WorldWideScience

Sample records for closure program applications

  1. Nevada Test Site closure program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenk, D.P.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use

  2. Distributed Programming via Safe Closure Passing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Haller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Programming systems incorporating aspects of functional programming, e.g., higher-order functions, are becoming increasingly popular for large-scale distributed programming. New frameworks such as Apache Spark leverage functional techniques to provide high-level, declarative APIs for in-memory data analytics, often outperforming traditional "big data" frameworks like Hadoop MapReduce. However, widely-used programming models remain rather ad-hoc; aspects such as implementation trade-offs, static typing, and semantics are not yet well-understood. We present a new asynchronous programming model that has at its core several principles facilitating functional processing of distributed data. The emphasis of our model is on simplicity, performance, and expressiveness. The primary means of communication is by passing functions (closures to distributed, immutable data. To ensure safe and efficient distribution of closures, our model leverages both syntactic and type-based restrictions. We report on a prototype implementation in Scala. Finally, we present preliminary experimental results evaluating the performance impact of a static, type-based optimization of serialization.

  3. 78 FR 32663 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ...] Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for Available... announces the closure of two teaching hospitals and the initiation of an application process where hospitals... modifying language at section 1886(d)(5)(B)(v) of the Act, to instruct the Secretary to establish a process...

  4. A successful environmental remediation program closure and post-closure activities (CAPCA) Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of eleven waste management units at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is nearing completion. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the US Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-84OR21400. The Closure and Post Closure Program (CAPCA) has been accomplished on an accelerated schedule through the efforts of a dedicated team from several organizations. This paper relates experience gained from the program that can be of benefit on other DOE environmental remediation projects. Technical design and construction aspects, as well as project management considerations, are discussed

  5. Tight closure and vanishing theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    applications of tight closure include Frobenius characterizations of certain singularities arising in the minimal model program and uniform bounds for global generation of adjoint linear series. Both of these applications are closely tied to vanishing theorems, and indeed, the Kodaira vanishing theorem itself has an equivalent formulation in terms of tight closure

  6. Software Review: A program for testing capture-recapture data for closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Richards, Jon D.

    2005-01-01

    Capture-recapture methods are widely used to estimate population parameters of free-ranging animals. Closed-population capture-recapture models, which assume there are no additions to or losses from the population over the period of study (i.e., the closure assumption), are preferred for population estimation over the open-population models, which do not assume closure, because heterogeneity in detection probabilities can be accounted for and this improves estimates. In this paper we introduce CloseTest, a new Microsoft® Windows-based program that computes the Otis et al. (1978) and Stanley and Burnham (1999) closure tests for capture-recapture data sets. Information on CloseTest features and where to obtain the program are provided.

  7. Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program plan, fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.C.; Wahlen, R.K.; Winship, R.A.

    1991-10-01

    The Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program is responsible to US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland for the safe, cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities at the Hanford Site. The Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program is also responsible to US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland for the program management of specific Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closures at the Hanford Site. This program plan addresses only the surplus facilities. The criteria used to evaluate each factor relative to decommissioning are based on the guidelines presented by the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland, Environmental Restoration Division. The guidelines are consistent with the Westinghouse Hanford Company commitment to decommission Hanford Site retired facilities in the safest and most cost-effective way achievable. This document outlines the plan for managing these facilities until disposal

  8. Application of statistical dynamical turbulence closures to data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kane, Terence J; Frederiksen, Jorgen S

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of an accurate yet computationally tractable statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows, coined the quasi-diagonal direct interaction approximation closure (QDIA), and its application to problems in data assimilation. The QDIA provides prognostic equations for evolving mean fields, covariances and higher-order non-Gaussian terms, all of which are also required in the formulation of data assimilation schemes for nonlinear geophysical flows. The QDIA is a generalization of the class of direct interaction approximation theories, initially developed by Kraichnan (1959 J. Fluid Mech. 5 497) for isotropic turbulence, to fully inhomogeneous flows and has been further generalized to allow for both inhomogeneous and non-Gaussian initial conditions and long integrations. A regularization procedure or empirical vertex renormalization that ensures correct inertial range spectra is also described. The aim of this paper is to provide a coherent mathematical description of the QDIA turbulence closure and closure-based data assimilation scheme we have labeled the statistical dynamical Kalman filter. The mathematical formalism presented has been synthesized from recent works of the authors with some additional material and is presented in sufficient detail that the paper is of a pedagogical nature.

  9. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA

  10. Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs.

  11. Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs

  12. The Evaluator's Role in Recommending Program Closure: A Model for Decision Making and Professional Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Rebecca M.; Berry, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Evaluators face challenges when programs consistently fail to meet expectations for performance or improvement and consequently, evaluators may recommend that closing a program is the most prudent course of action. However, the evaluation literature provides little guidance regarding when an evaluator might recommend program closure. Given…

  13. Tools for Closure Project and Contract Management: Development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, C. M.; Sheppard, F. R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper details the development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline - an innovative project management effort undertaken to ensure proactive management of the Rocky Flats Closure Contract in support of the Department's goal for achieving the safe closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in December 2006. The accelerated closure of RFETS is one of the most prominent projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management program. As the first major former weapons plant to be remediated and closed, it is a first-of-kind effort requiring the resolution of multiple complex technical and institutional challenges. Most significantly, the closure of RFETS is dependent upon the shipment of all special nuclear material and wastes to other DOE sites. The Department is actively working to strengthen project management across programs, and there is increasing external interest in this progress. The development of the Rocky Flats Integrated Closure Project Baseline represents a groundbreaking and cooperative effort to formalize the management of such a complex project across multiple sites and organizations. It is original in both scope and process, however it provides a useful precedent for the other ongoing project management efforts within the Environmental Management program

  14. Closure The Definitive Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Bolin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    If you're ready to use Closure to build rich web applications with JavaScript, this hands-on guide has precisely what you need to learn this suite of tools in depth. Closure makes it easy for experienced JavaScript developers to write and maintain large and complex codebases -- as Google has demonstrated by using Closure with Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Maps. Author and Closure contributor Michael Bolin has included numerous code examples and best practices, as well as valuable information not available publicly until now. You'll learn all about Closure's Library, Compiler, Templates, tes

  15. Pilonidal sinus disease surgery in children: the first study to compare crystallized phenol application to primary excision and closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Ufuk; Ergun, Ergun; Gollu, Gulnur; Sozduyar, Sumeyye; Kologlu, Meltem; Cakmak, Murat; Dindar, Huseyin; Yagmurlu, Aydin

    2018-03-01

    Pilonidal sinus (PS) is an infectious and inflammatory disease of sacrococcygeal region. Current methods include; surgical excision with/without suturing the defect, rhomboid excision and flap and chemical substance application. In this study, crystallized phenol application was compared to excision and primary closure. This retrospective study included pediatric patients with PS who were treated with excision and primer closure technique and phenol application. The patients' medical data were analyzed retrospectively. This study included 117 patients with PS. There were 52 girls (44%) and 65 boys (56%). Mean age of children was 15.6 (12-20) years. Excision and primary closure were applied to 77 patients (66%) and phenol was applied to 40 patients (34%). The children in phenol group were discharged on the operation day; mean hospitalization time in the excision and primary closure group was 2.7 (1-14) days. Mean follow up was 44.6 (8-82) months for primary excision and closure group and 8.1 (1-19) months for phenol group. Although many surgical and non-surgical treatment modalities have been described for PS, the optimal one remains unknown. Limited with the retrospective nature of the data, crystallized phenol application seems a feasible minimal invasive alternative to primary closure of PS with lower recurrence and complication rates in children. Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. WASTE PACKAGE OPERATIONS FY99 CLOSURE METHODS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. C. Knapp

    1999-09-23

    The waste package (WP) closure weld development task is part of a larger engineering development program to develop waste package designs. The purpose of the larger waste package engineering development program is to develop nuclear waste package fabrication and closure methods that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will find acceptable and will license for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), non-fuel components, and vitrified high-level waste within a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Within the WP closure development program are several major development tasks, which, in turn, are divided into subtasks. The major tasks include: WP fabrication development, WP closure weld development, nondestructive examination (NDE) development, and remote in-service inspection development. The purpose of this report is to present the objectives, technical information, and work scope relating to the WP closure weld development.and NDE tasks and subtasks and to report results of the closure weld and NDE development programs for fiscal year 1999 (FY-99). The objective of the FY-99 WP closure weld development task was to develop requirements for closure weld surface and volumetric NDE performance demonstrations, investigate alternative NDE inspection techniques, and develop specifications for welding, NDE, and handling system integration. In addition, objectives included fabricating several flat plate mock-ups that could be used for NDE development, stress relief peening, corrosion testing, and residual stress testing.

  17. WASTE PACKAGE OPERATIONS FY-99 CLOSURE METHODS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. C. Knapp

    1999-01-01

    The waste package (WP) closure weld development task is part of a larger engineering development program to develop waste package designs. The purpose of the larger waste package engineering development program is to develop nuclear waste package fabrication and closure methods that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will find acceptable and will license for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), non-fuel components, and vitrified high-level waste within a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Within the WP closure development program are several major development tasks, which, in turn, are divided into subtasks. The major tasks include: WP fabrication development, WP closure weld development, nondestructive examination (NDE) development, and remote in-service inspection development. The purpose of this report is to present the objectives, technical information, and work scope relating to the WP closure weld development.and NDE tasks and subtasks and to report results of the closure weld and NDE development programs for fiscal year 1999 (FY-99). The objective of the FY-99 WP closure weld development task was to develop requirements for closure weld surface and volumetric NDE performance demonstrations, investigate alternative NDE inspection techniques, and develop specifications for welding, NDE, and handling system integration. In addition, objectives included fabricating several flat plate mock-ups that could be used for NDE development, stress relief peening, corrosion testing, and residual stress testing

  18. Professional Closure Beyond State Authorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitte Sommer Harrits

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the Weberian approach to the study of professions has been strong, emphasizing state authorization and market monopolies as constituting what is considered a profession. Originally, however, the Weberian conception of closure, or the ways in which a profession is constituted and made separate, was broader. This article suggests a revision of the closure concept, integrating insights from Pierre Bourdieu, and conceptualizing professional closure as the intersection of social, symbolic and legal closure. Based on this revision, this article demonstrates how to apply such a concept in empirical studies. This is done by exploring social, symbolic and legal closure across sixteen professional degree programs. The analyses show a tendency for some overlap between different forms of closure, with a somewhat divergent pattern for legal closure. Results support the argument that we need to study these processes as an intersection of different sources of closure, including capital, lifestyles and discourse

  19. Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 plant: Walk-in pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    In June 1987, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure/Post-Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) located at the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval.The Closure Plan has been modified and revised several times. This document is an addendum to the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted to TDEC in June, 1994. This addendum contains information on the Walk-In Pits of the BCBG which is meant to supplement the information provided in the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted for the BCBG. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document.

  20. Program for closure of an inactive radioactive waste disposal site at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The 643-G Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility was operated at the Savannah River Plant from 1952 through 1974, and has been inactive since that time. The actions leading to closure of 643-G will involve a combination of activities consisting of limited waste removal, stabilization, capping, and monitoring. The overall effect of these closure actions will be to place the 643-G site in a physically and chemically stable state which will remain stable over a long period of time. During a one-hundred year institutional control period surveillance and monitoring of the site will be carried out to verify that the performance of the system is acceptable, and access of the general public to the site will be restricted. The program described in this paper is a recommendation; the actual closure plan will be negotiated with regulatory authorities. 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Bidirectional Barbed Sutures for Wound Closure: Evolution and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Malcolm D.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, wound closure sutures have in common the need to tie knots with the inherent risk of extrusion, palpability, microinfarcts, breakage, and slippage. Bidirectional barbed sutures have barbs arrayed in a helical fashion in opposing directions on either side of an unbarbed midsegment. This suture is inserted at the midpoint of a wound and pulled through till resistance is encountered from the opposing barbs; each half of the suture is then advanced to the lateral ends of the wound. This design provides a method of evenly distributing tension along the incision line, a faster suture placement and closure time with no need to tie knots, and the possibility of improved cosmesis. Bidirectional barbed sutures, which are available in both absorbable and nonabsorbable forms, can be used for simple closures, multilayered closures, and closure of high-tension wounds in a variety of surgical settings. PMID:24527114

  2. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  3. Occupancy estimation and the closure assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Christopher T.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    1. Recent advances in occupancy estimation that adjust for imperfect detection have provided substantial improvements over traditional approaches and are receiving considerable use in applied ecology. To estimate and adjust for detectability, occupancy modelling requires multiple surveys at a site and requires the assumption of 'closure' between surveys, i.e. no changes in occupancy between surveys. Violations of this assumption could bias parameter estimates; however, little work has assessed model sensitivity to violations of this assumption or how commonly such violations occur in nature. 2. We apply a modelling procedure that can test for closure to two avian point-count data sets in Montana and New Hampshire, USA, that exemplify time-scales at which closure is often assumed. These data sets illustrate different sampling designs that allow testing for closure but are currently rarely employed in field investigations. Using a simulation study, we then evaluate the sensitivity of parameter estimates to changes in site occupancy and evaluate a power analysis developed for sampling designs that is aimed at limiting the likelihood of closure. 3. Application of our approach to point-count data indicates that habitats may frequently be open to changes in site occupancy at time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, with 71% and 100% of species investigated in Montana and New Hampshire respectively, showing violation of closure across time periods of 3 weeks and 8 days respectively. 4. Simulations suggest that models assuming closure are sensitive to changes in occupancy. Power analyses further suggest that the modelling procedure we apply can effectively test for closure. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our demonstration that sites may be open to changes in site occupancy over time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, combined with the sensitivity of models to violations of the closure assumption, highlights the importance of properly addressing

  4. Scalp Wound Closure with K wires: An alternative easier method to scalp wound closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, S; Ajik, S

    2012-12-01

    Scalp defects and lacerations present a reconstructive challenge to plastic surgeons. Many methods have been described from the use of skin grafting to rotation flaps. Here we present a method of closure of a contaminated scalp wound with the use of Kirschner wires. In our case, closure of scalp laceration was made possible with the use of 1.4 Kirschner wires and cable tie/ zip tie fasteners. The duration to closure of wound was 10 days. In reconstructing the scalp defect, this method was found to adhere to principles of scalp reconstruction. There were no post operative complications found from the procedure. On initial application on the edge of the wound, tension applied caused the K wires to cut through the wound edge. On replacement of K wires 1cm away from wound edge the procedure was not plagued by any further complication. In conclusion we find scalp closure with Kirschner wires are a simple and effective method for scalp wound closure.

  5. 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Hanford Facility is owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. Dangerous waste and mixed waste (containing both radioactive and dangerous components) are managed and produced on the Hanford Facility. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office and serves as cooperator of the 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site, the unit addressed in this closure plan. The 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan consists of a Part A Permit Application (Revision 3) and a closure plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application revision is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and three appendices. This 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of October 15, 1992

  6. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999

  7. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-05-17

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

  8. Fuel channel closure and adapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashen, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a mechanical closure/actuating ram combination particularly suited for use in sealing the ends of the pressure tubes when a CANDU-type reactor is refueled. It provides a cluster that may be inserted into a fuel channel end fitting to provide at least partial closing off of a pressure tube while permitting the disengagement of the fueling machine and its withdrawal from the closure for other purposes. The invention also provides a ram/closure combination wherein the application of loading force to a deformable sealing disk is regulated by a massive load bar component forming part of the fueling machine and being therefore accessible for maintenance or replacement

  9. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP

  10. RCRA land unit closures at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.H.; Kelly, B.A.; Delozier, M.F.P.; Manrod, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Y-12 Plant are being closed under an integrated multi-year program. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. These units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. The closure of these sites will be funded by a new Department of Energy budget category, the Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to provide greater flexibility in the response to closure and remedial activities. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA), has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the scope of this program has required the development of a detailed set of assumptions and a confirmation program for each assumption. Other significant activities in the CAPCA program include the development of risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated schedule

  11. Reliability assessment of underground shaft closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    The intent of the WIPP, being constructed in the bedded geologic salt deposits of Southeastern New Mexico, is to provide the technological basis for the safe disposal of radioactive Transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by the defense programs of the United States. In determining this technological basis, advanced reliability and structural analysis techniques are used to determine the probability of time-to-closure of a hypothetical underground shaft located in an argillaceous salt formation and filled with compacted crushed salt. Before being filled with crushed salt for sealing, the shaft provides access to an underground facility. Reliable closure of the shaft depends upon the sealing of the shaft through creep closure and recompaction of crushed backfill. Appropriate methods are demonstrated to calculate cumulative distribution functions of the closure based on laboratory determined random variable uncertainty in salt creep properties

  12. Post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry at the Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) is located on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) property at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Until 1992, the primary mission of the Y-12 Plant was the production and fabrication of nuclear weapons components. Activities associated with these functions included production of lithium compounds, recovery of enriched uranium from scrap material, and fabrication of uranium and other materials into finished parts for assemblies. The Kerr Hollow Quarry was used for waste disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive and shock-sensitive chemicals and compressed gas cylinders. These materials were packaged in various containers and sank under the water in the quarry due to their great weight. Disposal activities were terminated in November, 1988 due to a determination by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation that the quarry was subject to regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1993. Methods of closure for the quarry were reviewed, and actions were initiated to close the quarry in accordance with closure requirements for interim status surface impoundments specified in Tennessee Rules 1200-1-11-.05(7) and 1200-1-11-.05(11). As part of these actions, efforts were made to characterize the physical and chemical nature of wastes that had been disposed of in the quarry, and to remove any containers or debris that were put into the quarry during waste disposal activities. Closure certification reports (Fraser et al. 1993 and Dames and Moore 1993) document closure activities in detail. This report contains the post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry site

  13. Long-term integrity of waste package final closure for HLW geological disposal, (2). Applicability of TIG welding method to overpack final closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Hidekazu; Sawa, Shuusuke; Aritomi, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    Overpack, a high-level radioactive waste package for geological disposal, seals vitrified waste and in line with Japan's waste management program is required to isolate it from contact with groundwater for 1,000 years. In this study, TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding method, a typical arc welding method and widely used in various industries, was examined for its applicability to seal a carbon steel overpack lid with a thickness of 190 mm. Welding conditions and welding parameters were examined for multi-layer welding in a narrow gap for four different groove depths. Weld joint tests were conducted and weld flaws, macro- and microstructure, and mechanical properties were assessed within tentatively applied criteria for weld joints. Measurement and numerical calculation for residual stress were also conducted and the tendency of residual stress distribution was discussed. These test results were compared with the basic requirements of the welding method for overpack which were pointed out in our first report. It is assessed that the TIG welding method has the potential to provide the necessary requirements to complete the final closure of overpack with a maximum thickness of 190 mm. (author)

  14. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure

  15. Closure of a mixed waste landfill: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phifer, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Much experience has been gained during the closure of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and many lessons were learned. This knowledge was applied to other closures at SRS yielding decreased costs, schedule enhancement, and increased overall project efficiency. The next major area of experience to be gained at SRS in the field of waste site closures will be in the upkeep, maintenance, and monitoring of clay caps. Further test programs will be required to address these requirements

  16. Assessment of consistent two-equation closure for forest flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Cavar, Dalibor; Bechmann, Andreas

    of grid turbulence and wall-bounded flow, the closure suggested is also valid for homogeneous shear flows commonly observed inside tall vegetative canopies. The present work assess the plant drag closure by comparing results of two different CFD models against observations derived over the forested area...... and can be applied for any twoequation closure. Results derived by different CFD models with k-epsilon and k-omega closure are similar and in good comparison with observations. Overall, numerical results show that the closure performs well, opening new possibilities for application to tasks related...... to the atmospheric boundary layer—where it is important to adequately account for the influences of vegetation....

  17. A kinematic view of loop closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsias, Evangelos A; Seok, Chaok; Jacobson, Matthew P; Dill, Ken A

    2004-03-01

    We consider the problem of loop closure, i.e., of finding the ensemble of possible backbone structures of a chain segment of a protein molecule that is geometrically consistent with preceding and following parts of the chain whose structures are given. We reduce this problem of determining the loop conformations of six torsions to finding the real roots of a 16th degree polynomial in one variable, based on the robotics literature on the kinematics of the equivalent rotator linkage in the most general case of oblique rotators. We provide a simple intuitive view and derivation of the polynomial for the case in which each of the three pair of torsional axes has a common point. Our method generalizes previous work on analytical loop closure in that the torsion angles need not be consecutive, and any rigid intervening segments are allowed between the free torsions. Our approach also allows for a small degree of flexibility in the bond angles and the peptide torsion angles; this substantially enlarges the space of solvable configurations as is demonstrated by an application of the method to the modeling of cyclic pentapeptides. We give further applications to two important problems. First, we show that this analytical loop closure algorithm can be efficiently combined with an existing loop-construction algorithm to sample loops longer than three residues. Second, we show that Monte Carlo minimization is made severalfold more efficient by employing the local moves generated by the loop closure algorithm, when applied to the global minimization of an eight-residue loop. Our loop closure algorithm is freely available at http://dillgroup. ucsf.edu/loop_closure/. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem 25: 510-528, 2004

  18. Special closure for radioactive shipping container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otts, J.V.

    1976-03-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a special lid closure for radioactive material shipping containers, typically steel drums. Three closure techniques were designed, fabricated, and proven to be structurally adequate to protect 1000 lb when dropped 30 ft. The three designs were (1) a 6-in. lid extension (skirt), (2) a 6-in. inner lid, and (3) c-clamps used at the container/lid interface. Based upon structural integrity, economic impact, and minimal design change, the 6-in. lid extension is recommended

  19. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references

  20. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  1. RCRA closure of eight land-based units at the Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.E.; Welch, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed under an integrated multi-year program. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. These units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. The closure of these sites will be funded by a new Department of Energy budget category, the Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to provide greater flexibility in the response to closure and remedial activities. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA), has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the scope of this program has required the development of risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated schedule

  2. Classification and closure properties of languages for describing concurrent system behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szijarto, M.

    1981-01-01

    The correspondence between sequential program schemes and formal languages is well known. The situation is more complicated in the case of parallel program schemes, and trace languages have been introduced to describe them. The author introduces the concept of the closure of a language on a so called independence relation on the alphabet of the language, and formulate several theorems about them and the trace languages. He investigates the closedness properties of Chomsky classes under closure on independence relations, and as a special case we derive a new necessary and sufficient condition for the regularity of the commutative closure of a language. 12 references.

  3. Special closures for steel drum shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzon, L.L.; Otts, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop special lid closures for typical, steel drum, radioactive material shipping containers. Previous experience and testing had shown that the existing container was adequate to withstand the required environmental tests for certification, but that the lid and closure were just marginally effective. Specifically, the lid closure failed to consistently maintain a tight seal between the container and the lid after drop tests, thus causing the package contents to be vulnerable in the subsequent fire test. Recognizing the deficiency, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration requested the development of new closure(s) which would: (1) be as strong and resistant to a drop as the bottom of the container; (2) have minimal economic impact on the overall container cost; (3) maximize the use of existing container designs; (4) consider crush loads; and (5) result in less dependence on personnel and loading procedures. Several techniques were evaluated and found to be more effective than the standard closure mechanism. Of these, three new closure techniques were designed, fabricated, and proven to be structurally adequate to provide containment when a 454-kg drum was drop tested from 9.14-m onto an unyielding surface. The three designs were: (1) a 152-mm long lid extension or skirt welded to the standard drum lid, (2) a separate inner lid, with 152-mm long skirt and (3) C-clamps used at the container-lid interface. Based upon structural integrity, economic impact, and minimal design change, the lid extension is the recommended special closure

  4. 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ''co-operator.'' The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit

  5. Biomechanics Strategies for Space Closure in Deep Overbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harryanto Wijaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Space closure is an interesting aspect of orthodontic treatment related to principles of biomechanics. It should be tailored individually based on patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan. Understanding the space closure biomechanics basis leads to achieve the desired treatment objective. Overbite deepening and losing posterior anchorage are the two most common unwanted side effects in space closure. Conventionally, correction of overbite must be done before space closure resulted in longer treatment. Application of proper space closure biomechanics strategies is necessary to achieve the desired treatment outcome. This cases report aimed to show the space closure biomechanics strategies that effectively control the overbite as well as posterior anchorage in deep overbite patients without increasing treatment time. Two patients who presented with class II division 1 malocclusion were treated with fixed orthodontic appliance. The primary strategies included extraction space closure on segmented arch that employed two-step space closure, namely single canine retraction simultaneously with incisors intrusion followed by enmasse retraction of four incisors by using differential moment concept. These strategies successfully closed the space, corrected deep overbite and controlled posterior anchorage simultaneously so that the treatment time was shortened. Biomechanics strategies that utilized were effective to achieve the desired treatment outcome.

  6. Mechanical properties of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel used in the LWBR closure head and support flange (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.M.; Hall, J.F.

    1978-07-01

    The LWBR closure head and support flange are manufactured from forgings of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel rather than the ASTM A508 Class 2 forging material more commonly used in reactor vessels and closure heads. Forgings involved were approximately 300,000 pounds and 46,000 pounds. The extensive material test program conducted on ASTM A508 Class 4 LWBR forgings is described. The results of the tests confirm that the A508 Class 4 material used for the LWBR forgings has been quite good through thickness, fracture toughness, and strength properties and fully meet all specified requirements

  7. Safety and effectiveness of a circumferential clip-based vascular closure device for hemostasis in off-label applications: Comparison with standard applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Kim, Chang Won [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ung Bae [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan Pusan National University Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of a circumferential nitinol clip based arterial closure device following arteriotomy, especially in off-label applications. Consecutive patients who underwent the procedure with arteriotomy from January 2011 to February 2014 were included in this study. We defined standard use as the use of StarClose for retrograde puncture of the common femoral artery (CFA) and off-label use as the use of StarClose for retrograde puncture of the superficial femoral artery (SFA), antegrade puncture of the CFA or SFA, puncture of the brachial artery or puncture of the vascular graft. The procedures performed included percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and thrombolysis. Technical success was defined as complete hemostasis achieved within 3 minute after the closure. Complications, and laboratory findings associated with coagulation function, were also investigated. There were 146 cases of standard applications and 111 cases of off-label applications. Technical success was achieved in all cases. The off-label group comprised the use of StarClose for retrograde puncture of the SFA (n = 19), antegrade puncture of the CFA or SFA (n = 74), brachial artery puncture (n = 5), larger sheath than 6 Fr (n = 7) and vascular graft puncture (n = 6). Minor complications were noted in both groups (standard group: 7.5%, off-label group: 2.7%). Off-label use of StarClose is safe and feasible.

  8. Safety and effectiveness of a circumferential clip-based vascular closure device for hemostasis in off-label applications: Comparison with standard applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Kim, Chang Won; Jeon, Ung Bae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of a circumferential nitinol clip based arterial closure device following arteriotomy, especially in off-label applications. Consecutive patients who underwent the procedure with arteriotomy from January 2011 to February 2014 were included in this study. We defined standard use as the use of StarClose for retrograde puncture of the common femoral artery (CFA) and off-label use as the use of StarClose for retrograde puncture of the superficial femoral artery (SFA), antegrade puncture of the CFA or SFA, puncture of the brachial artery or puncture of the vascular graft. The procedures performed included percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and thrombolysis. Technical success was defined as complete hemostasis achieved within 3 minute after the closure. Complications, and laboratory findings associated with coagulation function, were also investigated. There were 146 cases of standard applications and 111 cases of off-label applications. Technical success was achieved in all cases. The off-label group comprised the use of StarClose for retrograde puncture of the SFA (n = 19), antegrade puncture of the CFA or SFA (n = 74), brachial artery puncture (n = 5), larger sheath than 6 Fr (n = 7) and vascular graft puncture (n = 6). Minor complications were noted in both groups (standard group: 7.5%, off-label group: 2.7%). Off-label use of StarClose is safe and feasible

  9. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during

  10. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  11. Drafting of the closure of the Asse salt mine. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneefuss, J.U.

    2001-01-01

    The report of the R and D-project 'Drafting of the closure of the Asse salt mine' contains the results of the first phases 'Basic findings' and 'Predrafting'. These phases were started after the backfilling of the south flank of the Asse salt mine was permitted in accordance to 2.2 of the operating program 'Future work at the Asse salt mine'. The knowledge status of May 2000 is reported. The result obtained in this program provides the basis for future drafting the closure of the Asse salt mine. The final results will include the long-term safety assessment to obtain the permission of the mining authorities for the closure of the Asse salt mine. The evaluation of the basic data has shown that further investigations are necessary. During the predrafting period the method for backfilling of the cavities, transport of the backfill and backfill and closure of the shafts were developed. Other parts of the concept for the closure are not finalized (control of the brine inflow when starting backfilling above the 658-m-level, minimizing of the possible effects of dissolution of carnallitite, avoiding of squeezing brines from deeper cavities through the disposal chambers etc.). (orig.) [de

  12. Detailed design report for an operational phase panel-closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Under contract to Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Westinghouse), Waste Isolation Division (WID), IT Corporation has prepared a detailed design of a panel-closure system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Preparation of this detailed design of an operational-phase closure system is required to support a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application and a non-migration variance petition. This report describes the detailed design for a panel-closure system specific to the WIPP site. The recommended panel-closure system will adequately isolate the waste-emplacement panels for at least 35 years. This report provides detailed design and material engineering specifications for the construction, emplacement, and interface-grouting associated with a panel-closure system at the WIPP repository, which would ensure that an effective panel-closure system is in place for at least 35 years. The panel-closure system provides assurance that the limit for the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOC) will be met at the point of compliance, the WIPP site boundary. This assurance is obtained through the inherent flexibility of the panel-closure system

  13. Reliability in maintenance and design of elastomer sealed closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The methods of reliability are considered for maintenance and design of elastomer sealed containment closures. Component reliability is used to establish a replacement schedule for system maintenance. Reliability data on elastomer seals is used to evaluate the common practice of annual replacement, and to calculate component reliability values for several typical shipment time periods. System reliability methods are used to examine the relative merits of typical closure designs. These include single component and redundant seal closure, with and without closure verification testing. The paper presents a general method of quantifying the merits of closure designs through the use of reliability analysis, which is a probabilistic technique. The reference list offers a general source of information in the field of reliability, and should offer the opportunity to extend the procedures discussed in this paper to other design safety applications

  14. Characterization Report Operational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

    2005-01-01

    Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report - Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations

  15. Project Management Approach to Transition of the Miamisburg Closure Project From Environmental Cleanup to Post-Closure Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, C.P.; Marks, M.L.; Smiley, S.L.; Gallaher, D.M.; Williams, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) used a project management approach to transition the Miamisburg Closure Project from cleanup by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to post-closure operations by the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Two primary DOE orders were used to guide the site transition: DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, for assessment and disposition of real property assets and DOE Order 413.3, Program and Project Management for Acquisition of Capital Assets, for project closeout of environmental cleanup activities and project transition of post-closure activities. To effectively manage these multiple policy requirements, DOE chose to manage the Miamisburg Closure Project as a project under a cross-member transitional team using representatives from four principal organizations: DOE-LM, the LM contractor S.M. Stoller Corporation, DOE-EM, and the EM contractor CH2M Hill Mound Inc. The mission of LM is to manage the Department's post-transition responsibilities and long-term care of legacy liabilities and to ensure the future protection of human health and the environment for cleanup sites after the EM has completed its cleanup activities. (authors)

  16. Cyanoacrylate for Intraoral Wound Closure: A Possibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimala Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure is a part of any surgical procedure and the objective of laceration repair or incision closure is to approximate the edges of a wound so that natural healing process may occur. Over the years new biomaterials have been discovered as an alternate to conventional suture materials. Cyanoacrylate bioadhesives are one among them. They carry the advantages of rapid application, patient comfort, resistance to infection, hemostatic properties, and no suture removal anxiety. Hence this study was undertaken to study the effect of long chain cyanoacrylate as an adhesive for intraoral wound closure and also to explore its hemostatic and antibacterial effects. Isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate (AMCRYLATE was used as the adhesive in the study. In conclusion isoamyl cyanoacrylate can be used for intraoral wound closure, as an alternative to sutures for gluing the mucoperiosteum to bone, for example, after impaction removal, periapical surgeries, and cleft repair. Its hemostatic and antibacterial activity has to be further evaluated.

  17. Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

  18. Design Alternative Evaluation No. 3: Post-Closure Ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide input to the Enhanced Design Alternatives (EDA) for License Application Design Selection (LADS). Its purpose is to develop and evaluate conceptual designs for post-closure ventilation alternatives that enhance repository performance. Post-closure ventilation is expected to enhance repository performance by limiting the amount of water contacting the waste packages. Limiting the amount of water contacting the waste packages will reduce corrosion

  19. LLNL/YMP Waste Container Fabrication and Closure Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program is studying Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a suitable site for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for designing and developing the waste package for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste. This report is a summary of the technical activities for the LLNL/YMP Nuclear Waste Disposal Container Fabrication and Closure Development Project. Candidate welding closure processes were identified in the Phase 1 report. This report discusses Phase 2. Phase 2 of this effort involved laboratory studies to determine the optimum fabrication and closure processes. Because of budget limitations, LLNL narrowed the materials for evaluation in Phase 2 from the original six to four: Alloy 825, CDA 715, CDA 102 (or CDA 122) and CDA 952. Phase 2 studies focused on evaluation of candidate material in conjunction with fabrication and closure processes

  20. Test program for closure activities at a mixed waste disposal site at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Harley, J.P. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A 58-acre site at the Savannah River Plant which was used for disposal of low-level radioactive waste and quantities of the hazardous materials lead, cadmium, scintillation fluid, and oil will be the first large waste site at the Savannah River Plant to be permanently closed. The actions leading to closure of the facility will include surface stabilization and capping of the site. Test programs have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of dynamic compaction as a stabilization technique and the feasibility of using locally derived clay as a capping material

  1. Closure Plan for the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-10-30

    A closure plan has been developed to comply with the applicable requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.2 Manual and Guidance. The plan is organized according to the specifications of the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans.

  2. Closure Plan for the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    A closure plan has been developed to comply with the applicable requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.2 Manual and Guidance. The plan is organized according to the specifications of the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans

  3. The application of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Haoxue; Liu Shuyong; Jiang Rutong; Bai Hongcan; Wang Yanwei; Du Yuying; Yang Qiaoji; Qin Yongwen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the value of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases. Methods: Transcatheter closure was performed in 12 patients with congenital heart diseases including 6 ventricular septal defect (VSD), 4 atrial septal defect (ASD), 2 patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), by the Amplatzer occlusion device under local or general anesthesia. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients outcoming with the disappearance of cardiac murmur. All of them could get out of the bed within 6 to 12 hours postoperatively, and were discharged from hospital after 4 to 6 days. Conclusions: Transcatheter treatment of congenital cardiac defects by Amplatzer occlusion device is less traumatic, with good effect, simultaneously

  4. The application of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoxue, Guo; Shuyong, Liu; Rutong, Jiang; Hongcan, Bai; Yanwei, Wang; Yuying, Du; Qiaoji, Yang; Yongwen, Qin [Henan Provincial Corps Hospital, Chinese People' s Police Forces, Zhengzhou (China). Dept. of Surgery

    2003-10-01

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the value of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases. Methods: Transcatheter closure was performed in 12 patients with congenital heart diseases including 6 ventricular septal defect (VSD), 4 atrial septal defect (ASD), 2 patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), by the Amplatzer occlusion device under local or general anesthesia. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients outcoming with the disappearance of cardiac murmur. All of them could get out of the bed within 6 to 12 hours postoperatively, and were discharged from hospital after 4 to 6 days. Conclusions: Transcatheter treatment of congenital cardiac defects by Amplatzer occlusion device is less traumatic, with good effect, simultaneously.

  5. Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: Walk-in pits. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The revised Closure Plan was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits (WIPs) of the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). However, a strategy was developed to include the B Area [a solid waste management unit (SWMU)] with the WIPs so that both areas would be closed under one cap. The plan was presented to the State of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. Therefore, in November 1992, the Closure Plan for B Area and the WIPs was prepared separately from that of the other sites associated with the BCBG and was presented in a RCRA Closure Plan. The Closure Plan revision issued April 1993 was intended to reflect the placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs, revise the closure data, and acknowledge that the disposition of a monitoring well within the closure site could not be verified. A Post-Closure Permit Application (PCPA) was to include the WIPs; however, at the time of submittal, closure of the WIPs had not been certified. This addendum contains information on the WIPs to accompany the BCBG PCPA. The purpose of this document is to supplement the information provided in the BCBG PCPA. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document. Only additional information regarding the WIPs is included in the sections of this document, which correspond to sections of the PCPA submitted in June 1994

  6. A Crack Closure Model and Its Application to Vibrothermography Nondestructive Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefelbein, Bryan Edward

    Vibrothermography nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is in the early stages of research and development, and there exists uncertainty in the fundamental mechanisms and processes by which heat generation occurs. Holland et al. have developed a set of tools which simulate and predict the outcome of a vibrothermography inspection by breaking the inspection into three distinct processes: vibrational excitation, heat generation, and thermal imaging. The stage of vibrothermography which is not well understood is the process by which vibrations are converted to heat at the crack surface. It has been shown that crack closure and closure state impact the resulting heat generation. Despite this, research into the link between partial crack closure and vibrothermography is limited. This work seeks to rectify this gap in knowledge by modeling the behavior of a partially closed crack in response to static external loading and a dynamic vibration. The residual strains left by the plastic wake during fatigue crack growth manifest themselves as contact stresses acting at the crack surface interface. In response to an applied load below the crack opening stress, the crack closure state will evolve, but the crack will remain partially closed. The crack closure model developed in this work is based in linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and describes the behavior of a partially closed crack in response to a tensile external load and non-uniform closure stress distribution. The model builds on work by Fleck to describe the effective length, crack opening displacement, and crack tip stress field for a partially closed crack. These quantities are solved for by first establishing an equilibrium condition which governs the effective or apparent length of the partially closed crack. The equilibrium condition states that, under any external or crack surface loading, the effective crack tip will be located where the effective stress intensity factor is zero. In LEFM, this is equivalent to

  7. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management's (EM's) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE's 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM's accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document

  8. Multipass mining sequence room closures: In situ data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Jones, R.L.; Northrop-Salazar, C.L.; Woerner, S.J.

    1992-12-01

    During the construction of the Thermal/Structural In Situ Test Rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, measurements of the salt displacements were obtained at very early times, essentially concurrent with the mining activity. This was accomplished by emplacing manually read closure gage stations directly at the mining face, actually between the face and the mining machine, immediately upon mining of the intended gage location. Typically, these mining sequence closure measurements were taken within one hour of mining of the location and within one meter of the mining face. Readings were taken at these gage stations as the multipass mining continued, with the gage station reestablished as each successive mining pass destroyed the earlier gage points. Data reduction yields the displacement history during the mining operation. These early mining sequence closure data, when combined with the later data of the permanently emplaced closure gages, gives the total time-dependent closure displacements of the test rooms. This complete closure history is an essential part of assuring that the in situ test databases will provide an adequate basis for validation of the predictive technology of salt creep behavior, as required by the WIPP technology development program for disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt

  9. Road Closures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This is an up to date map of current road closures in Montgomery County.This dataset is updated every few minutes from the Department of Transportation road closure...

  10. Mass extraction container closure integrity physical testing method development for parenteral container closure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Yil; Sagi, Hemi; Goldhammer, Craig; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Container closure integrity (CCI) is a critical factor to ensure that product sterility is maintained over its entire shelf life. Assuring the CCI during container closure (C/C) system qualification, routine manufacturing and stability is important. FDA guidance also encourages industry to develop a CCI physical testing method in lieu of sterility testing in a stability program. A mass extraction system has been developed to check CCI for a variety of container closure systems such as vials, syringes, and cartridges. Various types of defects (e.g., glass micropipette, laser drill, wire) were created and used to demonstrate a detection limit. Leakage, detected as mass flow in this study, changes as a function of defect length and diameter. Therefore, the morphology of defects has been examined in detail with fluid theories. This study demonstrated that a mass extraction system was able to distinguish between intact samples and samples with 2 μm defects reliably when the defect was exposed to air, water, placebo, or drug product (3 mg/mL concentration) solution. Also, it has been verified that the method was robust, and capable of determining the acceptance limit using 3σ for syringes and 6σ for vials. Sterile products must maintain their sterility over their entire shelf life. Container closure systems such as those found in syringes and vials provide a seal between rubber and glass containers. This seal must be ensured to maintain product sterility. A mass extraction system has been developed to check container closure integrity for a variety of container closure systems such as vials, syringes, and cartridges. In order to demonstrate the method's capability, various types of defects (e.g., glass micropipette, laser drill, wire) were created in syringes and vials and were tested. This study demonstrated that a mass extraction system was able to distinguish between intact samples and samples with 2 μm defects reliably when the defect was exposed to air, water

  11. Interferometric Imaging Directly with Closure Phases and Closure Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Johnson, Michael D.; Bouman, Katherine L.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Akiyama, Kazunori; Narayan, Ramesh

    2018-04-01

    Interferometric imaging now achieves angular resolutions as fine as ∼10 μas, probing scales that are inaccessible to single telescopes. Traditional synthesis imaging methods require calibrated visibilities; however, interferometric calibration is challenging, especially at high frequencies. Nevertheless, most studies present only a single image of their data after a process of “self-calibration,” an iterative procedure where the initial image and calibration assumptions can significantly influence the final image. We present a method for efficient interferometric imaging directly using only closure amplitudes and closure phases, which are immune to station-based calibration errors. Closure-only imaging provides results that are as noncommittal as possible and allows for reconstructing an image independently from separate amplitude and phase self-calibration. While closure-only imaging eliminates some image information (e.g., the total image flux density and the image centroid), this information can be recovered through a small number of additional constraints. We demonstrate that closure-only imaging can produce high-fidelity results, even for sparse arrays such as the Event Horizon Telescope, and that the resulting images are independent of the level of systematic amplitude error. We apply closure imaging to VLBA and ALMA data and show that it is capable of matching or exceeding the performance of traditional self-calibration and CLEAN for these data sets.

  12. Closure plan for the proposed Millennium Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, S.; Sisson, R.

    1999-01-01

    A $2.2 billion expansion of the current oil sands operation has been proposed by Suncor Energy Inc. The expansion would more than double the productive capacity of the present facility. As part of the application for this expansion, called Project Millennium, a comprehensive closure plan has been developed and filed by the Corporation. The Plan includes a systematic evaluation of the area to be developed, a description of the development activities planned, and the goals and objectives of the Corporation in re-establishing the landforms and ecosystems concurrently with running the operation. The Plan envisages surface contouring as early as practicable during the mine development, soil reconstruction, and re-establishment of vegetation, surface drainage and wetlands. The Corporation undertakes to monitor the performance of the reclaimed areas based on landform performance, the impact of chemical constituents on the landscape and ecosystem sustainability. An annual monitoring report assessing herbaceous vegetation growth, major species composition, tree and shrub survival and growth rate, groundwater conditions, amount of precipitation, the utility of constructed wetlands for treatment of reclamation area seepage and runoff waters, and wildlife population changes, will be prepared annually. A future research program associated with the Reclamation and Closure Plan will also examine the effectiveness of the reclamation drainage system as fish habitat, and the potential of the proposed end-pit lake to provide a viable aquatic ecosystem. 8 refs., 2 figs

  13. Phenomenology of convection-parameterization closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-I. Yano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Closure is a problem of defining the convective intensity in a given parameterization. In spite of many years of efforts and progress, it is still considered an overall unresolved problem. The present article reviews this problem from phenomenological perspectives. The physical variables that may contribute in defining the convective intensity are listed, and their statistical significances identified by observational data analyses are reviewed. A possibility is discussed for identifying a correct closure hypothesis by performing a linear stability analysis of tropical convectively coupled waves with various different closure hypotheses. Various individual theoretical issues are considered from various different perspectives. The review also emphasizes that the dominant physical factors controlling convection differ between the tropics and extra-tropics, as well as between oceanic and land areas. Both observational as well as theoretical analyses, often focused on the tropics, do not necessarily lead to conclusions consistent with our operational experiences focused on midlatitudes. Though we emphasize the importance of the interplays between these observational, theoretical and operational perspectives, we also face challenges for establishing a solid research framework that is universally applicable. An energy cycle framework is suggested as such a candidate.

  14. Application of a k-epsilon closure to a heated turbulent offset jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, G.; Kumar, R.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The complex flow which occurs when a heated turbulent jet discharges above a cool, isothermal surface was investigated numerically. This flow is influenced by significant flow curvature, buoyancy, impingement, and recirculation. The main features of the flow have been characterized in the literature by the exit Reynolds number and offset ratio. It is the purpose of this study to assess the applicability of a modified k-epsilon closure model to this flow. Comparisons with limited data for the unheated case and flow predictions for the heated case are presented. The impingement distance is determined to within 2 percent of the experimental results. However, detailed velocity profiles are not well predicted near the wall. Curvature modification and the wall boundary condition for epsilon significantly affect the solution. 15 references

  15. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments

  16. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments.

  17. Impact of Different Standard Type A7A Drum Closure-Ring Practices on Gasket Contraction and Bolt Closure Distance– 15621

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, Edward [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Blanton, Paul [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bobbitt, John H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-11

    The Department of Energy, the Savannah River National Laboratory, several manufacturers of specification drums, and the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) are collaborating in the development of a guidance document for DOE contractors and vendors who wish to qualify containers to DOT 7A Type A requirements. Currently, the effort is focused on DOT 7A Type A 208-liter (55-gallons) drums with a standard 12-gauge bolted closure ring. The U.S. requirements, contained in Title 49, Part 178.350 “Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A specifies a competent authority review of the packaging is not required for the transport of (Class 7) radioactive material containing less than Type A quantities of radioactive material. For Type AF drums, a 4 ft. regulatory free drop must be performed, such that the drum “suffers maximum damage.” Although the actual orientation is not defined by the specification, recent studies suggest that maximum damage would result from a shallow angle top impact, where kinetic energy is transferred to the lid, ultimately causing heavy damage to the lid, or even worse, causing the lid to come off. Since each vendor develops closure recommendations/procedures for the drums they manufacture, key parameters applied to drums during closing vary based on vendor. As part of the initial phase of the collaboration, the impact of the closure variants on the ability of the drum to suffer maximum damage is investigated. Specifically, closure testing is performed varying: 1) the amount of torque applied to the closure ring bolt; and, 2) stress relief protocol, including: a) weight of hammer; and, b) orientation that the hammer hits the closure ring. After closure, the amount of drum lid gasket contraction and the distance that the closure bolt moves through the closure ring is measured.

  18. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE@@@s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts @@@ 15436

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Heather; Flach, Greg; Smith, Frank; Langton, Christine; Brown, Kevin; Kosson, David; Samson, Eric; Mallick, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox @@ @@Version 2.0@@@ which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  19. Post-Closure Strategy for Use-Restricted Sites on the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Test and Training Range, and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Post-Closure Strategy is to provide a consistent methodology for continual evaluation of post-closure requirements for use-restricted areas on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to consolidate, modify, or streamline the program. In addition, this document stipulates the creation of a single consolidated Post-Closure Plan that will detail the current post-closure requirements for all active use restrictions (URs) and outlines its implementation and subsequent revision. This strategy will ensure effective management and control of the post-closure sites. There are currently over 200 URs located on the NNSS, NTTR, and TTR. Post-closure requirements were initially established in the Closure Report for each site. In some cases, changes to the post-closure requirements have been implemented through addenda, errata sheets, records of technical change, or letters. Post-closure requirements have been collected from these multiple sources and consolidated into several formats, such as summaries and databases. This structure increases the possibility of inconsistencies and uncertainty. As more URs are established and the post-closure program is expanded, the need for a comprehensive approach for managing the program will increase. Not only should the current requirements be obtainable from a single source that supersedes all previous requirements, but the strategy for modifying the requirements should be standardized. This will enable more effective management of the program into the future. This strategy document and the subsequent comprehensive plan are to be implemented under the assumption that the NNSS and outlying sites will be under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the foreseeable future. This strategy was also developed assuming that regulatory control of the sites remains static. The comprehensive plan is not

  20. The Office of Site Closure: Progress in the Face of Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, J. J.; Murphie, W. E.; Meador, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Office of Site Closure (OSC) was formed in November 1999 when the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) reorganized to focus specifically on site cleanup and closure. OSC's objective is to achieve safe and cost-effective cleanups and closures that are protective of our workers, the public, and the environment, now and in the future. Since its inception, OSC has focused on implementing a culture of safe closure, with emphasis in three primary areas: complete our responsibility for the Closure Sites Rocky Flats, Mound, Fernald, Ashtabula, and Weldon Spring; complete our responsibility for cleanup at sites where the DOE mission has been completed (examples include Battelle King Avenue and Battelle West Jefferson in Columbus, and General Atomics) or where other Departmental organizations have an ongoing mission (examples include the Brookhaven, Livermore, or Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the Nevada Test Site); and create a framework a nd develop specific business closure tools that will help sites close, such as guidance for and decisions on post-contract benefit liabilities, records retention, and Federal employee incentives for site closure. This paper discusses OSC's 2001 progress in achieving site cleanups, moving towards site closure, and developing specific business closure tools to support site closure. It describes the tools used to achieve progress towards cleanup and closure, such as the application of new technologies, changes in contracting approaches, and the development of agreements between sites and with host states. The paper also identifies upcoming challenges and explores options for how Headquarters and the sites can work together to address these challenges. Finally, it articulates OSC's new focus on oversight of Field Offices to ensure they have the systems in place to oversee contractor activities resulting in site cleanups and closures

  1. Upper Incisor Changes Due to Modifying the Point of Application of Forces during Space Closure in MBT Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ravanmehr

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A recent technique (MBT has been introduced for easy and efficient orthodontic treatment by means of straight wire fixed appliances. Although this technique has many advantages, in space closure stage causes up righting problem in upper incisors, which should be adjusted by applying additional torque in anterior region.Purpose: The purpose of this clinical trial was to determine whether there is a significant difference in final incisor inclination (torque of two groups one treated with MBT technique and the other by changing the point of application of the closing force (in anterior region.Materials and Methods: Twelve patients (8 girls, 4 boys with Cl I malocclusion and crowding, whom were candidate for first premolars extraction, were selected.For space closure, 6 anterior teeth (canine to canine in upper and lower jaws ligated and the applied force was from the hooks on canines to hooks on the first molars.After space closure the results compared with the results of a previous study which treatment plan was according to original MBT technique (anterior hooks soldered to arch wire. Forces applied randomly among quadrants by NiTi coil spring (American Orthodontics Co. or active tie backs with elastic modules (Dentaurum Co.Results: The results showed a statistically significant difference between final torques of two techniques (P=0.0001. Also, the rate of space closure with NiTi coils was significantly greater than active tie back (P=0.0001.Conclusion: Anchorage loss in two groups compared and the results indicated significantly lower anchorage loss in NiTi coil spring group (P=0.035.

  2. The collision of healthcare and corporate law in a hospital closure case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, S M

    2001-01-01

    This Article analyzes potential conflicts that arise from both the judicial and administrative approval processes that govern the closure of charitable hospitals through a sale of all or substantially all of their assets. Examining the recent closure attempt by the Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital as an example, the Article highlights the various public health and corporate law issues that are raised when a not-for-profit hospital seeks closure. The Article thoroughly discusses both the statutorily and judicially required approval schemes applicable to the closure of charitable hospitals. The Article also suggests ways in which these conflicts might be avoided or remedied, as well as gives advice regarding hospital board decisionmaking.

  3. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion

  4. 40 CFR 264.228 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... remaining wastes to a bearing capacity sufficient to support final cover; and (iii) Cover the surface....112 must include both a plan for complying with paragraph (a)(1) of this section and a contingent plan... practicably removed at closure; and (ii) The owner or operator must prepare a contingent post-closure plan...

  5. RCRA corrective action and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators' interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE's permitted facilities and interim status facilities

  6. Argon laser peripheral iridoplasty for angle-closure glaucoma in sibilings with weill-marchesani syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, R; Solomon, L D

    1992-01-01

    A patient with Weill-Marchesani syndrome and angle-closure glaucoma had persistent appositional closure after laser iridotomy that was unrelieved by topical application of either miotic or cycloplegic agents. Argon laser peripheral iridoplasty successfully opened the angle. The patient's sister also had Weill-Marchesani syndrome and angle closure unrelieved by laser iridotomy. Angle closure in Weill-Marchesani syndrome and the response to laser iridotomy and treatment with either miotic or cycloplegic agents may be complex and depends on the relative proportion of pupillary block as a mechanism underlying the angle closure, the functional status of the zonular apparatus, and the degree of angle crowding by the peripheral iris in the presence or absence of peripheral anterior synechiae.

  7. Post-operative analgesic requirement in non-closure and closure of peritoneum during open appendectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.W.; Maqsood, R.; Saleem, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the mean post-operative analgesic requirement in non-closure and closure of peritoneum during open appendectomy. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of General Surgery Combined Military Hospital Quetta, from 1st August 2014 to 30th April 2015. Material and Methods: A total of 60 patients were included in this study and were divided into two groups of 30 each. Patients in group A underwent open appendectomy with closure of peritoneum while patients in group B had non-closure of peritoneum during the same procedure. Post-operatively, pain severity was assessed on visual analogue scale (VAS) numeric pain distress scale. On presence of VAS numeric pain distress scale between 5 to 7, intramuscular (IM) diclofenac sodium was given and on score >7, intravascular (IV) tramadol was given. The final outcome was measured at day 0 and day 1. Results: Pain score and analgesic requirements were significantly less in non-closure group than closure group on day 0 and day 1, showing statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Mean post-operative analgesic requirement is significantly less in non-closure group as compared to closure group during open appendectomy. (author)

  8. Primary closure after carotid endarterectomy is not inferior to other closure techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Chaer, Rabih A; Naddaf, Abdallah; El-Shazly, Omar M; Marone, Luke; Makaroun, Michel S

    2016-09-01

    Primary closure after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been much maligned as an inferior technique with worse outcomes than in patch closure. Our purpose was to compare perioperative and long-term results of different CEA closure techniques in a large institutional experience. A consecutive cohort of CEAs between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, was retrospectively analyzed. Closure technique was used to divide patients into three groups: primary longitudinal arteriotomy closure (PRC), patch closure (PAC), and eversion closure (EVC). End points were perioperative events, long-term strokes, and restenosis ≥70%. Multivariate regression models were used to assess the effect of baseline predictors. There were 1737 CEA cases (bilateral, 143; mean age, 71.4 ± 9.3 years; 56.2% men; 35.3% symptomatic) performed during the study period with a mean clinical follow-up of 49.8 ± 36.4 months (range, 0-155 months). More men had primary closure, but other demographic and baseline symptoms were similar between groups. Half the patients had PAC, with the rest evenly distributed between PRC and EVC. The rate of nerve injury was 2.7%, the rate of reintervention for hematoma was 1.5%, and the length of hospital stay was 2.4 ± 3.0 days, with no significant differences among groups. The combined stroke and death rate was 2.5% overall and 3.9% and 1.7% in the symptomatic and asymptomatic cohort, respectively. Stroke and death rates were similar between groups: PRC, 11 (2.7%); PAC, 19 (2.2%); EVC, 13 (2.9%). Multivariate analysis showed baseline symptomatic disease (odds ratio, 2.4; P = .007) and heart failure (odds ratio, 3.1; P = .003) as predictors of perioperative stroke and death, but not the type of closure. Cox regression analysis demonstrated, among other risk factors, no statin use (hazard ratio, 2.1; P = .008) as a predictor of ipsilateral stroke and severe (glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) renal insufficiency (hazard ratio, 2.6; P

  9. 10 CFR 60.112 - Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... repository after permanent closure. 60.112 Section 60.112 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance... environment following permanent closure conform to such generally applicable environmental standards for...

  10. Matching-range-constrained real-time loop closure detection with CNNs features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dongdong; Wang, Chaoqun; Zhang, Bo; Yi, Xiaodong; Tang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    The loop closure detection (LCD) is an essential part of visual simultaneous localization and mapping systems (SLAM). LCD is capable of identifying and compensating the accumulation drift of localization algorithms to produce an consistent map if the loops are checked correctly. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have outperformed state-of-the-art solutions that use traditional hand-crafted features in many computer vision and pattern recognition applications. After the great success of CNNs, there has been much interest in applying CNNs features to robotic fields such as visual LCD. Some researchers focus on using a pre-trained CNNs model as a method of generating an image representation appropriate for visual loop closure detection in SLAM. However, there are many fundamental differences and challenges involved in character between simple computer vision applications and robotic applications. Firstly, the adjacent images in the dataset of loop closure detection might have more resemblance than the images that form the loop closure. Secondly, real-time performance is one of the most critical demands for robots. In this paper, we focus on making use of the feature generated by CNNs layers to implement LCD in real environment. In order to address the above challenges, we explicitly provide a value to limit the matching range of images to solve the first problem; meanwhile we get better results than state-of-the-art methods and improve the real-time performance using an efficient feature compression method.

  11. 200 West Area Ash Pit Demolition Site closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruck, F.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ash Pit Demolition Site had two known demolition events, the first occurred in November of 1984, and the second occurred in June of 1986. These demolition events were a form of thermal treatment for discarded explosive chemical products. Because the Ash Pit Demolition Site will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the site will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) ''Dangerous Waste Regulations'', Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 270.1. The 200 West Area Ash Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan consists of a Part A, Form 3, Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Revision 4) and a closure plan. An explanation of the Part A, Form 3, submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. This closure plan presents a description of the Ash,Pit Demolition Site, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the Ash Pit Demolition Site. Because there were no radioactively contaminated chemicals involved in the demolitions, the information on radionuclides is provided for ''information only''. Remediation of any radioactive contamination is not within the scope of this closure plan. Only dangerous constituents derived from Ash Pit Demolition Site operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i)

  12. Environmental analysis of closure options for waste sites at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.E.; King, C.M.; Looney, B.B.; Stephenson, D.E.; Johnson, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    Previously acceptable waste management practices (e.g., the use of unlined seepage basins) for discarding of wastes from nuclear materials production has resulted in occasional cases of groundwater contamination beneath some disposal sites, mainly in water-table aquifers. Groundwater contaminants include volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other chemicals. The closure of active and inactive waste sites that have received hazardous and/or low-level radioactive materials at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is planned as part of an overall program to protect groundwater quality. DOE developed and submitted to Congress a groundwater protection plan for SRP. This initial plan and subsequent revisions provide the basis for closure of SRP waste sites to comply with applicable groundwater protection requirements. An environmental analysis of the closure options for the criteria waste sites that have received hazardous and/or low-level radioactive wastes was conducted to provide technical support. The several parts of this environmental analysis include description of geohydrologic conditions; determination of waste inventories; definition of closure options; modeling of environmental pathways; assessment of risk; and analysis of project costs. Each of these components of the overall analysis is described in turn in the following paragraphs. Production operations at SRP have generated a variety of solid, hazardous, and low-level radioactive waste materials. Several locations onplant have been used as waste disposal sites for solid and liquid wastes. Seventy-six individual waste sites at 45 distinct geographical locations on SRP have received hazardous, low-level radioactive, or mixed wastes. These waste sites can be categorized into 26 groupings according to the function of the waste disposed. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Ring closure in actin polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Supurna, E-mail: supurna@rri.res.in [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sebanti [Doon University, Dehradun 248001 (India)

    2017-03-18

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers. - Highlights: • Ring closure of biopolymers. • Worm like chain model. • Predictions for experiments.

  14. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE’s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts – 15436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Heather [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, Greg [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, Frank [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, Christine [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, Kevin [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Kosson, David [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, Eric [SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (United States); Mallick, Pramod [US DOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox –“Version 2.0” which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  15. Fatigue crack growth resistance and crack closure behavior in two aluminum alloys for aeronautical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Maria Rodrigues

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-lithium alloys are candidate materials for many aerospace applications because of their high specific strength and elastic modulus. These alloys have several unique characteristics such as excellent fatigue crack growth resistance when compared with that of the conventional 2000 and 7000 series alloys. In this study, fatigue crack propagation behavior has been examined in a commercial thin plate of Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloy (8090, with specific emphasis at the fatigue threshold. The results are compared with those of the traditional Al-Cu-Mg alloy (2024. Fatigue crack closure is used to explain the different behavior of the compared alloys.

  16. RIP Input Tables From WAPDEG for LA Design Selection: Continuous Post-Closure Ventilation Design- Open Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.G. Mon; P.K. Mast; R. Howard; J.H. Lee

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to document (1) the Waste Package Degradation (WAPDEG) version 3.09 (CRWMS M and O 1998b). Software Routine Report for WAPDEG (Version 3.09) simulations used to analyze waste package degradation and failure under the repository exposure conditions characterized by the open loop option of the post-closure ventilation design and, (2) post-processing of these results into tables of waste package degradation time histories suitable for use as input into the Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems version 5.19.0 1 (RIP) computer program (Golder Associates 1998). Specifically, the WAPDEG simulations discussed in this calculation correspond to waste package emplacement conditions (repository environment and design) defined in the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA), with the exception that the open loop option of the post-closure ventilation License Application Design Selection (LADS) Design Alternative (Design Alternative 3b) was analyzed. The open loop post-closure ventilation design alternative, under which airways to the surface remain open after repository closure, could result in substantial cooling and drying of the potential repository. In open loop post-closure ventilation, expanded air heated by waste decay would move up an exhaust shaft, pulling denser, cooler air into the repository through intake shafts. The exchange of air with the atmosphere could remove more heat and moisture. As a result of the enhanced ventilation relative to the TSPA-VA base-case design, different temperature and relative humidity time histories at the waste package surface are calculated (input to the WAPDEG simulations), and consequently different waste package failure histories (as calculated by WAPDEG) result

  17. Full-Thickness Thermal Injury Delays Wound Closure in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    skin replacement is achieved using autologous skin graft or skin substitute graft. While this strategy of early excision and grafting, first proposed in...several investigators have utilized the more appropriate model of burn eschar excision followed by sponta- neous wound closure or by skin graft or...without the application of a skin graft or a skin substitute graft. Furthermore, the effect of interval burn eschar excision on wound closure is also re

  18. Tubular closure device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klahn, F.C.; Nolan, J.H.; Wills, C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for closing openings such as the bore of a conduit and for releasably securing members within the bore. More particularly, this invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in nuclear reactors

  19. Corporate social responsibility for regional sustainability after mine closure: a case study of mining company in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarif, Andi Erwin; Hatori, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Creating a soft-landing path for mine closure is key to the sustainability of the mining region. In this research, we presents a case of mine closure in Soroako, a small mining town in the north-east of South Sulawesi province, in the center of Sulawesi Island in Indonesia. Especially we investigates corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs of a mining company, PT Vale Indonesia Tbk (PTVI), towards a soft-landing of mine closure in this region. The data of the CSR programs are gathered from in-depth interviews, the annual reports and managerial reports. Furthermore we presents an integrated view of CSR to close mining in a sustainable manner. We then evaluate CSR strategies of the company and its performance from this viewpoint. Based on these steps, the way to improve the CSR mine closure scenario for enhancing the regional sustainability is discussed and recommended.

  20. 218-E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruck, F.R.

    1994-01-01

    The 218-E-8 Demolition Site was the site of a single demolition event in November of 1984. This demolition event was a form of thermal treatment for discarded explosive chemical products. Because the 218-E-8 Demolition Site will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the site will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) ''Dangerous Waste Regulations,'' Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 270.1. The 218-E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3, Revision 4, and a closure plan. An explanation of the Part A Form 3, submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. This closure plan presents a description of the 218-E-8 Demolition Site, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the 218-E-8 Demolition Site. Because there were no radioactively contaminated chemicals involved in t he demolitions at the 218-E-8 Borrow Pit site, the information on radionuclides is provided for ''information only.'' Remediation of any radioactive contamination is not within the scope of this closure plan. Only dangerous constituents derived from 218-E-8 Demolition Site operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i)

  1. Post-closure permit application for the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, J.K. Jr.; Kimbrough, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains information related to the closure and post closure of the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin of the Y-12 plant. Information concerning the background of the basin, geology, hydrology, and analysis of the sediments is included

  2. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. The CIRSE registry of closure devices

  3. LLNL/YMP Waste Container Fabrication and Closure Project; GFY technical activity summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program is studying Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a suitable site for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for designing and developing the waste package for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste. This report is a summary of the technical activities for the LLNL/YMP Nuclear Waste Disposal Container Fabrication and Closure Development Project. Candidate welding closure processes were identified in the Phase 1 report. This report discusses Phase 2. Phase 2 of this effort involved laboratory studies to determine the optimum fabrication and closure processes. Because of budget limitations, LLNL narrowed the materials for evaluation in Phase 2 from the original six to four: Alloy 825, CDA 715, CDA 102 (or CDA 122) and CDA 952. Phase 2 studies focused on evaluation of candidate material in conjunction with fabrication and closure processes.

  4. Data-driven non-Markovian closure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, Dmitri; Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Ghil, Michael

    2015-03-01

    This paper has two interrelated foci: (i) obtaining stable and efficient data-driven closure models by using a multivariate time series of partial observations from a large-dimensional system; and (ii) comparing these closure models with the optimal closures predicted by the Mori-Zwanzig (MZ) formalism of statistical physics. Multilayer stochastic models (MSMs) are introduced as both a generalization and a time-continuous limit of existing multilevel, regression-based approaches to closure in a data-driven setting; these approaches include empirical model reduction (EMR), as well as more recent multi-layer modeling. It is shown that the multilayer structure of MSMs can provide a natural Markov approximation to the generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of the MZ formalism. A simple correlation-based stopping criterion for an EMR-MSM model is derived to assess how well it approximates the GLE solution. Sufficient conditions are derived on the structure of the nonlinear cross-interactions between the constitutive layers of a given MSM to guarantee the existence of a global random attractor. This existence ensures that no blow-up can occur for a broad class of MSM applications, a class that includes non-polynomial predictors and nonlinearities that do not necessarily preserve quadratic energy invariants. The EMR-MSM methodology is first applied to a conceptual, nonlinear, stochastic climate model of coupled slow and fast variables, in which only slow variables are observed. It is shown that the resulting closure model with energy-conserving nonlinearities efficiently captures the main statistical features of the slow variables, even when there is no formal scale separation and the fast variables are quite energetic. Second, an MSM is shown to successfully reproduce the statistics of a partially observed, generalized Lotka-Volterra model of population dynamics in its chaotic regime. The challenges here include the rarity of strange attractors in the model's parameter

  5. Comparison of different moment-closure approximations for stochastic chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnoerr, David [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Sanguinetti, Guido [School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Grima, Ramon [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-14

    In recent years, moment-closure approximations (MAs) of the chemical master equation have become a popular method for the study of stochastic effects in chemical reaction systems. Several different MA methods have been proposed and applied in the literature, but it remains unclear how they perform with respect to each other. In this paper, we study the normal, Poisson, log-normal, and central-moment-neglect MAs by applying them to understand the stochastic properties of chemical systems whose deterministic rate equations show the properties of bistability, ultrasensitivity, and oscillatory behaviour. Our results suggest that the normal MA is favourable over the other studied MAs. In particular, we found that (i) the size of the region of parameter space where a closure gives physically meaningful results, e.g., positive mean and variance, is considerably larger for the normal closure than for the other three closures, (ii) the accuracy of the predictions of the four closures (relative to simulations using the stochastic simulation algorithm) is comparable in those regions of parameter space where all closures give physically meaningful results, and (iii) the Poisson and log-normal MAs are not uniquely defined for systems involving conservation laws in molecule numbers. We also describe the new software package MOCA which enables the automated numerical analysis of various MA methods in a graphical user interface and which was used to perform the comparative analysis presented in this paper. MOCA allows the user to develop novel closure methods and can treat polynomial, non-polynomial, as well as time-dependent propensity functions, thus being applicable to virtually any chemical reaction system.

  6. Observations on early and delayed colostomy closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tade, A O; Salami, B A; Ayoade, B A

    2011-06-01

    Traditional treatment of a variety of colorectal pathologies had included a diverting colostomy that was closed eight or more weeks later during a readmission. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the outcomes of early colostomy closure and delayed colostomy closure in patients with temporary colostomies following traumatic and non-traumatic colorectal pathologies. In this study early colostomy closure was the closure of a colostomy within three weeks of its construction, while delayed colostomy closure referred to closure after 3 weeks. Complete records of the 37 adult patients who had temporary colostomy constructed and closed between Jan. 1997 December 2003 for various colorectal pathologies were studied. Fourteen patients had early colostomy closure while 23 had delayed closure. In the early colostomy closure group there were 10 men and 4 women. The mean age of the patients was 28yr with a range of 18-65yr. Colostomies were closed 9-18 days after initial colostomy construction. There was no mortality. Morbidity rate 28.6% (4 out of 14). There were two faecal fistulas (14.3%). Twenty-three patients had delayed colostomy closure 8 weeks to 18 months after initial colostomy construction. These were patients unfit for early surgery after initial colostomy construction because of carcinoma, significant weight loss, or sepsis. There was no mortality. Morbidity rate was 26.1%. There were 3 faecal fistulas (13.2%). Outcomes following early colostomy closure and delayed closure were comparable. Patients fit for surgery should have early closure whilst patients who may have compromised health should have delayed closure.

  7. 76 FR 72643 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Closure of the Hawaii Shallow-Set Pelagic Longline Fishery Due...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    .... 080225267-91393-03] RIN 0648-XA370 Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Closure of the Hawaii Shallow- Set...: Temporary rule; fishery closure. SUMMARY: NMFS closes the shallow-set pelagic longline fishery north of the Equator for all vessels registered under the Hawaii longline limited access program. The shallow-set...

  8. Latching device for securing a closure to a cask for transporting radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Cruz, R.R.; Bieberbach, G.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a latching device for removably securing and sealingly engaging a closure around an opening in a cask defined by an edge of the cask. It comprises: at least three shear key assemblies uniformly spaced around the outer portion of the closure, each of which includes a shear key means having a bolt portion movably mounted in the closure, and a latch portion that is insertable into and retractable out of a slot means in the cask edge in response to the application of a closing and an opening force applied to the bolt portion, at least one drive mechanism located within a cavity in the closure and connected to the bolt portion of the shear key assemblies for applying the closing and opening forces to the bolt portions

  9. Sternal exploration or closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAC - vacuum-assisted closure - sternal wound; Sternal dehiscence; Sternal infection ... in the wound to look for signs of infection Remove dead or infected ... use a VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) dressing. It is a negative ...

  10. Successful completion of a RCRA closure for the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippitt, J.M.; Kolthoff, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful completion of a RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) closure of a HF (hydrofluoric acid) tank car at FEMP, which is on the national priorities list of hazardous waste sites and is undergoing CERCLA remediation. The HF tank car closure was conducted by FERMCO. Through a combination of sound planning and team work, the HF tank car was closed safely and ahead of schedule. During > 22,000 hr field work required for construction modifications and neutralization of 9,600 gallons of HF and decontamination rinseates, there were no OSHA recordable incidents. The system design avoided additional costs by maximizing use of existing equipment and facilities. This successful closure of the HF tank car demonstrates FEMP's commitment to reducing risks and cleaning up the facility in a manner consistent with objectives of RCRA regulations and the Ohio EPA hazardous waste rules. This in turn facilitated ongoing negotiations with Ohio EPA to integrate RCRA closure and the ongoing CERCLA remediation activities. This paper addresses why the unit was clean closed under an approved RCRA Closure Plan. Integration of EPA regulations for RCRA and CERCLA programs and the DOE-Orders impacting design, construction and operation of an acid neutralization system is also reviewed. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned in the process in preparing the closure plant and through final project close out

  11. 16. Optimal guidance of percutaneous device closure of PDA by transthoracic echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alobaidan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is common congenital cardiac lesion and the most accepted way of management is transcatheter occlusion by device which is usually done under fluoroscopy guidance. Transoesophageal echo cardiography and transaortic imaging were used in adult to guide the procedure which is with certain applications in pediatric age group transthoracic echocardiography (TTE in pediatric population provides excellent images for PDA and may replace the use of fluoroscopy to guide PDA closure at least in special situations. To highlight the feasibility of device closure under guidance of TTE to be applied in sick patients who are not suitable for transfer to cardiac catheter laboratory or those with contraindication to contrast and or radiation application. 18 patients from July 2013 to May 2015 underwent TTE guidance device closure of PDA, 1 patient was excluded after device embolization which necessitate retrieval under fluoroscopy (fluoro.. Conscious sedation was used in 17 patients except 1 who was sick and already ventilated in ICU, there were 11 female and 7 male, antegrade approach was used in 10 patients with partial fluoro and retrograde approach in 8 patients without fluoro. Median age is 7 months, median weight is 8 kg (3.2–11 kg, 2 patients with renal impairment, 2 with Leukemia, median procedure time is 35 min, median fluoro. is 2.2 min, PDA size were small in 13 patients and moderate in 5, immediate closure is achieved in all. The devices were ADOI, ADOS, ADOII, Occlutech, and AVP2. Device embolization in 1 with successful retrieval and second device was used with complete closure percutaneous PDA closure under TTE guidance is feasible, safe and recommended in selected patients with certain situation.

  12. Model-Based Comprehensive Analysis of School Closure Policies for Mitigating Influenza Epidemics and Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumanelli, Laura; Ajelli, Marco; Merler, Stefano; Ferguson, Neil M; Cauchemez, Simon

    2016-01-01

    School closure policies are among the non-pharmaceutical measures taken into consideration to mitigate influenza epidemics and pandemics spread. However, a systematic review of the effectiveness of alternative closure policies has yet to emerge. Here we perform a model-based analysis of four types of school closure, ranging from the nationwide closure of all schools at the same time to reactive gradual closure, starting from class-by-class, then grades and finally the whole school. We consider policies based on triggers that are feasible to monitor, such as school absenteeism and national ILI surveillance system. We found that, under specific constraints on the average number of weeks lost per student, reactive school-by-school, gradual, and county-wide closure give comparable outcomes in terms of optimal infection attack rate reduction, peak incidence reduction or peak delay. Optimal implementations generally require short closures of one week each; this duration is long enough to break the transmission chain without leading to unnecessarily long periods of class interruption. Moreover, we found that gradual and county closures may be slightly more easily applicable in practice as they are less sensitive to the value of the excess absenteeism threshold triggering the start of the intervention. These findings suggest that policy makers could consider school closure policies more diffusely as response strategy to influenza epidemics and pandemics, and the fact that some countries already have some experience of gradual or regional closures for seasonal influenza outbreaks demonstrates that logistic and feasibility challenges of school closure strategies can be to some extent overcome.

  13. Full closure strategic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The full closure strategic analysis was conducted to create a decision process whereby full roadway : closures for construction and maintenance activities can be evaluated and approved or denied by CDOT : Traffic personnel. The study reviewed current...

  14. Crack closure, a literature study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, M.

    1993-08-01

    In this report crack closure is treated. The state of the art is reviewed. Different empirical formulas for determining the crack closure are compared with each other, and their benefits are discussed. Experimental techniques for determining the crack closure stress are discussed, and some results from fatigue tests are also reported. Experimental data from the literature are reported.

  15. Integer programming theory, applications, and computations

    CERN Document Server

    Taha, Hamdy A

    1975-01-01

    Integer Programming: Theory, Applications, and Computations provides information pertinent to the theory, applications, and computations of integer programming. This book presents the computational advantages of the various techniques of integer programming.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general categorization of integer applications and explains the three fundamental techniques of integer programming. This text then explores the concept of implicit enumeration, which is general in a sense that it is applicable to any well-defined binary program. Other

  16. Revisit to Grad's Closure and Development of Physically Motivated Closure for Phenomenological High-Order Moment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, R. S.; Nagdewe, S. P.

    2011-01-01

    The Grad's closure for the high-order moment equation is revisited and, by extending his theory, a physically motivated closure is developed for the one-dimensional velocity shear gas flow. The closure is based on the physical argument of the relative importance of various terms appearing in the moment equation. Also, the closure is derived such that the resulting theory may be inclusive of the well established linear theory (Navier-Stokes-Fourier) as limiting case near local thermal equilibrium.

  17. Programming Language Software For Graphics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    New approach reduces repetitive development of features common to different applications. High-level programming language and interactive environment with access to graphical hardware and software created by adding graphical commands and other constructs to standardized, general-purpose programming language, "Scheme". Designed for use in developing other software incorporating interactive computer-graphics capabilities into application programs. Provides alternative to programming entire applications in C or FORTRAN, specifically ameliorating design and implementation of complex control and data structures typifying applications with interactive graphics. Enables experimental programming and rapid development of prototype software, and yields high-level programs serving as executable versions of software-design documentation.

  18. Construction quality assurance closure report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Pits 1 and 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document presents the Final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) report for the closure cover system of two mixed, low-level radioactive and hazardous waste landfills (pits) at Site 300. Site 300, operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is located in the Altamont Hills, approximately 15 miles southeast of Livermore, California. The purpose of this report is to document the CQA program established to assure that construction is completed in accordance with the design intent and the approved Closure and Post Closure Plans dated May 1989 and revised January 1990 (EPA ID Number: CA 2890090002). Inclusive within the Closure and Post Closure Plan were the CQA Plan and the Technical Specifications for the final cover system. This report contains a complete narrative with photographic documentation of the construction activities and progress, problems encountered and solutions utilized, and third party testing and monitoring results, thus establishing the verification of compliance with the Quality Assurance Plan for the project

  19. Transcatheter closure, mini-invasive closure and open-heart surgical repair for treatment of perimembranous ventricular septal defects in children: a protocol for a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tao; Yi, Kang; Ding, Zhao-Hong; Hou, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xing-Guang; Wang, Xin-Kuan; Ge, Long; Tian, Jin-Hui

    2017-06-21

    Both transcatheter device closure and surgical repair are effective treatments with excellent midterm outcomes for perimembranous ventricular septal defects (pmVSDs) in children. The mini-invasive periventricular device occlusion technique has become prevalent in research and application, but evidence is limited for the assessment of transcatheter closure, mini-invasive closure and open-heart surgical repair. This study comprehensively compares the efficacy, safety and costs of transcatheter closure, mini-invasive closure and open-heart surgical repair for treatment of pmVSDs in children using Bayesian network meta-analysis. A systematic search will be performed using Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, PubMed, EMBASE.com and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to include random controlled trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies comparing the efficacy, safety and costs of transcatheter closure, mini-invasive closure and open-heart surgical repair. The risk of bias for the included prospective or retrospective cohort studies will be evaluated according to the risk of bias in non-randomised studies of interventions (ROBINS-I). For random controlled trials, we will use risk of bias tool from Cochrane Handbook version 5.1.0. A Bayesian network meta-analysis will be conducted using R-3.3.2 software. Ethical approval and patient consent are not required since this study is a network meta-analysis based on published trials. The results of this network meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CRD42016053352. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. End-of-year closure 2011/2012

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resouces Department

    2011-01-01

    (Application of Articles R II 4.38 and R II 4.39 of the Staff Regulations) Annual closure of the site of the Organization during the Christmas holidays and days of special leave granted by the Director-General : The Laboratory will be closed from Thursday 22 December 2011 to Wednesday 4 January 2012 inclusive (without deduction of annual leave). The first working day in the New Year will be Thursday 5 January 2012. Tel. 73903

  1. Evaluation of a novel trocar-site closure and comparison with a standard Carter-Thomason closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Junco, Michael; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Juncal, Samuel; Yoon, Renai; Landman, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare a novel trocars-site closure device, the WECK EFx™ Endo Fascial Closure System (EFx) with the Carter-Thomason CloseSure System® (CT) for the closure of laparoscopic trocar site defects created by a 12-mm dilating trocar. We created standardized laparoscopic trocars-site abdominal wall defects in cadaver models using a standard 12-mm laparoscopic dilating trocar. Trocar defects were closed in a randomized fashion using one of the two closure systems. We recorded time and number of attempts needed for complete defect closure. In addition, we recorded the ability to maintain pneumoperitoneum, endoscopic visualization, safety, security, and facility based on the surgeon's subjective evaluations. We compared outcomes for the EFx and CT closure systems. We created 72 standardized laparoscopic trocars-site abdominal wall defects. The mean time needed for complete defect closure was 98.53 seconds (±28.9) for the EFx compared with 133.61 seconds (±54.61) for the CT (Psafety were 2.92 for EFx vs 2.19 for CT (Pvs 1.83 for EFx and CT, respectively (Pvs 2.33 for CT (P=0.022). No significant difference was observed between the EFx and the CT systems for endoscopic visualization (2.28 vs 2.50, P=0.080). In this in vitro cadaver trial, the EFx was superior in terms of time needed to complete defect closure, safety, and facility. CT was superior in terms of maintenance of pneumoperitoneum. Both systems were equal in the number of attempts needed to complete the defect closure and endoscopic visualization.

  2. Planning for closures of hazardous waste land disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.H.; Kelly, B.A.; DeLozier, M.F.P.; Manrod, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eight hazardous waste land disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) under an integrated multi-year program. The units, some of which date back to the early 1950s and include five surface impoundments, two landfills and a land treatment unit, have been used for the management of a variety of types of hazardous wastes. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. The units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. Closure of all eight units must be initiated by November 8, 1988. Funding for the eight closures is being provided by a new Department of Energy budget category, the environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to allow for a more rapid response to environmental problems and regulatory requirements. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA) has been identified for ERBC funding to close the land disposal units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the project scope has required the development of a detailed set of assumptions and a confirmation program for each assumption. Other significant activities in the CAPCA project include risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated project schedule

  3. Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report, Amchitka Island, Alaska, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA/NSO) remediated six areas associated with Amchitka mud pit release sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. This included the construction of seven closure caps. To ensure the integrity and effectiveness of remedial action, the mud pit sites are to be inspected every five years as part of DOE's long-term monitoring and surveillance program. In August of 2006, the closure caps were inspected in accordance with the ''Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Plan for Amchitka Island Mud Pit Release Sites'' (Rev. 0, November 2005). This post-closure monitoring report provides the 2006 cap inspection results.

  4. The CFFTP technology applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP) was originally conceived as having a Technology Applications Program to help fulfill its mandate of extending and adapting existing Canadian technology for use in international fusion programs. This technology was determined to be materials, breeder technology, remote handling, health and saftey, and tritium fuel systems. The CFFTP Applications Program has done work for the STARFIRE, MARS and TFTR reactors as well as developing two computer codes for tritium fuel systems. In the future the Technology Applications Program will be involved in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) as well as work for NET, JET and Frascati

  5. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  6. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  7. Modeling and Simulating Passenger Behavior for a Station Closure in a Rail Transit Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haodong; Han, Baoming; Li, Dewei; Wu, Jianjun; Sun, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    A station closure is an abnormal operational situation in which the entrances or exits of a rail transit station have to be closed for some time due to an unexpected incident. A novel approach is developed to estimate the impacts of the alternative station closure scenarios on both passenger behavioral choices at the individual level and passenger demand at the disaggregate level in a rail transit network. Therefore, the contributions of this study are two-fold: (1) A basic passenger behavior optimization model is mathematically constructed based on 0–1 integer programming to describe passengers’ responses to alternative origin station closure scenarios and destination station closure scenarios; this model also considers the availability of multi-mode transportation and the uncertain duration of the station closure; (2) An integrated solution algorithm based on the passenger simulation is developed to solve the proposed model and to estimate the effects of a station closure on passenger demand in a rail transit network. Furthermore, 13 groups of numerical experiments based on the Beijing rail transit network are performed as case studies with 2,074,267 records of smart card data. The comparisons of the model outputs and the manual survey show that the accuracy of our proposed behavior optimization model is approximately 80%. The results also show that our model can be used to capture the passenger behavior and to quantitatively estimate the effects of alternative closure scenarios on passenger flow demand for the rail transit network. Moreover, the closure duration and its overestimation greatly influence the individual behavioral choices of the affected passengers and the passenger demand. Furthermore, if the rail transit operator can more accurately estimate the closure duration (namely, as g approaches 1), the impact of the closure can be somewhat mitigated. PMID:27935963

  8. Modeling and Simulating Passenger Behavior for a Station Closure in a Rail Transit Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodong Yin

    Full Text Available A station closure is an abnormal operational situation in which the entrances or exits of a rail transit station have to be closed for some time due to an unexpected incident. A novel approach is developed to estimate the impacts of the alternative station closure scenarios on both passenger behavioral choices at the individual level and passenger demand at the disaggregate level in a rail transit network. Therefore, the contributions of this study are two-fold: (1 A basic passenger behavior optimization model is mathematically constructed based on 0-1 integer programming to describe passengers' responses to alternative origin station closure scenarios and destination station closure scenarios; this model also considers the availability of multi-mode transportation and the uncertain duration of the station closure; (2 An integrated solution algorithm based on the passenger simulation is developed to solve the proposed model and to estimate the effects of a station closure on passenger demand in a rail transit network. Furthermore, 13 groups of numerical experiments based on the Beijing rail transit network are performed as case studies with 2,074,267 records of smart card data. The comparisons of the model outputs and the manual survey show that the accuracy of our proposed behavior optimization model is approximately 80%. The results also show that our model can be used to capture the passenger behavior and to quantitatively estimate the effects of alternative closure scenarios on passenger flow demand for the rail transit network. Moreover, the closure duration and its overestimation greatly influence the individual behavioral choices of the affected passengers and the passenger demand. Furthermore, if the rail transit operator can more accurately estimate the closure duration (namely, as g approaches 1, the impact of the closure can be somewhat mitigated.

  9. Modeling and Simulating Passenger Behavior for a Station Closure in a Rail Transit Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haodong; Han, Baoming; Li, Dewei; Wu, Jianjun; Sun, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    A station closure is an abnormal operational situation in which the entrances or exits of a rail transit station have to be closed for some time due to an unexpected incident. A novel approach is developed to estimate the impacts of the alternative station closure scenarios on both passenger behavioral choices at the individual level and passenger demand at the disaggregate level in a rail transit network. Therefore, the contributions of this study are two-fold: (1) A basic passenger behavior optimization model is mathematically constructed based on 0-1 integer programming to describe passengers' responses to alternative origin station closure scenarios and destination station closure scenarios; this model also considers the availability of multi-mode transportation and the uncertain duration of the station closure; (2) An integrated solution algorithm based on the passenger simulation is developed to solve the proposed model and to estimate the effects of a station closure on passenger demand in a rail transit network. Furthermore, 13 groups of numerical experiments based on the Beijing rail transit network are performed as case studies with 2,074,267 records of smart card data. The comparisons of the model outputs and the manual survey show that the accuracy of our proposed behavior optimization model is approximately 80%. The results also show that our model can be used to capture the passenger behavior and to quantitatively estimate the effects of alternative closure scenarios on passenger flow demand for the rail transit network. Moreover, the closure duration and its overestimation greatly influence the individual behavioral choices of the affected passengers and the passenger demand. Furthermore, if the rail transit operator can more accurately estimate the closure duration (namely, as g approaches 1), the impact of the closure can be somewhat mitigated.

  10. Scope and closures

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    No matter how much experience you have with JavaScript, odds are you don’t fully understand the language. This concise yet in-depth guide takes you inside scope and closures, two core concepts you need to know to become a more efficient and effective JavaScript programmer. You’ll learn how and why they work, and how an understanding of closures can be a powerful part of your development skillset.

  11. The impact of public hospital closure on medical and residency education: implications and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kara Odom; Calmes, Daphne; Hanna, Nancy; Baker, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Challenges around safety-net hospital closure have impacted medical student and resident exposure to urban public healthcare sites that may influence their future practice choices. To assess the impact of the closure of a public safety-net teaching hospital for the clinical medical education of Charles Drew University medical students and residents. Retrospective cohort study of medical students' and residents' and clinical placement into safety-net experiences after the closure of the primary teaching hospital. The hospital closure impacted both medical student and residency training experiences. Only 71% (17/24) of medical student rotations and 13% (23/180) of residents were maintained at public safety-net clinical sittings. The closure of the public safety-net hospital resulted in the loss of 36% of residency training spots sponsored by historically black medical schools in the United States and an even larger negative impact on the number of physicians training in underserved urban areas of Los Angeles County. While the medical educational program changes undertaken in the wake of hospital closure have negatively affected the immediate clinical educational experiences of medical students and residents, it remains to be seen whether the training site location changes will alter their long-term preferences in specialty choice and practice location.

  12. Uranium ISR Mine Closure — General Concepts and Model-Based Simulation of Natural Attenuation for South-Australian Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeuken, B.; Märten, H.; Woods, P., E-mail: horst.maerten@heathgate.com.au [Heathgate Resources Pty. Ltd. (Heathgate), Adelaide (Australia); Kalka, H.; Nicolai, J. [Umwelt- und Ingenieurtechnik GmbH Dresden (UIT), Dresden (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Heathgate has demonstrated the effect of natural attenuation (NA) in post in-situ recovery (ISR) aquifer regions during the operation of the Beverley mine since 2001. Enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) has been considered as the key component of the mine closure concept for the new Beverley Four Mile (BFM) project, complemented by an extensive monitoring program. Data from batch and column tests for BFM core samples was used to calibrate a reactive transport model, whose application in conjunction with the hydrological modelling of the BFM aquifer has shown that NA will result in the restoration of the aquifer in time. ENA within a staged mine development program under the site-specific circumstances is discussed. (author)

  13. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire

  14. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet (ft)) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area

  15. Cost effectiveness of risk-based closures at UST sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruton, K.M.; Baker, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    Risk-based closures have been achieved at Underground Storage Tank (UST) sites throughout the country for a major transportation company. The risk-based closures were cost-effective because a streamlined risk-based approach was used instead of the generic baseline risk assessment approach. USEPA has recently provided guidance encouraging the use of risk-based methodology for achieving closure at UST sites. The risk-based approach used in achieving the site closures involved an identification of potential human and ecological receptors and exposure pathways, and a comparison of maximum onsite chemical concentrations to applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). The ARARs used in the evaluation included Federal and/or State Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for groundwater and risk-based screening levels for soils. If the maximum concentrations were above the screening levels, a baseline risk assessment was recommended. In several instances, however, the risk-based approach resulted in a regulatory agency acceptance of a ''no further action'' alternative at UST sites which did not pose a significant threat to human health and the environment. The cost of the streamlined risk-based approach is approximately $3,500, while a baseline risk assessment for the same UST site could cost up to $10,000 or more. The use of the streamlined risk-based approach has proven to be successful for achieving a ''no further action'' outcome for the client at a reasonable cost

  16. Closure for spent-fuel transport and storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahner, S.; Knackstedt, H.G.; Srostlik, P.

    1980-01-01

    The container has a transport closure and a shielding closure. This shielding closure consists of two pieces (double closure system), which can be fartened to one another like a bayonet fixing. A central motion of rotation is enough to open the closure. It can be done remote-controlled as well as manually. (DG) [de

  17. Echocardiographic predictors of coil vs device closure in patients undergoing percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushdy, Alaa; Abd El Razek, Yasmeen; Mamdouh Tawfik, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    To determine anatomic and hemodynamic echocardiographic predictors for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) device vs coil closure. Seventy-six patients who were referred for elective transcatheter PDA closure were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent full echocardiogram including measurement of the PDA pulmonary end diameter, color flow width and extent, peak and end-diastolic Doppler gradients across the duct, diastolic flow reversal, left atrial dimensions and volume, left ventricular sphericity index, and volumes. The study group was subdivided into 2 subgroups based on the mode of PDA closure whether by coil (n = 42) or device (n = 34). Using univariate analysis there was a highly significant difference between the 2 groups as regard the pulmonary end diameter measured in both the suprasternal and parasternal short-axis views as well as the color flow width and color flow extent (P closure group had statistically significant higher end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes indexed, left atrial volume, and diastolic flow reversal. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed a pulmonary end diameter cutoff point from the suprasternal view > 2.5 mm and from parasternal short-axis view > 2.61 mm to have the highest balanced sensitivity and specificity to predict the likelihood for device closure (AUC 0.971 and 0.979 respectively). The pulmonary end diameter measured from the suprasternal view was the most independent predictor of device closure. The selection between PDA coil or device closure can be done on the basis of multiple anatomic and hemodynamic echocardiographic variables. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  19. Comparison of Outcomes between Early Fascial Closure and Delayed Abdominal Closure in Patients with Open Abdomen: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to the present, the optimal time to close an open abdomen remains controversial. This study was designed to evaluate whether early fascial abdominal closure had advantages over delayed approach for open abdomen populations. Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched until April 2013. Search terms included “open abdomen,” “abdominal compartment syndrome,” “laparostomy,” “celiotomy,” “abdominal closure,” “primary,” “delayed,” “permanent,” “fascial closure,” and “definitive closure.” Open abdomen was defined as “fail to close abdominal fascia after a laparotomy.” Mortality, complications, and length of stay were compared between early and delayed fascial closure. In total, 3125 patients were included for final analysis, and 1942 (62% patients successfully achieved early fascial closure. Vacuum assisted fascial closure had no impact on pooled fascial closure rate. Compared with delayed abdominal closure, early fascial closure significantly reduced mortality (12.3% versus 24.8%, RR, 0.53, P<0.0001 and complication incidence (RR, 0.68, P<0.0001. The mean interval from open abdomen to definitive closure ranged from 2.2 to 14.6 days in early fascial closure groups, but from 32.5 to 300 days in delayed closure groups. This study confirmed clinical advantages of early fascial closure over delayed approach in treatment of patients with open abdomen.

  20. HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLOSURE PROJECT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, K.D.; Wessman, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is in the process of closing two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 1.14 million liter (300,000 gallon) tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities. The basic tank closure sequence is as follows: Empty the tank to the residual heel using the existing jets; Video and sample the heel; Replace steam jets with new jet at a lower position in the tank, and remove additional material; Flush tank, piping and secondary containment with demineralized water; Video and sample the heel; Evaluate decontamination effectiveness; Displace the residual heel with multiple placements of grout; and Grout piping, vaults and remaining tank volume. Design, development, and deployment of a remotely operated tank cleaning system were completed in June 2002. The system incorporates many commercially available components, which have been adapted for application in cleaning high-level waste tanks. The system is cost-effective since it also utilizes existing waste transfer technology (steam jets), to remove tank heel solids from the tank bottoms during the cleaning operations. Remotely operated directional spray nozzles, automatic rotating wash balls, video monitoring equipment, decontamination spray-rings, and

  1. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in the management of lung abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziklavari, Zsolt; Ried, Michael; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2014-09-06

    Despite significant advances in the treatment of thoracic infections, complex lung abscess remains a problem in modern thoracic surgery. We describe the novel application of vacuum-assisted closure for the treatment of a lung abscess. The technical details and preliminary results are reported. After the initial failed conservative treatment of an abscess, minimally invasive surgical intervention was performed with vacuum-assisted closure. The vacuum sponges were inserted in the abscess cavity at the most proximal point to the pleural surface. The intercostal space of the chest wall above the entering place was secured by a soft tissue retractor. The level of suction was initially set to 100 mm Hg, with a maximum suction of 125 mm Hg. The sponge was changed once on the 3rd postoperative day. The abscess cavity was rapidly cleaned and decreased in size. The mini-thoracotomy could be closed on the 9th postoperative day. Closure of the cavity was simple, without any short- or long-term treatment failure. This technique reduced the trauma associated with the procedure. The patient was discharged on the 11th postoperative day. Vacuum-assisted closure systems should be considered for widespread use as an alternative option for the treatment of complicated pulmonary abscess in elderly, debilitated, immunocompromised patients after failed conservative treatment.

  2. 50 CFR 648.161 - Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Bluefish Fishery § 648.161 Closures. (a) EEZ closure. NMFS shall close the EEZ to fishing for bluefish by... dealer permit holders that no commercial quota is available for landing bluefish in that state. ...

  3. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B ampersand W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE's Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used to measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ at depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes, measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics. This paper presents a description and the results of the field tests. The results were used to characterize the lower detection limits, precision and bias of the system, which allowed the DOE to judge the monitoring system's ability to meet its long-term post-closure radiation monitoring needs. Based on the test results, the monitoring system has been redesigned for fabrication and testing in a potential Phase III of this program. If the DOE feels that this system can meet its needs and chooses to continue into Phase III of this program, this redesigned full scale prototype system will be built and tested for a period of approximately a year. Such a system can be used at a variety of radioactively contaminated sites

  4. Applications of Genetic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunholt, Hans; Toma, Laura

    1996-01-01

    In this report a study of genetic programming (GP) has been performed with respect to a number of applications such as Symbolic function regression, Solving Symbolic Differential Equations, Image encoding, the ant problem etc.......In this report a study of genetic programming (GP) has been performed with respect to a number of applications such as Symbolic function regression, Solving Symbolic Differential Equations, Image encoding, the ant problem etc....

  5. Predicting Financial Distress and Closure in Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, George M; Kaufman, Brystana G; Pink, George H

    2017-06-01

    Annual rates of rural hospital closure have been increasing since 2010, and hospitals that close have poor financial performance relative to those that remain open. This study develops and validates a latent index of financial distress to forecast the probability of financial distress and closure within 2 years for rural hospitals. Hospital and community characteristics are used to predict the risk of financial distress 2 years in the future. Financial and community data were drawn for 2,466 rural hospitals from 2000 through 2013. We tested and validated a model predicting a latent index of financial distress (FDI), measured by unprofitability, equity decline, insolvency, and closure. Using the predicted FDI score, hospitals are assigned to high, medium-high, medium-low, and low risk of financial distress for use by practitioners. The FDI forecasts 8.01% of rural hospitals to be at high risk of financial distress in 2015, 16.3% as mid-high, 46.8% as mid-low, and 28.9% as low risk. The rate of closure for hospitals in the high-risk category is 4 times the rate in the mid-high category and 28 times that in the mid-low category. The ability of the FDI to discriminate hospitals experiencing financial distress is supported by a c-statistic of .74 in a validation sample. This methodology offers improved specificity and predictive power relative to existing measures of financial distress applied to rural hospitals. This risk assessment tool may inform programs at the federal, state, and local levels that provide funding or support to rural hospitals. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Comparison of fasciotomy wound closures using traditional dressing changes and the vacuum-assisted closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannis, John; Angobaldo, Jeff; Marks, Malcolm; DeFranzo, Anthony; David, Lisa; Molnar, Joseph; Argenta, Louis

    2009-04-01

    Fasciotomy wounds can be a major contributor to length of stay for patients as well as a difficult reconstructive challenge. Once the compartment pressure has been relieved and stabilized, the wound should be closed as quickly and early as possible to avoid later complications. Skin grafting can lead to morbidity and scarring at both the donor and fasciotomy site. Primary closure results in a more functional and esthetic outcome with less morbidity for the patient, but can often be difficult to achieve secondary to edema, skin retraction, and skin edge necrosis. Our objective was to examine fasciotomy wound outcomes, including time to definitive closure, comparing traditional wet-to-dry dressings, and the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. This retrospective chart review included a consecutive series of patients over a 10-year period. This series included 458 patients who underwent 804 fasciotomies. Of these fasciotomy wounds, 438 received exclusively VAC. dressings, 270 received only normal saline wet-to-dry dressings, and 96 were treated with a combination of both. Of the sample, 408 patients were treated with exclusively VAC therapy or wet-to-dry dressings and 50 patients were treated with a combination of both. In comparing all wounds, there was a statistically significant higher rate of primary closure using the VAC versus traditional wet-to-dry dressings (P lower extremities and P extremities). The time to primary closure of wounds was shorter in the VAC. group in comparison with the non-VAC group. This study has shown that the use of the VAC for fasciotomy wound closure results in a higher rate of primary closure versus traditional wet-to-dry dressings. In addition, the time to primary closure of wounds or time to skin grafting is shorter when the VAC was employed. The VAC used in the described settings decreases hospitalization time, allows for earlier rehabilitation, and ultimately leads to increased patient satisfaction.

  7. Overview of the closure approach for the Hanford Site single-shell tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.H.

    1991-09-01

    The disposal of chemical and radioactive waste stored within the single-shell tanks (SST) represents one of the most significant waste management problems at the Hanford Site. A comprehensive program has been established to obtain analytical data regarding the chemical and radiological constituents within these tanks. This information will be used to support the development of a supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) and ultimately to aid in the selection of a final disposal option. This paper discusses some of the technical options and major regulatory issues associated with SST waste retrieval and in situ waste treatment and disposal. Certain closure options and treatment technologies will require further development before they can be implemented or accepted as being useful. In addition, continued negotiations with the regulatory authorities will be required to determine the preferred closure option and the regulatory pathway to accommodate such closure

  8. Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    From 1975 to 1991 the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites (HPADS) were used for demolition events. These demolition events were a form of thermal treatment for spent or abandoned chemical waste. Because the HPADS will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the sites will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy closure requirements of WAC 173-303-680 and for the thermal treatment closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the HPADS, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the HPADS. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. Only dangerous constituents derived from HPADS operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i). The HPADS are actually two distinct soil closure areas within the Hanford Patrol Academy training area

  9. Recommended management practices for operation and closure of shallow injection wells at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act established the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program to ensure that underground injection of wastes does not endanger an underground source of drinking water. Under UIC regulations, an injection well is a hole in the ground, deeper than it is wide, that receives wastes or other fluid substances. Types of injection wells range from deep cased wells to shallow sumps, drywells, and drainfields. The report describes the five classes of UIC wells and summarizes relevant regulations for each class of wells and for the UIC program. The main focus of the report is Class IV and V shallow injection wells. Class IV wells are prohibited and should be closed when they are identified. Class V wells are generally authorized by rule, but EPA or a delegated state may require a permit for a Class V well. This report provides recommendations on sound operating and closure practices for shallow injection wells. In addition the report contains copies of several relevant EPA documents that provide additional information on well operation and closure. Another appendix contains information on the UIC programs in 21 states in which there are DOE facilities discharging to injection wells. The appendix includes the name of the responsible regulatory agency and contact person, a summary of differences between the state's regulations and Federal regulations, and any closure guidelines for Class IV and V wells

  10. Evaluation of Two Energy Balance Closure Parametrizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Fabian; De Roo, Frederik; Kohnert, Katrin; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Mauder, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    A general lack of energy balance closure indicates that tower-based eddy-covariance (EC) measurements underestimate turbulent heat fluxes, which calls for robust correction schemes. Two parametrization approaches that can be found in the literature were tested using data from the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft and from tower-based measurements of the German Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO) programme. Our analysis shows that the approach of Huang et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 127:273-292, 2008), based on large-eddy simulation, is not applicable to typical near-surface flux measurements because it was developed for heights above the surface layer and over homogeneous terrain. The biggest shortcoming of this parametrization is that the grid resolution of the model was too coarse so that the surface layer, where EC measurements are usually made, is not properly resolved. The empirical approach of Panin and Bernhofer (Izvestiya Atmos Oceanic Phys 44:701-716, 2008) considers landscape-level roughness heterogeneities that induce secondary circulations and at least gives a qualitative estimate of the energy balance closure. However, it does not consider any feature of landscape-scale heterogeneity other than surface roughness, such as surface temperature, surface moisture or topography. The failures of both approaches might indicate that the influence of mesoscale structures is not a sufficient explanation for the energy balance closure problem. However, our analysis of different wind-direction sectors shows that the upwind landscape-scale heterogeneity indeed influences the energy balance closure determined from tower flux data. We also analyzed the aircraft measurements with respect to the partitioning of the "missing energy" between sensible and latent heat fluxes and we could confirm the assumption of scalar similarity only for Bowen ratios 1.

  11. ASD Closure in Structural Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Dominik M; Carroll, John D

    2018-04-17

    While the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ASD closure has been established, new data have recently emerged regarding the negative impact of residual iatrogenic ASD (iASD) following left heart structural interventions. Additionally, new devices with potential advantages have recently been studied. We will review here the potential indications for closure of iASD along with new generation closure devices and potential late complications requiring long-term follow-up. With the expansion of left-heart structural interventions and large-bore transseptal access, there has been growing experience gained with management of residual iASD. Some recently published reports have implicated residual iASD after these procedures as a potential source of diminished clinical outcomes and mortality. Additionally, recent trials investigating new generation closure devices as well as expanding knowledge regarding late complications of percutaneous ASD closure have been published. While percutaneous ASD closure is no longer a novel approach to managing septal defects, there are several contemporary issues related to residual iASD following large-bore transseptal access and new generation devices which serve as an impetus for this review. Ongoing attention to potential late complications and decreasing their incidence with ongoing study is clearly needed.

  12. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base closure...

  13. 40 CFR 146.73 - Financial responsibility for post-closure care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-closure by using a trust fund, surety bond, letter of credit, financial test, insurance or corporate... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial responsibility for post... Standards Applicable to Class I Hazardous Waste Injection Wells § 146.73 Financial responsibility for post...

  14. Accelerating cleanup. Paths to closure Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.

    1998-01-01

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE's national strategy, the Richland Operations Office's Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established

  15. Patent ductus arteriosus closure using an Amplatzer™ ventricular septal defect closure device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rajeev; Koranne, Ketan; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The ductus arteriosus originates from the persistence of the distal portion of the left sixth aortic arch. It connects the descending aorta (immediately distal to the left subclavian artery) to the roof of the main pulmonary artery, near the origin of the left pulmonary artery. Persistence of the duct beyond 48 h after birth is abnormal and results in patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). PDA is rare in adults because it is usually discovered and treated in childhood. Mechanical closure remains the definitive therapy because the patency of ductus arteriosus may lead to multiple complications, depending on the size and flow through the ductus. PDA closure is indicated in patients with symptoms and evidence of left heart enlargement, and in patients with elevated pulmonary pressures when reversal is possible. Transcatheter closure is the preferred technique in adults because it avoids sternotomy, reduces the length of hospital stay and is associated with fewer complications compared with surgery. First demonstrated in 1967, both the technique and the occluder devices used have since evolved. However, designing an ideal PDA occluder has been a challenge due to the variability in size, shape and orientation of PDAs. The present article describes a case involving a 35-year-old woman who presented to the Center for Advanced Heart Failure (Houston, USA) with congestive heart failure due to a large PDA, which was successfully occluded using an Amplatzer (St Jude Medical, USA) muscular ventricular septal defect closure device. The wider waist and dual-retention discs of these ventricular septal defect closure devices may be important factors to consider in the future development of devices for the occlusion of large PDAs. PMID:24294051

  16. Engineered covers for mud pit closures Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Two abandoned drilling mud pits impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons were determined to require closure action at the Central Nevada Test Area. The UC-4 Mud Pit C is approximately 0.12 hectares (0.3 acres) and 1.2 meters (4 feet) in depth. The UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) is approximately 1.54 hectares (3.8 acres) and 2.4 meters (8 feet) in depth. Both mud pits contain bentonite drilling muds with a thin dry crust, low shear strength, low permeability, and high moisture content. The following closure methodologies were evaluated: stabilization by mixing/injection with soil, fly ash, and lime; excavation and disposal; on-site drying; thermal destruction; wick drains; administrative closure (postings and land-use restrictions); and engineered covers. Based upon regulatory closure criteria, implementation, and cost considerations, the selected remedial alternative was the construction of an engineered cover. A multilayered cover with a geo-grid and geo-synthetic clay liner (GCL) was designed and constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit C to evaluate the constructability and applicability of the design for the CMP cover. The geo-grid provided structural strength for equipment and material loads during cover construction, and the GCL was used as a moisture infiltration barrier. The design was determined to be constructable and applicable. To reduce project costs for the CMP cover, a vegetative cover was designed with drainage toward the center of the cover rather than the perimeter. The vegetative cover with the internal drainage design resulted in a fill volume reduction of approximately 63 percent compared to the multilayered cover design with a GCL

  17. Evaluation of the Momentum Closure Schemes in MPAS-Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shimei; Liu, Yudi; Liu, Wei

    2018-04-01

    In order to compare and evaluate the performances of the Laplacian viscosity closure, the biharmonic viscosity closure, and the Leith closure momentum schemes in the MPAS-Ocean model, a variety of physical quantities, such as the relative reference potential energy (RPE) change, the RPE time change rate (RPETCR), the grid Reynolds number, the root mean square (RMS) of kinetic energy, and the spectra of kinetic energy and enstrophy, are calculated on the basis of results of a 3D baroclinic periodic channel. Results indicate that: 1) The RPETCR demonstrates a saturation phenomenon in baroclinic eddy tests. The critical grid Reynolds number corresponding to RPETCR saturation differs between the three closures: the largest value is in the biharmonic viscosity closure, followed by that in the Laplacian viscosity closure, and that in the Leith closure is the smallest. 2) All three closures can effectively suppress spurious dianeutral mixing by reducing the grid Reynolds number under sub-saturation conditions of the RPETCR, but they can also damage certain physical processes. Generally, the damage to the rotation process is greater than that to the advection process. 3) The dissipation in the biharmonic viscosity closure is strongly dependent on scales. Most dissipation concentrates on small scales, and the energy of small-scale eddies is often transferred to large-scale kinetic energy. The viscous dissipation in the Laplacian viscosity closure is the strongest on various scales, followed by that in the Leith closure. Note that part of the small-scale kinetic energy is also transferred to large-scale kinetic energy in the Leith closure. 4) The characteristic length scale L and the dimensionless parameter D in the Leith closure are inherently coupled. The RPETCR is inversely proportional to the product of D and L. When the product of D and L is constant, both the simulated RPETCR and the inhibition of spurious dianeutral mixing are the same in all tests using the Leith

  18. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn; Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

  19. Official holidays in 2015 and end-of-year closure 2015/2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Official holidays in 2015 and end-of-year closure 2015/2016 (Application of Articles R II 4.38 and R II 4.39 of the Staff Regulations).   Official holidays in 2015 (in addition to the special leave during the annual closure): Thursday, 1 January (New Year) Friday, 3 April (Good Friday) Monday, 6 April (Easter Monday) Friday, 1 May Thursday, 14 May (Ascension day) Monday, 25 May (Whit Monday) Thursday, 10 September ("Jeûne genevois") Thursday, 24 December (Christmas Eve) Friday, 25 December (Christmas) Thursday, 31 December (New Year’s Eve) Annual closure of the site of the Organization during the Christmas holidays and special leave granted by the Director-General: The Laboratory will be closed from Saturday, 19 December 2015 to Sunday, 3 January 2016 inclusive (without deduction of annual leave). The first working day in the New Year will be Monday, 4 January 2016. Human Resources Department Tel. 73903/79257

  20. Valuing Coastal Beaches and Closures Using Benefit Transfer: An Application to Barnstable, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, millions of Americans visit beaches for recreation and contribute significantly to local coastal economies as a result. Considering the frequency that coastal beaches are used for recreation, closures due to bacterial contamination have the potential to negatively impa...

  1. The River Corridor Closure Contract How Washington Closure Hanford is Closing A Unique Department of Energy Project - 12425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, E.T. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Cleanup of the Hanford River Corridor has been one of Hanford Site's top priorities since the early 1990's. This urgency is due to the proximity of hundreds of waste sites to the Columbia River and the groundwater that continues to threaten the Columbia River. In April 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract (RCCC), a cost-plus incentive-fee closure contract with a 2015 end date and first of its kind at Hanford Site, to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited-liability company owned by URS, Bechtel National, and CH2M HILL. WCH is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely, compliantly, and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the Hanford River Corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE-RL for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. Accelerated performance of the work-scope while keeping a perspective on contract completion presents challenges that require proactive strategies to support the remaining work-scope through the end of the RCCC. This paper outlines the processes to address the challenges of completing work-scope while planning for contract termination. WCH is responsible for cleanup of the River Corridor 569.8 km{sup 2} (220 mi{sup 2}) of the 1,517.7 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site's footprint reduction. At the end of calendar year 2011, WCH's closure implementation is well underway. Fieldwork is complete in three of the largest areas within the RCCC scope (Segments 1, 2, and 3), approximately 44.5% of the River Corridor (Figure 3). Working together, DOE-RL and WCH are in the process of completing the 'paper work' that will document the completion of the work-scope and allow DOE-RL to relieve WCH of contractual responsibilities and transition the completed areas to the Long-Term Stewardship Program, pending final action RODs. Within the next 4 years, WCH will continue to complete cleanup of the River

  2. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J.

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs

  3. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in primary angle-closure suspect, primary angle-closure and primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zeng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the features and clinical outcomes of cataract extraction by phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in primary angle-closure suspect(PACS, primary angle-closure(PACand primary angle-closure glaucoma(PACGwith cataract.METHODS:Phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation was performed on 86 cases(86 eyesdiagnosed as PACS, PAC and PACG co-existing cataract from January to December 2012. All cases were followed up for 3 months to 1 year. Pre-operative and post-operative visual acuity, intraocular pressure(IOP, gonioscopy, ultrasound biomicroscopy(UBM, visual field and usage of anti-glaucomaous eye drops were recorded.RESULTS:Zonular dialysis existed in 19 eyes(22%. The post-operative visual acuity improved in 84 eyes(98%. The post-operative visual acuity was CONCLUSION: PACS, PAC and PACG co-existing zonular dialysis is common. Phacoemulsification with IOL implantation can reduce IOP, deepen anterior chamber and open angle.

  5. Closure development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robitz, E.S. Jr.; McAninch, M.D. Jr.; Edmonds, D.P.; Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes Phase 1 activities for closure development of the high-level nuclear waste package task for the tuff repository. Work was conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract 9172105, administered through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), funded through the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The goal of this phase was to select five closure processes for further evaluation in later phases of the program. A decision tree methodology was utilized to perform an objective evaluation of 15 potential closure processes. Information was gathered via a literature survey, industrial contacts, and discussions with project team members, other experts in the field, and the LLNL waste package task staff. The five processes selected were friction welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and plasma arc welding. These are felt to represent the best combination of weldment material properties and process performance in a remote, radioactive environment. Conceptual designs have been generated for these processes to illustrate how they would be implemented in practice. Homopolar resistance welding was included in the Phase 1 analysis, and developments in this process will be monitored via literature in Phases 2 and 3. Work was conducted in accordance with the YMP Quality Assurance Program. 223 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  6. 40 CFR 264.178 - Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.178 Closure. At closure, all hazardous waste and hazardous waste residues must be removed...

  7. Closure report for N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule

  8. Closure report for N Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule.

  9. Flow simulation in piping system dead legs using second moment, closure and k-epsilon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Mechitoua, N.; Mattei, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with an industrial application of second moment closure turbulence model in in numerical simulation of 3D turbulent flows in piping system dead legs. Calculations performed with the 3D ESTET code are presented which contrast the performance of k-epsilon eddy viscosity model and second moment closure turbulence models. Coarse (100 000), medium (400 000) and fine (1 500 000) meshes were used. The second moment closure performs significantly better than eddy viscosity model and predicts with a good agreement the vortex penetration in dead legs provided to use sufficiently refined meshes. The results point out the necessity to be able to perform calculations using fine mesh before introducing refined physical models such as second moment closure turbulence model in a numerical code. This study illustrates the ability of second moment closure turbulence model to simulate 3D turbulent industrial flows. Reynolds stress model computation does not require special care, the calculation is carried on as simply as the k-ξ one. The CPU time needed is less that twice the CPU time needed using k-ξ model. (authors)

  10. 7 CFR 3406.12 - Program application materials-teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program application materials-teaching. 3406.12... GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of a Teaching Proposal § 3406.12 Program application materials—teaching... program, and the forms needed to prepare and submit teaching grant applications under the program. ...

  11. Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Percutaneous Closure Using a Starclose Closure Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare Louise; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Starclose (Abbott Vascular Devices, Redwood City, CA) is a new arterial closure device that seals a femoral puncture site with an extravascular star-shaped nitinol clip. The clip projects small tines into the arterial wall which fold inward, causing the arterial wall to pucker, producing a purse-string-like seal closing the puncture site. The case history is that of a 76-year-old female patient who underwent day-case percutaneous diagnostic coronary angiography. A Starclose femoral artery closure device was used to achieve hemostasis with subsequent femoral artery stenosis.

  12. 9 CFR 318.301 - Containers and closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Containers and closures. 318.301... Canning and Canned Products § 318.301 Containers and closures. (a) Examination and cleaning of empty containers. (1) Empty containers, closures, and flexible pouch roll stock shall be evaluated by the...

  13. 75 FR 29322 - Base Closure and Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Base Closure and Realignment AGENCY: Office of...)(ii) of the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990. It provides a partial list of military installations closing or realigning pursuant to the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment (BRAC) Report. It also...

  14. Closure Report Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 443 January 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, Rick [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) prepared this Closure Report for the subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Nevada, Site. CNTA was the site of a 0.2- to 1-megaton underground nuclear test in 1968. Responsibility for the site’s environmental restoration was transferred from the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Field Office to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 443 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended 2011) and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. This Closure Report provides justification for closure of CAU 443 and provides a summary of completed closure activities; describes the selected corrective action alternative; provides an implementation plan for long-term monitoring with well network maintenance and approaches/policies for institutional controls (ICs); and presents the contaminant, compliance, and use-restriction boundaries for the site.

  15. Empolder and application of LiveWire program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bo; Li Jing; Wang Xiaoming

    2007-01-01

    LiveWire is a specific module of Netscape Web server to actualize CGI function; through LiveWire application program one can create dynamic web page on web site. This article introduces how to write LiveWire application code, have to compile, debug and manage LiveWire application programs, and how to apply LiveWire application program on Netscape Web server to create a dynamic web page. (authors)

  16. Closure Welding of Plutonium Bearing Storage Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannell, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    A key element in the Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for the stabilization, packaging and storage of plutonium-bearing materials involves closure welding of DOE-STD-3013 Outer Containers (3013 container). The 3013 container provides the primary barrier and pressure boundary preventing release of plutonium-bearing materials to the environment. The final closure (closure weld) of the 3013 container must be leaktight, structurally sound and meet DOE STD 3013 specified criteria. This paper focuses on the development, qualification and demonstration of the welding process for the closure welding of Hanford PFP 3013 outer containers

  17. Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-09-01

    cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan.

  18. Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-01-01

    cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan

  19. Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, S.

    1997-04-01

    This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

  20. Automatic programming for critical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganantharaj, Raj L.

    1988-01-01

    The important phases of a software life cycle include verification and maintenance. Usually, the execution performance is an expected requirement in a software development process. Unfortunately, the verification and the maintenance of programs are the time consuming and the frustrating aspects of software engineering. The verification cannot be waived for the programs used for critical applications such as, military, space, and nuclear plants. As a consequence, synthesis of programs from specifications, an alternative way of developing correct programs, is becoming popular. The definition, or what is understood by automatic programming, has been changed with our expectations. At present, the goal of automatic programming is the automation of programming process. Specifically, it means the application of artificial intelligence to software engineering in order to define techniques and create environments that help in the creation of high level programs. The automatic programming process may be divided into two phases: the problem acquisition phase and the program synthesis phase. In the problem acquisition phase, an informal specification of the problem is transformed into an unambiguous specification while in the program synthesis phase such a specification is further transformed into a concrete, executable program.

  1. [Comparative description and retrospective analisis of modern methods of surgical wounds closure for intraoperative prophylaxis of development of pathologic cutaneous cicatrices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavyts'kyĭ, S O; Avetikov, D S; Lokes, K P; Rozkolupa, O O; Boĭko, I V

    2014-05-01

    The experience of application of various methods of closure was presented for the head and neck cutaneous wound surfaces after elective operative interventions. The variant of the postoperative results estimation and optimization of the wounds healing by primary closure was proposed.

  2. Restaurant closures

    CERN Document Server

    Novae Restauration

    2012-01-01

    Christmas Restaurant closures Please note that the Restaurant 1 and Restaurant 3 will be closed from Friday, 21 December at 5 p.m. to Sunday, 6 January, inclusive. They will reopen on Monday, 7 January 2013.   Restaurant 2 closure for renovation To meet greater demand and to modernize its infrastructure, Restaurant 2 will be closed from Monday, 17 December. On Monday, 14 January 2013, Sophie Vuetaz’s team will welcome you to a renovated self-service area on the 1st floor. The selections on the ground floor will also be expanded to include pasta and pizza, as well as snacks to eat in or take away. To ensure a continuity of service, we suggest you take your break at Restaurant 1 or Restaurant 3 (Prévessin).

  3. Anterior Segment Imaging Predicts Incident Gonioscopic Angle Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Mani; Iyer, Jayant V; Narayanaswamy, Arun K; He, Yingke; Sakata, Lisandro M; Wu, Renyi; Liu, Dianna; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Friedman, David S; Aung, Tin

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the incidence of gonioscopic angle closure after 4 years in subjects with gonioscopically open angles but varying degrees of angle closure detected on anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS OCT; Visante; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) at baseline. Prospective, observational study. Three hundred forty-two subjects, mostly Chinese, 50 years of age or older, were recruited, of whom 65 were controls with open angles on gonioscopy and AS OCT at baseline, and 277 were cases with baseline open angles on gonioscopy but closed angles (1-4 quadrants) on AS OCT scans. All subjects underwent gonioscopy and AS OCT at baseline (horizontal and vertical single scans) and after 4 years. The examiner performing gonioscopy was masked to the baseline and AS OCT data. Angle closure in a quadrant was defined as nonvisibility of the posterior trabecular meshwork by gonioscopy and visible iridotrabecular contact beyond the scleral spur in AS OCT scans. Gonioscopic angle closure in 2 or 3 quadrants after 4 years. There were no statistically significant differences in age, ethnicity, or gender between cases and controls. None of the control subjects demonstrated gonioscopic angle closure after 4 years. Forty-eight of the 277 subjects (17.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.8-23; P < 0.0001) with at least 1 quadrant of angle closure on AS OCT at baseline demonstrated gonioscopic angle closure in 2 or more quadrants, whereas 28 subjects (10.1%; 95% CI, 6.7-14.6; P < 0.004) demonstrated gonioscopic angle closure in 3 or more quadrants after 4 years. Individuals with more quadrants of angle closure on baseline AS OCT scans had a greater likelihood of gonioscopic angle closure developing after 4 years (P < 0.0001, chi-square test for trend for both definitions of angle closure). Anterior segment OCT imaging at baseline predicts incident gonioscopic angle closure after 4 years among subjects who have gonioscopically open angles and iridotrabecular contact on AS OCT at

  4. Randomized clinical trial of intestinal ostomy takedown comparing pursestring wound closure vs conventional closure to eliminate the risk of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Mauries, Daniel; Rodriguez-Díaz, José Luis; Salgado-Nesme, Noel; González, Quintín H; Vergara-Fernández, Omar

    2013-02-01

    The use of temporary stomas has been demonstrated to reduce septic complications, especially in high-risk anastomosis; therefore, it is necessary to reduce the number of complications secondary to ostomy takedowns, namely wound infection, anastomotic leaks, and intestinal obstruction. To compare the rates of superficial wound infection and patient satisfaction after pursestring closure of ostomy wound vs conventional linear closure. Patients undergoing colostomy or ileostomy closure between January 2010 and February 2011 were randomly assigned to linear closure (n = 30) or pursestring closure (n = 31) of their ostomy wound. Wound infection within 30 days of surgery was defined as the presence of purulent discharge, pain, erythema, warmth, or positive culture for bacteria. Patient satisfaction, healing time, difficulty managing the wound, and limitation of activities were analyzed with the Likert questionnaire. The infection rate for the control group was 36.6% (n = 11) vs 0% in the pursestring closure group (p ostomy wound closure (shorter healing time and improved patient satisfaction).

  5. Patent ductus arteriosus closure using an Amplatzer(™) ventricular septal defect closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rajeev; Koranne, Ketan; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The ductus arteriosus originates from the persistence of the distal portion of the left sixth aortic arch. It connects the descending aorta (immediately distal to the left subclavian artery) to the roof of the main pulmonary artery, near the origin of the left pulmonary artery. Persistence of the duct beyond 48 h after birth is abnormal and results in patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). PDA is rare in adults because it is usually discovered and treated in childhood. Mechanical closure remains the definitive therapy because the patency of ductus arteriosus may lead to multiple complications, depending on the size and flow through the ductus. PDA closure is indicated in patients with symptoms and evidence of left heart enlargement, and in patients with elevated pulmonary pressures when reversal is possible. Transcatheter closure is the preferred technique in adults because it avoids sternotomy, reduces the length of hospital stay and is associated with fewer complications compared with surgery. First demonstrated in 1967, both the technique and the occluder devices used have since evolved. However, designing an ideal PDA occluder has been a challenge due to the variability in size, shape and orientation of PDAs. The present article describes a case involving a 35-year-old woman who presented to the Center for Advanced Heart Failure (Houston, USA) with congestive heart failure due to a large PDA, which was successfully occluded using an Amplatzer (St Jude Medical, USA) muscular ventricular septal defect closure device. The wider waist and dual-retention discs of these ventricular septal defect closure devices may be important factors to consider in the future development of devices for the occlusion of large PDAs.

  6. Temporary Closure of the Open Abdomen: A Systematic Review on Delayed Primary Fascial Closure in Patients with an Open Abdomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele van Hensbroek, Pieter; Wind, Jan; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was designed to systematically review the literature to assess which temporary abdominal closure (TAC) technique is associated with the highest delayed primary fascial closure (FC) rate. In some cases of abdominal trauma or infection, edema or packing precludes fascial closure

  7. Local application of zoledronate for maximum anchorage during space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Adam J A J; Campbell, Phillip M; Hinton, Robert; Naidu, Aparna; Buschang, Peter H

    2012-12-01

    Orthodontists have used various compliance-dependent physical means such as headgears and intraoral appliances to prevent anchorage loss. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1 local application of the bisphosphonate zoledronate could be used to prevent anchorage loss during extraction space closure in rats. Thirty rats had their maxillary left first molars extracted and their maxillary left second molars protracted into the extraction space with a 10-g nickel-titanium closing coil for 21 days. Fifteen control rats received a local injection of phosphate-buffered saline solution, and 15 experimental rats received 16 μg of the bisphosphonate zoledronate. Bisphosphonate was also delivered directly into the extraction site and left undisturbed for 5 minutes. Cephalograms and incremental thickness gauges were used to measure tooth movements. Tissues were analyzed by microcomputed tomography and histology. The control group demonstrated significant (P <0.05) tooth movements throughout the 21-day period. They showed significantly greater tooth movements than the experimental group beginning in the second week. The experimental group showed no significant tooth movement after the first week. The microcomputed tomography and histologic observations showed significant bone loss in the extraction sites and around the second molars of the controls. In contrast, the experimental group had bone preservation and bone fill. There was no evidence of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis in any sample. A single small, locally applied dose of zoledronate provided maximum anchorage and prevented significant bone loss. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Some Recent Developments in Turbulence Closure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Turbulence closure models are central to a good deal of applied computational fluid dynamical analysis. Closure modeling endures as a productive area of research. This review covers recent developments in elliptic relaxation and elliptic blending models, unified rotation and curvature corrections, transition prediction, hybrid simulation, and data-driven methods. The focus is on closure models in which transport equations are solved for scalar variables, such as the turbulent kinetic energy, a timescale, or a measure of anisotropy. Algebraic constitutive representations are reviewed for their role in relating scalar closures to the Reynolds stress tensor. Seamless and nonzonal methods, which invoke a single closure model, are reviewed, especially detached eddy simulation (DES) and adaptive DES. Other topics surveyed include data-driven modeling and intermittency and laminar fluctuation models for transition prediction. The review concludes with an outlook.

  9. Deployment of an Alternative Closure Cover and Monitoring System at the Mixed Waste Disposal Unit U-3ax/bl at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitt, D.G.; Fitzmaurice, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    In October 2000, final closure was initiated of U-3ax/bl, a mixed waste disposal unit at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The application of approximately 30 cm of topsoil, composed of compacted native alluvium onto an operational cover, seeding of the topsoil, installation of soil water content sensors within the cover, and deployment of a drainage lysimeter facility immediately adjacent to the disposal unit initiated closure. This closure is unique in that it required the involvement of several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) groups: Waste Management (WM), Environmental Restoration (ER), and Technology Development (TD). Initial site characterization of the disposal unit was conducted by WM. Regulatory approval for closure of the disposal unit was obtained by ER, closure of the disposal unit was conducted by ER, and deployment of the drainage lysimeter facility was conducted by WM and ER, with funding provided by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment ( ASTD) program, administered under TD. In addition, this closure is unique in that a monolayer closure cover, also known as an evapotranspiration (ET) cover, consisting of native alluvium, received regulatory approval instead of a traditional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) multi-layered cover. Recent studies indicate that in the arid southwestern United States, monolayer covers may be more effective at isolating waste than layered covers because of the tendency of clay layers to desiccate and crack, and subsequently develop preferential pathways. The lysimeter facility deployed immediately adjacent to the closure cover consists of eight drainage lysimeters with three surface treatments: two were left bare; two were revegetated with native species; two were allowed to revegetate with invader species; and two are reserved for future studies. The lysimeters are constructed such that any drainage through the bottoms of the lysimeters can be measured. Sensors installed in the

  10. Analysis of Mining-induced Valley Closure Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Mitra, R.; Oh, J.; Hebblewhite, B.

    2016-05-01

    Valley closure movements have been observed for decades in Australia and overseas when underground mining occurred beneath or in close proximity to valleys and other forms of irregular topographies. Valley closure is defined as the inward movements of the valley sides towards the valley centreline. Due to the complexity of the local geology and the interplay between several geological, topographical and mining factors, the underlying mechanisms that actually cause this behaviour are not completely understood. A comprehensive programme of numerical modelling investigations has been carried out to further evaluate and quantify the influence of a number of these mining and geological factors and their inter-relationships. The factors investigated in this paper include longwall positional factors, horizontal stress, panel width, depth of cover and geological structures around the valley. It is found that mining in a series passing beneath the valley dramatically increases valley closure, and mining parallel to valley induces much more closure than other mining orientations. The redistribution of horizontal stress and influence of mining activity have also been recognised as important factors promoting valley closure, and the effect of geological structure around the valley is found to be relatively small. This paper provides further insight into both the valley closure mechanisms and how these mechanisms should be considered in valley closure prediction models.

  11. Magnetisable container closure and means for its removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, W.I.

    1984-01-01

    A container has a closed lower end and an open upper end, is made of a non-magnetic material such as aluminium, and has a peripheral groove spaced from the open end. A disc-like closure is of magnetic material such as ferritic steel, has a pair of spring jaws joined to the disc by a joining member such that when the disc of the closure is in position closing the open end of the container, the jaws engage in groove and hold the closure in position. To remove the closure, it is engaged by magnetic means mounted for example on a wall and having a step such that when the container is moved laterally away the closure is retained by the magnetic means aided by the step and thereby the closure becomes removed from the container. (author)

  12. Urethrovaginal fistula closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Marisa M; Goldman, Howard B

    2017-01-01

    In the developed world, urethrovaginal fistulas are most the likely the result of iatrogenic injury. These fistulas are quite rare. Proper surgical repair requires careful dissection and tension-free closure. The objective of this video is to demonstrate the identification and surgical correction of an urethrovaginal fistula. The case presented is of a 59-year-old woman with a history of pelvic organ prolapse and symptomatic stress urinary incontinence who underwent vaginal hysterectomy, anterior colporrhaphy, posterior colporrhaphy, and synthetic sling placement. Postoperatively, she developed a mesh extrusion and underwent sling excision. After removal of her synthetic sling, she began to experience continuous urinary incontinence. Physical examination and cystourethroscopy demonstrated an urethrovaginal fistula at the midurethra. Options were discussed and the patient wished to undergo transvaginal fistula repair. The urethrovaginal fistula was intubated with a Foley catheter. The fistula tract was isolated and removed. The urethra was then closed with multiple tension-free layers. This video demonstrates several techniques for identifying and subsequently repairing an urethrovaginal fistula. Additionally, it demonstrates the importance of tension-free closure. Urethrovaginal fistulas are rare. They should be repaired with careful dissection and tension-free closure.

  13. Information collection regarding geoscientific monitoring techniques during closure of underground facility in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Shinichi; Yamashita, Tadashi; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Onoe, Hironori; Ishibashi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project is being pursued by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to enhance the reliability of geological disposal technologies through investigations of the deep geological environment in the crystalline host rock (granite) at Mizunami City in Gifu Prefecture, central Japan. On the occasion of the reform of the entire JAEA organization in 2014, JAEA identified the critical issues on the geoscientific research program: “Development of modelling technologies for mass transport”, “Development of drift backfilling technologies” and “Development of technologies for reducing groundwater inflow”, based on the latest results of the synthesizing R and D. The purposes of the “Development of drift backfilling technologies” are to develop closure methodology and technology, and long-term monitoring technology, and to evaluate resilience of geological environment. In order to achieve the purposes, previous information from the case example of underground facility constructed in crystalline rock in Europe has been collected in this study. In particular, the boundary conditions for the closure, geological characteristics, technical specifications, and method of monitoring have been focused. The information on the international project regarding drift closure test and development of monitoring technologies has also been collected. In addition, interviews were conducted to Finnish and Swedish specialists who have experiences involving planning, construction management, monitoring, and safety assessment for the closure to obtain the technical knowledge. Based on the collected information, concept and point of attention, which are regarding drift closure testing, and planning, execution management and monitoring on the closure of MIU, have been specified. (author)

  14. Optimal Technique for Abdominal Fascial Closure in Liver Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unal Aydin

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that the novel technique used in this study contributed to overcoming early and late postoperative complications associated with closure of the abdominal fascia in liver transplant patients. In addition, this new technique has proven to be easily applicable, faster, safer and efficient in these patients; it is also potentially useful for conventional surgery.

  15. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge

  16. Closure of shallow underground injection wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veil, J.A.; Grunewald, B.

    1993-01-01

    Shallow injection wells have long been used for disposing liquid wastes. Some of these wells have received hazardous or radioactive wastes. According to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, Class IV wells are those injection wells through which hazardous or radioactive wastes are injected into or above an underground source of drinking water (USDW). These wells must be closed. Generally Class V wells are injection wells through which fluids that do not contain hazardous or radioactive wastes are injected into or above a USDW. Class V wells that are responsible for violations of drinking water regulations or that pose a threat to human health must also be closed. Although EPA regulations require closure of certain types of shallow injection wells, they do not provide specific details on the closure process. This paper describes the regulatory background, DOE requirements, and the steps in a shallow injection well closure process: Identification of wells needing closure; monitoring and disposal of accumulated substances; filling and sealing of wells; and remediation. In addition, the paper describes a major national EPA shallow injection well enforcement initiative, including closure plan guidance for wells used to dispose of wastes from service station operations

  17. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for closing the bore of a tube and releasably securing articles within the tube under longitudinal load. A latching member has a cylindrical section and several circumferentially-spaced elongated latches hanging down from one end of the cylinder. An elongated actuator has integral cam and spline and is partly located within the latch with the cam radially contacting the latches and the spline projecting into the circumferential spaces between the latches. The actuator is axially movable between a position in which the latches are locked to the tube walls and a position in which the latches are secured from contact with the tube walls. Means are provided for axially moving the actuator such that the cam positions the latches; and means are also provided for engaging the articles within the tube. The closure is particularly applicable to tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in reactors

  18. Vertical Profunda Artery Perforator Flap for Plantar Foot Wound Closure: A New Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Allyson R; Mayo, James L; Sharma, Vishal K; Allen, Robert J; Chiu, Ernest S

    2018-02-01

    Plantar foot reconstruction requires special consideration of both form and function. There are several fasciocutaneous flap options, each with indications and reservations. This case presents a new application of the vertical profunda artery perforator flap for definitive closure of a neuropathic foot ulcer in a young woman with spina bifida. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the flap survived completely. The surgical and donor sites were without wound recurrence at 5-month follow-up. Understanding the variability of foot flap options is important because of unique cases such as the one presented where the wound was caused by specific and less commonly observed foot anatomy. The specific choice to use the vertical profunda artery perforator flap for this patient and her neuropathic wound type was made based on its excellent flexibility, durability, and donor site appeal. The vertical profunda artery perforator flap has adequate surface area and bulk and a favorable pedicle length and caliber, can be thinned, and leaves a donor scar in a less conspicuous area than other popular free flaps for lower-extremity reconstruction. For these reasons, it should be considered a first-line therapy for free flap coverage of selected foot wounds.

  19. Comparison of cost-effectiveness and postoperative outcome of device closure and open surgery closure techniques for treatment of patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various devices have been recently employed for percutaneous closure of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA. Although the high effectiveness of device closure techniques has been clearly determined, a few studies have focused on the cost-effectiveness and also postoperative complications of these procedures in comparison with open surgery. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of PDA occlusion by Amplatzer and coil device in comparisong with open surgery. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a randomized sample of 201 patients aged 1 month to 16 years (105 patients with device closure and 96 patients with surgical closure was selected. The ratio of total pulmonary blood flow to total systemic blood flow, the Qp/Qs ratio, was measured using a pulmonary artery catheter. The cost analysis included direct medical care costs associated with device implantation and open surgery, as well as professional fees. All costs were calculated in Iranian Rials and then converted to US dollars. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in mean Qp/Qs ratio before the procedure between the device closure group and the open surgery group (2.1 ± 0.7 versus 1.7 ± 0.6, P = 0.090. The mean measured costs were overall higher in the device closure group than in open closure group (948.87 ± 548.76 US$ versus 743.70 ± 696.91 US$, P < 0.001. This difference remained significant after adjustment for age and gender (Standardized Beta = 0.160, P = 0.031. PDA closure with the Amplatzer ductal occluder (1053.05 ± 525.73 US$ or with Nit-Occlud coils (PFM (912.73 ± 565.94 US$, P < 0.001 was more expensive than that via open surgery. However, the Cook detachable spring coils device closure (605.65 ± 194.62 US$, P = 0.650 had a non-significant cost difference with open surgery. No event was observed in the device closure group regarding in-hospital mortality or morbidity; however, in another group, 2 in-hospital deaths

  20. Numerical approximation of the Boltzmann equation : moment closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdel Malik, M.R.A.; Brummelen, van E.H.

    2012-01-01

    This work applies the moment method onto a generic form of kinetic equations to simplify kinetic models of particle systems. This leads to the moment closure problem which is addressed using entropy-based moment closure techniques utilizing entropy minimization. The resulting moment closure system

  1. T-tube vs Primary Common Bile Duct Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Joshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Closure of the common bile duct over T-tube after exploration is a widely practiced traditional method. However, its use may give rise to many complications. We do primary closure of common bile duct after exploration. Aim of the study is to see the efficacy and safety of the primary closure. METHODS: Study was carried out to compare the results of both the techniques from 2006 to 2009 in the cases proven to have common bile duct stone with or without the features of obstructive jaundice. Post operative hospital stay and morbidities related to both the groups were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There were total 71 cases included in the study. Thirty one in T-tube group and 40 in primary closure group. T-tube was removed in most of the cases after three weeks where as average time of drain removal in primary closure group is 5.79 +/-1.79 days. Incidence of retained stone was equal in each group. Major complication in T-tube group is biliary peritonitis in four patients at the time of T-tube removal whereas none of the patient from primary closure group suffered from such major complication. CONCLUSIONS: Primary closure after the common bile duct exploration is safe and it helps to avoid the morbidities related to T-tube. Keywords: Choledocholithiasis, Primary closure, retained stone, T-tube, Ureterorenoscope.

  2. Objects as closures: Abstract semantics of object oriented languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Uday S.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss denotational semantics of object-oriented languages, using the concept of closure widely used in (semi) functional programming to encapsulate side effects. It is shown that this denotational framework is adequate to explain classes, instantiation, and inheritance in the style of Simula as well as SMALLTALK-80. This framework is then compared with that of Kamin, in his recent denotational definition of SMALLTALK-80, and the implications of the differences between the two approaches are discussed.

  3. Objects as closures - Abstract semantics of object oriented languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Uday S.

    1988-01-01

    The denotational semantics of object-oriented languages is discussed using the concept of closure widely used in (semi) functional programming to encapsulate side effects. It is shown that this denotational framework is adequate to explain classes, instantiation, and inheritance in the style of Simula as well as SMALLTALK-80. This framework is then compared with that of Kamin (1988), in his recent denotational definition of SMALLTALK-80, and the implications of the differences between the two approaches are discussed.

  4. Techniques for Abdominal Wall Closure after Damage Control Laparotomy: From Temporary Abdominal Closure to Early/Delayed Fascial Closure—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Open abdomen (OA has been an effective treatment for abdominal catastrophes in traumatic and general surgery. However, management of patients with OA remains a formidable task for surgeons. The central goal of OA is closure of fascial defect as early as is clinically feasible without precipitating abdominal compartment syndrome. Historically, techniques such as packing, mesh, and vacuum-assisted closure have been developed to assist temporary abdominal closure, and techniques such as components separation, mesh-mediated traction, bridging fascial defect with permanent synthetic mesh, or biologic mesh have also been attempted to achieve early primary fascial closure, either alone or in combined use. The objective of this review is to present the challenges of these techniques for OA with a goal of early primary fascial closure, when the patient’s physiological condition allows.

  5. Uncertainty Quantification of Multi-Phase Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baglietto, Emilio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-10-27

    In the ensemble-averaged dispersed phase formulation used for CFD of multiphase ows in nuclear reactor thermohydraulics, closures of interphase transfer of mass, momentum, and energy constitute, by far, the biggest source of error and uncertainty. Reliable estimators of this source of error and uncertainty are currently non-existent. Here, we report on how modern Validation and Uncertainty Quanti cation (VUQ) techniques can be leveraged to not only quantify such errors and uncertainties, but also to uncover (unintended) interactions between closures of di erent phenomena. As such this approach serves as a valuable aide in the research and development of multiphase closures. The joint modeling of lift, drag, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion|forces that lead to tranfer of momentum between the liquid and gas phases|is examined in the frame- work of validation of the adiabatic but turbulent experiments of Liu and Banko , 1993. An extensive calibration study is undertaken with a popular combination of closure relations and the popular k-ϵ turbulence model in a Bayesian framework. When a wide range of super cial liquid and gas velocities and void fractions is considered, it is found that this set of closures can be validated against the experimental data only by allowing large variations in the coe cients associated with the closures. We argue that such an extent of variation is a measure of uncertainty induced by the chosen set of closures. We also nd that while mean uid velocity and void fraction pro les are properly t, uctuating uid velocity may or may not be properly t. This aspect needs to be investigated further. The popular set of closures considered contains ad-hoc components and are undesirable from a predictive modeling point of view. Consequently, we next consider improvements that are being developed by the MIT group under CASL and which remove the ad-hoc elements. We use non-intrusive methodologies for sensitivity analysis and calibration (using

  6. Factors affecting closure of a temporary stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claire; Varma, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine time to reversal of a temporary ostomy, reasons for delayed closure, and patient satisfaction with the scheduling of their closure and related hospital care. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. The target population comprised patients who underwent creation of a temporary ostomy and reversal surgery within one National Health System Hospital Trust in the United Kingdom. The population served by this Trust are ethnically and socioeconomically diverse, predominantly living in urban areas around Greater London. Sixty-one persons who met inclusion criteria were identified. A two-step analytical process was undertaken. First, a literature review examining incidence and causes of delayed stoma closure was undertaken. Second, a postal survey of all patients who had had their stoma closed in 2009 was conducted. Respondents were allowed 2 weeks to complete and return the questionnaire. The survey instrument was developed locally and subjected to content validation using ostomy patients, surgical and nursing colleagues. It consisted of 9 questions querying time from original surgery to closure, reasons for delaying closure surgery beyond 12 weeks, and satisfaction with care. Twenty-seven patients returned their questionnaires, indicating they consented to participate; a response rate of 44%. Half of the respondents (n = 14 [52%]) underwent closure surgery within 6 months of stoma formation; the remaining 48% waited more than 6 months (median: 6.5 months, range: 1.5-26 months). Thirteen patients (48%) reported a delay in receiving their stoma closure; the main reason cited was the need for a course of adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy. Three quarters of respondents (22 [74%]) were satisfied with the overall care they received. Findings from this study suggest that stoma closure may be associated with fewest complications if performed before 12 weeks.

  7. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  8. 40 CFR 267.143 - Financial assurance for closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...), utilizing the certificate of insurance for closure specified at 40 CFR 264.151(e). (f) Corporate financial... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial assurance for closure. 267... PERMIT Financial Requirements § 267.143 Financial assurance for closure. The owner or operator must...

  9. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holder used in nuclear reactors. The closure mechanism is composed of a latching member which includes a generally circular chamber with a plurality of elongated latches depending therefrom. The latching member circumscribes part of an actuator member which is disposed within the latching member so as to be axially movable. The axial movement of the actuator actuates positioning of the latches between positions in which the latches are locked and secured within the actuator member. Means, capable of being remotely manipulated, are provided to move the actuator in order to position the latches and load the articles within the tube

  10. Design and analysis of PCRV core cavity closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.T.; Schwartz, A.A.; Koopman, D.C.A.

    1980-05-01

    Design requirements and considerations for a core cavity closure which led to the choice of a concrete closure with a toggle hold-down as the design for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) plant are discussed. A procedure for preliminary stress analysis of the closure by means of a three-dimensional finite element method is described. A limited parametric study using this procedure indicates the adequacy of the present closure design and the significance of radial compression developed as a result of inclined support reaction

  11. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain... and post-closure care objectives of paragraph (a) of this section: (1) Type and amount of hazardous..., including amount, frequency, and pH of precipitation; (5) Geological and soil profiles and surface and...

  12. Mechanisms and clinical applications of the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) Device: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Mark L; Attinger, Christopher E; Mesbahi, Ali N; Hess, Christopher L; Graw, Katherine S

    2005-01-01

    The use of sub-atmospheric pressure dressings, available commercially as the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device, has been shown to be an effective way to accelerate healing of various wounds. The optimal sub-atmospheric pressure for wound healing appears to be approximately 125 mm Hg utilizing an alternating pressure cycle of 5 minutes of suction followed by 2 minutes off suction. Animal studies have demonstrated that this technique optimizes blood flow, decreases local tissue edema, and removes excessive fluid from the wound bed. These physiologic changes facilitate the removal of bacteria from the wound. Additionally, the cyclical application of sub-atmospheric pressure alters the cytoskeleton of the cells in the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increases the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The combination of these mechanisms makes the VAC device an extremely versatile tool in the armamentarium of wound healing. This is evident in the VAC device's wide range of clinical applications, including treatment of infected surgical wounds, traumatic wounds, pressure ulcers, wounds with exposed bone and hardware, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous stasis ulcers. VAC has also proven useful in reconstruction of wounds by allowing elective planning of the definitive reconstructive surgery without jeopardizing the wound or outcome. Furthermore, VAC has significantly increased the skin graft success rate when used as a bolster over the freshly skin-grafted wound. VAC is generally well tolerated and, with few contraindications or complications, is fast becoming a mainstay of current wound care.

  13. Premature closure of the Trojan Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononetz, B.P.

    1995-01-01

    The premature closure of the Trojan Nuclear Plant is discussed in outline form. The topics discussed include: an overview of Trojan; events leading to shutdown decision; Trojan's lifetime O ampersand M performance; Trojan's Regulatory performance; historical Trojan regulatory versus economic performance; applicable Oregon law; least-cost planning process; 1992 least cost plan; 1993 LCP update; LCP limitations; comparative performance analysis; management assessments; Trojan O ampersand M analysis; steam generator issues; quantification of deficiencies; quantification of impact of steam generator degradation; 'net benefits' test; conclusions from net benefits analysis; total disallowances; and conclusions and ramifications

  14. Airport Movement Area Closure Planner, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR research develops an automation tool improving temporary and permanent runway closure management. The Movement Area Closure Planner (MACP) provides airport...

  15. A method to identify important dynamical states in Boolean models of regulatory networks: application to regulation of stomata closure by ABA in A. thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugs, Cristhian A; Librelotto, Giovani R; Mombach, José C M

    2011-12-22

    We introduce a method to analyze the states of regulatory Boolean models that identifies important network states and their biological influence on the global network dynamics. It consists in (1) finding the states of the network that are most frequently visited and (2) the identification of variable and frozen nodes of the network. The method, along with a simulation that includes random features, is applied to the study of stomata closure by abscisic acid (ABA) in A. thaliana proposed by Albert and coworkers. We find that for the case of study, that the dynamics of wild and mutant networks have just two states that are highly visited in their space of states and about a third of all nodes of the wild network are variable while the rest remain frozen in True or False states. This high number of frozen elements explains the low cardinality of the space of states of the wild network. Similar results are observed in the mutant networks. The application of the method allowed us to explain how wild and mutants behave dynamically in the SS and determined an essential feature of the activation of the closure node (representing stomata closure), i.e. its synchronization with the AnionEm node (representing anion efflux at the plasma membrane). The dynamics of this synchronization explains the efficiency reached by the wild and each of the mutant networks. For the biological problem analyzed, our method allows determining how wild and mutant networks differ 'phenotypically'. It shows that the different efficiencies of stomata closure reached among the simulated wild and mutant networks follow from a dynamical behavior of two nodes that are always synchronized. Additionally, we predict that the involvement of the anion efflux at the plasma membrane is crucial for the plant response to ABA. The algorithm used in the simulations is available upon request.

  16. Left ventricular remodeling and change of systolic function after closure of patent ductus arteriosus in adults: device and surgical closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young-Hoon; Yun, Tae-Jin; Song, Jong-Min; Park, Jung-Jun; Seo, Dong-Man; Koh, Jae-Kon; Lee, Se-Whan; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2007-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) remodeling and predictors of LV systolic function late after closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in adults remain to be clearly demonstrated. In 45 patients with PDA, including 28 patients who received successful occlusion using the Amplatzer device (AD group) (AGA, Golden Valley, MN) and 17 patients who received surgical closure (OP group), echocardiography studies were performed before closure and 1 day (AD group) or within 7 days (OP group) after closure, and then were repeated at > or = 6 months (17 +/- 13 months). In both groups, LV ejection fraction (EF) and end-diastolic volume index were significantly decreased immediately after closure, whereas end-systolic volume index did not change. During the long-term follow-up period, end-systolic as well as end-diastolic volume indices decreased significantly in both groups and LV EF recovered compared to the immediate postclosure state. However, LV EF remained low compared to the preclosure state. Five patients (11.1%) including 3 patients in the AD group and 2 patients in the OP group showed persistent late LV systolic dysfunction (EF or = 62% had a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 83% for predicting late normal LV EF after closure. Left ventricular EF remains low late after PDA closure compared with preclosure state in adults. Preclosure LV EF is the best index to predict late postclosure LV EF.

  17. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure – results of 58 consecutive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltzer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The optimal treatment concept for temporary abdominal closure (TAC in critically ill visceral surgery patients with open abdomen (OA continues to be unclear. The VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction therapy seems to permit higher delayed primary fascial closure rates (FCR than other TAC procedures. Material and methods: Patients of our clinic (n=58 who were treated by application of a VAC/VACM treatment manual in the period from 2005 to 2008 were retrospectively analysed. Results: The overall FCR of all patients was 48.3% (95% confidence interval: 34.95–61.78. An FCR of 61.3% was achieved in patients who had a vicryl mesh implanted at the fascial level (VACM therapy in the course of treatment. Mortality among patients treated with VACM therapy was 45.2% (95% CI: 27.32–63.97.Conclusions: The results of our own study confirm the results of previous studies which showed an acceptable FCR among non-trauma patients who were treated with VACM therapy. VACM therapy currently appears to be the treatment regime of choice for patients with OA requiring TAC.

  18. Single-site neural tube closure in human embryos revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, Bernadette S; Driessen, Stan; Boukens, Bastiaan J D; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-10-01

    Since the multi-site closure theory was first proposed in 1991 as explanation for the preferential localizations of neural tube defects, the closure of the neural tube has been debated. Although the multi-site closure theory is much cited in clinical literature, single-site closure is most apparent in literature concerning embryology. Inspired by Victor Hamburgers (1900-2001) statement that "our real teacher has been and still is the embryo, who is, incidentally, the only teacher who is always right", we decided to critically review both theories of neural tube closure. To verify the theories of closure, we studied serial histological sections of 10 mouse embryos between 8.5 and 9.5 days of gestation and 18 human embryos of the Carnegie collection between Carnegie stage 9 (19-21 days) and 13 (28-32 days). Neural tube closure was histologically defined by the neuroepithelial remodeling of the two adjoining neural fold tips in the midline. We did not observe multiple fusion sites in neither mouse nor human embryos. A meta-analysis of case reports on neural tube defects showed that defects can occur at any level of the neural axis. Our data indicate that the human neural tube fuses at a single site and, therefore, we propose to reinstate the single-site closure theory for neural tube closure. We showed that neural tube defects are not restricted to a specific location, thereby refuting the reasoning underlying the multi-site closure theory. Clin. Anat. 30:988-999, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Moment Closure for the Stochastic Logistic Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Abhyudai; Hespanha, Joao P

    2006-01-01

    ..., which we refer to as the moment closure function. In this paper, a systematic procedure for constructing moment closure functions of arbitrary order is presented for the stochastic logistic model...

  20. Comparison of cost-effectiveness and postoperative outcome of device closure and open surgery closure techniques for treatment of patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Sabri, Mohammadreza; Bigdelian, Hamid; Dehghan, Bahar; Gharipour, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    Various devices have been recently employed for percutaneous closure of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Although the high effectiveness of device closure techniques has been clearly determined, a few studies have focused on the cost-effectiveness and also postoperative complications of these procedures in comparison with open surgery. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of PDA occlusion by Amplatzer and coil device in comparisong with open surgery. In this cross-sectional study, a randomized sample of 201 patients aged 1 month to 16 years (105 patients with device closure and 96 patients with surgical closure) was selected. The ratio of total pulmonary blood flow to total systemic blood flow, the Qp/Qs ratio, was measured using a pulmonary artery catheter. The cost analysis included direct medical care costs associated with device implantation and open surgery, as well as professional fees. All costs were calculated in Iranian Rials and then converted to US dollars. There was no statistical difference in mean Qp/Qs ratio before the procedure between the device closure group and the open surgery group (2.1 ± 0.7 versus 1.7 ± 0.6, P = 0.090). The mean measured costs were overall higher in the device closure group than in open closure group (948.87 ± 548.76 US$ versus 743.70 ± 696.91 US$, P gender (Standardized Beta = 0.160, P = 0.031). PDA closure with the Amplatzer ductal occluder (1053.05 ± 525.73 US$) or with Nit-Occlud coils (PFM) (912.73 ± 565.94 US$, P < 0.001) was more expensive than that via open surgery. However, the Cook detachable spring coils device closure (605.65 ± 194.62 US$, P = 0.650) had a non-significant cost difference with open surgery. No event was observed in the device closure group regarding in-hospital mortality or morbidity; however, in another group, 2 in-hospital deaths occurred, two patients experienced pneumonia and seizure, and one suffered electrolyte abnormalities including

  1. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The closure activities discussed include: the closure activities for the structures, equipment, soil, and gravel scrubber; decontamination methods; materials made available for recycling or reuse; and waste management. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed

  2. Storage shaft definitive closure plug and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardaine, M.

    1992-01-01

    A definitive closure plug system for radioactive waste storage at any deepness, is presented. The inherent weight of the closure materials is used to set in the plug: these materials display an inclined sliding surface in such a way that when the closure material rests on a stable surface of the shaft storage materials, the relative sliding of the different materials tends to spread them towards the shaft internal wall so as to completely occlude the shaft

  3. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Broyd, T.W.; Jones, M.A.; Knowles, N.C.; Liew, S.K.; Mawbey, C.S.; Read, D.; Smith, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    This directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post-closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, geomechanics, heat transfer, groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, biosphere modelling, safety assessment and site evolution. A total of 320 programs are identified, of which 84 are reviewed in detail, 192 in summary and 44 in tabular fashion. Originally published in 1983, the directory was updated in 1985 with the addition of new programs and the revision of some of the existing program reviews. This directory has been completely rewritten in 1991 with the addition of more new programs and a full revision of all the existing program reviews, some of which have been deleted as they are no longer in general use. Although the directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described can also be used in other areas of repository (e.g. repository design). This directory is composed of two volumes, the present volume is the second

  4. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Broyd, T.W.; Jones, M.A.; Knowles, N.C.; Liew, S.K.; Mawbey, C.S.; Read, D.; Smith, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    This directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post-closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, geomechanics, heat transfer, groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, biosphere modelling, safety assessment and site evolution. A total of 320 programs are identified of which 84 are reviewed in detail, 192 in summary and 44 in tabular fashion. Originally published in 1983, the directory was updated in 1985 with the addition of new programs and the revision of some of the existing program reviews. This directory has been completely rewritten in 1991 with the addition of more new programs and a full revision of all the existing program reviews, some of which have been deleted as they are no longer in general use. Although the directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described can also be used in other areas of repository (e.g. repository design). This directory is composed of two volumes, the present volume is the first

  5. Laser peripheral iridoplasty for angle-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Siene; Ang, Ghee Soon; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2012-02-15

    Angle-closure glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Treatment is aimed at opening the anterior chamber angle and lowering the IOP with medical and/or surgical treatment (e.g. trabeculectomy, lens extraction). Laser iridotomy works by eliminating pupillary block and widens the anterior chamber angle in the majority of patients. When laser iridotomy fails to open the anterior chamber angle, laser iridoplasty may be recommended as one of the options in current standard treatment for angle-closure. Laser peripheral iridoplasty works by shrinking and pulling the peripheral iris tissue away from the trabecular meshwork. Laser peripheral iridoplasty can be used for crisis of acute angle-closure and also in non-acute situations.   To assess the effectiveness of laser peripheral iridoplasty in the treatment of narrow angles (i.e. primary angle-closure suspect), primary angle-closure (PAC) or primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in non-acute situations when compared with any other intervention. In this review, angle-closure will refer to patients with narrow angles (PACs), PAC and PACG. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 5 January 2012. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this review. Patients with narrow angles, PAC or PACG were eligible. We excluded studies that included only patients with acute presentations

  6. The potential migration effect of rural hospital closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Fyhn Lykke

    2008-01-01

    to out-migration, although the hypothetical way of questioning leaves uncertainty about the actual scale of out-migration. Child families appear to be the most likely out-migrants. Elderly people may be hardest hit by a hospital closure, being most reliant on health care and least inclined to move away.......Rural hospital closures are high on the current health care agenda in Denmark. One raised concern is that rural hospital closures may further decrease population numbers in rural areas, as closures may induce some residents to move away from affected areas, i.e. closer to health care services...

  7. 304 Concretion facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets in the 304 Concretion Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility). Clean closure of the 304 Facility is the proposed method for closure of the facility. Justification for this proposal is presented. 15 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs

  8. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters. PMID:20981425

  9. Environmental risk assessment as the basis for mine closure at Iscor Mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, S.J.; Pulles, W.; Boer, R.H.; Kirkaldy, J.; Pettit, C. [Iscor Mining, Pretoria (South Africa). Environmental Management Services

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles and application of risk assessment and management as the basis for environmental management within the mining industry. Unlike in other industries, mines are required to obtain closure certificates in terms of section 12 for the South African Minerals Act, which should ultimately release them from further environmental responsibilities. The focus shifts from conventional minimum legal compliance management to management of real environmental risks. The risk assessment approach has been applied to the planning of mine closure at Iscor`s Durban Navigation Collieries (Durnacol) in Kwa-Zulu Natal and certain key risk issues such as the long-term risk of water pollution from coal discard dumps have already progressed to fully quantitative risk assessment. This paper discussed the process which has been followed to date, with particular emphasis on the most recent phase, namely quantitative risk assessment and management of pollution from coal discard dumps. it is believed that the approach that is being pioneered at Durnacoal and which overcomes some of the more obvious deficineices of both the Environmental Risk Assessment Management (EMPR) and the traditional process will ultimately serve as the mode for all responsible mines in South Africa. It is also believed that this approach will enable the authorities to issue closure certificates with the confidence that there will be no unforeseen surprises in the years after closure. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. TOPOGRAPHIC CHANGES OF THE MACULA AFTER CLOSURE OF IDIOPATHIC MACULAR HOLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Kang Yeun; Park, Keun Heung; Kim, Kyong Ho; Park, Sung Who; Byon, Ik Soo; Kim, Hyun Woong; Chung, In Young; Lee, Joo Eun; Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Ji Eun

    2017-04-01

    To investigate retinal displacement in the macula after surgical closure of idiopathic macular hole and to identify factors correlated with displacement. This retrospective multicenter study included 73 eyes of 73 patients having idiopathic macular hole. A custom program was developed to compare the position of the retinal vessels in the macula between preoperative and postoperative photographs. En face images of a 6 mm × 6 mm optical coherence tomography volume scans were registered to calculate the scale. A grid comprising 16 sectors in 2 rings (inner; 2-4 mm and outer; 4-6 mm) was superimposed. The displacement of the retinal vessels was measured as a vector value by comparing the location of the retinal vessels in each sector. The correlation between displacement and various clinical parameters was analyzed. The average displacement was 57.2 μm at an angle of -3.3° (nasal and slightly inferior). Displacement was larger in the inner ring (79.2 μm) than in the outer ring (35.3 μm, P macula was displaced centripetally, nasally, and slightly inferiorly after surgical closure of idiopathic macular hole. Hole closure, contraction of the nerve fiber layer, and gravity are the suggested mechanisms of macular displacement caused by internal limiting membrane peeling.

  11. Evaluation of Container Closure System Integrity for Frozen Storage Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Nikoloff, Jonas; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, drug product for parenteral administration is stored in a frozen state (e.g., -20 °C or -80 °C), particularly during early stages of development of some biotech molecules in order to provide sufficient stability. Shipment of frozen product could potentially be performed in the frozen state, yet possibly at different temperatures, for example, using dry ice (-80 °C). Container closure systems of drug products usually consist of a glass vial, rubber stopper, and an aluminum crimped cap. In the frozen state, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of commonly used rubber stoppers is between -55 and -65 °C. Below their Tg, rubber stoppers are known to lose their elastic properties and become brittle, and thus potentially fail to maintain container closure integrity in the frozen state. Leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are likely to be transient, yet, can possibly risk container closure integrity and lead to microbial contamination. After thawing, the rubber stopper is supposed to re-seal the container closure system. Given the transient nature of the possible impact on container closure integrity in the frozen state, typical container closure integrity testing methods (used at room temperature conditions) are unable to evaluate and thus confirm container closure integrity in the frozen state. Here we present the development of a novel method (thermal physical container closure integrity) for direct assessment of container closure integrity by a physical method (physical container closure integrity) at frozen conditions, using a modified He leakage test. In this study, different container closure systems were evaluated with regard to physical container closure integrity in the frozen state to assess the suitability of vial/stopper combinations and were compared to a gas headspace method. In summary, the thermal physical container closure integrity He leakage method was more sensitive in detecting physical container closure

  12. Considerations for closure of low-level radioactive waste engineered disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Proper stabilization and closure of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities require detailed planning during the early stages of facility development. This report provides considerations for host States, compact regions, and unaffiliated States on stabilization and closure of engineered low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste disposal facilities. A time line for planning closure activities, which identifies closure considerations to be addressed during various stages of a facility's development, is presented. Current Federal regulatory requirements and guidance for closure and post-closure are outlined. Significant differences between host State and Federal closure requirements are identified. Design features used as stabilization measures that support closure, such as waste forms and containers, backfill materials, engineered barrier systems, and site drainage systems, are described. These design features are identified and evaluated in terms of how they promote long-term site stability by minimizing water infiltration, controlling subsidence and surface erosion, and deterring intrusion. Design and construction features critical to successful closure are presented for covers and site drainage. General considerations for stabilization and closure operations are introduced. The role of performance and environmental monitoring during closure is described

  13. Annual report, RCRA post-closure monitoring and inspections for the mercury landfill hazardous waste trenches for the period October 1995--October 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emer, D.F.; Smith, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches were closed in-place in September 1993. Post-closure monitoring of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches began in October 1993. The post-closure monitoring program is used to verify that the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trench covers are performing properly, and that there is no water infiltrating into the waste trenches. The performance of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches is currently monitored using 30 neutron access tubes positioned on and along the margins of the covers. Soil moisture measurements are obtained in the soils directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions from the first year of post-closure operation. This report documents the post-closure activities between October 1995 and October 1996.

  14. Annual report, RCRA post-closure monitoring and inspections for the mercury landfill hazardous waste trenches for the period October 1995--October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emer, D.F.; Smith, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches were closed in-place in September 1993. Post-closure monitoring of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches began in October 1993. The post-closure monitoring program is used to verify that the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trench covers are performing properly, and that there is no water infiltrating into the waste trenches. The performance of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches is currently monitored using 30 neutron access tubes positioned on and along the margins of the covers. Soil moisture measurements are obtained in the soils directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions from the first year of post-closure operation. This report documents the post-closure activities between October 1995 and October 1996

  15. Tank closure reducing grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-01-01

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr 90 , the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel

  16. Socket sclerosis--an obstacle for orthodontic space closure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertel, Sebastian

    2009-07-01

    Socket sclerosis is a rare reaction to tooth extraction resulting in high-density bone in the center of the alveolar process, where, under normal circumstances, cancellous bone is to be expected. In an adult orthodontic patient, routine extractions of the mandibular first permanent bicuspids were performed, resulting in socket sclerosis and unsuccessful orthodontic space closure. Orthodontic mini-implants were inserted to augment anchorage and aid in space closure. In the presence of socket sclerosis, conventional orthodontic mechanics failed to close the extraction spaces. However, with absolute anchorage in place, space closure occurred at a nearly normal rate. After treatment, no signs of socket sclerosis were discernible on the periapical radiographs. Socket sclerosis can be an obstacle for orthodontic space closure if traditional mechanics are employed. However, mini-implant-reinforced anchorage can lead to successful space closure, resulting in complete resolution of the sclerotic sites.

  17. Primary closure of equine laryngotomy incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, C.; Karlsson, L.; Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn

    2016-01-01

    incision between January 1995 and June 2012 were reviewed. Horses with a laryngotomy incision closed in three layers for primary healing were included. Descriptive data on healing characteristics and complications of laryngotomy wounds were collected from the medical records and via follow......The objective was to report healing characteristics and complications after primary closure of equine laryngotomies and analyse factors potentially associated with complications. This retrospective case series of the medical records of horses (n = 180) undergoing laryngoplasty and laryngotomy...... after primary closure of equine laryngotomy incisions are infrequent and considered of minimal severity and can be performed safely when paying careful attention to the closure of the cricothyroid membrane....

  18. Percutaneous Transcatheter PDA Device Closure in Infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, M.; Sultan, M.; Akhtar, K.; Sadiq, N.; Akbar, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results and complications associated with transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in infants. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Cardiology Department of Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology / National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC/NIHD), Rawalpindi, from December 2010 to June 2012. Methodology: Infants undergoing transcatheter device closure of PDA were included. All patients were evaluated by experienced Paediatric Cardiologists with 2-D echocardiography and Doppler before the procedure. Success of closure and complications were recorded. Results: The age of patients varied from 05 - 12 months and 31 (56.4%) were females. Out of the 55 infants, 3 (5.4%) were not offered device closure after aortogram (two large tubular type ducts and one tiny duct, considered unsuitable for device closure); while in 50 (96.1%) patients out of remaining 52, the duct was successfully closed with transcatheter PDA device or coil. In one infant, device deployment resulted in acquired coarctation, necessitating device retrieval by Snare followed by surgical duct interruption and another patient had non-fatal cardiac arrest during device deployment leading to abandonment of procedure and subsequent successful surgical interruption. Local vascular complications occurred in 12 (21.8%) of cases and all were satisfactorily treated. Conclusion: Transcatheter device closure of PDA in infants was an effective procedure in the majority of cases; however, here were considerable number of local access site vascular complications. (author)

  19. ASSESSMENT OF LENS THICKNESS IN ANGLE CLOSURE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Sultana Khayoom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anterior chamber depth and lens thickness have been considered as important biometric determinants in primary angle-closure glaucoma. Patients with primary narrow angle may be classified as a primary angle closure suspect (PACS, or as having primary angle closure (PAC or primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG. 23.9% of patients with primary angle closure disease are in India, which highlights the importance of understanding the disease, its natural history, and its underlying pathophysiology, so that we may try to establish effective methods of treatment and preventative measures to delay, or even arrest, disease progression, thereby reducing visual morbidity. AIM To determine the lens thickness using A-scan biometry and its significance in various stages of angle closure disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients attending outpatient department at Minto Ophthalmic Hospital between October 2013 to May 2015 were screened for angle closure disease and subsequently evaluated at glaucoma department. In our study, lens thickness showed a direct correlation with shallowing of the anterior chamber by determining the LT/ ACD ratio. A decrease in anterior chamber depth is proportional to the narrowing of the angle which contributes to the progression of the angle closure disease from just apposition to occlusion enhancing the risk for optic nerve damage and visual field loss. Hence, if the lens thickness values are assessed earlier in the disease process, appropriate intervention can be planned. CONCLUSION Determination of lens changes along with anterior chamber depth and axial length morphometrically can aid in early detection of angle closure. The role of lens extraction for PACG is a subject of increased interest. Lens extraction promotes the benefits of anatomical opening of the angle, IOP reduction and improved vision. This potential intervention may be one among the armamentarium of approaches for PACG. Among the current treatment modalities

  20. Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Hascoët, Sébastien; Baruteau, Julien; Boudjemline, Younes; Lambert, Virginie; Angel, Claude-Yves; Belli, Emre; Petit, Jérôme; Pass, Robert

    2014-02-01

    This review aims to describe the past history, present techniques and future directions in transcatheter treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Transcatheter PDA closure is the standard of care in most cases and PDA closure is indicated in any patient with signs of left ventricular volume overload due to a ductus. In cases of left-to-right PDA with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, closure may be performed under specific conditions. The management of clinically silent or very tiny PDAs remains highly controversial. Techniques have evolved and the transcatheter approach to PDA closure is now feasible and safe with current devices. Coils and the Amplatzer Duct Occluder are used most frequently for PDA closure worldwide, with a high occlusion rate and few complications. Transcatheter PDA closure in preterm or low-bodyweight infants remains a highly challenging procedure and further device and catheter design development is indicated before transcatheter closure is the treatment of choice in this delicate patient population. The evolution of transcatheter PDA closure from just 40 years ago with 18F sheaths to device delivery via a 3F sheath is remarkable and it is anticipated that further improvements will result in better safety and efficacy of transcatheter PDA closure techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Patent foramen ovale closure using a bioabsorbable closure device: safety and efficacy at 6-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Branden, Ben J; Post, Martijn C; Plokker, Herbert W; ten Berg, Jurriën M; Suttorp, Maarten J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mid-term safety and efficacy of percutaneous patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure using a bioabsorbable device (BioSTAR, NMT Medical, Boston, Massachusetts). Closure of PFO in patients with cryptogenic stroke has proven to be safe and effective using different types of permanent devices. All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous PFO closure with the bioabsorbable closure device between November 2007 and January 2009 were included. Residual shunt was assessed using contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Sixty-two patients (55% women, mean age 47.7 ± 11.8 years) underwent PFO closure. The in-hospital complications were a surgical device retrieval in 2 patients (3.2%), device reposition in 1 (1.6%), and a minimal groin hematoma in 6 patients (9.7%). The short-term complications at 1-month follow-up (n = 60) were a transient ischemic attack in the presence of a residual shunt in 1 patient and new supraventricular tachycardia in 7 patients (11.3%). At 6-month follow-up (n = 60), 1 patient without residual shunt developed a transient ischemic attack and 1 developed atrial fibrillation. A mild or moderate residual shunt was noted in 51.7%, 33.9%, and 23.7% after 1-day, 1-month, and 6-month follow-up, respectively. A large shunt was present in 8.3%, 3.4%, and 0% after 1-day, 1-month, and 6-month follow-up. Closure of PFO using the bioabsorbable device is associated with a low complication rate and a low recurrence rate of embolic events. However, a relatively high percentage of mild or moderate residual shunting is still present at 6-month follow-up. Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 324 Building REC and HLV Tank Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker-Khaleel, B.; Schlick, K.

    1995-12-01

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close the 324 Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and High-Level Vault (HLV) in accordance with the Washington State Dangerous Waste regulations. To provide a complete description of the activities required, the closure plan relies on information contained in the 324 Building B-Cell Safety Cleanout Project (BCCP) plans, the 324 Building REC HLV Interim Waste Management Plan (IWMP), the Project Management Plan for Nuclear Facilities Management 300 Area Compliance Program, and the 324 High Level Vault Interim Removal Action Project (project management plan [PMP]). The IWMP addresses the management of mixed waste in accordance with state and federal hazardous waste regulations. It provides a strategy for managing high-activity mixed waste in compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements or provides for an alternative management approach for the waste. The BCCP outlines the past, present, and future activities necessary for removing from B-Cell the solid waste, including mixed waste generated as a result of historical research and development (R ampersand D) activities conducted in the cell. The BCCP also includes all records and project files associated with the B-Cell cleanout. This information is referenced throughout the closure plan. The PMP sets forth the plans, organization, and systems that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will use to direct and control the 324 High-Level Vault Interim Removal Action Project. This project will develop and implement a treatment strategy that will remove and stabilize the inventory of liquid waste from the 324 HLV tanks. The PMP also provides for flushing and sampling the flush solution

  3. Simulated Leaching (Migration) Study for a Model Container-Closure System Applicable to Parenteral and Ophthalmic Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis; Egert, Thomas; Hendricker, Alan; Castner, James; Feinberg, Tom; Houston, Christopher; Hunt, Desmond G; Lynch, Michael; Nicholas, Kumudini; Norwood, Daniel L; Paskiet, Diane; Ruberto, Michael; Smith, Edward J; Holcomb, Frank; Markovic, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    A simulating leaching (migration) study was performed on a model container-closure system relevant to parenteral and ophthalmic drug products. This container-closure system consisted of a linear low-density polyethylene bottle (primary container), a polypropylene cap and an elastomeric cap liner (closure), an adhesive label (labeling), and a foil overpouch (secondary container). The bottles were filled with simulating solvents (aqueous salt/acid mixture at pH 2.5, aqueous buffer at pH 9.5, and 1/1 v/v isopropanol/water), a label was affixed to the filled and capped bottles, the filled bottles were placed into the foil overpouch, and the filled and pouched units were stored either upright or inverted for up to 6 months at 40 °C. After storage, the leaching solutions were tested for leached substances using multiple complementary analytical techniques to address volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile organic and inorganic extractables as potential leachables.The leaching data generated supported several conclusions, including that (1) the extractables (leachables) profile revealed by a simulating leaching study can qualitatively be correlated with compositional information for materials of construction, (2) the chemical nature of both the extracting medium and the individual extractables (leachables) can markedly affect the resulting profile, and (3) while direct contact between a drug product and a system's material of construction may exacerbate the leaching of substances from that material by the drug product, direct contact is not a prerequisite for migration and leaching to occur. LAY ABSTRACT: The migration of container-related extractables from a model pharmaceutical container-closure system and into simulated drug product solutions was studied, focusing on circumstances relevant to parenteral and ophthalmic drug products. The model system was constructed specifically to address the migration of extractables from labels applied to the outside of the

  4. AX Tank farm closure settlement estimates and soil testing; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECKER, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This study provides a conservative three-dimensional settlement study of the AX Tank Farm closure with fill materials and a surface barrier. The finite element settlement model constructed included the interaction of four tanks and the surface barrier with the site soil and bedrock. Also addressed are current soil testing techniques suitable for the site soil with recommendations applicable to the AX Tank Farm and the planned cone penetration testing

  5. Emergent properties during dorsal closure in Drosophila morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta, X G; Toyama, Y; Edwards, G S; Kiehart, D P

    2008-01-01

    Dorsal closure is an essential stage of Drosophila development that is a model system for research in morphogenesis and biological physics. Dorsal closure involves an orchestrated interplay between gene expression and cell activities that produce shape changes, exert forces and mediate tissue dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of dorsal closure based on confocal microscopic measurements of cell shortening in living embryos. During the mid-stages of dorsal closure we find that there are fluctuations in the width of the leading edge cells but the time-averaged analysis of measurements indicate that there is essentially no net shortening of cells in the bulk of the leading edge, that contraction predominantly occurs at the canthi as part of the process for zipping together the two leading edges of epidermis and that the rate constant for zipping correlates with the rate of movement of the leading edges. We characterize emergent properties that regulate dorsal closure, i.e., a velocity governor and the coordination and synchronization of tissue dynamics

  6. RIP Input Tables From WAPDEG for LA Design Selection: Continuous Pre-Closure Ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.G. Mon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to document the creation of .tables for input into Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems (RIP) version 5.19.01 (Golder Associates 1998) from Waste Package Degradation (WAPDEG) version 3.09 (CRWMS M and O 1998b. ''Software Routine Report for WAPDEG'' (Version 3.09)) simulations. This calculation details the creation of the RIP input tables (representing waste package corrosion degradation over time) for the License Application Design Selection (LADS) analysis of the effects of continuous pre-closure ventilation. Ventilation during the operational phase of the repository could remove considerable water from the system, as well as reduce temperatures. Pre-closure ventilation is LADS Design Feature 7

  7. Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration.

  8. Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration

  9. Key financial ratios can foretell hospital closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, M L; Wertheim, P

    1993-11-01

    An analysis of various financial ratios sampled from open and closed hospitals shows that certain leverage, liquidity, capital efficiency, and resource availability ratios can predict hospital closure up to two years in advance of the closure with an accuracy of nearly 75 percent.

  10. Installation Restoration General Environmental Technology Development. Task 3. Guidelines for In-Place Closure of Dry Lagoons. Volume 2. Evaluation of In-Place Closure Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    USLE ) may provide useful intormation for comparing different cover soils during 1, the design of a cap system (Lutten et al., 1979). The USLE as...lnstallatloh commander through the evaluation of the applicability of In-place closure., Technologies evaluated include soil cap systems, geotextile fabrics...18 2.2.2.3 Surface infiltration considerations 18 . 2.2.2.4 Subsurface soil characteristics 19 2.2.2.5 Hydrogeoloqical coaditions 19 2. 22.6

  11. Hospital closure: Phoenix, Hydra or Titanic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, T; Davis, S

    1996-01-01

    Very little has been published about the effects of hospital closure in terms of the service, financial or management issues of the process. Attempts through a case-study format to redress the balance and as such represents the reflections of practitioners who have recently undergone the experience of hospital closure and the often neglected issues arising both during and after the process.

  12. Simulating school closure policies for cost effective pandemic decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araz Ozgur M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around the globe, school closures were used sporadically to mitigate the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. However, such closures can detrimentally impact economic and social life. Methods Here, we couple a decision analytic approach with a mathematical model of influenza transmission to estimate the impact of school closures in terms of epidemiological and cost effectiveness. Our method assumes that the transmissibility and the severity of the disease are uncertain, and evaluates several closure and reopening strategies that cover a range of thresholds in school-aged prevalence (SAP and closure durations. Results Assuming a willingness to pay per quality adjusted life-year (QALY threshold equal to the US per capita GDP ($46,000, we found that the cost effectiveness of these strategies is highly dependent on the severity and on a willingness to pay per QALY. For severe pandemics, the preferred strategy couples the earliest closure trigger (0.5% SAP with the longest duration closure (24 weeks considered. For milder pandemics, the preferred strategies also involve the earliest closure trigger, but are shorter duration (12 weeks for low transmission rates and variable length for high transmission rates. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of obtaining early estimates of pandemic severity and provide guidance to public health decision-makers for effectively tailoring school closures strategies in response to a newly emergent influenza pandemic.

  13. Potential socio-economic consequences of mine closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietjie Ackermann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mine closures generally reveal negligence on the part of mining houses, not only in terms of the environment, but also the surrounding mining communities. Aim: This article reflects on the findings of research into the socio-economic consequences of mine closure. The research specifically explored how mineworkers’ dependency on their employment at a mine affects their ability to sustain their livelihood. Setting: The research was conducted at the Orkney Mine and the Grootvlei Mine (Springs. Methods: The research was conducted within a naturalistic domain, guided by a relativist orientation, a constructivist ontology and an interpretivist epistemology. Data were collected by means of document analysis, semi-structured interviews, focus group discussion and unstructured observation. Results: From the research findings, it is evident that mine closures, in general, have a devastating effect on the surrounding mining communities as well as on the employees. Mine closures in the case studies gradually depleted the mining communities’ livelihood assets and resulted in the collapse of their coping strategies and livelihood outcomes. It generally affected the communities’ nutrition, health, education, food security, water, shelter, levels of community participation and personal safety. Conclusion: If not managed efficiently and effectively, mine closures may pose significant challenges to the mining industry, government, the environment, national and local economic prosperity and communities in the peripheral areas of mines. This truly amplifies that mine closure, whether temporary or permanent, is an issue that needs to be addressed with responsibility towards all stakeholders, including the mining community and the labour force.

  14. Top closure for control rod drive for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raas, J.H.; Schwartz, J.I.

    1978-01-01

    A removable top closure and venting assembly for the tubular housing of a control rod drive includes a mounting ring threadably inserted in the upper end of the housing, a fluid-sealing closure member beneath the mounting ring and which is mounted in and coupled to the mounting ring by means of a ball and socket joint, a gas vent defined by interconnecting passages extending through the closure and through the ball and socket joint, and a vent valve accessible from the top of the closure assembly. 3 claims, 2 figures

  15. Transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defect with Occlutech Duct Occluder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik-Ugan, Sezen; Saltik, Irfan Levent

    2018-04-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus occluders are used for transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defects, as well as for closure of patent ductus arteriosus. The Occlutech Duct Occluder is a newly introduced device for transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus. Here, we present a case in which the Occlutech Duct Occluder was successfully used on a patient for the closure of a perimembraneous ventricular septal defect.

  16. Seven-year follow-up of percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzada, Naqibullah; Ladenvall, Per; Hansson, Per-Olof; Johansson, Magnus Carl; Furenäs, Eva; Eriksson, Peter; Dellborg, Mikael

    2013-12-01

    Observational studies favor percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) over medical treatment to reduce recurrent stroke while randomized trials fail to demonstrate significant superiority of percutaneous PFO closure. Few long-term studies are available post PFO closure. This study reports long-term clinical outcomes after percutaneous PFO closure. Between 1997 and 2006, 86 consecutive eligible patients with cerebrovascular events, presumably related to PFO, underwent percutaneous PFO closure. All 86 patients were invited to a long-term follow-up, which was carried out during 2011 and 2012. Percutaneous PFO closure was successfully performed in 85 of 86 patients. The follow-up rate was 100%. No cardiovascular or cerebrovascular deaths occurred. Two patients (both women) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Follow-up visits were conducted for 64 patients and the remaining 20 patients were followed up by phone. The mean follow-up time was 7.3 years (5 to 12.4 years). Mean age at PFO closure was 49 years. One patient had a minor stroke one month after PFO closure and a transient ischemic attack (TIA) two years afterwards. One other patient suffered from a TIA six years after closure. No long-term device-related complications were observed. Percutaneous PFO closure was associated with very low risk of recurrent stroke and is suitable in most patients. We observed no mortality and no long-term device-related complications related to PFO closure, indicating that percutaneous PFO closure is a safe and efficient treatment even in the long term.

  17. Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Griffith

    2011-12-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'

  18. Phytomelatonin receptor PMTR1-mediated signaling regulates stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jian; Li, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Jia-Rong; Shan, Chi; Rengel, Zed; Song, Zhong-Bang; Chen, Qi

    2018-04-27

    Melatonin has been detected in plants in 1995; however, the function and signaling pathway of this putative phytohormone are largely undetermined due to a lack of knowledge about its receptor. Here, we discovered the first phytomelatonin receptor (CAND2/PMTR1) in Arabidopsis thaliana and found that melatonin governs the receptor-dependent stomatal closure. The application of melatonin induced stomatal closure through the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit-regulated H 2 O 2 and Ca 2+ signals. The Arabidopsis mutant lines lacking AtCand2 that encodes a candidate G protein-coupled receptor were insensitive to melatonin-induced stomatal closure. Accordingly, the melatonin-induced H 2 O 2 production and Ca 2+ influx were completely abolished in cand2. CAND2 is a membrane protein that interacts with GPA1 and the expression of AtCand2 was tightly regulated by melatonin in various organs and guard cells. CAND2 showed saturable and specific 125 I-melatonin binding, with apparent K d (dissociation constant) of 0.73 ± 0.10 nmol/L (r 2  = .99), demonstrating this protein is a phytomelatonin receptor (PMTR1). Our results suggest that the phytomelatonin regulation of stomatal closure is dependent on its receptor CAND2/PMTR1-mediated H 2 O 2 and Ca 2+ signaling transduction cascade. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Social and macro economic impact of closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeliene, D.

    1999-01-01

    The social consequences of closure of Ignalina NPP will largely depend on the actions the Government takes. If it puts in place the conditions which enable the International Financial Institutions to assist Lithuania, both in providing loans and grants for decommissioning and (in the case of the EU) providing Structural Adjustment Funds for the regional economic development of the Visaginas area, then solutions to the problems of closure can be found. But if the Government delays putting into place the necessary conditions, then Lithuania will be left to solve the problems of - inter alia necessary - closure of Ignalina NPP on its own. (author)

  20. Angle closure glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace M. Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Congenital ectropion uvea is a rare anomaly, which is associated with open, but dysplastic iridocorneal angles that cause childhood glaucoma. Herein, we present 3 cases of angle-closure glaucoma in children with congenital ectropion uvea. Observations: Three children were initially diagnosed with unilateral glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uvea at 7, 8 and 13 years of age. The three cases showed 360° of ectropion uvea and iris stromal atrophy in the affected eye. In one case, we have photographic documentation of progression to complete angle closure, which necessitated placement of a glaucoma drainage device 3 years after combined trabeculotomy and trabeculectomy. The 2 other cases, which presented as complete angle closure, also underwent glaucoma drainage device implantation. All three cases had early glaucoma drainage device encapsulation (within 4 months and required additional surgery (cycloablation or trabeculectomy. Conclusions and importance: Congenital ectropion uvea can be associated with angle-closure glaucoma, and placement of glaucoma drainage devices in all 3 of our cases showed early failure due to plate encapsulation. Glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea requires attention to angle configuration and often requires multiple surgeries to obtain intraocular pressure control. Keywords: Congenital ectropion uvea, Juvenile glaucoma, Angle-closure glaucoma, Glaucoma drainage device

  1. Strategic Planning for Hot Cell Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LANGSTAFF, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor were remediating a large hot cell complex to mitigate the radiological hazard. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure unit was determined to be located within the complex. The regulator established a challenge to develop an acceptable closure plan on a short schedule (four months). The scope of the plan was to remove all excess equipment and mixed waste from the closure unit, establish the requirements of the legally binding Closure Plan and develop an acceptable schedule. The complex has several highly radioactive tanks, tank vaults, piping, and large hot cells containing complex chemical processing equipment. Driven by a strong need to develop an effective strategy to meet cleanup commitments, three principles were followed to develop an acceptable plan: (1) Use a team approach, (2) Establish a buffer zone to support closure, and (3) Use good practice when planning the work sequence. The team was composed of DOE, contractor, and Washington State Department of Ecology (Regulator) staff. The team approach utilized member expertise and fostered member involvement and communication. The buffer zone established an area between the unregulated parts of the building and the areas that were allegedly not in compliance with environmental standards. Introduction of the buffer zone provided simplicity, clarity, and flexibility into the process. Using good practice means using the DOE Integrated Safety Management Core Functions for planning and implementing work safely. Paying adequate attention to detail when the situation required contributed to the process credibility and a successful plan

  2. Machine Learning-based discovery of closures for reduced models of dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shaowu; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2017-11-01

    Despite the successful application of machine learning (ML) in fields such as image processing and speech recognition, only a few attempts has been made toward employing ML to represent the dynamics of complex physical systems. Previous attempts mostly focus on parameter calibration or data-driven augmentation of existing models. In this work we present a ML framework to discover closure terms in reduced models of dynamical systems and provide insights into potential problems associated with data-driven modeling. Based on exact closure models for linear system, we propose a general linear closure framework from viewpoint of optimization. The framework is based on trapezoidal approximation of convolution term. Hyperparameters that need to be determined include temporal length of memory effect, number of sampling points, and dimensions of hidden states. To circumvent the explicit specification of memory effect, a general framework inspired from neural networks is also proposed. We conduct both a priori and posteriori evaluations of the resulting model on a number of non-linear dynamical systems. This work was supported in part by AFOSR under the project ``LES Modeling of Non-local effects using Statistical Coarse-graining'' with Dr. Jean-Luc Cambier as the technical monitor.

  3. Subcostal closure technique for prevention of postthoracotomy pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kipyo; Bae, Mikyung; Han, Sora

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our subcostal closure technique in prevention of postthoracotomy pain syndrome. From July 2012 to March 2015, 29 patients in whom a lobectomy was indicated underwent a thoracotomy. The thoracotomy wounds were closed using a subcostal closure technique (subcostal closure group) and outcomes were compared with 31 patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (thoracoscopy group). The duration of oral opioid consumption was evaluated from medical records, and postoperative pain was evaluated by telephone interview conducted by a trained nurse practitioner who was unaware of the patient's group. Pain scores were higher in the thoracoscopy group compared to the subcostal closure group, reaching statistical significance (Numeric Rating Scale 0.55 ± 0.948 in the subcostal closure group vs. 1.84 ± 1.614 in the thoracoscopy group; p Pain Scale 0.24 ± 0.435 in the subcostal closure group vs. 0.81 ± 0.703 in the thoracoscopy group; p pain syndrome. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Vascular Closure Devices in Interventional Radiology Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rafiuddin, E-mail: rafiuddin.patel@ouh.nhs.uk [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Muller-Hulsbeck, Stefan, E-mail: muehue@diako.de [Diakonissen Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology/Neuroradiology (Germany); Morgan, Robert, E-mail: robert.morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Manual compression (MC) is a well-established technique for haemostasis following percutaneous arterial intervention. However, MC is labour and time intensive with potential limitations, particularly for patients who are coagulopathic, unable to comply with bed rest or obese and when large sheaths or anti-coagulants are used. There are a variety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) available to overcome these limitations. This review gives an overview of current VCDs, their mechanism of action, individual strengths and weaknesses, evidence base and utility in interventional radiology (IR) practice. The majority of the published evidence on VCDs is derived from patients undergoing cardiac interventions, which should be borne in mind when considering the applicability and transfer of this data for general IR practice. Overall, the evidence suggests that most VCDs are effective in achieving haemostasis with a similar rate of complications to MC although the complication profile associated with VCDs is distinct to that of MC. There is insufficient evidence to comparatively analyse the different types of VCDs currently available or reliably judge their cost-effectiveness. The interventional radiologist should have a thorough understanding of the available techniques for haemostasis and be able to identify and utilise the most appropriate strategy and closure technique for the individual patient.

  5. Comparing over-the-scope clip versus endoloop and clips (KING closure) for access site closure: a randomized experimental study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínek, J.; Ryska, O.; Tučková, I.; Filípková, T.; Doležel, R.; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan; Zavoral, M.; Ryska, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 4 (2013), s. 1203-1210 ISSN 0930-2794 R&D Projects: GA MZd NS9994 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : NOTES * gastrotomy closure * rectotomy closure Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 3.313, year: 2013

  6. Hexone Storage and Treatment Facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The HSTF is a storage and treatment unit subject to the requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure is being conducted under interim status and will be completed pursuant to the requirements of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and WAC 173-303-640. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. The known hazardous/dangerous waste remaining at the site before commencing other closure activities consists of the still vessels, a tarry sludge in the storage tanks, and residual contamination in equipment, piping, filters, etc. The treatment and removal of waste at the HSTF are closure activities as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and WAC 173-303

  7. Design, production and initial state of the closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The production reports are included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the closure and plugs in underground openings other than deposition tunnels for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides some input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the closure and plugs shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference designs of the closure and plugs and verifies their conformity to the design premises. It also briefly deals with the production of the closure and plugs. Finally, the initial state of the closure and plugs and their conformity to the reference designs and design premises are presented

  8. Design, production and initial state of the closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The production reports are included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the closure and plugs in underground openings other than deposition tunnels for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides some input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the closure and plugs shall be handled and installed. The report presents the design premises and reference designs of the closure and plugs and verifies their conformity to the design premises. It also briefly deals with the production of the closure and plugs. Finally, the initial state of the closure and plugs and their conformity to the reference designs and design premises are presented

  9. Transcatheter Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale: Devices and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) reduces the risk of recurrent cryptogenic stroke compared with medical therapy. PFO closure is a prophylactic procedure, and will not provide the patient with symptomatic improvement, except in cases of hypoxemia due to right-to-left shunt or possibly migraine headaches. Therefore, appropriate patient selection is critical, and procedural safety is paramount. Herein, we review key characteristics of the devices currently available for transcatheter PFO closure within the United States, and highlight key technical aspects of the PFO closure procedure that will maximize procedural success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Digital signal processing of data from borehole creep closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Patrick, W.C.; Duplancic, N.

    1987-01-01

    Digital signal processing, a technique commonly used in the fields of electrical engineering and communication technology, has been successfully used to analyze creep closure data obtained from a 0.91 m diameter by 5.13 deep borehole in bedded salt. By filtering the ''noise'' component of the closure data from a test borehole, important data trends were made more evident and average creep closure rates were able to be calculated. This process provided accurate estimates of closure rates that are used in the design of lined boreholes in which heat-generating transuranic nuclear wastes are emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  11. 40 CFR 264.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Closure... closure of each hazardous waste disposal unit, the owner or operator must submit to the local zoning... disposal unit of the facility. For hazardous wastes disposed of before January 12, 1981, the owner or...

  12. A closure test for time-specific capture-recapture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, T.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    The assumption of demographic closure in the analysis of capture-recapture data under closed-population models is of fundamental importance. Yet, little progress has been made in the development of omnibus tests of the closure assumption. We present a closure test for time-specific data that, in principle, tests the null hypothesis of closed-population model M(t) against the open-population Jolly-Seber model as a specific alternative. This test is chi-square, and can be decomposed into informative components that can be interpreted to determine the nature of closure violations. The test is most sensitive to permanent emigration and least sensitive to temporary emigration, and is of intermediate sensitivity to permanent or temporary immigration. This test is a versatile tool for testing the assumption of demographic closure in the analysis of capture-recapture data.

  13. RELAP-7 Closure Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansel, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, J. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s and TRACE’s capabilities and extends their analysis capabilities for all reactor system simulation scenarios. The RELAP-7 code utilizes the well-posed 7-equation two-phase flow model for compressible two-phase flow. Closure models used in the TRACE code has been reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past decades and provide a basis for the colure correlations implemented in the RELAP-7 code. This document provides a summary on the closure correlations that are currently implemented in the RELAP-7 code. The closure correlations include sub-grid models that describe interactions between the fluids and the flow channel, and interactions between the two phases.

  14. Application of Nuclear Application Programs to APR1400 Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hong, Jin Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400MWe (APR1400) simulator has been developed and installed at Kori Training Center for operators of ShinKori no.3, 4 nuclear power plant by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power,s Central Research Institute (KHNP CRI). NAPS (Nuclear Application Programs) is a computerbased system which provides operators with past and real-time information for monitoring and controlling NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System), BOP (Balance Of Plant) and Electric system. NAPS consists of several programs such as COLSS (Core Operating Limit Supervisory System), SPADES+ (Safety Parameter Display and Evaluation System), CEA (Control Element Assembly) Application Program, and so on. Each program makes calculations based on its own algorithm and provides information available for operation. In order to use NAPS programs with a simulator even though they are being used in a real plant, they should be modified to add several simulation functions such as reset, snap, run/freeze and backtrack required by ANSI/ANS-3.5 to the original NAPS functionality. On top of that, interfacing programs should be developed for the data communication between respective NAPS programs and simulator sever. The purpose of this paper is to provide the overall architecture of the communication system between NAPS and simulator model, and to describe the method to apply NAPS to APR1400 simulator

  15. The effectiveness of eye-closure in repeated interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Vredeveldt, A.; Baddeley, A.D.; Hitch, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Closing the eyes during recall can help witnesses remember more about a witnessed event. This study examined the effectiveness of eye-closure in a repeated recall paradigm with immediate free recall followed 1 week later by both free and cued recall. We examined whether eye-closure was more or less effective during the second free-recall attempt compared with the first, whether eye-closure during the first recall attempt had an impact on subsequent free- and cued-recall performance, a...

  16. Closure of the squared Zakharov--Shabat eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaup, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    By solution of the inverse scattering problem for a third-order (degenerate) eigenvalue problem, the closure of the squared eigenfunctions of the Zakharov--Shabat equations is found. The question of the completeness of squared eigenstates occurs in many aspects of ''inverse scattering transforms'' (solving nonlinear evolution equations exactly by inverse scattering techniques), as well as in various aspects of the inverse scattering problem. The method used here is quite suggestive as to how one might find the closure of the squared eigenfunctions of other eigenvalue equations, and the strong analogy between these results and the problem of finding the closure of the eigenvectors of a nonself-adjoint matrix is pointed out

  17. Designing and Programming CICS Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Horswill, John

    2011-01-01

    CICS is an application server that delivers industrial-strength, online transaction management for critical enterprise applications. Proven in the market for over 30 years with many of the world's leading businesses, CICS enables today's customers to modernize and extend their applications to take advantage of the opportunities provided by e-business while maximizing the benefits of their existing investments. Designing and Programming CICS Applications will benefit a diverse audience. It introduces new users of IBM's mainframe (OS/390) to CICS features. It shows experienced users how t

  18. Closure development for high-level nuclear waste containers for the tuff repository; Phase 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robitz, E.S. Jr.; McAninch, M.D. Jr.; Edmonds, D.P. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (USA). Nuclear Power Div.]|[Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (USA). Research and Development Div.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes Phase 1 activities for closure development of the high-level nuclear waste package task for the tuff repository. Work was conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract 9172105, administered through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), funded through the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The goal of this phase was to select five closure processes for further evaluation in later phases of the program. A decision tree methodology was utilized to perform an objective evaluation of 15 potential closure processes. Information was gathered via a literature survey, industrial contacts, and discussions with project team members, other experts in the field, and the LLNL waste package task staff. The five processes selected were friction welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and plasma arc welding. These are felt to represent the best combination of weldment material properties and process performance in a remote, radioactive environment. Conceptual designs have been generated for these processes to illustrate how they would be implemented in practice. Homopolar resistance welding was included in the Phase 1 analysis, and developments in this process will be monitored via literature in Phases 2 and 3. Work was conducted in accordance with the YMP Quality Assurance Program. 223 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Stomal Closure: Strategies to Prevent Incisional Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Rhiannon L.; Torkington, Jared

    2018-01-01

    Incisional hernias following ostomy reversal occur frequently. Incisional hernias at the site of a previous stoma closure can cause significant morbidity, impaired quality of life, lead to life-threatening hernia incarceration or strangulation and result in a significant financial burden on health care systems Despite this, the evidence base on the subject is limited. Many recognised risk factors for the development of incisional hernia following ostomy reversal are related to patient factors such as age, malignancy, diabetes, COPD, hypertension and obesity, and are not easily correctable. There is a limited amount of evidence to suggest that prophylactic mesh reinforcement may be of benefit to reduce the post stoma closure incisional hernia rate but a further large scale randomised controlled trial is due to report in the near future. There appears to be weak evidence to suggest that surgeons should favour circular, or “purse-string” closure of the skin following stoma closure in order to reduce the risk of SSI, which in turn may reduce incisional hernia formation. There remains the need for further evidence in relation to suture technique, skin closure techniques, mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotic prescription focusing on incisional hernia development as an outcome measure. Within this review, we discuss in detail the evidence base for the risk factors for the development of, and the strategies to prevent ostomy reversal site incisional hernias. PMID:29670882

  20. Stomal Closure: Strategies to Prevent Incisional Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon L. Harries

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Incisional hernias following ostomy reversal occur frequently. Incisional hernias at the site of a previous stoma closure can cause significant morbidity, impaired quality of life, lead to life-threatening hernia incarceration or strangulation and result in a significant financial burden on health care systems Despite this, the evidence base on the subject is limited. Many recognised risk factors for the development of incisional hernia following ostomy reversal are related to patient factors such as age, malignancy, diabetes, COPD, hypertension and obesity, and are not easily correctable. There is a limited amount of evidence to suggest that prophylactic mesh reinforcement may be of benefit to reduce the post stoma closure incisional hernia rate but a further large scale randomised controlled trial is due to report in the near future. There appears to be weak evidence to suggest that surgeons should favour circular, or “purse-string” closure of the skin following stoma closure in order to reduce the risk of SSI, which in turn may reduce incisional hernia formation. There remains the need for further evidence in relation to suture technique, skin closure techniques, mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotic prescription focusing on incisional hernia development as an outcome measure. Within this review, we discuss in detail the evidence base for the risk factors for the development of, and the strategies to prevent ostomy reversal site incisional hernias.

  1. Case Report: Rapid staged abdominal closure using Gore-Tex® mesh as a bridge to primary omphalocele sac closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Kethman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphaloceles present an ongoing challenge due to significant variations in presentation and associated co-morbidities. Diverse management strategies have been described to tackle many of the fundamental challenges of closure and reconstruction of the abdominal wall – this fact demonstrates a need for increasingly individualized management options for this complex disease. We describe a novel method of rapid staged abdominal wall closure using Gore-Tex® mesh as a bridge to primary omphalocele closure in an infant with partial Pentalogy of Cantrell and giant ruptured omphalocele. This strategy can be used in management of some of the most complex abdominal wall defects.

  2. Primary angle closure glaucoma in a myopic kinship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, J C; Lederer, C M

    1985-03-01

    Three related myopic individuals with primary angle closure glaucoma are reported. They had true myopia and not pseudomyopia secondary to increased lenticular index of refraction. We believe one of these individuals (-8.62 spherical equivalent) to have the most myopic case of primary angle closure glaucoma reported in the literature. Although myopia is associated with anatomical factors that offer considerable protection from primary angle closure glaucoma, its presence does not eliminate the possibility of this disease. Laser iridectomy was effective in the treatment of these patients.

  3. Influence of Closure & Non-Closure of the Visceral and Parietal Peritoneum on Post Cesarean Morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabasi Z.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Objectives: One of the most important issues in promoting mother and child health is reducing the morbidity rate after cesarean section. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of closure and non-closure of the visceral and parietal peritoneum on post cesarean morbidity in women attending Shabihkhani Maternity Hospital in Kashan, Iran.Methods: This study was conducted with a single blind randomized clinical trial method on 100 parturient women that underwent emergency or elective cesarean section. Patients with previous cesarean section and or abdominal surgery, diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus and premature rupture of membrane and pre operative bleeding, were excluded from this study. Then, the participants were randomly divided into two groups: in one group both peritoneal layers were closed while in the other group, they were not closed. Post operative morbidity including fever, bleeding, post operative pain, analgesic consumption and time of operation were assessed. Data were analyzed with t-tests, and χ2 and a P<0.05 were considered significant.Results: In this study, there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to age, gestational age, the reason for caesarean section and gravidity, nor were there any differences with respect to the incidence of fever or bleeding and was similar between the two groups, but there was a significant difference between the two groups regarding to feeling of severe pain (P=0.0003, analgesic consumption (P=0.0003 and time of operation (P=0.004. In the non-closure group, dose of analgesic drugs, pain severity and time of operation were less than those of the other group.Conclusion: The Findings showed that non-closure of peritoneal layers as a shorter and simpler procedure has no influence on increasing post cesarean morbidity. Therefore, due to maternal health promotion and early neonatal breastfeeding, non closure of peritoneal

  4. Porting linac application programs to a windowing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonglaton, J.M.; Raich, U.

    1992-01-01

    We report our experience in porting Linac application programs written for Camac controlled hardware consoles to an X-Windows/Motif based workstation environment. Application programs acquire their parameter values from a front end computer (FEC), controlling the acceleration process, via a local area network. The timing for data acquisition and control is determined by the particle source timing. Two server programs on the FEC for repetitive acquisition and command-response mode will be described. The application programs on the workstations access a common parameter access server who establishes the necessary connection to the parameters on the FEC. It displays the parameter's current values and allows control through Motif widgets. An interactive synoptics editor and its corresponding driver program allow easy generation of synoptics displays and interaction through command panels. (author)

  5. Relative expressive power of navigational querying on graphs using transitive closure

    OpenAIRE

    Surinx, Dimitri; Fletcher, George H. L.; Gyssens, Marc; Leinders, Dirk; Van den Bussche, Jan; Van Gucht, Dirk; Vansummeren, Stijn; Wu, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by both established and new applications, we study navigational query languages for graphs (binary relations). The simplest language has only the two operators union and composition, together with the identity relation. We make more powerful languages by adding any of the following operators: intersection; set difference; projection; coprojection; converse; transitive closure; and the diversity relation. All these operators map binary relations to binary relations. We compare the ex...

  6. Hamiltonian closures in fluid models for plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    This article reviews recent activity on the Hamiltonian formulation of fluid models for plasmas in the non-dissipative limit, with emphasis on the relations between the fluid closures adopted for the different models and the Hamiltonian structures. The review focuses on results obtained during the last decade, but a few classical results are also described, in order to illustrate connections with the most recent developments. With the hope of making the review accessible not only to specialists in the field, an introduction to the mathematical tools applied in the Hamiltonian formalism for continuum models is provided. Subsequently, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of models based on the magnetohydrodynamics description, including those based on the adiabatic and double adiabatic closure. It is shown how Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems can be applied to impose the incompressibility closure on a magnetohydrodynamic model and how an extended version of barotropic magnetohydrodynamics, accounting for two-fluid effects, is amenable to a Hamiltonian formulation. Hamiltonian reduced fluid models, valid in the presence of a strong magnetic field, are also reviewed. In particular, reduced magnetohydrodynamics and models assuming cold ions and different closures for the electron fluid are discussed. Hamiltonian models relaxing the cold-ion assumption are then introduced. These include models where finite Larmor radius effects are added by means of the gyromap technique, and gyrofluid models. Numerical simulations of Hamiltonian reduced fluid models investigating the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection are illustrated. The last part of the review concerns recent results based on the derivation of closures preserving a Hamiltonian structure, based on the Hamiltonian structure of parent kinetic models. Identification of such closures for fluid models derived from kinetic systems based on the Vlasov and drift-kinetic equations are presented, and

  7. Concrete characterization for the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator Closure Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prignano, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the sampling activities undertaken and the analytical results obtained in a concrete sampling and analyses study performed for the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator (300 ASE) closure site. The 300 ASE is identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) unit that will be closed in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations. No constituents of concern were found in concentrations indicating contamination of the concrete by 300 ASE operations

  8. Monitoring calculation of closure change of Extradosed Cable-stayed Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing Xian; Ran, Zhi Hong

    2018-06-01

    During the construction of extradosed cable-stayed bridge in Yunnan province, China, the construction unit has made certain changes in the construction process of the closure section due to environmental restrictions: remove the hanging basket after the closure, the sling shall not be provided in closure section, the function of the sling is realized by the hanging basket on the 16th beam. In case of this change, the bridge has been constructed to section 15th. In order to ensure the smooth and orderly progress of each stage in the closure phase, this article is arranged according to the construction plan, appropriate adjustment of related procedures, checking the bridge safety at all stages of construction, the stress and force of the main girder are compared to ensure the safety of the construction after closure changes. Adjust the height of the beam of the 16th and 17th to adapt the new construction plan, and the bridge closure smoothly.

  9. NASA energy technology applications program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-05

    The NASA Energy Technology Applications Program is reviewed. This program covers the following points: 1. wind generation of electricity; 2. photovoltaic solar cells; 3. satellite power systems; 4. direct solar heating and cooling; 5. solar thermal power plants; 6. energy storage; 7. advanced ground propulsion; 8. stationary on-site power supply; 9. advanced coal extraction; 10. magnetic heat pump; 11. aeronautics.

  10. MNC Subsidiary Closures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; Torres Preto, Miguel; de Faria, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of MNC subsidiary closures for employees who lose their jobs. In particular, we examine the extent to which the human capital that these employees acquired while employed by the MNC influences the wages they receive in their new jobs. We propose an employee...

  11. Improvement of tricuspid regurgitation after transcatheter ASD closure in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Shen, J; Shan, X; Wang, F; Kan, T; Tang, X; Zhao, X; Qin, Y

    2017-07-19

    Adult patients with undiagnosed atrial septal defect (ASD) may have right heart cavity enlargement and functional tricuspid valve insufficiency. Moderate or more severe tricuspid regurgitation has been associated with a worse prognosis, and more serious complications are typically seen in older patients. This study aimed to evaluate the improvement in functional tricuspid regurgitation and heart geometry after transcatheter ASD closure in older patients. The data of 111 patients over 60 years of age with moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation before ASD closure were analyzed. At the 1‑month and 6‑month follow-up after closure, both tricuspid regurgitation jet area and right atrial volume decreased significantly. Right ventricular volume decreased 1 month after closure, showing a further decrease at the end of the 6‑month follow-up. However, 24 patients (21.6%) still had persistent severe tricuspid regurgitation after the procedure. Multivariate analysis revealed that patient age at ASD closure and pulmonary artery systolic pressure determined by echocardiography before closure were predictors of persistent tricuspid regurgitation after closure. Transcatheter ASD closure in older patients could significantly decrease tricuspid regurgitation and improve right heart geometry.

  12. 2727-S Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility clean closure evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the analytical results of 2727-S NRDWS facility closure verification soil sampling and compares these results to clean closure criteria. The results of this comparison will determine if clean closure of the unit is regulatorily achievable. This report also serves to notify regulators that concentrations of some analytes at the site exceed sitewide background threshold levels (DOE-RL 1993b) and/or the limits of quantitation (LOQ). This report also presents a Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup (MTCA) (WAC 173-340) regulation health-based closure standard under which the unit can clean close in lieu of closure to background levels or LOQ in accordance with WAC 173-303-610. The health-based clean closure standard will be closure to MTCA Method B residential cleanup levels. This report reconciles all analyte concentrations reported above background or LOQ to this health-based cleanup standard. Regulator acceptance of the findings presented in this report will qualify the TSD unit for clean closure in accordance with WAC 173-303-610 without further TSD unit soil sampling, or soil removal and/or decontamination. Nondetected analytes require no further evaluation

  13. Significant skin-tightening by closure of fractional ablative laser holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russe, Elisabeth; Purschke, Martin; Limpiangkanan, Wikunda; Farinelli, William A; Wang, Ying; Doukas, Apostolos G; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Wechselberger, Gottfried; Anderson, Richard Rox

    2018-01-01

    and needle coring treatment without closure did not result in significant area reduction (P = 0.1289) compared with untreated control sites. Significant skin tightening can be achieved by immediate temporary non-invasive wound closure after short pulse Er:YAG fractional ablative laser treatment, as well as after mechanically removing skin with a coring needle. This approach may improve skin tightening after ablative laser treatments. Further clinical studies are necessary to confirm successful application in humans. Lasers Surg. Med. 50:64-69, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Waste Dump Closure and Cost Estimates at AngloGold Ashanti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... 2University of Mines and Technology, P.O. Box 237, Tarkwa, Ghana ... The mine has closure plans for the waste dumps and the closure activity ... incur additional cost, it was advised that the mine should execute the closure and reclamation plan without delay. .... Progressively rehabilitate the project area.

  15. A short summary on finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Konjengbam Darunkumar [Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati (India); Parry, Matthew Roger [Airbus Operations Ltd, Bristol(United Kingdom); Sinclair, Ian [University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents a short summary pertaining to the finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure. Several key issues related to finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure are highlighted: element type, mesh refinement, stabilization of crack closure, crack-tip node release scheme, constitutive model, specimen geometry, stress-states (i.e., plane stress, plane strain), crack closure monitoring. Reviews are presented for both straight and deflected cracks.

  16. Staged closure of a giant omphalocele with amnion preservation, modified technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram H. Aljahdali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Closure of a giant omphalocele can be challenging. Preservation of the amnion in staged closure is not commonly practiced. Here, we describe 2 cases of giant omphalocele treated with a modified amnion preservation, staged closure technique. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and safety of this technique, and the versatility of amnion to adapt to an escharization strategy if closure is not achievable.

  17. DESIGN OF A WELDING AND INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR WASTE STORAGE CLOSURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.B. Smartt; A.D. Watkins; D.P. Pace; R.J. Bitsoi; E.D. Larsen T.R. McJunkin; C.R. Tolle

    2005-01-01

    This work reported here was done to provide a conceptual design for a robotic welding and inspection system for the Yucca Mountain Repository waste package closure system. The welding and inspection system is intended to make the various closure welds that seal and/or structurally join the lids to the waste package vessels. The welding and inspection system will also perform surface and volumetric inspections of the various closure welds and has the means to repair closure welds, if required. The system is designed to perform these various activities remotely, without the necessity of having personnel in the closure cell

  18. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    Heritage is a discourse that aims at closure. It fixates the narrative of the past through the celebration of specific material (or sometimes immaterial non-) ob-jects. It organizes temporality and construct events and freezes time. How does this unfold in the case of the UNESCO World Heritage si...

  19. Small-incision cataract extraction combined trabeculectomy for primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the curative effect of treating small-incision cataract extraction by intraocular lens implantation combined with trabeculectomy for primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract. METHODS: Totally 44 cases(52 eyesof primary angle-closure glaucoma combined with cataract were selected to undergo the combined surgery, in order to observe the patients' pre- and postoperative eyesights, intraocular pressures and the postoperative complications.RESULTS: The postoperative eyesight was improved significantly as compared with the preoperative eyesight. The intraocular pressure was declined dramatically. The result was of statistical significance(P0.05. All the 52 cases' surgeries were performed by the same surgeon. The surgeries were processed smoothly, with 6 postoperative eyes of anterior chamber inflammation cell response, 3 eyes of anterior chamber fibrinoid exudate, 2 eyes of shallow anterior chamber through mydriasis and treatment with glucocorticoids and non-steroidal eyedrops before absorption, and no complications like malignant glaucoma, cyclodialysis, etc. were reported through mydriasis and pressure bandaging before recovery.CONCLUSION: Treating the primary angle-closure glaucoma combined with cataract through the combined surgery has high reliability and desirable curative effect. The surgical method is simple to learn and applicable for promotion on the basic level.

  20. Regional neural tube closure defined by the Grainy head-like transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Yeliz; Parekh, Vishwas; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Hislop, Nikki R; Auden, Alana; Ting, Stephen B; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2010-09-15

    Primary neurulation in mammals has been defined by distinct anatomical closure sites, at the hindbrain/cervical spine (closure 1), forebrain/midbrain boundary (closure 2), and rostral end of the forebrain (closure 3). Zones of neurulation have also been characterized by morphologic differences in neural fold elevation, with non-neural ectoderm-induced formation of paired dorso-lateral hinge points (DLHP) essential for neural tube closure in the cranial and lower spinal cord regions, and notochord-induced bending at the median hinge point (MHP) sufficient for closure in the upper spinal region. Here we identify a unifying molecular basis for these observations based on the function of the non-neural ectoderm-specific Grainy head-like genes in mice. Using a gene-targeting approach we show that deletion of Grhl2 results in failed closure 3, with mutants exhibiting a split-face malformation and exencephaly, associated with failure of neuro-epithelial folding at the DLHP. Loss of Grhl3 alone defines a distinct lower spinal closure defect, also with defective DLHP formation. The two genes contribute equally to closure 2, where only Grhl gene dosage is limiting. Combined deletion of Grhl2 and Grhl3 induces severe rostral and caudal neural tube defects, but DLHP-independent closure 1 proceeds normally in the upper spinal region. These findings provide a molecular basis for non-neural ectoderm mediated formation of the DLHP that is critical for complete neuraxis closure. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of successful closure of patent ductus arteriosus with indomethacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, M F; Verma, P; Lee, S; Vega, M; Wang, D; Kim, M; Fuloria, M

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether platelet counts can predict the likelihood of successful closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with indomethacin. This was a retrospective cohort study of infants closure with indomethacin and those who failed were compared. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of successful ductal closure. In infants with hemodynamically significant PDA, older GA (odds ratio=1.54; 95% confidence interval: 1.12 to 2.13), male gender (odds ratio=3.02; 95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 8.49) and higher platelet count (odds ratio=1.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 2.17) prior to indomethacin treatment were associated with successful ductal closure with indomethacin. Older GA, male gender and higher platelet count at time of treatment of hemodynamically significant PDA are predictors of successful ductal closure with indomethacin.

  2. Targeted transtracheal stimulation for vocal fold closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Aaron J; Thompson, Paul; Kolb, Ilya; Hahn, Elizabeth C; Tyler, Dustin J

    2014-06-01

    Paralysis of the structures in the head and neck due to stroke or other neurological disorder often causes dysphagia (difficulty in swallowing). Patients with dysphagia have a significantly higher incidence of aspiration pneumonia and death. The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), which innervates the intrinsic laryngeal muscles that control the vocal folds, travels superiorly in parallel to the trachea in the tracheoesophageal groove. This study tests the hypothesis that functional electrical stimulation (FES) applied via transtracheal electrodes can produce controlled vocal fold adduction. Bipolar electrodes were placed at 15° intervals around the interior mucosal surface of the canine trachea, and current was applied to the tissue while electromyography (EMG) from the intrinsic laryngeal muscles and vocal fold movement visualization via laryngoscopy were recorded. The lowest EMG thresholds were found at an average location of 100° to the left of the ventral midsagittal line and 128° to the right. A rotatable pair of bipolar electrodes spaced 230° apart were able to stimulate bilaterally both RLNs in every subject. Laryngoscopy showed complete glottal closure with transtracheal stimulation in six of the eight subjects, and this closure was maintained under simultaneous FES-induced laryngeal elevation. Transtracheal stimulation is an effective tool for minimally invasive application of FES to induce vocal fold adduction, providing an alternative mechanism to study airway protection.

  3. Site Closure Strategy Model for Creosote Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, F.R.; Gray, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    In conjunction with RCRA site corrective action at an active wood preserving facility, a risk-based site closure strategy was developed and incorporated the performance of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source recovery remedy, a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) remedy for dissolved phase groundwater, and institutional controls. Innovative creosote DNAPL source recovery has been undertaken at the Site since 1998. Pooled creosote DNAPL is present 90 feet below ground within a transmissive sand and gravel aquifer with a saturated thickness of approximately 80 feet. The creosote DNAPL source is situated on the property boundary of the site and has generated a 1/2 mile off-site dissolved phase plume, creating significant NAPL management and remedial technology verification issues. To date, over 120,000 gallons of creosote DNAPL have been recovered from the subsurface utilizing a modified circulation well technology. A mass discharge flux protocol was developed to serve as a major performance metrics for the continuation of source removal efforts and to support the application of monitored natural attenuation as an associated remedial technology for groundwater. The mass removal success has supported the MNA remedy for dissolved phase groundwater and the associated development of institutional controls. The enacted site management strategy outlines the current and future risk management activities for the Site and represents an appropriate site closure strategy for the Site. (authors)

  4. Catheter-based closure of the patent ductus arteriosus in lower weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlek, Leeann R; Slaughter, Jonathan L; Berman, Darren P; Backes, Carl H

    2018-06-13

    Risks associated with drug therapy and surgical ligation have led health care providers to consider alternative strategies for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure. Catheter-based PDA closure is the procedure of choice for ductal closure in adults, children, and infants ≥6kg. Given evidence among older counterparts, interest in catheter-based closure of the PDA in lower weight (closure devices; (3) review the technical success (feasibility); (4) review the risks (safety profile); (5) discuss the quality of evidence on procedural efficacy; (6) consider areas for future research. The review provided herein suggests that catheter-based PDA closure is technically feasible, but the lack of comparative trials precludes determination of the optimal strategy for ductal closure in this subgroup of infants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral Paracetamol for Patent Ductus Arteriosus Rescue Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharande, Pramod; Watson, Hadley; Tan, Kenneth; Sehgal, Arvind

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the efficacy of oral paracetamol in closing a symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) when used as 'rescue' option. After obtaining ethics approval, a retrospective appraisal of the data from April 2014 to July 2015 was performed. Infants who were administered oral paracetamol either after unsuccessful therapy with ibuprofen or where it was considered contraindicated were included. A previously published echocardiographic scoring schema to stratify for ductal disease severity was used. Using univariate analysis, characteristics of infants with successful closure were compared with partial (a priori reduction in composite score by ≥ 50% of pretreatment) or no closure. Twenty infants with gestation age and birthweight of 25.7 ± 1.5 weeks and 724.1 ± 143 g, respectively, were studied. Complete closure was noted in 10 (50%) infants with additional four infants showing a significant reduction in haemodynamic shunting. Gestational age at birth and at therapy, chronological age at therapy, birthweight and total fluid intake were comparable between the two groups. The pre-therapy composite score had a significant association with successful closure (the higher the echocardiographic score, the lesser the closure). Concomitant furosemide therapy and late-onset sepsis had a high likelihood ratio of unsuccessful closure (11.01 [2-tailed, p = 0.005] and 5.3 [2-tailed, p = 0.07]), respectively. Oral paracetamol may be a possible therapeutic option in premature infants where therapy with first-line agents is unsuccessful or contraindicated. Concomitant sepsis and furosemide administration may affect successful therapy.

  6. Remote automatic plasma arc-closure welding of a dry-storage canister for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecace, R.P.; Blankenship, W.P.

    1982-01-01

    A carbon steel storage canister has been designed for the dry encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies or of logs of vitrified high level radioactive waste. The canister design is in conformance with the requirements of the ASME Code, Section III, Division 1 for a Class 3 vessel. The canisters will be loaded and sealed as part of a completely remote process sequence to be performed in the hot bay of an experimental encapsulation facility at the Nevada Test Site. The final closure to be made is a full penetration butt weld between the canister body, a 12.75-in O.D. x 0.25-in wall pipe, and a mating semiellipsoidal closure lid. Due to a combination of design, application and facility constraints, the closure weld must be made in the 2G position (canister vertical). The plasma arc welding system is described, and the final welding procedure is described and discussed in detail. Several aspects and results of the procedure development activity, which are of both specific and general interest, are highlighted; these include: The critical welding torch features which must be exactly controlled to permit reproducible energy input to, and gas stream interaction with, the weld puddle. A comparison of results using automatic arc voltage control with those obtained using a mechanically fixed initial arc gap. The optimization of a keyhole initiation procedure. A comparison of results using an autogenous keyhole closure procedure with those obtained using a filler metal addition. The sensitivity of the welding process and procedure to variations in joint configuration and dimensions and to variations in base metal chemistry. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of the plasma arc process for this application are summarized from the current viewpoint, and the applicability of this process to other similar applications is briefly indicated

  7. Impact of Vial Capping on Residual Seal Force and Container Closure Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Roggo, Yves; Ovadia, Robert; Lam, Philippe; Stauch, Oliver; Vogt, Martin; Roehl, Holger; Huwyler, Joerg; Mohl, Silke; Streubel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The vial capping process is a critical unit operation during drug product manufacturing, as it could possibly generate cosmetic defects or even affect container closure integrity. Yet there is significant variability in capping equipment and processes, and their relation to potential defects or container closure integrity has not been thoroughly studied. In this study we applied several methods-residual seal force tester, a self-developed system of a piezo force sensor measurement, and computed tomography-to characterize different container closure system combinations that had been sealed using different capping process parameter settings. Additionally, container closure integrity of these samples was measured using helium leakage (physical container closure integrity) and compared to characterization data. The different capping equipment settings lead to residual seal force values from 7 to 115 N. High residual seal force values were achieved with high capping pre-compression force and a short distance between the capping plate and plunge. The choice of container closure system influenced the obtained residual seal force values. The residual seal force tester and piezoelectric measurements showed similar trends. All vials passed physical container closure integrity testing, and no stopper rupture was seen with any of the settings applied, suggesting that container closure integrity was warranted for the studied container closure system with the chosen capping setting ranges. The vial capping process is a critical unit operation during drug product manufacturing, as it could possibly generate cosmetic defects or even affect container closure integrity. Yet there is significant variability in capping equipment and processes, and their relation to potential defects or container closure integrity has not been thoroughly studied. In this study we applied several methods-residual seal force tester, a self-developed system of a piezo force sensor measurement, and

  8. Official holidays in 2012 and end-of-year closure 2012/2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    (Application of Articles R II 4.38 and R II 4.39 of the Staff Regulations) Official holidays in 2012 (in addition to the special leave during the annual closure): Sunday, 1st January (New Year); Friday, 6th April (Good Friday); Monday, 9th April (Easter Monday); Tuesday, 1st May; Thursday, 17th May (Ascension day); Monday, 28th May (Whit Monday); Thursday, 6th September ("Jeûne genevois"); Monday, 24th December (Christmas Eve); Tuesday, 25th December (Christmas); Monday, 31st December (New Year’s Eve). Annual closure of the site of the Organization during the Christmas holidays and day of special leave granted by the Director-General : The Laboratory will be closed from Saturday, 22nd December 2012 to Sunday, 6th January 2013 inclusive (without deduction of annual leave). The first working day in the New Year will be Monday, 7th January 2013. Human Resources Department Tel. 73903

  9. Military Base Closures: Updated Status of Prior Base Realignments and Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the Department of Defense (DOD) prepares for the 2005 base realignment and closure (BRAC) round, questions continue to be raised about the transfer and environmental cleanup of unneeded property arising from the prior four BRAC rounds and their impact on cost and savings and on local economies.

  10. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  11. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodman, D.W.; Spry, M.J.; Nolte, E.P.; Barry, G.A.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plans for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. Future plans for the unit include incorporating the earthen-covered portion of the TSA-2 pad into a TSA retrieval enclosure along with the TSA-1 and TSAR pads, and closure of the portion of the TSA-2 pad under the Air Support Weather Shield (ASWS-2). This plan addresses closure of the ASWS-2 by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted the waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all closure activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  12. Barriers and post-closure monitoring (AL121125)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, K.V.; Janecky, D.

    1995-01-01

    This project focuses on the rapid implementation of near-surface barriers, biotreatment, and post-closure monitoring technology. It uses water-permeable and biologic barriers that chemically capture and/or degrade contaminants without significantly altering the natural water flow regime. Barrier approaches are being tested for two different applications. The first is the use of barriers for confinement of chemical contaminants for in-trench treatments with leach systems or an in-place bioreactor. The second is an enhancement of the current practice of emplacing grout or clay slurry walls into direct horizontal surface and subsurface water flows around a contaminated area by integrating permeable reactive barriers and petroleum reservoir gel/foam/polymer technology

  13. Crack closure and sequential effects in fatigue: A literature survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, M.

    A literature survey of the phenomenon of crack closure is reported here. The state of the art is reviewed and several empirical formulas for determining the crack closure are compared with each other. Their properties, advantages and disadvantages are briefly discussed. Experimental techniques for determining the crack closure stress are presented and experimental data from the literature are reported.

  14. 303-K Storage Facility: Report on FY98 closure activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample analysis performed in support of the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility. The evaluation is based on the validated data included in the data validation package (98-EAP-346) for the 303-K Storage Facility. The results of this evaluation will be used for assessing contamination for the purpose of closing the 303-K Storage Facility as described in the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan, DOE/RL-90-04. The closure strategy for the 303-K Storage Facility is to decontaminate the interior of the north half of the 303-K Building to remove known or suspected dangerous waste contamination, to sample the interior concrete and exterior soils for the constituents of concern, and then to perform data analysis, with an evaluation to determine if the closure activities and data meet the closure criteria. The closure criteria for the 303-K Storage Facility is that the concentrations of constituents of concern are not present above the cleanup levels. Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, determination has been made that the soils at the 303-K Storage Facility meet the cleanup performance standards (WMH 1997) and can be clean closed. The evaluation determined that the 303-K Building cannot be clean closed without additional closure activities. An additional evaluation will be needed to determine the specific activities required to clean close the 303-K Storage Facility. The radiological contamination at the 303-K Storage Facility is not addressed by the closure strategy

  15. Percutaneous Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) Closure in Very Preterm Infants: Feasibility and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H; Cheatham, Sharon L; Deyo, Grace M; Leopold, Scott; Ball, Molly K; Smith, Charles V; Garg, Vidu; Holzer, Ralf J; Cheatham, John P; Berman, Darren P

    2016-02-12

    Percutaneous closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in term neonates is established, but data regarding outcomes in infants born very preterm (closure at weights closure. Twenty-five percent (13/52) of infants were closure. Compared to precatheterization trends, percutaneous PDA closure resulted in improved respiratory status, including less exposure to mechanical ventilation (mixed effects logistic model, Pclosure at weights closure versus alternative (surgical ligation) management strategies. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Angle closure glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Grace M; Thuente, Daniel; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2018-06-01

    Congenital ectropion uvea is a rare anomaly, which is associated with open, but dysplastic iridocorneal angles that cause childhood glaucoma. Herein, we present 3 cases of angle-closure glaucoma in children with congenital ectropion uvea. Three children were initially diagnosed with unilateral glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uvea at 7, 8 and 13 years of age. The three cases showed 360° of ectropion uvea and iris stromal atrophy in the affected eye. In one case, we have photographic documentation of progression to complete angle closure, which necessitated placement of a glaucoma drainage device 3 years after combined trabeculotomy and trabeculectomy. The 2 other cases, which presented as complete angle closure, also underwent glaucoma drainage device implantation. All three cases had early glaucoma drainage device encapsulation (within 4 months) and required additional surgery (cycloablation or trabeculectomy). Congenital ectropion uvea can be associated with angle-closure glaucoma, and placement of glaucoma drainage devices in all 3 of our cases showed early failure due to plate encapsulation. Glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea requires attention to angle configuration and often requires multiple surgeries to obtain intraocular pressure control.

  17. Mixed Waste Management Facility closure at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, M.F.

    1991-08-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility of the Savannah River Plant received hazardous and solid low level radioactive wastes from 1972 until 1986. Because this facility did not have a permit to receive hazardous wastes, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure was performed between 1987 and 1990. This closure consisted of dynamic compaction of the waste trenches and placement of a 3-foot clay cap, a 2-foot soil cover, and a vegetative layer. Operations of the waste disposal facility, tests performed to complete the closure design, and the construction of the closure cap are discussed herein

  18. Cystic Duct Closure by Sealing With Bipolar Electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, B.; Jorgensen, L. N.; Larsen, S. S.; Kristiansen, V. B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cystic duct leakage after cholecystectomy is not uncommon and is a potentially serious complication. The aim of this study was to assess a bipolar sealing system (LigaSure®) for closure of the cystic duct. Methods: The records from consecutive laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed in 2 hospitals with closure of the cystic duct with LigaSure after informed consent were recorded and complications and morbidity registered. The records were compared with those of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy with closure of the cystic duct with clips during the same period. Results: During the study period, 218 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed; 102 of these were performed with the LigaSure. One patient was excluded due to violation of the protocol. We experienced no cases of cystic duct leakage, but in one patient, bile leakage from the gallbladder bed was observed probably due to a small aberrant duct. Conclusion: The LigaSure system was safe and effective for closure and division of the cystic duct in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:20412641

  19. Stress analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, G.C.; Fischer, L.E.; Hsu, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report specifies the requirements and criteria for stress analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks containing nuclear spent fuels or high level radioactive materials. The specification is based on existing information conceming the structural behavior, analysis, and design of bolted joints. The approach taken was to extend the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements and criteria for bolting analysis of nuclear piping and pressure vessels to include the appropriate design and load characteristics of the shipping cask. The characteristics considered are large, flat, closure lids with metal-to-metal contact within the bolted joint; significant temperature and impact loads; and possible prying and bending effects. Specific formulas and procedures developed apply to the bolt stress analysis of a circular, flat, bolted closure. The report also includes critical load cases and desirable design practices for the bolted closure, an in-depth review of the structural behavior of bolted joints, and a comprehensive bibliography of current information on bolted joints

  20. Influence of Closure & Non-Closure of the Visceral and Parietal Peritoneum on Post Cesarean Morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Tabasi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: One of the most important issues in promoting mother and child health is reducing the morbidity rate after cesarean section. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of closure and non-closure of the visceral and parietal peritoneum on post cesarean morbidity in women attending Shabihkhani Maternity Hospital in Kashan, Iran.

    Methods: This study was conducted with a single blind randomized clinical trial method on 100 parturient women that underwent emergency or elective cesarean section. Patients with previous cesarean section and or abdominal surgery, diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus and premature rupture of membrane and pre operative bleeding, were excluded from this study. Then, the participants were randomly divided into two groups: in one group both peritoneal layers were closed while in the other group, they were not closed. Post operative morbidity including fever, bleeding, post operative pain, analgesic consumption and time of operation were assessed. Data were analyzed with t-tests, and χ2 and a P<0.05 were considered significant.

    Results: In this study, there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to age, gestational age, the reason for caesarean section and gravidity, nor were there any differences with respect to the incidence of fever or bleeding and was similar between the two groups, but there was a significant difference between the two groups regarding to feeling of severe pain (P=0.0003, analgesic consumption (P=0.0003 and time of operation (P=0.004. In the non-closure group, dose of analgesic drugs, pain severity and time of operation were less than those of the other group.

    Conclusion: The
  1. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: Causes of failure of initial bladder closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouame Dibi Bertin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0, concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0. The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  2. Understanding the Risk Factors of Trauma Center Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Chu; Hsia, Renee Y.; Kuzma, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We analyze whether hazard rates of shutting down trauma centers are higher due to financial pressures or in areas with vulnerable populations (such as minorities or the poor). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective study of all hospitals with trauma center services in urban areas in the continental US between 1990 and 2005, identified from the American Hospital Association Annual Surveys. These data were linked with Medicare cost reports, and supplemented with other sources, including the Area Resource File. We analyze the hazard rates of trauma center closures among several dimensions of risk factors using discrete-time proportional hazard models. Results The number of trauma center closures increased from 1990 to 2005, with a total of 339 during this period. The hazard rate of closing trauma centers in hospitals with a negative profit margin is 1.38 times higher than those hospitals without the negative profit margin (P lower hazard of shutting down trauma centers (ratio: 0.58, P penetration face a higher hazard of trauma center closure (ratio: 2.06, P < 0.01). Finally, hospitals in areas with higher shares of minorities face a higher risk of trauma center closure (ratio: 1.69, P < 0.01). Medicaid load and uninsured populations, however, are not risk factors for higher rates of closure after we control for other financial and community characteristics. Conclusions Our findings give an indication on how the current proposals to cut public spending could exacerbate the trauma closure particularly among areas with high shares of minorities. In addition, given the negative effect of health maintenance organizations on trauma center survival, the growth of Medicaid managed care population should be monitored. Finally, high shares of Medicaid or uninsurance by themselves are not independent risk factors for higher closure as long as financial pressures are mitigated. Targeted policy interventions and further research on the causes, are needed to

  3. The Rising Rate of Rural Hospital Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Brystana G; Thomas, Sharita R; Randolph, Randy K; Perry, Julie R; Thompson, Kristie W; Holmes, George M; Pink, George H

    2016-01-01

    Since 2010, the rate of rural hospital closures has increased significantly. This study is a preliminary look at recent closures and a formative step in research to understand the causes and the impact on rural communities. The 2009 financial performance and market characteristics of rural hospitals that closed from 2010 through 2014 were compared to rural hospitals that remained open during the same period, stratified by critical access hospitals (CAHs) and other rural hospitals (ORHs). Differences were tested using Pearson's chi-square (categorical variables) and Wilcoxon rank test of medians. The relationships between negative operating margin and (1) market factors and (2) utilization/staffing factors were explored using logistic regression. In 2009, CAHs that subsequently closed from 2010 through 2014 had, in general, lower levels of profitability, liquidity, equity, patient volume, and staffing. In addition, ORHs that closed had smaller market shares and operated in markets with smaller populations compared to ORHs that remained open. Odds of unprofitability were associated with both market and utilization factors. Although half of the closed hospitals ceased providing health services altogether, the remainder have since converted to an alternative health care delivery model. Financial and market characteristics appear to be associated with closure of rural hospitals from 2010 through 2014, suggesting that it is possible to identify hospitals at risk of closure. As closure rates show no sign of abating, it is important to study the drivers of distress in rural hospitals, as well as the potential for alternative health care delivery models. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Navy radon assessment and mitigation program: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This final report encompasses the events from the beginning of the Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program to the closure of the program on October 31, 1994. Included in the report are discussions of the phases of the program including screening, assessment, mitigation, and post-mitigation. The primary discussion involves screening and assessment. The report addresses recommendations made to the Naval Facilities Engineering Command by the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the final decisions that were made. Special emphasis is placed on quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), since QA/QC was given top priority during the implementation of this program. Included in the discussion on QA/QC are ana overview of the measurement process, positive and negative controls, replicated measurements, and application of chamber exposures to data calibration. The report concludes with a discussion of testing considerations for naval facilities and radon mitigation considerations for the Department of the Navy

  5. Environmental considerations in mine closure planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricks, G.

    1997-01-01

    Mine closure planning considers the best ways to plan and manage the environmental changes and socio-economic effects associated with the closing of mines. While the criteria for judging successful closures may vary, it is particularly important for physical, chemical and biological stability to be achieved and for final land use to be appropriate. Trust funds are increasingly favoured as a practical means of fulfilling the requirement for a financial surety and of ensuring that financial provision is available at the end of the mine's life. (author)

  6. Chlorella induces stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and its effects on instantaneous water use efficiency in Vicia faba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been established to participate in stomatal closure induced by live microbes and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs. Chlorella as a beneficial microorganism can be expected to trigger stomatal closure via ROS production. Here, we reported that Chlorella induced stomatal closure in a dose-and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of Vicia faba. Using pharmacological methods in this work, we found that the Chlorella-induced stomatal closure was almost completely abolished by a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 scavenger, catalase (CAT, significantly suppressed by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI, and slightly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, suggesting that ROS production involved in Chlorella-induced stomatal closure is mainly mediated by DPI-sensitive NADPH oxidase. Additionally, Exogenous application of optimal concentrations of Chlorella suspension improved instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi in Vicia faba via a reduction in leaf transpiration rate (E without a parallel reduction in net photosynthetic rate (Pn assessed by gas-exchange measurements. The chlorophyll fluorescence and content analysis further demonstrated that short-term use of Chlorella did not influence plant photosynthetic reactions center. These results preliminarily reveal that Chlorella can trigger stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in epidermal strips and improve WUEi in leave levels.

  7. Association of iris crypts with acute primary angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Victor; Chua, Jacqueline; Shi, Yuan; Thakku, Sri Gowtham; Lee, Ryan; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Baskaran, Mani; Kumar, Rajesh S; Perera, Shamira; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2017-10-01

    To determine the relationship between iris surface features and acute primary angle closure (APAC) in eyes with angle closure. Case-control study involving Asian patients diagnosed with previous APAC, primary angle closure suspect (PACS), primary angle closure (PAC) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) at an eye centre in Singapore between August 2012 and January 2015. Participants underwent ophthalmic examination and digital slit-lamp iris photography. Iris surface features were graded based on crypts, furrows and colour. Fellow eyes of APAC were compared with PACS and PAC/PACG eyes with regard to their iris surface features. Occurrence of APAC. A total of 309 patients (71 APAC, 139 PACS, 47 PAC and 52 PACG) were included (mean age: 67.7±7.2 years and 36.6% male). Compared with PACS, higher crypt grade was significantly associated with lower odds of APAC (OR=0.58 for one grade higher in crypt grade; p=0.027, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity and pupil diameter). The results remained similar when compared with PAC/PACG group (OR=0.58 for one grade higher in crypt grade; p=0.043). We did not observe any significant associations between iris furrows or colour with presence of APAC. Our study comprising Asian eyes with angle closure suggests that the presence of a higher crypt grading may be protective for APAC. As such, assessing iris surface architecture for crypts could be a new measure for risk stratification of developing APAC in eyes with angle closure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. PFO closuRE and CryptogenIc StrokE (PRECISE) registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wöhrle, Jochen; Bertrand, Bernard; Søndergaard, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The Premere™ PFO closure device has a special design for closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) including a flexible distance and angulation between the right and left disc providing minimal septal distortion. The primary objective of the study was to determine the degree of risk for stroke or tra...... or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in patients after Premere™ PFO closure device implantation....

  9. The effectiveness of eye-closure in repeated interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredeveldt, A.; Baddeley, A.D.; Hitch, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Closing the eyes during recall can help witnesses remember more about a witnessed event. This study examined the effectiveness of eye-closure in a repeated recall paradigm with immediate free recall followed 1 week later by both free and cued recall. We examined whether eye-closure was more

  10. Percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale in cryptogenic embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Bernhard; Kalesan, Bindu; Mattle, Heinrich P; Khattab, Ahmed A; Hildick-Smith, David; Dudek, Dariusz; Andersen, Grethe; Ibrahim, Reda; Schuler, Gerhard; Walton, Antony S; Wahl, Andreas; Windecker, Stephan; Jüni, Peter

    2013-03-21

    The options for secondary prevention of cryptogenic embolism in patients with patent foramen ovale are administration of antithrombotic medications or percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale. We investigated whether closure is superior to medical therapy. We performed a multicenter, superiority trial in 29 centers in Europe, Canada, Brazil, and Australia in which the assessors of end points were unaware of the study-group assignments. Patients with a patent foramen ovale and ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or a peripheral thromboembolic event were randomly assigned to undergo closure of the patent foramen ovale with the Amplatzer PFO Occluder or to receive medical therapy. The primary end point was a composite of death, nonfatal stroke, TIA, or peripheral embolism. Analysis was performed on data for the intention-to-treat population. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.1 years in the closure group and 4.0 years in the medical-therapy group. The primary end point occurred in 7 of the 204 patients (3.4%) in the closure group and in 11 of the 210 patients (5.2%) in the medical-therapy group (hazard ratio for closure vs. medical therapy, 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24 to 1.62; P=0.34). Nonfatal stroke occurred in 1 patient (0.5%) in the closure group and 5 patients (2.4%) in the medical-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.02 to 1.72; P=0.14), and TIA occurred in 5 patients (2.5%) and 7 patients (3.3%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.23 to 2.24; P=0.56). Closure of a patent foramen ovale for secondary prevention of cryptogenic embolism did not result in a significant reduction in the risk of recurrent embolic events or death as compared with medical therapy. (Funded by St. Jude Medical; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00166257.).

  11. Program za vođenje personalne evidencije / Application program for personnel files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Stojanović

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available U radu je opisan Program za multikorisnički rad u mrežnom okruženju, koji je namenjen za vođenje personalne evidencije u okviru jedinice. Program je razvijen tako da u mrežnom okruženju radi sa bazom podataka, Microsoft SQL Server, a kada je mreža nefunkcionalna da radi lokalno sa MS Access, i da omogući automatsko ažuriranje podataka iz lokalne u glavnu bazu podataka. Prva verzija programa razvijena je i nalazi se u fazi probnog rada. / The paper presents an application program for personnel files of a unit. The application works in multi-user and network environment. It is developed to work with the Microsoft SQL Server database in network environment and to work with the MS Access database when network is not functional and to allow data synchronization between the local and the main database. The alpha version of the application program is finished and it is on a test drive now.

  12. Biological constraints do not entail cognitive closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlerick, Michael

    2014-12-01

    From the premise that our biology imposes cognitive constraints on our epistemic activities, a series of prominent authors--most notably Fodor, Chomsky and McGinn--have argued that we are cognitively closed to certain aspects and properties of the world. Cognitive constraints, they argue, entail cognitive closure. I argue that this is not the case. More precisely, I detect two unwarranted conflations at the core of arguments deriving closure from constraints. The first is a conflation of what I will refer to as 'representation' and 'object of representation'. The second confuses the cognitive scope of the assisted mind for that of the unassisted mind. Cognitive closure, I conclude, cannot be established from pointing out the (uncontroversial) existence of cognitive constraints. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Procedures and techniques for closure of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The overall objective of this report is to provide Member States with guidance on planning and implementation of closure of near surface disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The specific objectives are to review closure concepts, requirements, and components of closure systems; to discuss issues and approaches to closure, including regulatory, economic, and technical aspects; and to present major examples of closure techniques used and/or considered by Member States. Some examples of closure experience from Member States are presented in the Appendix and were indexed separately

  14. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyd, T.W.; Dean, R.B.; Hobbs, G.D.; Knowles, N.C.; Putney, J.M.; Wrigley, J.

    1984-01-01

    This Directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, stress analysis, heat transfer, groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Biosphere modelling, surface water flow and risk analysis are not covered. A total of 248 programs are identified, of which 50 are reviewed in detail, 134 in summary and 64 in tabular fashion. The directory has been compiled using a combination of literature searches, telephone and postal correspondence and meetings with recognised experts in the respective areas of work covered. It differs from previous reviews of computer programs for similar topics areas in two main respects. Firstly, the method of obtaining information has resulted in program descriptions of considerable breadth and detail. Secondly, the Directory has concentrated wherever possible on European codes, whereas most previous work of this nature has looked solely at programs developed in North America. The reviews are presented in good faith, but it has not been possible to run any of the programs on a computer, and so truly objective comparisons may not be made. Finally, although the Directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described could also be used in other areas of repository analysis (eg repository design)

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites - Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 567 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. The corrective actions implemented at CAU 567 were developed based on an evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, the assumed presence of COCs at specific locations, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the CAAs. The CAAs were selected on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The implemented corrective actions meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The CAAs meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site. Based on the implementation of these corrective actions, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 567. • The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection issue a Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office for closure of CAU 567. • CAU 567 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  16. Clinical assessment of transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus with severe pulmonary hypertention using Amplatzer occluder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiumin, Han; Xianyang, Zhu; Yuwei, Zhang; Yan, Jin; Dong' an, Deng; Chanju, Hou; Wei, Quan [Shenyang General Hospital, PLA, Shenyang (China)

    2004-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with severe pulmonary hypertention using the Amplatzer occluder device. Methods: Fifty-one cases of PDA with severe pulmonary hypertention were treated by transcatheter closure with Amplatzer occluder. Patients mean age was 9.4 years (ranging 3 months to 60 years) and the mean weight was (18.7 {+-} 13.8) kg (ranging 5.0 to 65.0 kg). The mean PDA diameter at its narrowest segment was (7.0 {+-} 2.4) (ranging 3.0 to 15.0) mm. The achievement of permanent transcatheter closure was decided according to the change of the pulmonary arterial pressure, aortic pressure and oxygen saturation. Results: The devices were successfully placed in all patients except one failure owing to the resistance of pulmonary hypertention. The systolic pulmonary pressure decreased from (84.7 {+-} 13.5) (range 70 to 137) to mmHg to (46.1 {+-} 14.9) (24 to 109) mmHg, and the mean pulmonary pressure decreased from (65.0 {+-} 11.5) (42 to 97) mmHg to (31.3 {+-} 11.6) (14 to 69) mmHg. Complete angiographic closure was seen 10 minutes after the device deployment in 30 out of 50 patients (60%), while trivial to small leak was present in 20 (40%). Complete echocardiographic closure was demonstrated in 49 out of 50 patients (98%) at 10 min, and 100% at 6-month follow-up in all patients. There were no PDA recanalization and migration of devices after the complete occlusion during following up. Conclusion: Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus with severe pulmonary hypertention by using the Amplatzer occluder is a safe and effective interventional method with excellent short-term and middle-term results. (authors)

  17. Clinical assessment of transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus with severe pulmonary hypertention using Amplatzer occluder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiumin; Zhu Xianyang; Zhang Yuwei; Jin Yan; Deng Dong'an; Hou Chanju; Quan Wei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with severe pulmonary hypertention using the Amplatzer occluder device. Methods: Fifty-one cases of PDA with severe pulmonary hypertention were treated by transcatheter closure with Amplatzer occluder. Patients mean age was 9.4 years (ranging 3 months to 60 years) and the mean weight was (18.7 ± 13.8) kg (ranging 5.0 to 65.0 kg). The mean PDA diameter at its narrowest segment was (7.0 ± 2.4) (ranging 3.0 to 15.0) mm. The achievement of permanent transcatheter closure was decided according to the change of the pulmonary arterial pressure, aortic pressure and oxygen saturation. Results: The devices were successfully placed in all patients except one failure owing to the resistance of pulmonary hypertention. The systolic pulmonary pressure decreased from (84.7 ± 13.5) (range 70 to 137) to mmHg to (46.1 ± 14.9) (24 to 109) mmHg, and the mean pulmonary pressure decreased from (65.0 ± 11.5) (42 to 97) mmHg to (31.3 ± 11.6) (14 to 69) mmHg. Complete angiographic closure was seen 10 minutes after the device deployment in 30 out of 50 patients (60%), while trivial to small leak was present in 20 (40%). Complete echocardiographic closure was demonstrated in 49 out of 50 patients (98%) at 10 min, and 100% at 6-month follow-up in all patients. There were no PDA recanalization and migration of devices after the complete occlusion during following up. Conclusion: Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus with severe pulmonary hypertention by using the Amplatzer occluder is a safe and effective interventional method with excellent short-term and middle-term results. (authors)

  18. Exceptional closure of UNIQA office at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The UNIQA office at CERN will be closed from Wednesday 18 February to Friday 20 February due to painting work. During this closure, the Headquarters of UNIQA in Geneva will remain at the disposal of the members. See details https://cern.ch/chis/UNIQA_Offices.asp The CERN office will re-open on Monday 23 February according to the normal schedule. We apologise for any inconvenience caused by this closure.

  19. Exploring social support and job satisfaction among associate degree program directors in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Binder, Ronda D; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2009-01-01

    A troubling trend noted in California has been an increase in the number of open positions for program directors of associate degree registered nursing (ADRN) programs. Positions remain open for extended periods of time, and the number of qualified applicants for such positions is insufficient. The loss of and ensuing slow replacement of ADRN program directors can put these programs in jeopardy of student admission suspension, or, worse yet, closure by the state nursing board. In this exploratory study, variables of social support and job satisfaction were studied. Variables were found to be limited opportunities for peer interaction, expressed discontent, and retention concerns. A significant positive relationship between job satisfaction and social support was noted. Recommendations for future research are offered.

  20. Colostomy closure: how to avoid complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Marc A.; Lawal, Taiwo A.; Peña, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Colostomy is an operation frequently performed in pediatric surgery. Despite its benefits, it can produce significant morbidity. In a previous publication we presented our experience with the errors and complications that occurred during cases of colostomy creation. We now have focused in the morbidity related to the colostomy closure. The technical details that might have contributed to the minimal morbidity we experienced are described. Methods The medical records of 649 patients who underwent colostomy closure over a 28-year period were retrospectively reviewed looking for complications following these procedures. Our perioperative protocol for colostomy closure consisted in: clear fluids by mouth and repeated proximal stoma irrigations 24 h prior to the operation. Administration of IV antibiotics during anesthesia induction and continued for 48 h. Meticulous surgical technique that included: packing of the proximal stoma, plastic drape to immobilize the surgical field, careful hemostasis, emphasis in avoiding contamination, cleaning the edge of the stomas to allow a good 2-layer, end-to-end anastomosis with separated long-term absorbable sutures, generous irrigation of the peritoneal cavity and subsequent layers with saline solution, closure by layers to avoid dead space, and avoidance of hematomas. No drains and no nasogastric tubes were used. Oral fluids were started the day after surgery and patients were discharged 48–72 h after the operation. Results The original diagnoses of the patients were: anorectal malformation (583), Hirschsprung’s disease (53), and others (13). 10 patients (1.5%) had complications: 6 had intestinal obstruction (5 due to small bowel adhesions, 1 had temporary delay of the function of the anastomosis due to a severe size discrepancy between proximal and distal stoma with a distal microcolon) and 4 incisional hernias. There were no anastomotic dehiscences or wound infection. There was no bleeding, no anastomotic

  1. Colostomy closure: how to avoid complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc A; Lawal, Taiwo A; Peña, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Colostomy is an operation frequently performed in pediatric surgery. Despite its benefits, it can produce significant morbidity. In a previous publication we presented our experience with the errors and complications that occurred during cases of colostomy creation. We now have focused in the morbidity related to the colostomy closure. The technical details that might have contributed to the minimal morbidity we experienced are described. The medical records of 649 patients who underwent colostomy closure over a 28-year period were retrospectively reviewed looking for complications following these procedures. Our perioperative protocol for colostomy closure consisted in: clear fluids by mouth and repeated proximal stoma irrigations 24 h prior to the operation. Administration of IV antibiotics during anesthesia induction and continued for 48 h. Meticulous surgical technique that included: packing of the proximal stoma, plastic drape to immobilize the surgical field, careful hemostasis, emphasis in avoiding contamination, cleaning the edge of the stomas to allow a good 2-layer, end-to-end anastomosis with separated long-term absorbable sutures, generous irrigation of the peritoneal cavity and subsequent layers with saline solution, closure by layers to avoid dead space, and avoidance of hematomas. No drains and no nasogastric tubes were used. Oral fluids were started the day after surgery and patients were discharged 48-72 h after the operation. The original diagnoses of the patients were: anorectal malformation (583), Hirschsprung's disease (53), and others (13). 10 patients (1.5%) had complications: 6 had intestinal obstruction (5 due to small bowel adhesions, 1 had temporary delay of the function of the anastomosis due to a severe size discrepancy between proximal and distal stoma with a distal microcolon) and 4 incisional hernias. There were no anastomotic dehiscences or wound infection. There was no bleeding, no anastomotic stricture and no mortality. Based on

  2. Root Causes of Component Failures Program: Methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterwhite, D.G.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Vesely, W.E.; Meale, B.M.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains information pertaining to definitions, methodologies, and applications of root cause analysis. Of specific interest, and highlighted throughout the discussion, are applications pertaining to current and future Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) light water reactor safety programs. These applications are discussed in view of addressing specific program issues under NRC consideration and reflect current root cause analysis capabilities

  3. Autonomic Closure for Turbulent Flows Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, Olga; Christopher, Jason; Hamlington, Peter; Dahm, Werner

    2017-11-01

    Autonomic closure is a new technique for achieving fully adaptive and physically accurate closure of coarse-grained turbulent flow governing equations, such as those solved in large eddy simulations (LES). Although autonomic closure has been shown in recent a priori tests to more accurately represent unclosed terms than do dynamic versions of traditional LES models, the computational cost of the approach makes it challenging to implement for simulations of practical turbulent flows at realistically high Reynolds numbers. The optimization step used in the approach introduces large matrices that must be inverted and is highly memory intensive. In order to reduce memory requirements, here we propose to use approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) in place of the optimization step, thereby yielding a computationally-efficient implementation of autonomic closure that trades memory-intensive for processor-intensive computations. The latter challenge can be overcome as co-processors such as general purpose graphical processing units become increasingly available on current generation petascale and exascale supercomputers. In this work, we outline the formulation of ABC-enabled autonomic closure and present initial results demonstrating the accuracy and computational cost of the approach.

  4. 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon allo , uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gal containers) in the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility), located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040 (Ecology 1991). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The strategy for closure of the 304 Facility is presented in Section 6.0

  5. Development of an arid site closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Barnes, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes the development of a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of an arid low-level waste disposal site. This plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed. A specific example is presented showing how the field-validated hydrologic models can be used to develop a final prototype closure plan. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Bilateral Acute Angle-closure after Intraocular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskens, Kirsten; Pinto, Luis Abegão; Vandewalle, Evelien; Verdonk, Nancy; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed an acute bilateral angle-closure associated with choroidal effusion a day after an uneventful cataract surgery. The same patient had undergone a similarly uneventful cataract surgery two weeks before, under the same protocol, with no postoperative complication in the other eye. Medical treatment, including the use of oral sulfamide-related drugs (acetazolamide), topical beta-blockers and steroids led to a gradual decrease in intraocular pressure (IOP) and choroidal effusion. Despite initial reports suggesting a link between sulfamide-exposure and these rare forms of angle-closure, our report would suggest a more complex pathophysiology behind this intriguing phenomenon. How to cite this article: Hoskens K, Pinto LA, Vandewalle E, Verdonk N, Stalmans I. Bilateral Acute Angle-closure after Intraocular Surgery. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2014;8(3):113-114.

  7. Household responses to school closure resulting from outbreak of influenza B, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, April J; Moore, Zack S; Edelson, Paul J; Kinnane, Lynda; Davies, Megan; Shay, David K; Balish, Amanda; McCarron, Meg; Blanton, Lenee; Finelli, Lyn; Averhoff, Francisco; Bresee, Joseph; Engel, Jeffrey; Fiore, Anthony

    2008-07-01

    School closure is a proposed strategy for reducing influenza transmission during a pandemic. Few studies have assessed how families respond to closures, or whether other interactions during closure could reduce this strategy's effect. Questionnaires were administered to 220 households (438 adults and 355 children) with school-age children in a North Carolina county during an influenza B virus outbreak that resulted in school closure. Closure was considered appropriate by 201 (91%) households. No adults missed work to solely provide childcare, and only 22 (10%) households required special childcare arrangements; 2 households incurred additional costs. Eighty-nine percent of children visited at least 1 public location during the closure despite county recommendations to avoid large gatherings. Although behavior and attitudes might differ during a pandemic, these results suggest short-term closure did not cause substantial hardship for parents. Pandemic planning guidance should address the potential for transmission in public areas during school closure.

  8. [Epidemiologic and economic effectiveness of school closure during influenza epidemics and pandemics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendon, Iu Z; Vasil'ev, Iu M

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiologic and economic effectiveness of school closure during influenza epidemics and pandemics is discussed. Optimal effect of school closure is observed when this measure is taken at the start of the epidemic or pandemic and for a sufficiently long time. School closure during high morbidity among schoolchildren, in the middle (at the peak) and by the end of epidemic or pandemic does not influence significantly the spread of influenza or morbidity. Significant economic losses and other negative consequences of school closure are noted. School closure may be the most appropriate during the emergence of influenza pandemic when the pandemic vaccine is not yet available, however timely mass immunization of schoolchildren against influenza may be a more appropriate measure than school closure for the reduction of influenza morbidity and spread during seasonal influenza epidemics.

  9. Endoscopic full-thickness resection and defect closure in the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renteln, Daniel; Schmidt, Arthur; Vassiliou, Melina C; Rudolph, Hans-Ulrich; Caca, Karel

    2010-06-01

    Endoscopic full-thickness resection (eFTR) is a minimally invasive method for en bloc resection of GI lesions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of a grasp-and-snare technique for eFTR combined with an over-the-scope clip (OTSC) for defect closure. Nonsurvival animal study. Animal laboratory. Fourteen female domestic pigs. The eFTR was performed in porcine colons using a novel tissue anchor in combination with a standard monofilament snare and 14 mm OTSC. In the first group (n = 20), closure of the colonic defects with OTSC was attempted after the resection. In the second group (n = 8), an endoloop was used to secure the resection base before eFTR was performed. In the first group (n = 20), eFTR specimens ranged from 2.4 to 5.5 cm in diameter. Successful closure was achieved in 9 out of 20 cases. Mean burst pressure for OTSC closure was 29.2 mm Hg (range, 2-90; SD, 29.92). Injury to adjacent organs occurred in 3 cases. Lumen obstruction due to the OTSC closure occurred in 3 cases. In the second group (n = 8), the diameter of specimens ranged from 1.2 to 2.2 cm. Complete closure was achieved in all cases, with a mean burst pressure of 76.6 mm Hg (range, 35-120; SD, 31). Lumen obstruction due to the endoloop closure occurred in one case. No other complications or injuries were observed in the second group. Nonsurvival setting. Colonic eFTR using the grasp-and-snare technique is feasible in an animal model. Ligation of the resection base with an endoloop before eFTR seems to reduce complication rates and improve closure success and leak test results despite yielding smaller specimens. Copyright 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Overlay field application program, Pennsylvania US-119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The Concrete Overly Filed Application program is administered by FHWA and the National Concrete Pavement Technology Center (CP Tech Center). The overall objective of this program is to increase the awareness and knowledge of concrete overlay applicat...

  11. The Finishing Touch: Anatomy of Expert Lesson Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Collin A.; Connolly, Graeme; Schempp, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Based on the idea that students remember best what is presented last, the lesson closure is commonly identified as an important component of effective teaching and has recently surfaced as a routine practice of expert teachers in sport. Despite its link to both effective and expert instruction, the lesson closure has seen scarce…

  12. Tracheocutaneous Fistula Closure with Turnover Flap and Polydioxanone Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Bryant, DO, MBA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. An alternative surgical treatment is proposed for closure of tracheocutaneous fistulas. The authors present a new technique for reconstruction of persistent tracheocutaneous fistula resultant from temporary tracheostomy. The single-stage closure under local anesthesia involves a fistulous tract turnover flap with a perforated 0.15 mm polydioxanone plate between the flap and the subcutaneous closure. This article presents 3 cases of persistent tracheocutaneous fistula treated by this method. At follow-up examination after follow-up, no recurrent fistula formation had occurred, and no respiratory deformity was present.

  13. Clad vent set cup closure-weld-zone grinding evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Woods, A.T.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-04-01

    Clad vent set (CVS) cups were ground in the closure-weld zone to reduce the wall-thickness variation created by the cup deep-drawing process. A significantly more uniform wall thickness would be beneficial for the CVS closure-weld operation. The goal was to reduce the average within-cup wall-thickness variation (defined as the range of wall thicknesses in the closure-weld zone) approximately 50% from the Cassini production value of 42 microm. This goal was shown to be achievable but, unfortunately, not with the existing blank and formed cup thicknesses

  14. Sustainable closure of construction materials quarries in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Montero-Matos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of effective mine closure plans in the exploitation project is the way to compensate for the harmful effect of this activity. Based on a diagnosis carried out in 11 sites in operation, belonging to the company Canteras, a methodology was designed with a systemic and integral approach that consists of five stages and allows the execution of quarry closures in a sustainable manner. The Delphi method was applied to select the criteria that directly affect the sustainable closure of quarries in such a way that it considers the essential postulates of the Cuban Economic Model (MEC. The proposed methodology represents a contribution to the planning and design of the mining closure in Cuban non-metallic deposits to guarantee the reduction of the environmental impacts caused during its operation and the reduction, to the lesser extent possible, of negative socio-economic effects for the workers and the community located in the area of influence of the quarries. Currently applied in the quarry of San José, in Mayabeque province.

  15. Review on improved seismic imaging with closure phase

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-08-13

    The timing and amplitudes of arrivals recorded in seismic traces are influenced by velocity variations all along the associated raypaths. Consequently, velocity errors far from the target can lead to blurred imaging of the target body. To partly remedy this problem, we comprehensively reviewed inverting differential traveltimes that satisfied the closure-phase condition. The result is that the source and receiver statics are completely eliminated in the data and velocities far from the target do not need to be known. We successfully used the phase closure equation for traveltime tomography, refraction statics, migration, refraction tomography, and earthquake location, all of which demonstrated the higher resolution achievable by processing data with differential traveltimes rather than absolute traveltimes. More generally, the stationary version of the closure-phase equation is equivalent to Fermat’s principle and can be derived from the equations of seismic interferometry. In summary, the general closure-phase equation is the mathematical foundation for approximately redatuming sources and/or receivers to the target of interest without the need to accurately know the statics or the velocity model away from the target.

  16. GCFR 1/20-scale PCRV central core cavity closure model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.C.; Dougan, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting structural response tests of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) closures for the 300-MW(e) gas-cooled fast reactor demonstration power plant. This report describes the third in a series of tests of small-scale closure plug models. The model represents a redesign of the central core cavity closure plug. The primary objective was to demonstrate structural performance and ultimate load capacity of the closure plug. Secondary objectives included obtaining data on crack development and propagation and on mode of failure of the composite structure

  17. Cleft Palate Fistula Closure Utilizing Acellular Dermal Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Emodi, DMD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Fistulas represent failure of cleft palate repair. Secondary and tertiary fistula repair is challenging, with high recurrence rates. In the present retrospective study, we review the efficacy of using acellular dermal matrix as an interposition layer for cleft palate fistula closure in 20 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2016. Complete fistula closure was obtained in 16 patients; 1 patient had asymptomatic recurrent fistula; 2 patients had partial closure with reduction of fistula size and minimal nasal regurgitation; 1 patient developed a recurrent fistula without changes in symptoms (success rate of 85%. We conclude that utilizing acellular dermal matrix for cleft palate fistula repair is safe and simple with a high success rate.

  18. Cleft Palate Fistula Closure Utilizing Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emodi, Omri; Ginini, Jiriys George; van Aalst, John A; Shilo, Dekel; Naddaf, Raja; Aizenbud, Dror; Rachmiel, Adi

    2018-03-01

    Fistulas represent failure of cleft palate repair. Secondary and tertiary fistula repair is challenging, with high recurrence rates. In the present retrospective study, we review the efficacy of using acellular dermal matrix as an interposition layer for cleft palate fistula closure in 20 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2016. Complete fistula closure was obtained in 16 patients; 1 patient had asymptomatic recurrent fistula; 2 patients had partial closure with reduction of fistula size and minimal nasal regurgitation; 1 patient developed a recurrent fistula without changes in symptoms (success rate of 85%). We conclude that utilizing acellular dermal matrix for cleft palate fistula repair is safe and simple with a high success rate.

  19. Stationary neutrino radiation transport by maximum entropy closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    The authors obtain the angular distributions that maximize the entropy functional for Maxwell-Boltzmann (classical), Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac radiation. In the low and high occupancy limits, the maximum entropy closure is bounded by previously known variable Eddington factors that depend only on the flux. For intermediate occupancy, the maximum entropy closure depends on both the occupation density and the flux. The Fermi-Dirac maximum entropy variable Eddington factor shows a scale invariance, which leads to a simple, exact analytic closure for fermions. This two-dimensional variable Eddington factor gives results that agree well with exact (Monte Carlo) neutrino transport calculations out of a collapse residue during early phases of hydrostatic neutron star formation

  20. An Elongated Leading Edge Facilitates Rotation Flap Closure: In Vivo Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichon, Vanessa; Barbosa, Naiara; Gomez, Doug; Goldman, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Variation in the design of a rotation flap may affect wound closure tension. Lengthening the leading edge of a rotation flap has been a method of reducing the tension of closure in the primary motion. An in vitro study negating this tenant has been published. The authors set out to design an in vivo experiment to determine if lengthening the leading edge of a rotation flap has the effect of reducing closure tension in the primary motion of the repair. An animal study approved by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee was undertaken in a pig model. A tension-measuring apparatus was designed using Teflon-coated wires and digital tensiometers. Rotation flaps of a standard design and with elongated leading edges were incised on the flanks of pigs under general anesthesia. Flap closure tensions were measured at points along the leading edge of the flap and in the secondary motion. Elongating the leading edge of a flap led to a statistically significant reduction in closure tension in the primary motion of the flap and at the flap tip. The secondary motion closure tensions were essentially unaffected. The authors confirm that elongating the leading edge of a standard rotation flap will reduce closure tension in the primary flap motion.

  1. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials comparing purse-string vs conventional linear closure of the wound following ileostomy (stoma) closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Bhatti, Muhammad I; Miles, William Fa

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically analyse the randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure (PSC) of an ileostomy wound with conventional linear closure (CLC). Randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure vs conventional linear closure (CLC) of ileostomy wound in patients undergoing ileostomy closure were analysed using RevMan®, and the combined outcomes were expressed as risk ratio (RR) and standardized mean difference (SMD). Three randomized, controlled trials, recruiting 206 patients, were retrieved from medical electronic databases. There were 105 patients in the PSC group and 101 patients in the CLC group. There was no heterogeneity among included trials. Duration of operation (SMD: -0.18; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.09; z = 1.28; P SMD: 0.01; 95% CI: -0.26, 0.28; z = 0.07; P infection (OR, 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.33; z = 3.78; P infection apparently without influencing the duration of operation and length of hospital stay. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  2. Performance Assessment of a Post-Closure Pyrophoric Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, James; Senger, R.; Leem, J.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) is categorized into eleven different spent fuel groups. Group 7, is predominantly uranium metal spent fuel from N Reactor that could oxidize rapidly in the presence of air when a waste package is breached. Such rapid oxidation constitutes a pyrophoric event. The consequences of a post closure pyrophoric event were evaluated in terms of its potential to damage adjacent waste packages and consequences of it in terms of long-term dose to humans. This work was conducted as part of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of DOE spent fuel for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. These analyses were performed in support of the site recommendation for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  3. Supporting Fernald Site Closure with Integrated Health and Safety Plans as Documented Safety Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, S.; Brown, T.; Fisk, P.; Krach, F.; Klein, B.

    2004-01-01

    At the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) near Cincinnati, Ohio, environmental restoration activities are supported by Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) that combine the required project-specific Health and Safety Plans, Safety Basis Requirements (SBRs), and Process Requirements (PRs) into single Integrated Health and Safety Plans (I-HASPs). These integrated DSAs employ Integrated Safety Management methodology in support of simplified restoration and remediation activities that, so far, have resulted in the decontamination and demolition (D and D) of over 200 structures, including eight major nuclear production plants. There is one of twelve nuclear facilities still remaining (Silos containing uranium ore residues) with its own safety basis documentation. This paper presents the status of the FCP's safety basis documentation program, illustrating that all of the former nuclear facilities and activities have now replaced. Basis of Interim Operations (BIOs) with I-HASPs as their safety basis during the closure process

  4. Autocracy bias in informal groups under need for closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Antonio; Mannetti, Lucia; De Grada, Eraldo; Livi, Stefano; Kruglanski, Arie W

    2003-03-01

    Two experiments investigated the tendency of groups with members under high (vs. low) need for cognitive closure to develop an autocratic leadership structure in which some members dominate the discussion, constitute the "hubs" of communication, and influence the group more than other members. The first experiment found that high (vs. low) need for closure groups, as assessed via dispositional measure of the need for closure, manifested greater asymmetry of conversational floor control, such that members with autocratic interactional style were more conversationally dominant and influential than less autocratic members. The second experiment manipulated the need for closure via time pressure and utilized a social network analysis. Consistent with expectation, groups under time pressure (vs. no pressure) showed a greater asymmetry of participation, of centrality, and of prestige among the group members, such that the more focal members were perceived to exert the greater influence over the groups' decisions.

  5. Validation of a physically based catchment model for application in post-closure radiological safety assessments of deep geological repositories for solid radioactive wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, M C; Degnan, P; Ewen, J; Parkin, G

    2000-12-01

    The physically based river catchment modelling system SHETRAN incorporates components representing water flow, sediment transport and radionuclide transport both in solution and bound to sediments. The system has been applied to simulate hypothetical future catchments in the context of post-closure radiological safety assessments of a potential site for a deep geological disposal facility for intermediate and certain low-level radioactive wastes at Sellafield, west Cumbria. In order to have confidence in the application of SHETRAN for this purpose, various blind validation studies have been undertaken. In earlier studies, the validation was undertaken against uncertainty bounds in model output predictions set by the modelling team on the basis of how well they expected the model to perform. However, validation can also be carried out with bounds set on the basis of how well the model is required to perform in order to constitute a useful assessment tool. Herein, such an assessment-based validation exercise is reported. This exercise related to a field plot experiment conducted at Calder Hollow, west Cumbria, in which the migration of strontium and lanthanum in subsurface Quaternary deposits was studied on a length scale of a few metres. Blind predictions of tracer migration were compared with experimental results using bounds set by a small group of assessment experts independent of the modelling team. Overall, the SHETRAN system performed well, failing only two out of seven of the imposed tests. Furthermore, of the five tests that were not failed, three were positively passed even when a pessimistic view was taken as to how measurement errors should be taken into account. It is concluded that the SHETRAN system, which is still being developed further, is a powerful tool for application in post-closure radiological safety assessments.

  6. Closure properties of Watson-Crick grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkufli, Nurul Liyana binti Mohamad; Turaev, Sherzod; Tamrin, Mohd Izzuddin Mohd; Azeddine, Messikh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we define Watson-Crick context-free grammars, as an extension of Watson-Crick regular grammars and Watson-Crick linear grammars with context-free grammar rules. We show the relation of Watson-Crick (regular and linear) grammars to the sticker systems, and study some of the important closure properties of the Watson-Crick grammars. We establish that the Watson-Crick regular grammars are closed under almost all of the main closure operations, while the differences between other Watson-Crick grammars with their corresponding Chomsky grammars depend on the computational power of the Watson-Crick grammars which still need to be studied.

  7. Permanent Closure of MFC Biodiesel Underground Storage Tank 99ANL00013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerry L. Nisson

    2012-10-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the Materials and Fuels Complex biodiesel underground storage tank 99ANL00013 in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, “Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.”

  8. The Availability of Judicial Review Regarding Military Base Closures and Realignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-30

    held that the President is not subject to the APA, due to separation of powers principles.37 Base Closure Act Claims The Dalton Court distinguished...that the 1988 Base Closure Act violated the non-delegation doctrine and the separation of powers doctrine.53 However, the Base Closure Act has not yet been held unconstitutional by any federal appellate courts.

  9. HTGR experience, programs, and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.A.; Kantor, M.E.; Brey, H.L.; Olson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) in the major industrial countries of the world. Existing demonstration plants and facilities are briefly described, and national programs for exploiting the unique high-temperature capabilities of the HTGR for commercial production of electricity and in process steam/heat application are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Vascularized fibular graft combined with vacuum assisted closure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The flowthrough fibular graft combined with Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) controlled the infection, shortened the course of treatment, and effectively restored limb function when applied to the treatment of tibial defects. Keywords: Tibial defect, Flow-through fibular graft, Vacuum Assisted Closure, Chronic Osteomyelitis ...

  11. Quality assurance program for environmental assessment of Savannah River Plant waste sites: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.; King, C.M.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1987-03-01

    Forty-eight locations were identified that received a variety of radioactive and nonradioactive constituents during the past 35 years including surface impoundments and shallow land burial facilities. Detailed environmental assessments of existing waste disposal areas, as well as new waste disposal techniques and disposition of tritiated water, were completed to air in an evaluation of the low level, mixed and hazardous waste management activities. These assessments result in estimation of risk, or residual risk, posed by each disposal area to various receptors as a function of waste management alternative. For example, at existing waste sites, the closure actions evaluated were waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action; several pathways/receptors were considered, including groundwater to river, groundwater to well, atmospheric transport, occupational exposure, direct exposure, and contamination followed by ingestion of crops and meat. Modeling of chemical transport in a variety of media was an integral part of the assessment process. The quality of the models used and the application of these models were assured by an explicit quality assurance program

  12. Structural analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, G.C.; Fischer, L.E.

    1993-04-01

    This paper identifies the active forces and moments in a closure bolt of a shipping cask. It examines the interactions of these forces/moments and suggest simplified methods for their analysis. The paper also evaluates the role that the forces and moments play in the structure integrity of the closure bolt and recommends stress limits and desirable practices to ensure its integrity

  13. Official holidays in 2010 and end-of-year closure 2010/2011

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    (Application of Articles R II 4.38 and R II 4.39 of the Staff Regulations) Official holidays in 2010 (in addition to the special leave during the annual closure): Friday 1st January\t(New year) Friday 2nd April\t(Good Friday) Monday, 5th April\t(Easter Monday) Thursday 13th May\t(Ascension day) Friday 14th May\t(compensation granted for 1st May) Monday 24th May\t(Whit Monday) Thursday 9th September\t(“Jeûne genevois”) Thursday 23rd December\t(compensation granted for 25th December, Christmas) Friday 24th December\t(Christmas Eve) Thursday 30th December\t(compensation granted for 1st January 2011, New Year) Friday 31st December\t(New Year’s Eve) Annual closure of the site of the Organization during the Christmas holidays and day of special leave granted by the Director-General : The Laboratory will be closed from Wednesday, 22nd December 2010 to Tuesday, 4th January 2011 inclusive (without deduction of annual leave). The first worki...

  14. Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Daily activities at the Hanford Site generate sanitary solid waste (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) that is transported to and permanently disposed of at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill. This permit application describes the manner in which the solid Waste Landfill will be operated under Washington State Department of Ecology Minimum Functional Standards for Solid Waste Handling, Washington Administrative Code 173-304. The solid Waste Landfill is owned by the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations Office and is used for disposal of solid waste generated at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The jurisdictional health department's permit application form for the Solid Waste Landfill is provided in Chapter 1.0. Chapter 2.0 provides a description of the Hanford Site and the Solid Waste Landfill and reviews applicable locational, general facility, and landfilling standards. Chapter 3.0 discusses the characteristics and quantity of the waste disposed of in the Solid Waste Landfill. Chapter 4.0 reviews the regional and site geology and hydrology and the groundwater and vadose zone quality beneath the landfill. Chapters 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 contain the plan of operation, closure plan, and postclosure plan, respectively. The plan of operation describes the routine operation and maintenance of the Solid Waste Landfill, the environmental monitoring program, and the safety and emergency plans. Chapter 5.0 also addresses the operational cover, environmental controls, personnel requirements, inspections, recordkeeping, reporting, and site security. The postclosure plan describes requirements for final cover maintenance and environmental monitoring equipment following final closure. Chapter 8.0 discusses the integration of closure and postclosure activities between the Solid Waste Landfill and adjacent Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 76 refs., 48 figs, 15 tabs

  15. [Velopharyngeal closure pattern and speech performance among submucous cleft palate patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yin; Chunli, Guo; Bing, Shi; Yang, Li; Jingtao, Li

    2017-06-01

    To characterize the velopharyngeal closure patterns and speech performance among submucous cleft palate patients. Patients with submucous cleft palate visiting the Department of Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University between 2008 and 2016 were reviewed. Outcomes of subjective speech evaluation including velopharyngeal function, consonant articulation, and objective nasopharyngeal endoscopy including the mobility of soft palate, pharyngeal walls were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 353 cases were retrieved in this study, among which 138 (39.09%) demonstrated velopharyngeal competence, 176 (49.86%) velopharyngeal incompetence, and 39 (11.05%) marginal velopharyngeal incompetence. A total of 268 cases were subjected to nasopharyngeal endoscopy examination, where 167 (62.31%) demonstrated circular closure pattern, 89 (33.21%) coronal pattern, and 12 (4.48%) sagittal pattern. Passavant's ridge existed in 45.51% (76/167) patients with circular closure and 13.48% (12/89) patients with coronal closure. Among the 353 patients included in this study, 137 (38.81%) presented normal articulation, 124 (35.13%) consonant elimination, 51 (14.45%) compensatory articulation, 36 (10.20%) consonant weakening, 25 (7.08%) consonant replacement, and 36 (10.20%) multiple articulation errors. Circular closure was the most prevalent velopharyngeal closure pattern among patients with submucous cleft palate, and high-pressure consonant deletion was the most common articulation abnormality. Articulation error occurred more frequently among patients with a low velopharyngeal closure rate.

  16. Transcatheter closure of post-operative residual ventricular septal defect using a patent ductus arteriosus closure device in an adult: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djer, Mulyadi M; Idris, Nikmah S; Alwi, Idrus; Wijaya, Ika P

    2014-07-01

    Transcatheter closure of perimembranous and muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD) has been performed widely and it has more advantages compare to surgery. However, transcatheter closure of residual VSD post operation of complex congenital heart disease is still challenging because of the complexity of anatomy and concern about device stability, so the operator should meticulously choose the most appropriate technique and device. We would like to report a case of transcatheter closure of residual VSD post Rastelli operation in a patient with double outlet right ventricle (DORV), sub-aortic VSD, severe infundibulum pulmonary stenosis (PS) and single coronary artery. The patient had undergone operations for four times, but he still had intractable heart failure that did not response to medications. On the first attempt. we closed the VSD using a VSD occluder, unfortunately the device embolized into the descending aorta, but fortunately we was able to snare it out. Then we decided to close the VSD using a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA occluder). On transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and angiography evaluation, the device position was stable. Post transcatheter VSD closure, the patient clinical condition improved significantly and he could finally be discharged after a long post-surgery hospitalization. Based on this experience we concluded that the transcatheter closure of residual VSD in complex CHD using PDA occluder could be an effective alternative treatment.

  17. The open abdomen and temporary abdominal closure systems--historical evolution and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quyn, A J; Johnston, C; Hall, D; Chambers, A; Arapova, N; Ogston, S; Amin, A I

    2012-08-01

    Several techniques for temporary abdominal closure have been developed. We systematically review the literature on temporary abdominal closure to ascertain whether the method can be tailored to the indication. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and relevant meeting abstracts until December 2009 were searched using the following headings: open abdomen, laparostomy, VAC (vacuum assisted closure), TNP (topical negative pressure), fascial closure, temporary abdominal closure, fascial dehiscence and deep wound dehiscence. The data were analysed by closure technique and aetiology. The primary end-points included delayed fascial closure and in-hospital mortality. The secondary end-points were intra-abdominal complications. The search identified 106 papers for inclusion. The techniques described were VAC (38 series), mesh/sheet (30 series), packing (15 series), Wittmann patch (eight series), Bogotá bag (six series), dynamic retention sutures (three series), zipper (15 series), skin only and locking device (one series each). The highest facial closure rates were seen with the Wittmann patch (78%), dynamic retention sutures (71%) and VAC (61%). Temporary abdominal closure has evolved from simple packing to VAC based systems. In the absence of sepsis Wittmann patch and VAC offered the best outcome. In its presence VAC had the highest delayed primary closure and the lowest mortality rates. However, due to data heterogeneity only limited conclusions can be drawn from this analysis. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD. I. Derivation and energy dissipation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaykov, Dimitar G., E-mail: Dimitar.Vlaykov@ds.mpg.de [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Am Faßberg 17, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Grete, Philipp [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schmidt, Wolfram [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Schleicher, Dominik R. G. [Departamento de Astronomía, Facultad Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Av. Esteban Iturra s/n Barrio Universitario, Casilla 160-C (Chile)

    2016-06-15

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical phenomena ranging from the intergalactic to the stellar scales. In studying them, numerical simulations are nearly inescapable, due to the large degree of nonlinearity involved. However, the dynamical ranges of these phenomena are much larger than what is computationally accessible. In large eddy simulations (LESs), the resulting limited resolution effects are addressed explicitly by introducing to the equations of motion additional terms associated with the unresolved, subgrid-scale dynamics. This renders the system unclosed. We derive a set of nonlinear structural closures for the ideal MHD LES equations with particular emphasis on the effects of compressibility. The closures are based on a gradient expansion of the finite-resolution operator [W. K. Yeo (CUP, 1993)] and require no assumptions about the nature of the flow or magnetic field. Thus, the scope of their applicability ranges from the sub- to the hyper-sonic and -Alfvénic regimes. The closures support spectral energy cascades both up and down-scale, as well as direct transfer between kinetic and magnetic resolved and unresolved energy budgets. They implicitly take into account the local geometry, and in particular, the anisotropy of the flow. Their properties are a priori validated in Paper II [P. Grete et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 062317 (2016)] against alternative closures available in the literature with respect to a wide range of simulation data of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  19. Tremendous bleeding complication after vacuum-assisted sternal closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isgro Frank

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC of complex infected wounds has recently gained popularity among various surgical specialties. The system is based on the application of negative pressure by controlled suction to the wound surface. The effectiveness of the VAC System on microcirculation and the promotion of granulation tissue proliferation are proved. No contraindications for the use in deep sternal wounds in cardiac surgery are described. In our case report we illustrate a scenario were a patient developed severe bleeding from the ascending aorta by penetration of wire fragments in the vessel. We conclude that all free particles in the sternum have to be removed completely before negative pressure is used.

  20. Acceptable results of early closure of loop ileostomy to protect low rectal anastomosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perdawid, Sharafaden Karim; Andersen, Ole Bjørn; Perdawood, Sharaf

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This was a pilot project performed prior to full implementation of early loop ileostomy closure (within two weeks) following low anterior resection of the rectum in a group of patients selected according to previously recommended criteria for safe, early ileostomy closure. MATERIAL......, closure operation, the postoperative closure period and follow-up. RESULTS: Eleven patients were included (men, n = 4) with a median age of 58 years (range 47-79 years). Ileostomy closure was performed at a median of ten days (range 8-13 days) following rectum resection. The median hospital stay was 16...

  1. Experience in the application of erosion-corrosion prediction programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiella Villacampa, E.; Cacho Cordero, L.; Pascual Velazquez, A.; Casar Asuar, M.

    1994-01-01

    Recently the results of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's follow-on programme relating to the application of erosion-corrosion supervision and control programs were published. The main problems encountered in their practical application are highlighted, namely those associated with prediction, calculation of minimum thickness acceptable by code, results analyses of the thicknesses measured using ultrasound technology, cases of incorrect substitution, etc. A number of power plants in Spain are currently using a computerised prediction and monitoring program for the erosion-corrosion phenomenon. The experience gained in the application of this program has been such that it has led to a number or benefits: an improvement in the application of the program, proof of its suitability to real situation, the establishment of a series of criteria relative to the inclusion or exclusion of consideration during data input, the monitoring of the phenomenon, selection of elements for inspection, etc. The report describes these areas, using typical examples as illustrations. (Author)

  2. Guidance for closure of existing DOE LLW disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchfield, L.

    1987-01-01

    During FY 1986, a closure guidance document was developed. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance in support of DOE Order 5820.2 to site operating contractors for the stabilization and closure of existing low-level waste (LLW) shallow land disposal sites at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Guidance is provided to aid operators in placing existing LLW sites in a closed conditions, i.e., a condition in which a nonoperational site meets postclosure performance requirements and can be shown, within a high degree of confidence, to perform as anticipated in the future, under the most cost-effective maintenance approach. Guidance is based on the philosophy that closure should be planned and performed using a systems approach. Plans for FY 1987 call for revision of the document to incorporate more information on closure of LLW sites also containing radioactive mixed waste and/or transuranic waste. 4 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  3. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments

  4. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments.

  5. Linear Programming and Its Application to Pattern Recognition Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omalley, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Linear programming and linear programming like techniques as applied to pattern recognition problems are discussed. Three relatively recent research articles on such applications are summarized. The main results of each paper are described, indicating the theoretical tools needed to obtain them. A synopsis of the author's comments is presented with regard to the applicability or non-applicability of his methods to particular problems, including computational results wherever given.

  6. Hormonal regulation of floret closure of rice (Oryza sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youming Huang

    Full Text Available Plant hormones play important roles in regulating every aspect of growth, development, and metabolism of plants. We are interested in understanding hormonal regulation of floret opening and closure in plants. This is a particularly important problem for hybrid rice because regulation of flowering time is vitally important in hybrid rice seed production. However, little was known about the effects of plant hormones on rice flowering. We have shown that jasmonate and methyl jasmonate play significant roles in promoting rice floret opening. In this study, we investigated the effects of auxins including indole-3-acidic acid (IAA, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA, 1-naphthalene-acetic acid (NAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (DIC and abscisic acid (ABA on floret closure of four fertile and three sterile varieties of rice. The results from field studies in three growing seasons in 2013-2015 showed that the percentages of closed florets were significantly lower in plants treated with IAA, IBA, 2,4-D, DIC and NAA and that the durations of floret opening were significantly longer in plants treated with the same auxins. The auxins exhibited time- and concentration-dependant effects on floret closure. ABA displayed opposite effects of auxins because it increased the percentages of floret closure and decreased the length of floret opening of rice varieties. The degree of auxin-inhibiting and ABA-promoting effects on floret closure was varied somewhat but not significantly different among the rice varieties. Endogenous IAA levels were the highest in florets collected shortly before opening followed by a sharp decline in florets with maximal angles of opening and a significant jump of IAA levels shortly after floret closure in both fertile and sterile rice plants. ABA levels showed an opposite trend in the same samples. Our results showed that auxins delayed but ABA promoted the closure of rice floret regardless of

  7. Hormonal regulation of floret closure of rice (Oryza sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youming; Zeng, Xiaochun

    2018-01-01

    Plant hormones play important roles in regulating every aspect of growth, development, and metabolism of plants. We are interested in understanding hormonal regulation of floret opening and closure in plants. This is a particularly important problem for hybrid rice because regulation of flowering time is vitally important in hybrid rice seed production. However, little was known about the effects of plant hormones on rice flowering. We have shown that jasmonate and methyl jasmonate play significant roles in promoting rice floret opening. In this study, we investigated the effects of auxins including indole-3-acidic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 1-naphthalene-acetic acid (NAA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (DIC) and abscisic acid (ABA) on floret closure of four fertile and three sterile varieties of rice. The results from field studies in three growing seasons in 2013–2015 showed that the percentages of closed florets were significantly lower in plants treated with IAA, IBA, 2,4-D, DIC and NAA and that the durations of floret opening were significantly longer in plants treated with the same auxins. The auxins exhibited time- and concentration-dependant effects on floret closure. ABA displayed opposite effects of auxins because it increased the percentages of floret closure and decreased the length of floret opening of rice varieties. The degree of auxin-inhibiting and ABA-promoting effects on floret closure was varied somewhat but not significantly different among the rice varieties. Endogenous IAA levels were the highest in florets collected shortly before opening followed by a sharp decline in florets with maximal angles of opening and a significant jump of IAA levels shortly after floret closure in both fertile and sterile rice plants. ABA levels showed an opposite trend in the same samples. Our results showed that auxins delayed but ABA promoted the closure of rice floret regardless of the varieties

  8. Learning Programming Technique through Visual Programming Application as Learning Media with Fuzzy Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buditjahjanto, I. G. P. Asto; Nurlaela, Luthfiyah; Ekohariadi; Riduwan, Mochamad

    2017-01-01

    Programming technique is one of the subjects at Vocational High School in Indonesia. This subject contains theory and application of programming utilizing Visual Programming. Students experience some difficulties to learn textual learning. Therefore, it is necessary to develop media as a tool to transfer learning materials. The objectives of this…

  9. In-Situ Testing and Performance Assessment of a Redesigned WIPP Panel Closure - 13192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Thomas [URS-Professional Solutions, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Patterson, Russell [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Camphouse, Chris; Herrick, Courtney; Kirchner, Thomas; Malama, Bwalya; Zeitler, Todd [Sandia National Laboratories-Carlsbad, 4100 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Kicker, Dwayne [SM Stoller Corporation-Carlsbad, 4100 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2013-07-01

    operations and a greater understanding of the waste and the behavior of the underground salt formation, the DOE has established a revised panel closure design. This revised design meets both the short-term NMED Permit requirements for the operational period, and also the Federal requirements for long-term repository performance. This new design is simpler, easier to construct and has less of an adverse impact on waste disposal operations than the originally approved Option D design. The Panel Closure Redesign is based on: (1) the results of in-situ constructability testing performed to determine run-of-mine salt reconsolidation parameters and how the characteristics of the bedded salt formation affect these parameters and, (2) the results of air flow analysis of the new design to determine that the limit for the migration of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) will be met at the compliance point. Waste panel closures comprise a repository feature that has been represented in WIPP performance assessment (PA) since the original Compliance Certification Application of 1996. Panel closures are included in WIPP PA models principally because they are a part of the disposal system, not because they play a substantive role in inhibiting the release of radionuclides to the outside environment. The 1998 rulemaking that certified WIPP to receive transuranic waste placed conditions on the panel closure design to be implemented in the repository. The revised panel closure design, termed the Run-of-Mine (ROM) Panel Closure System (ROMPCS), is comprised of 30.48 meters of ROM salt with barriers at each end. The ROM salt is generated from ongoing mining operations at the WIPP and may be compacted and/or moistened as it is emplaced in a panel entry. The barriers consist of bulkheads, similar to those currently used in the panels as room closures. A WIPP performance assessment has been completed that incorporates the ROMPCS design into the representation of the repository, and compares

  10. 75 FR 28655 - Rexam Closure Systems, Inc. a Subsidiary of Rexam PLC Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Hamlet, NC; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In..., applicable to the workers of Rexam Closure Systems, Inc., a subsidiary of Rexam PLC, Hamlet, North Carolina... paid through Owens Illinois Manufacturing, Hamlet, North Carolina, who became totally or partially...

  11. Closure behavior of spherical void in slab during hot rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rong; Zhang, Jiongming; Wang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of steels are heavily deteriorated by voids. The influence of voids on the product quality should be eliminated through rolling processes. The study on the void closure during hot rolling processes is necessary. In present work, the closure behavior of voids at the center of a slab at 800 °C during hot rolling processes has been simulated with a 3D finite element model. The shape of the void and the plastic strain distribution of the slab are obtained by this model. The void decreases along the slab thickness direction and spreads along the rolling direction but hardly changes along the strip width direction. The relationship between closure behavior of voids and the plastic strain at the center of the slab is analyzed. The effects of rolling reduction, slab thickness and roller diameter on the closure behavior of voids are discussed. The larger reduction, thinner slab and larger roller diameter all improve the closure of voids during hot rolling processes. Experimental results of the closure behavior of a void in the slab during hot rolling process mostly agree with the simulation results..

  12. Security option file - After closure (DOS-AF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    A first volume presents the context and scope of the Cigeo project, and the scope of this document. It proposes a general presentation of Cigeo, the regulatory framework and standards. It describes the different aspects and components of the security strategy: principles, security functions after closure, objectives of protection, global approach. It proposes a security assessment: objectives, consistency with international practices, assessment steps, scenarios, scenario quantitative assessment. The next part addresses security management. The second volume contains a description of the storage system: site characteristics, types of stored parcels, the future of the installation after its closure. The third volume proposes a security assessment. It addresses the management of risks and uncertainties, describes a scenario of normal evolution and also scenarios of altered evolutions, scenarios of unintentional human intrusion, and what-if type scenarios. The fourth volume reports lessons at the current stage of the project, and gives an overview of important activities from storage design to storage closure

  13. Holistic Considerations in Optimizing a Sterile Product Package to Ensure Container Closure Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrazio, Fran L

    2018-01-01

    A new major chapter dealing with container closure integrity was released by the United States Pharmacopeial Convention. Chapter provides a significant amount of education and guidance concerning test methodologies to prove that a system is integral and safe for use. The test method used is only one of the major considerations in approaching the challenge of proving an integral system. This paper takes a holistic review of all the major considerations needed in qualifying a new vial system for container closure integrity. There is substantial interplay among many aspects in the process of sealing a vial. This review helps to define major risks that need to be considered and mitigated and reinforces the need to understand the maximum allowable leakage limit that is acceptable for a specific drug application. A typical risk-based approach considers materials, test methods, process, people, environment, and equipment. Each of these aspects is considered in some detail along with a recommended process flow for building a best practice, science-based approach. This approach will inform decision making for evaluating the correct combination of components and assuring they are assembled and tested in an appropriate manner. This work, once completed, can be the basis for a vial system platform or specific drug application qualification. LAY ABSTRACT: Container closure integrity is a fundamental requirement of every sterile drug package. With recent upgrading of compendia standards and guidance around this issue, there is an opportunity to better define a best practice approach to a complicated subject. It is important to recognize that there is substantial interplay among the components of the system, the process of assembly, and the test methods that are used. This paper takes a holistic approach to discussing these issues and identifying the risks that must be considered in assuring an integral container over the shelf life of a drug product. © PDA, Inc. 2018.

  14. Citizen Contributions to the Closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 18 and 19 at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) - 13448

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawless, W.F. [Paine College, Departments of Math and Psychology, 1235 15th Street, Augusta, GA 30901 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Citizen involvement in DOE's decision-making for the environmental cleanup from DOE's management of its nuclear wastes across the DOE complex has had a positive effect on the cleanup of its SRS site, characterized by an acceleration of cleanup not only for the Transuranic wastes at SRS, but also for DOE's first two closures of HLW tanks, both of which occurred at SRS. The Citizens around SRS had pushed successfully for the closures of Tanks 17 and 20 in 1997, becoming the first closures of HLW tanks under regulatory guidance in the USA. However, since then, HLW tank closures ceased due to a lawsuit, the application of new tank clean-up technology, interagency squabbling between DOE and NRC over tank closure criteria, and finally and almost fatally, from budget pressures. Despite an agreement with its regulators for the closure of Tanks 18 and 19 by the end of calendar year 2012, the outlook in Fall 2011 to close these two tanks had dimmed. It was at this point that the citizens around SRS became reengaged with tank closures, helping DOE to reach its agreed upon milestone. (authors)

  15. Mail Office annual closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On the occasion of the annual closure of CERN, there will be no mail distributed on Friday 20 December 2013 but mail will be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, you will still be able to bring your outgoing mail to Building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.  

  16. Interim status of closure/post-closure plan for 183-H solar evaporation basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report describes a plan for decommissioning several solar evaporation basins on the Hanford reservation. The document describes procedures for sampling during decommissioning and a plan for certification of the resulting completed landfill. Additional plans deal with the training, security of the site, and post-closure monitoring

  17. Closure certification report: TA-35 TSL-125 surface impoundment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This closure report documents closure activities for the TA-35 TSL-125 surface impoundment and associated structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory). Prior to formal approval of the closure plan, the decision was made to proceed with closure activities to prevent any further releases from the site following informal discussions with New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) personnel. The closure plan is a revision of the previously submitted draft dated July 1988. Clean closure of the TSL-125 site was accomplished through: Removal and proper disposal of all wastes contained within the surface impoundment system; Decontamination and/or removal and proper disposal of the surface impoundment, its associated structures, and contaminated soil underlying the impoundment area; Sampling and analysis of soil to determine the presence and concentrations of any hazardous constituents remaining in the soil at the TSL-125 site; and Demonstration through a risk assessment that any constituents remaining in the soil at the TSL-125 site pose no threat to human health and the environment. All remaining soil concentrations of hazardous constituents were below health-based action levels. Analytical results indicated that benzidine, n-nitrosodimethylamine, and n-nitrosodi-n-propylamine were not detected at or above their limits of quantitation and beryllium was not present at or above its laboratory detection limit. However, the limits of quantitation and detection for these constituents were greater than their calculated health-based action levels. To demonstrate that these constituents were not present, historical data was researched and it was determined that the constituents were not utilized at the Building 125 site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. Stochastic particle acceleration and statistical closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimits, A.M.; Krommes, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    In a recent paper, Maasjost and Elsasser (ME) concluded, from the results of numerical experiments and heuristic arguments, that the Bourret and the direct-interaction approximation (DIA) are ''of no use in connection with the stochastic acceleration problem'' because (1) their predictions were equivalent to that of the simpler Fokker-Planck (FP) theory, and (2) either all or none of the closures were in good agreement with the data. Here some analytically tractable cases are studied and used to test the accuracy of these closures. The cause of the discrepancy (2) is found to be the highly non-Gaussian nature of the force used by ME, a point not stressed by them. For the case where the force is a position-independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (i.e., Gaussian) process, an effective Kubo number K can be defined. For K << 1 an FP description is adequate, and conclusion (1) of ME follows; however, for K greater than or equal to 1 the DIA behaves much better qualitatively than the other two closures. For the non-Gaussian stochastic force used by ME, all common approximations fail, in agreement with (2)

  19. Straight line closure of congenital macrostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Richard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of patients operated on by Nepal Cleft Lip and Palate Association (NECLAPA surgeons for congenital macrostomia were prospectively studied between January 2000 and December 2002. There were four males and three females with a median age of 10 years. Three had an associated branchial arch syndrome. In all patients an overlapping repair of orbicularis oris was done. Six patients had a straight line closure with excellent cosmetic results and one a Z-plasty with a more obvious scar. All had a normal appearing commissure. Overlapping orbicularis repair with straight line skin closure for this rare congenital anomaly is recommended.

  20. Early Conversion of External Fixation to Interlocked Nailing in Open Fractures of Both Bone Leg Assisted with Vacuum Closure (VAC) - Final Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simrat Pal Singh; Raj, Manish; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Pulkesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Jasveer; Deep, Akash

    2016-02-01

    Management of compound grade III fractures of both bone leg includes external stabilization for long period, followed by various soft tissue coverage procedures. Primary interlocking of tibia had been also done with variable results. External fixation for long time without any bone loss often leads to infected nonunion, loss of reduction, pin tract infection and failure of fixation, primary interlocking in compound grade III fractures had shown high medullary infection rate. We managed all cases of compound grade III A/B fractures with primary external fixation, simultaneous wound management using vacuum assisted closure (VAC) followed by early conversion to interlocking within 2 weeks of fixator application. To determine the effectiveness of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) for the early conversion of external fixator to definitive interlocking in open fractures of the both bone leg. In current study we selected 84 cases of compound grade IIIA/B diaphyseal fractures of both bone leg during period of May 2010 to September 2013. We managed these cases by immediate debridement and application of external fixation followed by repeated debridement, application of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) and conversion to interlocking within two weeks. Out of 84 cases union was achieved in 80(95%) of cases with definitive tibial interlocking. Excellent to good result were obtained in 77(91.8%) of cases and fair to poor result seen in rest of 7(8.2%) of cases according to modified Ketenjian's criteria. 5 out of these 7 poor result group cases were from Compound Grade III B group to start with. Deep infection rate in our series were 7% i.e. total 6 cases and 4 out of these were from compound Grade III B group to start with. Vacuum assisted closure (VAC) give a good help for rapid closure of the wound and help in early conversion to definitive intramedullary nailing. Reamed nail could well be used in compound grade IIIA/B fractures without increasing the risk of infection. It gives

  1. A randomized clinical trial to compare three methods of orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, V; Read, M J F; O'Brien, K D; Worthington, H V; Mandall, N A

    2002-03-01

    To compare the rates of orthodontic space closure for: Active ligatures, polyurethane powerchain (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, RMO Europe, Parc d'Innovation, Rue Geiler de Kaysersberg, 67400 Illkirch-Graffenstaden, Strasbourg, France) and nickel titanium springs. Patients entering the space closure phase of fixed orthodontic treatment attending six orthodontic providers. Twelve patients received active ligatures (48 quadrants), 10 patients received powerchain (40 quadrants) and 11 patients, nickel-titanium springs (44 quadrants). Patients were randomly allocated for treatment with active ligatures, powerchain or nickel titanium springs. Upper and lower study models were collected at the start of space closure (T(o)) and 4 months later (T(1)). We recorded whether the patient wore Class II or Class III elastics. Space present in all four quadrants was measured, by a calibrated examiner, using Vernier callipers at T(o) and T(1.) The rate of space closure, in millimetres per month (4 weeks) and a 4-monthly rate, was then calculated. Examiner reliability was assessed at least 2 weeks later. Mean rates of space closure were 0.35 mm/month for active ligatures, 0.58 mm/month for powerchain, and 0.81 mm/month for NiTi springs. No statistically significant differences were found between any methods with the exception of NiTi springs showing more rapid space closure than active ligatures (P space closure. NiTi springs gave the most rapid rate of space closure and may be considered the treatment of choice. However, powerchain provides a cheaper treatment option that is as effective. The use of inter-arch elastics does not appear to influence rate of space closure.

  2. Feasibility of Using Fluorescence Spectrophotometry to Develop a Sensitive Dye Immersion Method for Container Closure Integrity Testing of Prefilled Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xujin; Lloyd, David K; Klohr, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    has recently gained industry attention due to increased regulatory agency scrutiny regarding the analytical rigor of container closure integrity testing methods and expectations to use container closure integrity testing in lieu of sterility tests in stability programs. Methylene blue dye is often used for dye ingress testing of container closure integrity, but we found it unsuitable for reliable detection of small breaches in prefilled syringes of drug product. This work describes the suitability and advantages of using a fluorescent dye and spectroscopic detection for a robust, sensitive, and quality control-friendly container closure integrity testing method for prefilled syringes. © PDA, Inc. 2016.

  3. Reactor vessel closure head replacements in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome-Jeumont Industrie consortium have completed in 1997 28 reactor vessel (RV) closure head replacements, including five on 1300 MWe class PWR units. Framatome manages the operations and handles removal and reinstallation of equipment (not including the control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM)) and the requalification tests, while JI, which manufactures the CRDMs, is involved in the CRDM cutting, re-machining and welding operations, using tools of original design, in order to optimize the RV closure head operation in terms of costs, schedule and dosage

  4. Estimating the costs of school closure for mitigating an influenza pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Elisabeth J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School closure is a key component of many countries' plans to mitigate the effect of an influenza pandemic. Although a number of studies have suggested that such a policy might reduce the incidence, there are no published studies of the cost of such policies. This study attempts to fill this knowledge gap Methods School closure is expected to lead to significant work absenteeism of working parents who are likely to be the main care givers to their dependent children at home. The cost of absenteeism due to school closure is calculated as the paid productivity loss of parental absenteeism during the period of school closure. The cost is estimated from societal perspective using a nationally representative survey. Results The results show that overall about 16% of the workforce is likely to be the main caregiver for dependent children and therefore likely to take absenteeism. This rises to 30% in the health and social care sector, as a large proportion of the workforce are women. The estimated costs of school closure are significant, at £0.2 bn – £1.2 bn per week. School closure is likely to significantly exacerbate the pressures on the health system through staff absenteeism. Conclusion The estimates of school closure associated absenteeism and the projected cost would be useful for pandemic planning for business continuity, and for cost effectiveness evaluation of different pandemic influenza mitigation strategies.

  5. High Performance Zero-Bleed CLSM/Grout Mixes for High-Level Waste Tank Closures Strategic Research and Development - FY99 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this program, SRD-99-08, was to design and test suitable materials, which can be used to close high-level waste tanks at SRS. Fill materials can be designed to perform several functions including chemical stabilization and/or physical encapsulation of incidental waste so that the potential for transport of contaminants into the environment is reduced. Also they are needed to physically stabilize the void volume in the tanks to prevent/minimize future subsidence and inadvertent intrusion. The intent of this work was to develop a zero-bleed soil CLSM (ZBS-CLSM) and a zero-bleed concrete mix (ZBC) which meet the unique placement and stabilization/encapsulation requirements for high-level waste tank closures. These mixes in addition to the zero-bleed CLSM mixes formulated for closure of Tanks 17-F and 20-F provide design engineers with a suite of options for specifying materials for future tank closures

  6. Troughs on Martian Ice Sheets: Analysis of Their Closure and Mass Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, A.; Kargel, J.; Lewis, K.; MacAyeal, D.; Pfeffer, T.; Zwally, J.

    2000-01-01

    At the Copenhagen workshop on Martian polar processes, Ralf Greve commented that the flow regime surrounding scarps and troughs of the Martian polar ice sheets cannot be modeled using traditional "plan view" ice-sheet models. Such models are inadequate because they typically use reduced equations that embody certain simplifications applicable only to terrestrial ice sheets where the upper ice sheet surface is smooth. In response to this suggestion, we have constructed a 2-dimensional, time dependent "side view" (two spatial dimensions: one horizontal, one vertical) model of scarp closure that is designed to overcome the difficulties described by Greve. The purpose of the model is to evaluate the scales of stress variation and styles of flow closure so as to estimate errors that may be encountered by "plan view" models. We show that there may be avenues whereby the complications associated with scarp closure can be overcome in "plan view" models through appropriate parameterizations of 3-dimensional effects. Following this, we apply the flow model to simulate the evolution of a typical scarp on the North Polar Cap of Mars. Our simulations investigate: (a) the role of "radiation trapping" (see our companion abstract) in creating and maintaining "spiral-like" scarps on the ice sheet, (b) the consequences of different flowlaws and ice compositions on scarp evolution and, in particular, scarp age, and (c) the role of dust and debris in scarp evolution.

  7. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 528: POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS CONTAMINATION NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2006-09-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed at CAU 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, as presented in the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (US. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSAINSO], 2005). The approved closure alternative was closure in place with administrative controls. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical data to confirm that the remediation goals were met.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan for the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information on the closure of the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility. Topics discussed include: facility description; closure history; closure performance standard; partial closure; maximum waste inventory; closure activities; schedule; and postclosure care

  9. Does velopharyngeal closure pattern affect the success of pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis; Fischbach, Simone; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David M

    2005-01-01

    Historically at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty has been the treatment of choice for treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency, regardless of velopharyngeal closure pattern. The authors hypothesize that pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty is more effective in treating velopharyngeal insufficiency in patients with circular or sagittal velopharyngeal closure and less effective in treating the coronal closure pattern. Ninety-three patients who underwent superiorly based pharyngeal flap surgery for velopharyngeal insufficiency were evaluated in a retrospective chart review. Closure pattern was determined preoperatively by nasopharyngoscopy or multiview videofluoroscopy. Nasalance was assessed preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. Nasalance during nonnasal speech was decreased on average, for all closure patterns, postoperatively. However, a significantly higher percentage of patients were corrected to normal nasalance scores in thenoncoronal group than in the coronal group (57 percent versus 35 percent, respectively) at 1 year postoperatively (p approach to the management of velopharyngeal insufficiency and are more inclined to treat coronal pattern velopharyngeal insufficiency with sphincter pharyngoplasty.

  10. Early Closure of a Temporary Ileostomy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne K; Park, Jennifer; Jansen, Jens E

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study morbidity and mortality associated with early closure (8-13 days) of a temporary stoma compared with standard procedure (closure after > 12 weeks) after rectal resection for cancer. BACKGROUND: A temporary ileostomy may reduce the risk of pelvic sepsis after .......0001. CONCLUSIONS: It is safe to close a temporary ileostomy 8 to 13 days after rectal resection and anastomosis for rectal cancer in selected patients without clinical or radiological signs of anastomotic leakage.......OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study morbidity and mortality associated with early closure (8-13 days) of a temporary stoma compared with standard procedure (closure after > 12 weeks) after rectal resection for cancer. BACKGROUND: A temporary ileostomy may reduce the risk of pelvic sepsis after...... creation) of a temporary ileostomy was compared with late closure (>12 weeks) in a multicenter randomized controlled trial, EASY (www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01287637) including patients undergoing rectal resection for cancer. Patients with a temporary ileostomy without signs of postoperative complications...

  11. Automated analysis of angle closure from anterior chamber angle images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Mani; Cheng, Jun; Perera, Shamira A; Tun, Tin A; Liu, Jiang; Aung, Tin

    2014-10-21

    To evaluate a novel software capable of automatically grading angle closure on EyeCam angle images in comparison with manual grading of images, with gonioscopy as the reference standard. In this hospital-based, prospective study, subjects underwent gonioscopy by a single observer, and EyeCam imaging by a different operator. The anterior chamber angle in a quadrant was classified as closed if the posterior trabecular meshwork could not be seen. An eye was classified as having angle closure if there were two or more quadrants of closure. Automated grading of the angle images was performed using customized software. Agreement between the methods was ascertained by κ statistic and comparison of area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). One hundred forty subjects (140 eyes) were included, most of whom were Chinese (102/140, 72.9%) and women (72/140, 51.5%). Angle closure was detected in 61 eyes (43.6%) with gonioscopy in comparison with 59 eyes (42.1%, P = 0.73) using manual grading, and 67 eyes (47.9%, P = 0.24) with automated grading of EyeCam images. The agreement for angle closure diagnosis between gonioscopy and both manual (κ = 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI), 0.81-0.96) and automated grading of EyeCam images was good (κ = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.85). The AUC for detecting eyes with gonioscopic angle closure was comparable for manual and automated grading (AUC 0.974 vs. 0.954, P = 0.31) of EyeCam images. Customized software for automated grading of EyeCam angle images was found to have good agreement with gonioscopy. Human observation of the EyeCam images may still be needed to avoid gross misclassification, especially in eyes with extensive angle closure. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  12. Transcatheter Device Closure of Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, M.; Ullah, M.; Sadiq, N.; Akhtar, K.; Akbar, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy, safety and immediate complications encountered during percutaneous device closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Paediatric Cardiology, AFIC/NIHD, Rawalpindi, from January 2005 to December 2010. Methodology: Consecutive 500 patients who underwent attempted transcatheter PDA device closure were included in the study. Device type position, success of closure and complications were described as frequency percentage. Results: In 491 cases (98.2%), PDA was successfully occluded including 4 cases (0.8%) where devices were dislodged but retrieved and redeployed in Cath laboratory. PDA occluder devices used in 448 cases (91%) while coils (single or multiple) were used in 42 cases (8.5%) and in one case (0.2%) ASD occluder device was used to occlude the PDA. There were 09 (1.8%) unsuccessful cases, 06 (1.2%) were abandoned as ducts were considered unsuitable for device closure, 02 (0.4%) devices dislodged and needed surgical retrieval and one case (0.2%) was abandoned due to faulty equipment. The narrowest PDA diameter ranged from 0.5 - 14 mm with mean of 4.5 +- 2.4 mm. There was a single (0.2%) mortality. Conclusion: Transcatheter occlusion of PDA by coil or occluder device is an effective therapeutic option with high success rate. Complication rate is low in the hands of skilled operators yet paediatric cardiac surgical back-up cover is mandatory. (author)

  13. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure or Antiplatelet Therapy for Cryptogenic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Kasner, Scott E; Rhodes, John F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the prevention of recurrent stroke after cryptogenic stroke is uncertain. We investigated the effect of PFO closure combined with antiplatelet therapy versus antiplatelet therapy alone on the risks of recurrent stroke and new...... brain infarctions. METHODS: In this multinational trial involving patients with a PFO who had had a cryptogenic stroke, we randomly assigned patients, in a 2:1 ratio, to undergo PFO closure plus antiplatelet therapy (PFO closure group) or to receive antiplatelet therapy alone (antiplatelet-only group......). Imaging of the brain was performed at the baseline screening and at 24 months. The coprimary end points were freedom from clinical evidence of ischemic stroke (reported here as the percentage of patients who had a recurrence of stroke) through at least 24 months after randomization and the 24-month...

  14. A Simple Application Program Interface for Saving Java Program Data on a Wiki

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanoue, Takashi; Oda, Kentaro; Shimozono, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    A simple application program interface (API) for Java programs running on a wiki is implemented experimentally. A Java program with the API can be running on a wiki, and the Java program can save its data on the wiki. The Java program consists of PukiWiki, which is a popular wiki in Japan, and a plug-in, which starts up Java programs and classes of Java. A Java applet with default access privilege cannot save its data at a local host. We have constructed an API of applets for easy and unified...

  15. The value of vacuum-assisted closure in septic patients treated with laparostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliakos, Ioannis; Papavramidis, Theodossis S; Michalopoulos, Nick; Deligiannidis, Nickolaos; Kesisoglou, Isaak; Sapalidis, Konstantinos; Papavramidis, Spiros

    2012-09-01

    The ideal method of temporary abdominal closure (TAC) should allow rapid closure, easy maintenance, and wound repair with minimal tissue damage. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare open abdomen outcomes between patients managed with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), and patients managed with other methods of TAC, when septic abdomen is present. Two groups of patients with septic open abdomen: 27 treated with VAC versus 31 treated with other techniques of TAC. We studied open abdomen duration, number of dressing changes, re-exploration rate, successful abdominal closure rate, overall mortality, and development of enteroatmospheric fistulas. The VAC device demonstrated its superiority concerning open abdomen duration (P advantages concerning clinical feasibility. The high rates of direct fascia closure with an acceptable rate of ventral hernias are further benefits of this technique.

  16. Influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Jack; Fisher, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    The location of crack closure with respect to crack wake and specimen thickness under different loading conditions was determined. The rate of increase of K sub CL in the crack wake was found to be significantly higher for plasticity induced closure in comparison to roughness induced closure. Roughness induced closure was uniform throughout the thickness of the specimen while plasticity induced closure levels were 50 percent higher in the near surface region than in the midthickness. The influence of state of stress on low-high load interaction effects was also examined. Load interaction effects differed depending upon the state of stress and were explained in terms of delta K sub eff.

  17. Status of Closure Welding Technology of Canister for Transportation and Storage of High Level Radioactive Material and Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Bang, K. S.; Seo, K. S.; Seo, C. S.

    2010-10-01

    Closure seal welding is one of the key technologies in fabricating and handling the canister which is used for transportation and storage of high radioactive material and waste. Simple industrial fabrication processes are used before filling the radioactive waste into the canister. But, automatic and remote processes should be used after filling the radioactive material because the thickness of canister is not sufficient to shield the high radiation from filled material or waste. In order to simplify the welding process the closure structure of canister and the sealing method are investigated and developed properly. Two types of radioactive materials such as vitrified waste and compacted solid waste are produced in nuclear industry. Because the filling method of two types of waste is different, the shapes of closure and opening of canister and welding method is also different. The canister shape and sealing method should be standardized to standardize the handling facilities and inspection process such as leak test after closure welding. In order to improve the productivity of disposal and compatibility of the canister, the structure and shape of canister should be standardized considering the type of waste. Two kind of welding process such as arc welding and resistance welding are reported and used in the field. In the arc welding process GTAW and PAW are considered proper processes for closure welding. The closure seal welding process can be selected by considering material of canister, thickness of body, productivity, and applicable codes and rules. Because the storage time of nuclear waste in canister is very long, at least 20 years, the long-time corrosion at the weld should be estimated including mechanical integrity. Recently, the mitigation of residual stress around weld region, which causes stress corrosion cracking, is also interesting research issue

  18. Parents' Attitudes to the Closure of Small Rural Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, A.; Nisbet, J.

    1977-01-01

    Attitudes of 134 parents of children from 10 rural schools threatened with closure, and 56 parents of children from seven schools recently closed, were assessed by interview. Most parents opposed closure, and most gave educational reasons for their attitudes. (Author)

  19. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  20. MCO closure welding process parameter development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key elements in the SNF process is final closure of the MCO by welding. Fuel is loaded into the MCO (approximately 2 ft. in diameter and 13 ft. long) and a heavy shield plug is inserted into the top, creating a mechanical seal. The plug contains several process ports for various operations, including vacuum drying and inert-gas backfilling of the packaged fuel. When fully processed, the Canister Cover Assembly (CCA) is placed over the shield plug and final closure made by welding. The following reports the effort between the Amer Industrial Technology (AIT) and Fluor Hanford (FH) to develop and qualify the welding process for making the final closure--with primary emphasis on developing a set of robust parameters for deposition of the root pass. Work was carried out in three phases: (1) Initial welding process and equipment selection with subsequent field demonstration testing; (2) Development and qualification of a specific process technique and parameters; and (3) Validation of the process and parameters at the CSB under mock production conditions. This work establishes the process technique and parameters that provide a high level of confidence that acceptable MCO closure welds will be made on a consistent and repeatable basis

  1. Multivariate moment closure techniques for stochastic kinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, Eszter; Ale, Angelique; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic effects dominate many chemical and biochemical processes. Their analysis, however, can be computationally prohibitively expensive and a range of approximation schemes have been proposed to lighten the computational burden. These, notably the increasingly popular linear noise approximation and the more general moment expansion methods, perform well for many dynamical regimes, especially linear systems. At higher levels of nonlinearity, it comes to an interplay between the nonlinearities and the stochastic dynamics, which is much harder to capture correctly by such approximations to the true stochastic processes. Moment-closure approaches promise to address this problem by capturing higher-order terms of the temporally evolving probability distribution. Here, we develop a set of multivariate moment-closures that allows us to describe the stochastic dynamics of nonlinear systems. Multivariate closure captures the way that correlations between different molecular species, induced by the reaction dynamics, interact with stochastic effects. We use multivariate Gaussian, gamma, and lognormal closure and illustrate their use in the context of two models that have proved challenging to the previous attempts at approximating stochastic dynamics: oscillations in p53 and Hes1. In addition, we consider a larger system, Erk-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling, where conventional stochastic simulation approaches incur unacceptably high computational costs

  2. Multivariate moment closure techniques for stochastic kinetic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, Eszter, E-mail: e.lakatos13@imperial.ac.uk; Ale, Angelique; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Stumpf, Michael P. H., E-mail: m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, Centre for Integrative Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-07

    Stochastic effects dominate many chemical and biochemical processes. Their analysis, however, can be computationally prohibitively expensive and a range of approximation schemes have been proposed to lighten the computational burden. These, notably the increasingly popular linear noise approximation and the more general moment expansion methods, perform well for many dynamical regimes, especially linear systems. At higher levels of nonlinearity, it comes to an interplay between the nonlinearities and the stochastic dynamics, which is much harder to capture correctly by such approximations to the true stochastic processes. Moment-closure approaches promise to address this problem by capturing higher-order terms of the temporally evolving probability distribution. Here, we develop a set of multivariate moment-closures that allows us to describe the stochastic dynamics of nonlinear systems. Multivariate closure captures the way that correlations between different molecular species, induced by the reaction dynamics, interact with stochastic effects. We use multivariate Gaussian, gamma, and lognormal closure and illustrate their use in the context of two models that have proved challenging to the previous attempts at approximating stochastic dynamics: oscillations in p53 and Hes1. In addition, we consider a larger system, Erk-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling, where conventional stochastic simulation approaches incur unacceptably high computational costs.

  3. Contemporary Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Primary Angle-Closure Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghinejad, M Reza; Myers, Jonathan S

    2018-05-16

    Primary angle closure disease spectrum varies from a narrow angle to advanced glaucoma. A variety of imaging technologies may assist the clinician in determining the pathophysiology and diagnosis of primary angle closure, but gonioscopy remains a mainstay of clinical evaluation. Laser iridotomy effectively eliminates the pupillary block component of angle closure; however, studies show that in many patients the iridocorneal angle remains narrow from underlying anatomic issues, and increasing lens size often leads to further narrowing over time. Recent studies have further characterized the role of the lens in angle closure disease, and cataract or clear lens extraction is increasingly used earlier in its management. As a first surgical step in angle closure glaucoma, lens extraction alone often effectively controls the pressure with less risk of complications than concurrent or stand alone glaucoma surgery, but may not be sufficient in more advanced or severe disease. We provide a comprehensive review on the primary angle-closure disease nomenclature, imaging, and current laser and surgical management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a open-quotes Settlement Agreementclose quotes (or open-quotes Batt Agreementclose quotes) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed

  5. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  6. Infering and Calibrating Triadic Closure in a Dynamic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    In the social sciences, the hypothesis of triadic closure contends that new links in a social contact network arise preferentially between those who currently share neighbours. Here, in a proof-of-principle study, we show how to calibrate a recently proposed evolving network model to time-dependent connectivity data. The probabilistic edge birth rate in the model contains a triadic closure term, so we are also able to assess statistically the evidence for this effect. The approach is shown to work on data generated synthetically from the model. We then apply this methodology to some real, large-scale data that records the build up of connections in a business-related social networking site, and find evidence for triadic closure.

  7. Transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defect with cardio SEAL septal occluder. A preliminary result of clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Gejun; Dai Ruping; Liu Yanling; Jiang Shiliang; Zeng Zheng; Huang Lianjun; Xie Ruolan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency and preliminary results of transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) with CardioSEAL septal occluder. Methods: There were 12 patients in this study. Trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) before the interventions confirmed the ASDs with a mean diameter of *13.14 +- 3.48) mm (ranging from 8 to 20 mm). There were 11 isolated ASDs and 1 multi-defects ASD in the group. Each ASD was occluded with CardioSEAL septal occluder through the percutaneous procedure. The closure procedure was guided by fluoroscopy and trans-esophageal echocardiography. The TEE was done immediately after the procedure to find whether there was residual shunt. Trans-thoracic-echocardiography (TTE), ECG, and X-ray examination were done 24 hours, 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year after the procedures as follow-up to evaluate the efficiency. Results: The placements of the occluders were successful in 11 cases. There were no mortality and no emergent surgery during the procedures. TEE confirmed that there were trivial and small residual shunts in 3 cases immediately after the procedures. TTE confirmed small residual shunts in 2 cases 24 hour after the procedures, and in 1 case 1 month, 3 month, and 1 year after the procedures. Conclusion: Transcatheter closure of secundum ASD with CardioSEAL septal occluder was an efficient nonsurgical method. It could be the method of choice in treating the ASDs with special anatomic variations. It had a high successful rate of device placement and satisfied preliminary results, but the long-term follow-up was needed

  8. Shell closure in stable and unstable Fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the findings of calculations performed with the density functional method in connection with shell closure are presented. In nuclei, some evidences seam to confirm the existence of a shell closure at N or Z=16, for Z or N<11. More data, particularly spectroscopic measurements would provide further information. Single particle energies for Z=16 isotopes as function of the neutron number N are given. (G.P.) 9 refs.; 6 figs

  9. Multicentre study on capsular closure versus non-capsular closure during hip arthroscopy in Danish patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippmann, Christian; Kraemer, Otto; Lund, Bent

    2018-01-01

    in patients without additional risk factors for instability such as hypermobility or dysplasia of the hip. We hypothesised that capsular closure will lead to a superior outcome in hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) compared with non-capsular closure. METHODS AND ANALYSIS...... years and FAIS according to the Warwick agreement. Exclusion criteria are: previous hip surgery in either hip, previous conditions of Legg-Calvé-Perthes or slipped capital femoral epiphysis, malignant disease, recent hip or pelvic fractures, arthritis, Ehlers-Danlos or Marfan disease, recent (within 6...

  10. Patient Satisfaction After Femoral Arterial Access Site Closure Using the ExoSeal® Vascular Closure Device Compared to Manual Compression: A Prospective Intra-individual Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieper, Claus Christian; Thomas, Daniel; Nadal, Jennifer; Willinek, Winfried A.; Schild, Hans Heinz; Meyer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo intra-individually compare discomfort levels and patient satisfaction after arterial access closure using the ExoSeal ® vascular closure device (VCD) and manual compression (MC) in a prospective study design.MethodsPatients undergoing two planned interventions from 07/2013 to 09/2014 could participate in the study. Access closure was performed with an ExoSeal ® -VCD in one and MC in the other intervention. Patients were clinically and sonographically examined and were given questionnaires 1 day after intervention [groin- and back-pain during bedrest (100-point visual analog scale; 0: no pain); comfortability of bedrest (10-point Likert scale, 1: comfortable), satisfaction with closure (10-point Likert scale, 1: very satisfied)]. Results were analyzed in a cross-over design.Results48 patients (29 male, median age 62.5 (32–88) years) were included. An ExoSeal ® -VCD was used first in 25 cases. As four of these subsequently refused MC as second intervention, data from 44 patients could be analyzed. All closures were technically successful (successful device deployment) without major complications. Groin- and back-pain after VCD-use/MC was 0 (0–15) vs. 10 (0–80) and 0 (0–75) vs. 25 (0–90), respectively (p < 0.0001). Bedrest after VCD-use was more comfortable than after MC [1 (range 1–7) vs. 6 (2–10); p < 0.0001]. Satisfaction with the closure procedure and with the intervention in general was higher after VCD-use compared to MC [1 (1–3) vs. 5 (2–10) and 1 (1–2) vs. 2 (1–4), respectively; p < 0.0001].ConclusionIntra-individual comparison showed pain levels and discomfort to be significantly lower after ExoSeal ® use compared to MC. VCD closure was associated with higher satisfaction both with the closure itself and with the intervention in general

  11. Guinea pig ductus arteriosus. II - Irreversible closure after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, F. S.; Cooke, P. H.

    1972-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying irreversibility of ductal closure after birth, studies were undertaken to determine the exact time course for the onset of irreversible closure of the guinea pig ductus arteriosus. Parallel studies of the reactivity of ductal smooth muscle to oxygen and studies of the postpartum cellular changes within the vessel were also carried out.

  12. Rating the Effectiveness of Fishery Closures With Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Boat Detection Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Elvidge

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fishery closures are widely used to promote the sustainability of fish stocks. Fishery agencies typically have very little data relevant to planning closure enforcement actions and evaluating the effectiveness of closures, due in part to the vast expanse and remote nature of many closures. In some cases the effectiveness of closures can be evaluated using data from GPS based beacons, such as Automatic Identification System (AIS or Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS installed on fishing boats. In fisheries where few boats are equipped with AIS or VMS, the rating of closures relies on other data sources capable of detecting or inferring fishing activity. One such source comes from low light imaging data collected by the NASA/NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS, which can detect fishing boats using lights to attract catch. This is a widely used practice in Asia and several other regions. NOAA has developed an automatic system for reporting the locations of VIIRS boat detections with a nominal 4 h temporal latency. VIIRS boat detection alerts are running for more than 900 fishery closures in the Philippines, with email and SMS transmission modes. These alerts are being actively used in the Philippines to plan enforcement actions and there is a growing list of apprehensions that occurred based on tip-offs from VIIRS. The VIIRS boat detection archive extends back to April 2012. A VIIRS closure index (VCI has been developed to rate the effectiveness of closures on monthly increments in terms of a percentage. The VCI analysis was performed on three types of closures: an ad hoc fishery closure associated with a toxic industrial discharge, a seasonal fishery closure and a permanent closure in restricted coastal waters. The VCI results indicate that it is possible to rank the effectiveness of different closure, year-to-year differences in compliance levels, and to identify closure encroachments which may warrant additional enforcement effort.

  13. A special pair of phytohormones controls excitability, slow closure, and external stomach formation in the Venus flytrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante-Pérez, María; Krol, Elzbieta; Stange, Annette; Geiger, Dietmar; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Hause, Bettina; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2011-09-13

    Venus flytrap's leaves can catch an insect in a fraction of a second. Since the time of Charles Darwin, scientists have struggled to understand the sensory biology and biomechanics of this plant, Dionaea muscipula. Here we show that insect-capture of Dionaea traps is modulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonates. Water-stressed Dionaea, as well as those exposed to the drought-stress hormone ABA, are less sensitive to mechanical stimulation. In contrast, application of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), a precursor of the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA), the methyl ester of JA (Me-JA), and coronatine (COR), the molecular mimic of the isoleucine conjugate of JA (JA-Ile), triggers secretion of digestive enzymes without any preceding mechanical stimulus. Such secretion is accompanied by slow trap closure. Under physiological conditions, insect-capture is associated with Ca(2+) signaling and a rise in OPDA, Apparently, jasmonates bypass hapto-electric processes associated with trap closure. However, ABA does not affect OPDA-dependent gland activity. Therefore, signals for trap movement and secretion seem to involve separate pathways. Jasmonates are systemically active because application to a single trap induces secretion and slow closure not only in the given trap but also in all others. Furthermore, formerly touch-insensitive trap sectors are converted into mechanosensitive ones. These findings demonstrate that prey-catching Dionaea combines plant-specific signaling pathways, involving OPDA and ABA with a rapidly acting trigger, which uses ion channels, action potentials, and Ca(2+) signals.

  14. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-07

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Limited utility of preoperative studies in preparation for colostomy closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, R M; Heniford, T; Allen, J W; Tuckson, W B; Galandiuk, S

    1999-04-01

    Numerous diagnostic and therapeutic practices are used in an attempt to reduce the morbidity of colostomy closures. Our principal aim was to evaluate the role of preoperative studies, specifically barium enemas and endoscopic examinations, performed before colostomy closures. Additionally, we wished to identify other practices involved in the perioperative management of patients undergoing colostomy closure that influenced morbidity. The records of 100 consecutive patients who underwent elective colostomy closure at University of Louisville Hospital between January 1989 and July 1995 were reviewed. Wound infection was the most common complication (12%). Various bowel preparations were equivalent in efficacy and did not influence the complication rate. Intermittent wound irrigation with antibiotics for 3 days postoperatively, via subcutaneous drains, was associated with a low incidence of incision infection. Preoperative barium enema or sigmoidoscopy were often performed but rarely useful. Performing these examinations merely increased hospital cost without a corresponding decline in morbidity.

  16. Procedures adopted by orthodontists for space closure and anchorage control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, André da Costa; Gandini Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga; dos Santos-Pinto, Ary; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Rodrigues, Willian Caetano

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the procedures adopted by Brazilian orthodontists in the following situations: extraction space closure, anchorage control in case of necessary anchorage for group A and frequency of skeletal anchorage use, especially in the upper jaw. A questionnaire was sent to the e-mail address of all dentists registered in the Brazilian Federal Council of Dentistry. The results showed that most Brazilian orthodontists usually perform extraction space closure by means of sliding mechanics. The use of palatal bar, inclusion of second molars in the archwire and space closure performed in two phases are the most used techniques for anchorage control in the upper jaw. The skeletal anchorage is referenced by 36.5% of specialists as a routine practice for the upper arch anchorage. There is a wide variety of procedures adopted by Brazilian orthodontists for orthodontic space closure and anchorage control.

  17. Eigenspace perturbations for structural uncertainty estimation of turbulence closure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofre, Lluis; Mishra, Aashwin; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    With the present state of computational resources, a purely numerical resolution of turbulent flows encountered in engineering applications is not viable. Consequently, investigations into turbulence rely on various degrees of modeling. Archetypal amongst these variable resolution approaches would be RANS models in two-equation closures, and subgrid-scale models in LES. However, owing to the simplifications introduced during model formulation, the fidelity of all such models is limited, and therefore the explicit quantification of the predictive uncertainty is essential. In such scenario, the ideal uncertainty estimation procedure must be agnostic to modeling resolution, methodology, and the nature or level of the model filter. The procedure should be able to give reliable prediction intervals for different Quantities of Interest, over varied flows and flow conditions, and at diametric levels of modeling resolution. In this talk, we present and substantiate the Eigenspace perturbation framework as an uncertainty estimation paradigm that meets these criteria. Commencing from a broad overview, we outline the details of this framework at different modeling resolution. Thence, using benchmark flows, along with engineering problems, the efficacy of this procedure is established. This research was partially supported by NNSA under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) II, and by DARPA under the Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems (EQUiPS) project (technical monitor: Dr Fariba Fahroo).

  18. 76 FR 69246 - Application for New Awards; High School Equivalency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ..., engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. The fourth priority is an invitational priority for applications... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Application for New Awards; High School Equivalency Program AGENCY: Office... High School Equivalency Program (HEP) Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY...

  19. Amnioserosa cell constriction but not epidermal actin cable tension autonomously drives dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Frei, Erich; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Affolter, Markus; Brunner, Damian

    2016-11-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires coordination of multiple force-producing components. During dorsal closure in fly embryogenesis, an epidermis opening closes. A tensioned epidermal actin/MyosinII cable, which surrounds the opening, produces a force that is thought to combine with another MyosinII force mediating apical constriction of the amnioserosa cells that fill the opening. A model proposing that each force could autonomously drive dorsal closure was recently challenged by a model in which the two forces combine in a ratchet mechanism. Acute force elimination via selective MyosinII depletion in one or the other tissue shows that the amnioserosa tissue autonomously drives dorsal closure while the actin/MyosinII cable cannot. These findings exclude both previous models, although a contribution of the ratchet mechanism at dorsal closure onset remains likely. This shifts the current view of dorsal closure being a combinatorial force-component system to a single tissue-driven closure event.

  20. Wound infection following stoma takedown: primary skin closure versus subcuticular purse-string suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Thao T; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Abraham, Anasooya; Madoff, Robert D; Rothenberger, David A

    2010-12-01

    Stoma closure has been associated with a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI) and the ideal stoma-site skin closure technique is still debated. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of SSI following primary skin closure (PC) versus a skin-approximating, subcuticular purse-string closure (APS). All consecutive patients undergoing stoma closure between 2002 and 2007 by two surgeons at a single tertiary-care institution were retrospectively assessed. Patients who had a new stoma created at the same site or those without wound closure were excluded. The end point was SSI, determined according to current CDC guidelines, at the stoma closure site and/or the midline laparotomy incision. There were 61 patients in the PC group (surgeon A: 58 of 61) and 17 in the APS group (surgeon B: 16 of 17). The two groups were similar in baseline and intraoperative characteristics, except that patients in the PC group were more often diagnosed with benign disease (p = 0.0156) and more often had a stapled anastomosis (p = 0.002). The overall SSI rate was 14 of 78 (18%). All SSIs occurred in the PC group (14 of 61 vs. 0 of 17, p = 0.03). Our study suggests that a skin-approximating closure with a subcuticular purse-string of the stoma site leads to less SSI than a primary closure. Randomized studies are needed to confirm our findings and assess additional end points such as healing time, cost, and patient satisfaction.

  1. Cost comparison of transcatheter and operative closures of ostium secundum atrial septal defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Byrne, Michael L.; Gillespie, Matthew J.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Dori, Yoav; Rome, Jonathan J.; Glatz, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes for transcatheter and operative closures of atrial septal defects (ASDs) are similar. Economic cost for each method has not been well described. Methods A single-center retrospective cohort study of children and adults cost of operative and transcatheter closures of ASD. A propensity score weight-adjusted multivariate regression model was used in an intention-to-treat analysis. Costs for reintervention and crossover admissions were included in primary analysis. Results A total of 244 subjects were included in the study (64% transcatheter and 36% operative), of which 2% (n = 5) were ≥18 years. Crossover rate from transcatheter to operative group was 3%. Risk of reintervention (P = .66) and 30-day mortality (P = .37) were not significantly different. In a multivariate model, adjusted cost of operative closure was 2012 US $60,992 versus 2012 US $55,841 for transcatheter closure (P cost favoring transcatheter closure were length of stay, medications, and follow-up radiologic and laboratory testing, overcoming higher costs of procedure and echocardiography. Professional costs did not differ. The rate of 30-day readmission was greater in the operative cohort, further increasing the cost advantage of transcatheter closure. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that costs of follow-up visits influenced relative cost but that device closure remained favorable over a broad range of crossover and reintervention rates. Conclusion For single secundum ASD, cost comparison analysis favors transcatheter closure over the short term. The cost of follow-up regimens influences the cost advantage of transcatheter closure. PMID:25965721

  2. The safety and efficacy of the Angio-Seal closure device in diagnostic and interventional neuroangiography setting: a single-center experience with 1,443 closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Akgoz, Ayca; Koc, Osman; Peynircioglu, Bora; Cil, Barbaros; Cekirge, Saruhan; Saatci, Isil [Hacettepe University Hospitals, Radiology Department, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-09-15

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Angio-Seal closure device used to close arterial puncture sites in patients who had undergone diagnostic cerebral angiography and neurointerventional procedures. A total of 1,443 Angio-Seal devices were placed in 1,099 patients in the Interventional Neuroradiology Unit between May 2005 and August 2006. Of these, 670 were interventional and 745 were diagnostic cerebral angiographic procedures. In 28 patients bilateral puncture of the femoral arteries was performed for endovascular treatment. In 167 patients 286 repeat diagnostic procedures were performed and 30 interventional procedures were followed by re-closure with an Angio-Seal device at the time of repeat puncture. The procedural success rate for antegrade closures was 99.7% for all procedures. The device failed in 5 of 745 diagnostic procedures (0.7%). Major complication occurred in one patient only (0.13%) in the diagnostic group. No minor complications were observed in this group. In the interventional group, the major complication rate was 1.4% (10 of 698 closures) and the minor complication rate was 2.4% (17 of 698 closures). However, in the subgroup of patients with cerebral aneurysms who received heparin in combination with antiplatelet agents after the procedure, the major complication rate was 5.3%, but in the carotid/vertebral stenting group it was 0.8%. Our experience in a relatively large series of patients shows that the use of the Angio-Seal STS vascular closure device is safe and effective in patients undergoing cerebral diagnostic angiography and neurointerventional procedures with an acceptable rate of complications, although the complication rate was higher in the group of patients who received heparin and/or antiplatelet medication. (orig.)

  3. 2101-M pond closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment

  4. 27 CFR 27.61 - Containers of distilled spirits to bear closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... BEER General Requirements Closures for Containers of Distilled Spirits § 27.61 Containers of distilled spirits to bear closures. No person shall transport, buy, possess, or sell, or transfer any imported...

  5. Ecologic assessment of closure options for Savannah River Plant waste sites: Task 38, AX-681812

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ecologic assessment of closure options is one of several analyses being documented in the EIDs (along with analysis of relative potential health risks, accident risks, and costs). This information will serve as a basis for choosing the best option for closing a particular waste facility. This report presents the methodology adopted for SRP waste site ecological assessment, and the results of its application. The results of the ecologic assessment indicated that no impacts are expected for any of the closure options at eleven sites. Significant ecologic impacts are possible at the eight waste sites or groups of waste sites including the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds, Old TNX Seepage Basin, CMP Pits, F-Area Seepage Basins, H-Area Seepage Basins, SRL Seepage Basins, R-Reactor Seepage Basins, and L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin. 104 refs., 22 figs., 241 tabs

  6. Cranial Suture Closure in Domestic Dog Breeds and Its Relationships to Skull Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Madeleine; Haussman, Sinah

    2016-04-01

    Bulldog-type brachycephalic domestic dog breeds are characterized by a relatively short and broad skull with a dorsally rotated rostrum (airorhynchy). Not much is known about the association between a bulldog-type skull conformation and peculiar patterns of suture and synchondrosis closure in domestic dogs. In this study, we aim to explore breed-specific patterns of cranial suture and synchondrosis closure in relation to the prebasial angle (proxy for airorhynchy and thus bulldog-type skull conformation) in domestic dogs. For this purpose, we coded closure of 18 sutures and synchondroses in 26 wolves, that is, the wild ancestor of all domestic dogs, and 134 domestic dogs comprising 11 breeds. Comparisons of the relative amount of closing and closed sutures and synchondroses (closure scores) in adult individuals showed that bulldog-type breeds have significantly higher closure scores than non-bulldog-type breeds and that domestic dogs have significantly higher closure scores than the wolf. We further found that the prebasial angle is significantly positively correlated with the amount of closure of the basispheno-presphenoid synchondrosis and sutures of the nose (premaxillo-nasal and maxillo-nasal) and the palate (premaxillo-maxillary and interpalatine). Our results show that there is a correlation between patterns of suture and synchondrosis closure and skull shape in domestic dogs, although the causal relationships remain elusive. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The timing of ostomy closure in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Marie-Chantal; Sloots, Cornelius E J; Hop, Wim C J; Tibboel, Dick; Wijnen, Rene M H

    2012-07-01

    The optimal timing of ostomy closure is a matter of debate. We performed a systematic review of outcomes of early ostomy closure (EC, within 8 weeks) and late ostomy closure (LC, after 8 weeks) in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. PubMed, EMbase, Web-of-Science, and Cinahl were searched for studies that detailed time to ostomy closure, and time to full enteral nutrition (FEN) or complications after ostomy closure. Patients with Hirschsprung's disease or anorectal malformations were excluded. Analysis was performed using SPSS 17 and RevMan 5. Of 778 retrieved articles, 5 met the inclusion criteria. The median score for study quality was 9 [range 8-14 on a scale of 0 to 32 points (Downs and Black, J Epidemiol Community Health 52:377-384, 1998)]. One study described mean time to FEN: 19.1 days after EC (n = 13) versus 7.2 days after LC (n = 24; P = 0.027). Four studies reported complication rates after ostomy closure, complications occurred in 27% of the EC group versus 23% of the LC group. The combined odds ratio (LC vs. EC) was 1.1 [95% CI 0.5, 2.5]. Evidence that supports early or late closure is scarce and the published articles are of poor quality. There is no significant difference between EC versus LC in the complication rate. This systematic review supports neither early nor late ostomy closure.

  8. Infiltration experiment for closure cap evaluation at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddy, N.S.; Cook, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This document discusses several large waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site which are being closed. These facilities include two seepage basins and the low-level waste disposal facility. The key element of the closures is the construction of a cap system to limit the infiltration of water which might reach the disposed waste. Cap designs have been modeled using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code. This code was developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers for the Environmental Protection Agency to model the effects of various cap and liner designs on the water balance at landfills. A field experiment has been set up which will allow the results of the HELP Code to be verified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by measuring the actual water balance created by closure cap configurations which will be used in waste site closures at SRS. Two of the caps will be similar to those used for the planned closure activities. Each one has a specific closure arrangement. Once operational, the experiment will be evaluated for a five-year period

  9. Assessment of MSIV full closure for Santa Maria de Garona Nuclear Power Plant using TRAC-BF1 (G1J1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    This document presents a spurious Main Steam Isolation Value (MSIV) closure analysis for Santa Maria de Garorta Nuclear Power Plan describing the problems found when comparing calculated and real data. The plant is a General Electric Boiling Water Reactor 3, containment type Mark 1. It is operated by NUCLENOR, S.A. and was connected to the grid in 1971. The analysis has been performed by the Apphed Physics Department from the University of Cantabria and the Analysis and Operation Section from NUCLENOR, S.A. as a part of an agreement for developing an engineering simulator of operational transients and accidents for Santa Maria de Gamma Power Plant. The analysis was performed using the frozen version of TRAC-BFI (GlJl) code and is the second of two NUCLENOR contributions to the International Code Applications and Assessment Program (ICAP). The code was run in a Cyber 932 with operating system NOS/VE, property of NUCLENOR, S.A.. A programming effort was carried out in order to provide suitable graphics from the output file

  10. Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas; Aly, Alaa; Kozak, Matthew; Mehta, Sunil; Connelly, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federal requirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA is being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residual wastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the

  11. Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Kemp, Christopher J.

    2013-11-11

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federal requirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA is being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residual wastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the

  12. Beginning Swift programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Wei-Meng

    2014-01-01

    Enter the Swift future of iOS and OS X programming Beginning Swift Programming is your ideal starting point for creating Mac, iPhone, and iPad apps using Apple's new Swift programming language. Written by an experienced Apple developer and trainer, this comprehensive guide explains everything you need to know to jumpstart the creation of your app idea. Coverage includes data types, strings and characters, operators and functions, arrays and dictionaries, control flow, and looping, with expert guidance on classes, objects, class inheritance, closures, protocols, and generics. This succinct - ye

  13. Cracked Vases and Untidy Seams: Narrative Structure and Closure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The TRC reveals a tension between a desire to open up the story of the past and to “close the chapter on our past”. I explore this tension by considering both the TRC's relation to closure and those of selected fictional narratives that explicitly respond to the TRC. I argue that the tidy closure of reconciliation both excludes the ...

  14. Self-testing security sensor for monitoring closure of vault doors and the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawthorne, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    A self-testing device is provided for a monitoring system for monitoring whether a closure member such as a door or window is closed. The monitoring system includes a switch unit mounted on the frame of the closure member being monitored and including magnetically biased switches connected in one or more electrical monitoring circuits, and a door magnet unit mounted on the closure member being monitored. The door magnet includes one or more permanent magnets that produce a magnetic field which, when the closure member is closed, cause said switches to assume a first state. When the closure member is opened, the switches switch to a second, alarm state. The self-testing device is electrically controllable from a remote location and produces a canceling or diverting magnetic field which simulates the effect of movement of the closure member from the closed position thereof without any actual movement of the member. 5 figs

  15. Closure for casks containing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.V.B.; Mallory, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an improved closure for covering and sealing an opening in a single cask for containing radioactive material, wherein the opening is characterized by a ledge. It comprises: an inner lid receivable within the opening and having a gasket means that is seatable over the ledge; an outer lid which is likewise receivable into the opening and securable therearound when the outer lid is rotated relative to the opening. The inner lid remaining stationary relative to the cask opening when the outer lid is rotated and having no torque applied thereto by the outer lid when the outer lid is rotated, and bolt means threadedly mounted through the outer lid for applying a compressive force between the inner and outer lids after the outer lid has been secured to the opening in order to depress the gasket means of the inner lid into sealing engagement with the ledge while avoiding the application of torsion between the gasket means and the ledge

  16. Credibilistic programming an introduction to models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    It provides fuzzy programming approach to solve real-life decision problems in fuzzy environment. Within the framework of credibility theory, it provides a self-contained, comprehensive and up-to-date presentation of fuzzy programming models, algorithms and applications in portfolio analysis.

  17. Bayesian inference reveals positive but subtle effects of experimental fishery closures on marine predator demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Barbara J.; Barham, Peter J.; Campbell, Kate J.; Crawford, Robert J. M.; Grigg, Jennifer; Horswill, Cat; Morris, Taryn L.; Pichegru, Lorien; Steinfurth, Antje; Weller, Florian; Winker, Henning

    2018-01-01

    Global forage-fish landings are increasing, with potentially grave consequences for marine ecosystems. Predators of forage fish may be influenced by this harvest, but the nature of these effects is contentious. Experimental fishery manipulations offer the best solution to quantify population-level impacts, but are rare. We used Bayesian inference to examine changes in chick survival, body condition and population growth rate of endangered African penguins Spheniscus demersus in response to 8 years of alternating time–area closures around two pairs of colonies. Our results demonstrate that fishing closures improved chick survival and condition, after controlling for changing prey availability. However, this effect was inconsistent across sites and years, highlighting the difficultly of assessing management interventions in marine ecosystems. Nevertheless, modelled increases in population growth rates exceeded 1% at one colony; i.e. the threshold considered biologically meaningful by fisheries management in South Africa. Fishing closures evidently can improve the population trend of a forage-fish-dependent predator—we therefore recommend they continue in South Africa and support their application elsewhere. However, detecting demographic gains for mobile marine predators from small no-take zones requires experimental time frames and scales that will often exceed those desired by decision makers. PMID:29343602

  18. Procedures adopted by orthodontists for space closure and anchorage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André da Costa Monini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the procedures adopted by Brazilian orthodontists in the following situations: extraction space closure, anchorage control in case of necessary anchorage for group A and frequency of skeletal anchorage use, especially in the upper jaw. METHOD: A questionnaire was sent to the e-mail address of all dentists registered in the Brazilian Federal Council of Dentistry. RESULTS: The results showed that most Brazilian orthodontists usually perform extraction space closure by means of sliding mechanics. The use of palatal bar, inclusion of second molars in the archwire and space closure performed in two phases are the most used techniques for anchorage control in the upper jaw. The skeletal anchorage is referenced by 36.5% of specialists as a routine practice for the upper jaw anchorage. CONCLUSIONS: There is a wide variety of procedures adopted by Brazilian orthodontists for orthodontic space closure and anchorage control.

  19. Closure and ratio correlation analysis of lunar chemical and grain size data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Major element and major element plus trace element analyses were selected from the lunar data base for Apollo 11, 12 and 15 basalt and regolith samples. Summary statistics for each of the six data sets were compiled, and the effects of closure on the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient were investigated using the Chayes and Kruskal approximation procedure. In general, there are two types of closure effects evident in these data sets: negative correlations of intermediate size which are solely the result of closure, and correlations of small absolute value which depart significantly from their expected closure correlations which are of intermediate size. It is shown that a positive closure correlation will arise only when the product of the coefficients of variation is very small (less than 0.01 for most data sets) and, in general, trace elements in the lunar data sets exhibit relatively large coefficients of variation.

  20. RCRA closures at Rocky Flats Plant: A programmatic perspective and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogg, Randy T.; Peterman, Bruce D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interagency Agreement (IAG) integrates a unique mechanism for remediating hazardous waste sites at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), which include utilizing RCRA and CERCLA technical/regulatory processes. Pursuant to the IAG signed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991, sixteen operable units (OUs) were defined for characterization and remediation at RFP. Of the sixteen OUs, six are classified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure units. The six RCRA interim status closure units are: Solar Evaporation Ponds-OU 4, Present LandfUl-OU 7, Original Process Waste Lines-OU 9, Other Outside Closures-OU 10, West Spray Field-OU II, and Inside Building Closures-OU 15. The IAG will function as a technical/regulatory mechanism for managing/complying with all aspects of the RCRA interim status closure units at RFP. (author)

  1. Revisiting the Landau fluid closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2017-12-01

    Advanced fluid models that are much closer to the full kinetic description than the usual magnetohydrodynamic description are a very useful tool for studying astrophysical plasmas and for interpreting solar wind observational data. The development of advanced fluid models that contain certain kinetic effects is complicated and has attracted much attention over the past years. Here we focus on fluid models that incorporate the simplest possible forms of Landau damping, derived from linear kinetic theory expanded about a leading-order (gyrotropic) bi-Maxwellian distribution function f_0, under the approximation that the perturbed distribution function f_1 is gyrotropic as well. Specifically, we focus on various Pade approximants to the usual plasma response function (and to the plasma dispersion function) and examine possibilities that lead to a closure of the linear kinetic hierarchy of fluid moments. We present re-examination of the simplest Landau fluid closures.

  2. Market-oriented programming and its application to power load management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ygge, F

    1998-04-01

    Market-oriented programming is a new approach to design and implementation of resource allocation mechanisms in computer systems. It has its roots in different disciplines, such as economics and computer science (in particular the area of multi-agent systems). This is divided into two different parts, focusing on: (1) central foundations and mechanisms of market-oriented programming, and (2) the use of market-oriented programming in practical applications. Market-oriented programming is seen as a programming paradigm based on abstractions such as prices and demands. Concepts, terminology and theory from micro-economics form the foundations of the paradigm. Central aspects of these foundations are investigated and some new insights are presented. Furthermore, some relations between standard optimization/resource allocation approaches and markets are described, and novel theorems are introduced. A published, and generally recognized, market oriented approach to the application building climate control is analyzed in detail. A new approach to this application, based on market-oriented programming, is introduced and shown to be superior to the analyzed approach in many ways. The case study pinpoints a number of potential pitfalls as well as advantages of market-oriented approaches to this and other applications. A second investigated application is power load management, i.e. the management of loads at the customer`s side for obtaining more efficient energy systems management. The basis of the application is described and a new market oriented approach is introduced and analyzed. The approach is shown to have a number of advantages compared to existing approaches to this problem. The main conclusion of the thesis is that there are some potential pitfalls of market-oriented programming, but when used with care it provides a highly natural and efficient means for resource allocation in computer systems

  3. The timing of ostomy closure in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.C.J.M. Struijs (Marie-Chantal); C.E.J. Sloots (Pim); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); D. Tibboel (Dick); R.M.H. Wijnen (René)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose The optimal timing of ostomy closure is a matter of debate. We performed a systematic review of outcomes of early ostomy closure (EC, within 8 weeks) and late ostomy closure (LC, after 8 weeks) in infants with necro-tizing enterocolitis. Methods PubMed, EMbase, Web-of-Science,

  4. The timing of ostomy closure in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, M.C.; Sloots, C.E.J.; Hop, W.C.J.; Tibboel, D.; Wijnen, R.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The optimal timing of ostomy closure is a matter of debate. We performed a systematic review of outcomes of early ostomy closure (EC, within 8 weeks) and late ostomy closure (LC, after 8 weeks) in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. METHODS: PubMed, EMbase, Web-of-Science, and Cinahl

  5. Environmental Assessment for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F- & H-Areas at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1996-07-31

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the closure of 51 high-level radioactive waste tanks and tank farm ancillary equipment (including transfer lines, evaporators, filters, pumps, etc) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The waste tanks are located in the F- and H-Areas of SRS and vary in capacity from 2,839,059 liters (750,000 gallons) to 4,921,035 liters (1,300,000 gallons). These in-ground tanks are surrounded by soil to provide shielding. The F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tanks are operated under the authority of Industrial Wastewater Permits No.17,424-IW; No.14520, and No.14338 issued by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with the Permit requirements, DOE has prepared a Closure Plan (DOE, 1996) and submitted it to SCDHEC for approval. The Closure Plan identifies all applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations, statutes, and DOE Orders for closing systems operated under the Industrial Wastewater Permits. When approved by SCDHEC, the Closure Plan will present the regulatory process for closing all of the F- and H-Area High Level Waste Tanks. The Closure Plan establishes performance objectives or criteria to be met prior to closing any tank, group of tanks, or ancillary tank farm equipment. The proposed action is to remove the residual wastes from the tanks and to fill the tanks with a material to prevent future collapse and bind up residual waste, to lower human health risks, and to increase safety in and around the tanks. If required, an engineered cap consisting of clay, backfill (soil), and vegetation as the final layer to prevent erosion would be applied over the tanks. The selection of tank system closure method will be evaluated against the following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) criteria described in 40

  6. Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure

  7. Multidisciplinary Assessment in Optimising Results of Percutaneous Patent Foramen Ovale Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Allan; Ekmejian, Avedis; Collins, Nicholas; Bhagwandeen, Rohan

    2017-03-01

    Percutaneous patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure is a therapeutic option to prevent recurrent cerebral ischaemia in patients with cryptogenic stroke and transient cerebral ischaemia (TIA). The apparent lack of benefit seen in previous randomised trials has, in part, reflected inclusion of patients with alternate mechanisms of stroke. The role of formal neurology involvement in accurately delineating the likely aetiology of stroke or TIA is crucial in appropriate identification of patients for device closure. Furthermore, as the benefits of device closure may accrue over time, long-term follow-up is essential to define the role of device closure in management of presumed cryptogenic stroke. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with percutaneous PFO device closure since 2005. All subjects who underwent PFO closure at John Hunter and Lake Macquarie Private Hospitals were included in the study. All patients referred for device closure following cryptogenic stroke or TIA had first undergone formal neurology review with appropriate imaging and exclusion of paroxysmal atrial arrhythmia. Patients with a history of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are frequently referred to a specialised clinic, aimed to identify patients with conditions not referable to cerebral ischaemia, with investigations initiated by the specialist clinic to elucidate an underlying aetiology. Outcome data was derived from the Hunter New England Area Local Health District Cardiac and Stroke Outcomes Unit, in addition to review of the medical record. The Cardiac and Stroke Outcomes Unit prospectively identified all patients presenting with stroke, TIA and atrial fibrillation. One hundred and twelve consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous patent foramen ovale closure between 2005 and 2015 were identified. The average age was 42.7 years and 57 (50.9%) patients were male. Cryptogenic stroke (68.8%) and transient cerebral ischaemia (23.2%) were the most common indications for PFO closure, with the

  8. Double-lock technique: a simple method to secure abdominal wall closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jategaonkar, P.A.; Yadav, S.P.

    2013-01-01

    Secure closure of a laparotomy incision remains an important aspect of any abdominal operation with the aim to avoid the postoperative morbidity and hasten the patient's recovery. Depending on the operator's preference and experience, it may be done by the continuous or the interrupted methods either using a non-absorbable or delayed-absorbable suture. We describe a simple, secure and quick technique of abdominal wall closure which involves continuous suture inter-locked doubly after every third bite. This simple and easy to use mass closure technique can be easily mastered by any member of the surgical team and does not need any assistant. It amalgamates the advantages of both, the continuous and the interrupted methods of closures. To our knowledge, such a technique has not been reported in the literature. (author)

  9. Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus using the angled duct occluder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongwen, Qin; Xianxian, Zhao; Hong, Wu; Xing, Zheng; Jijun, Ding; Jianqiang, Hu [Second Military Medical Univ., Shanghai (China). Changhai Hospital, Dept. of Cardiology

    2004-04-01

    Objective: To assess the immediate efficacy of transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus(PDA) using the angled duct occluder (ADO). Methods: 9 patients (1 male, 8 female) underwent transcatheter closure of PDA using the ADO. The mean PDA diameter at its narrowest segment was (5.8 {+-} 1.9) mm, ranging 3 to 10 mm. A 6 - 9F long sheath was used for the delivery of ADO. Results: The devices were deployed successfully in all patients. Angiographies showed no shunt across the device 15 min after the implantation of ADO. Within 1 week, echocardiography revealed complete closure in all patients. There were no complications. Conclusions: The transcatheter closure of PDA using ADO is an effective and safe procedure. The device matches with the shape of aortic cavity much more precisely than Amplatzer duct occluder. (authors)

  10. A linear programming approach for placement of applicants to academic programs

    OpenAIRE

    Kassa, Biniyam Asmare

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a linear programming approach for placement of applicants to study programs developed and implemented at the college of Business & Economics, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. The approach is estimated to significantly streamline the placement decision process at the college by reducing required man hour as well as the time it takes to announce placement decisions. Compared to the previous manual system where only one or two placement criteria were considered, the ...

  11. 29 CFR 2701.2 - Open meetings policy; closure of meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open meetings policy; closure of meetings. 2701.2 Section... GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT REGULATIONS § 2701.2 Open meetings policy; closure of meetings. (a) Policy. Commission meetings will generally be open to public observation, including meetings concerning the...

  12. Radiographic study of distal radial physeal closure in thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulcano, L.C.; Mamprim, M.J.; Muniz, L.M.R.; Moreira, A.F.; Luna, S.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    Monthly radiography was performed to study distal radial physeal closure in ten male and ten female Throughbred horses. The height, thoracic circumference and metacarpus circumference were also measured, Distal radial physeal closure time was sooner in females than males, and took 701 +/- 37 and 748 +/- 55 days respectively

  13. Transcatheter coil occluder for closure of ventricular septal defect (a report of 4 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Wei; Zhou Aiqing; Yu Zhiqing; Li Fen; Zhong Yumin; Zhang Yuqi; Huang Meirong; Sun Kun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the indication, methodology and complication of transcatheter coil closure of ventricular septal defect (VSD) in children. Methods: Transcatheter closure of perimembranous VSD with coils was performed in 4 cases from 2003 to 2005. The Duct-Occlude (pfm) and detachable coil (Cook) were chosen for embolization depending on the results of the left ventricular angiogram. The coil size was generally about 1-4 mm larger than the diameter of VSD. Follow up was carried out with echocardiography, ultrasound and clinical examination. Results: The defect diameters of the four cases were 2.0 mm, 2.7 mm, 2.5 mm and 1.5 mm respectively. The Duct-Occlude were successfully implanted in 3 cases of perimembranous VSD with the same type coil (OD[mm]7-3-6, windings 5-3-4) for each. One detachable coil (Cook) (5 x 5) was implanted in the remaining case. All cases had trivial residual shunt immediately after implantation which disappeared 24 hours later. Follow-up for 2 months to one year showed no coil displacement and secondary bacterial arteritis. No tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, no emboli, no endocarditis, and no arrhythmia were found. Conclusions: Coil closure of some small VSD with membranate part pseudo-ventricular aneurysm has good efficacy with the advantages of simple operation, less metal content and mini-invasion also applicable for infants. (authors)

  14. Nonlinear closure relations theory for transport processes in nonequilibrium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A decade ago, a macroscopic theory for closure relations has been proposed for systems out of Onsager's region. This theory is referred to as the thermodynamic field theory (TFT). The aim of this work was to determine the nonlinear flux-force relations that respect the thermodynamic theorems for systems far from equilibrium. We propose a formulation of the TFT where one of the basic restrictions, namely, the closed-form solution for the skew-symmetric piece of the transport coefficients, has been removed. In addition, the general covariance principle is replaced by the De Donder-Prigogine thermodynamic covariance principle (TCP). The introduction of TCP requires the application of an appropriate mathematical formalism, which is referred to as the entropy-covariant formalism. By geometrical arguments, we prove the validity of the Glansdorff-Prigogine universal criterion of evolution. A new set of closure equations determining the nonlinear corrections to the linear ('Onsager') transport coefficients is also derived. The geometry of the thermodynamic space is non-Riemannian. However, it tends to be Riemannian for high values of the entropy production. In this limit, we recover the transport equations found by the old theory. Applications of our approach to transport in magnetically confined plasmas, materials submitted to temperature, and electric potential gradients or to unimolecular triangular chemical reactions can be found at references cited herein. Transport processes in tokamak plasmas are of particular interest. In this case, even in the absence of turbulence, the state of the plasma remains close to (but, it is not in) a state of local equilibrium. This prevents the transport relations from being linear.

  15. Vacuum-assisted closure device for the management of infected postpneumonectomy chest cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perentes, Jean Yannis; Abdelnour-Berchtold, Etienne; Blatter, Jeannine; Lovis, Alban; Ris, Hans-Beat; Krueger, Thorsten; Gonzalez, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Infected postpneumonectomy chest cavities may be related to chronic postpneumonectomy empyema or arise in rare situations of necrotizing pneumonia with complete lung destruction where pneumonectomy and pleural debridement are required. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of an intrathoracic vacuum-assisted closure device (VAC) for the treatment of infected postpneumonectomy chest cavities. A retrospective single institution review of all patients with infected postpneumonectomy chest cavities treated by VAC between 2005 and 2013. Patients underwent surgical debridement of the thoracic cavity, muscle flap closure of the bronchial stump when a fistula was present, and repeated intrathoracic VAC dressings until granulation tissue covered the entire chest cavity. After this, the cavity was obliterated by a Clagett procedure and closed. Twenty-one patients (14 men and 7 women) underwent VAC treatment of their infected postpneumonectomy chest cavity. Twelve patients presented with a chronic postpneumonectomy empyema (10 of them with a bronchopleural fistula) and 9 patients with an empyema occurring in the context of necrotizing pneumonia treated by pneumonectomy. In-hospital mortality was 23%. The median duration of VAC therapy was 23 days (range, 4-61 days) and the median number of VAC changes per patient was 6 (range, 2-14 days). Infection control and successful chest cavity closure was achieved in all surviving patients. One adverse VAC treatment-related event was identified (5%). The intrathoracic VAC application is a safe and efficient treatment of infected postpneumonectomy chest cavities and allows the preservation of chest wall integrity. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient Satisfaction After Femoral Arterial Access Site Closure Using the ExoSeal{sup ®} Vascular Closure Device Compared to Manual Compression: A Prospective Intra-individual Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, Claus Christian, E-mail: claus.christian.pieper@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Thomas, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Nadal, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.nadal@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Institute for Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology (Germany); Willinek, Winfried A., E-mail: w.willinek@bk-trier.de; Schild, Hans Heinz, E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Meyer, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.meyer@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo intra-individually compare discomfort levels and patient satisfaction after arterial access closure using the ExoSeal{sup ®} vascular closure device (VCD) and manual compression (MC) in a prospective study design.MethodsPatients undergoing two planned interventions from 07/2013 to 09/2014 could participate in the study. Access closure was performed with an ExoSeal{sup ®}-VCD in one and MC in the other intervention. Patients were clinically and sonographically examined and were given questionnaires 1 day after intervention [groin- and back-pain during bedrest (100-point visual analog scale; 0: no pain); comfortability of bedrest (10-point Likert scale, 1: comfortable), satisfaction with closure (10-point Likert scale, 1: very satisfied)]. Results were analyzed in a cross-over design.Results48 patients (29 male, median age 62.5 (32–88) years) were included. An ExoSeal{sup ®}-VCD was used first in 25 cases. As four of these subsequently refused MC as second intervention, data from 44 patients could be analyzed. All closures were technically successful (successful device deployment) without major complications. Groin- and back-pain after VCD-use/MC was 0 (0–15) vs. 10 (0–80) and 0 (0–75) vs. 25 (0–90), respectively (p < 0.0001). Bedrest after VCD-use was more comfortable than after MC [1 (range 1–7) vs. 6 (2–10); p < 0.0001]. Satisfaction with the closure procedure and with the intervention in general was higher after VCD-use compared to MC [1 (1–3) vs. 5 (2–10) and 1 (1–2) vs. 2 (1–4), respectively; p < 0.0001].ConclusionIntra-individual comparison showed pain levels and discomfort to be significantly lower after ExoSeal{sup ®} use compared to MC. VCD closure was associated with higher satisfaction both with the closure itself and with the intervention in general.

  17. Positive Catch & Economic Benefits of Periodic Octopus Fishery Closures: Do Effective, Narrowly Targeted Actions 'Catalyze' Broader Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Thomas A; Oleson, Kirsten L L; Ratsimbazafy, Hajanaina; Raberinary, Daniel; Benbow, Sophie; Harris, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    Eight years of octopus fishery records from southwest Madagascar reveal significant positive impacts from 36 periodic closures on: (a) fishery catches and (b) village fishery income, such that (c) economic benefits from increased landings outweigh costs of foregone catch. Closures covered ~20% of a village's fished area and lasted 2-7 months. Octopus landings and catch per unit effort (CPUE) significantly increased in the 30 days following a closure's reopening, relative to the 30 days before a closure (landings: +718%, poctopus fishery income doubled in the 30 days after a closure, relative to 30 days before (+132%, p<0.001, n = 28). Control villages not implementing a closure showed no increase in income after "no ban" closures and modest increases after "ban" closures. Villages did not show a significant decline in income during closure events. Landings in closure sites generated more revenue than simulated landings assuming continued open-access fishing at that site (27/36 show positive net earnings; mean +$305/closure; mean +57.7% monthly). Benefits accrued faster than local fishers' time preferences during 17-27 of the 36 closures. High reported rates of illegal fishing during closures correlated with poor economic performance. We discuss the implications of our findings for broader co-management arrangements, particularly for catalyzing more comprehensive management.

  18. Comparison of two spectral domain optical coherence tomography devices for angle-closure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Desmond T; Narayanaswamy, Arun K; Tun, Tin A; Htoon, Hla M; Baskaran, Mani; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-08-03

    To compare two spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) devices for the identification of angle structures and the presence of angle closure. This was a prospective comparative study. Consecutive patients underwent gonioscopy and anterior segment imaging using two SD-OCT devices (iVue and Cirrus). Images were evaluated for the ability to detect angle structures such as Schwalbe's line (SL), trabecular meshwork (TM), Schlemm's canal (SC), and scleral spur (SS), and the presence of angle closure. Angle closure was defined as iris contact with the angle wall anterior to the SS on SD-OCT, and nonvisibility of the posterior TM on gonioscopy. Angle closure in an eye was defined as ≥two quadrants of closed angles. AC1 statistic was used to assess the agreement between devices. Of the 69 subjects studied (46.4% male, 84.1% Chinese, mean age 64.0 ± 10.5 years), 40 subjects (40 eyes, 58.0%) had angle closure on gonioscopy. The most identifiable structure on Cirrus SD-OCT was the SS (82.2%) and SL on iVue SD-OCT (74.5%). Angle closure was indeterminable in 14.5% and 50.7% of Cirrus and iVue scans (P gonioscopy was only fair (AC1 = 0.35 and 0.50 for Cirrus and iVue, respectively). It was more difficult to determine angle closure status with iVue compared with Cirrus SD-OCT. There was fair agreement between both devices with gonioscopy for identifying angle closure.

  19. A comparison of two endoscopic closures: over-the-scope clip (OTSC) versus KING closure (endoloop plus clips) in a randomized long-term experimental study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, R.; Ryska, O.; Kollár, M.; Juhásová, Jana; Kalvach, J.; Ryska, M.; Martínek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 11 (2016), s. 4910-4916 ISSN 0930-2794 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13634; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : NOTES * endoscopic closure * KING closure * over-the-scope clip Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 3.747, year: 2016

  20. CORNEAL ENDOTHELIAL CELL DENSITY IN ACUTE ANGLE CLOSURE GLAUCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Sultana K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Angle closure is characterised by apposition of the peripheral iris against the trabecular meshwork resulting in obstruction of aqueous outflow. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is characterised by pain, redness and blurred vision. The pain is typically a severe deep ache that follows the trigeminal distribution and maybe associated with nausea, vomiting, bradycardia and profuse sweating. The blurred vision, which is typically marked maybe caused by stretching of the corneal lamellae initially and later oedema of the cornea as well as a direct effect of the IOP on the optic nerve head. The modifications in corneal endothelial cell density after a crisis of angle-closure glaucoma is being evaluated. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The objective of the study is to assess the corneal endothelial cell count (density by specular microscopy in patients presenting with acute angle-closure glaucoma. METHODS Corneal endothelial cell counts of 20 eyes of patients with PACG with an earlier documented symptomatic acute attack unilaterally were compared with 20 fellow eyes. Evaluation of patient included visual acuity, intraocular pressure, gonioscopy, disc findings and specular microscopy. RESULTS The mean endothelial cell density was 2104 cells/mm2 in the eye with acute attack and 2615 cells/mm2 in the fellow eye. The average endothelial cell count when the duration of attack lasted more than 72 hours was 1861 cells/mm2 . CONCLUSION Corneal endothelial cell density was found to be significantly reduced in eyes following an acute attack of primary angle closure glaucoma.

  1. Mastering cloud computing foundations and applications programming

    CERN Document Server

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Selvi, SThamarai

    2013-01-01

    Mastering Cloud Computing is designed for undergraduate students learning to develop cloud computing applications. Tomorrow's applications won't live on a single computer but will be deployed from and reside on a virtual server, accessible anywhere, any time. Tomorrow's application developers need to understand the requirements of building apps for these virtual systems, including concurrent programming, high-performance computing, and data-intensive systems. The book introduces the principles of distributed and parallel computing underlying cloud architectures and specifical

  2. Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaphart, D.M.; Reed, S.R.; Rankin, W.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution disposal methods, and cost

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan

  4. A study on closure performance in geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (H14)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yutaka; Kawakami, Susumu; Yui, Mikazu; Makino, Hitoshi; Sawada, Atsushi; Kurihara, Yuji; Mihara, Morihiro

    2003-04-01

    Regarding closure technology of underground facilities in geological disposal of the HLW in H12 report, the fundamental concept that closure technology has no impact against the engineered barrier system (EBS) was described. Performance Assessment (PA) has been performed without considering of the barrier function of closure elements. Following H12 report, the various in-situ data of the closure elements (ex. plug, backfill) have been obtained. Therefore, we considered that the PA of the EBS considering the expecting performance of the closure elements from the view points of both the engineering technology and the PA should be examined. First, the characteristics of rock mass and the function of the closure elements were summarized. Then, the closure scenario was developed preliminarily based on hydrological analysis between a hydraulic fracture and a disposal panel, the fault tree analysis, and so on. (author)

  5. Moles: Tool-Assisted Environment Isolation with Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Halleux, Jonathan; Tillmann, Nikolai

    Isolating test cases from environment dependencies is often desirable, as it increases test reliability and reduces test execution time. However, code that calls non-virtual methods or consumes sealed classes is often impossible to test in isolation. Moles is a new lightweight framework which addresses this problem. For any .NET method, Moles allows test-code to provide alternative implementations, given as .NET delegates, for which C# provides very concise syntax while capturing local variables in a closure object. Using code instrumentation, the Moles framework will redirect calls to provided delegates instead of the original methods. The Moles framework is designed to work together with the dynamic symbolic execution tool Pex to enable automated test generation. In a case study, testing code programmed against the Microsoft SharePoint Foundation API, we achieved full code coverage while running tests in isolation without an actual SharePoint server. The Moles framework integrates with .NET and Visual Studio.

  6. Military Base Realignments and Closures: More Guidance and Information Needed to Take Advantage of Opportunities to Consolidate Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Management Training, (2) Joint Center of Excellence for Culinary Training, (3) Joint Center of Excellence for Religious Training and Education, (4...Realignments and Closures For the remaining three training functions— Culinary training, Transportation Management training, and Religious training— the... culinary , transportation management , and chaplain training programs did not have data for various reasons, including a change in accounting systems, and

  7. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackstedt, R W; Dixon, J A; O'Neill, P J; Herrera, F A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-adhering polyester-based mesh. Proposed benefits of wound closure with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, used with or without sutures, include its watertight seal, easy removal, microbial barrier, even distribution of tension, and reduction in wound closure time. Although allergic reactions to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate have been reported, few allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System have been noted in the literature. This case series describes three patients who experienced an allergic reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after undergoing elective bilateral reduction mammoplasties at our institution to further explore this topic. Methods. Retrospective chart review of bilateral reduction mammoplasty patients who received DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System dressing at our institution was performed. Results. Three patients were identified as having a rash in reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after bilateral reduction mammoplasty. All three patients required systemic steroid treatment to resolve the rash. One patient was identified as having a prior adhesive reaction. Conclusions. DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System has demonstrated its efficacy in optimizing scar healing and appearance. However, as we demonstrate these three allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, caution must be utilized in its usage, namely, in patients with a prior adhesive allergy and in sites where moisture or friction may be apparent.

  8. Rash with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Use in Bilateral Reduction Mammoplasty: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Knackstedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bilateral reduction mammoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure that can be complicated by unfavorable scar formation along incision sites. Surgical adhesives can be utilized as an alternative or as an adjunct to conventional suture closures to help achieve good wound tension and provide an adequate barrier with excellent cosmesis. The recently introduced DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System Skin Closure System combines the skin adhesive 2-octyl cyanoacrylate with a self-adhering polyester-based mesh. Proposed benefits of wound closure with DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, used with or without sutures, include its watertight seal, easy removal, microbial barrier, even distribution of tension, and reduction in wound closure time. Although allergic reactions to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate have been reported, few allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System have been noted in the literature. This case series describes three patients who experienced an allergic reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after undergoing elective bilateral reduction mammoplasties at our institution to further explore this topic. Methods. Retrospective chart review of bilateral reduction mammoplasty patients who received DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System dressing at our institution was performed. Results. Three patients were identified as having a rash in reaction to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System after bilateral reduction mammoplasty. All three patients required systemic steroid treatment to resolve the rash. One patient was identified as having a prior adhesive reaction. Conclusions. DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System has demonstrated its efficacy in optimizing scar healing and appearance. However, as we demonstrate these three allergic reactions to DERMABOND PRINEO Skin Closure System, caution must be utilized in its usage, namely, in patients with a prior adhesive allergy and in sites where moisture or friction may

  9. Closure Strategy Nevada Test Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the strategy for closure of part of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The Area 5 RWMS is in the northern part of Frenchman Flat, approximately 14 miles north of Mercury. The Area 5 RWMS encompasses 732 acres subdivided into quadrants, and is bounded by a 1,000-foot (ft)-wide buffer zone. The northwest and southwest quadrants have not been developed. The northeast and southeast quadrants have been used for disposal of unclassified low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and indefinite storage of classified materials. This paper focuses on closure of the 38 waste disposal and classified material storage units within the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 RWMS, called the ''92-Acre Area''. The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is currently planning to close the 92-Acre Area by 2011. Closure planning for this site must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. For ease of discussion, the 92-Acre Area has been subdivided into six closure units defined by waste type, location, and similarity in regulatory requirements. Each of the closure units contains one or more waste disposal units; waste disposal units are also called waste disposal cells. The paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues for the 92-Acre Area, recommends actions to address the issues, and provides the National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), schedule for closure.

  10. Effectiveness of percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale for hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Brett E; Nguyen, Bryant H; Buckner, J Kern; Freeman, Andrew M; Carroll, John D

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of percutaneous patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure to improve systemic hypoxemia. Although PFO-mediated right-to-left shunt (RTLS) is associated with hypoxemia, the ability of percutaneous closure to ameliorate hypoxemia is unknown. Between 2004 and 2009, 97 patients who underwent PFO closure for systemic hypoxemia and dyspnea that was disproportionate to underlying lung disease were included for evaluation. All patients exhibited PFO-mediated RTLS as determined by agitated saline echocardiography. Procedural success was defined as implantation of a device without major complications and mild or no residual shunt at 6 months. Clinical success was defined as a composite of an improvement in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, reduction of dyspnea symptoms, or decreased oxygen requirement. Procedural success was achieved in 96 of 97 (99%), and clinical success was achieved in 68 of 97 (70%). The presence of any moderate or severe interatrial shunt by agitated saline study (odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; p gender (OR = 0.30; p <0.017) decreased the likelihood of success. In conclusion, based on the largest single-center experience of patients referred for PFO closure for systemic hypoxemia, PFO closure was a mechanically effective procedure with an associated improvement in echocardiographic evidence of RTLS, NYHA functional class, and oxygen requirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Land use-based landscape planning and restoration in mine closure areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fu, Meichen; Hassani, Ferri P; Zeng, Hui; Geng, Yuhuan; Bai, Zhongke

    2011-05-01

    Landscape planning and restoration in mine closure areas is not only an inevitable choice to sustain mining areas but also an important path to maximize landscape resources and to improve ecological function in mine closure areas. The analysis of the present mine development shows that many mines are unavoidably facing closures in China. This paper analyzes the periodic impact of mining activities on landscapes and then proposes planning concepts and principles. According to the landscape characteristics in mine closure areas, this paper classifies available landscape resources in mine closure areas into the landscape for restoration, for limited restoration and for protection, and then summarizes directions for their uses. This paper establishes the framework of spatial control planning and design of landscape elements from "macro control, medium allocation and micro optimization" for the purpose of managing and using this kind of special landscape resources. Finally, this paper applies the theories and methods to a case study in Wu'an from two aspects: the construction of a sustainable land-use pattern on a large scale and the optimized allocation of typical mine landscape resources on a small scale.

  12. Land Use-Based Landscape Planning and Restoration in Mine Closure Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fu, Meichen; Hassani, Ferri P.; Zeng, Hui; Geng, Yuhuan; Bai, Zhongke

    2011-05-01

    Landscape planning and restoration in mine closure areas is not only an inevitable choice to sustain mining areas but also an important path to maximize landscape resources and to improve ecological function in mine closure areas. The analysis of the present mine development shows that many mines are unavoidably facing closures in China. This paper analyzes the periodic impact of mining activities on landscapes and then proposes planning concepts and principles. According to the landscape characteristics in mine closure areas, this paper classifies available landscape resources in mine closure areas into the landscape for restoration, for limited restoration and for protection, and then summarizes directions for their uses. This paper establishes the framework of spatial control planning and design of landscape elements from "macro control, medium allocation and micro optimization" for the purpose of managing and using this kind of special landscape resources. Finally, this paper applies the theories and methods to a case study in Wu'an from two aspects: the construction of a sustainable land-use pattern on a large scale and the optimized allocation of typical mine landscape resources on a small scale.

  13. Periodic Closures as Adaptive Coral Reef Management in the Indo-Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Cinner

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the social, economic, and ecological context within which communities in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia use adaptive coral reef management. We tested whether periodic closures had positive effects on reef resources, and found that both the biomass and the average size of fishes commonly caught in Indo-Pacific subsistence fisheries were greater inside areas subject to periodic closures compared to sites with year-round open access. Surprisingly, both long-lived and short-lived species benefited from periodic closures. Our study sites were remote communities that shared many socioeconomic characteristics; these may be crucial to the effectiveness of adaptive management of reef resources through periodic closures. Some of these factors include exclusive tenure over marine resources, a body of traditional ecological knowledge that allows for the rapid assessment of resource conditions, social customs that facilitate compliance with closures, relatively small human populations, negligible migration, and a relatively low dependence on fisheries. This dynamic adaptive management system, in which communities manage their resources among multiple social and ecological baselines, contrasts with western fisheries management practices, centered on maintaining exploited populations at stable levels in which net production is maximized.

  14. Manufacturing and properties of closure head forging integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoharu Sasaki; Iku Kurihara; Etsuo Murai; Yasuhiko Tanaka; Koumei Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    Closure head forging (SA508, Gr.3 Cl.1) integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel has been developed. This is intended to enhance structural integrity of closure head resulted in elimination of ISI, by eliminating weld joint between closure head and flange in the conventional design. Manufacturing procedures have been established so that homogeneity and isotropy of the material properties can be assured in the closure head forging integrated with flange. Acceptance tensile and impact test specimens are taken and tested regarding the closure head forging integrated with flange as very thick and complex forgings. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies and material properties of the closure head forging integrated with flange. (orig.)

  15. The program ORTOCARTAN for applications in the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasinski, A.

    1985-01-01

    A general outline of the program ORTOCARTAN for algebraic computing in the relativity theory is presented. A short history of the program is given. The base-programming language is LISP. The details of the calculation are presented. An example of application of the ORTOCARTAN is given

  16. European Hernia Society guidelines on the closure of abdominal wall incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muysoms, F E; Antoniou, S A; Bury, K

    2015-01-01

    using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach and methodological guidance was taken from Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The literature search included publications up to April 2014. The guidelines were written using the AGREE II...... of rapidly absorbable sutures. It is suggested using a slowly absorbable monofilament suture in a single layer aponeurotic closure technique without separate closure of the peritoneum. A small bites technique with a suture to wound length (SL/WL) ratio at least 4/1 is the current recommended method......, it is suggested using the smallest trocar size adequate for the procedure and closure of the fascial defect if trocars larger or equal to 10 mm are used. For single incision laparoscopic surgery, we suggest meticulous closure of the fascial incision to avoid an increased risk of incisional hernias....

  17. Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus using the angled duct occluder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yongwen; Zhao Xianxian; Wu Hong; Zheng Xing; Ding Jijun; Hu Jianqiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the immediate efficacy of transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus(PDA) using the angled duct occluder (ADO). Methods: 9 patients (1 male, 8 female) underwent transcatheter closure of PDA using the ADO. The mean PDA diameter at its narrowest segment was (5.8 ± 1.9) mm, ranging 3 to 10 mm. A 6 - 9F long sheath was used for the delivery of ADO. Results: The devices were deployed successfully in all patients. Angiographies showed no shunt across the device 15 min after the implantation of ADO. Within 1 week, echocardiography revealed complete closure in all patients. There were no complications. Conclusions: The transcatheter closure of PDA using ADO is an effective and safe procedure. The device matches with the shape of aortic cavity much more precisely than Amplatzer duct occluder. (authors)

  18. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-3 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, G.A.; Lodman, D.L.; Spry, M.J.; Poor, K.J.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plan for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-3 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. The unit will be closed by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  19. Multi-Canister overpack ultrasonic examination of closure weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    The method used for non-destructive examination of the closure weld must provide adequate assurance that the weld is structurally sound for the pressure and lifting loads to be imposed, and must be consistent with NRC equivalency requirements established for the SNF Project. Given the large flaw size that would need to exist before the structural integrity of the weld is challenged, liquid penetrant testing of the root and final passes provides adequate assurance of weld quality to meet structural loads. In addition, the helium leak test provides confirmation that the containment boundary is intact and leaktight. While UT examination does provide additional evidence of weld integrity, the value of that additional evidence for this particular application does not justify performing UT examination, given the additional financial and ALARA costs associated with performing the examination

  20. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs)