNA gene identity to each other but were related only distantly (89% to 90% on the 16S rRNA level) to the thermophilic genus Methylacidiphilum. We propose the new genus Methylacidimicrobium, including the novel species Methylacidimicrobium fagopyrum, Methylacidimicrobium tartarophylax, and Methylacidimicrobium cyclopophantes. These mesophilic Methylacidimicrobium spp. were more acid tolerant than their thermophilic relatives; the most tolerant species, M. tartarophylax, still grew at pH 0.5. The variation in growth temperature optima (35 to 44°C) and maximum growth rates (µmax; 0.013 to 0.040 h(-1)) suggested that all species were adapted to a specific niche within the geothermal environment. All three species grew autotrophically using the Calvin cycle. The cells of all species contained glycogen particles and electron-dense particles in their cytoplasm as visualized by electron microscopy. In addition, the cells of one of the species (M. fagopyrum) contained intracytoplasmic membrane stacks. The discovery of these three new species and their growth characteristics expands the known diversity of verrucomicrobial methanotrophs and shows that they are present in many more ecosystems than previously assumed.

  6. Methane and trichloroethylene oxidation by an estuarine methanotroph, Methylobacter sp. strain BB5.1.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, K. S.; Costello, A. M.; Lidstrom, M E

    1997-01-01

    An estuarine methanotroph was isolated from sediment enrichments and designated Methylobacter sp. strain BB5.1. In cells grown on medium with added copper, oxidation of methane and trichloroethylene occurred with similar Ks values, but the Vmax for trichloroethylene oxidation was only 0.1% of the methane oxidation Vmax. Cells grown on low-copper medium did not oxidize trichloroethylene and showed a variable rate of methane oxidation.

  7. Conventional methanotrophs are responsible for atmospheric methane oxidation in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Zheng, Yan; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Conrad, Ralf; Jia, Zhongjun

    2016-06-01

    Soils serve as the biological sink of the potent greenhouse gas methane with exceptionally low concentrations of ~1.84 p.p.m.v. in the atmosphere. The as-yet-uncultivated methane-consuming bacteria have long been proposed to be responsible for this `high-affinity' methane oxidation (HAMO). Here we show an emerging HAMO activity arising from conventional methanotrophs in paddy soil. HAMO activity was quickly induced during the low-affinity oxidation of high-concentration methane. Activity was lost gradually over 2 weeks, but could be repeatedly regained by flush-feeding the soil with elevated methane. The induction of HAMO activity occurred only after the rapid growth of methanotrophic populations, and a metatranscriptome-wide association study suggests that the concurrent high- and low-affinity methane oxidation was catalysed by known methanotrophs rather than by the proposed novel atmospheric methane oxidizers. These results provide evidence of atmospheric methane uptake in periodically drained ecosystems that are typically considered to be a source of atmospheric methane.

  8. Starvation and recovery in the deep-sea methanotroph Methyloprofundus sedimenti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavormina, Patricia L; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Tocheva, Elitza I; Dalleska, Nathan F; Jensen, Ashley J; Valentine, David L; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Jensen, Grant J; Dubilier, Nicole; Orphan, Victoria J

    2017-01-01

    In the deep ocean, the conversion of methane into derived carbon and energy drives the establishment of diverse faunal communities. Yet specific biological mechanisms underlying the introduction of methane-derived carbon into the food web remain poorly described, due to a lack of cultured representative deep-sea methanotrophic prokaryotes. Here, the response of the deep-sea aerobic methanotroph Methyloprofundus sedimenti to methane starvation and recovery was characterized. By combining lipid analysis, RNA analysis, and electron cryotomography, it was shown that M. sedimenti undergoes discrete cellular shifts in response to methane starvation, including changes in headgroup-specific fatty acid saturation levels, and reductions in cytoplasmic storage granules. Methane starvation is associated with a significant increase in the abundance of gene transcripts pertinent to methane oxidation. Methane reintroduction to starved cells stimulates a rapid, transient extracellular accumulation of methanol, revealing a way in which methane-derived carbon may be routed to community members. This study provides new understanding of methanotrophic responses to methane starvation and recovery, and lays the initial groundwork to develop Methyloprofundus as a model chemosynthesizing bacterium from the deep sea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Response of methanotrophic communities to afforestation and reforestation in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaries, Loïc; Tate, Kevin R; Ross, Des J; Singh, Jagrati; Dando, John; Saggar, Surinder; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J Colin; Singh, Brajesh K

    2011-11-01

    Methanotrophs use methane (CH(4)) as a carbon source. They are particularly active in temperate forest soils. However, the rate of change of CH(4) oxidation in soil with afforestation or reforestation is poorly understood. Here, soil CH(4) oxidation was examined in New Zealand volcanic soils under regenerating native forests following burning, and in a mature native forest. Results were compared with data for pasture to pine land-use change at nearby sites. We show that following soil disturbance, as little as 47 years may be needed for development of a stable methanotrophic community similar to that in the undisturbed native forest soil. Corresponding soil CH(4)-oxidation rates in the regenerating forest soil have the potential to reach those of the mature forest, but climo-edaphic fators appear limiting. The observed changes in CH(4)-oxidation rate were directly linked to a prior shift in methanotrophic communities, which suggests microbial control of the terrestrial CH(4) flux and identifies the need to account for this response to afforestation and reforestation in global prediction of CH(4) emission.

  10. [Methanotrophic bacteria in cold seeps of the floodplains of northern rivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, S É; Oshkin, I Iu; Glagolev, M V; Lapshina, E D; Maksiutov, Sh Sh; Dedysh, S N

    2013-01-01

    Small mud volcanoes (cold seeps), which are common in the floodplains of northern rivers, are a potentially important, although poorly studied sources of atmospheric methane. Field research on the cold seeps of the Mukhrina River (Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous okrug, Russia) revealed methane fluxes from these structures to be orders of magnitude higher than from equivalent areas of the mid-taiga bogs. Microbial communities developing around the seeps were formed under conditions of high methane concentrations, low temperatures (3-5 degrees C), and near-neutral pH. Molecular identification of methane-oxidizing bacteria from this community by analysis of the pmoA gene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase revealed both type I and type II methanotrophs (classes Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria, respectively), with predomination of type I methanotrophs. Among the latter, microorganisms related to Methylobacterpsychrophilus and Methylobacter tundripaludum, Crenothrix polyspora (a stagnant water dweller), and a number of methanotrophs belonging to unknown taxa were detected. Growth characteristics of two isolates were determined. Methylobactersp. CMS7 exhibited active growth at 4-10 degrees C, while Methylocystis sp. SB12 grew better at 20 degrees C. Experimental results confirmed the major role ofmethanotrophic gammaproteobacteria in controlling the methane emission from cold river seeps.

  11. Deciphering Community Structure of Methanotrophs Dwelling in Rice Rhizospheres of an Indian Rice Field Using Cultivation and Cultivation-Independent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Pranitha S; Rahalkar, Monali C; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Ranade, Dilip R; Pore, Soham; Arora, Preeti; Kapse, Neelam

    2016-04-01

    Methanotrophs play a crucial role in filtering out methane from habitats, such as flooded rice fields. India has the largest area under rice cultivation in the world; however, to the best of our knowledge, methanotrophs have not been isolated and characterized from Indian rice fields. A cultivation strategy composing of a modified medium, longer incubation time, and serial dilutions in microtiter plates was used to cultivate methanotrophs from a rice rhizosphere sample from a flooded rice field in Western India. We compared the cultured members with the uncultured community as revealed by three culture-independent methods. A novel type Ia methanotroph (Sn10-6), at the rank of a genus, and a putative novel species of a type II methanotroph (Sn-Cys) were cultivated from the terminal positive dilution (10(-6)). From lower dilution (10(-4)), a strain of Methylomonas spp. was cultivated. All the three culture-independent analyses, i.e., pmoA clone library, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and metagenomics approach, revealed the dominance of type I methanotrophs. Only metagenomic analysis showed significant presence of type II methanotrophs, albeit in lower proportion (37 %). All the three isolates showed relevance to the methanotrophic community as depicted by uncultured methods; however, the cultivated members might not be the most dominant ones. In conclusion, a combined cultivation and cultivation-independent strategy yielded us a broader picture of the methanotrophic community from rice rhizospheres of a flooded rice field in India.

  12. Clustering of Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, S; D'Odorico, V; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Moscardini, L; Savaglio, S

    1997-01-01

    The observed clustering of Lyman-$\\alpha$ lines is reviewed and compared with the clustering of CIV systems. We argue that a continuity of properties exists between Lyman-$\\alpha$ and metal systems and show that the small-scale clustering of the absorbers is consistent with a scenario of gravitationally induced correlations. At large scales statistically significant over and under-densities (including voids) are found on scales of tens of Mpc.

  13. In-Situ Quantification of Methanotrophic Activity in a Landfill Cover Soil Using Gas Push-Pull Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, K. E.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Schroth, M. H.; Zeyer, J.

    2007-12-01

    Landfills are both a major anthropogenic source and a sink for the greenhouse gas CH4. Methanogenic bacteria produce CH4 during the anaerobic digestion of landfill waste, whereas, methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 as it is transported through a landfill cover soil. Methanotrophs are thought to be ubiquitous in soils, but typically exist in large numbers at oxic/anoxic interfaces, close to anaerobic methane sources but exposed to oxygen required for metabolism. Accurate in-situ quantification of the sink strength of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils is needed for global carbon balances and for local emissions mitigation strategies. We measured in-situ CH4 concentrations at 30, 60, and 100 cm depth at 18 evenly spaced locations across a landfill cover soil. Furthermore, we performed Gas Push-Pull Tests (GPPTs) to estimate in-situ rates of methanotrophic activity in the cover soil. The GPPT is a gas-tracer test in which a gas mixture containing CH4, O2, and non-reactive tracer gases is injected (pushed) into the soil followed by extraction (pull) from the same location. Quantification of CH4 oxidation rates is based upon comparison of the breakthrough curves of CH4 and tracer gases. We present the results of a series of GPPTs conducted at two locations in the cover soil to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of this technique to quantify methanotrophic activity. Additional GPPTs were performed with a methanotrophic inhibitor in the injection gas mixture to confirm the appropriate choice of tracers to quantify CH4 oxidation. Estimated CH4 oxidation rate constants indicate that the cover soil contains a highly active methanotrophic community.

  14. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium.

  15. Alpha Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Thalassemia Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have no effect 1 on the anemia. αα αα Normal alpha ...

  16. A new sodium channel alpha-subunit gene (Scn9a) from Schwann cells maps to the Scn1a, Scn2a, Scn3a cluster of mouse chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, M C; Ernst, E; Belcher, S; Howe, J; Levenson, R; Gros, P

    1996-08-15

    We have used a total of 27 AXB/BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains to determine the chromosomal location of a newly identified gene encoding an alpha-subunit isoform of the sodium channel from Schwann cells, Scn9a. Linkage analysis established that Scn9a mapped to the proximal segment of mouse chromosome 2. The segregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 145 progeny from a Mus spretus x C57BL/6J backcross indicates that Scn9a is very tightly linked to Scn1a (gene encoding the type I sodium channel alpha-subunit of the brain) and forms part of a cluster of four Scna genes located on mouse chromosome 2.

  17. A new sodium channel {alpha}-subunit gene (Scn9a) from Schwann cells maps to the Scn1a, Scn2a, Scn3a cluster of mouse chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, M.C.; Ernst, E.; Gros, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    1996-08-15

    We have used a total of 27 AXB/BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains to determine the chromosomal location of a newly identified gene encoding an {alpha}-subunit isoform of the sodium channel from Schwann cells, Scn9a. Linkage analysis established that Scn9a mapped to the proximal segment of mouse chromosome 2. The segregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 145 progeny from a Mus spretus x C57BL/6J backcross indicates that Scn9a is very tightly linked to Scn1a (gene encoding the type I sodium channel {alpha}-subunit of the brain) and forms part of a cluster of four Scna genes located on mouse chromosome 2. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. The relative contribution of methanotrophs to microbial communities and carbon cycling in soil overlying a coal-bed methane seep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T; Slater, Gregory F; Dias, Robert F; Carr, Stephanie A; Reddy, Christopher M; Schmidt, Raleigh; Mandernack, Kevin W

    2013-06-01

    Seepage of coal-bed methane (CBM) through soils is a potential source of atmospheric CH4 and also a likely source of ancient (i.e. (14) C-dead) carbon to soil microbial communities. Natural abundance (13) C and (14) C compositions of bacterial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and soil gas CO2 and CH4 were used to assess the incorporation of CBM-derived carbon into methanotrophs and other members of the soil microbial community. Concentrations of type I and type II methanotroph PLFA biomarkers (16:1ω8c and 18:1ω8c, respectively) were elevated in CBM-impacted soils compared with a control site. Comparison of PLFA and 16s rDNA data suggested type I and II methanotroph populations were well estimated and overestimated by their PLFA biomarkers, respectively. The δ(13) C values of PLFAs common in type I and II methanotrophs were as negative as -67‰ and consistent with the assimilation of CBM. PLFAs more indicative of nonmethanotrophic bacteria had δ(13) C values that were intermediate indicating assimilation of both plant- and CBM-derived carbon. Δ(14) C values of select PLFAs (-351 to -936‰) indicated similar patterns of CBM assimilation by methanotrophs and nonmethanotrophs and were used to estimate that 35-91% of carbon assimilated by nonmethanotrophs was derived from CBM depending on time of sampling and soil depth.

  19. The relative contribution of methanotrophs to microbial communities and carbon cycling in soil overlying a coal-bed methane seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Slater, Gregory F.; Dias, Robert F.; Carr, Stephanie A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Schmidt, Raleigh; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage of coal-bed methane (CBM) through soils is a potential source of atmospheric CH4 and also a likely source of ancient (i.e. 14C-dead) carbon to soil microbial communities. Natural abundance 13C and 14C compositions of bacterial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and soil gas CO2 and CH4 were used to assess the incorporation of CBM-derived carbon into methanotrophs and other members of the soil microbial community. Concentrations of type I and type II methanotroph PLFA biomarkers (16:1ω8c and 18:1ω8c, respectively) were elevated in CBM-impacted soils compared with a control site. Comparison of PLFA and 16s rDNA data suggested type I and II methanotroph populations were well estimated and overestimated by their PLFA biomarkers, respectively. The δ13C values of PLFAs common in type I and II methanotrophs were as negative as −67‰ and consistent with the assimilation of CBM. PLFAs more indicative of nonmethanotrophic bacteria had δ13C values that were intermediate indicating assimilation of both plant- and CBM-derived carbon. Δ14C values of select PLFAs (−351 to −936‰) indicated similar patterns of CBM assimilation by methanotrophs and nonmethanotrophs and were used to estimate that 35–91% of carbon assimilated by nonmethanotrophs was derived from CBM depending on time of sampling and soil depth.

  20. Effects of granular activated carbon on methane removal performance and methanotrophic community of a lab-scale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Sun-Ah; Yi, Taewoo; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Two identical lab-scale bioreactor systems were operated to examine the effects of granular activated carbon (GAC) on methane removal performance and methanotrophic community. Both bioreactor systems removed methane completely at a CH4 loading rate of 71.2 g-CH4·d(-1) for 17 days. However, the methane removal efficiency declined to 88% in the bioreactor without GAC, while the bioreactor amended with GAC showed greater methane removal efficiency of 97% at a CH4 loading rate of 107.5 g-CH4·d(-1). Although quantitative real-time PCR showed that methanotrophic populations were similar levels of 5-10 × 10(8) pmoA gene copy number·VSS(-1) in both systems, GAC addition changed the methanotrophic community composition of the bioreactor systems. Microarray assay revealed that GAC enhanced the type I methanotrophic genera including Methylobacter, Methylomicrobium, and Methylomonas of the system, which suggests that GAC probably provided a favorable environment for type I methanotrophs. These results indicated that GAC is a promising support material in bioreactor systems for CH4 mitigation.

  1. Coordination of the Ser2056 and Thr2609 Clusters of DNA-PKcs in Regulating Gamma Rays and Extremely Low Fluencies of Alpha-Particle Irradiation to G0/G1 Phase Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Lin, Yu-Fen; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Brogan, John R.; Shih, Hung-Ying; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Bedford, Joel S.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Little, John B.

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) and its kinase activity are critical for mediation of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells after gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, DNA-PKcs phosphorylations at the T2609 cluster and the S2056 cluster also affect DSB repair and cellular sensitivity to gamma radiation. Previously we reported that phosphorylations within these two regions affect not only NHEJ but also homologous recombination repair (HRR) dependent DSB repair. In this study, we further examine phenotypic effects on cells bearing various combinations of mutations within either or both regions. Effects studied included cell killing as well as chromosomal aberration induction after 0.5–8 Gy gamma-ray irradiation delivered to synchronized cells during the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Blocking phosphorylation within the T2609 cluster was most critical regarding sensitization and depended on the number of available phosphorylation sites. It was also especially interesting that only one substitution of alanine in each of the two clusters separately abolished the restoration of wild-type sensitivity by DNA-PKcs. Similar patterns were seen for induction of chromosomal aberrations, reflecting their connection to cell killing. To study possible change in coordination between HRR and NHEJ directed repair in these DNA-PKcs mutant cell lines, we compared the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by very low fluencies of alpha particles with mutant cells defective in the HRR pathway that is required for induction of SCEs. Levels of true SCEs induced by very low fluence of alpha-particle irradiation normally seen in wild-type cells were only slightly decreased in the S2056 cluster mutants, but were completely abolished in the T2609 cluster mutants and were indistinguishable from levels seen in HRR deficient cells. Again, a single substitution in the S2056 together with a single

  2. High Throughput Sequencing to Detect Differences in Methanotrophic Methylococcaceae and Methylocystaceae in Surface Peat, Forest Soil, and Sphagnum Moss in Cranesville Swamp Preserve, West Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Lau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Northern temperate forest soils and Sphagnum-dominated peatlands are a major source and sink of methane. In these ecosystems, methane is mainly oxidized by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, which are typically found in aerated forest soils, surface peat, and Sphagnum moss. We contrasted methanotrophic bacterial diversity and abundances from the (i organic horizon of forest soil; (ii surface peat; and (iii submerged Sphagnum moss from Cranesville Swamp Preserve, West Virginia, using multiplex sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA (V3 region gene amplicons. From ~1 million reads, >50,000 unique OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, 29 and 34 unique sequences were detected in the Methylococcaceae and Methylocystaceae, respectively, and 24 potential methanotrophs in the Beijerinckiaceae were also identified. Methylacidiphilum-like methanotrophs were not detected. Proteobacterial methanotrophic bacteria constitute <2% of microbiota in these environments, with the Methylocystaceae one to two orders of magnitude more abundant than the Methylococcaceae in all environments sampled. The Methylococcaceae are also less diverse in forest soil compared to the other two habitats. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analyses indicated that the majority of methanotrophs from the Methylococcaceae and Methylocystaceae tend to occur in one habitat only (peat or Sphagnum moss or co-occurred in both Sphagnum moss and peat. This study provides insights into the structure of methanotrophic communities in relationship to habitat type, and suggests that peat and Sphagnum moss can influence methanotroph community structure and biogeography.

  3. GLACE survey: OSIRIS/GTC Tuneable Filter H$\\alpha$ imaging of the rich galaxy cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395. Part I -- Survey presentation, TF data reduction techniques and catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Portal, Miguel; Pérez-Martínez, Ricardo; Cepa, Jordi; García, Ana M Pérez; Domínguez-Sánchez, Helena; Bongiovanni, Ángel; Serra, Ana L; Alfaro, Emilio; Altieri, Bruno; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Balkowski, Chantal; Biviano, Andrea; Bremer, Malcom; Castander, Francisco; Castañeda, Héctor; Castro-Rodríguez, Nieves; Chies-Santos, Ana L; Coia, Daniela; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Geach, James; González-Serrano, Ignacio; Haines, Chris P; McBreen, Brian; Metcalfe, Leo; Oteo, Iván; Pérez-Fournón, Ismael; Poggianti, Bianca; Polednikova, Jana; Ramón-Pérez, Marina; Rodríguez-Espinosa, José M; Santos, Joana S; Smail, Ian; Smith, Graham P; Temporin, Sonia; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The cores of clusters at 0 $\\lesssim$ z $\\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\\beta$ and H$\\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest fra...

  4. Methylohalobius crimeensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, methanotrophic bacterium isolated from hypersaline lakes of Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Jürgen; Berger, Ursula; Hardt, Martin; Dunfield, Peter F

    2005-09-01

    A novel genus and species are proposed for two strains of methanotrophic bacteria isolated from hypersaline lakes in the Crimean Peninsula of Ukraine. Strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr are moderate halophiles that grow optimally at 1-1.5 M (5.8-8.7%, w/v) NaCl and tolerate NaCl concentrations from 0.2 M up to 2.5 M (1.2-15%). This optimum and upper limit are the highest for any methanotrophic bacterium known to date. The strains are Gram-negative, aerobic, non-pigmented, motile, coccoid to spindle-shaped bacteria that grow on methane or methanol only and utilize the ribulose monophosphate pathway for carbon assimilation. They are neutrophilic (growth occurs only in the range pH 6.5-7.5) and mesophilic (optimum growth occurs at 30 degrees C). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr represent a type I methanotroph within the 'Gammaproteobacteria'. However, the 16S rRNA gene sequence displays <91.5 % identity to any public-domain sequence. The most closely related methanotrophic bacterium is the thermophilic strain HB. The DNA G+C content is 58.7 mol%. The major phospholipid fatty acids are 18:1omega7 (52-61%), 16:0 (22-23%) and 16:1omega7 (14-20%). The dominance of 18:1 over 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids is unique among known type I methanotrophs. The data suggest that strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr should be considered as belonging to a novel genus and species of type I methanotrophic bacteria, for which the name Methylohalobius crimeensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. Strain 10Ki(T) (=DSM 16011(T)=ATCC BAA-967(T)) is the type strain.

  5. Seasonal and spatial aspects of the eco-distribution of methanotrophic bacteria in floodplain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelier, P. L. E.; Meima-Franke, M.; Kamst, M.; Bodrossy, L.; Stralis-Pavese, N.; Hefting, M. M.; Laanbroek, R.

    2009-04-01

    METHECO is the acronym of a consortium of research groups funded by the European Science foundation (ESF) within the EuroDIVERSITY program. The consortium investigates the role of microbial diversity in the dynamics and stability of global methane consumption. The consortium covers various habitats (i.e. Landfills, rice paddies, alpine meadows, littoral wetlands, forests, arctic wetlands, peat soils and river floodplains) and assesses the effects of natural environmental perturbation on the function structure relationship of methane-consuming microbial communities. Consortium members follow the same experimental and methodological scheme using DNA and RNA based techniques (i.e. pmoA-based cloning, DGGE, micro arrays, Real Time PCR, stable isotope probing). This paper presents the results obtained in a river floodplain along the river Rhine in the Netherlands, a habitat anticipated to be subjected to major changes in flooding regime due to climate change. Experiments were carried out to assess methanotrophic diversity, methane oxidation kinetics and spatial variability of function and structure of methane-oxidizing communities. Flooding events affected methane consumption negatively on short term. However, the long -term consequences of the flooding regime where the establishment of a distinct maximum methane consumption activity exactly in the part of the floodplain intermediate between permanently and irregularly flooded, where moisture and organic matter content were optimal for methane cycling. The methanotrophic community composition as analysed by pmoA micro array mirrored the result of the activity measurements, demonstrating that the communities differed clearly according to the flooding gradient. Diversity as assessed by micro array and activity components (initial consumption, Vmax, Vmax/Km) were positively correlated. QPCR analyses showed that main types of methanotrophic bacteria were differentially distributed throughout the flooding gradient. Type I

  6. Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Y

    2005-01-01

    The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the formation of very heavy nuclei and spectroscopic studies of the formed compound nuclei.

  7. Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Ikezoe, H.

    2005-01-01

    The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the f...

  8. In situ bioremediation of trichloroethylene-contaminated water by a resting-cell methanotrophic microbial filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R T; Duba, A G; Durham, W B; Hanna, M L; Jackson, K J; Jovanovich, M C; Knapp, R B; Knezovich, J P; Shah, N N; Shonnard, D R; Wijesinghe, A M

    1992-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is testing and developing an in situ microbial filter technology for remediating migrating subsurface plumes contaminated with low concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE). Their current focus is the establishment of a replenishable bioactive zone (catalytic filter) along expanding plume boundaries by the Injection of a representative methanotrophic bacterium, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. We have successfully demonstrated this microbial filter strategy using emplaced, attached resting cells (no methane additions) in a 1.1-m flow-through test bed loaded with water-saturated sand. Two separate 24 h pulses of TCE (109 ppb and 85 ppb), one week apart, were pumped through the system at a flow velocity of 1.5 cm/h; no TCE (<0.5 ppb) was detected on the downstream side of the microbial filter. Subsequent excavation of the wet sand confirmed the existence of a TCE-bioactive zone 19 days after it had been created. An enhanced longevity of the cellular, soluble-form methane monooxygenase produced by this methanotroph Is a result of our laboratory bioreactor culturing conditions. Additional experiments with cells in sealed vials and emplaced in the 1.1-m test bed yielded a high resting-cell finite TCE biotransformation capacity of [approximately] 0.25 mg per mg of bacteria; this is suitable for a planned sand-filled trench field demonstration at a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site.

  9. Biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate with a high molecular weight by methanotroph from methane and methanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxin Zhang; Jiaying Xin; Linlin Chen; Hao Song; Chungu Xia

    2008-01-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) can be produced by various species of bacteria. Among the possible carbon sources, both methane and methanol could be a suitable substrate for the production of PHB. Methane is cheap and plentiful not only as natural gas, but also as biogas. Methanol can also maintain methanotrophic activity in some conditions. The methanotrophic strain Methylosinus trichosporium IMV3011 can accumulate PHB with methane and methanol in a brief nonsterile process. Liquid methanol (0.1%) was added to improve the oxidization of methane. The studies were carried out using shake flasks. Cultivation was performed in two stages: a continuous growth phase and a PHB accumulation phase under the conditions short of essential nutrients (ammonium, nitrate, phosphorus, copper, iron (III), magnesium or ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA)) in batch culture. It was found that the most suitable growth time for the cell is 144 h. Then an optimized culture condition for second stage was determined, in which the PHB concentration could be much increased to 0.6 g/L. In order to increase PHB content, citric acid was added as an inhibitor of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). It was found that citric acid is favorable for the PHB accumulation, and the PHB yield was increased to 40% (w/w) from the initial yield of 12% (w/w) after nutrient deficiency cultivation. The PHB produced is of very high quality with molecular weight up to 1.5 ×106Da.

  10. Effect of nitrogen fertilization on methane oxidation, abundance, community structure, and gene expression of methanotrophs in the rice rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Minita; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Frenzel, Peter; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen, one of the limiting factors for the yield of rice, can also have an important function in methane oxidation, thus affecting its global budget. Rice microcosms, planted in the greenhouse, were treated with the N-fertilizers urea (UPK) and ammonium sulfate (APK) or were only treated with phosphorous and potassium (PK). Methane oxidation rates in PK and UPK treatments were similar during most of the rice-growing season, revealing no effect of urea. However, ammonium sulfate strongly suppressed methanogenesis providing an unfavorable environment for methanotrophs in APK treatment. Roots and rhizospheric soil samples, collected from six different growth stages of the rice plant, were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the pmoA gene. Assignment of abundant T-RFs to cloned pmoA sequences indicated that the populations on roots were dominated by type-I methanotrophs, whereas the populations in rhizospheric soil were dominated by type-II methanotrophs irrespectively of growth stages and fertilizer treatments. Non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination analysis of T-RFLP profiles revealed that the methanotrophic community was significantly (PAPK treatment.

  11. Isolation of methanotrophic bacteria from a london landfill: a preliminary study using molecular and stable isotopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriskantharajah, S.; Cutting, S.; Lowry, D.; Grassineau, N.; Nisbet, E.

    2003-04-01

    Methane emissions from landfills are an important source of European greenhouse emissions, and could be reduced by a biological management program that used methanotrophs in landfill cover soils. Topsoil samples taken from a London Landfill were incubated on Nitrate Mineral Salts medium in the presence of methane. The resulting colonies were probed for methanotrophic DNA using PCR amplification. DNA from methanotroph positive colonies was cloned and sequenced for identification. Isolates belonging to the genera Methylocaldum, Methylomonas and Methylosinus were detected. Phylogenetic analysis suggests the presence of possible new species. In addition dried samples of the isolates were analysed for their stable carbon isotope (δ 13C) composition. The results were δ 13C values of -27 per mil and -25 per mil for Methylomonas isolates, -35 per mil and -44 per mil for Methylosinus isolates, -58 per mil and -60 per mil for some of the Methylocaldum isolates and -35 per mil and -45 per mil for the others. This isotopic variation is reflected in a phylogenetic tree of the isolates. The differences shown in the δ 13C analysis could be due to differing biochemical properties, and if the technique is further developed, it may be used for rapid identification of bacteria useful in landfill management for reducing methane emissions. The results suggest that useful reductions in methane emissions could be achieved by a careful design of landfill cover to culture methanotrophs.

  12. Autotrophic Carbon Dioxide Fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle by the Denitrifying Methanotroph "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasigraf, O.; Kool, D.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Ettwig, K.F.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and the most abundant hydrocarbon in the Earth's atmosphere. Methanotrophic microorganisms can use methane as their sole energy source and play a crucial role in the mitigation of methane emissions in the environment. "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is a

  13. Spatial Patterns of Soil Development, Methane Oxidation, and Methanotrophic Diversity along a Receding Glacier Forefield, Southeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barcena, Teresa Gomez; Finster, Kai; Yde, Jacob Clement

    2011-01-01

    .24 nmol CH4 day−1 gsoil−1 at 10 °C in the LIA terminal moraine. Methane consumption was not detected in younger samples, despite the presence of high-affinity methanotrophs in all samples. This was indicated by successful amplification of partial pmoA genes, which code for a subunit of a key enzyme...

  14. Hydrology is reflected in the functioning and community composition of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a boreal lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siljanen, H.M.P.; Saari, A.; Krause, S.; Lensu, A.; Abell, G.C.J.; Bodrossy, L.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Martikainen, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In lake ecosystems a major proportion of methane emissions originate from the littoral zone which can have a great spatial variability in hydrology, soil quality and vegetation. Hitherto, spatial heterogeneity and the effects it has on functioning and diversity of methanotrophs in littoral wetlands

  15. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-Resolution, Integrated-Light Spectroscopy. IV. The Large Magellanic Cloud: $\\alpha$, Fe-peak, Light, and Heavy Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, J E; Cameron, S A; McWilliam, A

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed chemical abundances in 8 clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We measure abundances of 22 elements for clusters spanning a range in age of 0.05 to 12 Gyr, providing a comprehensive picture of the chemical enrichment and star formation history of the LMC. The abundances were obtained from individual absorption lines using a new method for analysis of high resolution ($R\\sim$25,000) integrated light spectra of star clusters. This method was developed and presented in Papers I, II, and III of this series. In this paper, we develop an additional integrated light $\\chi^2$-minimization spectral synthesis technique to facilitate measurement of weak ($\\sim$15 m\\AA) spectral lines and abundances in low signal-to-noise ratio data (S/N$\\sim$30). Additionally, we supplement the integrated light abundance measurements with detailed abundances that we measure for individual stars in the youngest clusters (Age$+0.5$) and increases with decreasing age, indicating a strong contribution of low-meta...

  16. Warmer and drier conditions and nitrogen fertilizer application altered methanotroph abundance and methane emissions in a vegetable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yu; Xie, Jianli; Xu, Xiaoya; Li, Yong; Liu, Yapeng; Zhang, Qichun; Li, Zheng; Xu, Jianming; Di, Hongjie

    2016-11-12

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, and soil can both be a source and sink for atmospheric CH4. It is not clear how future climate change may affect soil CH4 emissions and related microbial communities. The aim of this study was to determine the interactive effects of a simulated warmer and drier climate scenarios and the application of different nitrogen (N) sources (urea and manure) on CH4 emissions and related microbial community abundance in a vegetable soil. Greenhouses were used to control simulated climate conditions which gave 2.99 °C warmer and 6.2% lower water content conditions. The field experiment was divided into two phases. At the beginning of phase II, half of the greenhouses were removed to study possible legacy effects of the simulated warmer and drier conditions. The responses in methanogen and methanotroph abundance to a simulated climate change scenario were determined using real-time PCR. The results showed that the simulated warmer and drier conditions in the greenhouses significantly decreased CH4 emissions largely due to the lower soil moisture content. For the same reason, CH4 emissions of treatments in phase I were much lower than the same treatments in phase II. The abundance of methanotrophs showed a more significant response than methanogens to the simulated climate change scenario, increasing under simulated drier conditions. Methanogenic community abundance remained low, except where manure was applied which provided a source of organic C that stimulated methanogen growth. Soil moisture content was a major driver for methanotroph abundance and strongly affected CH4 emissions. The application of N source decreased CH4 emissions probably because of increased methanotrophic activity. CH4 emissions were positively correlated to methanogenic abundance and negatively correlated to methanotrophic abundance. These results demonstrate that projected future climate change conditions can have a feedback impact on CH4 emissions from the

  17. Autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle by the denitrifying methanotroph "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Kool, Dorien M; Jetten, Mike S M; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Ettwig, Katharina F

    2014-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and the most abundant hydrocarbon in the Earth's atmosphere. Methanotrophic microorganisms can use methane as their sole energy source and play a crucial role in the mitigation of methane emissions in the environment. "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is a recently described intra-aerobic methanotroph that is assumed to use nitric oxide to generate internal oxygen to oxidize methane via the conventional aerobic pathway, including the monooxygenase reaction. Previous genome analysis has suggested that, like the verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" encodes and transcribes genes for the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle for carbon assimilation. Here we provide multiple independent lines of evidence for autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation by "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" via the CBB cycle. The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), a key enzyme of the CBB cycle, in cell extracts from an "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" enrichment culture was shown to account for up to 10% of the total methane oxidation activity. Labeling studies with whole cells in batch incubations supplied with either (13)CH4 or [(13)C]bicarbonate revealed that "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" biomass and lipids became significantly more enriched in (13)C after incubation with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate (and unlabeled methane) than after incubation with (13)C-labeled methane (and unlabeled bicarbonate), providing evidence for autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation. Besides this experimental approach, detailed genomic and transcriptomic analysis demonstrated an operational CBB cycle in "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera." Altogether, these results show that the CBB cycle is active and plays a major role in carbon assimilation by "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" bacteria. Our results suggest that autotrophy might be more widespread among methanotrophs than was previously assumed and implies that a methanotrophic

  18. Unexpected DNA-fingerprinting pattern in a deep peat bog: evidence for methanotrophs at the bottom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, P.; Rossi, P.; Huon, S.; Eilrich, B.; Casati, S.

    2003-04-01

    With the goal of a better understanding of the fate of methane in the deep layers of peat bogs, we analysed the microbial 16S rDNA gene pool and measured the stable carbon isotope composition of bulk peat of a deep (6 m) peat bog profile (Etang de la Gruyère, Switzerland). Both Bacterial and Archaean communities were assessed using respectively TTGE (Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis) and SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism), with fragments of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA gene. The "relative diversity" shown in the TTGE AND SSCP gel patterns is presented using indices and band numbers per sample (Simpson evenness). PCA was calculated on the basis of the intensities of all bands found in the TTGE and SSCP fingerprinting profiles. These DNA fingerprinting patterns reveal the presence of a structured microbial community throughout the whole depth profile. Clear differences can be observed between the communities found in the near surface layers and those found at depth. Surprisingly, for both Archaean and Bacterial communities, the deepest samples display a high similarity level with those found in the first 20 centimeters. The δ13C values of the peat are relatively constant from the surface of the bog down to a depth of 5 m (values between 25.5 ppm and 26.5 ppm). Below 5 m the values decrease considerably with depth ( 28.5 ppm). As a working hypothesis to explain the two observations, we consider the possibility of the presence of methanotrophs in the deepest parts of the bogs. The electron acceptors needed for methane oxidation could be derived from lateral advection of less reducing groundwater. However, available pore water analyses suggest that neither molecular oxygen, nor sulfate or nitrate are present. One possible oxidising agent would be trivalent iron (solid or colloidal). Indeed are the iron concentrations in the deeper pore waters are elevated. Such deep methanotrophic microbial community could be similar to those found near

  19. Identification of hopanoid, sterol, and tetrahymanol production in the aerobic methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, P. V.; Summons, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Correlating the occurrence of molecular biosignatures preserved in the rock record with specific microbial taxa is a compelling strategy for studying microbial life in the context of the Earth's distant past. Polycyclic triterpenoids, including the hopanes and steranes, comprise classes of biomarkers that are readily detected in a variety of ancient sediments and are clearly recognized as the diagenetic products of modern day bacterial hopanoids and eukaryotic sterols. Thus, based on the distribution of these lipids in extant microbes, the occurrence of their diagenetic products in the rock record is often utilized as evidence for the existence of specific bacterial and eukaryotic taxa in ancient ecosystems. However, questions have arisen about our understanding of the taxonomic distribution of many of these molecular biomarkers in extant microbes. This is prompting reassessments of the use of polycyclic triterpenoids as geological proxies for microbial taxa, especially in the light of the poorly defined issue of microbial diversity. Recently, significant effort has been put forth to better understand the biosynthesis, function, and regulation of these lipid molecules in a variety of modern organisms so that a more informed interpretation of their occurrence in the rock record can be reached. Here we report the unprecedented production of three different classes of polycyclic triterpenoid biomarker lipids in one bacterium. Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a member of the Gammaproteobacteria, is a halotolerant alkaliphilic aerobic methanotroph previously isolated from a moderately saline soda lake in Tuva (Central Asia). In this study, M. alcaliphilum is shown to produce C-3 methylated and unmethylated aminohopanoids commonly associated with other mesophilic aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, this organism is also able to produce 4,4-dimethyl sterols and surprisingly, the gammacerane triterpenoid tetrahymanol. Previously, tetrahymanol production has only been

  20. Mutant U5A cells are complemented by an interferon-alpha beta receptor subunit generated by alternative processing of a new member of a cytokine receptor gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, G; Holland, S J; Cinato, E; Monneron, D; Reboul, J; Rogers, N C; Smith, J M; Stark, G R; Gardiner, K; Mogensen, K E

    1995-10-16

    The cellular receptor for the alpha/beta interferons contains at least two components that interact with interferon. The ifnar1 component is well characterized and a putative ifnar2 cDNA has recently been identified. We have cloned the gene for ifnar2 and show that it produces four different transcripts encoding three different polypeptides that are generated by exon skipping, alternative splicing and differential use of polyadenylation sites. One polypeptide is likely to be secreted and two are transmembrane proteins with identical extracellular and transmembrane domains but divergent cytoplasmic tails of 67 and 251 amino acids. A mutant cell line U5A, completely defective in IFN-alpha beta binding and response, has been isolated and characterized. Expression in U5A cells of the polypeptide with the long cytoplasmic domain reconstitutes a functional receptor that restores normal interferon binding, activation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway, interferon-inducible gene expression and antiviral response. The IFNAR2 gene maps at 0.5 kb from the CRFB4 gene, establishing that together IFNAR2, CRFB4, IFNAR1 and AF1 form a cluster of class II cytokine receptor genes on human chromosome 21.

  1. Interaction of carbon with vacancy and self-interstitial atom clusters in {alpha}-iron studied using metallic-covalent interatomic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, Dmitry, E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.b [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Jansson, Ville [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Khater, Hassan [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Bonny, Giovanni [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-01-31

    The presence of even small amount of carbon interstitial impurity affects properties of Fe and Fe-based ferritic alloys. From earlier experiments it follows that carbon exhibits considerably strong interaction with lattice defects and therefore influences their mobility, hence affecting the evolution of the microstructure under irradiation. This work is dedicated to understanding the interaction of carbon-vacancy complexes with glissile dislocation loops, which form in Fe, Fe-based alloys and ferritic steels under irradiation. We apply large scale atomistic simulations coupled with the so-called 'metallic-covalent bonding' interatomic model for the Fe-C system, known to be the most consistent interatomic model available today. With these techniques we have studied (i) the stability of vacancy-carbon clusters; (ii) the interaction of octahedral carbon with 1/2<1 1 1> loops; (iii) possibility of the dynamic drag of carbon by 1/2<1 1 1> loops and (iv) the interaction of 1/2<1 1 1> loops with the most stable vacancy-carbon clusters expected to occur under irradiation. Finally, we have shown that carbon-vacancy complexes act as strong traps for 1/2<1 1 1> loops.

  2. A Cluster of Low-Redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ Clouds toward PKS 2155-304; 1, Limits on Metals and D/H

    CERN Document Server

    Shull, J M; Stocke, J T; Giroux, M L; Van Gorkom, J H; Lee, Y H; Carilli, C L; Penton, Steven V.; Stocke, John T.; Giroux, Mark L.; Lee, Yong-Han; Carilli, Chris

    1998-01-01

    We report observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the VLA on the galactic environment, metallicity, and D/H in strong low-redshift Lya absorption systems toward the bright BL Lac object PKS 2155-304. GHRS/G160M spectra at 20 km/s resolution show 14 Lya absorbers, 6 clustered at cz = 16,100-18,500 km/s. ORFEUS claimed LyC absorption at z = 0.056 with N(HI) = (2-5)x10^16 cm^-2, while our Lya data suggest N(HI) = (3-10)x10^14 cm^-2. Higher columns are possible if the Lya line core at 17,000 +/- 50 km/s contains narrow HI components. We identify the Lya cluster with a group of five HI galaxies offset by 400-800 kpc from the sightline. The two strongest absorption features cover the same velocity range as the HI emission in the two galaxies closest to the line of sight. If the Lya is associated with these galaxies, they must have huge halos of highly turbulent, mostly ionized gas. The Lya absorption could also arise from an extended sheet of intragroup gas, or from smaller primordial clouds and halo...

  3. Microbial ecology on the microcosm level: Activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria during early succession in a flooded rice field soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S.; Frenzel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play an important role in natural wetlands and rice fields preventing large amounts of methane from escaping into the atmosphere. The occurrence of both type I and type II methanotrophs in the soil surface layer has been demonstrated in many studies. However, there is no profound understanding which of them are responsible for the oxidizing activity and how they differ ecologically. Hence, a gradient microcosm system was applied simulating oxic-anoxic interfaces of water saturated soils to unravel population dynamics in early succession of methanotrophs in a flooded rice paddy. Additionally, environmental parameters were analyzed to link environment, populations, and their specific activity. We measured pmoA-based (particulate methane monooxygenase) terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles both on transcription and population level. DNA T-RFLP patterns showed no major differences in the methanotrophic community structure remaining relatively constant over time. In contrast the active methanotrophic community structure as detected by pmoA mRNA T-RFLP analysis clearly demonstrated a distinct pattern from DNA T-RFLP profiles. While type II represented the most prominent group on the population level it seems to play a minor role on the transcription level. Furthermore there were no clear implications towards a link between soil parameters (e.g. NH4+ concentration) and methanotrophic community structure.

  4. Final Technical Report: Role of Methanotrophs in Metal Mobilization, Metal Immobilization and Mineral Weathering: Effects on the In Situ Microbial Community and the Sustainability of Subsurface Water Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semrau, Jeremy D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); DiSpirito, Alan A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-11-06

    Activities from this DOE sponsored project can be divided into four broad areas: (1) investigations into the potential of methanobactin, a biogenic metal-binding agent produced by methanotrophs, in mitigating mercury toxicity; (2) elucidation of the genetic basis for methanobactin synthesis from methanotrophs; (3) examination of differential gene expression of M. trichosporium OB3b when grown in the presence of varying amounts of copper and/or cerium, and (4) collection and characterization of soil cores from Savannah River Test Site to determine the ubiquity of methanobactin producing methanotrophs. From these efforts, we have conclusively shown that methanobactin can strongly bind mercury as Hg[II], and in so doing significantly reduce the toxicity of this metal to microbes. Further, we have deduced the genetic basis of methanobactin production in methanotrophs, enabling us to construct mutants such that we can now ascribe function to different genes as well as propose a pathway for methanobactin biosynthesis. We have also clear evidence that copper and cerium (as an example of a rare earth element) dramatically affect gene expression in methanotrophs, and thus have an important impact on the activity and application of these microbes to a variety of environmental and industrial issues. Finally, we successfully isolated one methanotroph from the deep subsurface of the Savannah River Test Site and characterized the ability of different forms of methanobactin to mobilize copper and mercury from these soils.

  5. Alpha Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... positive side, alpha blockers might decrease low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol). Alpha blockers can ... PreventionTreatmentofHighBloodPressure/Types-of-Blood-Pressure-Medications_UCM_303247_Article.jsp. Accessed June 4, 2016. Kaplan NM, et ...

  6. Expanding the range of polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized by methanotrophic bacteria through the utilization of omega-hydroxyalkanoate co-substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jaewook; Flanagan, James C A; Waymouth, Robert M; Criddle, Craig S

    2017-12-01

    The first methanotrophic syntheses of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) that contain repeating units beyond 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are reported. New PHAs synthesized by methanotrophs include poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB-co-4HB)), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-5-hydroxyvalerate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (P(3HB-co-5HV-co-3HV)), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-6-hydroxyhexanoate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB-co-6HHx-co-4HB)). This was achieved from a pure culture of Methylocystis parvus OBBP where the primary substrate is methane and the corresponding ω-hydroxyalkanoate monomers are added as a co-substrate after the cells are subjected to nitrogen-limited conditions.

  7. Role of Acidophilic Methanotrophs in Long Term Natural Attenuation of cVOCs in Low pH Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    bacteria in acidic peatlands using newly developed 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 43:299-308. Dedysh S.N...Methylocystis strain SB2 grown on ethanol: bioremediation via facultative methanotrophy. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 318:137–142. Islam T., Torsvik V., Larsen Ø...Verrumicrobia. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:8402-8410. Semrau J.D., DiSpirito A.A., Yoon, S. 2010. Methanotrophs and copper. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 34

  8. Genomic reconstruction of an uncultured hydrothermal vent gammaproteobacterial methanotroph (family Methylothermaceae indicates multiple adaptations to oxygen limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Tobias Skennerton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vents are an important contributor to marine biogeochemistry, producing large volumes of reduced fluids, gasses, and metals and housing unique, productive microbial and animal communities fueled by chemosynthesis. Methane is a common constituent of hydrothermal vent fluid and is frequently consumed at vent sites by methanotrophic bacteria that serve to control escape of this greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Despite their ecological and geochemical importance, little is known about the ecophysiology of uncultured hydrothermal vent-associated methanotrophic bacteria. Using metagenomic binning techniques, we recovered and analyzed a near-complete genome from a novel gammaproteobacterial methanotroph (B42 associated with a white smoker chimney in the Southern Lau basin. B42 was the dominant methanotroph in the community, at ~80x coverage, with only four others detected in the metagenome, all on low coverage contigs (7x - 12x. Phylogenetic placement of B42 showed it is a member of the Methylothermaceae, a family currently represented by only one sequenced genome. Metabolic inferences based on the presence of known pathways in the genome showed that B42 possesses a branched respiratory chain with A- and B-family heme copper oxidases, cytochrome bd oxidase and a partial denitrification pathway. These genes could allow B42 to respire over a wide range of oxygen concentrations within the highly dynamic vent environment. Phylogenies of the denitrification genes revealed they are the result of separate horizontal gene transfer from other proteobacteria and suggest that denitrification is a selective advantage in conditions where extremely low oxygen concentrations require all oxygen to be used for methane activation.

  9. Genomic Reconstruction of an Uncultured Hydrothermal Vent Gammaproteobacterial Methanotroph (Family Methylothermaceae) Indicates Multiple Adaptations to Oxygen Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skennerton, Connor T.; Ward, Lewis M.; Michel, Alice; Metcalfe, Kyle; Valiente, Chanel; Mullin, Sean; Chan, Ken Y.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are an important contributor to marine biogeochemistry, producing large volumes of reduced fluids, gasses, and metals and housing unique, productive microbial and animal communities fueled by chemosynthesis. Methane is a common constituent of hydrothermal vent fluid and is frequently consumed at vent sites by methanotrophic bacteria that serve to control escape of this greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Despite their ecological and geochemical importance, little is known about the ecophysiology of uncultured hydrothermal vent-associated methanotrophic bacteria. Using metagenomic binning techniques, we recovered and analyzed a near-complete genome from a novel gammaproteobacterial methanotroph (B42) associated with a white smoker chimney in the Southern Lau basin. B42 was the dominant methanotroph in the community, at ∼80x coverage, with only four others detected in the metagenome, all on low coverage contigs (7x–12x). Phylogenetic placement of B42 showed it is a member of the Methylothermaceae, a family currently represented by only one sequenced genome. Metabolic inferences based on the presence of known pathways in the genome showed that B42 possesses a branched respiratory chain with A- and B-family heme copper oxidases, cytochrome bd oxidase and a partial denitrification pathway. These genes could allow B42 to respire over a wide range of oxygen concentrations within the highly dynamic vent environment. Phylogenies of the denitrification genes revealed they are the result of separate horizontal gene transfer from other Proteobacteria and suggest that denitrification is a selective advantage in conditions where extremely low oxygen concentrations require all oxygen to be used for methane activation. PMID:26779119

  10. Global molecular analyses of methane metabolism in methanotrophic alphaproteobacterium, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Part I: transcriptomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet B Matsen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs are important in both environmental and biotechnological applications, due to their ability to convert methane to multicarbon compounds. However, systems-level studies of methane metabolism have not been carried out in methanotrophs. In this work we have integrated genomic and transcriptomic information to provide an overview of central metabolic pathways for methane utilization in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a model alphaproteobacterial methanotroph. Particulate methane monooxygenase, PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase, the H4MPT-pathway and NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase are involved in methane oxidation to CO2. All genes essential for operation of the serine cycle, the ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC pathway, and the citric acid (TCA cycle were expressed. PEP-pyruvate-oxaloacetate interconversions may have a function in regulation and balancing carbon between the serine cycle and the EMC pathway. A set of transaminases may contribute to carbon partitioning between the pathways. Metabolic pathways for acquisition and/or assimilation of nitrogen and iron are discussed.

  11. Methanotrophic bacteria associated to rice roots: the cultivar effect assessed by T-RFLP and microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Claudia; Bodrossy, Levente; Lupotto, Elisabetta; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Rice plants play a key role in regulating methane emissions from paddy fields by affecting both underlying processes: methane production and oxidation. Specific differences were reported for methane oxidation rates; however, studies on the bacterial communities involved are rare. Here, we analysed the methanotrophic community on the roots of 18 different rice cultivars by pmoA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and microarray analysis. Both techniques showed comparable and consistent results revealing a high diversity dominated by type II and type Ib methanotrophs. pmoA microarrays have been successfully used to study methane-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. However, the microarray's full potential resolving community structure has not been exploited yet. Here, we provide an example on how to include this information into multivariate statistics. The analysis revealed a rice cultivar effect on the methanotroph community composition that could be affiliated to the plant genotype. This effect became only significant by including the specific phylogenetic resolution provided by the microarray into the statistical analysis.

  12. MUSE integral-field spectroscopy towards the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063: II. Properties of low luminosity Lyman alpha emitters at z>3

    CERN Document Server

    Karman, W; Caminha, G B; Gronke, M; Grillo, C; Balestra, I; Rosati, P; Vanzella, E; Coe, D; Dijkstra, M; Koekemoer, A M; Mercurio, A; Nonino, M

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their conjectured importance for the Epoch of Reionization, the properties of low-mass galaxies are currently still under large debate. In this article, we study the stellar and gaseous properties of faint, low-mass galaxies at z>3. We observed the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063 with MUSE over a 2 arcmin^2 field, and combined integral-field spectroscopy with gravitational lensing to perform a blind search for intrinsically faint Lya emitters (LAEs). We found in total 14 lensed LAEs and increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed multiple-image families from 6 to 17, and updated our gravitational-lensing model accordingly. The lensing-corrected Lya luminosities are with L(Lya) =3 are reported. We performed SED modelling to broadband photometry from the {\\em U}-band through the infrared to determine the stellar properties of these LAEs. The stellar masses are very low (10^{6-8} Msun), and are accompanied by very young ages of 1-100 Myr. The very high specific star formation rates (~100/...

  13. Clusters in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This third volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol. 1) and 848 (Vol. 2), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics:  - Gamma Rays and Molecular Structure - Faddeev Equation Approach for Three Cluster Nuclear Reactions - Tomography of the Cluster Structure of Light Nuclei Via Relativistic Dissociation - Clustering Effects Within the Dinuclear Model : From Light to Hyper-heavy Molecules in Dynamical Mean-field Approach - Clusterization in Ternary Fission - Clusters in Light N...

  14. Ammonia Oxidation and Nitrite Reduction in the Verrucomicrobial Methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr S. Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Solfatara volcano near Naples (Italy, the origin of the recently discovered verrucomicrobial methanotroph Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV was shown to contain ammonium (NH4+ at concentrations ranging from 1 to 28 mM. Ammonia (NH3 can be converted to toxic hydroxylamine (NH2OH by the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO, the first enzyme of the methane (CH4 oxidation pathway. Methanotrophs rapidly detoxify the intermediate NH2OH. Here, we show that strain SolV performs ammonium oxidation to nitrite at a rate of 48.2 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under O2 limitation in a continuous culture grown on hydrogen (H2 as an electron donor. In addition, strain SolV carries out nitrite reduction at a rate of 74.4 nmol NO2-.h−1.mg DW−1 under anoxic condition at pH 5–6. This range of pH was selected to minimize the chemical conversion of nitrite (NO2- potentially occurring at more acidic pH values. Furthermore, at pH 6, we showed that the affinity constants (Ks of the cells for NH3 vary from 5 to 270 μM in the batch incubations with 0.5–8% (v/v CH4, respectively. Detailed kinetic analysis showed competitive substrate inhibition between CH4 and NH3. Using transcriptome analysis, we showed up-regulation of the gene encoding hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (haoA cells grown on H2/NH4+ compared to the cells grown on CH4/NO3- which do not have to cope with reactive N-compounds. The denitrifying genes nirk and norC showed high expression in H2/NH4+ and CH4/NO3- grown cells compared to cells growing at μmax (with no limitation while the norB gene showed downregulation in CH4/NO3- grown cells. These cells showed a strong upregulation of the genes in nitrate/nitrite assimilation. Our results demonstrate that strain SolV can perform ammonium oxidation producing nitrite. At high concentrations of ammonium this may results in toxic effects. However, at low oxygen concentrations strain SolV is able to reduce nitrite to N2O to cope with this toxicity.

  15. Transcriptional activities of methanogens and methanotrophs vary with methane emission flux in rice soils under chronic nutrient constraints of phosphorus and potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Rong; Chen, Anlei; Zhang, Miaomiao; Whiteley, Andrew S.; Kumaresan, Deepak; Wei, Wenxue

    2016-12-01

    Nutrient status in soil is crucial for the growth and development of plants which indirectly or directly affect the ecophysiological functions of resident soil microorganisms. Soil methanogens and methanotrophs can be affected by soil nutrient availabilities and plant growth, which in turn modulate methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we assessed whether deficits in soil-available phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) modulated the activities of methanogens and methanotrophs in a long-term (20 year) experimental system involving limitation in either one or both nutrients. Results showed that a large amount of CH4 was emitted from paddy soil at rice tillering stage (flooding) while CH4 flux was minimum at ripening stage (drying). Compared to soils amended with NPK fertiliser treatment, the soils without P input significantly reduced methane flux rates, whereas those without K input did not. Under P limitation, methanotroph transcript copy number significantly increased in tandem with a decrease in methanogen transcript abundance, suggesting that P-deficiency-induced changes in soil physio-chemical properties, in tandem with rice plant growth, might constrain the activity of methanogens, whereas the methanotrophs might be adaptive to this soil environment. In contrast, lower transcript abundance of both methanogen and methanotrophs were observed in K-deficient soils. Assessments of community structures based upon transcripts indicated that soils deficient in P induced greater shifts in the active methanotrophic community than K-deficient soils, while similar community structures of active methanogens were observed in both treatments. These results suggested that the population dynamics of methanogens and methanotrophs could vary along with the changes in plant growth states and soil properties induced by nutrient deficiency.

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization-flow cytometry-cell sorting-based method for separation and enrichment of type I and type II methanotroph populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Zabinsky, Rebecca; Bowerman, Sarah; Baker, David R; Lidstrom, Mary E; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2006-06-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization-flow cytometry (FISH/FC)-based method was optimized using artificial mixtures of pure cultures of methanotrophic bacteria. Traditional oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNAs of type I (MG84/705 probe) and type II (MA450 probe) methanotrophs were labeled with fluorescein or Alexa fluor and used for FISH, followed by fluorescence-activated FC analysis and cell sorting (FACS). The method resulted in efficient separation of target cells (type I or type II methanotrophs) from the artificial mixtures. The method was then applied for detection and enrichment of type I and type II methanotroph populations from a natural sample, Lake Washington sediment. Cells were extracted from the sediment, fixed, and subjected to FISH/FC/FACS. The resulting subpopulations were analyzed by reverse transcriptase PCR surveys of 16S rRNA, pmoA (encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase), and fae (encoding formaldehyde-activating enzyme) genes. The functional gene analysis indicated specific separation of the type I and type II methanotroph populations. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that type I methanotrophs comprised 59% of the subpopulation separated using the type I-specific probe and that type II methanotrophs comprised 47.5% of the subpopulation separated using the type II-specific probe. Our data indicate that the FISH/FC/FACS protocol described can provide significant enrichment of microbial populations of interest from complex natural communities and that these can be used for genetic tests. We further tested the possibility of direct whole-genome amplification (WGA) from limited numbers of sorted cells, using artificial mixtures of microbes whose genome sequences are known. We demonstrated that efficient WGA can be achieved using 10(4) or more cells separated by 16S rRNA-specific FISH/FC/FACS, while fewer cells resulted in less specific WGA.

  17. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  18. Abundance and Activity of Methanotrophic Bacteria in Littoral and Profundal Sediments of Lake Constance (Germany) ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahalkar, M.; Deutzmann, J.; Schink, B.; Bussmann, I.

    2009-01-01

    The abundances and activities of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) were compared in depth profiles of littoral and profundal sediments of Lake Constance, Germany. Abundances were determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the pmoA gene and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and data were compared to methane oxidation rates calculated from high-resolution concentration profiles. qPCR using type I MOB-specific pmoA primers indicated that type I MOB represented a major proportion in both sediments at all depths. FISH indicated that in both sediments, type I MOB outnumbered type II MOB at least fourfold. Results obtained with both techniques indicated that in the littoral sediment, the highest numbers of methanotrophs were found at a depth of 2 to 3 cm, corresponding to the zone of highest methane oxidation activity, although no oxygen could be detected in this zone. In the profundal sediment, highest methane oxidation activities were found at a depth of 1 to 2 cm, while MOB abundance decreased gradually with sediment depth. In both sediments, MOB were also present at high numbers in deeper sediment layers where no methane oxidation activity could be observed. PMID:18997033

  19. Abundance and activity of methanotrophic bacteria in littoral and profundal sediments of lake constance (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahalkar, M; Deutzmann, J; Schink, B; Bussmann, I

    2009-01-01

    The abundances and activities of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) were compared in depth profiles of littoral and profundal sediments of Lake Constance, Germany. Abundances were determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the pmoA gene and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and data were compared to methane oxidation rates calculated from high-resolution concentration profiles. qPCR using type I MOB-specific pmoA primers indicated that type I MOB represented a major proportion in both sediments at all depths. FISH indicated that in both sediments, type I MOB outnumbered type II MOB at least fourfold. Results obtained with both techniques indicated that in the littoral sediment, the highest numbers of methanotrophs were found at a depth of 2 to 3 cm, corresponding to the zone of highest methane oxidation activity, although no oxygen could be detected in this zone. In the profundal sediment, highest methane oxidation activities were found at a depth of 1 to 2 cm, while MOB abundance decreased gradually with sediment depth. In both sediments, MOB were also present at high numbers in deeper sediment layers where no methane oxidation activity could be observed.

  20. Characterization of the ectoine biosynthesis genes of haloalkalotolerant obligate methanotroph "Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2006-01-01

    The genes involved in biosynthesis of the major compatible solute ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methylpyrimidine carboxylic acid) in halotolerant obligate methanotroph "Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z" were studied. The complete nucleotide sequences of the structural genes encoding L: -aspartokinase (Ask), L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid transaminase (EctB), L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid acetyltransferase (EctA), and L-ectoine synthase (EctC) were defined and shown to be transcribed as a single operon ectABCask. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high sequence identities (34-63%) of the Ect proteins to those from halophilic heterotrophs with the highest amino acid identities being to Vibrio cholerae enzymes. The chromosomal DNA fragment from "M. alcaliphilum 20Z" containing ectABC genes and putative promoter region was expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant cells could grow in the presence of 4% NaCl and synthesize ectoine. The data obtained suggested that despite the ectoine biosynthesis pathway being evolutionary well conserved with respect to the genes and enzymes involved, some differences in their organization and regulation could occur in various halophilic bacteria.

  1. Two-liquid phase partitioning biotrickling filters for methane abatement: exploring the potential of hydrophobic methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrero, Raquel; Hernández, Laura; Pérez, Rebeca; Estrada, José M; Muñoz, Raúl

    2015-03-15

    The potential of two-liquid phase biotrickling filters (BTFs) to overcome mass transfer limitations derived from the poor aqueous solubility of CH4 has been scarcely investigated to date. In this context, the abatement of diluted methane emissions in two-liquid phase BTFs was evaluated using two different inocula: a type II methanotrophs culture in BTF 1 and a hydrophobic microbial consortium capable of growing inside silicone oil in BTF 2. Both BTFs supported stable elimination capacities above 45 g m(-3) h(-1) regardless of the inoculum, whereas no improvement derived from the presence of hydrophobic microorganisms compared to the type II metanotrophs culture was observed. Interestingly, the addition of silicone oil mediated a reduced metabolites concentration in the recycling aqueous phase, thus decreasing the needs for mineral medium renewal. Moreover, a 78% similarity was recorded between the microbial communities enriched in both BTFs at the end of the experimental period in spite of the differences in the initial inoculum structure. The results obtained confirmed the superior performance of two-liquid phase BTFs for CH4 abatement compared with conventional biotrickling filters.

  2. A new alpha(0)-thalassemia deletion found in a Dutch family (--(AW)).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Schaap, R.A.; Arkesteijn, S.G.; Boxma, G.L.; Helden, W.C. van; Wildschut, I.C.; Bruin-Roest, A.C. de; Giordano, P.C.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by a microcytic hypochromic anemia caused by a quantitative reduction of the alpha-globin chain. The majority of the alpha-thalassemias is caused by deletions in the alpha-globin gene cluster. A deletion in the alpha-globin gene

  3. A new alpha(0)-thalassemia deletion found in a Dutch family (--(AW)).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Schaap, R.A.; Arkesteijn, S.G.; Boxma, G.L.; Helden, W.C. van; Wildschut, I.C.; Bruin-Roest, A.C. de; Giordano, P.C.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by a microcytic hypochromic anemia caused by a quantitative reduction of the alpha-globin chain. The majority of the alpha-thalassemias is caused by deletions in the alpha-globin gene cluster. A deletion in the alpha-globin gene clu

  4. Cluster Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Greiner, Walter

    One of the rare examples of phenomena predicted before experimental discovery, offers the opportunity to introduce fission theory based on the asymmetric two center shell model. The valleys within the potential energy surfaces are due to the shell effects and are clearly showing why cluster radioactivity was mostly detected in parent nuclei leading to a doubly magic lead daughter. Saddle point shapes can be determined by solving an integro-differential equation. Nuclear dynamics allows us to calculate the half-lives. The following cluster decay modes (or heavy particle radioactivities) have been experimentally confirmed: 14C, 20O, 23F, 22,24-26Ne, 28,30Mg, 32,34Si with half-lives in good agreement with predicted values within our analytical superasymmetric fission model. The preformation probability is calculated as the internal barrier penetrability. An universal curve is described and used as an alternative for the estimation of the half-lives. The macroscopic-microscopic method was extended to investigate two-alpha accompanied fission and true ternary fission. The methods developed in nuclear physics are also adapted to study the stability of deposited atomic clusters on the planar surfaces.

  5. Identification and characterization of EctR1, a new transcriptional regulator of the ectoine biosynthesis genes in the halotolerant methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoding key enzymes of the ectoine biosynthesis pathway in the halotolerant obligate methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z have been shown to be organized into an ectABC-ask operon. Transcription of the ect operon is initiated from two promoters, ectAp(1) and ectAp(2) (ectAp(1)p(2)), similar to the sigma(70)-dependent promoters of Escherichia coli. Upstream of the gene cluster, an open reading frame (ectR1) encoding a MarR-like transcriptional regulator was identified. Investigation of the influence of EctR1 on the activity of the ectAp(1)p(2) promoters in wild-type M. alcaliphilum 20Z and ectR1 mutant strains suggested that EctR1 is a negative regulator of the ectABC-ask operon. Purified recombinant EctR1-His(6) specifically binds as a homodimer to the putative -10 motif of the ectAp(1) promoter. The EctR1 binding site contains a pseudopalindromic sequence (TATTTAGT-GT-ACTATATA) composed of 8-bp half-sites separated by 2 bp. Transcription of the ectR1 gene is initiated from a single sigma(70)-like promoter. The location of the EctR1 binding site between the transcriptional and translational start sites of the ectR1 gene suggests that EctR1 may regulate its own expression. The data presented suggest that in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, EctR1-mediated control of the transcription of the ect genes is not the single mechanism for the regulation of ectoine biosynthesis.

  6. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  7. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Production and Trichloroethylene Degradation by a Type I Methanotroph, Methylomonas methanica 68-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sung-Cheol; Bowman, John P.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A methanotroph (strain 68-1), originally isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer, was identified as the type I methanotroph Methylomonas methanica on the basis of intracytoplasmic membrane ultrastructure, phospholipid fatty acid profile, and 16S rRNA signature probe hybridization. Strain 68-1 was found to oxidize naphthalene and TCE via a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and thus becomes the first type I methanotroph known to be able to produce this enzyme. The specific whole-cell sMMO activity of 68-1, as measured by the naphthalene oxidation assay and by TCE biodegradation, was comparatively higher than sMMO activity levels in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b grown in the same copper-free conditions. The maximal naphthalene oxidation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 551 ± 27 and 321 ± 16 nmol h-1 mg of protein -1, respectively. The maximal TCE degradation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 2,325 ± 260 and 995 ± 160 nmol h-1 mg of protein-1, respectively. The substrate affinity of 68-1 sMMO to naphthalene (Km, 70 ± 4 μM) and TCE (Km, 225 ± 13 μM), however, was comparatively lower than that of the sMMO of OB3b, which had affinities of 40 ± 3 and 126 ± 8 μM, respectively. Genomic DNA slot and Southern blot analyses with an sMMO gene probe from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b showed that the sMMO genes of 68-1 have little genetic homology to those of OB3b. This result may indicate the evolutionary diversification of the sMMOs. Images PMID:16348920

  8. Recent Experimental Results on Nuclear Cluster Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on nuclear cluster physics has increased considerably since the pioneering discovery of 12C+12C resonances half a century ago and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes and/or Bose-Einstein alpha condensates in light N-Z alpha-conjugate nuclei is investigated. Evolution of clustering from stability to the drip-lines examined with clustering aspects persisting in light neutron-rich nuclei is consistent with the extension of the "Ikeda-diagram" to non alpha-conjugate nuclei.

  9. High resolution depth distribution of Bacteria, Archaea, methanotrophs, and methanogens in the bulk and rhizosphere soils of a flooded rice paddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jung eLee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The communities and abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, along with the oxygen, methane, and total organic carbon (TOC concentrations, were investigated along a depth gradient in a flooded rice paddy. Broad patterns in vertical profiles of oxygen, methane, TOC, and microbial abundances were similar in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, though methane and TOC concentrations and 16S rRNA gene copies were clearly higher in the rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil. Oxygen concentrations decreased sharply to below detection limits at the 8 mm depth. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial and archaeal communities varied according to the oxic, oxic-anoxic, and anoxic zones, indicating that oxygen is a determining factor for the distribution of bacterial and archaeal communities. Aerobic methanotrophs were maximally observed near the oxic-anoxic interface, while methane, TOC, and methanogens were highest in the rhizosphere soil at 30–200 mm depth, suggesting that methane is produced mainly from organic carbon derived from rice plants and is metabolized aerobically. The relative abundances of type I methanotrophs such as Methylococcus, Methylomonas, and Methylocaldum decreased more drastically than those of type II methanotrophs (such as Methylocystis and Methylosinus with increasing depth. Methanosaeta and Methanoregula were predominant methanogens at all depths, and the relative abundances of Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, and Methanosphaerula, and GOM_Arc_I increased with increasing depth. Based on contrasts between absolute abundances of methanogens and methanotrophs at depths sampled across rhizosphere and bulk soils (especially millimeter-scale slices at the surface, we have identified populations of methanogens (Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, Methanocella, Methanobacterium, and Methanosphaerula and methanotrophs (Methylosarcina, Methylococcus, Methylosinus, and unclassified Methylocystaceae that are likely physiologically

  10. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylocaldum sp. SAD2, a Methanotrophic Strain That Can Convert Raw Biogas to Methanol in the Presence of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangdong; Ge, Xumen; Li, Yebo; Yu, Zhongtang

    2017-08-10

    The draft genome sequence of Methylocaldum sp. SAD2, a methanotrophic strain isolated from a hydrogen sulfide-rich anaerobic digester, is reported here. Strain SAD2 possesses genes for methane oxidation in the presence of H2S. Copyright © 2017 Wei et al.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylocaldum sp. Strain 14B, an Obligate Hydrogen Sulfide-Tolerant Methanotrophic Strain That Can Convert Biogas to Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangdong; Ge, Xumen; Li, Yebo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of Methylocaldum sp. 14B, an obligate methanotrophic strain isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestion systems, is reported here. Strain 14B possesses genes for methane oxidation and exhibited tolerance to H2S. PMID:28428289

  13. Effects of nitrogen application rate and a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide on methanotroph abundance and methane uptake in a grazed pasture soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; He, Ji-Zheng

    2013-12-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) in the soil are a unique group of methylotrophic bacteria that utilize methane (CH4) as their sole source of carbon and energy which limit the flux of methane to the atmosphere from soils and consume atmospheric methane. A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen application rates and the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on the abundance of methanotrophs and on methane flux in a grazed pasture soil. Nitrogen (N) was applied at four different rates, with urea applied at 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1) and animal urine at 300 and 600 kg N ha(-1). DCD was applied at 10 kg ha(-1). The results showed that both the DNA and selected mRNA copy numbers of the methanotroph pmoA gene were not affected by the application of urea, urine or DCD. The methanotroph DNA and mRNA pmoA gene copy numbers were low in this soil, below 7.13 × 10(3) g(-1) soil and 3.75 × 10(3) μg(-1) RNA, respectively. Daily CH4 flux varied slightly among different treatments during the experimental period, ranging from -12.89 g CH4 ha(-1) day(-1) to -0.83 g CH4 ha(-1) day(-1), but no significant treatment effect was found. This study suggests that the application of urea fertilizer, animal urine returns and the use of the nitrification inhibitor DCD do not significantly affect soil methanotroph abundance or daily CH4 fluxes in grazed grassland soils.

  14. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... A cluster headache begins as a severe, sudden headache. The headache commonly strikes 2 to 3 hours after you fall ...

  15. Cluster Forests

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Donghui; Jordan, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by Random Forests (RF) in the context of classification, we propose a new clustering ensemble method---Cluster Forests (CF). Geometrically, CF randomly probes a high-dimensional data cloud to obtain "good local clusterings" and then aggregates via spectral clustering to obtain cluster assignments for the whole dataset. The search for good local clusterings is guided by a cluster quality measure $\\kappa$. CF progressively improves each local clustering in a fashion that resembles the tree growth in RF. Empirical studies on several real-world datasets under two different performance metrics show that CF compares favorably to its competitors. Theoretical analysis shows that the $\\kappa$ criterion is shown to grow each local clustering in a desirable way---it is "noise-resistant." A closed-form expression is obtained for the mis-clustering rate of spectral clustering under a perturbation model, which yields new insights into some aspects of spectral clustering.

  16. Spontaneous emission of heavy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M. (Central Inst. of Physics, Bucharest (Romania)); Sandulescu, A. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR)); Greiner, W. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1984-08-01

    The lifetimes of some heavy nuclei relative to the spontaneous emission of various clusters heavier than the alpha particle are estimated with a model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay, showing that this phenomenon is a new manifestation of the nuclear shell structure. A greater probability is obtained for parent-heavy-cluster combinations leading to a magic or almost magic daughter nucleus. The analytical formula obtained allows the handling of a large number of cases to search for new kinds of radioactivities.

  17. Star Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gieles, M.

    1993-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of stars and star clusters. These complexes share similar properties with giant molecular clouds, from which they are formed. Many (70%) of the young clusters will not survive the fist 10 Myr, due to t...

  18. GLOBAL MOLECULAR ANALYSES OF METHANE METABOLISM IN METHANOTROPHIC ALPHAPROTEOBACTERIUM, METHYLOSINUS TRICHOSPORIUM OB3B.PART II. METABOLOMICS AND 13C-LABELING STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Kalyuzhanaya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we use metabolomics and 13C-labeling data to refine central metabolic pathways for methane utilization in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a model alphaproteobacterial methanotrophic bacterium. We demonstrate here that similar to non-methane utilizing methylotrophic alphaproteobacteria the core metabolism of the microbe is represented by several tightly connected metabolic cycles, such as the serine pathway, the ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC pathway, and the citric acid (TCA cycle. Both in silico estimations and stable isotope labeling experiments combined with single cell (NanoSIMS and bulk biomass analyses indicate that a significantly larger portion of the cell carbon (over 60% is derived from CO2 in this methanotroph. Our 13C-labeling studies revealed an unusual topology of the assimilatory network in which phosph(enolpyruvate/pyruvate interconversions are key metabolic switches. A set of additional pathways for carbon fixation are identified and discussed.

  19. High precision $^{89}$Y($\\alpha$,$\\alpha$)$^{89}$Y scattering at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; \\, Zs; Fülöp,; Galaviz, D; Gyürky, Gy; Elekes, Z; Somorjai, E; Kretschmer, A; Sonnabend, K; Zilges, A; Avrigeanu, M

    2010-01-01

    Elastic scattering cross sections of the $^{89}$Y($\\alpha$,$\\alpha$)$^{89}$Y reaction have been measured at energies E$_{c.m.}$ = 15.51 and 18.63 MeV. The high precision data for the semi-magic $N = 50$ nucleus $^{89}$Y are used to derive a local potential and to evaluate the predictions of global and regional $\\alpha$-nucleus potentials. The variation of the elastic alpha scattering cross sections along the $N = 50$ isotonic chain is investigated by a study of the ratios of angular distributions for $^{89}$Y($\\alpha$,$\\alpha$)$^{89}$Y and $^{92}$Mo($\\alpha$,$\\alpha$)$^{92}$Mo at E$_{c.m.} \\approx$ 15.51 and 18.63 MeV. This ratio is a very sensitive probe at energies close to the Coulomb barrier, where scattering data alone is usually not enough to characterize the different potentials. Furthermore, $\\alpha$-cluster states in $^{93}$Nb = $^{89}$Y $\\otimes$ $\\alpha$ are investigated.

  20. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  1. Existence of six-$\\alpha$ linear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoritaka; Itagaki, Naoyuki; Maruhn, Joachim A; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-01-01

    The stable existence of a six-$\\alpha$ linear structure in highly excited states of $^{24}$Mg is studied based on a systematic Cranked Hartree-Fock calculation with various Skyrme-type interactions. Its stability is examined by allowing the transition of the cluster structure to the shell-model like structure. Especially, the six-$\\alpha$ linear state is exposed to two major instabilities: the bending motion, which is the main path for the transition to low-lying states, and the spin-orbit interaction, which is the driving force to break the $\\alpha$ clusters and enhance the independent motion of the nucleons. The linear structure with large angular momentum is obtained as a meta-stable stationary state.

  2. Methanotrophic activity in the water column above shallow gas flares west of Prins Karls Forland, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründger, Friederike; Svenning, Mette M.; Niemann, Helge; Silyakova, Anna; Serov, Pavel; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Granskog, Mats A.; Ferre, Bénédicte; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Numerous gas flares, interpreted to be streams of methane bubbles, were discovered in shallow waters (average water depth about 90 m) on the continental shelf west of Prins Karls Forland (Western Svalbard) in the Arctic Ocean. Gas is released from the seabed to the water column and potentially transferred into the atmosphere where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In order to resolve the fate of dissolved methane in the water column, we carried out grid-pattern biogeochemical measurements in the study area of 30 x 15 km. Specifically, we measured concentrations of dissolved methane and microbial methane oxidation (MOx) rates at 8 water depths at 31 sampling stations and performed 16S rRNA sequencing analysis on selected samples to characterize the microbial community composition. Availability of dissolved methane is essential for the process of microbial methane oxidation. However, our measurements reveal that high concentrations of dissolved methane in the water column do not necessarily lead to high MOx rates. Our results indicated that the presence of marine methanotrophic biomass as well as dissolved organic matter is of larger importance for the process of microbial methane oxidation. For example, we found MOx hot spots with values up to 13 nmol l-1 d-1 at bottom water depth with dissolved methane concentrations less than 160 nmol l-1. In contrast, at stations where bottom methane concentration values reached 640 nmol l-1, MOx rates were less than 0.7 nmol l-1 d-1. To interpret observed interconnection between methane concentrations and MOx rates, we use vertical distributions of seawater temperature, salinity and properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). This information helps us characterize the oceanographic setting and circulation patterns in the area, which we believe has a major impact on the origin and distribution of methanotrophic microbial biomass and methane oxidation in methanerich bottom water. This study is part of the Centre for

  3. Methane-Fueled Syntrophy through Extracellular Electron Transfer: Uncovering the Genomic Traits Conserved within Diverse Bacterial Partners of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skennerton, Connor T; Chourey, Karuna; Iyer, Ramsunder; Hettich, Robert L; Tyson, Gene W; Orphan, Victoria J

    2017-08-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea in syntrophic partnership with deltaproteobacterial sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is the primary mechanism for methane removal in ocean sediments. The mechanism of their syntrophy has been the subject of much research as traditional intermediate compounds, such as hydrogen and formate, failed to decouple the partners. Recent findings have indicated the potential for extracellular electron transfer from ANME archaea to SRB, though it is unclear how extracellular electrons are integrated into the metabolism of the SRB partner. We used metagenomics to reconstruct eight genomes from the globally distributed SEEP-SRB1 clade of ANME partner bacteria to determine what genomic features are required for syntrophy. The SEEP-SRB1 genomes contain large multiheme cytochromes that were not found in previously described free-living SRB and also lack periplasmic hydrogenases that may prevent an independent lifestyle without an extracellular source of electrons from ANME archaea. Metaproteomics revealed the expression of these cytochromes at in situ methane seep sediments from three sites along the Pacific coast of the United States. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these cytochromes appear to have been horizontally transferred from metal-respiring members of the Deltaproteobacteria such as Geobacter and may allow these syntrophic SRB to accept extracellular electrons in place of other chemical/organic electron donors.IMPORTANCE Some archaea, known as anaerobic methanotrophs, are capable of converting methane into carbon dioxide when they are growing syntopically with sulfate-reducing bacteria. This partnership is the primary mechanism for methane removal in ocean sediments; however, there is still much to learn about how this syntrophy works. Previous studies have failed to identify the metabolic intermediate, such as hydrogen or formate, that is passed between partners. However, recent analysis of

  4. Mutant U5A cells are complemented by an interferon-alpha beta receptor subunit generated by alternative processing of a new member of a cytokine receptor gene cluster.

    OpenAIRE

    Lutfalla, G; Holland, S J; Cinato, E; Monneron, D; Reboul, J.; Rogers, N C; J. M. Smith; Stark, G R; Gardiner, K.; Mogensen, K E

    1995-01-01

    The cellular receptor for the alpha/beta interferons contains at least two components that interact with interferon. The ifnar1 component is well characterized and a putative ifnar2 cDNA has recently been identified. We have cloned the gene for ifnar2 and show that it produces four different transcripts encoding three different polypeptides that are generated by exon skipping, alternative splicing and differential use of polyadenylation sites. One polypeptide is likely to be secreted and two ...

  5. Electron transfer from alpha-keggin anions to dioxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurii V. Geletii; Rajai H. Atalla; Craig L. Hill; Ira A. Weinstock

    2004-01-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs), of which alpha-Keggin anions are representative, are a diverse and rapidly growing class of water-soluble cluster-anion structures with applications ranging from molecular catalysis to materials. [1] POMs are inexpensive, minimally or non-toxic, negatively charged clusters comprised of early transition-metals, usually in their do electronic...

  6. Aspergillus nidulans alpha-galactosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 36 catalyses the formation of alpha-galacto-oligosaccharides by transglycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Baumann, Martin J; Petersen, Bent O; Westphal, Yvonne; Hachem, Maher Abou; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Duus, Jens Ø; Schols, Henk A; Svensson, Birte

    2010-09-01

    The alpha-galactosidase from Aspergillus nidulans (AglC) belongs to a phylogenetic cluster containing eukaryotic alpha-galactosidases and alpha-galacto-oligosaccharide synthases of glycoside hydrolase family 36 (GH36). The recombinant AglC, produced in high yield (0.65 g.L(-1) culture) as His-tag fusion in Escherichia coli, catalysed efficient transglycosylation with alpha-(1-->6) regioselectivity from 40 mm 4-nitrophenol alpha-d-galactopyranoside, melibiose or raffinose, resulting in a 37-74% yield of 4-nitrophenol alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-D-Galp, alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-D-Glcp and alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-D-Glcp-(alpha1-->beta2)-d-Fruf (stachyose), respectively. Furthermore, among 10 monosaccharide acceptor candidates (400 mm) and the donor 4-nitrophenol alpha-D-galactopyranoside (40 mm), alpha-(1-->6) linked galactodisaccharides were also obtained with galactose, glucose and mannose in high yields of 39-58%. AglC did not transglycosylate monosaccharides without the 6-hydroxymethyl group, i.e. xylose, L-arabinose, L-fucose and L-rhamnose, or with axial 3-OH, i.e. gulose, allose, altrose and L-rhamnose. Structural modelling using Thermotoga maritima GH36 alpha-galactosidase as the template and superimposition of melibiose from the complex with human GH27 alpha-galactosidase supported that recognition at subsite +1 in AglC presumably requires a hydrogen bond between 3-OH and Trp358 and a hydrophobic environment around the C-6 hydroxymethyl group. In addition, successful transglycosylation of eight of 10 disaccharides (400 mm), except xylobiose and arabinobiose, indicated broad specificity for interaction with the +2 subsite. AglC thus transferred alpha-galactosyl to 6-OH of the terminal residue in the alpha-linked melibiose, maltose, trehalose, sucrose and turanose in 6-46% yield and the beta-linked lactose, lactulose and cellobiose in 28-38% yield. The product structures were identified using NMR and ESI-MS and five of the 13

  7. Clustering in stable and exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering discovery of molecular resonances in the 12C+12C reaction more than half a century ago a great deal of research work has been undertaken in alpha clustering. Our knowledge on physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes and Bose-Einstein alpha condensates in light N=Z alpha-conjugate nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of the superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Evolution of clustering from stability to the drip-lines is examined: clustering aspects are, in particular, discussed for light exotic nuclei with large neutron excess such as neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes with their complete spectroscopy.

  8. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  9. Alpha Thalassemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Alpha Thalassemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Alpha Thalassemia Print A A ... Complications Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Alfa talasemia Thalassemias Thalassemias are a group of blood disorders that ...

  10. H-alpha Observations of MKW10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Harold; Coble, Kimberly A.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project looking at clusters and groups of galaxies to investigate the effects of environment on star formation, we analyzed H-alpha and R-band observations of the group MKW10 from the WIYN 0.9-m telescope with MOSAIC camera at Kitt Peak. We continuum-subtract the H-alpha images by scaling and subtracting the broadband R images. This process includes: determining the seeing of each image by calculating the FWHM values of several stars in the image; convolving all images to the worst seeing; stacking images for each filter; subtracting sky background; scaling the R image to H-alpha; and subtracting the scaled R from H-alpha. We then use the H-alpha-continuum-subtracted image to perform surface photometry of individual galaxies in MKW10. The data will be used to determine star formation rates and distributions of galaxies in this group environment and will be compared to results for galaxies in other UAT group and cluster environments. Analysis is ongoing.This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and the Illinois Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Star Cluster Dissolution in Arp 284

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Bradley W; Smith, Beverly J; Hancock, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We present results from a study of proto-globular cluster candidates in the interacting galaxy system Arp 284 (NGC 7714/5). Studies of the Antennae and M51 have suggested that the majority of these star clusters dissolve within 20 Myr due to mass loss. We obtain cluster colors using archival \\emph{HST} data, and estimate ages and extinctions for over 150 clusters using evolutionary synthesis models. We find that clusters in NGC 7714 are generally less than 20 Myr old, while the data in the bridge is too limited to allow good estimates for individual clusters. We also examine {H {\\sc ii}} region complexes with lower-resolution \\emph{GALEX} and ground-based H$\\alpha$ images. Several of these regions appear to be much older than the detected clusters within them, which may indicate the presence of an older, unresolved population of low mass or dispersed clusters.

  12. Cluster Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Kneib, Jean-Paul; 10.1007/s00159-011-0047-3

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most recently assembled, massive, bound structures in the Universe. As predicted by General Relativity, given their masses, clusters strongly deform space-time in their vicinity. Clusters act as some of the most powerful gravitational lenses in the Universe. Light rays traversing through clusters from distant sources are hence deflected, and the resulting images of these distant objects therefore appear distorted and magnified. Lensing by clusters occurs in two regimes, each with unique observational signatures. The strong lensing regime is characterized by effects readily seen by eye, namely, the production of giant arcs, multiple-images, and arclets. The weak lensing regime is characterized by small deformations in the shapes of background galaxies only detectable statistically. Cluster lenses have been exploited successfully to address several important current questions in cosmology: (i) the study of the lens(es) - understanding cluster mass distributions and issues pertaining...

  13. The Alpha Antihydrogen Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, N.; Andresen, G.; Bertsche, W.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Chartier, M.; Fajans, J.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-03-01

    ALPHA is a new experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The short term goal of ALPHA is trapping of cold antihydrogen, with the long term goal of conducting precise spectroscopic comparisons of hydrogen and antihydrogen. Here we present the current status of ALPHA and the physics considerations and results leading to its design as well as recent progress towards trapping.

  14. Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Alpha Spectra Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Orellana, Carlos J.; Rubio-Montero, Pilar; González-Velasco, Horacio

    2005-01-01

    We present a performance study of alpha-particle spectra fitting using parallel Genetic Algorithm (GA). The method uses a two-step approach. In the first step we run parallel GA to find an initial solution for the second step, in which we use Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method for a precise final fit. GA is a high resources-demanding method, so we use a Beowulf cluster for parallel simulation. The relationship between simulation time (and parallel efficiency) and processors number is studied using several alpha spectra, with the aim of obtaining a method to estimate the optimal processors number that must be used in a simulation.

  15. The δ15N and δ18O values of N2O produced during the co-oxidation of ammonia by methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandernack, Kevin W.; Mills, Christopher T.; Johnson, Craig A.; Rahn, Thomas; Kinney, Chad

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine if the δ15N and δ18O values of N2O produced during co-oxidation of NH4+ by methanotrophic (methane oxidizing) bacteria can be isotopically distinguished from N2O produced either by autotrophic nitrifying or denitrifying bacteria, we conducted laboratory incubation experiments with pure cultures of methanotrophic bacteria that were provided NH4Cl as an oxidation substrate. The N2O produced during NH4+ oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria showed nitrogen isotope fractionation between NH4+ and N2O (εN2O–NH4+) of − 48 and − 55‰ for Methylomonas methanica and Methylosinus trichosporium, OB3b respectively. These large fractionations are similar to those previously measured for autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and consistent with N2O formation by multiple rate limiting steps that include NH4+oxidation by the methane monooxygenase enzyme and reduction of NO2− to N2O. Consequently, N2O formed by NH4+ oxidation via methanotrophic or autotrophic nitrifying bacteria might generally be characterized by lower δ15NN2O values than that formed by denitrificaiton, although this also depends on the variability of δ15N of available nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4+, NO3−, NO2−). Additional incubations with M. trichosporium OB3b at high and low CH4 conditions in waters of different δ18O values revealed that 19–27% of the oxygen in N2O was derived from O2 with the remainder from water. The biochemical mechanisms that could explain this amount of O2 incorporation are discussed. The δ18O of N2O formed under high CH4 conditions was ~ + 15‰ more positive than that formed under lower CH4 conditions. This enrichment resulted in part from the incorporation of O2 into N2O that was enriched in 18O due to an isotope fractionation effect of − 16.1 ± 2.0‰ and − 17.5 ± 5.4‰ associated with O2 consumption during the high and low methane concentration incubations, respectively. Therefore, N2O formed by NH4+

  16. Alpha-resonance structure in $^{11}$C studied via resonant scattering of $^{7}$Be+$\\alpha$ and $^{7}$Be($\\alpha$, $p$) reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, H; Wakabayashi, Y; Kubono, S; Hashimoto, T; Hayakawa, S; Kawabata, T; Iwasa, N; Teranishi, T; Kwon, Y K; Binh, D N; Khiem, L H; Duy, N N

    2012-01-01

    The resonance structure in $^{11}$C is particularly of interest with regard to the astrophysical $^{7}$Be($\\alpha$, $\\gamma$) reaction, relevant at high temperature, and to the $\\alpha$-cluster structure in $^{11}$C. The measurement was to determine unknown resonance parameters for the high excited states of $^{11}$C. In particular, the $\\alpha$ decay width can be useful information to discuss $\\alpha$ cluster structure in $^{11}$C. New measurements of the $^{7}$Be+$\\alpha$ resonant scattering and the $^{7}$Be($\\alpha$, $p$)$^{10}$B reaction in inverse kinematics were performed for center-of-mass energy up to 5.5 MeV, and the resonances at excitation energies of 8.9--12.7 MeV in the compound $^{11}$C nucleus were studied. Inelastic scattering of $^{7}$Be+$\\alpha$ and the $^{7}$Be($\\alpha$, $p_1$)$^{10}$B$^*$ reaction were also studied with a simultaneous $\\gamma$-ray measurement. The measurements were performed at the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) of the Center for Nucl...

  17. Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials derived from the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2006-01-01

    We calculate Lambda alpha, Sigma alpha and Xi alpha potentials from the nuclear-matter G-matrices of the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction. The alpha-cluster wave function is assumed to be a simple harmonic-oscillator shell-model wave function. A new method is proposed to derive the direct and knock-on terms of the interaction Born kernel from the hyperon-nucleon G-matrices, with explicit treatments of the nonlocality and the center-of-mass motion between the hyperon and alpha. We find that the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interactions, FSS and fss2, yield a reasonable bound-state energy for 5 He Lambda, -3.18 -- -3.62 MeV, in spite of the fact that they give relatively large depths for the Lambda single-particle potentials, 46 -- 48 MeV, in symmetric nuclear matter. An equivalent local potential derived from the Wigner transform of the nonlocal Lambda alpha kernel shows a strong energy dependence for the incident Lambda-particle, indicating the importance of the strangeness-exchange process in the o...

  18. A novel integrated biorefinery process for diesel fuel blendstock production using lipids from the methanotroph, Methylomicrobium buryatense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Tao; Fei, Qiang; Genelot, Marie; Smith, Holly; Laurens, Lieve M. L.; Watson, Michael J.; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2017-03-08

    In light of the availability of low-cost methane (CH4) derived from natural gas and biogas along with increasing concerns of the greenhouse gas emissions, the production of alternative liquid biofuels directly from CH4 is a promising approach to capturing wasted energy. A novel biorefinery concept integrating biological conversion of CH4 to microbial lipids together with lipid extraction and generation of hydrocarbon fuels is demonstrated in this study for the first time. An aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense capable of using CH4 as the sole carbon source was selected on the basis of genetic tractability, cultivation robustness, and ability to accumulate phospholipids in membranes. A maximum fatty acid content of 10% of dry cell weight was obtained in batch cultures grown in a continuous gas sparging fermentation system. Although phospholipids are not typically considered as a good feedstock for upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels, we set out to demonstrate that using a combination of novel lipid extraction methodology with advanced catalyst design, we could prove the feasibility of this approach. Up to 95% of the total fatty acids from membrane-bound phospholipids were recovered by a two-stage pretreatment method followed by hexane extraction of the aqueous hydrolysate. The upgrading of extracted lipids was then demonstrated in a hydrodeoxygeation process using palladium on silica as a catalyst. Lipid conversion in excess of 99% was achieved, with a full selectivity to hydrocarbons. The final hydrocarbon mixture is dominated by 88% pentadecane (C15H32) based on decarbonylation/decarboxylation and hydrogenation of C16 fatty acids, indicating that a biological gas-to-liquid fuel (Bio-GTL) process is technically feasible.

  19. On the relationship between methane production and oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic communities from cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, Beth; Samarkin, Vladimir; Boetius, Antje; Joye, Samantha

    2008-05-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in the marine subsurface is a significant sink for methane in the environment, yet our understanding of its regulation and dynamics is still incomplete. Relatively few groups of microorganisms consume methane in subsurface environments--namely the anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME clades 1, 2 and 3), which are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic oxidation of methane presumably proceeds via a 'reversed' methanogenic pathway. The ANME are generally associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate is the only documented final electron acceptor for AOM in marine sediments. Our comparative study explored the coupling of AOM with sulfate reduction (SR) and methane generation (MOG) in microbial communities from Gulf of Mexico cold seep sediments that were naturally enriched with methane and other hydrocarbons. These sediments harbour a variety of ANME clades and SRB. Following enrichment under an atmosphere of methane, AOM fuelled 50-100% of SR, even in sediment slurries containing petroleum-associated hydrocarbons and organic matter. In the presence of methane and sulfate, the investigated microbial communities produce methane at a small fraction ( approximately 10%) of the AOM rate. Anaerobic oxidation of methane, MOG and SR rates decreased significantly with decreasing concentration of methane, and in the presence of the SR inhibitor molybdate, but reacted differently to the MOG inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES). The addition of acetate, a possible breakdown product of petroleum in situ and a potential intermediate in AOM/SR syntrophy, did not suppress AOM activity; rather acetate stimulated microbial activity in oily sediment slurries.

  20. Serpentinization: the engine that drove the onset of methanotrophic acetogenesis at the emergence of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Of all the processes in the cascade of dissipation engines relieving the Earth of its heat burden, it is largely in the process of serpentinization that the fateful transitional step from the largely physical to the largely chemical free energy converting engines on our planet first was taken. That is, the serpentinization process primarily converts physical disequilibria, in the form of mechanical stress and thermal gradients, to the production of structural, mineralogical, and most notably, chemical disequilibria - all of which then serve to directly set the table for the emergence of life. Moderate temperature serpentinization could offer two fuels in alkaline hydrothermal solution, H2 and CH4 as well as the vital catalyst molybdenum to what we take to be the hatchery of life - a compartmentalized submarine hydrothermal mound acting as both a materials and a free energy trap. The porous mound is generated as this hot alkaline solution interfaces the nitrate-bearing carbonic Hadean Ocean (Russell, Nitschke, Branscomb, 2012). We address here the problem of how, in this context, the fixation of carbon may have occurred abiotically, producing two critical reagents, at least as far as CO and a methyl group, which then react to form acetate. In this scheme both of these products are respectively derived from methane and CO2 through the double use of electron bifurcation mediated by two molybdenum atoms. Starting from methane on the one hand and CO2 on the other, oxidation of the former releases two electrons which are held temporarily in molybdenum orbitals, before being released to reduce directly the CO2 to CO as detailed next. Within the confining iron-nickel-molybdenum-sulfide-bearing, CH4 and CO2-permeated, inorganic membranes, 2 molecules of CH4 could lose 4 electrons to a putative Mo2VIFe3S90/2- cluster (Helz et al. 2011) as they are oxidized to methyl groups. Faced with the high potential oxidant NO3-, the electrons in the now reduced Mo2IVFe3S90/2- cluster

  1. Conduction and Turbulent Mixing in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, R; Kim, Woong-Tae; Narayan, Ramesh

    2004-01-01

    We discuss hydrostatic models of galaxy clusters in which heat diffusion balances radiative cooling. We consider two different sources of diffusion, thermal conduction and turbulent mixing, parameterized by dimensionless coefficients, f and alpha_mix, respectively. Models with thermal conduction give reasonably good fits to the density and temperature profiles of several cooling flow clusters, but some clusters require unphysically large values of f>1. Models with turbulent mixing give good fits to all clusters, with reasonable values of alpha_mix ~ 0.01-0.03. Both types of models are found to be essentially stable to thermal perturbations. The mixing model reproduces the observed scalings of various cluster properties with temperature, and also explains the entropy floor seen in galaxy groups.

  2. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  3. Nonlocalized cluster dynamics and nuclear molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bo; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Xu, Chang; Yamada, Taiichi

    2013-01-01

    A container picture is proposed for understanding cluster dynamics where the clusters make nonlocalized motion occupying the lowest orbit of the cluster mean-field potential characterized by the size parameter $``B"$ in the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"{o}pke) wave function. The nonlocalized cluster aspects of the inversion-doublet bands in $^{20}$Ne which have been considered as a typical manifestation of localized clustering are discussed. So far unexplained puzzling features of the THSR wave function, namely that after angular-momentum projection for two cluster systems the prolate THSR wave function is almost 100$\\%$ equivalent to an oblate THSR wave function is clarified. It is shown that the true intrinsic two-cluster THSR configuration is nonetheless prolate. The proposal of the container picture is based on the fact that typical cluster systems, 2$\\alpha$, 3$\\alpha$, and $\\alpha$+$^{16}$O, are all well described by a single THSR wave function. It will be shown for the case of linear-chain states w...

  4. Predicted halflives for cluster radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N. (Institutul Central de Fizica, Bucharest (Romania); Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik); Greiner, W. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik); Ivascu, M. (Institutul Central de Fizica, Bucharest (Romania))

    1989-10-09

    The main results of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, describing in a unified manner cluster radioactivities, alpha-decay and cold fission processes, are briefly reviewed. Predicted halflives for {sup 14}C, {sup 24,25,26}Ne, {sup 28,30}Mg and {sup 32}Si radioactivities in the range 10{sup 11}-10{sup 26} s and the corresponding branching ratios relative to {alpha}-decay 10{sup -16}-10{sup -9} have been experimentally confirmed within 1.5 orders of magnitude. (orig.).

  5. The determination of $\\alpha_s$ by the ALPHA collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    We review the ALPHA collaboration strategy for obtaining the QCD coupling at high scale. In the three-flavor effective theory it avoids the use of perturbation theory at $\\alpha > 0.2$ and at the same time has the physical scales small compared to the cutoff $1/a$ in all stages of the computation. The result $\\Lambda_\\overline{MS}^{(3)}=332(14)$~MeV is translated to $\\alpha_\\overline{MS}(m_Z)=0.1179(10)(2)$ by use of (high order) perturbative relations between the effective theory couplings at the charm and beauty quark "thresholds". The error of this perturbative step is discussed and estimated as $0.0002$.

  6. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  7. Clustered regression with unknown clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barman, Kishor

    2011-01-01

    We consider a collection of prediction experiments, which are clustered in the sense that groups of experiments ex- hibit similar relationship between the predictor and response variables. The experiment clusters as well as the regres- sion relationships are unknown. The regression relation- ships define the experiment clusters, and in general, the predictor and response variables may not exhibit any clus- tering. We call this prediction problem clustered regres- sion with unknown clusters (CRUC) and in this paper we focus on linear regression. We study and compare several methods for CRUC, demonstrate their applicability to the Yahoo Learning-to-rank Challenge (YLRC) dataset, and in- vestigate an associated mathematical model. CRUC is at the crossroads of many prior works and we study several prediction algorithms with diverse origins: an adaptation of the expectation-maximization algorithm, an approach in- spired by K-means clustering, the singular value threshold- ing approach to matrix rank minimization u...

  8. Relativistic effects in Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Iršič, Vid; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-$\\alpha$) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range ($z = 2 - 5$). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations to the Quasar- Lyman-$\\alpha$ cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects can be as large as 30% at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale, which is much larger than anticipated and mainly due to the large differences in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross- correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considerin...

  9. Subspace clustering through attribute clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun NIU; Shubo ZHANG; Junliang CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Many recently proposed subspace clustering methods suffer from two severe problems. First, the algorithms typically scale exponentially with the data dimensionality or the subspace dimensionality of clusters. Second, the clustering results are often sensitive to input parameters. In this paper, a fast algorithm of subspace clustering using attribute clustering is proposed to over-come these limitations. This algorithm first filters out redundant attributes by computing the Gini coefficient. To evaluate the correlation of every two non-redundant attributes, the relation matrix of non-redundant attributes is constructed based on the relation function of two dimensional united Gini coefficients. After applying an overlapping clustering algorithm on the relation matrix, the candidate of all interesting subspaces is achieved. Finally, all subspace clusters can be derived by clustering on interesting subspaces. Experiments on both synthesis and real datasets show that the new algorithm not only achieves a significant gain of runtime and quality to find subspace clusters, but also is insensitive to input parameters.

  10. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  11. Lyman Alpha Control

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Daniel Stefaniak

    2015-01-01

    This document gives an overview of how to operate the Lyman Alpha Control application written in LabVIEW along with things to watch out for. Overview of the LabVIEW code itself as well as the physical wiring of and connections from/to the NI PCI-6229 DAQ box is also included. The Lyman Alpha Control application is the interface between the ALPHA sequencer and the HighFinesse Wavelength Meter as well as the Lyman Alpha laser setup. The application measures the wavelength of the output light from the Lyman Alpha cavity through the Wavelength Meter. The application can use the Wavelength Meter’s PID capabilities to stabilize the Lyman Alpha laser output as well as switch between up to three frequencies.

  12. Prospects for the ensemble asteroseismology in young open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Moździerski, Dawid

    2016-01-01

    This is a progress report on the ongoing project dealing with ensemble asteroseismology of B-type stars in young open clusters. The project is aimed at searches for B-type pulsating stars in open clusters, determination of atmospheric parameters for some members and seismic modeling of B-type pulsators. Some results for NGC 457, IC 1805, IC 4996, NGC 6910 and alpha Per open clusters are presented. For the last cluster, BRITE data for five members were used.

  13. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnett, D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Culture scale-up and immobilisation of a mixed methanotrophic consortium for methane remediation in pilot-scale bio-filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Saravanan, Nadarajan; Cirés, Samuel; Alvarez-Roa, Carlos; Razaghi, Ali; Chidambarampadmavathy, Karthigeyan; Velu, Chinnathambi; Subashchandrabose, Gobalakrishnan; Heimann, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    Robust methanotrophic consortia for methane (CH4) remediation and by-product development are presently not readily available for industrial use. In this study, a mixed methanotrophic consortium (MMC), sequentially enriched from a marine sediment, was assessed for CH4 removal efficiency and potential biomass-generated by-product development. Suitable packing material for bio-filters to support MMC biofilm establishment and growth was also evaluated. The enriched MMC removed ∼7-13% CH4 under a very high gas flow rate (2.5 L min(-1); 20-25% CH4) in continuous-stirred tank reactors (∼10 L working volume) and the biomass contained long-chain fatty acids (i.e. C16 and C18). Cultivation of the MMC on plastic bio-balls abated ∼95-97% CH4 in pilot-scale non-sterile outdoor-operated bio-filters (0.1 L min(-1); 1% CH4). Contamination by cyanobacteria had beneficial effects on treating low-level CH4, by providing additional oxygen for methane oxidation by MMC, suggesting that the co-cultivation of MMC with cyanobacterial mats does not interfere with and may actually be beneficial for remediation of CH4 and CO2 at industrial scale.

  15. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  16. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior.

  17. Ternary fission and cluster radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W; Gherghescu, R A; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2002-01-01

    Ternary fission yield for different kinds of light particle accompanied fission processes is compared to the Q-values for the corresponding cold phenomena, showing a striking correlation. The experimental evidence for the existence of a quasimolecular state in sup 1 sup 0 Be accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf may be explained using a three-center phenomenological model which generates a third minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. This model is a natural extension of the unified approach to three groups of binary decay modes (cold fission, cluster radioactivities and alpha decay), illustrated by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 U decay modes, and the alpha valley on the potential energy surfaces of sup 1 sup 0 sup 6 Te. New measurements of cluster decay modes, confirming earlier predictions within analytical superasymmetric fission model, are included in a comprehensive half-life systematics. (authors)

  18. Complete genome sequence of the extremely acidophilic methanotroph isolate V4, Methylacidiphilum infernorum, a representative of the bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stott Matthew B

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Verrucomicrobia is a widespread but poorly characterized bacterial clade. Although cultivation-independent approaches detect representatives of this phylum in a wide range of environments, including soils, seawater, hot springs and human gastrointestinal tract, only few have been isolated in pure culture. We have recently reported cultivation and initial characterization of an extremely acidophilic methanotrophic member of the Verrucomicrobia, strain V4, isolated from the Hell's Gate geothermal area in New Zealand. Similar organisms were independently isolated from geothermal systems in Italy and Russia. Results We report the complete genome sequence of strain V4, the first one from a representative of the Verrucomicrobia. Isolate V4, initially named "Methylokorus infernorum" (and recently renamed Methylacidiphilum infernorum is an autotrophic bacterium with a streamlined genome of ~2.3 Mbp that encodes simple signal transduction pathways and has a limited potential for regulation of gene expression. Central metabolism of M. infernorum was reconstructed almost completely and revealed highly interconnected pathways of autotrophic central metabolism and modifications of C1-utilization pathways compared to other known methylotrophs. The M. infernorum genome does not encode tubulin, which was previously discovered in bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter, or close homologs of any other signature eukaryotic proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal proteins and RNA polymerase subunits unequivocally supports grouping Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chlamydiae into a single clade, the PVC superphylum, despite dramatically different gene content in members of these three groups. Comparative-genomic analysis suggests that evolution of the M. infernorum lineage involved extensive horizontal gene exchange with a variety of bacteria. The genome of M. infernorum shows apparent adaptations for existence under extremely

  19. Short-term variations of methane concentrations and methanotrophic activity in a coastal inlet (Eckernförde Bay, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richner, Dominik; Niemann, Helge; Steinle, Lea; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Urban, Peter; Hoffmann, Jasper; Schmidt, Mark; Treude, Tina; Lehmann, Moritz

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated into the overlying water column and, potentially, into the atmosphere. However, a sequence of microbially mediated methane oxidation pathways in sediments and the water column mitigate the contribution of oceans to the atmospheric methane budget. Of particular importance are methanotrophic bacteria in the water column that mediate the aerobic oxidation of methane (MOx), and represent the final sink for methane before its release to the atmosphere where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. However methane cycling in (aerobic) marine waters is not well constrained. Particularly little is known about spatiotemporal aspects of MOx activity and the underlying key physical, chemical and biological factors. Here we show results from our investigations on methane dynamics on very short time scales of hours to days in the Eckernförde Bay (E-Bay), a costal inlet of the Baltic Sea in northern Germany featuring seasonal bottom water hypoxia/anoxia. In autumn 2014, we observed highly spatiotemporal variations in water column methane contents and MOx activity: Anoxic bottom waters in a trough in the northern part of the bay contained extremely high methane concentrations of up to 800 nM, which sharply declined at the midwater redox interface (methane remained supersaturated with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium throughout the water column at all times). The methane decrease at the redox interface was related to highly active MOx communities consuming methane under microoxic conditions at rates of up 40 nM/d. About 12 hours later, the methane content and the extend of bottom water anoxia was much lower and MOx activity was highly reduced in the northern part but strongly elevated in the southern part of the bay. A few days later, bottom water anoxia, methane loading and MOx activity was partially re-established. In this contribution, we will discuss potential forcing

  20. Methane seep in shallow-water permeable sediment harbors high diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic communities, Elba, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Emil Ruff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is a key biogeochemical process regulating methane emission from marine sediments into the hydrosphere. AOM is largely mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, and has mainly been investigated in deep-sea sediments. Here we studied methane seepage at four spots located at 12 m water depth in coastal, organic-carbon depleted permeable sands off the Island of Elba (Italy. We combined biogeochemical measurements, sequencing-based community analyses and in situ hybridization to investigate the microbial communities of this environment. Increased alkalinity, formation of free sulfide and nearly stoichiometric methane oxidation and sulfate reduction rates up to 200 nmol g-1 day-1 indicated the predominance of sulfate-coupled AOM. With up to 40 cm thickness the zones of AOM activity were unusually large and occurred in deeper sediment horizons (20–50 cm below seafloor as compared to diffusion-dominated deep-sea seeps, which is likely caused by advective flow of pore water due to the shallow water depth and permeability of the sands. Hydrodynamic forces also may be responsible for the substantial phylogenetic and unprecedented morphological diversity of AOM consortia inhabiting these sands, including the clades ANME-1a/b, ANME-2a/b/c, ANME-3 and their partner bacteria SEEP-SRB1a and SEEP-SRB2. High microbial dispersal, the availability of diverse energy sources and high habitat heterogeneity might explain that the emission spots shared few microbial taxa, despite their physical proximity. Although the biogeochemistry of this shallow methane seep was very different to that of deep-sea seeps, their key functional taxa were very closely related, which supports the global dispersal of key taxa and underlines strong selection by methane as the predominant energy source. Mesophilic, methane-fueled ecosystems in shallow-water permeable sediments may comprise

  1. Predicted halflives for cluster radioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.

    1989-10-01

    The main results of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, describing in a unified manner cluster radioactivities, alpha-decay and cold fission processes, are briefly reviewed. Predicted halflives for 14C, 24, 25, 26Ne, 28, 30Mg and 32Si radioactivities in the range 10 11-10 26 s and the corresponding branching ratios relative to α-decay 10 -16 - 10 -9 have been experimentally confirmed within 1.5 orders of magnitude.

  2. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side...

  3. Weighted Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Margareta; Branzei, Simina; Loker, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate clustering in the weighted setting, in which every data point is assigned a real valued weight. We conduct a theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in each of the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterising the precise conditions under which such algorithms react to weights, and classifying clustering methods into three broad categories: weight-responsive, weight-considering, and weight-robust. Our analysis raises several interesting questions and can be directly mapped to the classical unweighted setting.

  4. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  5. Cluster-shell competition and its effect on the $E0$ transition probability in $^{20}$Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Itagaki, N

    2016-01-01

    $^{20}$Ne has been known as a typical example of a nucleus with $\\alpha$ cluster structure ($^{16}$O+$\\alpha$ structure). However according to the spherical shell model, the spin-orbit interaction acts attractively for four nucleons outside of the $^{16}$O core, and this spin-orbit effect cannot be taken into account in the simple $\\alpha$ cluster models. We investigate how the $\\alpha$ cluster structure competes with independent particle motions of these four nucleons. The antisymmetrized quasi-cluster model (AQCM) is a method to describe a transition from the $\\alpha$ cluster wave function to the $jj$-coupling shell model wave function. In this model, the cluster-shell transition is characterized by only two parameters; $R$ representing the distance between clusters and $\\Lambda$ describing the breaking of $\\alpha$ clusters, and the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction, very important in the $jj$-coupling shell model, can be taken into account by changing $\\alpha$ clusters to quasi clusters. In this a...

  6. Buffett’s Alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Kabiller, David; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    Berkshire Hathaway has realized a Sharpe ratio of 0.76, higher than any other stock or mutual fund with a history of more than 30 years, and Berkshire has a significant alpha to traditional risk factors. However, we find that the alpha becomes insignificant when controlling for exposures to Betting...

  7. H-alpha Photometry of Abell 2390

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, M L; Balogh, Michael L.; Morris, Simon L.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a search for strong H-alpha emission line galaxies (rest frame equivalent widths greater than 50 A) in the z=0.23 cluster Abell 2390. The survey contains 1189 galaxies over 270 square arcminutes, and is 50% complete at M_r=-17.5+5 log h. The fraction of galaxies in which H-alpha is detected at the 2sigma level rises from 0.0 in the central regions (excluding the cD galaxy) to 12.5+/-8% at R200. For 165 of the galaxies in our catalogue, we compare the H-alpha equivalent widths with their [OII] equivalent widths, from the CNOC1 spectra. The fraction of strong H-alpha emission line galaxies is consistent with the fraction of strong [OII] emission galaxies in the CNOC1 sample: only 2+/-1% have no detectable [OII] emission and yet significant (>2sigma) H-alpha equivalent widths. Dust obscuration, non-thermal ionization, and aperture effects are all likely to contribute to this non-correspondence of emission lines. We identify six spectroscopically 'secure' k+a galaxies (W(OII)5 A); at lea...

  8. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A symptom is a condition indicating the presence of a disease, especially, when regarded as an aid in diagnosis.Symptoms are the smallest units indicating the existence of a disease. A syndrome on the other hand is an aggregate, set or cluster of concurrent symptoms which together indicate...... and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c......-mean clustering is an easy and well improved tool, which has been applied in many medical fields. We used c-mean fuzzy clustering after feature extraction from an aphasia database. Factor analysis was applied on a correlation matrix of 26 symptoms of language disorders and led to five factors. The factors...

  9. Laser assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Excited or short-lived nuclei often decay by emitting alpha particles that are assumed to be preformed inside the nucleus and confined in the nuclear potential well. In this picture, {alpha} decay refers to the tunneling of the alpha particle through the potential barrier. In this thesis we investigate for the first time how strong laser fields can assist the tunneling of the alpha particle and thus influence the nuclear decay. Generally speaking, laser-assisted {alpha} decay can be described as laser-assisted tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e, a slowly decaying state. Our theoretical treatment is developed starting from the complex trajectory formulation of the well-known strong-field approximation used to describe laser-induced ionization. We extend this formulation and develop a method to treat the decay of quasistationary states. The effect of both static and optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the lifetimes and {alpha}-particle emission spectra are investigated for a number of {alpha}-emitting nuclei. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, ranging from a relative modification in the decay rate of 10{sup -3} for static fields of electric field strengths of 10{sup 15} V/m, to 10{sup -8} for strong optical fields with intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, and to 10{sup -6} for strong X-ray fields with laser intensities around 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the effect of the external field is visible in the spectrum of emitted alpha particles, leading in the case of optical fields even to rescattering phenomena for intensities approaching 6 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. The dynamics of the alpha particle in laser fields of intensities below the rescattering limit is investigated.

  10. Potential turning points in cluster radioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, D. N.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of various nuclear interaction potentials on the decay lifetimes and the turning points of the WKB action integral has been studied. The microscopic nuclear potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the two clusters with a realistic effective interaction has also been used to calculate the turning points. Half lives of alpha and ^{20}O cluster emissions from ^{228}Th have been calculated within the superasymmetric fission model using various phenomenologic...

  11. Cytokines and clustered cardiovascular risk factors in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Müller, Klaus; Eiberg, Stig

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the possible role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), low fitness, and fatness in the early development of clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and insulin resistance. Subjects for this cross...

  12. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, M T; Pulido, F; Nulsen, P E J; Russell, H R; Vantyghem, A N; Edge, A C; Main, R A

    2016-01-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and AGN feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurately mapping the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly towards cluster centres where the total mass budget has substantial radially-dependent contributions from the stellar, gas, and dark matter components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular H-alpha emission in cool core clusters. Amongst this small sample we find no support for t...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions alpha thalassemia alpha thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  14. Seismic constraints on open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Piau, L; Turck-Chièze, S

    2005-01-01

    We derive knowledge on the global and structural parameters of low-mass stars using asteroseismology and taking advantage of the stellar collective behavior within open clusters. We build stellar models and compute the seismic signal expected from main sequence objects in the 0.8-1.6 Msun range. We first evaluate apparent magnitudes and oscillations-induced luminosity fluctuations expected in the Hyades, the Pleiades and the alpha Persei clusters. The closest cluster presents a feasible challenge to observational asteroseismology in the present and near future. We combine seismological and classical computations to address three questions: what can be inferred about 1) mass, 2) composition and 3) extension of outer convection zones of solar analogs in the Hyades. The first issue relies on the strong sensitivity of the large separation to mass. Then large separations and second differences are used to respectively constrain metal and helium fractions in the Hyades.When plotted for several masses, the relation ...

  15. Study of nuclear clustering using the modern shell model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volya, Alexander; Tchuvil'Sky, Yury

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear clustering, alpha decays, and multi-particle correlations are important components of nuclear dynamics. In this work we use the modern configuration-interaction approach with most advanced realistic shell-model Hamiltonians to study these questions. We utilize the algebraic many-nucleon structures and the corresponding fractional parentage coefficients to build the translationally invariant wave functions of the alpha-cluster channels. We explore the alpha spectroscopic factors, study the distribution of clustering strength, and discuss the structure of an effective 4-body operator describing the in-medium alpha dynamics in the multi-shell valence configuration space. Sensitivity of alpha clustering to the components of an effective Hamiltonian, which includes its collective and many-body components, as well as isospin symmetry breaking terms, are of interest. We offer effective techniques for evaluation of the cluster spectroscopic factors satisfying the orthogonality conditions of the respective cluster channels. We present a study of clustering phenomena, single-particle dynamics, and electromagnetic transitions for a number of nuclei in p-sd shells and compare our results with the experimentally available data. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-SC0009883.

  16. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Raja, Chand [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Rizvi, Syed [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Li Yong [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Tsui, Wendy [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Zhang, David [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Song, Emma [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Qu, C F [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Kearsley, John [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Thompson, John [Sydney Melanoma Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown 2050 NSW (Australia)

    2004-08-21

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The {sup 213}Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 {mu

  17. alpha_s from tau decays revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, D; Golterman, M; Jamin, M; Maltman, K; Osborne, J; Peris, S

    2011-01-01

    Being a determination at low energies, the analysis of hadronic tau decay data provides a rather precise determination of the strong coupling alpha_s after evolving the result to M_Z. At such a level of precision, even small non-perturbative effects become relevant for the central value and error. While those effects had been taken into account in the framework of the operator product expansion, contributions going beyond it, so-called duality violations, have previously been neglected. The following investigation fills this gap through a finite-energy sum rule analysis of tau decay spectra from the OPAL experiment, including duality violations and performing a consistent fit of all appearing QCD parameters. The resulting values for alpha_s(M_tau) are 0.307(19) in fixed-order perturbation theory and 0.322(26) in contour-improved perturbation theory, which translates to the n_f=5 values 0.1169(25) and 0.1187(32) at M_Z, respectively.

  18. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    .g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco......, Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e...... to the automotive sector in Wales. Specifically, the paper evaluates the "Accelerates" programme initiated by the Welsh Development Agency and elaborates on how and to what extent the Accelerate programme supports the development of a sustainable automotive industry cluster. The Accelerate programme was set up...

  19. Alpha Decay Preformation Factors for Even-Even 280-316116 Superheavy Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaif, Norah A. M.; Radiman, Shahidan; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Ahmed, Saad M. Saleh

    2016-06-01

    The success of the cluster formation model (CFM) in deriving an energy-dependent formula for the preformation factors of heavy nuclei has motivated us to expand this approach to the superheavy isotopes (SHI). In this paper, the alpha-cluster formation (preformation factor) behavior inside the parent nuclei of SHI with atomic number Z = 116 and neutron numbers 164 ≤ N ≤ 200 is determined using the alpha preformation formula contained within the CFM. The cluster formation energy of the alpha particles and the total energy of the parent nuclei are calculated on the basis of the various binding energies. Our results clearly show that the CFM remains valid for superheavy nuclei (SHN). In addition, our calculations reveal that the alpha clustering mechanism and formation probability in 280-316116 even-even SHI are similar to those of even-even heavy nuclei in a general sense.

  20. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by blood tests showing the low levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin and abnormal liver tests. Other tests such as ultrasound imaging or tests using specialized X-ray techniques may be necessary. A liver biopsy may ...

  1. ALPHA-2: the sequel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While many experiments are methodically planning for intense works over the long shutdown, there is one experiment that is already working at full steam: ALPHA-2. Its final components arrived last month and will completely replace the previous ALPHA set-up. Unlike its predecessor, this next generation experiment has been specifically designed to measure the properties of antimatter.   The ALPHA team lower the new superconducting solenoid magnet into place. The ALPHA collaboration is working at full speed to complete the ALPHA-2 set-up for mid-November – this will give them a few weeks of running before the AD shutdown on 17 December. “We really want to get some experience with this device this year so that, if we need to make any changes, we will have time during the long shutdown in which to make them,” says Jeffrey Hangst, ALPHA spokesperson. “Rather than starting the 2014 run in the commissioning stage, we will be up and running from the get go.&...

  2. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands...

  3. Synaptic alpha-dystrobrevin: localization of a short alpha-dystrobrevin isoform in melanin-concentrating hormone neurons of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazai, Diana; Lien, Chun-Fu; Hajós, Ferenc; Halasy, Katalin; Górecki, Dariusz C; Jancsik, Veronika

    2008-03-27

    The expression of the two members of the dystrobrevin (DB) family in the adult brain was thought to be highly specific for the two main cell types: alpha-dystrobrevin (alpha-DB) and beta-dystrobrevin (beta-DB) has been identified as glial and neuronal proteins, respectively. In the present work we show that a subset of neurons in the hypothalamus contains alpha-DB. Comparative immunohistochemical studies with two alpha-DB antibodies of different specificity indicate that the neurons contain short alpha-DB isoform(s) alpha-DB-2 and/or alpha-DB-4. Immunoreactive multipolar or spindle-shaped neurons form clusters with bilateral symmetry, localized predominantly in the lateral hypothalamic area, with extensions into the zona incerta and the dorso-medial and ventro-medial hypothalamic region. alpha-DB immunoreactivity was localized in cell processes and at postsynaptic densities, furthermore in the endoplasmic reticulum within the perikarya. alpha-DB-positive neurons are beta-dystrobrevin immunoreactive, but alpha- and beta-DB do not co-localize with their usual molecular anchors like dystrophins or high molecular weight forms of utrophin. Colocalization with nNOS was also not observed. The pattern of alpha-DB immunoreactive neurons gave a perfect colocalization with melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons throughout the whole region studied. We propose that alpha-DB plays a role in a structure or regulation mechanism unique to MCH-expressing neurons.

  4. High-statistics measurement of the {beta} -delayed {alpha} spectrum of {sup 20}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, K.L.; Fynbo, H.O.U.; Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus (Denmark); Kirsebom, O.S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus (Denmark); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jokinen, A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Madurga, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-15

    A measurement of the {sup 20}Na {beta} -delayed alpha spectrum with a high-granularity setup has allowed the decay scheme to be revised on several points. Three new transitions of low intensity are found at low {alpha} -particle energy. An R-matrix fit of the complete spectrum gives an improved description of the decay and indicates feeding to the broad 2{sup +} {alpha} -cluster state close to 9MeV. (orig.)

  5. Alpha-particle decays from excited states in 24Mg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIOTTA; R; J

    2011-01-01

    Using a cluster model based on the Woods-Saxon potential, alpha-particle decays from excited states in 24Mg have been system atically investigated. Calculations can in general reproduce experimental data, noticing the fact that the preformation factor P of alpha particle in alpha-decaying nuclei is of order from 100 to 10?2. This can be the evidence for the α+20Ne structure in 24Mg. Meanwhile, the results also show the existence of other configurations, such as 16O+2α. Since the calculated decay widths are very sensitive to the angular momentum carried by the outgoing cluster (α particle), our results could serve as a guide to experimental spin assignments.

  6. Quotients of cluster categories

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Higher cluster categories were recently introduced as a generalization of cluster categories. This paper shows that in Dynkin types A and D, half of all higher cluster categories are actually just quotients of cluster categories. The other half can be obtained as quotients of 2-cluster categories, the "lowest" type of higher cluster categories. Hence, in Dynkin types A and D, all higher cluster phenomena are implicit in cluster categories and 2-cluster categories. In contrast, the same is not...

  7. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C; Anders, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in three galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to H$\\alpha$ data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral-energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  8. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  9. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  10. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  11. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansing, Hope A. [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States); Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R. [Department of Chemical Physiology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Berrier, Allison L., E-mail: allison.berrier@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  12. AlphaSphere

    OpenAIRE

    Place, A.; Lacey, L.; Mitchell, T.

    2013-01-01

    The AlphaSphere is an electronic musical instrument featuring a series of tactile, pressure sensitive touch pads arranged in a spherical form. It is designed to offer a new playing style, while allowing for the expressive real-time modulation of sound available in electronic-based music. It is also designed to be programmable, enabling the flexibility to map a series of different notational arrangements to the pad-based interface.\\ud \\ud The AlphaSphere functions as an HID, MIDI and OSC devic...

  13. Effective liquid drop description for alpha decay of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear (ISCTN), La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1998-06-01

    Alpha decay half-lives are presented in the framework of an effective liquid drop model for different combination of mass transfer descriptions and inertia coefficients. Calculated half-life-values for ground-state to ground-state favoured alpha transitions are compared with available, updated experimental data. Results have shown that the present model is very suitable to treat the alpha decay process on equal foot as cluster radioactivity and cold fission processes. Better agreement with the data is found when the sub-set of even-even alpha emitters are considered in the calculation. (author) 44 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.; e-mail: telo at ird.gov.br

  14. Cluster formation probability in the trans-tin and trans-lead nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Payyanur Campus, Payyanur 670 327 (India)], E-mail: drkpsanthosh@gmail.com; Biju, R.K.; Sahadevan, Sabina [P.G. Department of Physics and Research Centre, Payyanur College, Payyanur 670 327 (India)

    2010-07-01

    Within our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) cluster formation probabilities are calculated for different clusters ranging from carbon to silicon for the parents in the trans-tin and trans-lead regions. It is found that in trans-tin region the {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg clusters have maximum cluster formation probability and lowest half lives as compared to other clusters. In trans-lead region the {sup 14}C, {sup 18,20}O, {sup 23}F, {sup 24,26}Ne, {sup 28,30}Mg and {sup 34}Si clusters have the maximum cluster formation probability and minimum half life, which show that alpha like clusters are most probable for emission from trans-tin region while non-alpha clusters are probable from trans-lead region. These results stress the role of neutron proton symmetry and asymmetry of daughter nuclei in these two cases.

  15. Cluster formation probability in the trans-tin and trans-lead nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P; Sahadevan, Sabina; 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2010.03.004

    2010-01-01

    Within our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) cluster formation probabilities are calculated for different clusters ranging from carbon to silicon for the parents in the trans-tin and trans- lead regions. It is found that in trans-tin region the 12^C, 16^O, 20^Ne and 24^Mg clusters have maximum cluster formation probability and lowest half lives as compared to other clusters. In trans-lead region the 14^C, 18, 20^O, 23^F, 24,26^Ne, 28,30^Mg and 34^Si clusters have the maximum cluster formation probability and minimum half life, which show that alpha like clusters are most probable for emission from trans-tin region while non-alpha clusters are probable from trans-lead region. These results stress the role of neutron proton symmetry and asymmetry of daughter nuclei in these two cases.

  16. Half-lives of $\\alpha$ decay from natural nuclides and from superheavy elements

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Recently, experimental researches on the $\\alpha$ decay with long lifetime are one of hot topics in the contemporary nuclear physics [e.g. N. Kinoshita {\\sl et al.} (2012) and J. W. Beeman {\\sl et al.} (2012) ]. In this study, we have systematically investigated the extremely long-lived $\\alpha$-decaying nuclei within a generalized density-dependent cluster model involving the experimental nuclear charge radii. In detail, the important density distribution of daughter nuclei is deduced from the corresponding experimental charge radii, leading to an improved $\\alpha$-core potential in the quantum tunneling calculation of $\\alpha$-decay width. Besides the excellent agreement between theory and experiment, predictions on half-lives of possible candidates for natural $\\alpha$ emitters are made for future experimental detections. In addition, the recently confirmed $\\alpha$-decay chain from $^{294}$117 is well described, including the attractive long-lived $\\alpha$-decaying $^{270}$Db, i.e., a positive step toward...

  17. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross C. Smith

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy for the control of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models is reviewed. Results are given for in vitro pancreatic cancer cells and clusters and micro-metastatic cancer lesions in vivo. Two complementary targeting vectors are examined. These are the C595 monoclonal antibody that targets the MUC1 antigen and the PAI2 ligand that targets the uPA receptor. The expression of the tumor-associated antigen MUC-1 and the uPA receptor on three pancreatic cancer cell lines is reported for cell clusters, human mouse xenografts and lymph node metastases, as well as for human pancreatic cancer tissues, using immuno-histochemistry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The targeting vectors C595 and PAI2 were labeled with the alpha emitting radioisotope 213Bi using the chelators cDTPA and CHX-A″ to form the alpha-conjugates (AC. Cell clusters were incubated with the AC and examined at 48 hours. Apoptosis was documented using the TUNEL assay. In vivo, the anti-proliferative effect for tumors was tested at two days post-subcutaneous cell inoculation. Mice were injected with different concentrations of AC by local or systemic administration. Changes in tumor progression were assessed by tumor size. MUC-1 and uPA are strongly expressed on CFPAC-1, PANC-1 and moderate expression was found CAPAN-1 cell clusters and tumor xenografts. The ACs can target pancreatic cells and regress cell clusters (~100 µm diameter, causing apoptosis in some 70–90 % of cells. At two days post-cell inoculation in mice, a single local injection of 74 MBq/kg of AC causes complete inhibition of tumor growth. Systemic injections of 111, 222 and 333 MBq/kg of alpha-conjugate caused significant tumor growth delay in a dose dependent manner after 16 weeks, compared with the non-specific control at 333 MBq/kg. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTS and TUNEL assays. The C595 and PAI2-alpha conjugates are indicated for the treatment of

  18. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J., E-mail: barry.allen@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Abbas Rizvi, Syed M.; Qu, Chang F. [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah, 2217 (Australia); Smith, Ross C. [Cancer Surgery Laboratory, Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, Kolling Institute, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia)

    2011-04-01

    Evidence for the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy for the control of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models is reviewed. Results are given for in vitro pancreatic cancer cells and clusters and micro-metastatic cancer lesions in vivo. Two complementary targeting vectors are examined. These are the C595 monoclonal antibody that targets the MUC1 antigen and the PAI2 ligand that targets the uPA receptor. The expression of the tumor-associated antigen MUC-1 and the uPA receptor on three pancreatic cancer cell lines is reported for cell clusters, human mouse xenografts and lymph node metastases, as well as for human pancreatic cancer tissues, using immuno-histochemistry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The targeting vectors C595 and PAI2 were labeled with the alpha emitting radioisotope {sup 213}Bi using the chelators cDTPA and CHX-A″ to form the alpha-conjugates (AC). Cell clusters were incubated with the AC and examined at 48 hours. Apoptosis was documented using the TUNEL assay. In vivo, the anti-proliferative effect for tumors was tested at two days post-subcutaneous cell inoculation. Mice were injected with different concentrations of AC by local or systemic administration. Changes in tumor progression were assessed by tumor size. MUC-1 and uPA are strongly expressed on CFPAC-1, PANC-1 and moderate expression was found CAPAN-1 cell clusters and tumor xenografts. The ACs can target pancreatic cells and regress cell clusters (∼100 μm diameter), causing apoptosis in some 70–90 % of cells. At two days post-cell inoculation in mice, a single local injection of 74 MBq/kg of AC causes complete inhibition of tumor growth. Systemic injections of 111, 222 and 333 MBq/kg of alpha-conjugate caused significant tumor growth delay in a dose dependent manner after 16 weeks, compared with the non-specific control at 333 MBq/kg. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTS and TUNEL assays. The C595 and PAI2-alpha conjugates are indicated for the treatment of micro

  19. Properties of hierarchically forming star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Maschberger, Th; Bonnell, I A; Kroupa, P

    2010-01-01

    We undertake a systematic analysis of the early (< 0.5 Myr) evolution of clustering and the stellar initial mass function in turbulent fragmentation simulations. These large scale simulations for the first time offer the opportunity for a statistical analysis of IMF variations and correlations between stellar properties and cluster richness. The typical evolutionary scenario involves star formation in small-n clusters which then progressively merge; the first stars to form are seeds of massive stars and achieve a headstart in mass acquisition. These massive seeds end up in the cores of clusters and a large fraction of new stars of lower mass is formed in the outer parts of the clusters. The resulting clusters are therefore mass segregated at an age of 0.5 Myr, although the signature of mass segregation is weakened during mergers. We find that the resulting IMF has a smaller exponent (alpha=1.8-2.2) than the Salpeter value (alpha=2.35). The IMFs in subclusters are truncated at masses only somewhat larger th...

  20. Alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line; Stensland, Hilde Monica Frostad Riise; Olsen, Klaus Juul;

    2015-01-01

    of the three subgroups of genotype/subcellular localisation and the clinical and biochemical data were done to investigate the potential relationship between genotype and phenotype in alpha-mannosidosis. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS software. Analyses of covariance were performed...

  1. Alpha Antihydrogen Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M. C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Cesar, C. L.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2011-12-01

    ALPHA is an experiment at CERN, whose ultimate goal is to perform a precise test of CPT symmetry with trapped antihydrogen atoms. After reviewing the motivations, we discuss our recent progress toward the initial goal of stable trapping of antihydrogen, with some emphasis on particle detection techniques.

  2. Case Study - Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Leybourne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study was developed from an actual scenario by Dr. Steve Leybourne of Boston University.  The case documents the historical evolution of an organization, and has been used successfully in courses dealing with organizational and cultural change, and the utilization of ‘soft skills’ in project-based management. This is a short case, ideal for classroom use and discussion.  The issues are easily accessible to students, and there is a single wide ranging question that allows for the inclusion of many issues surrounding strategic decision-making, and behavioural and cultural change. Alpha was one of the earlier companies in the USA to invest in large, edge-of-town superstores, with plentiful free vehicle parking, selling food and related household products. Alpha was created in the 1950s as a subsidiary of a major publicly quoted retail group.  It started business by opening a string of very large discount stores in converted industrial and warehouse premises in the south of the United States. In the early days shoppers were offered a limited range of very competitively priced products. When Alpha went public in 1981 it was the fourth largest food retailer in the US, selling an ever-widening range of food and non-food products.  Its success continued to be based on high volume, low margins and good value for money, under the slogan of ‘Alpha Price.’

  3. Alpha Antihydrogen Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Cesar, C L; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-01

    ALPHA is an experiment at CERN, whose ultimate goal is to perform a precise test of CPT symmetry with trapped antihydrogen atoms. After reviewing the motivations, we discuss our recent progress toward the initial goal of stable trapping of antihydrogen, with some emphasis on particle detection techniques.

  4. Molecular cloning and phylogenetic analysis of integrins alpha v beta 1 and alpha v beta 6 of one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Junzheng; Larska, Magdalena Larska; Chang, Huiyun

    2010-01-01

    integrin cDNAs encoding alpha v beta 1 and alpha v beta 6 and compare them to those of other species, especially to Bactrian camels. The complete coding sequences for the dromedary camel alpha v,beta 1 and beta 6 subunits were found to be 3147, 2397, and 2364 nucleotides in length, encoding 1048, 798......, and 787 amino acids, respectively. The dromedary camel integrin alpha v, beta 1, and beta 6 subunit shares common structural and functional elements with their counterparts from the other species. Phylogenetic trees showed that the dromedary camel alpha v, beta 1, and beta 6 were clustered...... into the Artiodactyla group, together with those of Bactrian camel, pig, sheep, and cattle that are susceptible to FMDV infection. Compared with the Bactrian camel integrins, 4, 10, and 8 amino acid changes were found in the dromedary camel alpha v, beta 1, and beta 6 subunits, respectively. This study...

  5. Stereoselective Synthesis of [alpha, alpha][superscript ']-Biprolines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartak, Ashish P.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Johnson, Rodney L. (Minnesota)

    2010-11-10

    A means to induce dehydrodimerization of Seebach's oxazolidinone (5), the stereochemical outcome of which is entirely temperature dependent, is described. The resultant dimers 3 and 4 are precursors to (R,R)-alpha,alpha'-biproline (1) and meso-alpha,alpha'-biproline (2), respectively. An organohypobromite and an iminium halide are proposed to serve as electrophiles in the reaction with the enolate of 5 to give 3 and 4, respectively.

  6. Turbulent Mixing in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, W T; Kim, Woong-Tae; Narayan, Ramesh

    2003-01-01

    We present a model of galaxy clusters in which radiative cooling from the hot gas is balanced by heat transport through turbulent mixing. We describe the turbulent heat diffusion by means of a mixing length prescription with a dimensionless parameter alpha_mix. Models with alpha_mix ~ 0.01-0.03 yield reasonably good fits to the observed density and temperature profiles of several cooling flow clusters. The model clusters do not experience any serious thermal instability: they are either completely stable or have growth times considerably longer than the Hubble time. With the assumption that alpha_mix is roughly the same for all clusters, the model reproduces remarkably well the observed scalings of X-ray luminosity, gas mass fraction and entropy with temperature. The break in the scaling relations at kT ~ 1-2 keV is explained by the break in the cooling function at around this temperature, and the entropy floor observed in galaxy groups is reproduced naturally.

  7. An Automatic Clustering Technique for Optimal Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, K Karteeka; Rao, A V Dattatreya; 10.5121/ijcsea.2011.1412

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple, automatic and efficient clustering algorithm, namely, Automatic Merging for Optimal Clusters (AMOC) which aims to generate nearly optimal clusters for the given datasets automatically. The AMOC is an extension to standard k-means with a two phase iterative procedure combining certain validation techniques in order to find optimal clusters with automation of merging of clusters. Experiments on both synthetic and real data have proved that the proposed algorithm finds nearly optimal clustering structures in terms of number of clusters, compactness and separation.

  8. Functional Cortical Network in Alpha Band Correlates with Social Bargaining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; Chavez, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Solving demanding tasks requires fast and flexible coordination among different brain areas. Everyday examples of this are the social dilemmas in which goals tend to clash, requiring one to weigh alternative courses of action in limited time. In spite of this fact, there are few studies that directly address the dynamics of flexible brain network integration during social interaction. To study the preceding, we carried out EEG recordings while subjects played a repeated version of the Ultimatum Game in both human (social) and computer (non-social) conditions. We found phase synchrony (inter-site-phase-clustering) modulation in alpha band that was specific to the human condition and independent of power modulation. The strength and patterns of the inter-site-phase-clustering of the cortical networks were also modulated, and these modulations were mainly in frontal and parietal regions. Moreover, changes in the individuals’ alpha network structure correlated with the risk of the offers made only in social conditions. This correlation was independent of changes in power and inter-site-phase-clustering strength. Our results indicate that, when subjects believe they are participating in a social interaction, a specific modulation of functional cortical networks in alpha band takes place, suggesting that phase synchrony of alpha oscillations could serve as a mechanism by which different brain areas flexibly interact in order to adapt ongoing behavior in socially demanding contexts. PMID:25286240

  9. Research Progress on Methanotrophic Bacteria in Landfills and the Reduction of Methane Emission%垃圾填埋场甲烷氧化菌及甲烷减排的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓琳; 曹爱新; 周传斌; 赵恺凝; 赵国柱

    2016-01-01

    As the main source of anthropogenic methane emission,landfills globally produce 35-69 Tg methane per year. The technology of reducing the methane emission in landfills has become a hot topic at present. Methanotrophic bacteria decomposing methane are the important biological collection to reduce atmospheric methane emissions,which is of significance in keeping the balance of the methane concentration in the atmosphere. Starting from the taxonomy and characteristics of methanotrophic bacteria,and the mechanism of its oxidizing methane, we summarized the latest research progress on the methods of studying diversity,factors affecting the activities of methanotrophic bacteria in landfills,and applications of them in the biological reduction of methane emission. Based on the prior researches,the issues in current studies of methanotrophic bacteria are also discussed. We propose comprehensive measures of utilizing the complex microbial agents of methanotrophic bacteria in landfills,providing a new thought in the research and application of reducing methane emission in landfills.%垃圾填埋场是全球最重要的人为甲烷排放源之一,其全球年甲烷释放量为35-69 Tg,垃圾填埋场甲烷减排是目前全球温室气体研究的热点。甲烷氧化菌能够氧化分解甲烷,作为减少大气甲烷排放的重要生物汇,对保持大气中甲烷浓度的平衡具有重要意义。从甲烷氧化菌的类型及其特征、甲烷氧化机理着手,介绍了多样性研究方法、填埋场中甲烷氧化菌的活性影响因素及甲烷生物减排应用等最新研究进展。在综述前人研究的基础上,探讨了目前研究的不足,提出了利用甲烷氧化菌复合微生物菌剂等综合处理措施,旨为垃圾填埋场甲烷减排的研究和应用提供新的思路。

  10. 8Li+alpha decay of 12B and its possible astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Soic, N; Lattuada, M; Miljanic, D; Romano, S; Spitaleri, C; Zadro, M; Miljanic, DJ.

    2003-01-01

    The 12B excitation energy spectrum has been obtained from coincidence measurements of the 9Be+7Li -> 2alpha+8Li reaction at E{0}=52 MeV. The decay of the states at excitations between 10 and 16 Mev into alpha$+8Li has been observed for the first time. Observed alpha-decay indicates possible cluster structure of the 12B excited states. The influence of these states on the cross section of the astrophysically important 8Li(alpha,n)11B and 9Be+t reactions is discussed and the results are compared with existing results.

  11. HB Hillingdon [alpha46(CE4)Phe-->Val (alpha1 Or alpha2)]: a new alpha chain hemoglobin variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Anna; Solaiman, Susannah; Green, Brian N; Mantio, Debbie; Patel, Ketan

    2009-01-01

    Routine antenatal hemoglobinopathy screening detected a new alpha chain variant that eluted with Hb A(2) on cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in a lady of Sri Lankan origin who had normal hematological indices. The mutation was identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) as alpha46(CE4)Phe-->Val, inferring that the variant was due to a single base change at codon 46 (TTC>GTC) of the alpha1- or alpha2-globin genes.

  12. $\\alpha$-Representation for QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Richard Hong

    1998-01-01

    An $\\alpha$-parameter representation is derived for gauge field theories.It involves, relative to a scalar field theory, only constants and derivatives with respect to the $\\alpha$-parameters. Simple rules are given to obtain the $\\alpha$-representation for a Feynman graph with an arbitrary number of loops in gauge theories in the Feynman gauge.

  13. 水稻土甲烷氧化菌对镉胁迫的响应%Response of methanotrophic community structure and oxidation potential to cadmium stress in a Chinese paddy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勇; 郑袁明; 贺纪正

    2012-01-01

    重金属污染影响土壤微生物群落结构与活性,间接影响土壤碳(如CO2、CH4)的生物地球化学循环和全球气候变化.甲烷氧化菌氧化消耗CH4,降低大气中CH4含量,在缓解由温室气体导致的全球温暖化方面起着重要作用.本研究通过短期土壤培养实验,比较研究了不同强度重金属镉(Cd)胁迫下,水稻土中甲烷氧化菌的多度、群落组成及其氧化CH4潜势的差异.结果表明,添加Cd含量越大,水稻土氧化CH4潜势越弱,甲烷氧化菌pmoA基因拷贝数显著减少;甲烷氧化菌多度与水稻土氧化CH4潜势之间存在显著正相关关系(P< 0.001).群落组成分析发现,在相对低含量Cd(1 mg·kg-1)条件下,有新的甲烷氧化菌菌属出现,而添加较高含量Cd (10 mg·kg-1)时甲烷氧化菌种类减少.总之,Cd胁迫降低水稻土中甲烷氧化菌多样性及其氧化CH4潜势,可能导致原位CH4消耗减少,从而增加稻田CH4排放.%Heavy metal contamination has strong effect on the soil microbial community and activities, and also affects the biogeochemical cycling of soil carbon (e.g. CO2 and CH4) and global climate change. Fortunately, methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) can consume CH4 and therefore play a critical role in the mitigation of global warming. Here, a short-term, laboratory-based incubation experiment was conducted to examine the effects of cadmium (Cd) amendments on the abundance, community composition and oxidation potential of methanotrophs in a southern China paddy soil. The results showed that there were significantly lower methanotrophic oxidation potential and abundance in the treatment of Cd amendment of 10 mg·kg-1 (high-Cd) than those in the treatment of Cd amendment of 1 mg·kg-1 (low-Cd) dry weight soil and the Control. Correlation analyses indicated that the methanotrophic oxidation potentials were significantly positively correlated with the abundance of methanotrophs (P < 0.001). For the community in rice

  14. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saito, K; Watanabe, T

    2010-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to the AMD, the Be-9 nucleus consists of two alpha-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F_2 of Be-9 along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F_2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in Be-9. It indicates that the anomalous Be-9 result should be explain...

  15. Alpha and Beta Determinations

    CERN Document Server

    Dunietz, Isard

    1999-01-01

    Because the Bd -> J/psi Ks asymmetry determines only sin(2 beta), a discrete ambiguity in the true value of beta remains. This note reviews how the ambiguity can be removed. Extractions of the CKM angle alpha are discussed next. Some of the methods require very large data samples and will not be feasible in the near future. In the near future, semi-inclusive CP-violating searches could be undertaken, which are reviewed last.

  16. Methane-Fueled Syntrophy through Extracellular Electron Transfer: Uncovering the Genomic Traits Conserved within Diverse Bacterial Partners of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor T. Skennerton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of methane by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME archaea in syntrophic partnership with deltaproteobacterial sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB is the primary mechanism for methane removal in ocean sediments. The mechanism of their syntrophy has been the subject of much research as traditional intermediate compounds, such as hydrogen and formate, failed to decouple the partners. Recent findings have indicated the potential for extracellular electron transfer from ANME archaea to SRB, though it is unclear how extracellular electrons are integrated into the metabolism of the SRB partner. We used metagenomics to reconstruct eight genomes from the globally distributed SEEP-SRB1 clade of ANME partner bacteria to determine what genomic features are required for syntrophy. The SEEP-SRB1 genomes contain large multiheme cytochromes that were not found in previously described free-living SRB and also lack periplasmic hydrogenases that may prevent an independent lifestyle without an extracellular source of electrons from ANME archaea. Metaproteomics revealed the expression of these cytochromes at in situ methane seep sediments from three sites along the Pacific coast of the United States. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these cytochromes appear to have been horizontally transferred from metal-respiring members of the Deltaproteobacteria such as Geobacter and may allow these syntrophic SRB to accept extracellular electrons in place of other chemical/organic electron donors.

  17. Vertical profiles of community abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and bacteria in a simple waste landfill in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Ding, Linjie; Wang, Xu; Chi, Zifang; Lei, Jiansen

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is considered to be an important sink of CH4 in habitats as marine sediments. But, few studies focused on AMO in landfills which may be an important sink of CH4 derived from waste fermentation. To show evidence of AMO and to uncover function anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) community in landfill, different age waste samples were collected in Jinqianpu landfill located in north China. Through high-throughput sequencing, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales archaea associated with ANME and reverse methanogenic archaea of Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfobulbus and Desulfococcus) which could couple with ANME-conducting AMO were also found. But, the community structure of ANME had no significant difference with depths. From the results of investigation, we can come to a conclusion that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (SR-DAMO) would be the dominant AMO process in the landfill, while iron-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (M/IR-DAMO) process was weak though concentration of ferric iron was large in the landfill. Denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (NR-DAMO) was negative because of lack of nitrate and relevant function microorganisms in the landfill. Results also indicate that CH4 mitigation would have higher potential by increasing electron acceptor contents and promoting the growth of relevant function microorganisms.

  18. Production of poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Methylobacterium organophilum isolated from a methanotrophic consortium in a two-phase partition bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga, C., E-mail: cristal7n@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Artificios 40, Col. Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 01120, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Morales, M., E-mail: mmorales@correo.cua.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Artificios 40, Col. Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 01120, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Le Borgne, S., E-mail: sylvielb@correo.cua.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Artificios 40, Col. Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 01120, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Revah, S., E-mail: srevah@correo.cua.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Artificios 40, Col. Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 01120, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    The biodegradation of methane, a greenhouse gas, and the accumulation of poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) were studied using a methanotrophic consortium and an isolated strain thereof. The specific rates for methane consumption were 100 and 17mg{sub CH{sub 4}}g{sub x}{sup -1} h{sup -1} for the isolate and the consortium, respectively. Also the effect of including 10% (v v{sup -1}) of silicone oil in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) was assayed for the elimination of 1% methane in air stream. TPPB allowed a 33-45% increase of methane elimination under growing conditions. Nitrogen limitation was assayed in bioreactors to promote PHB production. Under this condition, the specific methane degradation rate remained unchanged for the consortium and decreased to 36mg{sub CH{sub 4}}g{sub x}{sup -1} h{sup -1} for the isolated strain. The accumulated PHB in the reactor was 34% and 38% (w w{sup -1}) for the consortium and the isolate, respectively. The highest productivity was obtained in the TPPB and was 1.61mg{sub PHB}g{sub x}{sup -1} h{sup -1}. The CZ-2 isolate was identified as Methylobacterium organophilum, this is the first study that reports this species as being able to grow on methane and accumulate up to 57% (w w{sup -1}) of PHB under nitrogen limitation in microcosm experiments.

  19. The use of methanotrophic bacteria for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, S.B. II; Palumbo, A.V.; Strandberg, G.W.; Donaldson, T.L.; Farr, L.L.; Eng, W.; Little, C.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Microbiology; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (USA). Inst. of Molecular Biophysics)

    1989-11-01

    This study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a trickle-filter methanotrophic bioreactor for the remediation of trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in groundwater. A bench-scale continuous-flow bioreactor was constructed and operated for several months to treat synthetic contaminated groundwater and to identify the rate of TCE degradation and the parameters that control bioreactor performance. With influent concentrations of TCE and trans-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) of 1 mg/L each and a residence time of 50 min, approximately 50% of the TCE and 90% of the DCE were degraded in a single pass through the bioreactor. Further degradation of TCE was obtained with liquid recycle. The performance of the bench-scale bioreactor indicates that bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater is technically feasible. A 3-month pilot plant project to further develop the process is estimated to cost approximately $180,000. A full-scale plant ranging in size from 50 to 700 gal/min is estimated to cost from $180,000 to $1 million to construct and from $4 to $1 per 1000 gal to operate.

  20. A Novel Framework for Quantifying past Methane Recycling by Sphagnum-Methanotroph Symbiosis Using Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, 'PRM.' We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, delta C-13 of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  1. Heavy hitters via cluster-preserving clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nelson, Jelani; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2016-01-01

    , providing correctness whp. In fact, a simpler version of our algorithm for p = 1 in the strict turnstile model answers queries even faster than the "dyadic trick" by roughly a log n factor, dominating it in all regards. Our main innovation is an efficient reduction from the heavy hitters to a clustering...... problem in which each heavy hitter is encoded as some form of noisy spectral cluster in a much bigger graph, and the goal is to identify every cluster. Since every heavy hitter must be found, correctness requires that every cluster be found. We thus need a "cluster-preserving clustering" algorithm......, that partitions the graph into clusters with the promise of not destroying any original cluster. To do this we first apply standard spectral graph partitioning, and then we use some novel combinatorial techniques to modify the cuts obtained so as to make sure that the original clusters are sufficiently preserved...

  2. Alpha-synuclein-induced aggregation of cytoplasmic vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, James H; Roy, Subhojit; Stieber, Anna; Lee, Eliza; Wilson, Robert B; Trojanowski, John Q; Burd, Christopher G; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2008-03-01

    Aggregated alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) fibrils form Lewy bodies (LBs), the signature lesions of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related synucleinopathies, but the pathogenesis and neurodegenerative effects of LBs remain enigmatic. Recent studies have shown that when overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alpha-syn localizes to plasma membranes and forms cytoplasmic accumulations similar to human alpha-syn inclusions. However, the exact nature, composition, temporal evolution, and underlying mechanisms of yeast alpha-syn accumulations and their relevance to human synucleinopathies are unknown. Here we provide ultrastructural evidence that alpha-syn accumulations are not comprised of LB-like fibrils, but are associated with clusters of vesicles. Live-cell imaging showed alpha-syn initially localized to the plasma membrane and subsequently formed accumulations in association with vesicles. Imaging of truncated and mutant forms of alpha-syn revealed the molecular determinants and vesicular trafficking pathways underlying this pathological process. Because vesicular clustering is also found in LB-containing neurons of PD brains, alpha-syn-mediated vesicular accumulation in yeast represents a model system to study specific aspects of neurodegeneration in PD and related synucleinopathies.

  3. Bayesian Analysis of Two Stellar Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters II: NGC 5024, NGC 5272, and NGC 6352

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner-Kaiser, R; Robinson, E; von Hippel, T; Sarajedini, A; van Dyk, D A; Stein, N; Jefferys, W H

    2016-01-01

    We use Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and HST archival ACS Treasury observations of Galactic Globular Clusters to find and characterize two stellar populations in NGC 5024 (M53), NGC 5272 (M3), and NGC 6352. For these three clusters, both single and double-population analyses are used to determine a best fit isochrone(s). We employ a sophisticated Bayesian analysis technique to simultaneously fit the cluster parameters (age, distance, absorption, and metallicity) that characterize each cluster. For the two-population analysis, unique population level helium values are also fit to each distinct population of the cluster and the relative proportions of the populations are determined. We find differences in helium ranging from $\\sim$0.05 to 0.11 for these three clusters. Model grids with solar $\\alpha$-element abundances ([$\\alpha$/Fe] =0.0) and enhanced $\\alpha$-elements ([$\\alpha$/Fe]=0.4) are adopted.

  4. Microscopic three-cluster model of 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashko, Yu. A.; Filippov, G. F.; Vasilevsky, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and scattering of alpha-particles on 6He. For this aim we make use of a three-cluster microscopic model. This model incorporates Gaussian and oscillator basis functions and reduces three-cluster Schrödinger equation to a two-body like many-channel problem with the two-cluster subsystem being in a bound or a pseudo-bound state. Much attention is given to the effects of cluster polarization on spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and on elastic and inelastic 6He + α scattering.

  5. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  6. Orthopositronium lifetime. Analytic results in O ({alpha}) and O ({alpha}{sup 3} ln {alpha})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Kotikov, A.V.; Veretin, O.L. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-06-15

    We present the O({alpha}) and O({alpha}{sup 3}ln {alpha}) corrections to the total decay width of orthopositronium in closed analytic form, in terms of basic transcendental numbers, which can be evaluated numerically to arbitrary precision. (orig.)

  7. The Lifecycle of Clusters in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    We review many of the basic properties of star cluster systems, and focus in particular on how they relate to their host galaxy properties and ambient environment. The cluster mass and luminosity functions are well approximated by power-laws of the form $Ndm \\propto M^{\\alpha}dm$, with $\\alpha\\sim-2$ over most of the observable range. However, there is now clear evidence that both become steeper at high masses/luminosities, with the value of the downward turn dependent on environment. The host galaxy properties also appear to affect the cluster formation efficiency ($\\Gamma$ - i.e., the fraction of stars that form in bound clusters), with higher star-formation rate density galaxies having higher $\\Gamma$ values. Within individual galaxies, there is evidence for $\\Gamma$ to vary by a factor of 3-4, likely following the molecular gas surface density, in agreement with recent predictions. Finally, we discuss cluster disruption and its effect on the observed properties of a population, focussing on the age distri...

  8. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  9. The Fundamental Plane of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Schäffer, R; Cappi, A; Bernardeau, F

    1993-01-01

    Velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, radius $R$ and luminosity $L$ of elliptical galaxies are known to be related, leaving only two degrees of freedom and defining the so-called ``fundamental plane". In this {\\em Letter} we present observational evidence that rich galaxy clusters exhibit a similar behaviour. Assuming a relation $L \\propto R^{\\alpha}\\sigma^{2 \\beta}$, the best-fit values of $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ are very close to those defined by galaxies. The dispersion of this relation is lower than 10 percent, i.e. significantly smaller than the dispersion observed in the $L-\\sigma$ and $L-R$ relations. We briefly suggest some possible implications on the spread of formation times of objects and on peculiar velocities of galaxy clusters.

  10. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  11. Clustering and Community Detection with Imbalanced Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Aksoylar, Cem; Qian, Jing; Saligrama, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods which are frequently used in clustering and community detection applications are sensitive to the specific graph constructions particularly when imbalanced clusters are present. We show that ratio cut (RCut) or normalized cut (NCut) objectives are not tailored to imbalanced cluster sizes since they tend to emphasize cut sizes over cut values. We propose a graph partitioning problem that seeks minimum cut partitions under minimum size constraints on partitions to de...

  12. Alpha-mannosidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilssen Øivind

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alpha-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder characterized by immune deficiency, facial and skeletal abnormalities, hearing impairment, and intellectual disability. It occurs in approximately 1 of 500,000 live births. The children are often born apparently normal, and their condition worsens progressively. Some children are born with ankle equinus or develop hydrocephalus in the first year of life. Main features are immune deficiency (manifested by recurrent infections, especially in the first decade of life, skeletal abnormalities (mild-to-moderate dysostosis multiplex, scoliosis and deformation of the sternum, hearing impairment (moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss, gradual impairment of mental functions and speech, and often, periods of psychosis. Associated motor function disturbances include muscular weakness, joint abnormalities and ataxia. The facial trait include large head with prominent forehead, rounded eyebrows, flattened nasal bridge, macroglossia, widely spaced teeth, and prognathism. Slight strabismus is common. The clinical variability is significant, representing a continuum in severity. The disorder is caused by lysosomal alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Alpha-mannosidosis is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and is caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene located on chromosome 19 (19 p13.2-q12. Diagnosis is made by measuring acid alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes or other nucleated cells and can be confirmed by genetic testing. Elevated urinary secretion of mannose-rich oligosaccharides is suggestive, but not diagnostic. Differential diagnoses are mainly the other lysosomal storage diseases like the mucopolysaccharidoses. Genetic counseling should be given to explain the nature of the disease and to detect carriers. Antenatal diagnosis is possible, based on both biochemical and genetic methods. The management should be pro-active, preventing complications and treating

  13. Alpha phoenix公司

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    德国Alpha phoenix公司成立于2009年.专注于制药领域清洗机器的研发和生产,产品符合cGMP的要求。公司的人员是制药领域清洗机器研发和生产的专家,他们具有20多年的全自动清洗机器的设计和生产经验。

  14. Cluster headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R E; Ryan, R E

    1989-12-01

    The patient with cluster headaches will be afflicted with the most severe type of pain that one will encounter. If the physician can do something to help this patient either by symptomatic or, more importantly, prophylactic treatment, he or she will have a most thankful patient. This type of headache is seen most frequently in men, and occurs in a cyclic manner. During an acute cycle, the patient will experience a daily type of pain that may occur many times per day. The pain is usually unilateral and may be accompanied by unilateral lacrimation, conjunctivitis, and clear rhinorrhea. Prednisone is the first treatment we employ. Patients are seen for follow-up approximately twice a week, and their medication is lowered in an appropriate manner, depending on their response to the treatment. Regulation of dosage has to be individualized, and when one reaches the lower dose such as 5 to 10 mg per day, the drug may have to be tapered more slowly, or even maintained at that level for a period of time to prevent further recurrence of symptoms. We frequently will use an intravenous histamine desensitization technique to prevent further attacks. We will give the patient an ergotamine preparation to use for symptomatic relief. As these patients often have headaches during the middle of the night, we will place the patient on a 2-mg ergotamine preparation to take prior to going to bed in the evening. This often works in a prophylactic nature, and prevents the nighttime occurrence of a headache. We believe that following these principles to make the accurate diagnosis and institute the proper therapy will help the practicing otolaryngologist recognize and treat patients suffering from this severe pain.

  15. Genomic variability and alternative splicing generate multiple PML/RAR alpha transcripts that encode aberrant PML proteins and PML/RAR alpha isoforms in acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, P P; Alcalay, M; Fagioli, M; Zangrilli, D; Mencarelli, A; Diverio, D; Biondi, A; Lo Coco, F; Rambaldi, A; Grignani, F

    1992-01-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) 15;17 translocation generates a PML/RAR alpha chimeric gene which is transcribed as a fusion PML/RAR alpha mRNA. Molecular studies on a large series of APLs revealed great heterogeneity of the PML/RAR alpha transcripts due to: (i) variable breaking of chromosome 15 within three PML breakpoint cluster regions (bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3), (ii) alternative splicings of the PML portion and (iii) alternative usage of two RAR alpha polyadenylation sites. Nucleotide sequence analysis predicted two types of proteins: multiple PML/RAR alpha and aberrant PML. The PML/RAR alpha proteins varied among bcr1, 2 and 3 APL cases and within single cases. The fusion proteins contained variable portions of the PML N terminus joined to the B-F RAR alpha domains; the only PML region retained was the putative DNA binding domain. The aberrant PML proteins lacked the C terminus, which had been replaced by from two to ten amino acid residues from the RAR alpha sequence. Multiple PML/RAR alpha isoforms and aberrant PML proteins were found to coexist in all APLs. These findings indicate that two potential oncogenic proteins are generated by the t(15;17) and suggest that the PML activation pathway is altered in APLs. Images PMID:1314166

  16. Solving Three-Cluster OCM Equations in the Faddeev Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2004-01-01

    Two different types of orthogonality condition models (OCM) are equivalently formulated in the Faddeev formalism. One is the OCM which uses pairwise orthogonality conditions for the relative motion of clusters, and the other is the one which uses the orthogonalizing pseudo-potential method. By constructing a redundancy-free T-matrix, one can exactly eliminate the redundant components of the total wave function for the harmonic-oscillator Pauli-forbidden states, without introducing any limiting procedure. As an example, a three-alpha-particle model interacting via the deep alpha alpha potential by Buck, Friedrich and Wheatley is investigated.

  17. From the stable to the exotic: clustering in light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of research work has been undertaken in alpha-clustering study since the pioneering discovery of 12C+12C molecular resonances half a century ago. Our knowledge on physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes in light N=Z alpha-like nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of the superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Evolution of clustering from stability to the drip-lines is examined: clustering aspects are, in particular, discussed for light exotic nuclei with large neutron excess such as neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes with their complete spectroscopy.

  18. Cluster emissions with ? daughter from neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Batra, J. S.; Gupta, Raj K.

    1996-02-01

    Cluster emissions from neutron-rich 0954-3899/22/2/006/img2, and 0954-3899/22/2/006/img3 nuclei are studied within the preformed cluster model of Malik and Gupta. Q-value estimates of the decays selected on the basis of shell effects in binding energies and their relative preformation probabilities show that these nuclei are stable (Qdecays and all the metastable (Q>0) decays are of non-alpha-like heavy clusters. The most probable decays (minimum half-life times) are the ones with a doubly magic 0954-3899/22/2/006/img6 nucleus as the daughter nucleus, arising due to the WKB penetrability. Compared to the presently measurable alpha-like cluster decays of the corresponding neutron-deficient parents into a 0954-3899/22/2/006/img7 daughter nucleus, these decays are suppressed by many orders of magnitude.

  19. RELICS: Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Dan A.; RELICS Team

    2017-01-01

    Hubble and Spitzer imaging programs observing galaxy cluster lenses have delivered some of the highest redshift galaxy candidates to date (z ~ 9 - 11, or 540 - 410 Myr after the Big Bang). These magnified galaxies are intrinsically faint, and thus more representative of the sources believed to be primarily responsible for reionization. Magnified galaxies are also observed brightly enough to be prime targets for detailed follow-up study with current and future observatories, including JWST. Building on the successes of CLASH and the Frontier Fields, we have begun RELICS, the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey. By observing 41 massive clusters for the first time at infrared wavelengths, RELICS will deliver more of the best and brightest high-redshift candidates to the community in time for the November 2017 JWST GO Cycle 1 call for proposals. I will present our early results. I will also discuss prospects for JWST to follow-up known candidates and discover new galaxies at even higher redshifts (z > 11). The discovery efficiency gains from lensing will be even more pronounced at z > 11 if luminosity function faint end slopes are steeper than alpha ~ -2, as suggested by current models and observational extrapolations.

  20. Be Stars in the Open Cluster NGC 6830

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Po-Chieh; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Lee, Chien-De; Konidaris, Nick; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ip, Wing-Huen; Chen, Wen-Ping; Chen, Hui-Chen; Malkan, Matthew A; Chang, Chan-Kao; Laher, Russ; Huang, Li-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Edelson, Rick; Ritter, Andreas; Quimby, Robert; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Ofek, Eran O; Surace, Jason; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 2 new Be stars, and re-identify one known Be star in the open cluster NGC 6830. Eleven H-alpha emitters were discovered using the H-alpha imaging photometry of the Palomar Transient Factory Survey. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified with photometric and kinematic information using 2MASS data and proper motions. The spectroscopic confirmation was carried out by using the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick observatory. Based on their spectral types, three H-alpha emitters were confirmed as Be stars with H-alpha equivalent widths > -10 Angstrom. Two objects were also observed by the new spectrograph SED-Machine on the Palomar 60 inch Telescope. The SED-Machine results show strong H-alpha emission lines, which are consistent with the results of the Lick observations. The high efficiency of the SED-Machine can provide rapid observations for Be stars in a comprehensive survey in the future.

  1. Robust estimation of Cronbach's alpha

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Cronbach’s alpha is a popular method to measure reliability, e.g. in quantifying the reliability of a score to summarize the information of several items in questionnaires. The alpha coefficient is known to be non-robust. We study the behavior of this coefficient in different settings to identify situations, which can easily occur in practice, but under which the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient is extremely sensitive to violations of the classical model assumptions. Furthermore, we construct a r...

  2. Are alpha-gliadins glycosylated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J B; Garner, G V; Gordon, D B; Brookes, S J; Smith, C A

    2002-02-01

    Alpha-gliadins isolated by carboxymethylcellulose chromatography contain noncovalently bound glucose probably due to contaminating proteoglycans and to material shed from the column. Traces of carbohydrate remain strongly bound to alpha-gliadins even after harsh denaturation, but our results indicate alpha-gliadins are not glycoproteins. Suggestions that gliadins are glycoproteins are probably due to contamination with this glucose and the presence of these proteoglycans.

  3. Factorial PD-Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Tortora, Cristina; Summa, Mireille Gettler

    2011-01-01

    Factorial clustering methods have been developed in recent years thanks to the improving of computational power. These methods perform a linear transformation of data and a clustering on transformed data optimizing a common criterion. Factorial PD-clustering is based on Probabilistic Distance clustering (PD-clustering). PD-clustering is an iterative, distribution free, probabilistic, clustering method. Factorial PD-clustering make a linear transformation of original variables into a reduced number of orthogonal ones using a common criterion with PD-Clustering. It is demonstrated that Tucker 3 decomposition allows to obtain this transformation. Factorial PD-clustering makes alternatively a Tucker 3 decomposition and a PD-clustering on transformed data until convergence. This method could significantly improve the algorithm performance and allows to work with large dataset, to improve the stability and the robustness of the method.

  4. Detection of a T cell receptor delta chain with an anti-TCR alpha chain serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leca, G; Bories, J C; Davi, F; Bensussan, A

    1990-04-01

    Two types of T cell antigen-specific receptors have been described. Most peripheral blood T lymphocytes express, at their surface, an antigen receptor consisting of alpha and beta subunits, while a small subset of thymocytes and a minority of mature T lymphocytes express a heterodimeric receptor termed gamma delta. Whereas the gene segments localization corresponding to the TCR gamma and beta chains are separate, genes encoding the joining and the constant regions of TCR delta chain are located between the TCR V alpha region and the J alpha-C alpha gene cluster. To determine whether V alpha gene segments are used by delta chains, immunoprecipitations from human TCR gamma delta expressing cell clones were performed with an anti-alpha serum. The results show that a rabbit antiserum raised against the purified REX TCR alpha subunit immunoprecipitates a TCR delta chain from the cell surface of only one human T cell clone termed SO1. However, since no SO1 RNA hybridization is observed with REX TCR V alpha probe and SO1 cloned cells do react with an anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibody, we conclude that TCR delta and alpha chains expressed a limited structural homology and that REX TCR V alpha gene do not seem to be frequently used in a functional delta chain.

  5. Possibilistic Exponential Fuzzy Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiatichai Treerattanapitak; Chuleerat Jaruskulchai

    2013-01-01

    Generally,abnormal points (noise and outliers) cause cluster analysis to produce low accuracy especially in fuzzy clustering.These data not only stay in clusters but also deviate the centroids from their true positions.Traditional fuzzy clustering like Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) always assigns data to all clusters which is not reasonable in some circumstances.By reformulating objective function in exponential equation,the algorithm aggressively selects data into the clusters.However noisy data and outliers cannot be properly handled by clustering process therefore they are forced to be included in a cluster because of a general probabilistic constraint that the sum of the membership degrees across all clusters is one.In order to improve this weakness,possibilistic approach relaxes this condition to improve membership assignment.Nevertheless,possibilistic clustering algorithms generally suffer from coincident clusters because their membership equations ignore the distance to other clusters.Although there are some possibilistic clustering approaches that do not generate coincident clusters,most of them require the right combination of multiple parameters for the algorithms to work.In this paper,we theoretically study Possibilistic Exponential Fuzzy Clustering (PXFCM) that integrates possibilistic approach with exponential fuzzy clustering.PXFCM has only one parameter and not only partitions the data but also filters noisy data or detects them as outliers.The comprehensive experiments show that PXFCM produces high accuracy in both clustering results and outlier detection without generating coincident problems.

  6. The Lyman alpha reference sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Schaerer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on new imaging observations of the Lyman alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028 alpha emission line (Lyα), performed with the Hubble Space Telescope, that comprise the backbone of the Lyman alpha Reference Sample. We present images of 14 starburst galaxies at redshifts 0.028

  7. The widths of the α decaying states of 12C within the three-cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.

    2003-05-01

    We estimate the widths of the alpha decaying states of 12C (1+, 1-, 1-1, 2+, 2-, 3-, and 4+) within the three-alpha cluster model. We solve the Faddeev equations using the hyperspheric approach and calculate the decisive effective hyper-radial barriers. We calculate the widths in the WKB approximation and compare with experimental data.

  8. Calculation of energy spectrum of $^{12}$C isotope with modified Yukawa potential by cluster models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMMAD REZA SHOJAE; NAFISEH ROSHAN BAKHT

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we have calculated the energy spectrum of 12C isotope in two-cluster models, $3\\alpha$ cluster model and $^8$Be + $\\alpha$ cluster model. We use the modified Yukawa potential for interaction between theclusters and solve the Schrödinger equation using Nikiforov–Uvarov method to calculate the energy spectrum. Then, we increase the accuracy by adding spin-orbit coupling and tensor force and solve them by perturbationtheory in both models. Finally, the calculated results for both models are compared with each other and with the experimental data. The results show that the isotope $^{12}$C should be considered as a three-$\\alpha$ cluster and themodified Yukawa potential is adaptable for cluster interactions.

  9. Molecular characterization of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J K; Pearson, W R; Lynch, K R

    1991-02-01

    Three 'alpha 1-adrenoceptors' and three 'alpha 2-adrenoceptors' have now been cloned. How closely do these receptors match the native receptors that have been identified pharmacologically? What are the properties of these receptors, and how do they relate to other members of the cationic amine receptor family? Kevin Lynch and his colleagues discuss these questions in this review.

  10. PDFs, $\\alpha_s$, and quark masses from global fits

    CERN Document Server

    Alekhin, S; Moch, S; Placakyte, R

    2016-01-01

    The strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ and the heavy-quark masses, $m_c$, $m_b$, $m_t$ are extracted simultaneosly with the parton distribution functions (PDFs) in the updated ABM12 fit including recent data from CERN-SPS, HERA, Tevatron, and the LHC. The values of \\begin{eqnarray} \

  11. Alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Danielsen, E R; Thomsen, Carsten;

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (AM) (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease. The understanding of the central nervous system (CNS) pathology is limited. This study is the first describing the CNS pathology and the correlation between the CNS pathology and intellectual disabilities in human AM. Thirty......-protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilament light protein in 97 patients, 74% and 41% of CSF samples, respectively. A negative correlation between CSF-biomarkers and cognitive function and CSF-oligosaccharides and cognitive function was found. The combination of MRS/MRI changes, elevated...... concentrations of CSF-biomarkers and CSF-oligosaccharides suggests gliosis and reduced myelination, as part of the CNS pathology in AM. Our data demonstrate early neuropathological changes, which may be taken into consideration when planning initiation of treatment....

  12. Structures of Mn clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tina M Briere; Marcel H F Sluiter; Vijay Kumar; Yoshiyuki Kawazoe

    2003-01-01

    The geometries of several Mn clusters in the size range Mn13–Mn23 are studied via the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory. For the 13- and 19-atom clusters, the icosahedral structures are found to be most stable, while for the 15-atom cluster, the bcc structure is more favoured. The clusters show ferrimagnetic spin configurations.

  13. Dissolution of Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgardt, Holger

    2006-01-01

    Globular clusters are among the oldest objects in galaxies, and understanding the details of their formation and evolution can bring valuable insight into the early history of galaxies. This review summarises the current knowledge about the dissolution of star clusters and discusses the implications of star cluster dissolution for the evolution of the mass function of star cluster systems in galaxies.

  14. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  15. The population of galaxies in the forming cluster around the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 at z=2.2

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Röttgering, H J A; Miley, G K; Venemans, B P

    2001-01-01

    We have recently discovered a forming cluster around the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 at redshift 2.2. Besides the population of Ly alpha emitting galaxies that have been confirmed spectroscopically, we have detected many candidate H alpha emitters that seem to have a different spatial distribution from the other galaxies: they are more clustered towards the center of the cluster and seem to be distributed along the same direction as the radio source. We present here the characteristics of the Ly alpha and H alpha emitters and study the nature of these populations.

  16. Contextualizing the Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    This dissertation examines the case of the palm oil cluster in Malaysia and Indonesia, today one of the largest agricultural clusters in the world. My analysis focuses on the evolution of the cluster from the 1880s to the 1970s in order to understand how it helped these two countries to integrate......-researched topic in the cluster literature – the emergence of clusters, their governance and institutional change, and competition between rival cluster locations – through the case of the Southeast Asian palm oil cluster....

  17. Contextualizing the Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    This dissertation examines the case of the palm oil cluster in Malaysia and Indonesia, today one of the largest agricultural clusters in the world. My analysis focuses on the evolution of the cluster from the 1880s to the 1970s in order to understand how it helped these two countries to integrate......-researched topic in the cluster literature – the emergence of clusters, their governance and institutional change, and competition between rival cluster locations – through the case of the Southeast Asian palm oil cluster....

  18. Single universal curve for Alpha decay derived from semi-microscopic calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Abdurrahman, A

    2015-01-01

    The universal curve is one of the simple ways to get preliminary information about the Alpha-decay half-life times of heavy nuclei. We try to find parameterization for the universal curve of Alpha decay based on semi-microscopic calculations, starting from the realistic M3Y-Reid nucleon-nucleon interaction. Within the deformed density-dependent cluster model, the penetration probability and the assault frequency are calculated using the WKB penetration probability. The deformations of daughte...

  19. Clustering in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drab, Klaudia; Daszykowski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Data clustering plays an important role in the exploratory analysis of analytical data, and the use of clustering methods has been acknowledged in different fields of science. In this paper, principles of data clustering are presented with a direct focus on clustering of analytical data. The role of the clustering process in the analytical workflow is underlined, and its potential impact on the analytical workflow is emphasized.

  20. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carpenter, P. T.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Escallier, J.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Isaac, C. A.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Marone, A.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Parker, B.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seddon, D.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  1. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  2. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  3. DFT CONFORMATIONAL STUDIES OF ALPHA-MALTOTRIOSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent DFT optimization studies on alpha-maltose improved our understanding of the preferred conformations of alpha-maltose and the present study extends these studies to alpha-maltotriose with three alpha-D-glucopyranose residues linked by two alpha-[1-4] bridges, denoted herein as DP-3's. Combina...

  4. Alpha Decay in the Complex Energy Shell Model

    CERN Document Server

    Betan, R Id

    2012-01-01

    Alpha emission from a nucleus is a fundamental decay process in which the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels out through the potential barrier. We describe alpha decay of $^{212}$Po and $^{104}$Te by means of the configuration interaction approach. To compute the preformation factor and penetrability, we use the complex-energy shell model with a separable T=1 interaction. The single-particle space is expanded in a Woods-Saxon basis that consists of bound and unbound resonant states. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the norm kernel appearing in the definition of the formation amplitude that guarantees the normalization of the channel function. Without explicitly considering the alpha-cluster component in the wave function of the parent nucleus, we reproduce the experimental alpha-decay width of $^{212}$Po and predict an upper limit of T_{1/2}=5.5x10^{-7} sec for the half-life of $^{104}$Te. The complex-energy shell model in a large valence configuration space is capable of providing ...

  5. Proteinaceous alpha-araylase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous a-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase...... inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases...... in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological...

  6. Three-cluster nuclear molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2000-01-01

    A three-center phenomenological model able to explain, at least from a qualitative point of view, the difference in the observed yield of a particle-accompanied fission and that of binary fission was developed. It is derived from the liquid drop model under the assumption that the aligned configuration, with the emitted particle between the light and heavy fragment is obtained by increasing continuously the separation distance, while the radii of the light fragment and of the light particle are kept constant. During the first stage of the deformation one has a two-center evolution until the neck radius becomes equal to the radius of the emitted particle. Then the three center starts developing by decreasing with the same amount the two tip distances. In such a way a second minimum, typical for a cluster molecule, appears in the deformation energy. Examples are presented for $^{240}$Pu parent nucleus emitting $\\alpha$-particles and $^{14}$C in a ternary process.

  7. Simultaneous quantification of GABAergic 3alpha,5alpha/3alpha,5beta neuroactive steroids in human and rat serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcu, Patrizia; O'Buckley, Todd K; Alward, Sarah E; Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Girdler, Susan S; Morrow, A Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and produce inhibitory neurobehavioral and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite substantial information on the progesterone derivative (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP, allopregnanolone), the physiological significance of the other endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids has remained elusive. Here, we describe the validation of a method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to simultaneously identify serum levels of the eight 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone. The method shows specificity, sensitivity and enhanced throughput compared to other methods already available for neuroactive steroid quantification. Administration of pregnenolone to rats and progesterone to women produced selective effects on the 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced neuroactive steroids, indicating differential regulation of their biosynthetic pathways. Pregnenolone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1488%, psteroid was detected only in 3/16 control subjects. Levels of 3alpha,5alpha-A, 3alpha,5beta-A and pregnenolone were not altered. This method can be used to investigate the physiological and pathological role of neuroactive steroids and to develop biomarkers and new therapeutics for neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  8. Studying Reionization with Ly-alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Matthew; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    We show that observations of high-redshift Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) have the potential to provide definitive evidence for reionization in the near future. Using 200 Mpc radiative transfer simulations, we calculate the effect that patchy reionization has on the line profile, on the luminosity function, and, most interestingly, on the clustering of emitters for several realistic models of reionization. Reionization increases the measured clustering of emitters, and we show that this enhancement would be essentially impossible to attribute to anything other than reionization. Our results motivate looking for the signature of reionization in existing LAE data. We find that for stellar reionization scenarios the angular correlation function of the 58 LAEs in the Subaru Deep Field z = 6.6 photometric sample is more consistent with a fully ionized universe (mean volume ionized fraction x_i = 1) than a universe with x_i 2-sigma confidence level. Measurements in the next year on Subaru will increase their z = 6.6 LAE ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-mannosidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions alpha-mannosidosis alpha-mannosidosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha-mannosidosis is a rare inherited disorder that causes ...

  10. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  11. Venus - Alpha Regio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The eastern edge of Alpha Regio is shown in this image centered at 30 degrees south latitude and 11.8 degrees east longitude (longitude on Venus is measured from 0 degrees to 360 degrees east). Seven circular, dome-like hills, averaging 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter with maximum heights of 750 meters (2,475 feet) dominate the scene. These features are interpreted as very thick lava flows that came from an opening on the relatively level ground, which allowed the lava to flow in an even pattern outward from the opening. The complex fractures on top of the domes suggest that if the domes were created by lava flows, a cooled outer layer formed and then further lava flowing in the interior stretched the surface. The domes may be similar to volcanic domes on Earth. Another interpretation is that the domes are the result of molten rock or magma in the interior that pushed the surface layer upward. The near-surface magma then withdrew to deeper levels, causing the collapse and fracturing of the dome surface. The bright margins possibly indicate the presence of rock debris on the slopes of the domes. Some of the fractures on the plains cut through the domes, while others appear to be covered by the domes. This indicates that active processes pre date and post date the dome-like hills. The prominent black area in the northeast corner of the image is a data gap. North is at the top of the image.

  12. Effects of conservation tillage on soil photosynthetic bacteria and typeⅡ methanotrophs%保护性耕作对土壤光合细菌和Ⅱ型甲烷氧化菌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敬敬; 李新宇; 徐明恺; 苏振成; 李旭; 孙健; 张惠文

    2012-01-01

    保护性耕作对土壤微生物具有明显的保护效应,但是其对土壤光合细菌和甲烷氧化菌的影响却鲜有报道.本文采用土壤宏基因组16S rDNA变性梯度凝胶电泳(DGGE)和荧光定量PCR技术比较了不同耕作模式(免耕和传统翻耕)和不同秸秆覆盖量(0、50%、100%)对潮土中光合细菌和Ⅱ型甲烷氧化菌数量和群落结构的影响.结果表明:免耕土壤中光合细菌的多样性(多样性指数H=2.47)显著高于传统翻耕土壤(多样性指数H=2.35),且与土壤总氮呈显著正相关,数量略低于传统翻耕土壤;光合细菌的数量和多样性虽均随着秸秆覆盖量的增加而有所增加,但不显著;虽然免耕和秸秆覆盖对Ⅱ型甲烷氧化菌数量和多样性产生了有益的影响,但是耕作模式、秸秆覆盖及二者互作对其影响均不显著;不同处理中光合细菌和Ⅱ型甲烷氧化菌的种群结构无明显变化,光合细菌优势种群以根瘤菌目(Rhizobiales)和鞘脂单胞菌目(Sphingomonadales)为主,Ⅱ型甲烷氧化菌优势种群主要为甲基孢囊菌科(Methylocystaceae)的细菌类群.%Conservation tillage has beneficial effects on soil microbes, but the effects on soil photosynthetic,bacteria and methanotrophs are rarely reported. In this study, denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative PCR technique were adopted to investigate the abundance and community structure of photosynthetic bacteria and type Ⅱ methanotrophs in a fluvo-aquic soil as affected by different tillage modes ( no-tillage and conventional tillage) and straw mulching (0, 50% , 100% ). Under no tillage, the diversity of soil photosynthetic bacteria was significantly higher but the abundance was slightly lower, as compared with those under conventional tillage, and there was a significant positive correlation between the diversity of soil photosynthetic bacteria and the soil total nitrogen. Both the abundance and the diversity of soil

  13. Galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae and the fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Colaço, L R; Alcaniz, J S; Landau, S J

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be combined with observations of the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters to estimate the angular diameter distance to these structures. In this paper, we show that this technique depends on the fine structure constant, $\\alpha$. Therefore, if $\\alpha$ is a time-dependent quantity, e.g., $\\alpha=\\alpha_0 \\phi(z)$, where $\\phi$ is a function of redshift, we argue that current data do not provide the real angular diameter distance, $D_{\\rm{A}}(z)$, to the cluster but instead $D_A^{data}(z) = \\phi(z)^2 D_{\\rm{A}}(z)$. We use this result to derive constraints on a possible variation of $\\alpha$ for a class of dilaton runaway models considering a sample of 25 measurements of $D_A^{data}(z)$ in redshift range $0.023 < z < 0.784$ and estimates of $D_{\\rm{A}}(z)$ from current type Ia supernovae observations. We find no significant indication of variation of $\\alpha$ with the present data.

  14. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark....... The longitudinal study on the high-tech cluster reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to decline. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on the cluster’s adaptive capabilities, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in new resources to the cluster...

  15. Measurement of $\\alpha_{s}$ with Radiative Hadronic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkays, A Jr; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schiecks, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2008-01-01

    Hadronic final states with a hard isolated photon are studied using data taken at centre-of-mass energies around the mass of the Z0 boson with the OPAL detector at LEP. The strong coupling alpha S is extracted by comparing data and QCD predictions for event shape observables at average reduced centre-of-mass energies ranging from 24 GeV to 78 GeV, and the energy dependence of alpha S is studied. Our results are consistent with the running of alpha S as predicted by QCD and show that within the uncertainties of our analysis event shapes in hadronic Z0 decays with hard and isolated photon radiation can be described by QCD at reduced centre-of-mass energies. Combining all values from different event shape observables and energies gives alpha S (Mz)=0.1182 pm 0.0015(stat.) pm 0.0101(syst.).

  16. Two alpha, three alpha and multiple heavy-ion radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M. (Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania))

    1985-07-01

    New decay modes by spontaneous emission of two and three ..cap alpha.. particles and two identical or different heavy ions, are predicted. The analytical variant of the superasymmetric fission model is used to estimate the half lives.

  17. Unusual novel n-4 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cold-seep mussels (Bathymodiolus japonicus and Bathymodiolus platifrons), originating from symbiotic methanotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroaki

    2008-07-25

    Novel fatty acids originated from the two cold-seep mussels Bathymodiolus japonicus and Bathymodiolus platifrons, which host methane-oxidizing bacteria, were determined by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivatives. The major polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the two mussels belong to unusual n-4 and n-7 methylene interrupted PUFAs, such as 18:3 n-7,10,13 (Delta5,8,11-18:3), 18:4 n-4,7,10,13 (Delta5,8,11,14-18:4), 20:3n-7,10,13 (Delta7,10,13-20:3), 20:4n-4,7,10,13 (Delta7,10,13,16-20:4), and 21:4n-7,10,13,16 (Delta5,8,11,14-20:4). The similarity of fatty acids in the two Bathymodiolus species produced by the symbiotic bacteria, indicate occurrence of highly homologous mussel symbionts. In contrast to the lipids of shallow-water mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, which contains photosynthetic n-3 PUFAs, the two Bathymodiolus mussels were lacking in docosahexaenoic acid and icosapentaenoic acid even though they are marine animals. These findings suggest the Bathymodiolus species survive independently of photosynthetic products, similar to the Calyptogena clams, which house sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and whose lipid contains n-4 non-methylene interrupted PUFAs (20:3n-4,7,15 (Delta5,13,16-20:3), 20:4n-1,4,7,15 (Delta5,13,16,19-20:4), and 21:3n-4,7,16 (Delta5,14,17-20:3)). The similarity in n-4 fatty acids between the mussels and the clam suggests that these bivalves depend on analogous n-4 family PUFAs and that the n-4 PUFA family is a characteristic of all vent bivalves depending on geothermal energy. The differences of the n-4 PUFAs between the mussels and the clam suggest a generic specificity of symbiotic bacteria and differences in lipid physiology between thiotrophic and methanotrophic symbionts. Such a highly diversified variety of n-4 family PUFAs in the mussels and the clam under different environments presumably increase the great potential of the chemosynthetic bacteria.

  18. Radiative Corrections to the Muonium Hyperfine Structure; 2, The $\\alpha (Z\\alpha)^2$ Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Nio, M

    1997-01-01

    This is the second of a series of papers on the radiative corrections of order $\\alpha^2 (Z\\alpha)$, $\\alpha (Z\\alpha )^2$, and various logarithmic terms of order $\\alpha^4$, to the hyperfine structure of the muonium ground state. This paper deals with the $\\alpha (Z\\alpha)^2$ correction. Based on the NRQED bound state theory, we isolated the term of order $\\alpha(Z\\alpha)^2$ exactly. Our result $+16.904~2~(11) \\alpha(Z\\alpha)^2 E_F / \\pi$ for the non-logarithmic part is consistent with the $\\alpha (Z\\alpha)^2$ part of Sapirstein's calculation and the recent result of Pachucki, and reduces the numerical uncertainty in the $\\alpha (Z\\alpha)^2$ term by two orders of magnitude.

  19. The Brightest Young Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetti, D; Adamo, A; Gallagher, J S; Andrews, J E; Smith, L J; Clayton, G C; Lee, J C; Sabbi, E; Ubeda, L; Kim, H; Ryon, J E; Thilker, D; Bright, S N; Zackrisson, E; Kennicutt, R C; de Mink, S E; Whitmore, B C; Aloisi, A; Chandar, R; Cignoni, M; Cook, D; Dale, D A; Elmegreen, B G; Elmegreen, D M; Evans, A S; Fumagalli, M; Gouliermis, D A; Grasha, K; Grebel, E K; Krumholz, M R; Walterbos, R; Wofford, A; Brown, T M; Christian, C; Dobbs, C; Herrero, A; Kahre, L; Messa, M; Nair, P; Nota, A; Oestlin, G; Pellerin, A; Sacchi, E; Schaerer, D; Tosi, M

    2015-01-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC5253 hosts a number of young, massive star clusters, the two youngest of which are centrally concentrated and surrounded by thermal radio emission (the `radio nebula'). To investigate the role of these clusters in the starburst energetics, we combine new and archival Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC5253 with wavelength coverage from 1500 Ang to 1.9 micron in 13 filters. These include H-alpha, P-beta, and P-alpha, and the imaging from the Hubble Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey). The extraordinarily well-sampled spectral energy distributions enable modeling with unprecedented accuracy the ages, masses, and extinctions of the 9 optically brightest clusters (M_V < -8.8) and the two young radio nebula clusters. The clusters have ages ~1-15 Myr and masses ~1x10^4 - 2.5x10^5 M_sun. The clusters' spatial location and ages indicate that star formation has become more concentrated towards the radio nebula over the last ~15 Myr. The most massive cluster ...

  20. Alpha heating in toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ignition (or near-ignition) by alpha heating is a key objective for the achievement of economic fusion reactors. While good confinement of high-energy alphas appears possible in larger reactors, near-term tokamak-type ignition experiments as well as some concepts for small reactors (e.g., the Field-Reversed Mirror or FRM) potentially face marginal situations. Consequently, there is a strong motivation to develop methods to evaluate alpha losses and heating profiles in some detail. Such studies for a TFTR-size tokamak and for a small FRM are described here.

  1. A new approach for cluster structures in $^{16}$O and $^{20}Ne$

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NILOUFAR ZOGHI-FOUMANI; MOHAMMAD REZA SHOJAEI; ALI AKBAR RAJABI

    2017-04-01

    In this article, the cluster–cluster interaction between $\\alpha$-clusters in $^{16}$O and $^{20}$Ne is studied theoretically. Using the generalized Nikiforov–Uvarov (NU) technique, the clusterization energy for these nuclei is calculated. Based on the obtained results, one can find out that the clustering phenomenon does not take place neither at the ground state, nor at the excited states of these nuclei and it is more probable at energies among excited levels. It is shown that the formulation presented for the clustering phenomenon reproduces the results obtained in previous experimental and theoretical attempts. It is worth mentioning that the consistency of the results with the previous experimental and theoretical predictions for clustering phenomenon in $^{16}$O and $^{20}$Ne indicates the reliability of this formulation for various types of light $\\alpha$-conjugate nuclei, such as $^{8}$Be, $^{12}$C, $^{24}$Mg and so on.

  2. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  3. THE RELATION BETWEEN COOL CLUSTER CORES AND HERSCHEL-DETECTED STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Fiedler, A.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Portouw, J.; Walth, G. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Smith, G. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500 {mu}m), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22{sup +6.2}{sub -5.3}% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR = 1-150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing H{alpha} emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), only a small ({approx}<0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(H{alpha}) to agree with SFR{sub FIR}. The relatively low H{alpha} extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate from normal stellar mass loss.

  4. The Cluster Substructure - Alignment Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Plionis, Manolis

    2001-01-01

    Using the APM cluster data we investigate whether the dynamical status of clusters is related to the large-scale structure of the Universe. We find that cluster substructure is strongly correlated with the tendency of clusters to be aligned with their nearest neighbour and in general with the nearby clusters that belong to the same supercluster. Furthermore, dynamically young clusters are more clustered than the overall cluster population. These are strong indications that cluster develop in ...

  5. The Age Distribution of Clusters in M83

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Villa, E; Bastian, N; Fouesneau, M; Zackrisson, E

    2014-01-01

    In order to empirically determine the timescale and environmental dependence of stellar cluster disruption, we have undertaken an analysis of the unprecedented multi-pointing (seven), multi-wavelength (U, B, V, H$\\alpha$, and I) Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey of the nearby, face-on spiral galaxy M83. The images are used to locate stellar clusters and stellar associations throughout the galaxy. Estimation of cluster properties (age, mass, and extinction) was done through a comparison of their spectral energy distributions with simple stellar population models. We constructed the largest catalog of stellar clusters and associations in this galaxy to-date, with ~1800 sources with masses above ~5000 M$_{\\odot}$ and ages younger than ~300 Myr. In the present letter, we focus on the age distribution of the resulting clusters and associations. In particular, we explicitly test whether the age distributions are related with the ambient environment. Our results are in excellent agreement with previous studies o...

  6. Alpha Theta Meditation: Phenomenological, neurophysiologic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... neurophysiologic, mindfulness, mood, health and sport implications ... Integrated findings are in line with other studies which support the psychological value of alpha theta training.

  7. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache.

  8. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor M. Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard LCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant ($Lambda$ and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM, structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging.Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang,hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics.The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions:the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulenceare developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thusour review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clustersis to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses.New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopeswill come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities,we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  9. The Durban Auto Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jochen; Robbins, Glen; Barnes, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the formation of the Durban Auto Cluster in the context of trade liberalization. It argues that the improvement of operational competitiveness of firms in the cluster is prominently due to joint action. It tests this proposition by comparing the gains from cluster activities i...

  10. The Durban Auto Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jochen; Robbins, Glen; Barnes, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the formation of the Durban Auto Cluster in the context of trade liberalization. It argues that the improvement of operational competitiveness of firms in the cluster is prominently due to joint action. It tests this proposition by comparing the gains from cluster activities i...

  11. Marketing research cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nebojša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One area of applications of cluster analysis in marketing is identification of groups of cities and towns with similar demographic profiles. This paper considers main aspects of cluster analysis by an example of clustering 12 cities with the use of Minitab software.

  12. Cluster Correspondence Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van de Velden (Michel); A. Iodice D' Enza; F. Palumbo

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ A new method is proposed that combines dimension reduction and cluster analysis for categorical data. A least-squares objective function is formulated that approximates the cluster by variables cross-tabulation. Individual observations are assigned to clusters

  13. The XMM Cluster Survey: the halo occupation number of BOSS galaxies in X-ray clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtens, Nicola; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Collins, Chris A.; Sahlén, Martin; Rooney, Philip J.; Mayers, Julian A.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Bristow, Martyn; Capozzi, Diego; Christodoulou, L.; Comparat, Johan; Hilton, Matt; Hoyle, Ben; Kay, Scott T.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mann, Robert G.; Masters, Karen; Miller, Christopher J.; Parejko, John K.; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Ashley J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Stott, John P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Viana, Pedro T. P.; White, Martin; Wilcox, Harry; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-12-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: 0.2 < z < 0.4) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: 0.43 < z < 0.7) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark matter haloes of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between log10(M180/M⊙) = 13 and 15. Our directly measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fitting alpha-index of 0.91 ± 0.08 and 1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04} for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. and Parejko et al. In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.

  14. Almost Redundant Components in the 3 alpha Faddeev Equation for the Buck, Friedlich and Wheatly alpha alpha Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M

    2004-01-01

    The 3 alpha orthogonality condition model using the Pauli-forbidden bound states of the Buck, Friedlich and Wheatly alpha alpha potential can yield a compact 3 alpha ground state with a large binding energy, in which a small admixture of the redundant components can never be eliminated.

  15. The Chemical Properties of Milky Way and M31 Globular Clusters: II. Stellar Population Model Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, M A; Strader, J; Forbes, D A; Proctor, R N; Barmby, P; Huchra, J P; Beasley, Michael A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Forbes, Duncan A.; Proctor, Robert N.; Barmby, Pauline; Huchra, John P.

    2004-01-01

    We derive ages, metallicities and [alpha/Fe] ratios from the integrated spectra of 23 globular clusters in M31, by employing multivariate fits to two stellar population models. In parallel we analyze spectra of 21 Galactic globular clusters in order to facilitate a differential analysis. We find that the M31 globular clusters separate into three distinct components in age and metallicity. We identify an old, metal-poor group (7 clusters), an old, metal-rich group (10 clusters) and an intermediate age (3-6 Gyr), intermediate-metallicity ([Z/H]~-1) group (6 clusters). This third group is not identified in the Galactic globular cluster sample. The majority of globular clusters in both samples appear to be enhanced in alpha-elements, the degree of enhancement being model-dependent. The intermediate age GCs appear to be the most enhanced, with [alpha/Fe]~0.4. These clusters are clearly depressed in CN with respect to the models and the bulk of the M31 and Milky Way sample. Compared to the bulge of M31, M32 and NGC...

  16. Alpha Conjugate Neck Structures in the Collisions of 35 MeV/nucleon 40Ca with 40Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, K; Kim, E J; Hagel, K; Barbui, M; Gauthier, J; Wuenschel, S; Giuliani, G; Rodrigues, M R D; Zheng, H; Huang, M; Blando, N; Bonasera, A; Wada, R; Botosso, C; Liu, G; Viesti, G; Moretto, S; Prete, G; Pesente, S; Fabris, D; Masri, Y El; Keutgen, T; Kolwaski, S; Kumar, A; Zhang, G; Natowitz, J B

    2016-01-01

    The de-excitation of alpha-conjugate nuclei produced in reactions of 35 MeV/nucleon 40Ca with 40Ca has been investigated. Particular emphasis is placed on examining the dynamics of collisions leading to projectile-like fragment exit channels. A general exploration of the reaction systematics reveals the binary dissipative character of the collisions and a hierarchy effect similar to that seen for heavier systems. Investigation of the subset of events characterized by a total alpha-conjugate mass (alpha particles plus alpha-conjugate fragments) equal to 40 and atomic number equal to 20 reveals a dominance of alpha-conjugate exit channels. The hierarchy effect for these channels leads to the production of alpha-clustered neck structures with potentially exotic geometries and properties.

  17. Cluster analysis for applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anderberg, Michael R

    1973-01-01

    Cluster Analysis for Applications deals with methods and various applications of cluster analysis. Topics covered range from variables and scales to measures of association among variables and among data units. Conceptual problems in cluster analysis are discussed, along with hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering methods. The necessary elements of data analysis, statistics, cluster analysis, and computer implementation are integrated vertically to cover the complete path from raw data to a finished analysis.Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the subject o

  18. Range-Clustering Queries

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Mikkel; de Berg, Mark; Buchin, Kevin; Mehr, Mehran; Mehrabi, Ali D.

    2017-01-01

    In a geometric $k$-clustering problem the goal is to partition a set of points in $\\mathbb{R}^d$ into $k$ subsets such that a certain cost function of the clustering is minimized. We present data structures for orthogonal range-clustering queries on a point set $S$: given a query box $Q$ and an integer $k>2$, compute an optimal $k$-clustering for $S\\setminus Q$. We obtain the following results. We present a general method to compute a $(1+\\epsilon)$-approximation to a range-clustering query, ...

  19. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    -2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing......Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark, 1963...

  20. Management of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-01-01

    and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment....... In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy. For most cluster headache patients there are fairly good treatment options both for acute attacks and for prophylaxis. The big problem...

  1. Star cluster formation in cosmological simulations. I. properties of young clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Meng, Xi; Semenov, Vadim A; Kravtsov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a new implementation of star formation in cosmological simulations, by considering star clusters as a unit of star formation. Cluster particles grow in mass over several million years at the rate determined by local gas properties, with high time resolution. The particle growth is terminated by its own energy and momentum feedback on the interstellar medium. We test this implementation for Milky Way-sized galaxies at high redshift, by comparing the properties of model clusters with observations of young star clusters. We find that the cluster initial mass function is best described by a Schechter function rather than a single power law. In agreement with observations, at low masses the logarithmic slope is $\\alpha\\approx 1.8-2$, while the cutoff at high mass scales with the star formation rate. A related trend is a positive correlation between the surface density of star formation rate and fraction of stars contained in massive clusters. Both trends indicate that the formation of massive star clust...

  2. The K-band Hubble diagram for brightest cluster galaxies in X-ray clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, C; Collins, Chris; Mann, Bob

    1997-01-01

    This paper concerns the K band Hubble diagram for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of X-ray clusters covering the redshift range $0.05 2.3 \\times 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (in the 0.3 - 3.5 keV band) is no more than 0.22 mag, and is not significantly reduced by correcting for the BCG structure parameter, $\\alpha$, or for X-ray luminosity. This is the smallest scatter in the absolute magnitudes of any single class of galaxy and demonstrates the homogeneity of BCGs in high-$L_{\\rm X}$ clusters. By contrast, we find that the brightest members of low-$L_{\\rm X}$ systems display a wider dispersion ($\\sim 0.5$ mag) in absolute magnitude than commonly seen in previous studies, which arises from the inclusion, in X-ray flux-limited samples, of poor clusters and groups which are usually omitted from low redshift studies of BCGs in optically rich clusters....[abstract shortened].. The BCGs in our high-$L_{\\rm X}$ clusters yield a value of $\\Omega_{\\rm M}=0.28\\pm0.24$ if the cosmological constant with a 95 ...

  3. The preformation probability inside Alpha-emitters having different ground state spin-parity than daughters

    CERN Document Server

    Seif, W M; Refaie, A I

    2015-01-01

    The ground-state spin and parity of a formed daughter in the radioactive Alpha-emitter is expected to influence the preformation probability of the Alpha and daughter clusters inside it. We investigate the Alpha and daughter preformation probability inside odd-A and doubly-odd radioactive nuclei when the daughter and parent are of different spin and/or parity. We consider only the ground-state to ground-state unfavored decays. This is to extract precise information about the effect of the difference in the ground states spin-parity of the involved nuclei far away any influences from the excitation energy if the decays are coming from isomeric states. The calculations are done for 161 Alpha-emitters, with Z=65-112 and N=84-173, in the framework of the extended cluster model, with WKB penetrability and assault frequency. We used a Hamiltonian energy density scheme based on Skyrme-SLy4 interaction to compute the interaction potential. The Alpha plus cluster preformation probability is extracted from the calculat...

  4. Nitrogen Abundances in Damped Ly-alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Molaro, Paolo; Peroux, Celine; D'Odorico, Valentina; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is thought to have both primary and secondary origins depending on whether the seed carbon and oxygen are produced by the star itself (primary) or already present in the interstellar medium (secondary) from which star forms. DLA and sub-DLA systems with typical metallicities of -3.0alpha-elements. This yields a total of 98 systems, i.e. the largest nitrogen abundance sample investigated so far. In agreement with previous studies, we indeed find a bimodal [N/alpha] behaviour: three-quarter systems show a mean value of [N/alpha]=-0.87 with a scatter of 0.21 dex and one-quarter shows ratios clustered at [N/alpha]=-1.43 with a lower dispersion of 0.13 dex. The high [N/alph...

  5. Spatial cluster modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Andrew B

    2002-01-01

    Research has generated a number of advances in methods for spatial cluster modelling in recent years, particularly in the area of Bayesian cluster modelling. Along with these advances has come an explosion of interest in the potential applications of this work, especially in epidemiology and genome research. In one integrated volume, this book reviews the state-of-the-art in spatial clustering and spatial cluster modelling, bringing together research and applications previously scattered throughout the literature. It begins with an overview of the field, then presents a series of chapters that illuminate the nature and purpose of cluster modelling within different application areas, including astrophysics, epidemiology, ecology, and imaging. The focus then shifts to methods, with discussions on point and object process modelling, perfect sampling of cluster processes, partitioning in space and space-time, spatial and spatio-temporal process modelling, nonparametric methods for clustering, and spatio-temporal ...

  6. Unconventional methods for clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  7. CLEAN: CLustering Enrichment ANalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medvedovic Mario

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of biological knowledge encoded in various lists of functionally related genes has become one of the most important aspects of analyzing genome-wide functional genomics data. In the context of cluster analysis, functional coherence of clusters established through such analyses have been used to identify biologically meaningful clusters, compare clustering algorithms and identify biological pathways associated with the biological process under investigation. Results We developed a computational framework for analytically and visually integrating knowledge-based functional categories with the cluster analysis of genomics data. The framework is based on the simple, conceptually appealing, and biologically interpretable gene-specific functional coherence score (CLEAN score. The score is derived by correlating the clustering structure as a whole with functional categories of interest. We directly demonstrate that integrating biological knowledge in this way improves the reproducibility of conclusions derived from cluster analysis. The CLEAN score differentiates between the levels of functional coherence for genes within the same cluster based on their membership in enriched functional categories. We show that this aspect results in higher reproducibility across independent datasets and produces more informative genes for distinguishing different sample types than the scores based on the traditional cluster-wide analysis. We also demonstrate the utility of the CLEAN framework in comparing clusterings produced by different algorithms. CLEAN was implemented as an add-on R package and can be downloaded at http://Clusteranalysis.org. The package integrates routines for calculating gene specific functional coherence scores and the open source interactive Java-based viewer Functional TreeView (FTreeView. Conclusion Our results indicate that using the gene-specific functional coherence score improves the reproducibility of the

  8. Survey on Text Document Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    M.Thangamani; Dr.P.Thangaraj

    2010-01-01

    Document clustering is also referred as text clustering, and its concept is merely equal to data clustering. It is hardly difficult to find the selective information from an ‘N’number of series information, so that document clustering came into picture. Basically cluster means a group of similar data, document clustering means segregating the data into different groups of similar data. Clustering can be of mathematical, statistical or numerical domain. Clustering is a fundamental data analysi...

  9. Discovery of a very cool object with extraordinarily strong H(alpha) emission

    CERN Document Server

    Barrado y Navascués, D; Martín, E L; Béjar, V J S; Rebolo, R; Mundt, R; Navascues, David Barrado y; Osorio, Maria Rosa Zapatero; Martin, Eduardo L.; Bejar, Victor J.S.; Rebolo, Rafael; Mundt, Reinhard

    2002-01-01

    We report on the finding of the strongest H(alpha) emission -pseudoequivalent width of 705 Angstrom- known so far in a young, late type dwarf. This object, named as SOri71, is a substellar candidate member of the 1-8 Myr star cluster sigma Orionis. Due to its overluminous location in color-magnitude diagrams, SOri71 might be younger than other cluster members, or a binary of similar components. Its mass is in the range 0.021-0.012 M(sun), depending on evolutionary models and possible binarity. The broad H(alpha) line of SOri71 appears asymmetric, indicative of high velocity mass motions in the H(alpha) forming region. The origin of this emission is unclear at the present time. We discuss three possible scenarios: accretion from a disk, mass exchange between the components of a binary system, and emission from a chromosphere.

  10. Metabolic engineering in methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, MG; Puri, AW; Lidstrom, ME

    2015-05-01

    Methane, as natural gas or biogas, is the least expensive source of carbon for (bio)chemical synthesis. Scalable biological upgrading of this simple alkane to chemicals and fuels can bring new sustainable solutions to a number of industries with large environmental footprints, such as natural gas/petroleum production, landfills, wastewater treatment, and livestock. Microbial biocatalysis with methane as a feedstock has been pursued off and on for almost a half century, with little enduring success. Today, biological engineering and systems biology provide new opportunities for metabolic system modulation and give new optimism to the concept of a methane-based bio-industry. Here we present an overview of the most recent advances pertaining to metabolic engineering of microbial methane utilization. Some ideas concerning metabolic improvements for production of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, two main precursors for bioconversion, are presented. We also discuss main gaps in the current knowledge of aerobic methane utilization, which must be solved in order to release the full potential of methane-based biosystems. (C) 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Multiply-Imaged z $\\sim$ 6.3 Lyman Alpha Emitter candidate behind Abell 2261

    CERN Document Server

    Rydberg, Claes-Erik; Zackrisson, Erik; Melinder, Jens; Whalen, Daniel J; Klessen, Ralf S; Gonzalez, Juan; Östlin, Göran; Carollo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    While the Lyman-$\\alpha$ ($\\mathrm{Ly}\\alpha$) emission line serves as an important tool in the study of galaxies at $z\\lesssim 6$, finding Ly$\\alpha$ emitters (LAE) at significantly higher redshifts has been more challenging, probably because of the increasing neutrality of the intergalactic medium above $z\\sim6$. Galaxies with extremely high rest-frame Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent widths, EW(Ly$\\alpha$) $\\gtrsim 150$ \\AA{}, at $z>6$ are good candidates for Ly$\\alpha$ follow-up observations, and can stand out in multiband imaging surveys because of their unusual colors. We have conducted a photometric search for such objects in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH), and report here the identification of three likely gravitationally-lensed images of a single LAE candidate at $z\\sim6.3$, behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2261($z = 0.225$). In the process, we also measured with Keck/MOSFIRE the first spectroscopic redshift of a multiply-imaged galaxy behind Abell 2261, at $z = 3.337$. This allows ...

  12. Photometric Calibration of the [$\\alpha$/Fe] Element: I. Calibration with UBV Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Karaali, S; Bilir, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the calibration of the [$\\alpha$/Fe] element in terms of the ultra-violet excess for 469 dwarf stars with $0.325<(B-V)_0 \\leq 0.775$ mag corresponding the spectral type range F0-K2. The star sample is separated into nine sub-samples with equal range in $(B-V)_0$ colour, $\\Delta(B-V)_0=0.05$ mag, and a third degree polynomial is fitted to each dataset. Our calibrations provide [$\\alpha$/Fe] elements in the range [0.0, 0.4]. We applied the procedure to two sets of field stars and two sets of clusters. The mean and the corresponding standard deviation of the residuals for 43 field stars taken from the Hypatia catalogue are [$\\alpha$/Fe]=-0.090 and $\\sigma =0.102$ dex, while for the 39 ones taken from the same catalogue of stars used in the calibration are [$\\alpha$/Fe]=-0.009 and $\\sigma = 0.079$ dex, respectively. We showed that the differences between the mean of the residuals and standard deviations for two sets of clusters ([$\\alpha$/Fe]=0.073 and $\\sigma = 0.91$ dex; [$\\alpha$/Fe]=-0.012 and $...

  13. Agricultural Clusters in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.A.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Porter was the first to use the term cluster in an economic context. He introduced the term in The Competitive Advantage of Nations (1990). The term cluster is also known as business cluster, industry cluster, competitive cluster or Porterian cluster. This article aims at determining and

  14. Agricultural Clusters in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.A.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Porter was the first to use the term cluster in an economic context. He introduced the term in The Competitive Advantage of Nations (1990). The term cluster is also known as business cluster, industry cluster, competitive cluster or Porterian cluster. This article aims at determining and mea

  15. Agricultural Clusters in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.A.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Porter was the first to use the term cluster in an economic context. He introduced the term in The Competitive Advantage of Nations (1990). The term cluster is also known as business cluster, industry cluster, competitive cluster or Porterian cluster. This article aims at determining and mea

  16. Investigation of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in (alpha, alpha 'gamma) coincidence experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savran, D.; Babilon, M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hasper, J.; Wortche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on first results from experiments using the (alpha, alpha'gamma) reaction at E alpha = 136 MeV to investigate bound electric dipole (El) excitations building the so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in the semi-magic nucleus Ce-140. The method of (alpha, alpha'gamma) allows the separatio

  17. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  18. Scale Setting for $\\alpha_{s}$ Beyond Leading Order

    CERN Document Server

    Hornbostel, K; Morningstar, C J

    2001-01-01

    We present a general procedure for applying the scale-setting prescription of Brodsky, Lepage and Mackenzie to higher orders in the strong coupling constant $\\alphas$. In particular, we show how to apply this prescription when the leading coefficient or coefficients in a series in $\\alphas$ are anomalously small. We give a general method for computing an optimum scale numerically, within dimensional regularization, and in cases when the coefficients of a series are known. We find significant corrections to the scales for $R_{e^+ e^-}$, $\\Gamma(B \\to X_u e \\bar{\

  19. Proxima's orbit around Alpha Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Kervella, P

    2016-01-01

    Proxima and Alpha Centauri AB have almost identical distances and proper motions with respect to the Sun. Although the probability of such similar parameters is in principle very low, the question whether they actually form a single gravitationally bound triple system has been open since the discovery of Proxima one century ago. Owing to recent high precision radial velocity measurements and the revision of the parameters of the Alpha Cen pair, we show that Proxima and Alpha Cen are gravitationally bound with a high degree of confidence. The orbital period of Proxima is approximately 600 000 years, with a moderate excentricity of 0.42 +0.07 -0.08. Proxima comes within 5.3 -0.9 +1.2 kAU of Alpha Cen at periastron, and the apastron occurs at 12.9 +0.3 -0.1 kAU. This orbital motion may have influenced the formation or evolution of the recently discovered planet orbiting Proxima as well as circumbinary planet formation around Alpha Cen.

  20. Potential turning points in cluster radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, D N

    2002-01-01

    Effect of various nuclear interaction potentials on the decay lifetimes and the turning points of the WKB action integral has been studied. The microscopic nuclear potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the two clusters with a realistic effective interaction has also been used to calculate the turning points. Half lives of $\\alpha$ and $^{20} O$ cluster emissions from $^{228} Th$ have been calculated within the superasymmetric fission model using various phenomenological and the microscopic double folding potentials. Calculations of half lives with the microscopic double folding potentials are found to be in good agreement with the observed experimental data. Present calculations put the superasymmetric fission model on a firm theoretical basis.

  1. Ionisation clusters at DNA level: experimental modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pszona, S.; Kula, J

    2002-07-01

    The importance of initial clustered damage to DNA is a hypothesis, which has to be approached also from physical modelling of the initial products of single charged particle interaction with DNA. A new tool for such studies, presented here, is based on modelling of the ionisation patterns resulting from a single charged particle crossing a nitrogen cavity of nanometre size. The nanometre size sites equivalent in unit density to DNA and nucleosome, have been modelled in a device, called a Jet Counter, consisting of a pulse operated valve which inject nitrogen in the form of an expansion jet into a interaction chamber. The distributions of the number of ions in a cluster created by a single alpha particle of 4.6 MeV along 0.15 nm to 13 nm size in nitrogen have been measured. A new descriptor of radiation action at DNA level is proposed. (author)

  2. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  3. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as selective human alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavadekar, Supriya A; Hong, Seoung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ii; Miller, Duane D; Feller, Dennis R

    2008-08-20

    Phentolamine is known to act as a competitive, non-subtype-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. In an attempt to improve alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor selectivity and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtype-selectivity, two new chemical series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs were prepared and evaluated. These compounds were evaluated for binding affinities on alpha(1)- (alpha(1A)-, alpha(1B)-, alpha(1D)-) and alpha(2)- (alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)-, alpha(2C)-) adrenoceptor subtypes that had been stably expressed in human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, respectively. Methylation of the phenolic hydroxy group and replacement of the 4-methyl group of phentolamine with varying lipophilic substituents yielded bioisosteric analogs selective for the alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Within the alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, these analogs bound with higher affinity at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-subtypes as compared to the alpha(2B)-subtype. In particular, the t-butyl analog was found to be the most selective, its binding at the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor (Ki=3.6 nM) being 37- to 173-fold higher than that at the alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, and around 2- and 19-fold higher than at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2B)-adrenoceptors, respectively. Data from luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the functional antagonist activities of selected compounds from the bioisosteric series on human alpha(1A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Thus, the results with these bioisosteric analogs of phentolamine provide a lead to the rational design of potent and selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor ligands that may be useful in improving the therapeutic profile of this drug class for human disorders.

  4. The Spatial Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in the Star Forming Galaxy NGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Grasha, K; Adamo, A; Kim, H; Elmegreen, B G; Gouliermis, D A; Aloisi, A; Bright, S N; Christian, C; Cignoni, M; Dale, D A; Dobbs, C; Elmegreen, D M; Fumagalli, M; Gallagher, J S; Grebel, E K; Johnson, K E; Lee, J C; Messa, M; Smith, L J; Ryon, J E; Thilker, D; Ubeda, L; Wofford, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution of the stellar cluster populations in the star forming galaxy NGC 628. Using Hubble Space Telescope broad band WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), we have identified 1392 potential young (<100 Myr) stellar clusters within the galaxy, identified from a combination of visual inspection and automatic selection. We investigate the clustering of these young stellar clusters and quantify the strength and change of clustering strength with scale using the two-point correlation function. We also investigate how image boundary conditions and dust lanes affect the observed clustering. The distribution of the clusters is well fit by a broken power law with negative exponent $\\alpha$. We recover a weighted mean index of $\\alpha$ ~ -0.8 for all spatial scales below the break at 3".3 (158 pc at a distance of 9.9 Mpc) and an index of $\\alpha$ ~ -0.18 above 158 pc for the accumulation of all cluster types. The stre...

  5. CSR in Industrial Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Pillay, Renginee G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to review the literature on CSR in industrial clusters in developing countries, identifying the main strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in this literature, pointing to future research directions and policy implications in the area of CSR and industrial cluster development...... in this field and their comments incorporated in the final version submitted to Corporate Governance. Findings – The article traces the origins of the debate on industrial clusters and CSR in developing countries back to the early 1990s when clusters began to be seen as an important vehicle for local economic...... development in the South. At the turn of the millennium the industrial cluster debate expanded as clusters were perceived as a potential source of poverty reduction, while their role in promoting CSR among small and medium-sized enterprises began to take shape from 2006 onwards. At present, there is still...

  6. Cosmology with cluster surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhabrata Majumdar

    2004-10-01

    Surveys of clusters of galaxies provide us with a powerful probe of the density and nature of the dark energy. The red-shift distribution of detected clusters is highly sensitive to the dark energy equation of state parameter . Upcoming Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys would provide us large yields of clusters to very high red-shifts. Self-calibration of cluster scaling relations, possible for such a huge sample, would be able to constrain systematic biases on mass estimators. Combining cluster red-shift abundance with limited mass follow-up and cluster mass power spectrum can then give constraints on , as well as on 8 and to a few per cents.

  7. Disentangling Porterian Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagtfelt, Tue

    This dissertation investigates the contemporary phenomenon of industrial clusters based on the work of Michael E. Porter, the central progenitor and promoter of the cluster notion. The dissertation pursues two central questions: 1) What is a cluster? and 2) How could Porter’s seemingly fuzzy......, contested theory become so widely disseminated and applied as a normative and prescriptive strategy for economic development? The dissertation traces the introduction of the cluster notion into the EU’s Lisbon Strategy and demonstrates how its inclusion originates from Porter’s colleagues: Professor Örjan...... Sölvell, Dr. Christian Ketels and Dr. Göran Lindqvist. Taking departure in Porter’s works and the cluster literature, the dissertations shows a considerable paradigmatic shift has occurred from the first edition of Nations to the present state of cluster cooperation. To elaborate on this change...

  8. Melting of sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Nava, J A; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stability properties and the melting-like transition of Na_n, n=13-147, clusters are studied through microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The metallic bonding in the sodium clusters is mimicked by a many-body Gupta potential based on the second moment approximation of a tight-binding Hamiltonian. The characteristics of the solid-to-liquid transition in the sodium clusters are analyzed by calculating physical quantities like caloric curves, heat capacities, and root-mean-square bond length fluctuations using simulation times of several nanoseconds. Distinct melting mechanisms are obtained for the sodium clusters in the size range investigated. The calculated melting temperatures show an irregular variation with the cluster size, in qualitative agreement with recent experimental results. However, the calculated melting point for the Na_55 cluster is about 40 % lower than the experimental value.

  9. Online Correlation Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Claire; Schudy, Warren

    2010-01-01

    We study the online clustering problem where data items arrive in an online fashion. The algorithm maintains a clustering of data items into similarity classes. Upon arrival of v, the relation between v and previously arrived items is revealed, so that for each u we are told whether v is similar to u. The algorithm can create a new cluster for v and merge existing clusters. When the objective is to minimize disagreements between the clustering and the input, we prove that a natural greedy algorithm is O(n)-competitive, and this is optimal. When the objective is to maximize agreements between the clustering and the input, we prove that the greedy algorithm is .5-competitive; that no online algorithm can be better than .834-competitive; we prove that it is possible to get better than 1/2, by exhibiting a randomized algorithm with competitive ratio .5+c for a small positive fixed constant c.

  10. Cluster Management Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Leo; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    This article explores a new management form – cluster management – in Danish public sector day care. Although cluster management has been widely adopted in Danish day care at the municipality level, it has attracted only sparse research attention. We use theoretical insights from Scandinavian...... institutionalism together with a longitudinal case-based inquiry into how cluster management has entered and penetrated the management practices of day care in Denmark. We demonstrate how cluster management became widely adopted in the day care field not only because of its intrinsic properties but also because...... of how it was legitimized as a “ready-to-use” management model. Further, our account reveals how cluster management translated into considerably different local variants as it travelled into specific organizations. However, these processes have not occurred sequentially with cluster management first...

  11. Cluster Correspondence Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velden, M; D'Enza, A Iodice; Palumbo, F

    2017-03-01

    A method is proposed that combines dimension reduction and cluster analysis for categorical data by simultaneously assigning individuals to clusters and optimal scaling values to categories in such a way that a single between variance maximization objective is achieved. In a unified framework, a brief review of alternative methods is provided and we show that the proposed method is equivalent to GROUPALS applied to categorical data. Performance of the methods is appraised by means of a simulation study. The results of the joint dimension reduction and clustering methods are compared with the so-called tandem approach, a sequential analysis of dimension reduction followed by cluster analysis. The tandem approach is conjectured to perform worse when variables are added that are unrelated to the cluster structure. Our simulation study confirms this conjecture. Moreover, the results of the simulation study indicate that the proposed method also consistently outperforms alternative joint dimension reduction and clustering methods.

  12. Cluster Management Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Leo; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    of how it was legitimized as a “ready-to-use” management model. Further, our account reveals how cluster management translated into considerably different local variants as it travelled into specific organizations. However, these processes have not occurred sequentially with cluster management first......This article explores a new management form – cluster management – in Danish public sector day care. Although cluster management has been widely adopted in Danish day care at the municipality level, it has attracted only sparse research attention. We use theoretical insights from Scandinavian...... institutionalism together with a longitudinal case-based inquiry into how cluster management has entered and penetrated the management practices of day care in Denmark. We demonstrate how cluster management became widely adopted in the day care field not only because of its intrinsic properties but also because...

  13. Functional expression of the GABAA receptor alpha2 and alpha3 subunits at synapses between intercalated medial paracapsular neurons of mouse amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella eGeracitano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the amygdala, GABAergic neurons in the intercalated medial paracapsular cluster (Imp have been suggested to play a key role in fear learning and extinction. These neurons project to the central amygdaloid nucleus and to other areas within and outside the amygdala. In addition, they give rise to local collaterals that innervate other neurons in the Imp. Several drugs, including benzodiazepines, are allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors. Benzodiazepines have both anxiolytic and sedative actions, which are mediated through GABA-A receptors containing alpha2/3 and alpha1 subunits, respectively. To establish whether alpha1 or alpha2/3 subunits are expressed at Imp cell synapses, we used paired recordings of anatomically-identified Imp neurons and high resolution immunocytochemistry in the mouse. We observed that a selective alpha3 subunit agonist, TP003 (100 nM, significantly increased the decay time constant of the unitary IPSCs. A similar effect was also induced by zolpidem (10 microM or by diazepam (1 microM. In contrast, lower doses of zolpidem (0.1-1 microM did not significantly alter the kinetics of the unitary IPSCs. Accordingly, immunocytochemical experiments established that the alpha2 and alpha3, but not the alpha1 subunits of the GABA-A receptors, were present at Imp cell synapses of the mouse amygdala. These results define, for the first time, some of the functional GABA-A receptor subunits expressed at synapses of Imp cells. The data also provide an additional rationale to prompt the search of GABA-A receptor alpha3 selective ligands as improved anxiolytic drugs.

  14. Clustering Categorical Data:A Cluster Ensemble Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zengyou(何增友); Xu Xiaofei; Deng Shengchun

    2003-01-01

    Clustering categorical data, an integral part of data mining,has attracted much attention recently. In this paper, the authors formally define the categorical data clustering problem as an optimization problem from the viewpoint of cluster ensemble, and apply cluster ensemble approach for clustering categorical data. Experimental results on real datasets show that better clustering accuracy can be obtained by comparing with existing categorical data clustering algorithms.

  15. Spatial Scan Statistic: Selecting clusters and generating elliptic clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Andersen, Jens Strodl

    2004-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is widely used to search for clusters. This paper shows that the usually applied elimination of overlapping clusters to find secondary clusters is sensitive to smooth changes in the shape of the clusters. We present an algorithm for generation of set of confocal elliptic...... clusters. In addition, we propose a new way to present the information in a given set of clusters based on the significance of the clusters....

  16. Simulating the Lyman Alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Machacek, M E; Anninos, P; Meiksin, A; Norman, M L; Machacek, Marie E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Anninos, Peter; Meiksin, Avery; Norman, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we review the importance of the Lyman alpha forest as a probe of structure formation in the universe. We first discuss the statistics used to describe the Lyman alpha forest and the numerical techniques used to produce simulated spectra of the forest from a given cosmological model. We then discuss the physical picture of the absorbing structures that emerges from these numerical simulations. Finally, we comment on how two of the statistics, the slope of the column density distribution and the b parameter distribution, may be used to constrain competing cosmologies.

  17. NACA Physicist Studying Alpha Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1957-01-01

    NACA Physicits studying Alpha Rays in a continuous cloud chamber. A cloud chamber is used by Lewis scientists to obtain information aimed at minimizing undesirable effects of radiation on nuclear-powered aircraft components. Here, alpha particles from a polonium source emit in a flower-like pattern at the cloud chamber's center. The particles are made visible by means of alcohol vapor diffusing from an area at room temperature to an area at minus -78 deg. Centigrade. Nuclear-powered aircraft were never developed and aircraft nuclear propulsion systems were canceled in the early 1960s.

  18. Clustering Techniques in Bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Masood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dealing with data means to group information into a set of categories either in order to learn new artifacts or understand new domains. For this purpose researchers have always looked for the hidden patterns in data that can be defined and compared with other known notions based on the similarity or dissimilarity of their attributes according to well-defined rules. Data mining, having the tools of data classification and data clustering, is one of the most powerful techniques to deal with data in such a manner that it can help researchers identify the required information. As a step forward to address this challenge, experts have utilized clustering techniques as a mean of exploring hidden structure and patterns in underlying data. Improved stability, robustness and accuracy of unsupervised data classification in many fields including pattern recognition, machine learning, information retrieval, image analysis and bioinformatics, clustering has proven itself as a reliable tool. To identify the clusters in datasets algorithm are utilized to partition data set into several groups based on the similarity within a group. There is no specific clustering algorithm, but various algorithms are utilized based on domain of data that constitutes a cluster and the level of efficiency required. Clustering techniques are categorized based upon different approaches. This paper is a survey of few clustering techniques out of many in data mining. For the purpose five of the most common clustering techniques out of many have been discussed. The clustering techniques which have been surveyed are: K-medoids, K-means, Fuzzy C-means, Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN and Self-Organizing Map (SOM clustering.

  19. Structures in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Escalera, E; Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mazure, A; Mezzetti, M

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the presence of substructures in 16 well-sampled clusters of galaxies suggests a stimulating hypothesis: Clusters could be classified as unimodal or bimodal, on the basis of to the sub-clump distribution in the {\\em 3-D} space of positions and velocities. The dynamic study of these clusters shows that their fundamental characteristics, in particular the virial masses, are not severely biased by the presence of subclustering if the system considered is bound.

  20. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS). II. IC 1848 Cluster in the H II Region W5 West

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Kim, Jinyoung S; Bessell, Michael S; Karimov, Rivkat

    2013-01-01

    IC 1848 is one of the young open clusters in the giant star forming Cas OB6 association. Several interesting aspects relating to star formation processes in giant star forming regions attracted us to study the initial mass function (IMF), star formation mode, and properties of pre-main sequence stars (PMS). A UBVI and H alpha photometric study of the young open cluster IC 1848 was conducted as part of the "Sejong Open cluster Survey" (SOS). We have selected 105 early-type members from photometric diagrams. Their mean reddening is = 0.660 +/- 0.054 mag. Using the published photometric data with near- and mid-infrared archival data we confirmed the normal reddening law (R_V = 3.1) toward the cluster (IC 1848). A careful zero-age main sequence fitting gives a distance modulus of V_0 - M_V = 11.7 +/- 0.2 mag, equivalent to 2.2 +/- 0.2 kpc. H alpha photometry and the list of young stellar objects identified by Koenig et al. permitted us to select a large number of PMS stars comprising 196 H alpha emission stars, ...

  1. Magnetic phase diagrams of {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23 (Germany)]. E-mail: ehrenberg@tu-darmstadt.de; Schwarz, B. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23 (Germany); Weitzel, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23 (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Field-induced spin-flop transitions in {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4} are summarized in magnetic H-T phase diagrams for different directions of the applied magnetic field up to 12T. The antiferromagnetic arrangement in the spin-flop phase is preserved at least up to this field for a field parallel to the easy direction. This high transition field is in contrast to the low one of {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} and favours a model, based on dominant antiferromagnetic supersuperexchange couplings in {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4} over a ferromagnetic Mn{sub 4} ''cluster'' model. The Neel temperature of 9.8(1)K was determined from the corresponding specific-heat anomaly, measured on a single crystal of {alpha}-MnMoO{sub 4}.

  2. The Youngest Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Sara

    2014-01-01

    It is likely that all stars are born in clusters, but most clusters are not bound and disperse. None of the many protoclusters in our Galaxy are likely to develop into long-lived bound clusters. The Super Star Clusters (SSCs) seen in starburst galaxies are more massive and compact and have better chances of survival. The birth and early development of SSCs takes place deep in molecular clouds, and during this crucial stage the embedded clusters are invisible to optical or UV observations but are studied via the radio-infared supernebulae (RISN) they excite. We review observations of embedded clusters and identify RISN within 10 Mpc whose exciting clusters have a million solar masses or more in volumes of a few cubic parsecs and which are likely to not only survive as bound clusters, but to evolve into objects as massive and compact as Galactic globulars. These clusters are distinguished by very high star formation efficiency eta, at least a factor of 10 higher than the few percent seen in the Galaxy, probably...

  3. Star Clusters within FIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  4. Galaxy Clusters with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss Chandra results related to 1) cluster mergers and cold fronts and 2) interactions between relativistic plasma and hot cluster atmospheres. We describe the properties of cold fronts using NGC1404 in the Fornax cluster and A3667 as examples. We discuss multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the cooling flow cluster ZW3146. We review the supersonic merger underway in CL0657. Finally, we summarize the interaction between plasma bubbles produced by AGN and hot gas using M87 and NGC507 as examples.

  5. 15th Cluster workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Laakso, Harri; Escoubet, C. Philippe; The Cluster Active Archive : Studying the Earth’s Space Plasma Environment

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000 the ESA Cluster mission has been investigating the small-scale structures and processes of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. This book contains presentations made at the 15th Cluster workshop held in March 2008. It also presents several articles about the Cluster Active Archive and its datasets, a few overview papers on the Cluster mission, and articles reporting on scientific findings on the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause and the magnetotail.

  6. Clustering of Parkinson disease: shared cause or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Calne, Susan M; Schulzer, Michael; Mak, Edwin; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Van Netten, Chris; Tsui, Joseph K C; Stoessl, A Jon; Calne, Donald B

    2004-07-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of excessive disease occurrence, termed clustering, may provide clues about the underlying etiology. To report the occurrence of 3 clusters of Parkinson disease (PD) in Canada. We determined the population groups containing the clusters, geographical limits, and duration of exposure to the specific environments. We tested whether there was an excessive presence of Parkinson disease by calculating the probability of the observed cases occurring under the null hypothesis that the disease developed independently and at random in cluster subjects. Results of genetic testing for mutations in the alpha-synuclein, parkin, tau genes, and spinocerebellar ataxia genes (SCA2 and SCA3) were negative. The probabilities of random occurrence (P values) in the 3 clusters were P = 7.9 x 10 (-7)for cluster 1, P = 2.6 x 10 (-7)for cluster 2, and P = 1.5 x 10 (-7)for cluster 3. Our findings indicate an important role for environmental causation in Parkinson disease. A possible role exists for environmental factors such as viral infection and toxins in the light of current evidence.

  7. Statistical properties of convex clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering. We establish that convex clustering is closely related to single linkage hierarchical clustering and $k$-means clustering. In addition, we derive the range of the tuning parameter for convex clustering that yields a non-trivial solution. We also provide an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom, and provide a finite sample bound for the prediction error for convex clustering. We compare convex clustering to so...

  8. Pre-stimulus alpha oscillations over somatosensory cortex predict tactile misperceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Matt; Poliakoff, Ellen; El-Deredy, Wael; Klepousniotou, Ekaterini; Lloyd, Donna M

    2017-02-01

    Fluctuations of pre-stimulus oscillatory activity in the somatosensory alpha band (8-14Hz) observed using human EEG and MEG have been shown to influence the detection of supra- and peri-threshold somatosensory stimuli. However, some reports of touch occur even without a stimulus. We investigated the possibility that pre-stimulus alpha oscillations might also influence these false reports of touch - known as tactile misperceptions. We recorded EEG while participants performed the Somatic Signal Detection Task (SSDT), in which participants must detect brief, peri-threshold somatosensory targets. We found that pre-stimulus oscillatory power in the somatosensory alpha range exhibited a negative linear relationship with reporting of touch at electrode clusters over both contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory regions. As pre-stimulus alpha power increased, the probability of reporting a touch declined; as it decreased, the probability of reporting a touch increased. This relationship was stronger on trials without a somatosensory stimulus than on trials with a somatosensory stimulus, although was present for both trial types. Spatio-temporal cluster-based permutation analysis also found that pre-stimulus alpha was lower on trials when touch was reported - irrespective of whether it was present - over contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory cortices, as well as left frontocentral areas. We argue that alpha power may reflect changes in response criterion rather than sensitivity alone. Low alpha power relates to a low barrier to reporting a touch even when one is not present, while high alpha power is linked to less frequent reporting of touch overall.

  9. Cluster analysis of obesity and asthma phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rand Sutherland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with variability among patients in characteristics such as lung function, symptoms and control, body weight, markers of inflammation, and responsiveness to glucocorticoids (GC. Cluster analysis of well-characterized cohorts can advance understanding of disease subgroups in asthma and point to unsuspected disease mechanisms. We utilized an hypothesis-free cluster analytical approach to define the contribution of obesity and related variables to asthma phenotype. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cohort of clinical trial participants (n = 250, minimum-variance hierarchical clustering was used to identify clinical and inflammatory biomarkers important in determining disease cluster membership in mild and moderate persistent asthmatics. In a subset of participants, GC sensitivity was assessed via expression of GC receptor alpha (GCRα and induction of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 expression by dexamethasone. Four asthma clusters were identified, with body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2 and severity of asthma symptoms (AEQ score the most significant determinants of cluster membership (F = 57.1, p<0.0001 and F = 44.8, p<0.0001, respectively. Two clusters were composed of predominantly obese individuals; these two obese asthma clusters differed from one another with regard to age of asthma onset, measures of asthma symptoms (AEQ and control (ACQ, exhaled nitric oxide concentration (F(ENO and airway hyperresponsiveness (methacholine PC(20 but were similar with regard to measures of lung function (FEV(1 (% and FEV(1/FVC, airway eosinophilia, IgE, leptin, adiponectin and C-reactive protein (hsCRP. Members of obese clusters demonstrated evidence of reduced expression of GCRα, a finding which was correlated with a reduced induction of MKP-1 expression by dexamethasone CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Obesity is an important determinant of asthma phenotype in adults. There is heterogeneity in

  10. Inflaton Decay in an Alpha Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, S; Naidu, Siddartha; Holman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    We study the alpha vacua of de Sitter space by considering the decay rate of the inflaton field coupled to a scalar field placed in an alpha vacuum. We find an {\\em alpha dependent} Bose enhancement relative to the Bunch-Davies vacuum and, surprisingly, no non-renormalizable divergences. We also consider a modified alpha dependent time ordering prescription for the Feynman propagator and show that it leads to an alpha independent result. This result suggests that it may be possible to calculate in any alpha vacuum if we employ the appropriate causality preserving prescription.

  11. Document Clustering Based on Semi-Supervised Term Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mahmoodi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study is conducted to propose a multi-step feature (term selection process and in semi-supervised fashion, provide initial centers for term clusters. Then utilize the fuzzy c-means (FCM clustering algorithm for clustering terms. Finally assign each of documents to closest associated term clusters. While most text clustering algorithms directly use documents for clustering, we propose to first group the terms using FCM algorithm and then cluster documents based on terms clusters. We evaluate effectiveness of our technique on several standard text collections and compare our results with the some classical text clustering algorithms.

  12. What Powers Lyman alpha Blobs?

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Y; Beelen, A; Henkel, C; Cen, R; De Breuck, C; Francis, P; Kovacs, A; Lagache, G; Lehnert, M; Mao, M; Menten, K M; Norris, R; Omont, A; Tatemastu, K; Weiss, A; Zheng, Z

    2015-01-01

    Lyman alpha blobs (LABs) are spatially extended lyman alpha nebulae seen at high redshift. The origin of Lyman alpha emission in the LABs is still unclear and under debate. To study their heating mechanism(s), we present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of the 20 cm radio emission and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) emission towards the four LABs in the protocluster J2143-4423 at z=2.38. Among the four LABs, B6 and B7 are detected in the radio with fluxes of 67+/-17 microJy and 77+/-16 microJy, respectively, and B5 is marginally detected at 3 sigma (51+/-16 microJy). For all detected sources, their radio positions are consistent with the central positions of the LABs. B6 and B7 are obviously also detected in the FIR. By fitting the data with different templates, we obtained redshifts of 2.20$^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$ for B6 and 2.20$^{+0.45}_{-0.30}$ for B7 which are consistent with the redshift of the lyman alpha emission within uncertainties, indicating that both ...

  13. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  14. Sparse Coding for Alpha Matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jubin; Varnousfaderani, Ehsan; Cholakkal, Hisham; Rajan, Deepu

    2016-04-21

    Existing color sampling based alpha matting methods use the compositing equation to estimate alpha at a pixel from pairs of foreground (F) and background (B) samples. The quality of the matte depends on the selected (F,B) pairs. In this paper, the matting problem is reinterpreted as a sparse coding of pixel features, wherein the sum of the codes gives the estimate of the alpha matte from a set of unpaired F and B samples. A non-parametric probabilistic segmentation provides a certainty measure on the pixel belonging to foreground or background, based on which a dictionary is formed for use in sparse coding. By removing the restriction to conform to (F,B) pairs, this method allows for better alpha estimation from multiple F and B samples. The same framework is extended to videos, where the requirement of temporal coherence is handled effectively. Here, the dictionary is formed by samples from multiple frames. A multi-frame graph model, as opposed to a single image as for image matting, is proposed that can be solved efficiently in closed form. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations on a benchmark dataset are provided to show that the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art in image and video matting.

  15. Cost-Effective Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Gottlieb, S

    2001-01-01

    Small Beowulf clusters can effectively serve as personal or group supercomputers. In such an environment, a cluster can be optimally designed for a specific problem (or a small set of codes). We discuss how theoretical analysis of the code and benchmarking on similar hardware lead to optimal systems.

  16. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  17. Coma cluster of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  18. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  19. Cluster Synchronization Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Weiguo; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents two approaches to achieving cluster synchronization in dynamical multi-agent systems. In contrast to the widely studied synchronization behavior, where all the coupled agents converge to the same value asymptotically, in the cluster synchronization problem studied in this paper,

  20. Neurostimulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe L; Barloese, Mads; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neurostimulation has emerged as a viable treatment for intractable chronic cluster headache. Several therapeutic strategies are being investigated including stimulation of the hypothalamus, occipital nerves and sphenopalatine ganglion. The aim of this review is to provide...... effective strategy must be preferred as first-line therapy for intractable chronic cluster headache....