WorldWideScience

Sample records for clostridium difficile isolates

  1. Clostridium difficile

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore forming Gram positive bacillus which is a worldwide enteric pathogen. It is a common cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and colitis and was identified as the cause of antibiotic associated pseudomembranous colitis in the late 1970s. Since 2000, C. difficile ...

  2. Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Macnaughton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore forming Gram positive bacillus which is a worldwide enteric pathogen. It is a common cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and colitis and was identified as the cause of antibiotic associated pseudomembranous colitis in the late 1970s. Since 2000, C. difficile infection (CDI has had a higher profile following reports of increasing rates, mortality and morbidity, and outbreaks have presented significant challenges to many healthcare facilities. CDI was initially associated with hospital acquired infection but community acquired infections are being increasingly recognised.

  3. [Clostridium difficile isolation in children hospitalized with diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, B; Guerra, L; García-Morín, M; González, E; Gonzálvez, A; Izquierdo, G; Martos, A; Santos, M; Navarro, M; Hernández-Sampelayo, M T; Saavedra-Lozano, J

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial and antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults, and its incidence has substantially risen over the last few years. The prevalence of this infection in children is difficult to assess due to the high rates of colonization in this setting. A one-year retrospective study was conducted on children under 15 years admitted to hospital with acute diarrhea. Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory findings and outcome of children with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were compared to other causes of diarrhea. Risk factors for CDI were identified by multivariate analysis. Two hundred and fifty children with acute diarrhea were identified. A microbiological pathogen was identified in 79 (45.4%) of 174 patients who underwent complete testing: 19 CDI (25.6%, 13 of which were enterotoxin-producing), 21 other bacteria (28.6%), and 34 viruses (45.8%; rotavirus n=31; adenovirus n=3). The estimated incidence of CDI was 3 cases/1,000 admissions, with 68.4% of them occurring in children younger than 2 years. Overall, 15.8% were community-acquired. Compared to other causes of diarrhea, CDI was associated with comorbidity (P<.0001), recent contact with the health-care system (P<.0001) or intensive care unit stay (P=.003) and exposure to antibiotics in the previous month (P<.0001). The clinical course of children with CDI was less symptomatic. There were no clinical differences between Clostridium difficile toxin-producers and non-toxin producers. Comorbidity was identified as the main risk factor associated with CDI (OR 40.02, 95% CI 6.84-232.32; P<.0001). The isolation of Clostridium difficile is common in hospitalized children with diarrhea in our setting. CDI is more frequent in children with comorbidity and recent contact with the health-care system, presenting a mostly oligosymptomatic clinical course. Further studies are needed to understand the epidemiology of this infection in pediatrics, especially the percentage of

  4. DETECTION, RIBOTYPING AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PROPERTIES OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE STRAINS ISOLATED FROM THE CASES OF DIARRHEA

    OpenAIRE

    Kouzegaran, Samaneh; Ganjifard, Mahmood; Tanha, Amir Saber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is the most prevalent cause of antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea al-around the world. Prevalence of virulent and resistant strains of Clostridium difficile is increasing now a day. The present investigation was carried out to study the prevalence, ribotyping and antibiotic resistance pattern of C. difficile isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic pediatrics. Materials and methods: Four-hundred stool specimens were collected from the diarrheic and no...

  5. Detection of A/B toxin and isolation of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R O S; Ribeiro, M G; Palhares, M S; Borges, A S; Maranhão, R P A; Silva, M X; Lucas, T M; Olivo, G; Lobato, F C F

    2013-11-01

    Toxin detection and screening could contribute to knowledge of the transmission patterns, risk factors and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. To isolate C. difficile and C. perfringens and to detect A/B toxins in faecal samples from diarrhoeic and nondiarrhoeic foals. Cross-sectional observational study. A total of 153 samples from foals were collected: 139 samples from farms and 14 samples from diarrhoeic foals admitted to a veterinary hospital. The A/B toxins were detected by cytotoxicity assay. All suspected colonies of C. perfringens were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for detection of the major toxin genes (α, β, ε and ι) and for detection of β2-, NetB- and enterotoxin-encoding genes. Furthermore, C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates were evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. Seven of 153 (4.6%) samples, all from diarrhoeic foals, were positive for C. difficile A/B toxin. Of these, 5 of 14 (35.7%) were from hospitalised foals, and only 2 of 63 (3.2%) diarrhoeic foal samples were from farms (P = 0.002). Clostridium perfringens was isolated from 31 (20.3%) foals, of which 21 of 76 (27.6%) were diarrhoeic and 10 of 76 (13.2%) were nondiarrhoeic, demonstrating a difference between these 2 groups (P = 0.045). Only 4 strains were positive for the β2-encoding gene (cpb2). All C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. The present report highlights the need for laboratory diagnostics to differentiate C. difficile-associated infection in foals from other causes of diarrhoea to facilitate adequate antimicrobial therapy. More studies are needed to clarify the role of C. perfringens as a primary agent of diarrhoea in foals. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Clostridium Difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MODABER

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy-five meconium samples were examined for the presence of CI. difficile: 3 strains were isola ted. Additionally 45 labora tory animal faeces specimens were tested for the same purpose, a further 2 cases were isolated. These five suspicious strains were identified as CI. difficile acco rding to the tests mentioned in the previous paragraphs. The organisms . isolated here showed the same characteristics as five of the strains received and also as the organisms isolated from the inoculated animals with the crude cultures of CI. difficile. These organisms were variable in size, roughly 2-9 XO.3-0. 8u, Gram positive rods, moti le, capsulated, fl agellated, most probably peritrichous, possessing non-bulging spores located terminally or msubterminally, free spores were-rarely detectable. Cell arrangements : singly or in pairs and occasionally in short chains. On longer incubation the organisms slightly shifted to become Gram variable and longer in size. Colonies on ordinary aga r and solid blood agar appeared to be punctiform and rough. On the other hand the colony appearance on the rest of the solid media which are mentioned previously a re as fo llows: 1-3 mm in diameter, greenish, smooth, non-haemolytic, entire some showing slight irregularities of their edges. Colonies slightly raised, butyrous and semi opaque to opaque. This organism does not liquify the serum of Loeffler medium and also does not cause any changes of this medium. The metachromatic granules are readily seen by Albert's staining. Neither proteolytic nor lipolytic activi ties are possessed by this organ ism. Sensitivity to antibiotics showed the same pattern as mentioned about the strains received. H?S production was positive after 48 hours. All the strains reduce nitrates. Most of the strains produce Indole and none liquify gelatin and also none produce any changes in Litmus Milk medium. The agglutinating serum prepared in rabbits as mentioned before were tested against

  7. Comparison of ChromID agar and Clostridium difficile selective agar for effective isolation of C. difficile from stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bo-Moon; Lee, Eun Joo

    2014-01-01

    ChromID Clostridium difficile agar (IDCd; bioMérieux SA, France) is a recently developed chromogenic medium for rapid and specific isolation of C. difficile. We compared the performance of IDCd with that of Clostridium difficile Selective Agar (CDSA). A total of 530 fresh stool specimens were collected from patients with clinical signs compatible with C. difficile infection, and cultures for C. difficile were performed on IDCd and CDSA. C. difficile colonies were identified by spore staining, odor, use of an ANI identification test kit (bioMérieux SA), and multiplex PCR for tcdA, tcdB, and tpi. The concordance rate between IDCd and CDSA was 90.6% (480/530). The positivity rates on IDCd on days 1 and 2 (55.6% and 85.0%, respectively) were significantly higher than those on CDSA (19.4% and 75.6%, respectively) (P<0.001 for day 1 and P=0.02 for day 2), but the detection rates on IDCd and CDSA on day 3 were not different (89.4% vs. 82.8%, P=0.0914). On day 3, the recovery rates for non-C. difficile isolates on IDCd and CDSA were 30.2% (160/530) and 22.1% (117/530), respectively (P=0.0075). Clostridium spp. other than C. difficile were the most prevalent non-C. difficile isolates on both media. The culture positivity rates on IDCd and CDSA were not different on day 3 but IDCd may allow for rapid and sensitive detection of C. difficile within 2 days of cultivation.

  8. Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Poeker, Sophie Annick; Derrien, Muriel; Fourmestraux, Candice; Lacroix, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (CD), a spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium, is the main cause for antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the elderly. Here we investigated CD colonization in novel in vitro fermentation models inoculated with immobilized elderly fecal microbiota and the effects of antibiotic treatments. Two continuous intestinal PolyFermS models inoculated with different immobilized elder microbiota were used to investigate selected factors of colonization of CD in proximal (PC, model 1) and transverse-distal (TDC, model 1 and 2) colon conditions. Colonization of two CD strains of different PCR ribotypes, inoculated as vegetative cells (ribotype 001, model 1) or spores (ribotypes 001 and 012, model 2), was tested. Treatments with two antibiotics, ceftriaxone (daily 150 mg L -1 ) known to induce CD infection in vivo or metronidazole (twice daily 333 mg L -1 ) commonly used to treat CD, were investigated in TDC conditions (model 2) for their effects on gut microbiota composition (qPCR, 16S pyrosequencing) and activity (HPLC), CD spore germination and colonization, and cytotoxin titer (Vero cell assay). CD remained undetected after inoculating vegetative cells in PC reactors of model 1, but was shown to colonize TDC reactors of both models, reaching copy numbers of up to log 10 8 mL -1 effluent with stable production of toxin correlating with CD cell numbers. Ceftriaxone treatment in TDC reactors showed only small effects on microbiota composition and activity and did not promote CD colonization compared to antibiotic-free control reactor. In contrast, treatment with metronidazole after colonization of CD induced large modifications in the microbiota and decreased CD numbers below the detection limit of the specific qPCR. However, a fast CD recurrence was measured only 2 days after cessation of metronidazole treatment. Using our in vitro fermentation models, we demonstrated that stable CD colonization in TDC reactors can be induced by inoculating CD

  9. More than 50% of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Pet Dogs in Flagstaff, USA, Carry Toxigenic Genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan E Stone

    Full Text Available Nosocomial acquisition of Clostridium difficile is well documented, yet recent studies have highlighted the importance of community acquired infections and identified community associated reservoirs for this pathogen. Multiple studies have implicated companion pets and farm animals as possible sources of community acquired C. difficile infections in humans. To explore the potential role of pet dogs in human C. difficile infections we systematically collected canine fecal samples (n = 197 in Flagstaff, AZ. Additionally, nineteen fecal samples were collected at a local veterinary clinic from diarrheic dogs. We used these combined samples to investigate important questions regarding C. difficile colonization in pet canines: 1 What is the prevalence and diversity of C. difficile in this companion pet population, and 2 Do C. difficile isolates collected from canines genetically overlap with isolates that cause disease in humans? We used a two-step sequence typing approach, including multilocus sequence typing to determine the overall genetic diversity of C. difficile present in Flagstaff canines, and whole-genome sequencing to assess the fine-scale diversity patterns within identical multilocus sequence types from isolates obtained within and among multiple canine hosts. We detected C. difficile in 17% of the canine fecal samples with 10% containing toxigenic strains that are known to cause human disease. Sequencing analyses revealed similar genotypes in dogs and humans. These findings suggest that companion pets are a potential source of community acquired C. difficile infections in humans.

  10. More than 50% of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Pet Dogs in Flagstaff, USA, Carry Toxigenic Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nathan E; Sidak-Loftis, Lindsay C; Sahl, Jason W; Vazquez, Adam J; Wiggins, Kristin B; Gillece, John D; Hicks, Nathan D; Schupp, James M; Busch, Joseph D; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial acquisition of Clostridium difficile is well documented, yet recent studies have highlighted the importance of community acquired infections and identified community associated reservoirs for this pathogen. Multiple studies have implicated companion pets and farm animals as possible sources of community acquired C. difficile infections in humans. To explore the potential role of pet dogs in human C. difficile infections we systematically collected canine fecal samples (n = 197) in Flagstaff, AZ. Additionally, nineteen fecal samples were collected at a local veterinary clinic from diarrheic dogs. We used these combined samples to investigate important questions regarding C. difficile colonization in pet canines: 1) What is the prevalence and diversity of C. difficile in this companion pet population, and 2) Do C. difficile isolates collected from canines genetically overlap with isolates that cause disease in humans? We used a two-step sequence typing approach, including multilocus sequence typing to determine the overall genetic diversity of C. difficile present in Flagstaff canines, and whole-genome sequencing to assess the fine-scale diversity patterns within identical multilocus sequence types from isolates obtained within and among multiple canine hosts. We detected C. difficile in 17% of the canine fecal samples with 10% containing toxigenic strains that are known to cause human disease. Sequencing analyses revealed similar genotypes in dogs and humans. These findings suggest that companion pets are a potential source of community acquired C. difficile infections in humans.

  11. Characterization of temperate phages infecting Clostridium difficile isolates of human and animal origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Garneau, Julian R; Néron, Audrey; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive pathogen infecting humans and animals. Recent studies suggest that animals could represent potential reservoirs of C. difficile that could then transfer to humans. Temperate phages contribute to the evolution of most bacteria, for example, by promoting the transduction of virulence, fitness, and antibiotic resistance genes. In C. difficile, little is known about their role, mainly because suitable propagating hosts and conditions are lacking. Here we report the isolation, propagation, and preliminary characterization of nine temperate phages from animal and human C. difficile isolates. Prophages were induced by UV light from 58 C. difficile isolates of animal and human origins. Using soft agar overlays with 27 different C. difficile test strains, we isolated and further propagated nine temperate phages: two from horse isolates (ΦCD481-1 and ΦCD481-2), three from dog isolates (ΦCD505, ΦCD506, and ΦCD508), and four from human isolates (ΦCD24-2, ΦCD111, ΦCD146, and ΦCD526). Two phages are members of the Siphoviridae family (ΦCD111 and ΦCD146), while the others are Myoviridae phages. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analyses showed that all of the phages had unique double-stranded DNA genomes of 30 to 60 kb. Phages induced from human C. difficile isolates, especially the members of the Siphoviridae family, had a broader host range than phages from animal C. difficile isolates. Nevertheless, most of the phages could infect both human and animal strains. Phage transduction of antibiotic resistance was recently reported in C. difficile. Our findings therefore call for further investigation of the potential risk of transduction between animal and human C. difficile isolates.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of fidaxomicin against Clostridium difficile clinical isolates in Aichi area in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Matsukawa, Yoko; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Mao; Katsumata, Kiyomitsu; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility of 100 Japanese Clostridium difficile isolates to fidaxomicin, a new macrocyclic antibiotic. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range of fidaxomicin was 0.03-0.5 μg/mL, with a MIC for inhibition of 50% (MIC50) of 0.12 μg/mL, and for inhibition of 90% (MIC90) of 0.25 μg/mL. We also evaluated the susceptibilities of the same 100 C. difficile isolates to vancomycin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, clindamycin, meropenem, and ampicillin. Of all the antibiotics tested, fidaxomicin showed the most potent antimicrobial activity against this group of C. difficile isolates. MIC levels against C. difficile isolates, including those producing binary toxin, did not substantially differ from those previously reported in Europe, North America and Taiwan. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clostridium difficile infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geller, Stephen A; Campos, Fernando P. F. de

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant and increasing medical problem, surpassing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as the most common hospital-onset or facility-associated infection, and a key element...

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin, Jae Hyun; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Warren, Cirle A

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming, toxin-secreting bacillus that has long been recognized to be the most common etiologic pathogen of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. C...

  15. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from rabbits raised for meat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigo, Ilenia; Mazzolini, Elena; Bacchin, Cosetta; Tonon, Elena; Puiatti, Cinzia; Bano, Luca; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Agnoletti, Fabrizio

    2015-12-31

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric disease in humans and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a genetic overlap between C. difficile isolated from animals and humans suggesting animals as possible reservoir for human pathogenic strains. This study was a preliminary investigation on the occurrence of C. difficile in rabbits raised in industrial holdings for food production and aimed to characterise isolates and estimate their antimicrobial susceptibility. C. difficile isolates were characterized by toxin profiles, toxinotyping and PCR-ribotyping. The MICs of six antibiotics were determined using E-test. Between 2007 and 2013, 285 industrial holdings (representing 40% of the national census) submitted rabbits to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes, among these holdings, groups of three to five post-weaned rabbits were sampled once by convenience. 1279 samples of caecal content were collected. The overall isolation rate of C. difficile from the enteric specimen was 3% (38/1279), with no difference among animals affected or not by enteric disorders. Among isolates 66% (25/38) were toxigenic. Sixteen different PCR-ribotypes (RTs) were identified. Among the toxigenic strains RT-014/020, RT-078 and RT-012 were found in at least three rabbit holdings. According to the ECOFF threshold, 82% (31/38) C. difficile isolates displayed a reduced susceptibility to at least one and 18% (7/38) to three tested antimicrobials. Rabbits are colonized by heterogeneous C. difficile ribotypes many of which are commonly isolated in humans. One third of isolates displayed a reduced susceptibility to MTZ, the first choice antimicrobial for human CDI treatment. According to our findings rabbits are a potential source of C. difficile for humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clostridium difficile infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, WK; Lyras, D.; Lacy, DB; Wilcox, MH; Kuijper, EJ

    2016-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of infla...

  17. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from the environment and contacts of patients with antibiotic-associated colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.H.; Fekety, R.; Batts, D.H.; Brown, D.; Cudmore, M.; Silva, J. Jr.; Waters, D.

    1981-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of antibiotic-associated colitis, but its epidemiology remains unknown. Using a selective medium for the isolation of C. difficile, cultures were obtained from the environment and contacts of hospitalized patients carrying C. difficile in their stools. In areas where carriers had diarrhea, 85 (9.3%) of 910 cultures of floors and other surfaces, especially those subject to fecal contamination, were positive. In areas where there were no known carriers, only 13 (2.6%) of 497 cultures of similar sites were positive (P less than 0.005). C difficile was isolated from hands and stools of asymptomatic hospital personnel, from sewage and soil, and from the home of a patient. Environmental isolates were toxigenic. C. difficile inoculated onto a floor persisted there for five months. Further studies are needed to document how often floor persisted there for five months. Further studies are needed to document how often C. difficile shed by patients with antibiotic-associated colitis is acquired by other persons and whether isolation precautions are capable of limiting the organism's spread.

  18. Comparative nutritional and chemical phenome of Clostridium difficile isolates determined using phenotype microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaria, Joy; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Useh, Nicodemus; He, Hongxuan; McDonough, Sean P; Mao, Chunhong; Sobral, Bruno; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in North America and Europe. The risk of CDI increases significantly in the case where antimicrobial treatment reduces the number of competing bacteria in the gut, thus leading to the increased availability of nutrients and loss of colonization resistance. The objective of this study was to determine comprehensive nutritional utilization and the chemical sensitivity profile of historic and newer C. difficile isolates and to examine the possible role of the phenotype diversity in C. difficile virulence. Phenotype microarrays (PMs) were used to elucidate the complete nutritional and chemical sensitivity profile of six C. difficile isolates. Of the 760 nutrient sources tested, 285 compounds were utilized by at least one strain. Among the C. difficile isolates compared, R20291, a recent hypervirulent outbreak-associated strain, appears to have an expanded nutrient utilization profile when compared to all other strains. The expanded nutritional utilization profile of some newer C. difficile strains could be one of the reasons for infections in patients who are not exposed to the hospital environment or not undergoing antibiotic treatment. This nutritional profile could be used to design tube feeding formulas that reduce the risk of CDI. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from animals and humans in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in Clostridium difficile strains isolated from animals and humans in Brazil. The 54 C. difficile strains used were isolated from stool samples from piglets (n=16, dogs (n=13, humans (n=13, foals (n=8 calves (n=2, an ocelot (n=1 and a maned wolf (n=1. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the serial plate agar dilution method for penicillin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, vancomycin, metronidazole and tylosin. The C. difficile strains assessed were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Florfenicol resistance was rarely observed; 52 (96.4% strains were sensitive to this antimicrobial. Five (9.3%, five (9.3%, 14 (25.9% and 20 (37.0% strains were resistant to oxytetracycline, penicillin, tylosin and erythromycin respectively.

  20. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B F; Olsen, K E P; Nielsen, X C

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) requires the detection of toxigenic C. difficile or its toxins and a clinical assessment. We evaluated the performance of four nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) detecting toxigenic C. difficile directly from faeces compared to routine...... ribotyping and toxinotyping (TT) were performed on culture-positive samples. In parallel, the samples were analysed by four NAATs; two targeting tcdA or tcdB (illumigene® C. difficile and PCRFast® C. difficile A/B) and two multi-target real-time (RT) PCR assays also targeting cdt and tcdC alleles...... characteristic of epidemic and potentially more virulent PCR ribotypes 027, 066 and 078 (GeneXpert® C. difficile/Epi and an 'in-house RT PCR' two-step algorithm). The multi-target assays were significantly more sensitive compared to routine toxigenic culture (p 

  1. Molecular, microbiological and clinical characterization of Clostridium difficile isolates from tertiary care hospitals in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Lina Salazar

    Full Text Available In Colombia, the epidemiology and circulating genotypes of Clostridium difficile have not yet been described. Therefore, we molecularly characterized clinical isolates of C.difficile from patients with suspicion of C.difficile infection (CDI in three tertiary care hospitals. C.difficile was isolated from stool samples by culture, the presence of A/B toxins were detected by enzyme immunoassay, cytotoxicity was tested by cell culture and the antimicrobial susceptibility determined. After DNA extraction, tcdA, tcdB and binary toxin (CDTa/CDTb genes were detected by PCR, and PCR-ribotyping performed. From a total of 913 stool samples collected during 2013-2014, 775 were included in the study. The frequency of A/B toxins-positive samples was 9.7% (75/775. A total of 143 isolates of C.difficile were recovered from culture, 110 (76.9% produced cytotoxic effect in cell culture, 100 (69.9% were tcdA+/tcdB+, 11 (7.7% tcdA-/tcdB+, 32 (22.4% tcdA-/tcdB- and 25 (17.5% CDTa+/CDTb+. From 37 ribotypes identified, ribotypes 591 (20%, 106 (9% and 002 (7.9% were the most prevalent; only one isolate corresponded to ribotype 027, four to ribotype 078 and four were new ribotypes (794,795, 804,805. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole, while 85% and 7.7% were resistant to clindamycin and moxifloxacin, respectively. By multivariate analysis, significant risk factors associated to CDI were, staying in orthopedic service, exposure to third-generation cephalosporins and staying in an ICU before CDI symptoms; moreover, steroids showed to be a protector factor. These results revealed new C. difficile ribotypes and a high diversity profile circulating in Colombia different from those reported in America and European countries.

  2. Isolation of Clostridium difficile and Detection of A and B Toxins Encoding Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clostridium difficile is the most important anaerobic, gram positive, spore forming bacillus which is known as a prevalent factor leading to antibiotic associated diarrheas and is the causative agent of pseudomembrane colitis. The role of this bacterium along with the over use of antibiotics have been proved to result in colitis. The major virulence factors of these bacteria are the A and B toxins. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to isolate C. difficile from stool samples and detect A and B toxins encoding genes, in order toserve as a routine method for clinical diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Recognition of A and B toxins encoding genes by uniplex and multiplex PCR using two pairs of primers from 136 accumulated stool samples. Results: Results of the present study showed that out of 136 stool samples, three C. difficile were isolated and these strains contained A and B toxins encoding genes. Conclusions: It was concluded that although detection of C. difficile from stool samples based on PCR (polymerase chain reaction is expensive, yet this method is more sensitive and less time-consuming than culture methods and can be used as a clinical laboratory test.

  3. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  4. Transmission of Clostridium difficile spores in isolation room environments and through hospital beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Maria; Eriksson, Mats; Andersson, Josefin; Norén, Torbjörn

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dissemination of Clostridium difficile (CD) spores in a hospital setting where the potassium monopersulfate-based disinfectant Virkon™ was used for cleaning. In the initial part of the study, we sampled 16 areas of frequent patient contact in 10 patient rooms where a patient with CD infection (CDI) had been accommodated. In the second part of the study, we obtained samples from 10 patient beds after discharge of CDI patients, both before and after the beds were cleaned. In the first part, CDspores were isolated in only 30% of the rooms. In the second part, which focused on transmission to hospital beds, C. difficile was found in four of 10 beds either before or after cleaning. In conclusion, in both parts of the study, we demonstrated a moderate spread of CD spores to the environment despite routine cleaning procedures involving Virkon™. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile from pet dogs in Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Isfaqul; Sharma, R K; Borah, P; Rajkhowa, S; Hussain, Iftikar; Barkalita, L M; Hasin, D; Choudhury, M; Rupnik, M; Deka, N K; Saikia, G K

    2015-12-01

    One hundred and seventeen faecal samples from pet dogs (pup = 21 and adult = 96) brought for treatment to a veterinary clinic were examined for Clostridium difficile. A total of 16 (13.67%) samples were positive. Nine (56.25%) isolates were obtained from 17 adult dogs undergoing antibiotic treatment and this was significantly higher (p dogs without antibiotic treatment. Ten isolates (62.5%) were toxigenic (all toxinotype 0) and six were non-toxigenic. None of the isolates were positive for binary toxin genes. PCR ribotyping revealed three different ribotypes (012, 014 and 046) among A(+)B(+) isolates and five different ribotypes (010, SLO 131, and ACD 001 to ACD 003) among A(-)B(-) isolates. The PFGE analysis of toxigenic isolates revealed three different pulsotypes corresponding to the PCR ribotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic relatedness between Japanese and European isolates of Clostridium difficile originating from piglets and their risk associated with human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eUsui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colonization in pig intestine has been a public health concern. We analyzed C. difficile prevalence among piglets in Japan to clarify their origin and extent of the associated risk by using molecular and microbiological methods for both swine and human clinical isolates and foreign isolates. C. difficile was isolated from 120 neonatal piglet faecal samples. Toxin gene profile, antimicrobial susceptibilities, PCR ribotype, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA type of swine isolates were determined and compared with those of human clinical and foreign isolates. One-hundred C. difficile strains were isolated from 69 (57.5% samples, and 61 isolates (61% were toxin gene-positive. Some isolates were resistant to antimicrobials, contributing to antibiotic-associated diarrhoea by C. difficile. These results suggest that C. difficile, prevalent among Japanese pigs, is a potential risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Furthermore, PCR ribotype 078 (12 isolates, which has been linked to multiple outbreaks worldwide, was the third-most frequently isolated of the 14 PCR ribotypes identified. Moreover, MLVA revealed that all 12 PCR ribotype 078 isolates were genetically related to European PCR ribotype 078 strains found in both humans and pigs. To date, in Japan, many breeding pigs have been imported from European countries. The genetic relatedness of C. difficile isolates of Japanese swine origin to those of European origin suggests that they were introduced into Japan via imported pigs.

  7. Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a significant and increasing medical problem, surpassing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as the most common hospital-onset or facility-associated infection, and a key element in the challenging battle against hospital-acquired infections. This Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming colonizes the intestinal tract after antibiotics have altered the normal intestinal flora.

  8. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile in farm animals from slaughterhouse to retail stage in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, Zahra; Weese, J Scott; Ezzatpanah, Hamid; Chamani, Mohammad; Shoaei, Parisa; Yaran, Majid; Ataei, Behrooz; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Ansariyan, Akbar; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Jalali, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of Clostridium difficile in farm animals from slaughterhouse through to retail stage, a total of 750 samples of feces, posteviscerated and washed carcass were collected from cattle, camels, goats, and sheep in Isfahan, Iran. The overall prevalence of C. difficile in feces, posteviscerated and washed carcass were 20 (13.3%), 23 (15.3%), and 11 (7.3%), respectively; while C. difficile was isolated from 79 (26.3%) retail samples. Twenty-nine (3.8%) isolates were toxigenic, with most toxigenic isolates (n = 17, 5.6%) identified from the retail stage. All toxigenic isolates harbored tcdA and tcdB; however, all were negative for cdtB. The 29 isolates were classified into 21 different ribotypes. This study revealed evidence of existence of toxigenic C. difficile in farm animal feces and meat in Iran.

  9. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 078 toxinotype V found in diarrhoeal pigs identical to isolates from affected humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, Sylvia B.; van Leengoed, Leo A. M. G.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Harmanus, Celine; Kuijper, Ed J.; Bergwerff, Aldert A.

    2009-01-01

    In diseased piglets from two Dutch pig-breeding farms with neonatal diarrhoea for more than a year, culture and PCR analyses identified the involved microorganism as Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 078 harbouring toxin A (tcdA) and B (tcdB), and binary toxin genes. Isolated strains showed a 39 bp

  10. Clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection and molecular characterization of the isolated strains in a cohort of Danish hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Brock, Inger; Persson, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to toxin gene profiles of the strains isolated from Danish hospitalized patients. C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR based molecular typing methods including toxin gene profiling...... and analysis of deletions and truncating mutations in the toxin regulating gene tcdC. Clinical features were obtained by questionnaire. Thirty percent of the CDI cases were classified as community-acquired. Infection by C. difficile with genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin...... was significantly associated with hospital-acquired/healthcare-associated CDI compared to community-acquired CDI. Significantly higher leukocyte counts and more severe clinical manifestations were observed in patients infected by C. difficile containing genes also encoding the binary toxin together with toxin...

  11. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile isolates from a pig slaughterhouse, pork, and humans in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Lee, Jen-Jie; Chen, Pin-Chun; Chang, Yi-Chih; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2017-02-02

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea in both humans and animals. The ribotype 078, predominant in food animals, is associated with community-acquired C. difficile infection, and C. difficile is suggested to be a foodborne pathogen. Recently, the C. difficile ribotype 078 lineage emerged in patients and pigs in Taiwan. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and molecular characterization of C. difficile isolated from a pig slaughterhouse, retail meat, ready-to-eat meals, and humans in Taiwan. We collected samples from one slaughterhouse (n=422), 29 retail markets (raw pork, n=62; ready-to-eat pork, n=65), and one hospital (non-diarrheal humans, stool, n=317) in 2015. The isolated C. difficile were subjected to ribotyping and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). In the slaughterhouse, the isolation rate from carcasses was high (23%, 21/92) and ribotype 126 dominated. Scalding water was found to have C. difficile contamination (44%, 4/9), and two of the seven isolates were ribotype 126. The isolation rates from raw pork and ready-to-eat pork were between 20% and 29%. Ribotypes 126, 127, and 014 were found in raw pork, whereas ribotype 078 was not identified in this study. Eight isolates-seven non-toxigenic isolates and one ribotype 017-were found in non-diarrheal human samples. Notably, MLVA showed that ribotype 126 isolates from the slaughterhouse, pig stool, colons, carcasses, and scalding water were closely genetically related, indicating serious risk for cross-contamination. However, the genetic evidence of foodborne transmission from carcasses to food and humans is still lacking. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of LFF571 and three treatment agents against Clostridium difficile isolates collected for a pan-European survey in 2008: clinical and therapeutic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, S.B.; Bauer, M.P.; Sanders, I.M.; Wilcox, M.H.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In November 2008, a study was performed with support from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) to obtain an overview of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) in European hospitals. A collection of 398 C. difficile isolates obtained from this hospital-based

  13. Data from a survey of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile shedding by dogs and cats in the Madrid region (Spain, including phenotypic and genetic characteristics of recovered isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Álvarez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article contains information related to a recent survey of the prevalence of fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile by dogs and cats attended in veterinary clinics located in the Madrid region (Spain. Specifically, we provide detailed information about the clinics that participated in the survey, the demographic and clinic characteristics of recruited animals and the genetic and phenotypic characteristics (including antimicrobial susceptibility data, of recovered bacterial isolates.

  14. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa Y Jamal

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008-2012 in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates.

  15. Isolation of recombinant antibodies directed against surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari Shirvan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clostridium difficile has emerged as an increasingly important nosocomial pathogen and the prime causative agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. In addition to toxins A and B, immunological studies using antisera from patients infected with C. difficile have shown that a number of other bacterial factors contribute to the pathogenesis, including surface proteins, which are responsible for adhesion, motility and other interactions with the human host. In this study, various clostridial targets, including FliC, FliD and cell wall protein 66, were expressed and purified. Phage antibody display yielded a large panel of specific recombinant antibodies, which were expressed, purified and characterised. Reactions of the recombinant antibodies with their targets were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and Western blotting suggested that linear rather than conformational epitopes were recognised. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to surface-layer proteins and their components showed strain specificity, with good recognition of proteins from C. difficile 630. However, no reaction was observed for strain R20291—a representative of the 027 ribotype. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to C. difficile M120 extracts indicated that a component of a surface-layer protein of this strain might possess immunoglobulin-binding activities. The recombinant antibodies against FliC and FliD proteins were able to inhibit bacterial motility.

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  17. Unusual Localization of Clostridium Difficile Infection in an Isolated Segment of the Descending Colon in a Critical Care Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni Brotfain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unrecognized severe pseudomembranous colitis may become life threatening. A typical Clostridium difficile infection is associated with involvement of the colon; however, small bowel disease has also been described. Here, we present a case of a 48-year-old man with Clostridium difficile colitis of an isolated segment in the descending colon treated by a novel catheter intraluminal antibiotic irrigation. The intraluminal antibiotic irrigation was performed through a Foley catheter inserted into the isolated mucus fistula. The patient recovered after three weeks of intraluminal vancomycin (250 mg diluted in 150 ml of normal saline  x Q6 and metronidazole (500 mg  x Q8. Both antibiotics were given into the mucus fistula over 30 min. The patient was discharged from the unit four weeks after admission. This novel technique, in which the antibiotic was administered through an inserted intraluminal Foley urinary catheter, may be an efficient and safe alternative when conventional routes cannot be implemented.

  18. Pseudomembranous colitis: Not always Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek M; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-05-01

    Although Clostridium difficile infection is the cause of most cases of pseudomembranous colitis, clinicians should consider less common causes, especially if pseudomembranes are seen on endoscopy but testing remains negative for C difficile or if presumed C difficile infection does not respond to treatment. Histologic review of colonic mucosal biopsy specimens can provide clues to the underlying cause. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  19. Array comparative hybridisation reveals a high degree of similarity between UK and European clinical isolates of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuijper Ed J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is responsible for C. difficile associated disease in humans and is currently the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the western world. This current status has been linked to the emergence of a highly virulent PCR-ribotype 027 strain. The aim of this work was to identify regions of sequence divergence that may be used as genetic markers of hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strains and markers of the sequenced strain, CD630 by array comparative hybridisation. Results In this study, we examined 94 clinical strains of the most common PCR-ribotypes isolated in mainland Europe and the UK by array comparative genomic hybridisation. Our array was comprehensive with 40,097 oligonucleotides covering the C. difficile 630 genome and revealed a core genome for all the strains of 32%. The array also covered genes unique to two PCR-ribotype 027 strains, relative to C. difficile 630 which were represented by 681 probes. All of these genes were also found in the commonly occuring PCR-ribotypes 001 and 106, and the emerging hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 078 strains, indicating that these are markers for all highly virulent strains. Conclusions We have fulfilled the aims of this study by identifying markers for CD630 and markers associated with hypervirulence, albeit genes that are not just indicative of PCR-ribotype 027 strains. We have also extended this study and have defined a more stringent core gene set compared to those previously published due to the comprehensive array coverage. Further to this we have defined a list of genes absent from non-toxinogenic strains and defined the nature of the specific toxin deletion in the strain CD37.

  20. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course...... period, stool specimens for C. difficile toxins analysis were collected from 112 children with celiac disease as controls. RESULTS: Clostridium difficile occurrence was significantly higher in patients with IBD compared with patients with celiac disease (7.5% versus 0.8%; P = 0.008). Clostridium...... difficile was associated with active disease in 71.4% of patients with IBD (P = 0.01). Colonic involvement was found in 85.7% of patients with C. difficile. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors, hospitalization, and IBD therapies were not associated with increased C. difficile detection. At 12 months...

  1. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile/Epi and meridian bioscience illumigene C. difficile assays for detecting Clostridium difficile ribotype 033 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androga, Grace O; McGovern, Alan M; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J; Perkins, Timothy T; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 033 (RT033) is found in the gastrointestinal tracts of production animals and, occasionally, humans. The illumigene C. difficile assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) failed to detect any of 52 C. difficile RT033 isolates, while all strains signaled positive for the binary toxin genes but were reported as negative for C. difficile by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi assay (Cepheid). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Clostridium difficile in Retail Meats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-16

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea in healthcare settings but little is known about what causes cases in the community. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. L. Clifford McDonald discusses two papers in the May 2009 edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases that explore whether the organism could be found in meat samples purchased in grocery stores in Arizona and Canada.  Created: 4/16/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/16/2009.

  3. Yield of stool culture with isolate toxin testing versus a two-step algorithm including stool toxin testing for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Lema, Clara A; Perl, Trish M; Cai, Mian; Ross, Tracy L; Speck, Kathleen A; Carroll, Karen C

    2007-11-01

    We examined the incremental yield of stool culture (with toxin testing on isolates) versus our two-step algorithm for optimal detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile. Per the two-step algorithm, stools were screened for C. difficile-associated glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen and, if positive, tested for toxin by a direct (stool) cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). In parallel, stools were cultured for C. difficile and tested for toxin by both indirect (isolate) CCNA and conventional PCR if the direct CCNA was negative. The "gold standard" for toxigenic C. difficile was detection of C. difficile by the GDH screen or by culture and toxin production by direct or indirect CCNA. We tested 439 specimens from 439 patients. GDH screening detected all culture-positive specimens. The sensitivity of the two-step algorithm was 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70 to 84%), and that of culture was 87% (95% CI, 80 to 92%). PCR results correlated completely with those of CCNA testing on isolates (29/29 positive and 32/32 negative, respectively). We conclude that GDH is an excellent screening test and that culture with isolate CCNA testing detects an additional 23% of toxigenic C. difficile missed by direct CCNA. Since culture is tedious and also detects nontoxigenic C. difficile, we conclude that culture is most useful (i) when the direct CCNA is negative but a high clinical suspicion of toxigenic C. difficile remains, (ii) in the evaluation of new diagnostic tests for toxigenic C. difficile (where the best reference standard is essential), and (iii) in epidemiologic studies (where the availability of an isolate allows for strain typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing).

  4. [Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá-Hernández, Luis; Mena-Ribas, Ana; Niubó-Bosh, Jordi; Marín-Arriaza, Mercedes

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in developed countries, and is one of the main aetiologic agents of community diarrhea. The eruption of the hypervirulent strain BI/NAP1/027 has given rise to an increase in the morbidity and mortality of C.difficile infection (CDI). This document aims to review the main clinical pictures of CDI and the laboratory diagnosis, including sampling, transport and storage of specimens, specimen processing, diagnostic procedures, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and molecular characterisation of the isolates. The main purpose of the article is to develop a practical document that provides answers to the main questions that arise in the laboratory diagnosis of CDI. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Update on Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Monnier, A; Zahar, J-R; Barbut, F

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) occur primarily in hospitalized patients with risk factors such as concomitant or recent use of antibiotics. CDI related additional costs are important for the global population and health-care facilities. CDI epidemiology has changed since 2003: they became more frequent boosted by large outbreaks, more severe, more resistant to antibiotic treatment, and spread to new groups of population without any risk factor. This is partly due to the emergence and worldwide dissemination of new and more virulent C. difficile strains such as the epidemic clone 027/NAP1/BI. The host immune response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of CDI and could also be involved in the occurrence of recurrent or severe forms. New guidelines including new molecular tests (NAAT) have recently clarified and simplified the diagnostic strategies for the microbiological diagnosis of CDI. The CDI incidence was proven to be related to the level of clinical suspicion and the frequency of microbiological screening for C. difficile. The current recommendations for the treatment of CDI mention oral metronidazole as the first line treatment for mild to moderate diarrhea. Oral vancomycin use should be restricted to severe cases. In the absence of consensus, the treatment of multiple recurrences remains a major concern. New and more targeted antibiotics and innovative therapeutic strategies (fecal transplantation, monoclonal antibodies, and vaccination) have emerged as new therapies for CDI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  7. Recent changes in Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Silva Júnior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Diarrhea associated with C. difficile has increased incidence, morbidity, and mortality in the last few years. The major related risk factors include use of antibiotics, elderly patients and prolonged hospital stay. Many patients receive combinations of antibiotics or multiple antibiotics, which represents the main risk to develop diarrhea associated to C. difficile or its recurrence. Therefore, interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing, as well as compliance with infection control measures can reduce hospital-acquired C. difficile infections. This review addresses the epidemiological changes in C. difficile disease and its treatment.

  8. Current status of Clostridium difficile infection epidemiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lessa, Fernanda C; Gould, Carolyn V; McDonald, L Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge...

  9. Nieuwe mogelijkheden bij Clostridium difficile-infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nood, Els; Keller, Josbert J.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Speelman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Currently available broad spectrum antibiotics are not sufficiently effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). Donor faecal microbiota transplantation is a very effective treatment for second and recurrent infection but is time-consuming and requires careful screening of

  10. Clostridium difficile colitis: A clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gabie K B; Reidy, Tobi J; Huk, Matthew D; Lane, Frederick R

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium difficile colitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the surgical patient. In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have shown marked increases in frequency, severity, and resistance to standard treatment. With urgent operative interventions and novel endoscopic approaches, pseudomembranous colitis is being seen more commonly in surgical practices. In this paper, we will review a number of papers from the literature. We will discuss the epidemiology, evaluation and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Fulminant colitis may require emergency operation. For the surgical endoscopist, fecal microbiota transplantation restores the gastrointestinal flora, and has been shown to be effective in more than 80% of patients. Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of healthcare-related diarrhea leading to increased morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Increases in failure rates and resistance to current treatments are clinical and economic challenges in the healthcare situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitive and selective culture medium for detection of environmental Clostridium difficile isolates without requirement for anaerobic culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadnum, Jennifer L; Hurless, Kelly N; Deshpande, Abhishek; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-09-01

    Effective and easy-to-use methods for detecting Clostridium difficile spore contamination would be useful for identifying environmental reservoirs and monitoring the effectiveness of room disinfection. Culture-based detection methods are sensitive for detecting C. difficile, but their utility is limited due to the requirement of anaerobic culture conditions and microbiological expertise. We developed a low-cost selective broth medium containing thioglycolic acid and l-cystine, termed C. difficile brucella broth with thioglycolic acid and l-cystine (CDBB-TC), for the detection of C. difficile from environmental specimens under aerobic culture conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of CDBB-TC (under aerobic culture conditions) were compared to those of CDBB (under anaerobic culture conditions) for the recovery of C. difficile from swabs collected from hospital room surfaces. CDBB-TC was significantly more sensitive than CDBB for recovering environmental C. difficile (36/41 [88%] versus 21/41 [51%], respectively; P = 0.006). C. difficile latex agglutination, an enzyme immunoassay for toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase, and a PCR for toxin B genes were all effective as confirmatory tests. For 477 total environmental cultures, the specificity of CDBB-TC versus that of CDBB based upon false-positive yellow-color development of the medium without recovery of C. difficile was 100% (0 false-positive results) versus 96% (18 false-positive results), respectively. False-positive cultures for CDBB were attributable to the growth of anaerobic non-C. difficile organisms that did not grow in CDBB-TC. Our results suggest that CDBB-TC provides a sensitive and selective medium for the recovery of C. difficile organisms from environmental samples, without the need for anaerobic culture conditions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Polyclonal Antibody Therapies for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Simon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection has emerged as a growing worldwide health problem. The colitis of Clostridium difficile infection results from the synergistic action of C. difficile secreted toxins A and B upon the colon mucosa. A human monoclonal IgG anti-toxin has demonstrated the ability in combination therapy to reduce mortality in C. difficile challenged hamsters. This antibody is currently in a clinical trial for the treatment of human Clostridium difficile infection. More than one group of investigators has considered using polyclonal bovine colostral antibodies to toxins A and B as an oral passive immunization. A significant proportion of the healthy human population possesses polyclonal antibodies to the Clostridium difficile toxins. We have demonstrated that polyclonal IgA derived from the pooled plasma of healthy donors possesses specificity to toxins A and B and can neutralize these toxins in a cell-based assay. This suggests that secretory IgA prepared from such pooled plasma IgA may be able to be used as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.

  13. Molecular diagnosis and genotyping of Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Renate Johanna van den

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first discovered in 1935, but it was not until 1977 that this bacterium was found to be associated with pseudomembranous colitis. The disease was considered to be caused by the production of two C. difficile toxins, toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB). TcdA was shown to exhibit

  14. Clostridium difficile infection : epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the

  15. TREATMENT OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE- ASSOCIATED DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Antic-Mladenovic

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus that is widely distributed in the environment, but is found as a part of a normal large bowel flora in approximately 3% of normal adults. C. difficile produces two protein exotoxins: toxin A and toxin B. Both toxins are responsible for causing the sings and symptoms of disease.C. difficile is now thought to be responsible for a spectrum of diseases, ranging from asymptomatic colonization to diarrhea of varying severity, life-threatening colitis, often as a consequence of long-term antibiotic exposure. This spectrum has become known as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD.Treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease demand administration of effi-cient antibiotics (vancomycin, metronidazole, anion exchange resins and probiotics (Lactobacillus spp., Saccharomyces boulardii.

  16. Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea: An increased problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina Soto, Leticia; García Ávila, Sara; Córdoba Alonso, Ana Isabel; Roiz Mesones, M Pía; Arnaiz García, Ana M; Valero Díaz de Lamadrid, M Carmen

    2016-12-16

    Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea is a major health problem that seems to be on the increase. In our study, we analyse the changes in the incidence of this infection over the last 11 years. A descriptive study in hospitalised patients with Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea in University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla (Santander, Spain) from 2004 to 2014. A total of 244 adults were identified [53% men; 66 (SD 15) years]. The cases of nosocomial acquisition (80%), with respect to community acquired Clostridium difficile infection, were older [67 (SD 15) years vs. 63 (19) years; P=.01), high comorbidity (86% vs. 75%; P=.01), use of antibiotics (95% vs. 75%; P<.001) and proton pump inhibitors (87% vs. 48% P<.001). There has been an increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea in our hospital over an 11-year period. The clinical profile of patients with Clostridium difficile diarrhoea varies by place of acquisition of infection. The prevalence of this disease is increasing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative nutritional and chemical phenome of Clostridium difficile isolates determined using phenotype microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Scaria

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The expanded nutritional utilization profile of some newer C. difficile strains could be one of the reasons for infections in patients who are not exposed to the hospital environment or not undergoing antibiotic treatment. This nutritional profile could be used to design tube feeding formulas that reduce the risk of CDI.

  18. The importance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry for correct identification of Clostridium difficile isolated from chromID C. difficile chromogenic agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H.K. Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical workflow of using chromogenic agar and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-fight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS for Clostridium difficile identification was evaluated. The addition of MALDI-TOF MS identification after the chromID C. difficile chromogenic agar culture could significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy of C. difficile.

  19. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keshtkar-Jahromi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS can be associated with different infectious etiologies, but the relationship between pseudomembranous colitis and HUS was first described in the 1970s in some childhood patients. There is very limited published literature on Clostridium difficile-associated HUS. We report a case of C. difficile-related HUS in an adult patient and provide a review of the literature.

  20. Clinical and cost effectiveness of eight disinfection methods for terminal disinfection of hospital isolation rooms contaminated with Clostridium difficile 027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, L; Forrest, H; Fakis, A; Craig, J; Claxton, L; Khare, M

    2012-10-01

    Clostridium difficile spores can survive in the environment for months or years, and contaminated environmental surfaces are important sources of nosocomial C. difficile transmission. To compare the clinical and cost effectiveness of eight C. difficile environmental disinfection methods for the terminal cleaning of hospital rooms contaminated with C. difficile spores. This was a novel randomized prospective study undertaken in three phases. Each empty hospital room was disinfected, then contaminated with C. difficile spores and disinfected with one of eight disinfection products: hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV; Bioquell Q10) 350-700 parts per million (ppm); dry ozone at 25 ppm (Meditrox); 1000 ppm chlorine-releasing agent (Actichlor Plus); microfibre cloths (Vermop) used in combination with and without a chlorine-releasing agent; high temperature over heated dry atomized steam cleaning (Polti steam) in combination with a sanitizing solution (HPMed); steam cleaning (Osprey steam); and peracetic acid wipes (Clinell). Swabs were inoculated on to C. difficile-selective agar and colony counts were performed pre and post disinfection for each method. A cost-effectiveness analysis was also undertaken comparing all methods to the current method of 1000 ppm chlorine-releasing agent (Actichlor Plus). Products were ranked according to the log(10) reduction in colony count from contamination phase to disinfection. The three statistically significant most effective products were hydrogen peroxide (2.303); 1000 ppm chlorine-releasing agent (2.223) and peracetic acid wipes (2.134). The cheaper traditional method of using a chlorine-releasing agent for disinfection was as effective as modern methods. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. CRISPR Diversity and Microevolution in Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Joakim M.; Shoup, Madelyn; Robinson, Cathy; Britton, Robert; Olsen, Katharina E.P.; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virulent strains of Clostridium difficile have become a global health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. Traditional typing methods do not provide ideal resolution to track outbreak strains, ascertain genetic diversity between isolates, or monitor the phylogeny of this species on a global basis. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) in C. difficile to assess the potential of CRISPR-based phylogeny and high-resolution genotyping. A single Type-IB CRISPR-Cas system was identified in 217 analyzed genomes with cas gene clusters present at conserved chromosomal locations, suggesting vertical evolution of the system, assessing a total of 1,865 CRISPR arrays. The CRISPR arrays, markedly enriched (8.5 arrays/genome) compared with other species, occur both at conserved and variable locations across strains, and thus provide a basis for typing based on locus occurrence and spacer polymorphism. Clustering of strains by array composition correlated with sequence type (ST) analysis. Spacer content and polymorphism within conserved CRISPR arrays revealed phylogenetic relationship across clades and within ST. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays were instrumental for differentiating closely related strains, e.g., ST1/RT027/B1 strains and pathogenicity locus encoding ST3/RT001 strains. CRISPR spacers showed sequence similarity to phage sequences, which is consistent with the native role of CRISPR-Cas as adaptive immune systems in bacteria. Overall, CRISPR-Cas sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping of C. difficile isolates, provide insights into the micro-evolutionary events that occur between closely related strains, and reflect the evolutionary trajectory of these genomes. PMID:27576538

  2. CRISPR Diversity and Microevolution in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Joakim M; Shoup, Madelyn; Robinson, Cathy; Britton, Robert; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-09-19

    Virulent strains of Clostridium difficile have become a global health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. Traditional typing methods do not provide ideal resolution to track outbreak strains, ascertain genetic diversity between isolates, or monitor the phylogeny of this species on a global basis. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) in C. difficile to assess the potential of CRISPR-based phylogeny and high-resolution genotyping. A single Type-IB CRISPR-Cas system was identified in 217 analyzed genomes with cas gene clusters present at conserved chromosomal locations, suggesting vertical evolution of the system, assessing a total of 1,865 CRISPR arrays. The CRISPR arrays, markedly enriched (8.5 arrays/genome) compared with other species, occur both at conserved and variable locations across strains, and thus provide a basis for typing based on locus occurrence and spacer polymorphism. Clustering of strains by array composition correlated with sequence type (ST) analysis. Spacer content and polymorphism within conserved CRISPR arrays revealed phylogenetic relationship across clades and within ST. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays were instrumental for differentiating closely related strains, e.g., ST1/RT027/B1 strains and pathogenicity locus encoding ST3/RT001 strains. CRISPR spacers showed sequence similarity to phage sequences, which is consistent with the native role of CRISPR-Cas as adaptive immune systems in bacteria. Overall, CRISPR-Cas sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping of C. difficile isolates, provide insights into the micro-evolutionary events that occur between closely related strains, and reflect the evolutionary trajectory of these genomes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Clostridium difficile in Humans and Food Animals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-06-30

    Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that causes diarrhea and sometimes serious intestinal illnesses. In recent years, C. difficile infections have been increasing in number and severity, including among some people outside healthcare settings. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Michael Jhung discusses his recent study that looked at a new, increasingly prevalent strain of C. difficile in people and compared it to a strain historically found in animals to see whether the two might be linked. The study is published in the July 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 6/30/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/3/2008.

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGIC INVESTIGATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE AND CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN HEALTHY HORSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Arroyo, Luis; Staempfli, Henry

    Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are important causes of equine colitis but can also be found in healthy individuals. Epidemiologic information is restricted to cross-sectional studies of fecal shedding with little information on prevalence in gastrointestinal compartments other...... than feces and variability in shedding over time. The objectives were to investigate the presence of C. difficile and C. perfringens in healthy horses over time and assess prevalence in different gastrointestinal compartments. Feces were collected monthly from 25 horses for one year. Ingesta were...... collected from nine GI compartments of a separate group of 15 euthanized horses. Selective enrichment culture was performed, followed by toxin gene detection and ribotyping (C. difficile) and multiplex PCR (C. perfringens). Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 15/275 (5.5%) samples from 10/25 (40...

  5. Pomegranate extract exhibits in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Sydney M; Summanen, Paula H; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Henning, Susanne M; Li, Zhaoping

    2014-10-01

    To determine the possible utility of pomegranate extract in the management or prevention of Clostridium difficile infections or colonization. The activity of pomegranate was tested against 29 clinical C. difficile isolates using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved agar dilution technique. Total phenolics content of the pomegranate extract was determined by Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method and final concentrations of 6.25 to 400 μg/mL gallic acid equivalent were achieved in the agar. All strains had MICs at 12.5 to 25 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent range. Our results suggest antimicrobial in vitro activity for pomegranate extract against toxigenic C. difficile. Pomegranate extract may be a useful contributor to the management and prevention of C. difficile disease or colonization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Routine disc diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Clostridium difficile and association with PCR ribotype 027

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, H M; Danielsen, T K; Justesen, U S

    2015-01-01

    Reduced susceptibility to metronidazole and vancomycin in Clostridium difficile has been reported, which emphasises the need for simple antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. The aim of this study was to apply a published disc diffusion method and zone diameter breakpoint correlates...... the published breakpoint (difficile PCR ribotype 027 isolates had smaller zone...... diameters than non-027 isolates. The disc diffusion method is very simple and inexpensive, and the published zone diameter breakpoints will detect C. difficile isolates with reduced susceptibility to metronidazole and vancomycin....

  7. The changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI.

  8. Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michal Stevens, A.; Esposito, Douglas H.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Connor, Bradley A.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Goorhuis, Abraham; Hynes, Noreen A.; Libman, Michael; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; McCarthy, Anne E.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Schwartz, Eli; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Scott Benson, L.; Leung, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and

  9. PCR ribotype prevalence and molecular basis of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) and fluoroquinolone resistance in Irish clinical Clostridium difficile isolates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Solomon, Katie

    2011-09-01

    Antimicrobial use is recognized as a risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and outbreaks. We studied the relationship between PCR ribotype, antimicrobial susceptibility and the genetic basis of resistance in response to exposure to antimicrobial agents.

  10. Genotypic investigation of Clostridium difficile in Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, H; Abbott, L P; Low, D E; Willey, B; Mulvey, M; Weese, J Scott

    2008-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of disease in Canada; however, little information is available about the disease in the Maritime provinces. The objective of the present study was to characterize C difficile isolates obtained from people hospitalized with C difficile infection in Prince Edward Island. One hundred twenty-six C difficile ELISA toxin-positive stool samples were obtained and cultured using an enrichment protocol. C difficile was isolated from 105 of 126 (83%) samples. Twenty-two different ribotypes were identified. The most common ribotype, ribotype W, was a North American pulsotype 2 (NAP2), toxinotype 0 strain, which represented 18% of isolates. The next most common ribotype was a NAP1, toxinotype III strain, which accounted for 11% of isolates. Ribotype 027/NAP1 only accounted for five (4.7%) isolates. Forty-five per cent of isolates possessed genes encoding production of binary toxin. Three different ribotypes, all NAP1, toxinotype III strains, had a frameshift mutation in the tcdC gene (Delta117), while one isolate (ribotype 078, NAP4, toxinotype V) had a truncating mutation (C184T) in the tcdC gene.

  11. Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from wild carnivore species in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'Elia, Mirella Lauria; Tostes Teixeira, Erika Procópio; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Kocuvan, Aleksander; Rupnik, Maja; Santos, André Luiz Quagliatto; Junior, Carlos Augusto Oliveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2014-08-01

    Despite some case reports, the importance of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile for wild carnivores remains unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify C. perfringens and C. difficile strains in stool samples from wild carnivore species in Brazil. A total of 34 stool samples were collected and subjected to C. perfringens and C. difficile isolation. Suggestive colonies of C. perfringens were then analyzed for genes encoding the major C. perfringens toxins (alpha, beta, epsilon and iota) and the beta-2 toxin (cpb2), enterotoxin (cpe) and NetB (netb) genes. C. difficile strains were analyzed by multiplex-PCR for toxins A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) and a binary toxin gene (cdtB) and also submitted to a PCR ribotyping. Unthawed aliquots of samples positive for C. difficile isolation were subjected to the detection of A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay (CTA). C. perfringens was isolated from 26 samples (76.5%), all of which were genotyped as type A. The netb gene was not detected, whereas the cpb2 and cpe genes were found in nine and three C. perfringens strains, respectively. C. difficile was isolated from two (5.9%) samples. A non-toxigenic strain was recovered from a non-diarrheic maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Conversely, a toxigenic strain was found in the sample of a diarrheic ocelot (Leopardus pardallis); an unthawed stool sample was also positive for A/B toxins by CTA, indicating a diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in this animal. The present work suggests that wild carnivore species could carry C. difficile strains and that they could be susceptible to C. difficile infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile: comparison of the cell culture neutralization, Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholi, P; Kelly, C; Raczkowski, M; Balada-Llasat, J M

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Several laboratory techniques are available to detect C. difficile toxins or the genes that encode them in fecal samples. We evaluated the Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi (Cepheid, CA) that detect the toxin B gene (tcdB) and tcdB, cdt, and a deletion in tcdC associated with the 027/NAP1/BI strain, respectively, by real-time PCR, and the Illumigene C. difficile (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) that detects the toxin A gene (tcdA) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification in stool specimens. Toxigenic culture was used as the reference method for discrepant stool specimens. Two hundred prospective and fifty retrospective diarrheal stool specimens were tested simultaneously by the cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (CCNA) and the Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays. Of the 200 prospective stools tested, 10.5% (n = 23) were determined to be positive by CCNA, 17.5% (n = 35) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile, and 21.5% (n = 43) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 50 retrospective stools, previously determined to be positive by CCNA, 94% (n = 47) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile and 100% (n = 50) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 11 discrepant results (i.e., negative by Illumigene C. difficile but positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi), all were determined to be positive by the toxigenic culture. A total of 21% of the isolates were presumptively identified by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi as the 027/NAP1/BI strain. The Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi assays were the most sensitive, rapid, and easy-to use assays for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in stool specimens.

  13. Protective effect of a mixture of kefir-isolated lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in a hamster model of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Patricia A; Carasi, Paula; Bolla, María de los Angeles; De Antoni, Graciela L; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to test the protective effect of a mixture (MM) constituted by kefir-isolated microorganisms (Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus kefir, Lc. lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in a hamster model of infection with Clostridium difficile, an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium that causes diarrhoea. Placebo or MM was administered ad libitum in drinking water from day 0 to the end of treatment. Hamsters received orally 200 μg of clyndamicin at day 7 and then were infected with 1 × 10(8) CFU of C. difficile by gavage. Development of diarrhoea and death was registered until the end of the protocol. Surviving animals were sacrificed at day 16, and a test for biological activity of clostridial toxins and histological stainings were performed in caecum samples. Six of seven infected animals developed diarrhoea and 5/7 died at the end of the experimental protocol. The histological sections showed oedema and inflammatory infiltrates with neutrophils and crypt abscesses. In the group of animals infected and treated with MM1/1000, only 1 of 7 hamsters showed diarrhoea and none of them died. The histological sections showed only a slight thickening of the mucosa with presence of lymphocytic infiltrate. These results demonstrate that an oral treatment with a mixture of kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts was able to prevent diarrhoea and enterocolitis triggered by C. difficile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection Worsens the Prognosis of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Negrón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients.

  15. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martijn P; Notermans, Daan W; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance.......Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance....

  16. Real-time polymerase chain reaction testing for Clostridium difficile reduces isolation time and improves patient management in a small community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzaro, Mary; Cirone, Justin

    2012-09-01

    The impact of a switch from a toxin A/B enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile was assessed for C difficile infection (CDI) rates, patient isolation-days, and CDI-related treatment. A 6-month retrospective study was done on symptomatic patients tested by the toxin A/B EIA and PCR assays. Data on the number of C difficile tests ordered, patient isolation-days, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin were collected. CDI rates were reported as cases per 10,000 patient-days, and differences between both groups were compared by χ(2) and Z-test analysis. The CDI incidence was 11.2 and 12.7/10,000 patient-days in the EIA and PCR test periods, respectively (P = .36). Health care-associated CDI decreased from 4.4 per 10,000 patient-days during EIA testing to 0.9 per 10,000 patient-days during PCR testing (P = .02). A significant decrease in patient isolation-days (P tests ordered (P = .002), and metronidazole treatment for patients with a negative C difficile test (P = .02) was observed with PCR testing. PCR testing is a viable option for small community hospitals, providing accurate and timely results for patient management and infection control. This can potentially lead to improved outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and significant hospital cost savings. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile at a medical center in Taiwan: persistence of genetically clustering of A⁻B⁺ isolates and increase of A⁺B⁺ isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hsin Chia

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We investigated the changing trend of various toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolates at a 3 500-bed hospital in Taiwan. Genetic relatedness and antimicrobial susceptibility of toxigenic C. difficile isolates were also examined. METHODS: A total of 110 non-repeat toxigenic C. difficile isolates from different patients were collected between 2002 and 2007. Characterization of the 110 toxigenic isolates was performed using agar dilution method, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA genotyping, tcdC genotyping, and toxinotyping. RESULTS: Among the 110 toxigenic isolates studied, 70 isolates harbored tcdA and tcdB (A⁺B⁺ and 40 isolates harbored tcdB only (A⁻B⁺. The annual number of A⁺B⁺ isolates considerably increased over the 6-year study (P = 0.055. A total of 109 different MLVA genotypes were identified, in which A⁺B⁺ isolates and A⁻B⁺ isolates were differentiated into two genetic clusters with similarity of 17.6%. Twenty-four (60% of the 40 A⁻B⁺ isolates formed a major cluster, MLVA-group 1, with a similarity of 85%. Seven (6.4% resistant isolates were identified, including two metronidazole-resistant and five vancomycin-resistant isolates. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated a persistence of a MLVA group 1 A⁻B⁺ isolates and an increase of A⁺B⁺ isolates with diverse MLVA types. Moreover, C. difficile isolates with antimicrobial resistance to metronidazole or vancomycin were found to have emerged. Continuous surveillance is warranted to understand the recent situation and control the further spread of the toxigenic C. difficile isolates, especially among hospitalized patients.

  18. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming obligate anaerobe responsible for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Its virulence is associated with the production of endotoxins A and B and endospores, which can cause symptoms, such as diarrhoea, toxic megacolon, and pseudomembranous colitis. Given the increasing elderly population and the well-recognized problem of over-prescribing of broad-spectrum antibiotics, it is critical to have an understanding of molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility in China. This study analyzed the toxin types and multilocus sequence typing (MLST results of 74 clinical isolates of C. difficile after the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH screening test and anaerobic culture. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of four different antibiotics were determined for all of the isolates, and the bacterial resistance mechanisms were investigated. Sixty-five strains (75% were toxigenic, including 54 tcdA-positive, tcdB-positive, and cdtA/cdtB-negative strains (A+B+CDT− and nine A−B+CDT− strains. Eleven strains (14.9% were non-toxigenic. All clinical isolates were classified into 26 MLST genotypes, with the predominant type being ST-54 (18.9%. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. The tetracycline, clindamycin, and levofloxacin resistance rates were 1.4%, 36.5%, and 20.3%, respectively. The expression of tet(M, erm(B, and mutations of gyrA and/or gyrB were observed in the tetracycline-, clindamycin-, and levofloxacin-resistant isolates, respectively.

  19. Updates on Clostridium difficile spore biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Fernando; Lagos-Moraga, Sebastián; Calderón-Romero, Paulina; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic spore former, and an important nosocomial pathogenic bacterium. C. difficile spores are the morphotype of transmission and recurrence of the disease. The formation of C. difficile spores and their subsequent germination are essential processes during the infection. Recent in vitro and in vivo work has shed light on how spores are formed and the timing of in vivo sporulation in a mouse model. Advances have also been made in our understanding of the machineries involved in spore germination, and how antibiotic-induced dysbiosis affects the metabolism of bile salts and thus impacts C. difficile germination in vivo. Studies have also attempted to identify how C. difficile spores interact with the host's intestinal mucosa. Spore resistance has also been revisited by several groups highlighting the extreme resistance of this morphotype to traditional food processing regimes and disinfectants used in clinical settings. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize recent advances on spore formation/germination in vitro and in vivo, spore-host interactions, and spore resistance that contribute to our knowledge of the role of C. difficile spores in the infectious process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Antibiotic prescribing policy and Clostridium difficile diarrhoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Broad-spectrum antibiotics, particularly intravenous cephalosporins, are associated with Clostridium difficile diarrhoea. Diarrhoea due to C. difficile is a growing problem in hospitals, especially among elderly patients. AIM: To establish whether changing an antibiotic policy with the aim of reducing the use of injectable cephalosporins leads to a reduction in the incidence of C. difficile diarrhoea in elderly patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. METHODS: A group of patients who were subject to the new antibiotic policy from the period following July 2000, were compared with patients who were admitted prior to July 2000 and were not subject to the new policy. Infections, antibiotic prescriptions and mortality rates were determined from case notes, and C. difficle diarrhoea rates from microbiological data. RESULTS: Intravenous cephalosporin use fell from 210 to 28 defined daily doses (p < 0.001) following the change in antibiotic policy, with a corresponding increase in piperacillin-tazobactam (p < 0.001) and moxifloxacin (p < 0.001) use. The new policy led to a significant reduction in C. difficile diarrhoea cases. The relative risk of developing C. difficile infection with the old policy compared to the new policy was 3.24 (95%CI 1.07-9.84, p = 0.03). DISCUSSION: The antibiotic policy was successfully introduced into an elderly care service. It reduced both intravenous cephalosporin use and C. difficile diarrhoea.

  1. Infection control measures to limit the spread of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonberg, R-P; Kuijper, E J; Wilcox, M H; Barbut, F; Tüll, P; Gastmeier, P; van den Broek, P J; Colville, A; Coignard, B; Daha, T; Debast, S; Duerden, B I; van den Hof, S; van der Kooi, T; Maarleveld, H J H; Nagy, E; Notermans, D W; O'Driscoll, J; Patel, B; Stone, S; Wiuff, C

    2008-05-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) presents mainly as a nosocomial infection, usually after antimicrobial therapy. Many outbreaks have been attributed to C. difficile, some due to a new hyper-virulent strain that may cause more severe disease and a worse patient outcome. As a result of CDAD, large numbers of C. difficile spores may be excreted by affected patients. Spores then survive for months in the environment; they cannot be destroyed by standard alcohol-based hand disinfection, and persist despite usual environmental cleaning agents. All these factors increase the risk of C. difficile transmission. Once CDAD is diagnosed in a patient, immediate implementation of appropriate infection control measures is mandatory in order to prevent further spread within the hospital. The quality and quantity of antibiotic prescribing should be reviewed to minimise the selective pressure for CDAD. This article provides a review of the literature that can be used for evidence-based guidelines to limit the spread of C. difficile. These include early diagnosis of CDAD, surveillance of CDAD cases, education of staff, appropriate use of isolation precautions, hand hygiene, protective clothing, environmental cleaning and cleaning of medical equipment, good antibiotic stewardship, and specific measures during outbreaks. Existing local protocols and practices for the control of C. difficile should be carefully reviewed and modified if necessary.

  2. ETIOPATHOGENESIS OF DISEASES CAUSED BY CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Stojanović

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium (C. difficile is a typical representative of the genus Clostridium. After colonization of the intestinal tract, toxigenic C. difficile strains are capable to produce two exotoxins, enterotoxin (toxin A and cytotoxin (toxin B, which cause diarrhea and colitis. Toxin A binds to specific carbohydrate receptors on the surface of intestinal cells and this is the beginning of damages in the intestinal tract which include destruction of the villi epithelium, limiting membrane, intercellular connections (zonula occludens and surface of the mucosa. If only toxin B is injected into intestinal cells, it does not cause damage nor increased fluids secretion. Probably, the reason for this is the inability of the toxin to bind to the cell membrane receptor in the intestinal tract under normal physiological conditions. Toxigenic strains of C. difficile can be found in the intestines of healthy people, without any symptoms or clinical signs (asymptomatic colonization. However, in people with risk factors, they can cause diarrhea of varying severity and life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. These diseases are known as C. difficile associated disease - CDAD.

  3. Rectal bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, M; Tinggaard, M; Helms, M

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections. Among other alternatives to standard treatment with vancomycin for recurrent infection are faecal microbiota transplantation and rectal bacteriotherapy with a fixed mixture of intestinal bacterial strains isolated from...... for relapsing C. difficile in Denmark, 2000-2012. The primary end point was recurrent diarrhoea within 30 days after treatment. A total of 55 patients were included in this case series. Thirty-five patients (64%) had no recurrence within 30 days of bacteriotherapy. Patients with recurrence tended to be older....... difficile episode less than 6 months before bacteriotherapy. The most common adverse events were abdominal pain (10.9%) and worsening diarrhoea (4.3%). One patient was hospitalized 10 days after treatment with appendicitis, fever, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. The results from this study indicate...

  4. A review on epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Esfandiari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile is an important factor in the development of the gastrointestinal diseases because of irrational antibiotic prescription and antimicrobial resistance. In the past, this bacterium was introduced as an agent of the infection in the hospitals called "hospital acquired Clostridium difficile infection". This infection is a main cause of morbidity and mortality internationally. But changing in the epidemiology of the infection was observed in recent years. People not taking antibiotics as well as any contact with the clinical system were hospitalized due to the infection named "Community-Associated Clostridium difficile infection". Furthermore, the hypervirulent strains of C. difficile were identified outside of the health care facilities in different sources such as environment, animals and food products. Today the role of C. difficile has not been confirmed as a zoonotic agent or foodborne pathogen. Taking into account, it should be taken attention to the sensitive individuals such as pregnant women, elderly and children for the consumption of the contaminated food products with C. difficile spores and probable cause of the infection in these individuals. For this purpose, presentation of the guidelines or the prevention strategies for the transmission of bacteria in the society as well as the healthcare facilities is important. In this review study, the history, the risk factors of disease and the reports of infection in the healthcare facilities and outside of this environment in Iran were discussed. Finally, we supposed that based on the isolation of C. difficile with different genetic profile in Iran in comparison with international ribotypes, the existence of native strains leading to the infection in the community and the healthcare facilities is possible. This hypothesis shows the significance of regional differences in the epidemiology and microbiology of disease. In addition, according to the present

  5. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  6. Clostridium difficile – emergent hospital flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela V. Dumitrescu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile is a Gram-positive sporogenous bacillus strictly anaerobic, which in the last decade has became the most important anaerobic bacterium in nosocomial human pathology. Cl.dificile is the etiological agent of more than 20% of diarrhea postantibiotics, over 95% of pseudomembranous colitis and the first cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea in adults. Although this bacterium usually colonizes the intestine of vertebrates (the normal microbiota, the toxinogenic strains (tcdA and tcdB are pathogenic in the digestive tract. Given the excessive use of antibiotics and the increased spores resistance, it is possible an environment contamination, with strains which may already be resistant to antibiotics. The main causes of this infection are decreased resistance to antibiotic-induced colonization, contamination with a pathogenic strain of Cl.difficile, secretion of A and/or B toxins and deficient immune response. Due to the increasing worldwide incidence of infections with C. difficile on one hand and to the discovery of new ways of transmitting the infection according with some studies regarding the genetic diversity of bacterium strains on the other hand, a new approach is necessary for C. difficile related topics..

  7. Diagnostic trends in Clostridium difficile detection in Finnish microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Eija; Rasinperä, Marja; Virolainen, Anni; Mentula, Silja; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2009-12-01

    Due to increased interest directed to Clostridium difficile-associated infections, a questionnaire survey of laboratory diagnostics of toxin-producing C. difficile was conducted in Finland in June 2006. Different aspects pertaining to C. difficile diagnosis, such as requests and criteria used for testing, methods used for its detection, yearly changes in diagnostics since 1996, and the total number of investigations positive for C. difficile in 2005, were asked in the questionnaire, which was sent to 32 clinical microbiology laboratories, including all hospital-affiliated and the relevant private clinical microbiology laboratories in Finland. The situation was updated by phone and email correspondence in September 2008. In June 2006, 28 (88%) laboratories responded to the questionnaire survey; 24 of them reported routinely testing requested stool specimens for C. difficile. Main laboratory methods included toxin detection (21/24; 88%) and/or anaerobic culture (19/24; 79%). In June 2006, 18 (86%) of the 21 laboratories detecting toxins directly from feces, from the isolate, or both used methods for both toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), whereas only one laboratory did so in 1996. By September 2008, all of the 23 laboratories performing diagnostics for C. difficile used methods for both TcdA and TcdB. In 2006, the number of specimens processed per 100,000 population varied remarkably between different hospital districts. In conclusion, culturing C. difficile is common and there has been a favorable shift in toxin detection practice in Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories. However, the variability in diagnostic activity reported in 2006 creates a challenge for national monitoring of the epidemiology of C. difficile and related diseases.

  8. An investigation of the subtype diversity of clinical isolates of Irish Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078 by repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Solomon, K

    2011-08-01

    A repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) subtyping method (DiversiLab) in conjunction with ribotyping, toxinotyping and antimicrobial-susceptibility testing was used to detect subtypes within Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078. Clinical isolates of ribotypes 027 (toxinotype III) (n = 30) and 078 (toxinotype V) (n = 23) were provided by health-care facilities across the Republic of Ireland over 2 months in 2006 and 1 month in 2009. Ribotype 027 isolates were significantly more related to each other (9 different subtype profiles) when compared to ribotype 078 isolates (14 different profiles) (P = 0.001; cut-off >90 % similarity). Almost half of ribotype 078 isolates (45.5 %) showed no relationship to each other. The clonality of ribotype 027 isolates suggests effective adaptation to the human niche, whereas the considerable genetic diversity within ribotype 078 isolates suggests that they may have originated from a variety of sources. Subtyping correlated well with antimicrobial susceptibility, in particular clindamycin susceptibility for ribotype 027, but diverse antimicrobial-susceptibility profiles were seen in ribotype 078 isolates, even within a single health-care facility. Between 2006 and 2009, a change in the predominant subtype of ribotype 027 was seen, with the recent clone representing half of all ribotype 027 isolates studied. This strain exhibited 89 % similarity to a rep-PCR profile of the North American NAP-1 strain.

  9. High prevalence of Clostridium difficile on retail root vegetables, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S C; Foster, N F; Elliott, B; Riley, T V

    2018-02-01

    The incidence of community-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI) in Australia has increased since mid-2011. With reports of clinically important C. difficile strains being isolated from retail foods in Europe and North America, a foodborne source of C. difficile in cases of CA-CDI is a possibility. This study represents the first to investigate the prevalence and genotypes of C. difficile in Australian retail vegetables. A total of 300 root vegetables grown in Western Australia (WA) were collected from retail stores and farmers' markets. Three vegetables of the same kind bought from the same store/market were treated as one sample. Selective enrichment culture, toxin profiling and PCR ribotyping were performed. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 30% (30/100) of pooled vegetable samples, 55·6% of organic potatoes, 50% of nonorganic potatoes, 22·2% of organic beetroots, 5·6% of organic onions and 5·3% of organic carrots. Over half (51·2%, 22/43) the isolates were toxigenic. Many of the ribotypes of C. difficile isolated were common among human and Australian animals. Clostridium difficile could be found commonly on retail root vegetables of WA. This may be potential sources for CA-CDI. This study enhances knowledge of possible sources of C. difficile in the Australian community, outside the hospital setting. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Clostridium difficile ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emerging enteropathogen responsible for pseudomembranous colitis in humans and diarrhoea in several domestic and wild animal species. Despite its known importance, there are few studies aboutC. difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR ribotypes in Brazil and the actual knowledge is restricted to studies on human isolates. The aim of the study was therefore to compare C. difficileribotypes isolated from humans and animals in Brazil. Seventy-six C. difficile strains isolated from humans (n = 25, dogs (n = 23, piglets (n = 12, foals (n = 7, calves (n = 7, one cat, and one manned wolf were distributed into 24 different PCR ribotypes. Among toxigenic strains, PCR ribotypes 014/020 and 106 were the most common, accounting for 14 (18.4% and eight (10.5% samples, respectively. Fourteen different PCR ribotypes were detected among human isolates, nine of them have also been identified in at least one animal species. PCR ribotype 027 was not detected, whereas 078 were found only in foals. This data suggests a high diversity of PCR ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil and support the discussion of C. difficile as a zoonotic pathogen.

  11. Selected aspects of Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mehlich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile pathogen is a cause of the most frequent nosocomial infection, which is antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Antibiotic treatment causes disruption of the microbiome balance, which makes the gut a friendly environment for the pathogen. It leads to pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon and even death. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is particularly dangerous to elderly patients, leading to the highest mortality rate. C. difficile is equipped with many virulence factors such as toxin A and B, binary toxin CDT, flagellum, S-layer proteins, Cwp66 and GroEL proteins, protease Cwp84, fibronectin-binding protein and the ability to form biofilm and spores. Problems with anti-CDI therapy prompt researchers and clinicians to seek alternative ways of therapy. Identification of immunological epitopes in outer layer proteins and the use of them as antigens for anti-CDI vaccines would be a rational approach to prevent the disease, but unfortunately such vaccines are not available yet. In this article we review the course of the disease, virulence and risk factors. We summarize briefly epidemiological data and the latest achievements in CDI treatment.

  12. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Collins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile has not been studied in detail in Asia, particularly Southeast Asia. We thus performed a prevalence study across four hospitals in Central Java province, Indonesia. Stool samples were collected from patients with diarrhoea and tested by enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and toxin A/B (C DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE, TechLab. Specimens were cultured and molecular typing was performed. In total, 340 samples were tested, of which 70 (20.6% were GDH positive, with toxin detected in 19 (5.6%. Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 37 specimens (10.9%, while a further 36 (10.6% nontoxigenic isolates were identified. The most common strain was ribotype 017 (24.3% of 74 isolates, followed by nontoxigenic types QX 224 (9.5%, and QX 238 and QX 108 (both 8.1%. The high prevalence of C. difficile highlights a need for ongoing surveillance of C. difficile infection in Indonesia.

  13. Clostridium Difficile Infection in the Nephrology Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dudzicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is currently the most frequently identified pathogen causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In recent years, increases incidence of infection, severe infection, recurrent infection and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have been observed. This may be a consequence of excessive antibiotic use and spread of the hypervirulent epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain of Clostridium difficile. The main risk factors for CDI are: antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalizations and number of comorbid conditions. Prevention of CDI mainly is focused in two directions: reducing the exposure of patients to the disease pathogen by intensifying hygiene measures, and reducing the impact of risk factors. A meta-analyses of clinical studies (observational, cohort and case control showed significantly higher risk of CDI and CDI recurrence in patients with chronic kidney disease and increased mortality risk in chronic kidney disease patients with CDI comparing those without CDI. Increased risk of CDI in patients with chronic kidney disease can be caused by: frequent antibiotic therapy associated with numerous infections resulting in intestinal microflora dysfunction, frequent hospitalizations, older age of the patients and an impaired immune system. Among preventative measures against CDI, the use of probiotics were also studied. In patients hospitalized in nephrology ward highly significant reduction of the CDI incidence was observed after the introduction of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v as CDI prophylaxis. Therefore, the use of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v seems to be a promising method of CDI prevention in chronic kidney disease patients hospitalized in nephrology ward.

  14. Clostridium difficile in Crete, Greece: epidemiology, microbiology and clinical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonis, G; Vardakas, K Z; Tansarli, G S; Dimopoulou, D; Papadimitriou, G; Kofteridis, D P; Maraki, S; Karanika, M; Falagas, M E

    2016-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology and microbiology of Clostridium difficile and the characteristics of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) in Crete in three groups of hospitalized patients with diarrhoea: group 1 [positive culture and positive toxin by enzyme immunoassay (EIA)]; group 2 (positive culture, negative toxin); group 3 (negative culture, negative toxin). Patients in group 1 were designated as those with definitive CDI (20 patients for whom data was available) and matched with cases in group 2 (40 patients) and group 3 (40 patients). C. difficile grew from 6% (263/4379) of stool specimens; 14·4% of these had positive EIA, of which 3% were resistant to metronidazole. Three isolates had decreased vancomycin susceptibility. Patients in groups 1 and 2 received more antibiotics (P = 0·03) and had more infectious episodes (P = 0·03) than patients in group 3 prior to diarrhoea. Antibiotic administration for C. difficile did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Mortality was similar in all three groups (10%, 12·5% and 5%, P = 0·49). CDI frequency was low in the University Hospital of Crete and isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  15. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: prevention and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez FJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fernando J Martinez,1 Daniel A Leffler,2 Ciaran P Kelly21Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral vancomycin use as a first-line agent in severe disease. From 1999 to 2004, 20,642 deaths were attributed to CDI in the United States, almost 7 times the rate of all other intestinal infections combined. Worldwide, several major CDI outbreaks have occurred, and many of these were associated with the NAP1 strain. This ‘epidemic’ strain has contributed to the rising incidence and mortality of CDI. The purpose of this article is to review the current management, treatment, infection control, and prevention strategies that are needed to combat this increasingly morbid disease.Keywords: antibiotic, antimicrobial, infectious colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, nosocomial, iatrogenic, toxin, Clostridium difficile

  16. [Successful measures to combat Clostridium difficile at Herlev Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarløv, Jens Otto; Arpi, Magnus

    2014-02-17

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of health-care associated diarrhoea. We describe the supplementary measures taken at Herlev Hospital to combat a concerning rise in number of cases. The measures taken involve implementation of antibiotic stewardship; meetings every two weeks between the cleaning department, head nurses, infection control nurse and a clinical microbiologist with plans for near future actions; prompt isolation of patients with diarrhoea; rapid, PCR-based diagnostics; room disinfection. Comparing 2011 with 2012 shows a total decline of 32.9%.

  17. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: the importance of the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella Terrier, Marie Céline; Simonet, Martine Louis; Bichard, Philippe; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2014-06-21

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial diarrhea. Despite effective antibiotic treatments, recurrent infections are common. With the recent emergence of hypervirulent isolates of C. difficile, CDI is a growing epidemic with higher rates of recurrence, increasing severity and mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative treatment for recurrent CDI. A better understanding of intestinal microbiota and its role in CDI has opened the door to this promising therapeutic approach. FMT is thought to resolve dysbiosis by restoring gut microbiota diversity thereby breaking the cycle of recurrent CDI. Since the first reported use of FMT for recurrent CDI in 1958, systematic reviews of case series and case report have shown its effectiveness with high resolution rates compared to standard antibiotic treatment. This article focuses on current guidelines for CDI treatment, the role of intestinal microbiota in CDI recurrence and current evidence about FMT efficacy, adverse effects and acceptability.

  18. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: The importance of the intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella Terrier, Marie Céline; Simonet, Martine Louis; Bichard, Philippe; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial diarrhea. Despite effective antibiotic treatments, recurrent infections are common. With the recent emergence of hypervirulent isolates of C. difficile, CDI is a growing epidemic with higher rates of recurrence, increasing severity and mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative treatment for recurrent CDI. A better understanding of intestinal microbiota and its role in CDI has opened the door to this promising therapeutic approach. FMT is thought to resolve dysbiosis by restoring gut microbiota diversity thereby breaking the cycle of recurrent CDI. Since the first reported use of FMT for recurrent CDI in 1958, systematic reviews of case series and case report have shown its effectiveness with high resolution rates compared to standard antibiotic treatment. This article focuses on current guidelines for CDI treatment, the role of intestinal microbiota in CDI recurrence and current evidence about FMT efficacy, adverse effects and acceptability. PMID:24966611

  19. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-01-01

    .... This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota...

  20. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  1. Carriage of Clostridium difficile by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and black rats (Rattus rattus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Patrick, David M; Mak, Sunny; Jardine, Claire M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric infections in humans. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding whether animals could be a source of C. difficile spores. Although colonization has been identified in a number of domestic species, the ability of commensal pests to serve as a reservoir for C. difficile has not been well investigated. The objective of this study was to determine whether urban rats (Rattus spp.) from Vancouver, Canada, carry C. difficile. Clostridium difficile was isolated from the colon contents of trapped rats and was characterized using ribotyping, toxinotyping, and toxin gene identification. Generalized linear mixed models and spatial analysis were used to characterize the ecology of C. difficile in rats. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 95 of 724 (13.1%) rats, although prevalence differed from 0% to 46.7% among city blocks. The odds of being C. difficile positive decreased with increasing weight (odds ratio [OR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53 to 0.87), suggesting that carriage is more common in younger animals. The strains isolated included 9 ribotypes that matched recognized international designations, 5 identified by our laboratory in previous studies, and 21 "novel" ribotypes. Some strains were clustered geographically; however, the majority were dispersed throughout the study area, supporting environmental sources of exposure and widespread environmental contamination with a variety of C. difficile strains. Given that urban rats are the source of a number of other pathogens responsible for human morbidity and mortality, the potential for rats to be a source of C. difficile for humans deserves further consideration.

  2. Clostridium difficile-ribotype 027 er en udfordring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe Sommer, Trine; Ravn, Pernille; Gjørup, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Clostridium difficile is the primary infective cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. In 2008, a major outbreak of CD027 took place in North Zealand, Denmark. We described this infection in a single medical department. Patients positive for C. difficile enlisted at Medical...

  3. Duodenal infusion of donor feces for recurrent Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nood, Els; Vrieze, Anne; Nieuwdorp, Max; Fuentes, Susana; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; de Vos, Willem M.; Visser, Caroline E.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Bartelsman, Joep F. W. M.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Speelman, Peter; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Keller, Josbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection is difficult to treat, and failure rates for antibiotic therapy are high. We studied the effect of duodenal infusion of donor feces in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection. We randomly assigned patients to receive one of three therapies: an initial

  4. Duodenal Infusion of Donor Feces for Recurrent Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nood, van E.; Vrieze, A.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Visser, C.E.; Kuijper, E.J.; Bartelsman, J.F.; Tijssen, J.G.; Speelman, P.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Keller, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection is difficult to treat, and failure rates for antibiotic therapy are high. We studied the effect of duodenal infusion of donor feces in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection. Methods We randomly assigned patients to receive one of three

  5. Interspecies Interactions between Clostridium difficile and Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, P.T.; van der Peet, J.M.; Bikker, F.J.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Oliveira Paiva, A.M.; Kostidis, S.; Mayboroda, O.A.; Smits, W.K.; Krom, B.P.

    2016-01-01

    The facultative anaerobic polymorphic fungus Candida albicans and the strictly anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens residing in the human gut. While a few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, the

  6. Levensbedreigende infecties met een nieuwe variant van Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krausz, S.; Bessems, M.; Boermeester, M. A.; Kuijper, E. J.; Visser, C. E.; Speelman, P.

    2005-01-01

    Three men, aged 39, 73, and 66 years, respectively, developed an infection with a new strain ofClostridium difficile, ribotype 027.C.difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) occurred in two patients after multiple abdominal surgery and in the third patient one week after autologous haematopoietic cell

  7. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, toxinotype III, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Ed J.; van den Berg, Renate J.; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E.; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; van der Kooi, Tjallie; van den Hof, Susan; Notermans, Daan W.

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A-negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017

  8. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, toxinotype III, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Ed J; Berg, Renate J van den; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; Kooi, Tjallie van der; Hof, Susan van den; Notermans, Daan W

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A-negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017

  9. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in the community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Holt, H M; Böttiger, B

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Danish patients consulting general practice with gastrointestinal symptoms, a prospective matched case-control study was performed; cases (N = 259) had positive cultures for toxigenic C. difficile and controls (N = 455...

  10. Detection of enterotoxin A and cytotoxin B, and isolation of Clostridium difficile in piglets in Minas Gerais, Brazil Detecção da enterotoxina A e citotoxina B e isolamento de Clostridium difficile em leitões em Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile has emerged as a major cause of neonatal colitis in piglets, displacing classic bacterial pathogens. However, there is no information regarding the distribution of this microorganism in pig farms in Brazil. In the present study, the presence of toxins A/B and of C. difficile strains in stool samples from 60 diarrheic or non-diarrheic newborn piglets (one to seven days old, from 15 different farms, was studied. The presence of toxins A/B was detected by ELISA and PCR was used to identify toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin gene in each isolated strain. C. difficile A/B toxins were detected in ten samples (16.7%. Of these, seven were from diarrheic and three were from non-diarrheic piglets. C. difficile was recovered from 12 out of 60 (20% fecal samples. Of those, three strains were non-toxigenic (A-B- and nine were toxigenic. Of the nine toxigenic strains, four were A+B+ strains and five were A-B+ strains. The presence of binary toxin observed in the present study was much higher (50% than in previously reported studies. All three non-toxigenic strains were isolated from otherwise healthy piglets. The results suggest the occurrence of neonatal diarrhea by C. difficile in farms in Brazil.Clostridium difficile tem sido relatado como o principal causador de colite neonatal em suínos. Apesar da crescente importância deste agente, não há dados sobre infecções causadas por C. difficile em suínos no Brasil. O objetivo do presente estudo foi detectar as toxinas A/B e isolar C. difficile a partir de 60 amostras de fezes de leitões diarreicos ou apararentemente saudáveis, com no máximo sete dias de vida, e oriundos de 15 granjas diferentes. As toxinas A/B foram detectadas por ELISA e uma PCR multiplex foi utilizada para detecção dos genes responsáveis pela codificação das toxinas A, B e toxina binária. As toxinas A/B de C. difficile foram detectadas em dez amostras de fezes (16.7%. Dessas, sete eram de animais diarreicos

  11. Clostridium difficile and the disease it causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norén, Torbjörn

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, anaerobic bacterium abundant in soils and water. Frequent and early colonization of the human intestinal flora is common and often asymptomatic. Antimicrobials given commonly disrupt the intestinal microflora and through proliferation in colon and production of toxin A and B it precipitates C. difficile infection (CDI). The enterocytic detachment and bowel inflammation provoke C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) sometimes developing into severe pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) and paralytic ileus. Infection is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily facilitated during hospital stay. In the elderly, comorbidity, hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment present as major risk factors and the slow recolonization of the normal flora likely responsible for single or multiple recurrences of CDI (25-50%) post therapy. The key procedure for diagnosis is toxin detection from stool specimens and sometimes in combination with culture to increase sensitivity. In mild cases stopping the offending antimicrobial will lead to resolution (25%) but standard therapy still consist of either oral metronidazole or vancomycin. Alternative agents are presently being developed and fidaxomicin, as well as nitrothiazolide are promising. Furthermore, host factors like low antitoxin A levels in serum relates to increased risk of recurrence and small numbers of patients have received immunoglobulin with good results. An immunogenic toxoid vaccine has been developed and human colostrum rich in specific secretory Ig A also support the future use of immunotherapy. Today we experience a tenfold increase of CDI incidence in the western world and both epidemics and therapeutic failure of metronidazole is contributing to morbidity and mortality. The current epidemic of the C. difficile strain NAP1/027 emerging in 2002 in Canada and the USA has now spread to most parts of Europe and virulence

  12. Fulminant postcesarean Clostridium difficile pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Sonia; Ghai, Vikas; Sunderji, Shiraz

    2007-02-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis due to Clostridium difficile infection is rarely reported in the obstetric literature. This disease process is associated with prior antibiotic exposure. A term primigravida was delivered by primary cesarean for failed vacuum extraction. She received Intravenous cefazolin after cord clamping, which was continued for 36 hours for a presumptive diagnosis of endometritis. On day 3, oral amoxicillin and clavulanate was started for suspected cellulitis of the incision. She was readmitted 1 day after her discharge with severe diffuse abdominal pain and distention. Proctoscopy showed pseudomembranous colitis. Colectomy with temporary ileostomy was performed for worsening symptoms and imminent perforation. The diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis should be considered in postpartum women who have low-grade fever, abdominal and gastrointestinal symptoms, and recent antibiotic exposure.

  13. Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubakka, Alyssa; Vaughn, Byron P.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. This review covers the current epidemiology of CDI (including toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains, risk factors for infection, and recurrent infection), methods of diagnosis, existing first-line therapies in CDI, the role of fecal microbiota transplant for multiple recurrent CDIs, and the potential use of fecal microbial transplant for patients with severe or refractory infection. PMID:27959316

  14. Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile in cooked beef sold in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Kra Athanase; Dadie, Adjéhi Thomas; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Loukou, Yao Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef sold in the streets in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 395 kidney and flesh samples of cooked beef were collected from vendors at Abidjan and subjected to C. difficile and C. perfringens isolation and identification by using biochemical tests, API 20A system and PCR detection. Subsequently, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for confirmed isolates. Our results showed the prevalence of 12.4% for C. difficile (11.04% in kidney and 13.45% in flesh) and 5.06% for C. perfringens (2.32% in kidney and 7.17% in flesh). Metronidazole and vancomycin remained the most potent antimicrobial agents against C. difficile while metronidazole and penicillin G were the most potent agents against C. perfringens. The resistance rates to tetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol and erythromycin against C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates ranged from 2.05% to 8.16% and from 20% to 50%, respectively. Among all antimicrobial agents tested against C. difficile, percentages of resistance to quinolones ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid as well as to gentamicin and cefotaxime were the highest. Eight resistant phenotypes were defined for C. difficile isolates and eleven resistant phenotypes for C. perfringens isolates. Clindamycin/gentamicin/cefotaxime/ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. difficile (55.10% of isolates) while norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. perfringens (20% of isolates). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of Clostridium difficile diarrhoea in District General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clostridium difficileis one of the most important causes of diarrhoea especially following antibiotic course. Elderly population is more susceptible and results in significant mortality and morbidity. We audited twenty four cases of Clostridium difficile in our hospital over duration of three months. We looked into the demographic

  16. Presence and molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in intestinal compartments of healthy horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Arroyo, Luis Guillermo; Staempfli, Henry Rolf

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are commonly associated with colitis in equids, but healthy carriers exist. Scarce information is available on the prevalence of Clostridium spp. in gastrointestinal compartments other than faeces in healthy horses, and it is unknown...... colon and rectum. When multiple compartments were positive in a single horse, two different C. difficile ribotypes were always present. Clostridium perfringens Type A (CPE, beta2 toxin gene negative) was recovered from the left ventral colon of one horse (0.74%, 1/135 samples). Agreement between faeces...... and overall C. difficile carrier status was good. CONCLUSIONS: Clostridium difficile can be found in different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract of healthy horses, and multiple strains can be present in an individual horse. The prevalence of C. perfringens in healthy adult hoses was low, consistent...

  17. Clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile cultivated from stool samples of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Stojanovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to fortify the clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from stool samples of hospitalized patients. This survey included 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea and positive findings of Clostridium difficile in stool samples, and 100 hospitalized patients with formed stool as a control group. Bacteriological examination of a stool samples was conducted using standard microbiological methods. Stool sample were inoculated directly on nutrient media for bacterial cultivation (blood agar using 5% sheep blood, Endo agar, selective Salmonella Shigella agar, Selenite-F broth, CIN agar and Skirrow's medium, and to selective cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA (Biomedics, Parg qe tehnicologico, Madrid, Spain for isolation of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile toxin was detected by ELISA-ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm AG, Germany and ColorPAC ToxinA test (Becton Dickinson, USA. Examination of stool specimens for the presence of parasites (causing diarrhea was done using standard methods (conventional microscopy, commercial concentration test Paraprep S Gold kit (Dia Mondial, France and RIDA®QUICK Cryptosporidium/Giardia Combi test (R-Biopharm AG, Germany. Examination of stool specimens for the presence of fungi (causing diarrhea was performed by standard methods. All stool samples positive for Clostridium difficile were tested for Rota, Noro, Astro and Adeno viruses by ELISA - ridascreen (R-Biopharm AG, Germany. In this research we isolated 99 Clostridium difficile strains from 116 stool samples of 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. The 53 (66.25% of patients with diarrhea were positive for toxins A and B, one (1.25% were positive for only toxin B. Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from samples of 26 (32.5% patients. However, other pathogenic microorganisms of intestinal tract cultivated from samples of 16 patients

  18. The Incidence of Nosocomial Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea in Tehran Tertiary Medical Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norakhoda Sadeghifard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It is usually a consequence of antibiotic treatment, But sporadic cases can occur. This study was aimed to determine the frequency of the nosocomial Clostridium difficile (C. difficile associated diarrhea in Tehran University of Medical Sciences hospitals and study of antibacterial susceptibility of isolates. In this study a total of 942 stool samples from patients with nosocomial diarrhea that were hospitalized in Imam Khomeini hospital, Shariati hospital and Children clinical center were collected. The samples were cultured on a selective cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA and incubated in anaerobic conditions, at 37°C for 5 days. Isolates were characterized to species level by conventional biochemical tests. Bacterial cytotoxicity was assayed on tissue culture (vero. Antimicrobial sensitivity of isolated toxigenic C. difficile were investigated by kirby Beuer method (disk diffusion. Our findings show that, of the total patients, 57 toxigenic C. difficile (6.1% were isolated. Results of statistical analysis show significant differences between the rate of isolated toxigenic C. difficile and age group of patients (P

  19. Clostridium difficile spore-macrophage interactions: spore survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paredes-Sabja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI, C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host's innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells' ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells.

  20. Performance of chromID Clostridium difficile agar compared with BBL C. difficile selective agar for detection of C. difficile in stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Bong; Chang, Jiyoung; Shin, Sang Hyun; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new chromogenic medium for detection of Clostridium difficile, chromID C. difficile agar (CDIF; bioMérieux, France), by comparison with BBL C. difficile Selective Agar (CDSA; Becton Dickinson and Company, USA). After heat pre-treatment (80℃, 5 min), 185 diarrheal stool samples were inoculated onto the two media types and incubated anaerobically for 24 hr and 48 hr for CDIF and for 48 hr and 72 hr for CDSA. All typical colonies on each medium were examined by Gram staining, and the gram-positive rods confirmed to contain the tpi gene by PCR were identified as C. difficile. C. difficile was recovered from 36 samples by using a combination of the two media. The sensitivity with CDIF 48 hr was highest (100%) and was significantly higher than that with CDIF 24 hr (58.3%; P<0.001), because samples with a low burden of C. difficile tended to require prolonged incubation up to 48 hr (P<0.001). The specificity of CDIF 24 hr and CDIF 48 hr (99.3% and 90.6%, respectively) was significantly higher than that of CDSA 48 hr and CDSA 72 hr (72.5% and 67.1%, respectively; P<0.001). CDIF was effective for detecting C. difficile in heat-pretreated stool specimens, thus reducing unnecessary testing for toxin production in non-C. difficile isolates and turnaround time.

  1. Clostridium difficile infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Deepa; Nanda, Neha

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated infection that causes significant morbidity and an economic impact in the United States. In this review, we provide an overview of Clostridium difficile infection in solid organ transplant recipients with an emphasis on recent literature. C. difficile in solid organ transplant population has unique risk factors. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown favorable results in treatment of recurrent C. difficile in this population. Preliminary data from animal studies suggests excellent efficacy with immunization against C. difficile toxins. Over the last decade, number of individuals receiving solid organ transplants has increased exponentially making peri-transplant complications a common occurrence.C. difficile is a frequent cause of morbidity in solid organ transplant recipients. Early and accurate diagnosis of C. difficile requires a stepwise approach. Differentiating between asymptomatic carriage and infection is a diagnostic challenge. Microbial diversity is inversely proportional to risk of C. difficile infection. Antimicrobial stewardship programs help to retain microbial diversity in individuals susceptible to CDI. Recurrent or relapsing C. difficile infection require fecal microbiota transplantation for definitive cure.

  2. Investigating Transfer of Large Chromosomal Regions Containing the Pathogenicity Locus Between Clostridium difficile Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Mike; Mullany, P.; Allan, E.; Roberts, P.

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of all sequenced Clostridium difficile isolates contain multiple mobile genetic elements. The chromosomally located pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), encoding the cytotoxins TcdA and TcdB, was previously hypothesized to be a mobile genetic element; however, mobility was not demonstrated. Here

  3. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile Toward Antimicrobial Agents Used as Feed Additives for Food Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Tvede, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A total of 65 toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains isolated from patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea were tested for susceptibility to avilamycin, flavomycin, monensin, and salinomycin. Except for flavomycin the substances showed in vitro efficacy comparable to reports of the currently...

  4. Tracing the Spread of Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027 in Germany Based on Bacterial Genome Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Steglich

    Full Text Available We applied whole-genome sequencing to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dynamics underpinning the expansion of Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 in Germany. Based on re-sequencing of genomes from 57 clinical C. difficile isolates, which had been collected from hospitalized patients at 36 locations throughout Germany between 1990 and 2012, we demonstrate that C. difficile genomes have accumulated sequence variation sufficiently fast to document the pathogen's spread at a regional scale. We detected both previously described lineages of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. difficile ribotype 027, FQR1 and FQR2. Using Bayesian phylogeographic analyses, we show that fluoroquinolone-resistant C. difficile 027 was imported into Germany at least four times, that it had been widely disseminated across multiple federal states even before the first outbreak was noted in 2007, and that it has continued to spread since.

  5. Tracing the Spread of Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027 in Germany Based on Bacterial Genome Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steglich, Matthias; Nitsche, Andreas; von Müller, Lutz; Herrmann, Mathias; Kohl, Thomas A; Niemann, Stefan; Nübel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We applied whole-genome sequencing to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dynamics underpinning the expansion of Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 in Germany. Based on re-sequencing of genomes from 57 clinical C. difficile isolates, which had been collected from hospitalized patients at 36 locations throughout Germany between 1990 and 2012, we demonstrate that C. difficile genomes have accumulated sequence variation sufficiently fast to document the pathogen's spread at a regional scale. We detected both previously described lineages of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. difficile ribotype 027, FQR1 and FQR2. Using Bayesian phylogeographic analyses, we show that fluoroquinolone-resistant C. difficile 027 was imported into Germany at least four times, that it had been widely disseminated across multiple federal states even before the first outbreak was noted in 2007, and that it has continued to spread since.

  6. Clostridium difficile Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Goudarzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality rate of Clostridium difficile infection have increased remarkably in both hospital and community settings during the last two decades. The growth of infection may be caused by multiple factors including inappropriate antibiotic usage, poor standards of environmental cleanliness, changes in infection control practices, large outbreaks of C. difficile infection in hospitals, alteration of circulating strains of C. difficile, and spread of hypervirulent strains. Detection of high-risk populations could be helpful for prompt diagnosis and consequent treatment of patients suffering from C. difficile infection. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are recommended antibiotics for the treatment of initial infection. Current treatments for C. difficile infection consist of supportive care, discontinuing the unnecessary antibiotic, and specific antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, novel approaches include fidaxomicin therapy, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation mediated therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown relevant efficacy to overcome C. difficile infection and reduce its recurrence.

  7. Asymptomatic carriers contribute to nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Thomas; Gradel, Kim Oren; Homann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects...... of of asymptomatic carriers on nosocomial C difficile infections. METHODS: We performed a population-based prospective cohort study at 2 university hospitals in Denmark, screening all patients for toxigenic C difficile in the intestine upon admittance, from October 1, 2012, to January 31, 2013. Screening results...... were blinded to patients, staff, and researchers. Patients were followed during their hospital stay by daily registration of wards and patient rooms. The primary outcomes were rate of C difficile infection in exposed and unexposed patients and factors associated with transmission. RESULTS: C difficile...

  8. Longitudinal study of Clostridium difficile and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli in healthy horses in a community setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Staempfli, H. R.; Arroyo, L. G.

    2012-01-01

    were to investigate and molecularly characterize isolates of Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Salmonella, collected sequentially over a one year period, and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile for E. coli. Fecal samples were collected monthly from 25 adult horses...... for one year. Selective cultures were performed for all above bacteria. C. difficile isolates were characterized via PCR toxin gene profiling and ribotyping. Broth microdilution was performed to assess antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of E. coli. Toxigenic Clostridium difficile was isolated from 15....... Resistance to =1 and = 3 antimicrobials was present in 31/232 (13.4%) and 6/232 (2.6%) respectively. Only two horses shed the same strain of toxigenic C. difficile for more than one month, indicating that shedding is transient. The high number of ribotype 078 is consistent with recent emergence...

  9. [Nosocomial diarrhea in intensive care unit: other than Clostridium difficile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Cai, Lin; Hu, Tian-Yu; Tang, Li; Wu, Dan; Kang, Yan; Zong, Zhi-Yong

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the incidence and clinical features of non-Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated nosocomial diarrhea in intensive care unit (ICU) caused by Klebsiella oxytoca and Clostridium perfringens. The faeces of 102 patients with non-C. difficile associated nosocomial diarrhea in ICU of West China Hospital, were collected during April to November, 2012. The target bacterial genes were detected by PCR amplification and sequencing, including toxic gene pehX of Klebsiella oxytoca, species-specific 16S rRNA gene and toxic gene cpa and cpe of Clostridium perfringens, species-specific 16S rRNA gene with mapA and toxic gene hipO of Campylobacter jejuni. Clinical features of the patients with positive results were summarized. Among 102 patients with non-C. difficile associated nosocomial diarrhea, 4 patients (3.9%) were detected with toxic Klebsiella oxytoca while 4 patients (3.9%) were detected with toxic Clostridium perfringens. No toxic Campylobacter jejuni was detected. Most of the patients had severe underlying diseases and poor final outcome, accepted potent antibiotics which disturbed intestinal flora obviously.. Non-C. difficile associated nosocomial diarrhea in ICU caused by Klebsiella oxytoca is and Clostridium perfringens is associated with severe diseases and poor outcome, but the incidence in our hospital is relatively low in our hospital.

  10. Clostridium Difficile, Colitis, and Colonoscopy: Pediatric Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnie, Randolph; Kastl, Arthur

    2017-08-01

    Review tests available for detection of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) induced disease, including when such tests should be done in children and how they should be interpreted. Multiple tests are available for detecting disease due to C. diff. These include colonoscopy and stool analysis. Colonoscopy with biopsy is the most sensitive test for detecting the presence of colitis. The toxins produced by the C. diff. (toxin A, toxin B, and binary toxin) are the agents that cause injury and disease. Only toxin producing C. diff. Strains will cause disease. Binary toxin by itself is not thought to produce disease. Binary toxin causes disease in humans when present with toxin A and B producing bacteria, and has been implicated with fulminant life threatening disease. Stool analyses vary in sensitivity and specificity depending on the assay used. The presence of toxin producing strains of C diff. in the stool does not equate with disease. The presence of a toxin-producing bacteria or toxins (A or B) only equates with disease if diarrhea or a diseased colon (toxic megacolon, ileus, and sepsis) is present. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), when used in the stool from patients with diarrhea, appears to be the most efficient study to detect the gene that encodes for toxin A and B and thus to diagnose C. diff.-induced disease. Infants have a high carriage rate of C. diff. and are believed not to develop disease from it or its toxins. Infants should not be tested for C. difficile. The NAAT is most specific when done on patients with diarrhea with liquid stools. Testing for C. difficile should only be done on patients with diarrhea. One can assume that a patient who has no diarrhea and is not ill does not have C. diff.-induced disease. Treatment should be limited to patients with diarrhea who test positive for C. diff. toxin (A or B) or toxin-producing bacteria. Direct testing for binary toxin is not commercially available. Binary toxin is only thought to cause disease

  11. Survival of Clostridium difficile spores at low water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Talukdar, Prabhat K; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Torres, J Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is frequently found in meat and meat products. Germination efficiency, defined as colony formation, was previously investigated at temperatures found in meat handling and processing for spores of strain M120 (animal isolate), R20291 (human isolate), and DK1 (beef isolate). In this study, germination efficiency of these spore strains was assessed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, a w ∼1.00), commercial beef jerky (a w ∼0.82/0.72), and a w -adjusted PBS (a w ∼0.82/0.72). Surface hydrophobicity was followed for spores stored in PBS. After three months and for all PBS a w levels tested, M120 and DK1 spores showed a ∼1 decimal reduction in colony formation but this was not the case when kept in beef jerky suggesting a protective food matrix effect. During storage, and with no significant a w effect, an increase in colony formation was observed for R20291 spores kept in PBS (∼2 decimal log increase) and beef jerky (∼1 decimal log increase) suggesting a loss of spore superdormancy. For all strains, no significant changes in spore surface hydrophobicity were observed after storage. Collectively, these results indicate that depending on the germination properties of C. difficile spores and the media properties, their germination efficiency may increase or decrease during long term food storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of two hydrogen peroxide vapour aerial decontamination systems for enhanced disinfection of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium difficile in single isolation rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S; Muzslay, M; Bruce, M; Jeanes, A; Moore, G; Wilson, A P R

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) disinfection systems are being used to reduce patients' exposure to hospital pathogens in the environment. HPV whole-room aerial disinfection systems may vary in terms of operating concentration and mode of delivery. To assess the efficacy of two HPV systems (HPS1 and HPS2) for whole-room aerial disinfection of single isolation rooms (SIRs). Ten SIRs were selected for manual terminal disinfection after patient discharge. Test coupons seeded with biological indicator (BI) organisms [∼10(6) colony-forming units (cfu) of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Klebsiella pneumoniae, or ∼10(5)cfu Clostridium difficile 027 spores] prepared in a soil challenge were placed at five locations per room. For each cycle, 22 high-frequency-touch surfaces in SIRs were sampled with contact plates (∼25cm(2)) before and after HPV decontamination, and BIs were assayed for the persistence of pathogens. Approximately 95% of 214 sites were contaminated with bacteria after manual terminal disinfection, with high numbers present on the SIR floor (238.0-352.5cfu), bed control panel (24.0-33.5cfu), and nurse call button (21.5-7.0cfu). Enhanced disinfection using HPV reduced surface contamination to low levels: HPS1 [0.25cfu, interquartile range (IQR) 0-1.13] and HPS2 (0.5cfu, IQR 0-2.0). Both systems demonstrated similar turnaround times (∼2-2.5h), and no differences were observed in the efficacy of the two systems against BIs (C. difficile ∼5.1log10 reduction; MRSA/K. pneumoniae ∼6.3log10 reduction). Despite different operating concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, MRSA persisted on 27% of coupons after HPV decontamination. Enhanced disinfection with HPV reduces surface contamination left by manual terminal cleaning, minimizing the risks of cross-contamination. The starting concentration and mode of delivery of hydrogen peroxide may not improve the efficacy of decontamination in practice, and therefore the choice of HPV system may

  13. Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile in parvovirus-positive dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Dorella, Fernanda Alves; Figueiredo, Henrique Cesar Pereira; Costa, Érica Azevedo; Pelicia, Vanessa; Ribeiro, Bruna Letícia Devidé; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Megid, Jane; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in 82 diarrheic dogs positive for canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV). Enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A was isolated from three (3.6%) dogs. One (1.2%) strain was also positive for NetE- and NetF-encoding genes, which are commonly associated with diarrhea in dogs. Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from one animal (1.2%), which was also positive for A/B toxins. The present study identified C. difficile and C. perfringens infection in CPV-positive dogs. Further studies are necessary to clarify if clostridial infections may predispose or potentiate CPV-infection in dogs or vice versa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  15. Biofilm formation by the anaerobic pathogen Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Dapa, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an obligate anaerobic, Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium. Although an opportunistic pathogen, it is one of the important causes of healthcare-associated infections. While toxins TcdA and TcdB are the main virulence factors of C. difficile, the factors or processes involved in gut colonization during infection remain unclear. The biofilm-forming ability of bacterial pathogens has been associated with increased antibiotic resistance and chronic recurrent in...

  16. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Derek M.; Nathalie H. Urrunaga; Hannah De Groot; von Rosenvinge, Erik C.; Guofeng Xie; Leyla J. Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembrane...

  17. A simulation-based assessment of strategies to control Clostridium difficile transmission and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Rubin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile is one of the most common and important nosocomial pathogens, causing severe gastrointestinal disease in hospitalized patients. Although "bundled" interventions have been proposed and promoted, optimal control strategies remain unknown. METHODS: We designed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection, which included components such as: patients and health care workers, and their interactions; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. We then introduced six interventions, alone and "bundled" together: aggressive C. difficile testing; empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; improved adherence to hand hygiene and contact precautions; improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and improved environmental cleaning. All interventions were tested using values representing base-case, typical intervention, and optimal intervention scenarios. FINDINGS: In the base-case scenario, C. difficile infection rates ranged from 8-21 cases/10,000 patient-days, with a case detection fraction between 32%-50%. Implementing the "bundle" at typical intervention levels had a large impact on C. difficile acquisition and infection rates, although intensifying the intervention to optimal levels had much less additional impact. Most of the impact came from improved hand hygiene and empiric isolation and treatment of suspected C. difficile cases. CONCLUSION: A "bundled" intervention is likely to reduce nosocomial C. difficile infection rates, even under typical implementation conditions. Real-world implementation of the "bundle" should focus on those components of the intervention that are likely to produce the greatest impact on C. difficile infection rates, such as hand hygiene and empiric

  18. A simulation-based assessment of strategies to control Clostridium difficile transmission and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Michael A; Jones, Makoto; Leecaster, Molly; Khader, Karim; Ray, Willy; Huttner, Angela; Huttner, Benedikt; Toth, Damon; Sablay, Theodore; Borotkanics, Robert J; Gerding, Dale N; Samore, Matthew H

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most common and important nosocomial pathogens, causing severe gastrointestinal disease in hospitalized patients. Although "bundled" interventions have been proposed and promoted, optimal control strategies remain unknown. We designed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection, which included components such as: patients and health care workers, and their interactions; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. We then introduced six interventions, alone and "bundled" together: aggressive C. difficile testing; empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; improved adherence to hand hygiene and contact precautions; improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and improved environmental cleaning. All interventions were tested using values representing base-case, typical intervention, and optimal intervention scenarios. In the base-case scenario, C. difficile infection rates ranged from 8-21 cases/10,000 patient-days, with a case detection fraction between 32%-50%. Implementing the "bundle" at typical intervention levels had a large impact on C. difficile acquisition and infection rates, although intensifying the intervention to optimal levels had much less additional impact. Most of the impact came from improved hand hygiene and empiric isolation and treatment of suspected C. difficile cases. A "bundled" intervention is likely to reduce nosocomial C. difficile infection rates, even under typical implementation conditions. Real-world implementation of the "bundle" should focus on those components of the intervention that are likely to produce the greatest impact on C. difficile infection rates, such as hand hygiene and empiric isolation and treatment of suspected cases.

  19. An atypical case of infection by Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Neri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive human pathogenic bacterium and nosocomial pathogen; it is the causative agent diarrhoea, colitis and pseudo-membranous colitis associated with antibiotic therapy. The pathogenesis of diarrhoea linked to a Clostridium difficile infection is complex and only partly know. A 75 years old subject with biventricular defibrillator for atrial flutter-fibril slow dilated cardiomyopathy underwent, in february 2008, surgery of mitro-aortic replacement.The subject, in march 2009, followed a rehabilitation therapy with aspirin and esomeprazole, as an outpatient, to Pio Albergo Trivulzio. The patient appeared lucid, oriented in time and space, in good general conditions; objectivity shows mild abdominal bloating, rectal examination negative; reported bowel function tend constipated with 1-2 bowel movements per week with formed stools and recent episodes of melena. Blood tests showed anemia and positive research haemoglobin in stool.The patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and then rettosigmoidoscopia, and decided to carry out biopsies. The sigmoid-rectal endoscopic picture was compatible with a diagnosis of “pseudo-membranous colitis hospitalization, On the basis of symptoms reported was required to search for toxins and bacterial culture for Clostridium difficile, resulting both positive. In literature are reported with increasing frequency of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea in patients home. The clinical case presented shows that in patients from home with symptoms vanished, the presence of formed stool does not exclude the possibility of infection by Clostridium difficile and is therefore useful and absolutely advisable to search for toxins and bacterial culture for Clostridium difficile.

  20. First confirmed case of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in foals in Brazil Primeiro relato de diarreia associada à Clostridium difficile em potros no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of the substantial role of Clostridium difficile in causing diarrhea and colitis in foals, there have been no confirmed diagnoses of disease caused by this bacteria in Brazil. In this paper, we describe confirmed cases of colitis caused by C. difficile in two foals in Brazil. Two five-month-old foals with a five-day history of diarrhea after antibiotic treatment for a respiratory disease were treated at the Veterinary Hospital of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. C. difficile A/B toxins were detected, and toxigenic strains of C. difficile were isolated from the foals' feces. The treatment was based on fluid therapy and antibiotics (metronidazole and ceftiofur, and the animals experienced a gradual recovery. The association between the medical history, clinical signs, laboratory exam results and therapeutic success confirmed the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. The present report raises the possibility that C. difficile is also a pathogen in equines in Brazil and highlights the need for up to date routine laboratory protocols for the diagnosis of this disease.Apesar da importância de Clostridium difficile como agente causador de diarreia e colite em potros, inexistem relatos confirmados de tal doença no Brasil. O objetivo deste trabalho foi descrever dois casos confirmados de diarreia causados por C. difficile em potros, ocorridos em Minas Gerais, Brasil. Os animais, com cinco meses de idade, foram encaminhados ao Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG com histórico de cinco dias de diarreia após antibioticoterapia com penicilina para uma possível pneumonia. Ambos os animais foram positivos para detecção das toxinas A/B de C. difficile e isolados toxigênicas de C. difficile foram isoladas de amostras de fezes. Os animais apresentaram melhora gradual com o tratamento baseado em metronidazol e fluidoterapia e receberam alta após sete dias. A associação do quadro clínico, exames

  1. Molecular characterization of pathogenic Clostridium difficile strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years major advances have been made in the field of C. difficile research. Despite the continuous progress of research in C. difficile epidemiology and molecular biology. This thesis shows that the development of molecular based techniques in detecetion and typing of C. difficile could

  2. Carriage of Clostridium difficile in free-living South American coati (Nasua nasua) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Ribeiro de Almeida, Lara; Oliveira Junior, Carlos Augusto; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; Rupnik, Maja; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize Clostridium difficile strains in stool samples from a wild urban mammal, a South American coati (Nasua nasua) in Brazil. Forty-six free-living N. nasua were trapped, and stool samples were collected. C. difficile was isolated from three (6.5%) sampled animals, two strains were toxigenic (A+B+CDT-, PCR ribotype 014/020 and 106) and one was non toxigenic (A-B-CDT-, PCR ribotype 053). The present work confirms that ring-tailed coati (N. nasua) could harbor C. difficile strains, including those PCR ribotypes commonly reported in C. difficile infection in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in Germany based on a single center long-term surveillance and German-wide genotyping of recent isolates provided to the advisory laboratory for diagnostic reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Müller, Lutz; Mock, Markus; Halfmann, Alexander; Stahlmann, Julia; Simon, Arne; Herrmann, Mathias

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile is characterized by worldwide increase of C. difficile infections (CDI) and the emergence of new epidemic outbreak strains with the capacity for global spreading. Long-term local surveillance at the University of Saarland Medical Center between 2000 and 2013 shows that the incidence rate of laboratory-confirmed CDI was influenced by local epidemiology as well as by testing strategies. Since 2008, molecular typing of C. difficile was regularly performed for symptomatic hospitalized patients by surface-layer protein A sequence typing (slpAST), which is an established highly standardized technique for genotyping of C. difficile. The results were assigned to known ribotypes for better comparison to international data. It could be demonstrated that distribution of genotypes was different between age groups. Older patients were predominantly infected with ribotype 001 and 027, whereas ribotype 027 was not detected in the pediatric population. Molecular typing of German isolates sent to the advisory laboratory between 2011 and 2013 revealed that ribotype 027 is present with high percentages in most German regions except for the very North. In conclusion, optimized testing of all hospitalized patients with diarrhea should be generally implemented to avoid under-diagnosis of C. difficile infection. Ribotype 027 is highly prevalent in Germany, but its infections are restricted to older patients, while absent in children. Molecular typing of suspected hospital outbreaks and of patients with severe or recurrent disease may help to better understand virulence and epidemic spreading of C. difficile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Infectious Diarrhea: Norovirus and Clostridium difficile in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary B; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

    2016-08-01

    Norovirus infection usually results in acute gastroenteritis, often with incapacitating nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is highly contagious and resistant to eradication with alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Appropriate preventative and infection control measures can mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with norovirus infection. Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea in the United States. Antibiotic use is by far the most common risk factor for C difficile colonization and infection. Appropriate preventive measures and judicious use of antibiotics can help mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M. Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembranes. Further imaging, endoscopy, and careful histopathology review revealed chronic ischemia as the cause of her pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea. This case highlights the need for gastroenterologists to consider non-C. difficile etiologies when diagnosing pseudomembranous colitis.

  6. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek M; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; De Groot, Hannah; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Xie, Guofeng; Ghazi, Leyla J

    2014-01-01

    Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembranes. Further imaging, endoscopy, and careful histopathology review revealed chronic ischemia as the cause of her pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea. This case highlights the need for gastroenterologists to consider non-C. difficile etiologies when diagnosing pseudomembranous colitis.

  7. Clostridium difficile-ribotype 027 er en udfordring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Trine Nyboe; Ravn, Pernille; Skinhøj, Ida Elisabeth Gjørup

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Clostridium difficile is the primary infective cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. In 2008, a major outbreak of CD027 took place in North Zealand, Denmark. We described this infection in a single medical department. Patients positive for C. difficile enlisted at Medical...... Department O, Herlev Hospital, in 2009 were included and demographic data were recorded. In total, 69 patients were included, average age 83 years, Charlson Comorbidity Score 4. Of all patients 24 died. Further studies are needed in order to treat and minimize infection with C. difficile....

  8. Controversies Surrounding Clostridium difficile Infection in Infants and Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribeth R. Nicholson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults and older children. However, as many as 80% of infants can be asymptomatically colonized. The reasons for this have not been well established but are believed to be due to differences in toxin receptors or toxin internalization. Determining which children who test positive for C. difficile warrant treatment is exceedingly difficult, especially in the setting of increased rates of detection and the rising risk of disease in children lacking classic risk factors for C. difficile.

  9. Comparative analysis of different methods to detect Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Adriana; Buttrini, Mirko; Martinelli, Monica; Gorrini, Chiara; Montecchini, Sara; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Covan, Silvia; Chezzi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The increased incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection, particularly in North America and Europe, have brought renewed focus on the most appropriate method to detect C. difficile and/or its toxins in stools. This prospective study evaluated the usefulness of the Illumigene TM C. difficile assay in diagnostic practice for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile DNA in clinical samples. A total of 88 out of 306 stool samples analysed were positive both by Illumigene and the combination of toxigenic C. difficile culture (TC) and immunochromatographic assay (IC) with a concordance of 100%. Of the 218 samples negative by the combination of TC and IC, 204 were negative also by Illumigene with a concordance of 93.57%. In our experience, compared to conventional assays Illumigene assay proved to be easy to perform, accurate and prompt giving results within 1 hour at a cost of 28 euro per sample.

  10. Clostridium difficile infection: Evolution, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Briony; Androga, Grace O; Knight, Daniel R; Riley, Thomas V

    2017-04-01

    Over the recent decades, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has emerged as a global public health threat. Despite growing attention, C. difficile remains a poorly understood pathogen, however, the exquisite sensitivity offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has enabled analysis of the genome of C. difficile, giving us access to massive genomic data on factors such as virulence, evolution, and genetic relatedness within C. difficile groups. NGS has also demonstrated excellence in investigations of outbreaks and disease transmission, in both small and large-scale applications. This review summarizes the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and phylogeny of C. difficile, one of the most important pathogens worldwide in the current antibiotic resistance era. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic testing for Clostridium difficile in Italian microbiological laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Morandi, Matteo; Moro, Maria Luisa; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2016-02-01

    A laboratory diagnosis survey of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was performed in Italy in 2012-2013. Questionnaires from 278 healthcare settings from 15 regions of Italy were collected and analysed. Eighty seven percent of the laboratories declared to routinely perform CDI diagnosis, 99% of them only after the clinician's request. Among the 216 laboratories providing information on the size of the hospitals in which they were located, 65 had more than 500 beds (large hospitals), while 151 had less than 500 beds (small hospitals). The average percentage of positive tests for C. difficile toxins was 12.2%. Almost half of the laboratories (42%) used immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) for Tox A/B as a stand-alone method, while only 34% used an algorithm for CDI as indicated by the European guidelines. A low percentage of laboratories performed molecular assays or C. difficile culture, 25% and 29%, respectively. Most laboratories (161/278) declared to type C. difficile strains, the majority in collaboration with a reference laboratory. Among the 103 C. difficile clinical isolates collected during the study, 31 different PCR-ribotypes were identified. PCR-ribotype 356/607 (27%) was predominant, followed by 018 (12%). These two PCR-ribotypes show 87.5% of similarity in ribotyping profile. PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 represented 8% and 4% of the strains, respectively. Four PCR-ribotypes (027, 033, 078 and 126) were positive for the binary toxin CDT. In particular, PCR-ribotype 033 produces only CDT, and it has recently been associated with symptomatic cases. The majority of strains were multidrug resistant. In particular, all strains PCR-ribotypes 356/607 and 018 were resistant to moxifloxacin, rifampicin, erythromycin and clindamycin. The results obtained highlight the need to raise awareness to the microbiological diagnosis of CDI among clinicians and to implement and harmonize diagnostic methods for CDI in Italian laboratories in the perspective of a future national

  12. The first case of antibiotic-associated colitis by Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Song, Hyun Joo; Kim, Seong-Eun; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Miae; Hwang, Yusun; Kim, Heejung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a common causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) ranges from mild diarrhea to life threatening PMC. Recently, a highly virulent strain of C. difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 was found in North America, Europe, and Japan. A 52-yr-old woman with anti-tuberculosis medication and neurogenic bladder due to traffic accident experienced five episodes of C. difficile PMC after taking antibiotics for pneumonia along with septic shock and acute renal failure. She was readmitted to the intensive care unit and treated with oral vancomycin with refractory of oral metronidazole, inotropics and probiotics for over 60 days. C. difficile isolated both at the first and the last admission was identified as C. difficile ribotype 027 by ribotyping, toxinotyping, and tcdC gene sequencing, which turned out the same pathogen as the epidemic hypervirulent B1/NAP1 strain. This is the first case of C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Korea. After discharge, she was maintained on probiotics and rifaximin for 3 weeks. She had no relapse for 6 months.

  13. Clostridium difficile in retail baskets, trolleys, conveyor belts, and plastic bags in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqumber, Mohammed A

    2014-10-01

    To determine Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) prevalence on retail surfaces and shoppers plastic bags. From 20 June to 10 August 2011, in a cross-sectional epidemiological study, 17 supermarkets from 2 cities, Albaha and Altaif, Saudi Arabia were sampled. A total of 800 samples, which comprised 200 samples per surveyed surface, were studied. These included baskets, trolleys, conveyer belts, and outgoing shoppers' plastic bags. Clostridium difficile strains were isolated. The isolates were characterized using ribotyping and  polymerase chain reaction for the detection of toxin A (tcdA), toxin B (tcdB), binary toxin (cdtB), and toxin C (tcdC) genes. Susceptibility to antibiotics was determined on a Muller-Hinton agar with 5% sheep blood agar using E-tests. Overall, the C. difficile prevalence on sampled surfaces was 0.75%. The highest prevalence was found on retail baskets and trolleys, followed by plastic bags. A total of 5 different ribotypes were identified. Alterations in tcdC were detected in ribotype 027 and BT1. All the identified isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, but resistant to levofloxacin. In this study, C. difficile was present at a rate of 0.75% on supermarket surfaces. Spore disinfection of implicated surfaces may be necessary to control any community-acquired infections caused by this pathogen. 

  14. Discovery of selective inhibitors of the Clostridium difficile dehydroquinate dehydratase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiira Ratia

    Full Text Available A vibrant and healthy gut flora is essential for preventing the proliferation of Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms. In fact, most C. difficile infections (CDIs occur after broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, which, by eradicating the commensal gut bacteria, allows its spores to proliferate. Hence, a C. difficile specific antibiotic that spares the gut flora would be highly beneficial in treating CDI. Towards this goal, we set out to discover small molecule inhibitors of the C. difficile enzyme dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD. DHQD is the 3(rd of seven enzymes that compose the shikimate pathway, a metabolic pathway absent in humans, and is present in bacteria as two phylogenetically and mechanistically distinct types. Using a high-throughput screen we identified three compounds that inhibited the type I C. difficile DHQD but not the type II DHQD from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a highly represented commensal gut bacterial species. Kinetic analysis revealed that the compounds inhibit the C. difficile enzyme with Ki values ranging from 10 to 20 µM. Unexpectedly, kinetic and biophysical studies demonstrate that inhibitors also exhibit selectivity between type I DHQDs, inhibiting the C. difficile but not the highly homologous Salmonella enterica DHQD. Therefore, the three identified compounds seem to be promising lead compounds for the development of C. difficile specific antibiotics.

  15. Muricholic acids inhibit Clostridium difficile spore germination and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Francis

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Clostridium difficile have increased steadily over the past several years. While studies on C. difficile virulence and physiology have been hindered, in the past, by lack of genetic approaches and suitable animal models, newly developed technologies and animal models allow these processes to be studied in detail. One such advance is the generation of a mouse-model of C. difficile infection. The development of this system is a major step forward in analyzing the genetic requirements for colonization and infection. While important, it is equally as important in understanding what differences exist between mice and humans. One of these differences is the natural bile acid composition. Bile acid-mediated spore germination is an important step in C. difficile colonization. Mice produce several different bile acids that are not found in humans. These muricholic acids have the potential to impact C. difficile spore germination. Here we find that the three muricholic acids (α-muricholic acid, β-muricholic acid and ω-muricholic acid inhibit C. difficile spore germination and can impact the growth of vegetative cells. These results highlight an important difference between humans and mice and may have an impact on C. difficile virulence in the mouse-model of C. difficile infection.

  16. Total synthesis of five lipoteichoic acids of Clostridium difficile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogendorf, Wouter Frederik Johan; Gisch, Nicolas; Schwudke, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of hypervirulent resistant strains have made Clostridium difficile a notorious nosocomial pathogen and has resulted in a renewed interest in preventive strategies, such as vaccines based on (synthetic) cell wall antigens. Recently, the structure of the lipoteichoic acid (LTA...

  17. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more comm...

  18. Cost-effectiveness in Clostridium difficile treatment decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, Mark J. C.; Keller, Josbert J.; Visser, Caroline E.; Redekop, Ken; Claassen, Eric; Speelman, Peter; Pronk, Marja H.

    2015-01-01

    To develop a framework for the clinical and health economic assessment for management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). CDI has vast economic consequences emphasizing the need for innovative and cost effective solutions, which were aim of this study. A guidance model was developed for

  19. Management of Clostridium Difficile: Case study and review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Clostridium Difficile: Case study and review of the basic tenets. M Roberts, C Kiire. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

  20. Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes a high burden of disease in high-resource healthcare systems, with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial implications. CDI is a healthcare-associated infection for which the primary risk factor is antibiotic usage, and it is the leading cause of bacterial diarrhoea in ...

  1. New advances in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis D Hedge

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dennis D Hedge, Joe D Strain, Jodi R Heins, Debra K FarverSouth Dakota State University College of Pharmacy, Brookings, SD 57007, USAAbstract: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI have increased in frequency throughout the world. In addition to an increase in frequency, recent CDI epidemics have been linked to a hypervirulent C. difficile strain resulting in greater severity of disease. Although most mild to moderate cases of CDI continue to respond to metronidazole or vancomycin, refractory and recurrent cases of CDI may require alternative therapies. This review provides a brief overview of CDI and summarizes studies involving alternative antibiotics, toxin binders, probiotics, and immunological therapies that can be considered for treatment of acute and recurrent CDI in severe and refractory situations.Keywords: Clostridium difficile, antibiotics, probiotics, immunological therapy

  2. In-vitro growth characteristics of commercial probiotic strains and their potential for inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...

  3. Clostridium difficile in Food and Animals: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Van Broeck, J; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-01-01

    Zoonoses are infections or diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans through direct contact, close proximity or the environment. Clostridium difficile is ubiquitous in the environment, and the bacterium is able to colonise the intestinal tract of both animals and humans. Since domestic and food animals frequently test positive for toxigenic C. difficile, even without showing any signs of disease, it seems plausible that C. difficile could be zoonotic. Therefore, animals could play an essential role as carriers of the bacterium. In addition, the presence of the spores in different meats, fish, fruits and vegetables suggests a risk of foodborne transmission. This review summarises the current available data on C. difficile in animals and foods, from when the bacterium was first described up to the present.

  4. In vitro and in vivo antagonistic activity of new probiotic culture against Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golić, Nataša; Veljović, Katarina; Popović, Nikola; Djokić, Jelena; Strahinić, Ivana; Mrvaljević, Igor; Terzić-Vidojević, Amarela

    2017-05-06

    Genus Clostridium accompanies more than 200 known species and at least 30 among them are associated with human and animal diseases. At the moment, the treatment of clostridial infections is based on use of antibiotics. However, due to the European ban on the use of antibiotics in livestock production, novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of these hardly curable infections have been evaluated. Hence, in this study the antimicrobial effect of newly designed probiotic culture consisted of natural isolates Lactobacillus helveticus BGRA43, Lactobacillus fermentum BGHI14 and Streptococcus thermophilus BGVLJ1-44 against Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens was analyzed. The probiotic culture showed strong in vitro antimicrobial effect on C. difficile (human clinical isolate). In addition, individual strains and the probiotic combination exhibited immunomodulatory activity. The probiotic combination significantly increased the proliferation of GALT lymphocytes. At the other hand, none of the bacterial treatments (individual strains and the combination) induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β by intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2. Interestingly, Caco-2 cells exposed to the probiotic combination produced significantly elevated amount of TGFβ pointing to potential protecting effect of the probiotic. In addition, the results of field trial on spontaneously infected goats revealed reduction of C. perfringens in goats (below the detection threshold) after the probiotic treatment. The results of this study indicated that the novel probiotic deserves to be further investigated as a promising antimicrobial agent against C. difficile and C. perfringens.

  5. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in raw beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo meat in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Jalali, Mohammad; Weese, J Scott

    2014-02-05

    Clostridium difficile has been shown to be a nosocomial pathogen associated with diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in hospitalised patients and the infection is believed to be acquired nosocomially. Recent studies have shown the occurrence of C. difficile in food animals which may act as a source of infection to humans.The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of C. difficile in retail raw beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo meat in Iran. From April to October 2012, a total of 660 raw meat samples from beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo were purchased from 49 butcheries in Isfahan and Khuzestan provinces, Iran, and were evaluated for the presence of C. difficile using a method including selective enrichment in C. difficile broth, subsequent alcohol shock-treatment and plating onto C. difficile selective medium. C. difficile isolates were tested for the presence of toxin genes and were typed using PCR ribotyping. In this study, 13 of 660 meat samples (2%) were contaminated with C. difficile. The highest prevalence of C. difficile was found in buffalo meat (9%), followed by goat meat (3.3%), beef meat (1.7%), cow (0.94%) and sheep meat (0.9%). Seven of the 13C. difficile strains (53.9%) were positive for tcdA, tcdB and cdtB toxin genes and were classified as ribotype 078. Four strains (30.8%) were positive tcdA, and tcdB, and one strain (7.7%) was possessed only tcdB. The remaining isolate was non-toxigenic. Susceptibilities of 13C. difficile isolates were determined for 11 antimicrobial drugs using the disk diffusion assay. Resistance to clindamycin, gentamycin, and nalidixic acid was the most common finding. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report of the isolation of C. difficile from raw buffalo meat. This study indicates the potential importance of food, including buffalo meat, as a source of transmission of C. difficile to humans.

  6. Struggling with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: is donor faeces the solution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nood, E.; Speelman, P.; Kuijper, E. J.; Keller, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospitals and the community constitute an increasing treatment problem. While most patients with a first infection respond to either metronidazole or oral vancomycin, therapy in recurrent C. difficile infections tends to fail

  7. In vitro inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens by commercial probiotic strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent and control clostridial enteric disease. Limited information is available on the ability of different probiotic bacteria used in food products to inhibit Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. The objective......) on the reference strains of C. difficile and C. perfringens were assessed by an agar well diffusion assay and by a broth culture inhibition assay using cell-free supernatant harvested at different growth phases, with and without pH neutralization. To study growth characteristics, probiotic strains were cultivated...... supernatant was assessed with and without pH neutralization. Supernatants obtained from 10 probiotic strains inhibited C. difficile only when supernatant was added without pH neutralization. In the broth culture inhibition assay, growth of C. perfringens and C. difficile was inhibited by supernatant without p...

  8. Emerging therapies for Clostridium difficile infection – focus on fidaxomicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaparro-Rojas F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fredy Chaparro-Rojas, Kathleen M MullaneDepartment of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI has evolved during the last decades, with an increase in the reported incidence, severity of cases, and rate of mortality and relapses. These increases have primarily affected some special populations including the elderly, patients requiring concomitant antibiotic therapy, patients with renal failure, and patients with cancer. Until recently, the treatment of CDI was limited to either metronidazole or vancomycin. New therapeutic options have emerged to address the shortcomings of current antibiotic therapy. Fidaxomicin stands out as the first-in-class oral macrocyclic antibiotic with targeted activity against C. difficile and minimal collateral damage on the normal colonic flora. Fidaxomicin has demonstrated performance not inferior to what is considered the “gold standard” available therapy for CDI, vancomycin, in two separate Phase III clinical trials, but with significant advantages, including fewer recurrences and higher rates of sustained clinical cures. Fidaxomicin constitutes an important development in targeted antibiotic therapy for CDI and must be considered as a first-line agent for patients with risk factors known to portend relapse and severe infection.Keywords: fidaxomicin, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, CDAD, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI, vancomycin, metronidazole

  9. Fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis associated with paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, E.; Lefevre, C. A.

    1999-11-01

    Resnik E, LeFevre CA. Fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis associated with paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy. Pseudomembranous colitis is commonly associated with the use of antibiotics. Some antineoplastic agents even without associated antibiotic use can predispose patients to developing infection with Clostridium difficile. The infection is usually mild; however, in rare cases severe forms of pseudomembranous colitis may be encountered. A 66 year-old female with stage IIIC suboptimally debulked epithelial ovarian cancer was treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin. the patient developed fulminant C. difficile colitis three weeks after the second cycle of chemotherapy. Severe symptoms began 24 h prior to admission; however, mild nausea and diarrhea had been present for a week despite self-treatment with over-the-counter Imodium and Pepto-Bismol. Her last antibiotic use was seven weeks previously. The patient was hospitalized immediately for aggressive treatment. Notwithstanding all the efforts, her condition continued to deteriorate and she expired. Severe C. difficile colitis can be life threatening. Patients undergoing chemotherapy who develop significant diarrhea should be evaluated for C. difficile. Prompt diagnosis and intervention prior to onset of severe symptoms can potentially improve the outcome.

  10. Fate of ingested Clostridium difficile spores in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Howerton

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, a major nosocomial complication. The infective form of C. difficile is the spore, a dormant and resistant structure that forms under stress. Although spore germination is the first committed step in CDI onset, the temporal and spatial distribution of ingested C. difficile spores is not clearly understood. We recently reported that CamSA, a synthetic bile salt analog, inhibits C. difficile spore germination in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we took advantage of the anti-germination activity of bile salts to determine the fate of ingested C. difficile spores. We tested four different bile salts for efficacy in preventing CDI. Since CamSA was the only anti-germinant tested able to prevent signs of CDI, we characterized CamSa's in vitro stability, distribution, and cytotoxicity. We report that CamSA is stable to simulated gastrointestinal (GI environments, but will be degraded by members of the natural microbiota found in a healthy gut. Our data suggest that CamSA will not be systemically available, but instead will be localized to the GI tract. Since in vitro pharmacological parameters were acceptable, CamSA was used to probe the mouse model of CDI. By varying the timing of CamSA dosage, we estimated that C. difficile spores germinated and established infection less than 10 hours after ingestion. We also showed that ingested C. difficile spores rapidly transited through the GI tract and accumulated in the colon and cecum of CamSA-treated mice. From there, C. difficile spores were slowly shed over a 96-hour period. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using molecular probes to obtain disease progression information for C. difficile infection.

  11. Clostridium Difficile and Fecal Microbial Transplant in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critically-ill patients constitute majority of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards (1, 2. This group of patients demands special considerations and measures of care (3-6. Clostridium difficile infection causes dangerous, painful and persistent diarrhea in critically ill patients. Its treatment consists of enteral metronidazol or vancomycin in combination with IV antibiotics cessation. Recently, probiotics have been considered as an alternative treatment for pseudomembranous colitis. In 1958, fecal microbial transplant was first described from healthy individuals to sick patients to displace pathogenic microbes from the intestine by re-establishing a healthy microbial community. Since then, it has gained value as “express stool treatment” or currently known as “fecal transplant”. Last year, FDA classified stool as drug, which typically requires an Investigational New Drug application (IND. However, in July 2013, the FDA issued guidance stating that it would exercise enforcement discretion for physicians administering FMT to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Accordingly, considering stool as a tissue product or giving it its own classification, as FDA approved for blood, would keep patients safe, ensure broad access and facilitate research (7. It should be taken into consideration that some complications might accompany fecal microbial transplant such as making patients susceptible for conditions like obesity or autoimmune disorders. Safety and quality assurance starts from pre-enrollment donor screening, donor testing (17 serological and stool-based assays, donor monitoring and process control. The composition of the bacterial community has been shown to change when stored at -80oC compared to the samples stored at -20oC and it has been recommended to store the samples of intestinal content at -20oC before use for bacterial community analysis, instead of the current practice at -80oC (7, 8. However, if

  12. Diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile in patients with postoperative subhepatic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Predrag

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile in the majority of cases cause disease of the intestinal tract of hospitalized patients. For a long time, Clostridium difficile was considered to produce both types of toxins (A+/B+ strain, however, the investigations conducted in the last ten years point to the existence of clinically significant isolates which produce only toxin B, i.e. toxin A negative / toxin B positive (A-/B+ strain Clostridium difficile. Case report. We presented the case of a patient admitted to the Surgery Clinic, Clinical Center Nis due to the presence of calculus in the ductus choledochus. Twenty-four hours after the surgical intervention for calculus removal, the first signs of the operative wound infection began to appear. In the course of infection treatment, different antibiotics were administered (cefuroxine, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem. After making etiological microbiological diagnosis and application of antibiotics according to antibiogram results, the signs of the operative wound infection began to withdraw, but the patient reported the abdominal pain and liquid stools with traces of blood (up to 17 stools per day. By microbiological examination, Clostridium difficile was cultivated and the presence of toxin B was detected in the stool samples. The patient was sent to the Clinic for Infectious Diseases, where the causal therapy of mitronidazol was administered. Liquid and electrolytes were made up by substitution therapy. After the eight-day-treatment, the patient felt much better, and diarrheas stopped on the 10th day of the therapy application. Conclusion. Our results have shown that toxingen strains Clostridium difficile are present in our country so this bacterium sort have to be considered in differential causal diagnosis of diarrhoea syndrom. Considering that it can cause difficult form of the disease, it is an obligation to establish the presence of some toxins of Clostridium difficile in

  13. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G Semenyuk

    Full Text Available The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA, polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  14. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J. Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0–6 days, 7–13 days, 14–20 days, and 21–27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19–64 years, ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7–13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37. This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01–10.19. Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05. Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change.

  15. Epidemiological model for Clostridium difficile transmission in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzas, C; Dubberke, E R; Lu, Z; Reske, K A; Gröhn, Y T

    2011-06-01

    Recent outbreaks of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have been difficult to control, and data indicate that the importance of different sources of transmission may have changed. Our objectives were to evaluate the contributions of asymptomatic and symptomatic C. difficile carriers to new colonizations and to determine the most important epidemiological factors influencing C. difficile transmission. Retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to medical wards at a large tertiary care hospital in the United States in the calendar year 2008. Data from six medical wards and published literature were used to develop a compartmental model of C. difficile transmission. Patients could be in one of five transition states in the model: resistant to colonization (R), susceptible to colonization (S), asymptomatically colonized without protection against CDI (C(-)), asymptomatically colonized with protection against CDI (C(+)), and diseased (ie, with CDI; D). The contributions of C(-), C(+), and D patients to new colonizations were similar. The simulated basic reproduction number ranged from 0.55 to 1.99, with a median of 1.04. These values suggest that transmission within the ward alone from patients with CDI cannot sustain new C. difficile colonizations and therefore that the admission of colonized patients plays an important role in sustaining transmission in the ward. The epidemiological parameters that ranked as the most influential were the proportion of admitted C(-) patients and the transmission coefficient for asymptomatic carriers. Our study underscores the need to further evaluate the role of asymptomatically colonized patients in C. difficile transmission in healthcare settings.

  16. Insight into alteration of gut microbiota in Clostridium difficile infection and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Danfeng; Jiang, Cen; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xuefeng; Peng, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the common pathogen of nosocomial diarrhea, meanwhile, asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile in part of the population has also drawn public attention. Although gut microbiota is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI), whether there is any alteration of gut microbial composition in asymptomatic C. difficile carriers hasn't been clearly described. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in gut microbiome among CDI patients, asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and healthy individuals. We performed fecal microbiota analysis on the samples of eight CDI patients, eight asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and nine healthy subjects using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers showed reduced microbial richness and diversity compared with healthy subjects, accompanied with a paucity of phylum Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as well as an overabundance of Proteobacteria. Some normally commensal bacteria, especially butyrate producers, were significantly depleted in CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers. Furthermore, the differences observed in microbial community structure between CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers suggested that the gut microbiota may be a potential factor of disease state for CDI. Our study demonstrates the characterization and diversity of gut microbiota in CDI and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, which will provide new ideas for surveillance of the disease state and development of microbiota-targeted agents for CDI prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A case if infant botulism due to neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E associated with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, L; Da Dalt, L; Anniballi, F; Franciosa, G; Zanconato, S; Aureli, P

    2002-10-01

    Reported here is the sixth case of intestinal toxemia botulism caused by Clostridium butyricum type E in Italy since 1984. In this case, the patient was concomitantly affected with colitis due to Clostridium difficile toxin. A review of previously reported cases revealed that some of these patients may also have had intestinal toxemia botulism associated with Clostridium difficile colitis, based on the reported symptoms. Given that this association has been shown to exist not only in Italy but also in the USA, it is recommended that individuals with intestinal botulism and symptoms of colitis undergo testing for Clostridium difficile and its toxins in fecal samples.

  18. Effect of bismuth subsalicylate on Clostridium difficile colitis in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T W; Dong, M Y; Gorbach, S L

    1990-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of bismuth subsalicylate (BSS, Pepto-Bismol) in Clostridium difficile colitis was studied in golden Syrian hamsters. C. difficile was fed to the hamsters by orogastric intubation 2-3 days after their arrival. Clindamycin (1.5 mg per animal) was given intraperitoneally 4 days later. Twenty-four hours after challenge with clindamycin, animals were given BSS at dosages of 5, 10, and 15 mg twice daily for 5 days by orogastric intubation. Controls included untreated animals and those given 5 mg of vancomycin once daily by intubation. Delay in the time of death was observed in all BSS-treated animals and was statistically significant on days 4-6 in those receiving 15 mg twice daily. Vancomycin produced a greater delay in death than did BSS. Our study suggests that BSS at a dosage of 15 mg twice daily has some therapeutic effect on C. difficile colitis in hamsters.

  19. Acute Appendicitis: An Extracolonic Manifestation of Clostridium difficile Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridha, Ali; Safiullah, Shoaib M; Al-Abayechi, Sarah; Nadeem, Amin Ur Rehman

    2017-01-01

    The current report is the case of a 30-year-old male patient who presented with symptomatology suggestive of appendicitis. However, careful history-taking and laboratory tests led to the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile colitis, resulting in successful nonsurgical management of this patient. Although both appendicitis and C. difficile colitis are common conditions, they are rarely diagnosed concurrently. This is reflected by paucity of literature describing this manifestation. Given this current presentation, the authors contend that the manifestation of extracolonic colitis within the appendix is possibly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as an acute appendicitis and thus potentially results in unnecessary surgical intervention. This report reminds physicians to consider the medical approach to managing acute appendicitis given the possibility of underlying C. difficile colitis as the causative factor.

  20. Acute Appendicitis: An Extracolonic Manifestation of Clostridium difficile Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ridha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current report is the case of a 30-year-old male patient who presented with symptomatology suggestive of appendicitis. However, careful history-taking and laboratory tests led to the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile colitis, resulting in successful nonsurgical management of this patient. Although both appendicitis and C. difficile colitis are common conditions, they are rarely diagnosed concurrently. This is reflected by paucity of literature describing this manifestation. Given this current presentation, the authors contend that the manifestation of extracolonic colitis within the appendix is possibly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as an acute appendicitis and thus potentially results in unnecessary surgical intervention. This report reminds physicians to consider the medical approach to managing acute appendicitis given the possibility of underlying C. difficile colitis as the causative factor.

  1. Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Hui; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-06-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which is rare in pediatric patients. The definite etiology and mechanism to induce an acute exacerbation of Crohn disease remains mostly unknown. The authors report on a 14-year-old girl with Crohn disease who has acute gastrointestinal symptoms caused by toxin A-producing Clostridium difficile, which mimicked a flare-up of Crohn disease. There was no preceding antibiotic prescription before the episode. The disease activity did not improve after steroid treatment, which is unusual for Crohn disease. However, all symptoms were dramatically relieved after eradication of C difficile, and led to a symptom-free period for more than 3 years. This case report aims to address the unusual presentation of a usual pathogen, C difficile, in a pediatric patient with Crohn disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Blowhole Colostomy for Clostridium difficile-Associated Toxic Megacolon

    OpenAIRE

    Jeroen Kerstens; Ian Diebels; Charles de Gheldere; Patrick Vanclooster

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent urgent blowhole colostomy for toxic megacolon (TM) secondary to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This infection occurred under antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, four days after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in our hospital. Although prospective clinical research regarding the surgical management of TM is lacking, decompressive procedures like blowhole colostomy are reported to carry a high risk of postoperative morb...

  3. Clostridium difficile Infection in Production Animals and Avian Species: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moono, Peter; Foster, Niki F; Hampson, David J; Knight, Daniel R; Bloomfield, Lauren E; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis in hospitalized humans. Recently, C. difficile infection (CDI) has been increasingly recognized as a cause of neonatal enteritis in food animals such as pigs, resulting in stunted growth, delays in weaning, and mortality, as well as colitis in large birds such as ostriches. C. difficile is a strictly anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, which produces two toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) as its main virulence factors. The majority of strains isolated from animals produce an additional binary toxin (C. difficile transferase) that is associated with increased virulence. C. difficile is ubiquitous in the environment and has a wide host range. This review summarizes the epidemiology, clinical presentations, risk factors, and laboratory diagnosis of CDI in animals. Increased awareness by veterinarians and animal owners of the significance of clinical disease caused by C. difficile in livestock and avians is needed. Finally, this review provides an overview on methods for controlling environmental contamination and potential therapeutics available.

  4. Global analysis of the sporulation pathway of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive, spore-forming pathogen Clostridium difficile is the leading definable cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile infections are difficult to treat because of their frequent recurrence, which can cause life-threatening complications such as pseudomembranous colitis. The spores of C. difficile are responsible for these high rates of recurrence, since they are the major transmissive form of the organism and resistant to antibiotics and many disinfectants. Despite the importance of spores to the pathogenesis of C. difficile, little is known about their composition or formation. Based on studies in Bacillus subtilis and other Clostridium spp., the sigma factors σ(F, σ(E, σ(G, and σ(K are predicted to control the transcription of genes required for sporulation, although their specific functions vary depending on the organism. In order to determine the roles of σ(F, σ(E, σ(G, and σ(K in regulating C. difficile sporulation, we generated loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding these sporulation sigma factors and performed RNA-Sequencing to identify specific sigma factor-dependent genes. This analysis identified 224 genes whose expression was collectively activated by sporulation sigma factors: 183 were σ(F-dependent, 169 were σ(E-dependent, 34 were σ(G-dependent, and 31 were σ(K-dependent. In contrast with B. subtilis, C. difficile σ(E was dispensable for σ(G activation, σ(G was dispensable for σ(K activation, and σ(F was required for post-translationally activating σ(G. Collectively, these results provide the first genome-wide transcriptional analysis of genes induced by specific sporulation sigma factors in the Clostridia and highlight that diverse mechanisms regulate sporulation sigma factor activity in the Firmicutes.

  5. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A two-step approach improves the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachrimanidou, Melina; Tegou, Zoi; Chasampalioti, Maria; Arvaniti, Kostoula; Protonotariou, Efthymia; Skoura, Lemonia

    2017-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of health care-associated diarrhea. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a two-step approach for the diagnosis of CDI. The two-step procedure consisted of GDH-toxin A/B EIA (Enzyme immunoassay targeting enterotoxin A and Cytotoxin B), followed by PCR detecting toxigenic C. difficile. Results indicate that EIAs provide a rapid screening assay for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI but, in GDH-positive and toxins-negative samples, EIA should be always followed by PCR to distinguish toxigenic vs nontoxigenic strains. GDH-toxin A/B EIA-rapid test has high specificity but low sensitivity to detect CDI. The implementation of a two-step procedure significantly increases the diagnostic accuracy to detect CDI and provides a toxigenic type characterization of C. difficile isolates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. SEVERE CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTIONS. A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE -review-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Elena NICA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that has been brought to the attention of the medical community recently, as the number of infections related to it has increased dramatically. This is happening mainly because of the excessive and defective use of antibiotic therapy. The pathology of a Clostridium Difficile infection is very complex, as it ranges from easy symptoms like abdominal pain and diarrhea to severe complications, like toxic megacolon. The management of these infections has become even more difficult, as they are not appearing only in the hospital environment anymore, but also outside of it. The bacterium spreads through poor hands hygiene. Also, we don’t have a clear strategy for overcoming an infection like this, so it gets even more difficult as most of the times the doctors need to rely only on their experience and knowledge to find ways of battling it. We would like to underline the research opportunities that are available in this domain as very few things are known about Clostridium difficile and also the crucial importance of research, as these infections are common and dangerous not only for patients, but for the medical staff and their families too.

  8. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: From Clostridium difficile to Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Robert J; Moss, Alan C

    2017-04-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has evolved from a case report in the medical literature to the basis of major innovations in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and, potentially, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the clinical setting, FMT was noted to significantly lower the risk of recurrent CDI, likely by increasing microbial diversity and altering the metabolic environment in the intestinal tract of recipients. In parallel, advances in the ability to quantify and characterize microbial communities in fecal samples led to the association of IBD with a state of intestinal dysbiosis. Consequently, a number of case series and randomized, controlled trials have evaluated FMT in treating active ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Unlike in CDI, the efficacy of FMT in the treatment of IBD appears to be influenced by a number of factors, including donor microbial profiles, inflammatory burden, and the microbial diversity of the recipient. The therapeutic potential of the microbiome has led to a number of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies isolating specific strains from healthy stool for use as targeted therapies for IBD in clinical trials. Ongoing studies are likely to determine the missing link between the efficacy of FMT and its impact on microbial communities and mucosal inflammation.

  9. Comparison of the in vitro activities of teicoplanin and vancomycin against Clostridium difficile and their interactions with cholestyramine.

    OpenAIRE

    Pantosti, A; Luzzi, I; Cardines, R; Gianfrilli, P

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activity of teicoplanin was compared with that of vancomycin against fecal isolates of Clostridium difficile. All strains were susceptible to both antibiotics, but teicoplanin was fourfold more active than vancomycin. Cholestyramine was found to bind teicoplanin almost completely, reducing its activity to nondetectable levels.

  10. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT for Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa De Sordi

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections.PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29.Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2 without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT.This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon.

  11. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  12. Toxigenic Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in edible marine bivalve molluscs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Tiziana; Harmanus, Celine; Sanders, Ingrid M J G; Pasquale, Vincenzo; Dumontet, Stefano; Capuano, Federico; Romano, Vincenza; Kuijper, Ed J

    2015-09-02

    Even though food of animal sources and different foodstuffs are well known to be potentially carrier of Clostridium difficile, few data are available on the occurrence of C. difficile in seafood. This work investigated the occurrence of C. difficile in edible bivalve molluscs in southern Italy. Out of the 925 investigated samples, 3.9% contained C. difficile. Eighteen strains harboured both genes for toxins A and B whereas 1 only had toxin B gene. Binary toxin genes were found in 22.2% of the isolates. The most frequently ribotypes found were 078/126 (22.2%), 010 (19.4%), and 001 (8.3%). All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, and to the new semisynthetic thiopeptide antibiotic LFF571, whereas 19.4% of them were resistant to moxifloxacin, 30.5% to clindamycin, 38.8% to erythromycin, and 100% to ciprofloxacin. This study points out that edible molluscs could be a potential source of toxigenic C. difficile ribotypes and a potential risk for human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The potential beneficial role of faecal microbiota transplantation in diseases other than Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, R.; Nieuwdorp, M.; ten Berge, I. J. M.; Bemelman, F. J.; Geerlings, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    This review gives an outline of the indications for faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for diseases other than Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection. The remarkable efficacy of FMT against C. difficile infection has already been demonstrated. The use of FMT for other diseases, such as

  14. The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea: comparison of Triage C. difficile panel, EIA for Tox A/B and cytotoxin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfa, M J; Swan, B; VanDekerkhove, B; Pang, P; Harding, G K M

    2002-08-01

    This study prospectively compared; Triage(R) C. difficile test (TCT), TechLab C. difficile toxin A-B enzyme immuno-assay (EIA), and cell-culture cytotoxin test (CT). Of the 400 stools tested, 99 were positive by any test with 92, 41 and 58 detected by TCT, EIA and CT, respectively. Culture of discordant samples indicated that 52 contained C. difficile (42 toxigenic, 10 non-toxigenic), 10 contained Clostridium species and 2 had no detectable clostridium isolates. There were 21/42 toxigenic C. difficile isolates from 17 patients whose stools were negative when originally tested by CT. Review of available patient charts indicated that 12/14 did not previously or currently have C. difficile associated diarrhea, whereas 2 patients developed disease within a few days. Compared to CT as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were; 93%, 89% and 66%, 99% for TCT and EIA respectively. The 8 stool samples with Toxin A(-) Toxin B(+) isolates were detected in 8, 4, and 6 samples by TCT, EIA and CT, respectively. In summary, TCT as a screening test allowed reliable reporting for 85% of stools on the day of receipt. For the 15% of stools requiring further testing we recommend the use of CT.

  15. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Cappella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered.

  16. Comparative in vitro activities of SMT19969, a new antimicrobial agent, against Clostridium difficile and 350 gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic intestinal flora isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Merriam, C Vreni

    2013-10-01

    The comparative in vitro activity of SMT19969, a novel, narrow-spectrum, nonabsorbable agent, was studied against 50 ribotype-defined Clostridium difficile strains, 174 Gram-positive and 136 Gram-negative intestinal anaerobes, and 40 Gram-positive aerobes. SMT19969 was one dilution more active against C. difficile isolates (MIC range, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml; MIC90, 0.25 μg/ml), including ribotype 027 strains, than fidaxomicin (range, 0.06 to 1 μg/ml; MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) and two to six dilutions lower than either vancomycin or metronidazole. SMT19969 and fidaxomicin were generally less active against Gram-negative anaerobes, especially the Bacteroides fragilis group species, than vancomycin and metronidazole, suggesting that SMT19969 has a lesser impact on the normal intestinal microbiota that maintain colonization resistance. SMT19969 showed limited activity against other Gram-positive anaerobes, including Bifidobacteria species, Eggerthella lenta, Finegoldia magna, and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, with MIC90s of >512, >512, 64, and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Clostridium species showed various levels of susceptibility, with C. innocuum being susceptible (MIC90, 1 μg/ml) and C. ramosum and C. perfringens being nonsusceptible (MIC90, >512 μg/ml). Activity against Lactobacillus spp. (range, 0.06 to >512 μg/ml; MIC90, >512 μg/ml) was comparable to that of fidaxomicin and varied by species and strain. Gram-positive aerobic cocci (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and streptococci) showed high SMT19969 MIC90 values (128 to >512 μg/ml).

  17. Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile in an Irish continuing care institution for the elderly: prevalence and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J; Murphy, C; Twomey, C; Paul Ross, R; Rea, M C; MacSharry, J; Sheil, B; Shanahan, F

    2010-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is an increasing cause of nosocomial diarrhoea and colitis. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and characteristics of asymptomatic C. difficile carriage in a continuing care institution for the elderly. Stool samples were collected from 100 asymptomatic patients, whose median age was 83 years. Samples were tested for C. difficile using traditional culturing methods, 16s rDNA and 16s-23s intergenic spacer (IGS) rDNA sequencing, and analysed for toxin production and toxin genes. The prevalence of C. difficile carriage was 10/100 (10%) following culture and 16s and IGS sequencing. An additional seven isolates, initially identified as C. difficile, were subsequently identified by IGS rDNA sequencing as C. sordellii of the 10% that tested positive for C. difficile, seven tested positive for toxin A and B. A significant number of C. difficile carriers had recent antibiotic exposure compared with non-carriers, P = 0.046. The prevalence of asymptomatic C. difficile carriage in this institution was 10%, 7% of which were toxin positive. This study underscores the importance of increased vigilance for C. difficile using microbial and molecular methodology and identifies patients at increased risk following antibiotic administration.

  18. Clostridium difficile flagellin FliC: Evaluation as adjuvant and use in a mucosal vaccine against Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Bruxelle

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of bacterial flagellin has been reported in different studies. By its close interaction with the immune system, the flagellin represents an interesting adjuvant and vaccine candidate. Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin has already been tested as adjuvant to stimulate mucosal immunity. Here, we assessed the ability of Clostridium difficile flagellin FliC to act as a mucosal adjuvant, first combined with ovalbumin as antigen and second with a C. difficile surface protein, the precursor of the S-layer proteins SlpA. Using ovalbumin as antigen, we compared the gut mucosal adjuvanticity of FliC to Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin and cholera toxin. Two routes of immunization were tested in a mouse model: intra-rectal and intra-peritoneal, following which, gut mucosal and systemic antibody responses against ovalbumin (Immunoglobulins G and Immunoglobulins A were analyzed by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Assay in intestinal contents and in sera. In addition, ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin producing cells were detected in the intestinal lamina propria by Enzyme-Linked Immunospot. Results showed that FliC as adjuvant for immunization targeting ovalbumin was able to stimulate a gut mucosal and systemic antibody response independently of the immunization route. In order to develop a mucosal vaccine to prevent C. difficile intestinal colonization, we assessed in a mouse model the efficacy of FliC as adjuvant compared with cholera toxin co-administrated with the C. difficile S-layer precursor SlpA as antigen. After challenge, a significant decrease of C. difficile intestinal colonization was observed in immunized groups compared to the control group. Our results showed that C. difficile FliC could be used as adjuvant in mucosal vaccination strategy against C. difficile infections.

  19. Reconsidering the sporulation characteristics of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile BI/NAP1/027.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Burns

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and a major burden to healthcare services worldwide. In recent years, C. difficile strains belonging to the BI/NAP1/027 type have become highly represented among clinical isolates. These so-called 'hypervirulent' strains are associated with outbreaks of increased disease severity, higher relapse rates and an expanded repertoire of antibiotic resistance. Spores, formed during sporulation, play a pivotal role in disease transmission and it has been suggested that BI/NAP1/027 strains are more prolific in terms of sporulation in vitro than 'non-epidemic' C. difficile types. Work in our laboratory has since provided credible evidence to the contrary suggesting that the strain-to-strain variation in C. difficile sporulation characteristics is not type-associated. However, the BI/NAP1/027 type is still widely stated to have an increased rate of sporulation. In this study, we analysed the sporulation rates of 53 C. difficile strains, the largest sample size used to-date in such a study, including 28 BI/NAP1/027 isolates. Our data confirm that significant variation exists in the rate at which different C. difficile strains form spores. However, we clearly show that the sporulation rate of the BI/NAP1/027 type was no higher than that of non-BI/NAP1/027 strains. In addition, we observed substantial variation in sporulation characteristics within the BI/NAP1/027 type. This work highlights the danger of assuming that all strains of one type behave similarly without studying adequate sample sizes. Furthermore, we stress the need for more rigorous experimental procedures in order to quantify C. difficile sporulation more accurately in the future.

  20. Efficacy of decontaminants and disinfectants against Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Prerna; Poxton, Ian R

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a common nosocomial pathogen transmitted mainly via its spores. These spores can remain viable on contaminated surfaces for several months and are resistant to most commonly used cleaning agents. Thus, effective decontamination of the environment is essential in preventing the transmission of C. difficile in health-care establishments. However, this emphasis on decontamination must also be extended to laboratories due to risk of exposure of staff to potentially virulent strains. Though few cases of laboratory-acquired infection have been reported, the threat of infection by C. difficile in the laboratory is real. Our aim was to test the efficacy of four disinfectants, Actichlor, MicroSol 3+, TriGene Advance and Virkon, and one laboratory decontaminant, Decon 90, against vegetative cells and spores of C. difficile. Five strains were selected for the study: the three most commonly encountered epidemic strains in Scotland, PCR ribotypes 106, 001 and 027, and control strains 630 and VPI 10463. MICs were determined by agar dilution and broth microdilution. All the agents tested inhibited the growth of vegetative cells of the selected strains at concentrations below the recommended working concentrations. Additionally, their effect on spores was determined by exposing the spores of these strains to different concentrations of the agents for different periods of time. For some of the agents, an exposure of 10 min was required for sporicidal activity. Further, only Actichlor was able to bring about a 3 log(10) reduction in spore numbers under clean and dirty conditions. It was also the only agent that decontaminated different hard, non-porous surfaces artificially contaminated with C. difficile spores. However, this too required an exposure time of more than 2 min and up to 10 min. In conclusion, only the chlorine-releasing agent Actichlor was found to be suitable for the elimination of C. difficile spores from the environment, making it the agent

  1. Early Clostridium difficile infection during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Kinnebrew

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is frequently diagnosed in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. We characterized early-transplant CDI and its associations, and analyzed serially-collected feces to determine intestinal carriage of toxigenic C. difficile. Fecal specimens were collected longitudinally from 94 patients during allo-HSCT hospitalization, from the start of pre-transplant conditioning until up to 35 days after stem cell infusion. Presence of C. difficile 16S rRNA and tcdB genes was determined. Clinical variables and specimen data were analyzed for association with development of CDI. Historical data from an additional 1144 allo-HSCT patients was also used. Fecal specimens from 37 patients (39% were found to harbor C. difficile. Early-transplant CDI was diagnosed in 16 of 94 (17% patients undergoing allo-HSCT; cases were generally mild and resembled non-CDI diarrhea associated with transplant conditioning. CDI was associated with preceding colonization with tcdB-positive C. difficile and conditioning regimen intensity. We found no associations between early-transplant CDI and graft-versus-host disease or CDI later in transplant. CDI occurs with high frequency during the early phase of allo-HSCT, where recipients are pre-colonized with toxigenic C. difficile. During this time, CDI incidence peaks during pre-transplant conditioning, and is correlated to intensity of the treatment. In this unique setting, high rates of CDI may be explained by prior colonization and chemotherapy; however, cases were generally mild and resembled non-infectious diarrhea due to conditioning, raising concerns of misdiagnosis. Further study of this unique population with more discriminating CDI diagnostic tests are warranted.

  2. Overdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Molecular Test Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polage, Christopher R; Gyorke, Clare E; Kennedy, Michael A; Leslie, Jhansi L; Chin, David L; Wang, Susan; Nguyen, Hien H; Huang, Bin; Tang, Yi-Wei; Lee, Lenora W; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra; Romano, Patrick S; Panacek, Edward A; Goodell, Parker B; Solnick, Jay V; Cohen, Stuart H

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care-associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making and public health reporting. Molecular tests are increasingly used to diagnose C difficile infection (CDI), but many molecular test-positive patients lack toxins that historically defined disease, making it unclear if they need treatment. To determine the natural history and need for treatment of patients who are toxin immunoassay negative and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive (Tox-/PCR+) for CDI. Prospective observational cohort study at a single academic medical center among 1416 hospitalized adults tested for C difficile toxins 72 hours or longer after admission between December 1, 2010, and October 20, 2012. The analysis was conducted in stages with revisions from April 27, 2013, to January 13, 2015. Patients undergoing C difficile testing were grouped by US Food and Drug Administration-approved toxin and PCR tests as Tox+/PCR+, Tox-/PCR+, or Tox-/PCR-. Toxin results were reported clinically. Polymerase chain reaction results were not reported. The main study outcomes were duration of diarrhea during up to 14 days of treatment, rate of CDI-related complications (ie, colectomy, megacolon, or intensive care unit care) and CDI-related death within 30 days. Twenty-one percent (293 of 1416) of hospitalized adults tested for C difficile were positive by PCR, but 44.7% (131 of 293) had toxins detected by the clinical toxin test. At baseline, Tox-/PCR+ patients had lower C difficile bacterial load and less antibiotic exposure, fecal inflammation, and diarrhea than Tox+/PCR+ patients (P overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and increased health care costs.

  3. Clostridium Difficile Infection Due to Pneumonia Treatment: Mortality Risk Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, M; Zycinska, K; Lenartowicz, B; Hadzik-Błaszczyk, M; Cieplak, M; Kur, Z; Wardyn, K A

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common gastrointestinal infection after the antibiotic treatment of community or nosocomial pneumonia is caused by the anaerobic spore Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess mortality due to C. difficile infection (CDI) in patients treated for pneumonia. We identified 94 cases of post-pneumonia CDI out of the 217 patients with CDI. The mortality issue was addressed by creating a mortality risk models using logistic regression and multivariate fractional polynomial analysis. The patients' demographics, clinical features, and laboratory results were taken into consideration. To estimate the influence of the preceding respiratory infection, a pneumonia severity scale was included in the analysis. The analysis showed two statistically significant and clinically relevant mortality models. The model with the highest prognostic strength entailed age, leukocyte count, serum creatinine and urea concentration, hematocrit, coexisting neoplasia or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In conclusion, we report on two prognostic models, based on clinically relevant factors, which can be of help in predicting mortality risk in C. difficile infection, secondary to the antibiotic treatment of pneumonia. These models could be useful in preventive tailoring of individual therapy.

  4. Colonization Resistance of the Gut Microbiota against Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elena Pérez-Cobas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics strongly disrupt the human gut microbiota, which in consequence loses its colonization resistance capacity, allowing infection by opportunistic pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. This bacterium is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a current problem in developed countries, since its incidence and severity have increased during the last years. Furthermore, the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains has reduced the efficiency of the standard treatment with antibiotics, leading to a higher rate of relapses. Here, we review recent efforts focused on the impact of antibiotics in the gut microbiome and their relationship with C. difficile colonization, as well as, in the identification of bacteria and mechanisms involved in the protection against C. difficile infection. Since a healthy gut microbiota is able to avoid pathogen colonization, restoration of the gut microbiota seems to be the most promising approach to face C. difficile infection, especially for recurrent cases. Therefore, it would be possible to design probiotics for patients undergoing antimicrobial therapies in order to prevent or fight the expansion of the pathogen in the gut ecosystem.

  5. Current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that is the principal etiologic agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Infection with C. difficile (CDI) is characterized by diarrhea in clinical syndromes that vary from self-limited to mild or severe. Since its initial recognition as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis, C. difficile has spread around the world. CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Due to extensive antibiotic usage, the number of CDIs has increased. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with the disease, mainly with regards to antibiotic management. The diagnosis of CDI is primarily based on the clinical signs and symptoms and is only confirmed by laboratory testing. Despite the high burden of CDI and the increasing interest in the disease, episodes of CDI are often misdiagnosed. The reasons for misdiagnosis are the lack of clinical suspicion or the use of inappropriate tests. The proper diagnosis of CDI reduces transmission, prevents inadequate or unnecessary treatments, and assures best antibiotic treatment. We review the options for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI within the settings of the most accepted guidelines for CDI diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of CDI. PMID:28321156

  6. The structure of the S-layer of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, William J; Roberts, April K; Shone, Clifford C; Acharya, K Ravi

    2017-11-23

    The nosocomially acquired pathogen Clostridium difficile is the primary causative agent of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and causes tens of thousands of deaths globally each year. C. difficile presents a paracrystalline protein array on the surface of the cell known as an S-layer. S-layers have been demonstrated to possess a wide range of important functions, which, combined with their inherent accessibility, makes them a promising drug target. The unusually complex S-layer of C. difficile is primarily comprised of the high- and low- molecular weight S-layer proteins, HMW SLP and LMW SLP, formed from the cleavage of the S-layer precursor protein, SlpA, but may also contain up to 28 SlpA paralogues. A model of how the S-layer functions as a whole is required if it is to be exploited in fighting the bacterium. Here, we provide a summary of what is known about the S-layer of C. difficile and each of the paralogues and, considering some of the domains present, suggest potential roles for them.

  7. Proline-Dependent Regulation of Clostridium difficile Stickland Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaut, Laurent; Self, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a proteolytic Gram-positive anaerobe, has emerged as a significant nosocomial pathogen. Stickland fermentation reactions are thought to be important for growth of C. difficile and appear to influence toxin production. In Stickland reactions, pairs of amino acids donate and accept electrons, generating ATP and reducing power in the process. Reduction of the electron acceptors proline and glycine requires the d-proline reductase (PR) and the glycine reductase (GR) enzyme complexes, respectively. Addition of proline in the medium increases the level of PR protein but decreases the level of GR. We report the identification of PrdR, a protein that activates transcription of the PR-encoding genes in the presence of proline and negatively regulates the GR-encoding genes. The results suggest that PrdR is a central metabolism regulator that controls preferential utilization of proline and glycine to produce energy via the Stickland reactions. PMID:23222730

  8. Emphysematous cystitis due to recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Michel E; Jonkman, Jeroen G J; van Rijn, Michiel; Dees, Adriaan

    2014-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman with long-standing obstipation presented herself to the hospital with diarrhoea and progressive abdominal cramping since 2 days. Acute abdomen developed and an emergency exploratory laparotomy was indicated, which showed no signs of bowel ischaemia. After admission to the internal ward, stool Clostridium difficile PCR was tested positive. Hence the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis became apparent. Abdominal imaging demonstrated multiple gas foci in the wall of the bladder and extensive pseudomembranous colitis. The patient was initially treated with oral vancomycin and secondarily with metronidazole for recurrent C. difficile infection. Resolution of diarrhoea and abdominal cramping was noted on 6-week follow-up visit. PMID:25519862

  9. A role for TLR4 in Clostridium difficile infection and the recognition of surface layer proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. The role of the surface layer proteins (SLPs in this disease has not yet been fully explored. The aim of this study was to investigate a role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile and the subsequent activation of the immune system. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs exposed to SLPs were assessed for production of inflammatory cytokines, expression of cell surface markers and their ability to generate T helper (Th cell responses. DCs isolated from C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice were used in order to examine whether SLPs are recognised by TLR4. The role of TLR4 in infection was examined in TLR4-deficient mice. SLPs induced maturation of DCs characterised by production of IL-12, TNFα and IL-10 and expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80 and CD86. Furthermore, SLP-activated DCs generated Th cells producing IFNγ and IL-17. SLPs were unable to activate DCs isolated from TLR4-mutant C3H/HeJ mice and failed to induce a subsequent Th cell response. TLR4⁻/⁻ and Myd88⁻/⁻, but not TRIF⁻/⁻ mice were more susceptible than wild-type mice to C. difficile infection. Furthermore, SLPs activated NFκB, but not IRF3, downstream of TLR4. Our results indicate that SLPs isolated from C. difficile can activate innate and adaptive immunity and that these effects are mediated by TLR4, with TLR4 having a functional role in experimental C. difficile infection. This suggests an important role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile by the immune system.

  10. A Role for TLR4 in Clostridium difficile Infection and the Recognition of Surface Layer Proteins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. The role of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) in this disease has not yet been fully explored. The aim of this study was to investigate a role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile and the subsequent activation of the immune system. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to SLPs were assessed for production of inflammatory cytokines, expression of cell surface markers and their ability to generate T helper (Th) cell responses. DCs isolated from C3H\\/HeN and C3H\\/HeJ mice were used in order to examine whether SLPs are recognised by TLR4. The role of TLR4 in infection was examined in TLR4-deficient mice. SLPs induced maturation of DCs characterised by production of IL-12, TNFα and IL-10 and expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80 and CD86. Furthermore, SLP-activated DCs generated Th cells producing IFNγ and IL-17. SLPs were unable to activate DCs isolated from TLR4-mutant C3H\\/HeJ mice and failed to induce a subsequent Th cell response. TLR4(-\\/-) and Myd88(-\\/-), but not TRIF(-\\/-) mice were more susceptible than wild-type mice to C. difficile infection. Furthermore, SLPs activated NFκB, but not IRF3, downstream of TLR4. Our results indicate that SLPs isolated from C. difficile can activate innate and adaptive immunity and that these effects are mediated by TLR4, with TLR4 having a functional role in experimental C. difficile infection. This suggests an important role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile by the immune system.

  11. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Özsoy

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association between Clostridium difficile (C. difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE and efficacy of screening stools submitted for C. difficile toxin assay for prevalence of VRE. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 158 stool samples submitted for C. difficile toxin to the Marmara University Microbiology Laboratory, were included in the study. Stool samples were analyzed by enzyme immuno assay test; VIDAS (bioMerieux, France for Toxin A&B. Samples were inoculated on chromID VRE (bioMerieux, France and incubated 24 h at 37 °C. Manuel tests and API20 STREP (bioMerieux, France test were used to identify the Enterococci species. After the species identification, vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC's were performed by E test and molecular resistance genes for vanA vs vanB were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Of the 158 stool samples, 88 were toxin positive. The prevalence of VRE was 17%(n:19 in toxin positives however, 11.4% in toxin negatives(n:70. All VRE isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium. These results were evaluated according to Fischer's exact chi-square test and p value between VRE colonization and C. difficile toxin positivity was detected 0.047 (p < 0.05. PPV and NPV were 79% and 47% respectively. In our study, the presence of VRE in C. difficile toxin positives is statistically significant compared with toxin negatives (p < 0.05. Screening for VRE is both additional cost and work load for the laboratories. Therefore VRE screening among C. difficile toxin positive samples, will be cost effective for determination of high risk patients in the hospitals especially for developing countries.

  12. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  13. Toxigenic Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotypes from Wastewater Treatment Plants in Southern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Vincenza; Krovacek, Karel; Mauri, Federica; Demarta, Antonella; Dumontet, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium difficile in nine wastewater treatment plants in the Ticino Canton (southern Switzerland) was investigated. The samples were collected from raw sewage influents and from treated effluents. Forty-seven out of 55 characterized C. difficile strains belonged to 13 different reference PCR ribotypes (009, 010, 014, 015, 039, 052, 053, 066, 070, 078, 101, 106, and 117), whereas 8 strains did not match any of those available in our libraries. The most frequently isolated ribotype (40%) was 078, isolated from six wastewater treatment plants, whereas ribotype 066, a toxigenic emerging ribotype isolated from patients admitted to hospitals in Europe and Switzerland, was isolated from the outgoing effluent of one plant. The majority of the isolates (85%) were toxigenic. Forty-nine percent of them produced toxin A, toxin B, and the binary toxin (toxigenic profile A+ B+ CDT+), whereas 51% showed the profile A+ B+ CDT−. Interestingly, eight ribotypes (010, 014, 015, 039, 066, 078, 101, and 106) were among the riboprofiles isolated from symptomatic patients admitted to the hospitals of the Ticino Canton in 2010. Despite the limitation of sampling, this study highlights that toxigenic ribotypes of C. difficile involved in human infections may occur in both incoming and outgoing biological wastewater treatment plants. Such a finding raises concern about the possible contamination of water bodies that receive wastewater treatment plant effluents and about the safe reuse of treated wastewater. PMID:22798376

  14. [Fecal microbiota transplant in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemers, I; Delvallée, M

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Its incidence has increased in the past 20 years and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Relapsing is frequent after treatment and the management of these recurrent Clostridium difficile infections is challenging. Several studies over the years have shown that fecal microbiota transplantion is associated with a high degree of success. Fecal microbiota transplantion is now part of the European recommendations in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. However, standard procedures are needed to define indications, donor's selection criteria, preparation of the stool sample and its administration as well as the patients follow up. Illustration by a case report.

  15. Presence of Clostridium difficile in pigs and cattle intestinal contents and carcass contamination at the slaughterhouse in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Taminiau, B; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2013-09-02

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of Clostridium difficile in intestinal and carcass samples collected from pigs and cattle at a single slaughterhouse. C. difficile was isolated in 1% and 9.9% of the pig and cattle intestinal contents and in 7.9% and 7% of cattle and pig carcass samples respectively. A total of 19 different PCR-ribotypes were identified, among them types 078 and 014. Seven of 19 ribotypes correlated with the PCR-ribotypes involved in human C. difficile infections in Belgium. This study confirms that animals are carriers of C. difficile at slaughter and ribotypes are identical than those in humans, and that carcass contamination occurs inside the slaughterhouse. © 2013.

  16. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penit, A; Bemer, P; Besson, J; Cazet, L; Bourigault, C; Juvin, M-E; Fix, M-H; Bruley des Varannes, S; Boutoille, D; Batard, E; Lepelletier, D

    2016-05-01

    To describe the management and treatment of community-acquired C. difficile infections (CDI) and to evaluate family physicians' (FP) knowledge and practice. Observational study from December 2013 to June 2014. All community-acquired CDI case patients diagnosed in the community or at the University Hospital of Nantes were prospectively included. A questionnaire was mailed to 150 FPs of the area of Nantes. A total of 27 community-acquired CDI case patients were included (incidence: 7.7 case patients/100,000 inhabitants). Mean age was higher among case patients diagnosed at hospital (69years) compared with those diagnosed in the community (44years). Fifteen patients were treated at home (55%) and 22 received a first-line treatment with metronidazole. Only one patient did not receive any prior antibiotic treatment. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was mainly prescribed (68%) for respiratory and ENT infections (40%). Twenty-three patients were cured on Day 7 and three had complications (two deaths). Thirty-one of 47 FPs reported to have already managed CDI patients. Twenty-two FPs reported to usually treat patients with uncomplicated CDI at home, 21 to refer patients to a specialist, and three to hospital. Forty-one FPs reported to prescribe a CD toxin test only after recent antibiotic exposure and 30 when patients are at risk of CDI. The incidence and impact of community-acquired CDIs may be underestimated and the unjustified use of antibiotics may promote their emergence. FPs are not used to treat CDIs as more than 50% prefer referring patients to hospital or to a specialist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. First report of Clostridium difficile NAP1/027 in a Mexican hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Camacho-Ortiz

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile NAP1/ribotype 027 is associated with severe disease and high mortality rates. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of NAP1/ribotype 027 among C. difficile isolates in a tertiary care hospital, and review the main clinical data.We included 106 stool samples from 106 patients. Samples were tested for A&B toxins and were cultured on CCFA agar. The genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdC, cdtA, and cdtB were amplified using PCR in clinical isolates. The tcdA 3'-end deletion analysis, PCR-ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were also performed. Stool samples that were positive for culture were tested by the GeneXpert C. difficile assay. Clinical data were collected.Thirty-six patients tested positive for A&B toxins; and 22 patients had positive culture for C. difficile, 14 of which tested positive for the A&B toxins and all 22 patients tested positive by the GeneXpert C. difficile assay. Risk factors included an average hospital stay of 16.1 days prior to toxin detection, average antibiotic use for 16.2 days, and a median of 3 antibiotics used. The 30-day crude mortality rate was 8.4%. Six of the 22 patients died, and 3 of those deaths were directly attributed to C. difficile infection. The majority of isolates, 90.9% (20/22, carried genes tcdB, tcdA, cdtA, and cdtB; and these strains carried the corresponding downregulator gene tcdC, with an 18-bp deletion. PFGE was performed on 17 isolates, and one main pattern was observed. Analysis of the ribotyping data showed similar results.The above findings represent the clonal spread of C. difficile in our institution, which mainly includes the NAP1/027 strain. This is the first report of C. difficile ribotype NAP1/027 in Mexico.

  18. Management of Clostridium difficile in a developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clostridium difficile is the most important definable cause of healthcare acquired diarrhea. Recommended treatments for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI are metronidazole, oral vancomycin and fidaxomicin (a new narrow spectrum macrocyclic antibiotic. Aim: The aim of this investigation was to review the treatment of CDI in Iran. Method: 1600 medical records and prescriptions were scrutinized for patients complaining of diarrhea, colitis and gastroenteritis. The therapeutic route was investigated in each individual case bearing in mind the medical and medication history as well as other co-morbidities. Results: The selection of antibiotic by many medical practitioners for the treatment of diarrhea, colitis and gastroenteritis were inappropriate and random. In most cases the chosen antibiotic, can itself be associated with initiation or worsening of CDI. Conclusion: The needs for antimicrobial stewardship program to preserve the effectiveness of current available therapies are strongly recommended. This program must focus on the overall reduction of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and ultimately on enforcing the adherence to the reputable antibacterial guidelines.

  19. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Essenmacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis.

  20. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis.

  1. Clostridium Difficile Infection Complicated By Toxic Megacolon In Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganescu Miruna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxic megacolon can be a form of severe clinical course of the infection with Clostridium difficile (ICD, life-threatening, requiring a particular course of treatment. Infection with Clostridium difficile in the Galati Infectious Disease Hospital presents rising number of cases, namely 172 cases in 2014, 271 cases in 2015 and 301 cases in 2016 with clinical evolutions with different severity degrees, including toxic megacolon and death. Among 744 patients with ICD in our clinic, since 1st January 2014 to 31 December 2016. The frequency of toxic megacolon (TM was 0,537%, so: 3 toxic megacolon cases with favorable evolution with treatment with vancomycin and metronidazole and just one case whose evolution was aggravated under this therapy and evolved favorably under treatment with tigecycline. The work presents this last case of ICD occurred in a 69 years old, immunocompetent man with unknown concomitant chronic diseases which undergoes surgery for bilateral inguinal hernia and receives antibiotherapy with cephalosporin IIIrd generation during surgery and after 7 days develops medium degree ICD with score Atlas 3 and receives therapy with oral vancomycin. He presents clinical aggravation during this therapy with the occurrence of colon dilatation, ascites and right pleurisy at ultrasound and therapy associated with metronidazole is decided. Clinical aggravation continues in this combined therapy with defining the clinical, colonoscopy and tomography criteria for TM and is decided surgical monitoring and replacing antibiotherapy with tigecycline. Evolution is favorable with tigecycline without surgical intervention.

  2. The microbiota and immune response during Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonomo, Erica L; Petri, William A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, spore forming anaerobe that infects the gut when the normal microbiota has been disrupted. C. difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of hospital acquired infection in the United States, and the leading cause of death due to gastroenteritis. Patients suffering from CDI have varying symptoms which range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis and death. The involvement of the immune response to influence disease severity is just beginning to be investigated. There is evidence that the immune response can facilitate either protective or pathogenic phenotypes, suggesting it plays a multifaceted role during CDI. In addition to the immune response, the microbiota is pivotal in dictating the pathogenesis to CDI. A healthy microbiota effectively inhibits infection by restricting the ability of C. difficile to expand in the colon. Thus, understanding which immune mediators and components of the microbiota play beneficial roles during CDI will be important to future therapeutic developments. This review outlines how the microbiota can modulate specific immune mediators, such as IL-23 and others, to influence disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advances in the Microbiome: Applications to Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn P. Culligan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing over 400,000 infections and approximately 29,000 deaths in the United States alone each year. C. difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the developed world, and, in recent years, the emergence of hyper-virulent (mainly ribotypes 027 and 078, sometimes characterised by increased toxin production, epidemic strains and an increase in the number of community-acquired infections has caused further concern. Antibiotic therapy with metronidazole, vancomycin or fidaxomicin is the primary treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI. However, CDI is unique, in that, antibiotic use is also a major risk factor for acquiring CDI or recurrent CDI due to disruption of the normal gut microbiota. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative, non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat or prevent CDI. Here, we review a number of such potential treatments which have emerged from advances in the field of microbiome research.

  4. Important clinical advances in the understanding of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Susan M; Johnson, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile remains an important cause of infectious colitis, particularly in healthcare facilities. This review summarizes recent advances in the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this endemic pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI) hospitalizations and mortality rates have increased over the last decade. The BI/NAP1/027 strain has been responsible for epidemics with increased severity and mortality and is now endemic in many settings, particularly North America. Concurrent antibiotics have now been shown to decrease the cure rates for anti-C. difficile therapy and increase the risk of recurrence. Although studies implicate proton pump inhibitors as a risk for CDI, the magnitude of and the biological basis for that risk remain unclear. Molecular diagnostic techniques are rapid and sensitive but highlight the importance of using appropriate clinical testing criteria. Fidaxomicin is a promising new therapy associated with decreased recurrence; infections due to BI strains, however, are associated with inferior outcomes regardless of the treatment agent. Fecal transplantation continues to have impressive success rates for patients with recurrent CDI, and a new colon-sparing surgical procedure presents an intriguing suggested alternative to total colectomy in severe, complicated cases. Elucidating CDI risk factors, identifying rapid, accurate diagnostic tools, and validating new treatment approaches remains an urgent priority.

  5. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Daniel R; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J; Perkins, Timothy T; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Clostridium difficile infection in the elderly: an update on management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asempa TE

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomefa E Asempa, David P Nicolau Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA Abstract: The burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is profound and growing. CDI now represents a common cause of health care–associated diarrhea, and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. CDI disproportionally affects the elderly, possibly explained by the following risk factors: age-related impairment of the immune system, increasing antibiotic utilization, and frequent health care exposure. In the USA, recent epidemiological studies estimate that two out of every three health care–associated CDIs occur in patients 65 years or older. Additionally, the elderly are at higher risk for recurrent CDI. Existing therapeutic options include metronidazole, oral vancomycin, and fidaxomicin. Choice of agent depends on disease severity, history of recurrence, and, increasingly, the drug cost. Bezlotoxumab, a recently approved monoclonal antibody targeting C. difficile toxin B, offers an exciting advancement into immunologic therapies. Similarly, fecal microbiota transplantation is gaining popularity as an effective option mainly for recurrent CDI. The challenge of decreasing CDI burden in the elderly involves adopting preventative strategies, optimizing initial treatment, and decreasing the risk of recurrence. Expanded strategies are certainly needed to improve outcomes in this high-risk population. This review considers available data from prospective and retrospective studies as well as case reports to illustrate the merits and gaps in care related to the management of CDI in the elderly. Keywords: Clostridium difficile, recurrence, risk factors, elderly, aging, treatment, bezlotoxumab, fecal microbiota transplant

  7. An Economic Analysis of Strategies to Control Clostridium Difficile Transmission and Infection Using an Agent-Based Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard E; Jones, Makoto; Leecaster, Molly; Samore, Matthew H; Ray, William; Huttner, Angela; Huttner, Benedikt; Khader, Karim; Stevens, Vanessa W; Gerding, Dale; Schweizer, Marin L; Rubin, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    A number of strategies exist to reduce Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) transmission. We conducted an economic evaluation of "bundling" these strategies together. We constructed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection in a hospital setting. This model included the following components: interactions between patients and health care workers; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. Six interventions were introduced alone and "bundled" together: (a) aggressive C. difficile testing; (b) empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; (c) improved adherence to hand hygiene and (d) contact precautions; (e) improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and (f) improved environmental cleaning. Our analysis compared these interventions using values representing 3 different scenarios: (1) base-case (BASE) values that reflect typical hospital practice, (2) intervention (INT) values that represent implementation of hospital-wide efforts to reduce C. diff transmission, and (3) optimal (OPT) values representing the highest expected results from strong adherence to the interventions. Cost parameters for each intervention were obtained from published literature. We performed our analyses assuming low, normal, and high C. difficile importation prevalence and transmissibility of C. difficile. INT levels of the "bundled" intervention were cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year in all importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. OPT levels of intervention were cost-effective for normal and high importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. When analyzed separately, hand hygiene compliance, environmental decontamination, and empiric isolation and treatment were the

  8. Occurrence of Clostridium difficile in seasoned hamburgers and seven processing plants in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, Zahra; Weese, Scott; Ezzatpanah, Hamid; Jalali, Mohammad; Chamani, Mohammad

    2014-11-25

    The recent increment of the incidence of Community Associated Clostridium difficile Infection (CA)-CDI has led to speculation that this disease is associated to foodborne transmission. Therefore it is critical to establish the community sources of CDI in order to implement the appropriate interventions. The present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of C. difficile in seasoned hamburger and examine the sources of C. difficile dispersal in hamburger processing plants. A total of 211 samples including hamburger ingredients, the final product, processing equipment and food contact surfaces were collected from seven hamburger processing plants to evaluate the routes of dispersal of C. difficile. The samples were assessed for the occurrence of C. difficile using culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. All isolates were screened for the existence of toxin A, B and binary toxin genes. In addition, isolates were subjected to PCR ribotyping. Overall, 9/211 (4.2%) samples were positive. Toxigenic C. difficile were detected from 2/7 (28.5%) hamburger processing plants, in (3/54) 5.6% of beef meat samples, (2/56) 3.5% of swabs taken from the environment and (4/56) 7.1% of hamburger samples after both molding and freezing. C. difficile was not found in 45 non-meat ingredients including 14 defrosted onions, 14 textured soy proteins and 17 seasonings. All isolates contained tcdB gene while 7 strains were positive for tcdA and two remaining strains were negative for tcdA. None of the isolates harbored binary toxin gene (cdtB). PCR ribotyping of 9 isolates categorized into four ribotypes (IR21, IR 22, IR 23 and IR24). Ribotype IR 22 was the most common type 6/9 (66.6%) found. This genotype was isolated from raw meat, environmental samples and hamburger after both forming and freezing in one processing plant, suggesting raw beef meat as a possible major source of contamination. Hyper-virulent strains of ribotype were not found in this study however

  9. Infection control practices related to Clostridium difficile infection in acute care hospitals in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Denise; Gardam, Michael; Taylor, Geoffrey; Miller, Mark; Simor, Andrew; McGeer, Allison; Hutchinson, James; Moore, Dorothy; Kelly, Sharon; Mulvey, Michael

    2009-02-01

    We carried out a survey to identify the infection prevention and control practices in place in Canadian hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP). An infection prevention and control practices survey was sent to CNISP hospitals at the beginning of November 2004, the same time that CNISP started a 6-month prospective surveillance for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to evaluate their infection prevention and control measures and laboratory methods for C difficile. A total of 33 hospitals completed and returned the survey. Infection control precautions were initiated in 18 hospitals (55%) due to the presence of a symptomatic patient before the C difficile laboratory tests were available. All of the hospitals used gloves and gowns as additional precautions. Twenty-three hospitals (70%) tested liquid stools based on a clinician's order, and 8 (24%) tested all liquid stools submitted whether of not C difficile testing was requested. The hospitals used 1 of 3 different products as a standard hospital-wide disinfectant; 24 (73%) used a quaternary ammonium compound, 8 (24%) used accelerated hydrogen peroxide, and 1 (3%) used a hypochlorite solution (1:10 bleach solution). Although the hospitals used contact precautions quite uniformly, considerable variation was seen among hospitals in terms of testing strategies, cleaning and disinfection protocols and products, and isolation practices. The timing for the initiation of infection control precautions is important to prevent secondary transmission of CDI. Most of the hospitals implemented precautions while waiting for the toxin assay results.

  10. Clostridium difficile outbreak in Costa Rica: control actions and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-McClure, Roy A; Guevara-Rodríguez, Moraima; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra; Solano-Chinchilla, Antonio; Marchena-Picado, Margarita; O'Shea, Michele; Badilla-Vargas, Xiomara

    2012-12-01

    To describe interventions implemented during a nosocomial outbreak of Clostridium difficile in a general hospital in Costa Rica from December 2009 to April 2010 in order to achieve outbreak control and the factors determined to be associated with C. difficile infection. Laboratory-confirmed cases of C. difficile were analyzed to describe the outbreak pattern and intervention measures implemented. Cases were selected and recruited in a case-control study. Controls were selected from the same services and time period as the cases. Evaluated exposures included underlying medical conditions and treatments administered before the onset of symptoms. The mean ages in case and control groups were 62.3 and 55.3 years, respectively. Control measures included a hand-hygiene campaign, deep disinfection of hospital surfaces, strict isolation of cases, use of personal protection equipment, and restriction of antibiotic use. The adjusted attributable risks associated with the outbreak were diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-7.7], chronic renal failure (OR 9.0, 95% CI 1.5-53.0), and prescribing ceftazidime (OR 33.3, 95% CI 2.9-385.5) and cefotaxime (OR 20.4, 95% CI 6.9-60.3). Timely implementation of control measures resulted in reduced infection transmission and successful control of the outbreak. Conditions associated with C. difficile infection were similar to those found in previously described outbreaks of this bacterium.

  11. Diversity of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in Europe: results from the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), 2012 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kerrie A; Ashwin, Helen; Longshaw, Christopher M; Burns, David A; Davis, Georgina L; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of infective diarrhoea in healthcare environments. As part of the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), the largest C. difficile epidemiological study of its type, PCR ribotype distribution of C. difficile isolates in Europe was investigated. PCR ribotyping was performed on 1,196 C. difficile isolates from diarrhoeal samples sent to the European coordinating laboratory in 2012-13 and 2013 (from two sampling days) by 482 participating hospitals from 19 European countries. A total of 125 ribotypes were identified, of which ribotypes 027 (19%, n =222), 001/072 (11%, n = 134) and 014/020 (10%, n = 119) were the most prevalent. Distinct regional patterns of ribotype distribution were noted. Of 596 isolates from patients with toxin-positive stools (CDI cases), ribotype 027 accounted for 22% (32/144) of infections in cases aged from 18 to less than 65 years, but the prevalence decreased in those aged ≥ 65 years (14% (59/412)) and further decreased in those aged ≥ 81 years (9% (18/195)). The prevalence of ribotype 027 and 176, but not other epidemic strains, was inversely proportional to overall ribotype diversity (R(2) = 0.717). This study highlights an increased diversity of C. difficile ribotypes across Europe compared with previous studies, with considerable intercountry variation in ribotype distribution. Continuous surveillance programmes are necessary to monitor the changing epidemiology of C. difficile. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  12. Evaluation of repeat Clostridium difficile enzyme immunoassay testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Diana M; Rand, Kenneth H

    2008-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, which have significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate and timely diagnosis is critical. Repeat enzyme immunoassay testing for C. difficile toxin has been recommended because of tests between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2006 were retrospectively analyzed for results and testing patterns. The Wampole C. difficile Tox A/B II enzyme immunoassay kit was used. There were a total of 8,256 tests from 3,112 patients; 49% of tests were repeated. Of the 3,749 initially negative patient tests, 96 were positive upon repeat testing within 10 days of the first test. Of repeat tests, 0.9% repeated on day 0 (same day as the first test), 1.8% on day 1, 3.8% on day 2, 2.6% on day 3, 5.4% on days 4 to 6, and 10.6% on days 7 to 10 were positive. Thirty-eight patients had a positive test within 48 h of an initial negative test, and based on chart review, 18 patients were treated empirically while 16 were treated following the new result. None had evidence of medical complications. Of initially positive patients, 91% were positive upon repeat testing on day 0, 75% on day 1, and 58% on day 2, to a low of 14% on days 7 to 10. Depending on the clinical setting, these data support not repeating C. difficile tests within 2 days of a negative result and limiting repeat testing to >/=1 week of a positive result.

  13. Oscillating behavior of Clostridium difficile Min proteins in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makroczyová, Jana; Jamroškovič, Ján; Krascsenitsová, Eva; Labajová, Nad'a; Barák, Imrich

    2016-06-01

    In rod-shaped bacteria, the proper placement of the division septum at the midcell relies, at least partially, on the proteins of the Min system as an inhibitor of cell division. The main principle of Min system function involves the formation of an inhibitor gradient along the cell axis; however, the establishment of this gradient differs between two well-studied gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. While in gram-negative Escherichia coli, the Min system undergoes pole-to-pole oscillation, in gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, proper spatial inhibition is achieved by the preferential attraction of the Min proteins to the cell poles. Nevertheless, when E.coli Min proteins are inserted into B.subtilis cells, they still oscillate, which negatively affects asymmetric septation during sporulation in this organism. Interestingly, homologs of both Min systems were found to be present in various combinations in the genomes of anaerobic and endospore-forming Clostridia, including the pathogenic Clostridium difficile. Here, we have investigated the localization and behavior of C.difficile Min protein homologs and showed that MinDE proteins of C.difficile can oscillate when expressed together in B.subtilis cells. We have also investigated the effects of this oscillation on B.subtilis sporulation, and observed decreased sporulation efficiency in strains harboring the MinDE genes. Additionally, we have evaluated the effects of C.difficile Min protein expression on vegetative division in this heterologous host. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Reset of a critically disturbed microbial ecosystem: faecal transplant in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Nood, van E.; Tims, S.; Heikamp-de Jong, I.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Keller, J.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can be effectively treated by infusion of a healthy donor faeces suspension. However, it is unclear what factors determine treatment efficacy. By using a phylogenetic microarray platform, we assessed composition, diversity and dynamics of faecal

  15. Diarrhea Recurrence in Patients with Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea: Role of Concurrent Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Alfa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To monitor prospectively patients with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CAD in a six hundred bed tertiary care hospital to determine which factors influenced the recurrence of the diarrhea.

  16. Clostridium difficile infection : the role of antibiotics in outbreak control, epidemiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, Sylvia Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Since a decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased progressively in incidence and severity of disease. Currently, CDI is considered the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea, associated with an increased duration of hospitalization, healthcare expenses, morbidity and mortality.

  17. Toksisk megacolon sekundært til Clostridium difficile-associeret pseudomembranøs kolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Friis, Mikkel Lønborg; Lehnhoff, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    severe colonic dilation, inflammation and oedema consistent with toxic megacolon. Stool samples were positive for Clostridium difficile. Oral vancomycine treatment and colonic decompression were inefficient. Subtotal colectomy was performed after which the condition improved. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-May-5...

  18. Analysis of risk factors and clinical manifestations associated with Clostridium difficile disease in Serbian hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Predrag

    Full Text Available Abstract Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors important for the development of hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated disease and clinical manifestations of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. The clinical trial group included 37 hospitalized patients who were selected according to the inclusion criteria. A control group of 74 hospitalized patients was individually matched with cases based on hospital, age (within 4 years, sex and month of admission.Clostridium difficile-associated disease most commonly manifested as diarrhoea (56.76% and colitis (32%, while in 8.11% of patients, it was diagnosed as pseudomembranous colitis, and in one patient, it was diagnosed as fulminant colitis. Statistically significant associations (p < 0.05 were found with the presence of chronic renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident (stroke and haemodialysis. In this study, it was confirmed that all the groups of antibiotics, except for tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were statistically significant risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05. However, it was difficult to determine the individual role of antibiotics in the development of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Univariate logistic regression also found that applying antibiotic therapy, the duration of antibiotic therapy, administration of two or more antibiotics to treat infections, administering laxatives and the total number of days spent in the hospital significantly affected the onset of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05, and associations were confirmed using the multivariate model for the application of antibiotic therapy (p = 0.001, duration of antibiotic treatment (p = 0.01, use of laxatives (p = 0.01 and total number of days spent in the hospital (p = 0.001. In this study

  19. Decrease of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M. P.; Goorhuis, A.; Notermans, D. W.; van Benthem, B. H.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    After the first outbreaks of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 (North American pulsed-field type 1, restriction endonuclease analysis group BI) in the Netherlands in 2005, a national surveillance programme for C. difficile infection (CDI) was started. Furthermore, national guidelines were

  20. The HtrA-Like Protease CD3284 Modulates Virulence of Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Dennis; Buckley, Anthony M.; de Jong, Anne; van Winden, Vincent J. C.; Verhoeks, Joost P. A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Douce, Gillian R.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Corver, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Besides the two main virulence factors toxin A and toxin B, other virulence factors are likely to play a role in the

  1. Molecular Characterization of a Clostridium difficile Bacteriophage and Its Cloned Biologically Active Endolysin▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Narbad, Arjan; Gasson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in both frequency and severity, with the emergence of new highly virulent strains highlighting the need for more rapid and effective methods of control. Here, we show that bacteriophage endolysin can be used to inhibit and kill C. difficile. The genome sequence of a novel bacteriophage that is active against C. difficile was determined, and the bacteriophage endolysin gene was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The partially purified end...

  2. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in raw beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo meat in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Jalali, Mohammad; Weese, J Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile has been shown to be a nosocomial pathogen associated with diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in hospitalised patients and the infection is believed to be acquired nosocomially. Recent studies have shown the occurrence of C. difficile in food animals which may act as a source of infection to humans.The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of C. difficile in retail raw beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo meat in Iran. Method From April to...

  3. Clostridium difficile PCR Cycle Threshold Predicts Free Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchyna, Fiona; Gaur, Rajiv L; Gombar, Saurabh; Truong, Cynthia Y; Schroeder, Lee F; Banaei, Niaz

    2017-09-01

    There is no stand-alone Clostridium difficile diagnostic that can sensitively and rapidly detect fecal free toxins. We investigated the performance of the C. difficile PCR cycle threshold ( C T ) for predicting free toxin status. Consecutive stool samples ( n = 312) positive for toxigenic C. difficile by the GeneXpert C. difficile /Epi tcdB PCR assay were tested with the rapid membrane C. Diff Quik Chek Complete immunoassay (RMEIA). RMEIA toxin-negative samples were tested with the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and tgcBIOMICS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using RMEIA alone or in combination with CCNA and/or ELISA as the reference method, the accuracy of C T was measured at different C T cutoffs. Using RMEIA as the reference method, a C T cutoff of 26.35 detected toxin-positive samples with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.2% to 98.9%), 65.9% (95% CI, 59.0% to 72.2%), 57.4% (95% CI, 52.7% to 62%), and 97.1% (95% CI, 92.8% to 98.9), respectively. Inclusion of CCNA in the reference method improved C T specificity to 78.0% (95% CI, 70.7% to 84.2%). Intercartridge lot C T variability measured as the average coefficient of variation was 2.8% (95% CI, 1.2% to 3.2%). Standardizing the input stool volume did not improve C T toxin specificity. The median C T values were not significantly different between stool samples with Bristol scores of 5, 6, and 7, between pediatric and adult samples, or between presumptive 027 and non-027 strains. In addition to sensitively detecting toxigenic C. difficile in stool, on-demand PCR may also be used to accurately predict toxin-negative stool samples, thus providing additional results in PCR-positive stool samples to guide therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. [Diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile in the elderly: new perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Sierra, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Infection due to Clostridium difficile is currently the main cause of hospital acquired gastrointestinal disease. Its prevalence in the elderly population is higher due to there being many associated risk factors in this age group, such as comorbidity, frequent exposure to the healthcare or residential home setting, immunosenescence, greater consumption of antibiotics, and antiacids. The diagnostic techniques have notably improved in the last few years, which could also account for an increase in its diagnosis. The new expert consensus recommendations propose stratifying the clinical situation of the patient in order to choose the treatment option. Therapeutic options have recently been included in the new Clinical Guidelines, such as flidaxomicin or fecal transplants, with encouraging results, particularly for the control of frequent recurrences. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Blowhole Colostomy for Clostridium difficile-Associated Toxic Megacolon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Kerstens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent urgent blowhole colostomy for toxic megacolon (TM secondary to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. This infection occurred under antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, four days after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in our hospital. Although prospective clinical research regarding the surgical management of TM is lacking, decompressive procedures like blowhole colostomy are reported to carry a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality and are widely regarded as obsolete. Subtotal or total colectomy with end ileostomy is currently considered the procedure of choice. After presenting our case, we discuss the literature available on the subject to argue that the scarce evidence on the optimal surgical treatment for TM is primarily based on TM associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and that there might be a rationale for considering minimally invasive procedures like blowhole colostomy for CDI-associated TM.

  6. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection in a Large Teaching Hospital in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popchai Ngamskulrungroj

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a leading cause of healthcare-associated morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Thailand, CDI exhibits low recurrence and mortality and its molecular epidemiology is unknown. CDI surveillance was conducted in a tertiary facility (Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok. A total of 53 toxigenic C. difficile strains from Thai patients were analyzed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, PCR ribotyping, and pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. The mean age of the cohort was 64 years and 62.3% were female; 37.7% of patients were exposed to > two antibiotics prior to a diagnosis of CDI, with beta-lactams the most commonly used drug (56.3%. Metronidazole was used most commonly (77.5%; success rate 83.9%, and non-responders were treated with vancomycin (success rate 100%. None of the isolates carried binary toxin genes. Most isolates (98.2-100% were susceptible to metronidazole, vancomycin, tigecycline and daptomycin. There were 11 sequence types (STs, 13 ribotypes (RTs and four PFGE types. Six previously identified STs (ST12, ST13, ST14, ST33, ST41 and ST45 and five novel STs unique to Thailand (ST66, ST67, ST68, ST69 and ST70 were identified. PCR RTs UK 017 (ST45 (45.3% and UK 014/020 (ST33 (24.5% were the most common. High concordance was observed between the MLST and ribotyping results (p<0.001. C. difficile isolates from Thai patients were highly susceptible to standard antimicrobial agents. In conclusion, the five STs indicate the high genetic diversity and unique polymorphisms in Thailand. Moreover, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance to vancomycin warranted continuous surveillance to prevent further spread of the toxigenic C. difficile isolates.

  8. Changes in Colonic Bile Acid Composition following Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Are Sufficient to Control Clostridium difficile Germination and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa R Weingarden

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a highly effective therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI, but its mechanisms remain poorly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that gut bile acids have significant influence on the physiology of C. difficile, and therefore on patient susceptibility to recurrent infection. We analyzed spore germination of 10 clinical C. difficile isolates exposed to combinations of bile acids present in patient feces before and after FMT. Bile acids at concentrations found in patients' feces prior to FMT induced germination of C. difficile, although with variable potency across different strains. However, bile acids at concentrations found in patients after FMT did not induce germination and inhibited vegetative growth of all C. difficile strains. Sequencing of the newly identified germinant receptor in C. difficile, CspC, revealed a possible correspondence of variation in germination responses across isolates with mutations in this receptor. This may be related to interstrain variability in spore germination and vegetative growth in response to bile acids seen in this and other studies. These results support the idea that intra-colonic bile acids play a key mechanistic role in the success of FMT, and suggests that novel therapeutic alternatives for treatment of R-CDI may be developed by targeted manipulation of bile acid composition in the colon.

  9. Prevalence of Clostridium spp. and Clostridium difficile in children with acute diarrhea in São Paulo city, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia EA Ferreira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Species of Clostridium are widely distributed in the environment, inhabiting both human and animal gastrointestinal tracts. Clostridium difficile is an important pathogen associated with outbreaks of pseudomembranous colitis and other intestinal disorders, such as diarrhea. In this study, the prevalence of Clostridium spp. and C. difficile, from hospitalized children with acute diarrhea, was examined. These children were admitted to 3 different hospitals for over 12 months. Eighteen (20% and 19 (21% stool specimens from children with (90 and without (91 diarrhea respectively, were positive to clostridia. Only 10 C. difficile strains were detected in 5.5% of the stool samples of children with diarrhea. None healthy children (without diarrhea harbored C. difficile. From these 10 C. difficile, 9 were considered as toxigenic and genotyped as tcdA+/tcdB+ or tcdA-/tcdB+, and 1 strain as nontoxigenic (tcdA-/tdcB-. They were detected by the citotoxicity on VERO cells and by the multiplex-polymerase chain reaction. Thirty clinical fecal extracts produced minor alterations on VERO cells. The presence of C. difficile as a probable agent of acute diarrhea is suggested in several countries, but in this study, the presence of these organisms was not significant. More studies will be necessary to evaluate the role of clostridia or C. difficile in diarrhoeal processes in children.

  10. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in infants in Oxfordshire, UK: Risk factors for colonization and carriage, and genetic overlap with regional C. difficile infection strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, Nicole; Eyre, David W; Quan, T Phuong; Godwin, Heather; Pill, Gemma; Mbuvi, Emily; Vaughan, Alison; Griffiths, David; Martin, Jessica; Fawley, Warren; Dingle, Kate E; Oakley, Sarah; Wanelik, Kazimierz; Finney, John M; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Moore, Catrin E; Gorbach, Sherwood; Riley, Thomas V; Crook, Derrick W; Peto, Tim E A; Wilcox, Mark H; Walker, A Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 30-40% of children <1 year of age are Clostridium difficile colonized, and may represent a reservoir for adult C. difficile infections (CDI). Risk factors for colonization with toxigenic versus non-toxigenic C. difficile strains and longitudinal acquisition dynamics in infants remain incompletely characterized. Predominantly healthy infants (≤2 years) were recruited in Oxfordshire, UK, and provided ≥1 fecal samples. Independent risk factors for toxigenic/non-toxigenic C. difficile colonization and acquisition were identified using multivariable regression. Infant C. difficile isolates were whole-genome sequenced to assay genetic diversity and prevalence of toxin-associated genes, and compared with sequenced strains from Oxfordshire CDI cases. 338/365 enrolled infants provided 1332 fecal samples, representing 158 C. difficile colonization or carriage episodes (107[68%] toxigenic). Initial colonization was associated with age, and reduced with breastfeeding but increased with pet dogs. Acquisition was associated with older age, Caesarean delivery, and diarrhea. Breastfeeding and pre-existing C. difficile colonization reduced acquisition risk. Overall 13% of CDI C. difficile strains were genetically related to infant strains. 29(18%) infant C. difficile sequences were consistent with recent direct/indirect transmission to/from Oxfordshire CDI cases (≤2 single nucleotide variants [SNVs]); 79(50%) shared a common origin with an Oxfordshire CDI case within the last ~5 years (0-10 SNVs). The hypervirulent, epidemic ST1/ribotype 027 remained notably absent in infants in this large study, as did other lineages such as STs 10/44 (ribotype 015); the most common strain in infants was ST2 (ribotype 020/014)(22%). In predominantly healthy infants without significant healthcare exposure C. difficile colonization and acquisition reflect environmental exposures, with pet dogs identified as a novel risk factor. Genetic overlap between some infant strains and

  11. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile in infants in Oxfordshire, UK: Risk factors for colonization and carriage, and genetic overlap with regional C. difficile infection strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Stoesser

    Full Text Available Approximately 30-40% of children <1 year of age are Clostridium difficile colonized, and may represent a reservoir for adult C. difficile infections (CDI. Risk factors for colonization with toxigenic versus non-toxigenic C. difficile strains and longitudinal acquisition dynamics in infants remain incompletely characterized.Predominantly healthy infants (≤2 years were recruited in Oxfordshire, UK, and provided ≥1 fecal samples. Independent risk factors for toxigenic/non-toxigenic C. difficile colonization and acquisition were identified using multivariable regression. Infant C. difficile isolates were whole-genome sequenced to assay genetic diversity and prevalence of toxin-associated genes, and compared with sequenced strains from Oxfordshire CDI cases.338/365 enrolled infants provided 1332 fecal samples, representing 158 C. difficile colonization or carriage episodes (107[68%] toxigenic. Initial colonization was associated with age, and reduced with breastfeeding but increased with pet dogs. Acquisition was associated with older age, Caesarean delivery, and diarrhea. Breastfeeding and pre-existing C. difficile colonization reduced acquisition risk. Overall 13% of CDI C. difficile strains were genetically related to infant strains. 29(18% infant C. difficile sequences were consistent with recent direct/indirect transmission to/from Oxfordshire CDI cases (≤2 single nucleotide variants [SNVs]; 79(50% shared a common origin with an Oxfordshire CDI case within the last ~5 years (0-10 SNVs. The hypervirulent, epidemic ST1/ribotype 027 remained notably absent in infants in this large study, as did other lineages such as STs 10/44 (ribotype 015; the most common strain in infants was ST2 (ribotype 020/014(22%.In predominantly healthy infants without significant healthcare exposure C. difficile colonization and acquisition reflect environmental exposures, with pet dogs identified as a novel risk factor. Genetic overlap between some infant strains

  12. CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE ASSOCIATED DISEASE IN THE NEUROINTENSIVECARE UNIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata eTripathy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND- Critically ill patients are at high risk for acquiring Clostridium difficile infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, severity and outcome of Neurointensive Care Unit (NICU acquired Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD. METHODS: Intensive care admission and hospital infection control databases from April 2008 to August 2010 were studied and the case notes reviewed retrospectively. Diarrhoea was classified as mild, moderate or severe based on the frequency and volume. Information on demographics, risk factors for CDAD, presentation and course of the disease was gathered. Admission diagnosis, days of NICU stay and incidence of complications were noted. RESULTS: In the time period studied, 9 out of 2212 patients (prevalence rate 0.4% admitted to the ICU for a total of 10,825 bed days ( incidence rate 8.3 per 10,000 bed days acquired CDAD. Median age was 55 (IQR 20-72 years. The median NICU stay was 26 (IQR 11-103 days. The median duration between ICU admission and development of CDAD was 11 (IQR 3 to 93 days. 4 patients (44% had moderate CDAD. Concurrent infections occurred in 7 (77% patients. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials prior to CDAD were cephalosporins (71%. The apparent risk factors in this group included age > 65 year (22% and antibiotics (67% among others. One patient developed CDAD colitis. Three patients had a perceived delay in discharge from the ICU (1 to 8 days due to their infective status. No mortality was ascribed to CDAD. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate (0.4% and morbidity of CDAD in the unit are low. A larger database is needed to better analyse the associated risk factors in this subgroup of patients. A possible increase in disease burden due to a delay in discharge from the ICU merits further evaluation.

  13. Rheological properties of erythrocytes in patients infected with Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Czepiel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a bacterial infection of the digestive tract. Acute infections are accompanied by increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE. To date, there have been no studies of the rheological properties of blood during the course of digestive tract infections. The aim of our study was to examine the effects of CDI on red blood cell (RBC rheology, specifically RBC deformability, RBC aggregation, and plasma viscosity. In addition, the activity of glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE in RBC was studied. Our study group included 20 patients with CDI, 20 healthy persons comprised the control group. We examined the effects of CDI on the rheology of RBCs, their deformability and aggregation, using a Laser–assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LORCA. Plasma viscosity was determined using a capillary tube plasma viscosymeter. Moreover, we estimated the activity of AChE and G6PD in RBC using spectrophotometric method. A statistically significant increase was found in the aggregation index, viscosity and activity of G6PD whereas the amount of time to reach half of maximum aggregation (t½ and the amplitude of aggregation (AMP both showed statistically significantly decreases among patients with CDI compared to the control group. We also observed that the Elongation Index (EI was decreased when shear stress values were low, between 0.3 Pa and 0.58 Pa, whereas EI was increased for shear stress in the range of 1.13 - 59.97 Pa. These observations were statistically significant. We report for the first time that acute infection of the gastrointestinal tract with Clostridium difficile is associated with abnormalities in rheological properties of blood, increased serum viscosity as well as increased aggregation of RBCs, which correlated with severity of inflammation. These abnormalities may be an additional mechanism causing increased incidence of VTE in CDI.

  14. Structural insight into the Clostridium difficile ethanolamine utilisation microcompartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C Pitts

    Full Text Available Bacterial microcompartments form a protective proteinaceous barrier around metabolic enzymes that process unstable or toxic chemical intermediates. The genome of the virulent, multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile 630 strain contains an operon, eut, encoding a bacterial microcompartment with genes for the breakdown of ethanolamine and its utilisation as a source of reduced nitrogen and carbon. The C. difficile eut operon displays regulatory genetic elements and protein encoding regions in common with homologous loci found in the genomes of other bacteria, including the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecalis. The crystal structures of two microcompartment shell proteins, CD1908 and CD1918, and an uncharacterised protein with potential enzymatic activity, CD1925, were determined by X-ray crystallography. CD1908 and CD1918 display the same protein fold, though the order of secondary structure elements is permuted in CD1908 and this protein displays an N-terminal β-strand extension. These proteins form hexamers with molecules related by crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetry. The structure of CD1925 has a cupin β-barrel fold and a putative active site that is distinct from the metal-ion dependent catalytic cupins. Thin-section transmission electron microscopy of Escherichia coli over-expressing eut proteins indicates that CD1918 is capable of self-association into arrays, suggesting an organisational role for CD1918 in the formation of this microcompartment. The work presented provides the basis for further study of the architecture and function of the C. difficile eut microcompartment, its role in metabolism and the wider consequences of intestinal colonisation and virulence in this pathogen.

  15. Structural Insight into the Clostridium difficile Ethanolamine Utilisation Microcompartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Lewis, Richard J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments form a protective proteinaceous barrier around metabolic enzymes that process unstable or toxic chemical intermediates. The genome of the virulent, multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile 630 strain contains an operon, eut, encoding a bacterial microcompartment with genes for the breakdown of ethanolamine and its utilisation as a source of reduced nitrogen and carbon. The C. difficile eut operon displays regulatory genetic elements and protein encoding regions in common with homologous loci found in the genomes of other bacteria, including the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecalis. The crystal structures of two microcompartment shell proteins, CD1908 and CD1918, and an uncharacterised protein with potential enzymatic activity, CD1925, were determined by X-ray crystallography. CD1908 and CD1918 display the same protein fold, though the order of secondary structure elements is permuted in CD1908 and this protein displays an N-terminal β-strand extension. These proteins form hexamers with molecules related by crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetry. The structure of CD1925 has a cupin β-barrel fold and a putative active site that is distinct from the metal-ion dependent catalytic cupins. Thin-section transmission electron microscopy of Escherichia coli over-expressing eut proteins indicates that CD1918 is capable of self-association into arrays, suggesting an organisational role for CD1918 in the formation of this microcompartment. The work presented provides the basis for further study of the architecture and function of the C. difficile eut microcompartment, its role in metabolism and the wider consequences of intestinal colonisation and virulence in this pathogen. PMID:23144756

  16. Human alpha-defensins inhibit Clostridium difficile toxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesemann, Torsten; Guttenberg, Gregor; Aktories, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    Clostridium difficile toxins A and B are major virulence factors implicated in pseudomembranous colitis and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The toxins are glucosyltransferases, which inactivate Rho proteins involved in cellular signaling. Human alpha-defensins as part of the innate immune system inactivate various microbial pathogens as well as specific bacterial exotoxins. Here, we studied the effects of alpha-defensins human neutrophil protein (HNP)-1, HNP-3, and enteric human defensin (HD)-5 on the activity of C difficile toxins A and B. Inactivation of C difficile toxins by alpha-defensins in vivo was monitored by microscopy, determination of the transepithelial resistance of CaCo-2 cell monolayers, and analysis of the glucosylation of Rac1 in toxin-treated cells. In vitro glucosylation was used to determine K(m) and median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values. Formation of defensin-toxin complexes was analyzed by precipitation and turbidity studies. Treatment of cells with human alpha-defensins caused loss of cytotoxicity of toxin B, but not of toxin A. Only alpha-defensins, but not beta-defensin-1 or cathelicidin LL-37, inhibited toxin B-catalyzed in vitro glucosylation of Rho guanosine triphosphatases in a competitive manner, increasing K(m) values for uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose up to 10-fold. The IC(50) values for inhibition of toxin B-catalyzed glucosylation by the alpha-defensins were 0.6-1.5 micromol/L. At high concentrations, defensins (HNP-1 > or = 2 micromol/L) caused high-molecular-mass aggregates, comparable to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor. Our data indicate that toxin B interacts with high affinity with alpha-defensins and suggest that defensins may provide a defense mechanism against some types of clostridial glucosylating cytotoxins.

  17. An exploratory study to evaluate Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotypes and infection outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabit AK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abrar K Thabit,1,2 David P Nicolau1,3 1Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA Background: Clostridium difficile infection ranges from mild to severe prolonged diarrhea with systemic symptoms. Previous studies have assessed the correlation of some disease severity parameters to C. difficile ribotypes. However, certain clinical parameters of interest have not yet been evaluated.Aim: We conducted an exploratory study to evaluate the correlation of C. difficile ribotypes to parameters not assessed previously, notably days to diarrhea resolution (in terms of days to formed stools and days to less than three stools per day, length of hospital stay, 30-day recurrence rates, and 30-day readmission rates. Additional severity parameters evaluated include leukocytosis, serum creatinine, fever, and nausea/vomiting.Methods: Polymerase chain reaction ribotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates from baseline stool samples of 29 patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess the parameters of interest.Results: The most common ribotypes were 027 (38%, 014/020 (21%, and 106/174 (21%. Numerically, 027 ribotype patients required more days to less than three stools per day versus 014/020 and 106/174 ribotype patients (P=0.2. The three ribotypes were similar regarding time to formed stools, duration of hospitalization, and 30-day readmission rate (P=0.2, 0.6, and 0.8, respectively. Recurrence within 30 days occurred in two patients with 027 and two patients with 014/020 (P=0.6. Leukocytosis and fever were more prominent with 027 than with 014/020 and 106/174 (P=0.04 for both parameters, although the degree of nausea/vomiting did not differ between the three groups (P=0.3. A serum creatinine level ≥1.5 times the premorbid level was seen in only three

  18. Management of a cluster of Clostridium difficile infections among patients with osteoarticular infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Färber

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe a cluster of hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infections (CDI among 26 patients with osteoarticular infections. The aim of the study was to define the source of C. difficile and to evaluate the impact of general infection control measures and antibiotic stewardship on the incidence of CDI. Methods Epidemiological analysis included typing of C. difficile strains and analysis of possible patient to patient transmission. Infection control measures comprised strict isolation of CDI patients, additional hand washings, and intensified environmental cleaning with sporicidal disinfection. In addition an antibiotic stewardship program was implemented in order to prevent the use of CDI high risk antimicrobials such as fluoroquinolones, clindamycin, and cephalosporins. Results The majority of CDI (n = 15 were caused by C. difficile ribotype 027 (RT027. Most RT027 isolates (n = 9 showed high minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC for levofloxacin, clindamycin, and remarkably to rifampicin, which were all used for the treatment of osteoarticular infections. Epidemiological analysis, however, revealed no closer genetic relationship among the majority of RT027 isolates. The incidence of CDI was reduced only when a significant reduction in the use of fluoroquinolones (p = 0.006, third generation cephalosporins (p = 0.015, and clindamycin (p = 0.001 was achieved after implementation of an intensified antibiotic stewardship program which included a systematic review of all antibiotic prescriptions. Conclusion The successful reduction of the CDI incidence demonstrates the importance of antibiotic stewardship programs focused on patients treated for osteoarticular infections.

  19. Treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile infection using fecal microbiota transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak R

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Pathak,1 Hill Ambrose Enuh,1 Anish Patel,1 Prasanna Wickremesinghe21Department of Internal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Department of Gastrointestinal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USABackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has become a global concern over the last decade. In the United States, CDI escalated in incidence from 1996 to 2005 from 31 to 64/100,000. In 2010, there were 500,000 cases of CDI with an estimated mortality up to 20,000 cases a year. The significance of this problem is evident from the hospital costs of over 3 billion dollars annually. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT was first described in 1958 and since then about 500 cases have been published in literature in various small series and case reports. This procedure has been reported mainly from centers outside of the United States and acceptance of the practice has been difficult. Recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA labeled FMT as a biological drug; as a result, guidelines will soon be required to help establish it as a mainstream treatment. More US experience needs to be reported to popularize this procedure here and form guidelines.Method: We did a retrospective review of our series of patients with relapsing CDI who were treated with FMT over a 3-year period. We present our experience with FMT at a community hospital as a retrospective review and describe our procedure.Results: There were a total of 12 patients who underwent FMT for relapsing C. difficile. Only one patient failed to respond and required a second FMT. There were no complications associated with the transplant and all patients had resolution of symptoms within 48 hours of FMT.Conclusion: FMT is a cheap, easily available, effective therapy for recurrent CDI; it can be safely performed in a

  20. A case report of successful management of clostridium difficile colitis with antegrade Fidaxomicin through a mucous fistula obviating the need for subtotal colectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Arnott

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: In our case of fulminant clostridium difficile colitis, Fidaxomicin administered in an antegrade fashion through a mucous fistula may have reduced the need for total colectomy in the treatment of fulminant clostridium difficile colitis.

  1. Lauric Acid Is an Inhibitor of Clostridium difficile Growth in Vitro and Reduces Inflammation in a Mouse Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ting Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic human gastrointestinal pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI is a major health concern worldwide, with symptoms ranging from diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, sepsis, and death. CDI onset and progression are mostly caused by intestinal dysbiosis and exposure to C. difficile spores. Current treatment strategies include antibiotics; however, antibiotic use is often associated with high recurrence rates and an increased risk of antibiotic resistance. Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs have been revealed to inhibit the growth of multiple human bacterial pathogens. Components of coconut oil, which include lauric acid, have been revealed to inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro. In this study, we demonstrated that lauric acid exhibits potent antimicrobial activities against multiple toxigenic C. difficile isolates in vitro. The inhibitory effect of lauric acid is partly due to reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and cell membrane damage. The administration of lauric acid considerably reduced biofilm formation and preformed biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, in a mouse infection model, lauric acid pretreatment reduced CDI symptoms and proinflammatory cytokine production. Our combined results suggest that the naturally occurring MCFA lauric acid is a novel C. difficile inhibitor and is useful in the development of an alternative or adjunctive treatment for CDI.

  2. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection and colonization in a tertiary hospital and elderly community of North-Eastern Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainul, N H; Ma, Z F; Besari, A; Siti Asma, H; Rahman, R A; Collins, D A; Hamid, N; Riley, T V; Lee, Y Y

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Asia. The aims of our study were to explore (i) the prevalence, risk factors and molecular epidemiology of CDI and colonization in a tertiary academic hospital in North-Eastern Peninsular Malaysia; (ii) the rate of carriage of C. difficile among the elderly in the region; (iii) the awareness level of this infection among the hospital staffs and students. For stool samples collected from hospital inpatients with diarrhea (n = 76) and healthy community members (n = 138), C. difficile antigen and toxins were tested by enzyme immunoassay. Stool samples were subsequently analyzed by culture and molecular detection of toxin genes, and PCR ribotyping of isolates. To examine awareness among hospital staff and students, participants were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire. For the hospital and community studies, the prevalence of non-toxigenic C. difficile colonization was 16% and 2%, respectively. The prevalence of CDI among hospital inpatients with diarrhea was 13%. Out of 22 C. difficile strains from hospital inpatients, the toxigenic ribotypes 043 and 017 were most common (both 14%). In univariate analysis, C. difficile colonization in hospital inpatients was significantly associated with greater duration of hospitalization and use of penicillin (both P prevalent in a Malaysian hospital setting but not in the elderly community with little or no contact with hospitals. Awareness of CDI is alarmingly poor.

  3. Doxycycline and Tigecycline: Two Friendly Drugs with a Low Association with Clostridium Difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Pin Hung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is known to be associated with prior exposure to many classes of antibiotics. Standard therapy for CDI (i.e., metronidazole and vancomycin is associated with high recurrence rates. Although tetracycline derivatives such as tetracycline, doxycycline or tigecycline are not the standard therapeutic choices for CDI, they may serve as an alternative or a component of combination therapy. Previous tetracycline or doxycycline usage had been shown to have less association with CDI development. Tigecycline, a broad-spectrum glycylcycline with potency against many gram-positive or gram-negative pathogens, had been successfully used to treat severe or refractory CDI. The in vitro susceptibility of C. difficile clinical isolates to tigecycline in many studies showed low minimal inhibitory concentrations. Tigecycline can suppress in vitro toxin production in both historical and hypervirulent C. difficile strains and reduce spore production in a dose-dependent manner. Tetracycline compounds such as doxycycline, minocycline, and tigecycline possess anti-inflammatory properties that are independent of their antibiotic activity and may contribute to their therapeutic effect for CDI. Although clinical data are limited, doxycycline is less likely to induce CDI, and tigecycline can be considered one of the therapeutic choices for severe or refractory CDI.

  4. Faecal excretion of brush border membrane enzymes in patients with clostridium difficile diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyal R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To look for the presence of intestinal brush border membrane (BBM enzymes in the faecal samples of patients with Clostridium difficile association. METHODS: One hundred faecal samples were investigated for C.difficile toxin (CDT. Simultaneous assays for faecal excretion of intestinal BBM enzymes viz., disaccharidases, alkaline phosphatase (AP and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP were also done. RESULTS: C.difficile toxin was detected in 25 (25% of the samples with a titre ranging from 10 to 160. No significant difference (p>0.05 was seen between the CDT positive and negative groups with any of the disaccharidases studied. However, significant increase (pC.difficile diarrhoea.

  5. Preterm Infant-Associated Clostridium tertium, Clostridium cadaveris, and Clostridium paraputrificum Strains: Genomic and Evolutionary Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Kiu, Raymond; Caim, Shabhonam; Alcon-Giner, Cristina; Belteki, Gustav; Clarke, Paul; Pickard, Derek; Dougan, Gordon; Hall, Lindsay J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Clostridium species (particularly Clostridium difficile, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens) are associated with a range of human and animal diseases. Several other species including Clostridium tertium, Clostridium cadaveris, and Clostridium paraputrificum have also been linked with sporadic human infections, however there is very limited, or in some cases, no genomic information publicly available. Thus, we isolated one C. tertium strain, one C. c...

  6. Effect of a probiotic on prevention of diarrhea and Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens shedding in foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Staempfli, H R; Abrahams, M

    2015-01-01

    of incidence and duration of diarrhea and fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile between treatment and age groups. RESULTS: The overall incidence of diarrhea was 41 of 72 (59%) and did not differ (P = 0.37) between treatment groups. Foals treated with probiotics were more likely...... of C. perfringens shedding was 55% with no difference between treatment groups (P = 0.23). The prevalence of C. difficile shedding was 11%. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: There was no benefit of administering a 3-week course of probiotics, but potential adverse effects were noted. Whether...

  7. Clostridium difficile with Moxifloxacin/Clindamycin Resistance in Vegetables in Ohio, USA, and Prevalence Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Rodriguez-Palacios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We (i determined the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and their antimicrobial resistance to six antimicrobial classes, in a variety of fresh vegetables sold in retail in Ohio, USA, and (ii conducted cumulative meta-analysis of reported prevalence in vegetables since the 1990s. Six antimicrobial classes were tested for their relevance as risk factors for C. difficile infections (CDIs (clindamycin, moxifloxacin or their clinical priority as exhaustive therapeutic options (metronidazole, vancomycin, linezolid, and tigecycline. By using an enrichment protocol we isolated C. difficile from three of 125 vegetable products (2.4%. All isolates were toxigenic, and originated from 4.6% of 65 vegetables cultivated above the ground (n=3; outer leaves of iceberg lettuce, green pepper, and eggplant. Root vegetables yielded no C. difficile. The C. difficile isolates belonged to two PCR ribotypes, one with an unusual antimicrobial resistance for moxifloxacin and clindamycin (lettuce and pepper; 027-like, A+B+CDT+; tcdC 18 bp deletion; the other PCR ribotype (eggplant, A+B+ CDT−; classic tcdC was susceptible to all antimicrobials. Results of the cumulative weighted meta-analysis (6 studies indicate that the prevalence of C. difficile in vegetables is 2.1% and homogeneous (P<0.001 since the first report in 1996 (2.4%. The present study is the first report of the isolation of C. difficile from retail vegetables in the USA. Of public health relevance, antimicrobial resistance to moxifloxacin/clindamycin (a bacterial-associated risk factor for severe CDIs was identified on the surface of vegetables that are consumed raw.

  8. In vitro inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens by commercial probiotic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoster, A; Kokotovic, B; Permin, A; Pedersen, P D; Dal Bello, F; Guardabassi, L

    2013-04-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent and control clostridial enteric disease. Limited information is available on the ability of different probiotic bacteria used in food products to inhibit Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro inhibitory effects of selected commercial bacterial strains on pathogenic clostridia and their growth characteristics under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The inhibitory effects of 17 commercial strains of Lactobacillus (n = 16) and Bifidobacterium (n = 1) on the reference strains of C. difficile and C. perfringens were assessed by an agar well diffusion assay and by a broth culture inhibition assay using cell-free supernatant harvested at different growth phases, with and without pH neutralization. To study growth characteristics, probiotic strains were cultivated in different acid and bile environments, and growth in the modified media was compared to growth in standard medium. In the agar well diffusion assay, supernatant obtained from two probiotic strains inhibited the growth of both reference and clinical strains of C. perfringens. This effect as seen when supernatant was assessed with and without pH neutralization. Supernatants obtained from 10 probiotic strains inhibited C. difficile only when supernatant was added without pH neutralization. In the broth culture inhibition assay, growth of C. perfringens and C. difficile was inhibited by supernatant without pH neutralization from 5 and 10 probiotic strains, respectively. All potential probiotic strains were able to grow at pH 4.0 and in the presence of 0.15% and 0.3% bile but none were able to grow or survive at pH 2.0. Altogether five probiotic strains [Lactobacillus plantarum (n = 2), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (n = 2), Bifidobacterium animalis lactis (n = 1)] were shown to inhibit all strains of C. difficile and C. perfringens. The inhibitory effect was probiotic

  9. Community-onset Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea not associated with antibiotic usage--two case reports with review of the changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, M. P.; Goorhuis, A.; Koster, T.; Numan-Ruberg, S. C.; Hagen, E. C.; Debast, S. B.; Kuijper, E. J.; van Dissel, J. T.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of hypervirulent strains of Clostridium difficile causing outbreaks in hospitals and nursing homes may result in a greater than before spread of the bacterium in the community. By consequence, the incidence of community-onset cases of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD)

  10. Outpatient healthcare settings and transmission of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy A Jury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reports suggest that community-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI (i.e., no healthcare facility admission within 90 days may be increasing in frequency. We hypothesized that outpatient clinics could be an important source for acquisition of community-associated CDI. METHODS: We performed a 6-month prospective study of CDI patients to determine frequency of and risk factors for skin and environmental shedding during outpatient visits and to derive a prediction rule for positive cultures. We performed a point-prevalence culture survey to assess the frequency of C. difficile contamination in outpatient settings and evaluated the frequency of prior outpatient visits in patients with community-associated CDI. RESULTS: Of 67 CDI patients studied, 54 (81% had 1 or more outpatient visits within 12 weeks after diagnosis. Of 44 patients cultured during outpatient visits, 14 (32% had skin contamination and 12 (27% contaminated environmental surfaces. Decreased mobility, fecal incontinence, and treatment with non-CDI antibiotics were associated with positive cultures, whereas vancomycin taper therapy was protective. In patients not on CDI therapy, a prediction rule including incontinence or decreased mobility was 90% sensitive and 79% specific for detection of spore shedding. Of 84 clinic and emergency department rooms cultured, 12 (14% had 1 or more contaminated environmental sites. For 33 community-associated CDI cases, 31 (94% had an outpatient visit during the 12 weeks prior to onset of diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with recent CDI present a significant risk for transmission of spores during outpatient visits. The outpatient setting may be an underappreciated source of community-associated CDI cases.

  11. Outcomes With Fidaxomicin Therapy in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiceland, Clayton M; Khanna, Sahil; Pardi, Darrell S

    2016-12-22

    Fidaxomicin is a new antibiotic used to treat Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Given limited clinical experience with fidaxomicin, we assessed outcomes in a diverse cohort of patients with CDI treated with fidaxomicin. All CDI cases treated with fidaxomicin at 3 referral centers over a 4-year period were included. Response was defined as resolution of diarrhea and recurrence was defined by recurrence of CDI within 8 weeks of the end of treatment. Overall, 81 patients (median age 55.9 y; 53% female; 26% with inflammatory bowel disease) were included. Response occurred in 90%. Responders had fewer prior CDI episodes [median 1 (range, 0 to 8)] than nonresponders [median 2.5 (range, 1 to 8)], P=0.01. Response after a first CDI episode was 100%, 96% after 1 prior episode, and 82% after 2 or more, P=0.02. Recurrence occurred in 19%. Patients without recurrence had fewer prior episodes of CDI [median 1 (range, 0 to 6)] than patients who recurred [median 2 (range, 1 to 8)], P=0.005. Recurrence after a first episode was 0%, 23% after 1 prior episode, and 29% after 2 or more, P=0.005. All patients with inflammatory bowel disease responded either with improvement of symptoms or a negative C. difficile test; 19% recurred. All patients with a first CDI episode treated with fidaxomicin responded with no recurrences. Patients with prior CDI episodes were less likely to respond (especially with more than 1 prior episode) and more likely to recur, suggesting a greater clinical benefit of fidaxomicin earlier in the course of CDI.

  12. Disruption of the Gut Microbiome: Clostridium difficile Infection and the Threat of Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla A. Johanesen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, having a significant impact in both health-care and community settings. Central to predisposition to C. difficile infection is disruption of the gut microbiome by antibiotics. Being a Gram-positive anaerobe, C. difficile is intrinsically resistant to a number of antibiotics. Mobile elements encoding antibiotic resistance determinants have also been characterized in this pathogen. While resistance to antibiotics currently used to treat C. difficile infection has not yet been detected, it may be only a matter of time before this occurs, as has been seen with other bacterial pathogens. This review will discuss C. difficile disease pathogenesis, the impact of antibiotic use on inducing disease susceptibility, and the role of antibiotic resistance and mobile elements in C. difficile epidemiology.

  13. Role of microbiota and innate immunity in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbò, Stefano; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection represents a burdensome clinical issue whose epidemiology is increasing worldwide. The pathogenesis is not yet completely known. Recent observations suggest that the alteration of the intestinal microbiota and impaired innate immunity may play a leading role in the development of recurrent infection. Various factors can cause dysbiosis. The causes most involved in the process are antibiotics, NSAIDs, acid suppressing therapies, and age. Gut microbiota impairment can favor Clostridium difficile infection through several mechanisms, such as the alteration of fermentative metabolism (especially SCFAs), the alteration of bile acid metabolism, and the imbalance of antimicrobial substances production. These factors alter the intestinal homeostasis promoting the development of an ecological niche for Clostridium difficile and of the modulation of immune response. Moreover, the intestinal dysbiosis can promote a proinflammatory environment, whereas Clostridium difficile itself modulates the innate immunity through both toxin-dependent and toxin-independent mechanisms. In this narrative review, we discuss how the intestinal microbiota modifications and the modulation of innate immune response can lead to and exacerbate Clostridium difficile infection.

  14. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of tcdA-negative variant clostridium difficile infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jieun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tcdA-negative variant (A-B+ of Clostridium difficile is prevalent in East Asian countries. However, the risk factors and clinical characteristics of A-B+C. difficile infections (CDI are not clearly documented. The objective of this study was to investigate these characteristics. Methods From September 2008 through January 2010, the clinical characteristics, medication history and treatment outcomes of CDI patients were recorded prospectively. Toxin characterization and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on stool isolates of C. difficile. Results During the study period, we identified 22 cases of CDI caused by tcdA-negative tcdB-positive (A-B+ strains and 105 cases caused by tcdA-positive tcdB-positive (A+B+ strains. There was no significant difference in disease severity or clinical characteristics between the two groups. Previous use of clindamycin and young age were identified as significant risk factors for the acquisition of A-B+ CDI (OR = 4.738, 95% CI 1.48–15.157, p = 0.009 and OR = 0.966, 95% CI 0.935–0.998, p = 0.038, respectively in logistic regression. Rates of resistance to clindamycin were 100% and 69.6% in the A-B+ and A+B+ isolates, respectively (p = 0.006, and the ermB gene was identified in 17 of 21 A-B+ isolates (81%. Resistance to moxifloxacin was also more frequent in the A-B+ than in the A+B+ isolates (95.2% vs. 63.7%, p = 0.004. Conclusions The clinical course of A-B+ CDI is not different from that of A+B+ CDI. Clindamycin use is a significant risk factor for the acquisition of tcdA-negative variant strains.

  15. Effects of ß-Lactam Antibiotics and Fluoroquinolones on Human Gut Microbiota in Relation to Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knecht, H.; Neulinger, S.C.; Heinsen, F.A.; Knecht, C.; Schilhabel, A.; Schmitz, R.A.; Zimmermann, A.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Ferrer, R.; Rosenstiel, P.C.; Schreiber, S.; Friedrichs, A.K.; Ott, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are an emerging health problem in the modern hospital environment. Severe alterations of the gut microbiome with loss of resistance to colonization against C. difficile are thought to be the major trigger, but there is no clear concept of how C. difficile infection

  16. Clostridium difficile from food and surface samples in a Belgian nursing home: an unlikely source of contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Brach, P; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the contamination of foods and surfaces with Clostridium difficile in a single nursing home. C. difficile PCR-ribotype 078 was found in one food sample and in none of the tested surfaces. These results indicate that food and surfaces are an unlikely source of C. difficile infection in this setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Occurrence of Clostridium difficile in two types of wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Nikaeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater is a potential environmental source of Clostridium difficile, although a direct link with community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI in humans has not yet been established. The present study was performed to determine the occurrence of C. difficile in two types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs in Isfahan, Iran. A total of 95 samples were taken from a conventional activated sludge treatment plant and a waste stabilization ponds system, and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile. C. difficile was found in 13.6% (3/22 of digested sludge samples. However, no C. difficile was detected in inlet and outlet samples or in raw sludge of activated sludge. C. difficile was also detected in 5% (2/40 of the samples from waste stabilization ponds. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis showed that all strains of C. difficile detected were toxigenic (tcdB gene positive. This study shows that C. difficile was present in WWTPs, which might constitute a potential source of community-acquired C. difficile infection.

  18. The changing faces of Clostridium difficile: a personal reflection of the past 34 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poxton, Ian R

    2013-12-01

    Late in 1978 my boss gave me a folder with "Clostridium difficile (diffikilé)" written on it. Inside were a few recent and now classic papers by Bartlett, Larson and co. It was suggested that this might be an interesting research topic. So began a continuing adventure which has resulted in at least 50 publications from my group. Over the years we have made several important contributions to the field. Beginning in 1982 we showed that C. difficile was a common cause of community-acquired infection! During the next few years we did extensive structural studies on the bacterium. This culminated in 1984 with a fingerprinting study (by immunoblotting surface antigens), on Swedish strains supplied by Carl-Erik Nord, which was probably the first study to demonstrate that C. difficile was really an infectious agent. This was later reinforced with strains sent from Amsterdam by Ed Kuijper. Later in the 1980s, in a study of recurrent disease, we showed that ca. 50% of recurrences were due to infection with a different strain. During my term as chair of the European Study Group for C. difficile, we began to define the status of C. difficile infection (CDI) in Europe and develop guidance for diagnosis and treatment. Recently we utilised our extensive culture collection, with isolates from the 1970s to the present, to observe how epidemiology has been driven largely by antibiotic usage. We have now come full circle: in the early years C. difficile infection was caused by many different strains. Then in the period beginning in the 1990s, characterised by often-large outbreaks and poor infection control, disease was caused by a few endemic strains highlighted by the 027/NAP1/BI pandemic. Now in a much-improved local situation, we are seeing again that the majority of cases (largely sporadic) is caused by multiple types. Current studies range from molecular studies on toxin and spore production, immune responses, novel observations on CDI in children, to what is the best way of

  19. The appendix may protect against Clostridium difficile recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gene Y; Modayil, Rani J; Lin, Cheng T; Geier, Steven J; Katz, Douglas S; Feuerman, Martin; Grendell, James H

    2011-12-01

    Several risk factors have been identified for the development of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) that alter host immunity and disrupt colonic flora. Although the function of the appendix has been debated, its active, gut-associated lymphoid tissue and biofilm production indicate potential roles in recovery from initial CDI and protection against recurrent CDI. We investigated whether the presence or absence of an appendix is associated with CDI recurrence. We reviewed the medical records of adult inpatients with CDI who were admitted to a tertiary-care teaching hospital from 2005 to 2007 to identify those with and without an appendix. The primary dependent variable for statistical analysis was CDI recurrence. In a multivariate analysis of 11 clinical variables, the presence of an appendix was associated inversely with CDI recurrence (P appendix has a significant and independent, inverse association with CDI recurrence, but this finding requires validation in a prospective study. Assessing the presence or absence of an appendix might be useful in predicting CDI recurrence. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients with severe clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Eric M; Moses, Maggie C; Park, Lawrence P; Woods, Christopher W; Arepally, Gowthami M

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea and colitis. The incidence and prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia as related to mode of acquisition (hospital vs. community), NAP1/027 strain, and disease severity has not been examined. We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of all adult inpatients from 2013 to 2014 diagnosed with CDI during their hospitalization to document the incidence/prevalence of thrombocytopenia and associated outcomes. Severe disease was defined by a composite endpoint of inpatient death, death within 30 days of discharge, presence of septic shock, or need for colectomy during hospitalization. Of the 533 patients diagnosed with CDI, moderate thrombocytopenia (platelet count thrombocytopenia developed in 3 % of patients after admission. Thrombocytopenia was more common in hospital-acquired disease and associated with increased length of stay, but was not associated with treatment failure. Those with moderate thrombocytopenia were more likely to have severe disease, after controlling for white blood cell count, albumin, and creatinine. Moderate thrombocytopenia is associated with poor prognosis and is a potential risk stratification tool for severe CDI.

  1. [Current treatment and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, A; Bouchand, F; Le Monnier, A

    2015-09-01

    During the past 10years, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have become a major public health challenge. Their epidemiology has changed with a rise in the number of cases and an increase in severe episodes. Recurrence and failure of conventional treatments have become more common. Furthermore, a spread of CDI has been observed in the general population-involving subjects without the usual risk factors (unexposed to antibiotic treatment, young people, pregnant women, etc.). All these change are partially due to the emergence of the hypervirulent and hyperepidemic clone NAP1/B1/027. New therapeutic strategies (antimicrobial treatment, immunoglobulins, toxin chelation, fecal microbiota transplantation) are now available and conventional treatments (metronidazole and vancomycin) have been reevaluated with new recommendations. Recent studies show a better efficacy of vancomycin compared to metronidazole for severe episodes. Fidaxomicin is a novel antibiotic drug with interesting features, including an efficacy not inferior to vancomycin and a lower risk of recurrence. Finally, for multi-recurrent forms, fecal microbiota transplantation seems to be the best option. We present the available data in this review. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection: England and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alice; Mullish, Benjamin H; Williams, Horace R T; Aylin, Paul

    2017-10-01

    To examine whether there is an epidemiological difference between Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) inpatient populations in England and the United States. A cross-sectional study. National administrative inpatient discharge data from England (Hospital Episode Statistics) and the USA (National Inpatient Sample) in 2012. De-identifiable non-obstetric inpatient discharges from the national datasets were used to estimate national CDI incidence in the United States and England using ICD9-CM(008.45) and ICD10(A04.7) respectively. The rate of CDI was calculated per 100 000 population using national population estimates. Rate per 100 000 inpatient discharges was also calculated separated by primary and secondary diagnosis of CDI. Age, sex and Elixhauser comorbidities profiles were examined. The USA had a higher rate of CDI compared to England: 115.1/100 000 vs. 19.3/100 000 population (P USA (OR 1.20 95% CI [1.18,1.22] P USA compared to England apart from dementia, which was greater in England (9.63% vs. 1.25%, P USA was much higher than in England. Age and comorbidity profiles also differed between CDI patients in both countries. The reasons for this are likely multi-factorial but may reflect national infection control policy.

  3. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in infants and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuletić Biljana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (CD is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea in adults with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The epidemiology of CD infection (CDI has changed in the last few decades associated with increasing severity of the infection rate related to the occurrence of NAP1 hypervirulent strain and the emergence of the disease among ambulatory patients and the wider community. Although little is known about CDI in pediatric patients, CD is surprisingly recognized as an important pathogen in children. In this review article, we direct attention to the recent findings on the incidence and epidemiology of pediatric CDI, including the risk factors for infection, with special emphasis on the importance of CDI in infants and a population of children suffering from chronic gastrointestinal diseases or cancer. Despite recent pharmacotherapeutic protocols successfully used in children with CDI, we would like to draw attention to precautionary and preventive measures in terms of both unnecessary testing and uncritical use of antibiotics as the most important risk factors.

  4. Procalcitonin levels associate with severity of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Rao

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a major cause of morbidity and biomarkers that predict severity of illness are needed. Procalcitonin (PCT, a serum biomarker with specificity for bacterial infections, has been little studied in CDI. We hypothesized that PCT associated with CDI severity.Serum PCT levels were measured for 69 cases of CDI. Chart review was performed to evaluate the presence of severity markers and concurrent acute bacterial infection (CABI. We defined the binary variables clinical score as having fever (T >38°C, acute organ dysfunction (AOD, and/or WBC >15,000 cells/mm(3 and expanded score, which included the clinical score plus the following: ICU admission, no response to therapy, colectomy, and/or death.In univariate analysis log10 PCT associated with clinical score (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.69-5.81, P0.2 ng/mL was 81% sensitive/73% specific for a positive clinical score and had a negative predictive value of 90%.An elevated PCT level associated with the presence of CDI severity markers and CDI was unlikely to be severe with a serum PCT level below 0.2 ng/mL. The extent to which PCT changes during CDI therapy or predicts recurrent CDI remains to be quantified.

  5. Coexisting cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompetent patients with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Lee, Wen-Ying; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Weight Changes in Fecal Microbiota Transplant for Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussam, Dina; Drees, Marci; Myerson, Scott; Duffalo, Chad; Mosby, Danielle; Herdman, Christine; Depalma, Fedele; Mcgraw, Patty; Bacon, Alfred E

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for relapsing Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) allows for rapid repopulation of the colonic microbiome and may prevent future relapses. FMT is considered safe, however subsequent impact on weight and metabolism are incompletely understood. Animal studies have shown that alterations in microbiota lead to changes in weight; this is also suggested in humans, based on limited anecdotal evidence. This study explores changes in weight associated with FMT. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational study of patients who underwent FMT at our 1100-bed community-based academic healthcare system. FMT protocol requires 2 documented CDI relapses and failed vancomycin taper. FMT methods include colonoscopy, EGD and oral capsules. Of note, donor stool (OpenBiome, Boston, Massachusetts) criteria include BMI 5% gain 11 (65) >10% gain 6 (35) >5% loss 6 (50) >10% loss 2 (17) Average % of body weight change (among those with changes) - Gain 7.7 Loss 5.5 Conclusion In this limited population, it appears FMT may predispose to weight gain, which may reflect improved health with CDI cure. However, effects of FMT on patient’s microbiomes must also be considered. As this intervention becomes more widely used we must be increasingly aware of possible metabolic side effects and ensure documentation of weight changes as part of FMT protocols. Disclosures All authors: No reported disclosures.

  7. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nassif

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10−8 M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2. Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation.

  8. The intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile infection: is there a relationship with inflammatory bowel disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Bien, Justyna; Palagani, Vindhya; Bozko, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota is a compilation of microorganisms dwelling in the entire mammalian gastrointestinal tract. They display a symbiotic relationship with the host contributing to its intestinal health and disease. Even a slight fluctuation in this equipoise may be deleterious to the host, leading to many pathological conditions like Clostridium difficile infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we focus on the role of microbial dysbiosis in initiation of C. difficile infecti...

  9. Successful colonoscopic fecal transplant for severe acute Clostridium difficile pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Orozco, J F; Paskvan-Gawryletz, C D; Gurudu, S R; Orenstein, R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea has become one of the most common healthcare-associated infections, with significant morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly in the inpatient setting. The standard approach with metronidazole and vancomycin is not very effective in treating patients with severe colitis and hence other alternatives have been explored. We herein describe the first successful experience of colonoscopic fecal transplant in a case of severe refractory C. difficile pseudomembranous colitis.

  10. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotypes from Different Animal Hosts and Different Geographic Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zidaric, V.; Janezic, S.; Indra, A.

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic sporogenic bacterium traditionally associated with human nosocomial infections, and animals have been recognized as an important potential reservoir for human infections (Rodriguez-Palacios et al., 2013). Ribotype 078 is often reported in animals but according...... was to establish an international C. difficile animal collection with one PCR ribotype per species per country/laboratory and to compare PCR ribotypes across animal hosts and countries....

  11. Crystal structure of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator MarR from Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, J. W.; Yuan, H; Tan, X. S.

    2017-01-01

    Regulators of multiple antibiotic resistance (MarRs) are key players against toxins in prokaryotes. MarR homologues have been identified in many bacterial and archaeal species which pose daunting antibiotic resistance issues that threaten public health. The continuous prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) throughout the world is associated with the abuse of antibiotics, and antibiotic treatments of CDI have limited effect. In the genome of C. difficile strain 630, the marR gene ...

  12. Analysis of Clostridium difficile infections in patients hospitalized at the nephrological ward in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Kujawa-Szewieczek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have evaluated the incidence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI in the adult Polish population, in particular in solid organ recipients hospitalized at the nephrological ward.Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze Clostridium difficile infections (CDI among patients hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology, Transplantation and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice.Material/Methods: Thirty-seven patients with Clostridium difficile infection diagnosed between October 2011 and November 2013 (26 months, identified among a total of 3728 patients hospitalized in this department during this period, were included in this retrospective, single-center study. The CDI definition was based on the current recommendations of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.Results: The observation period was divided into two 13-month intervals. Increased incidence (of borderline significance of CDI in the second period compared to the first period was observed (1.33% vs 0.65% respectively; p=0.057. Patients after kidney (n=11, kidney and pancreas (n=2 and liver (n=5 transplantation represented 48% of the analyzed CDI patients, and in half of these patients (50% CDI symptoms occurred within the first 3 months after transplantation. Clostridium difficile infection leads to irreversible deterioration of graft function in 38% of kidney recipients. Most incidents of CDI (70% were identified as nosocomial infection.Conclusions: 1. Clostridium difficile infection is particularly common among patients in the early period after solid organ transplantation. 2. Clostridium difficile infection may lead to irreversible deterioration of transplanted kidney function.

  13. A Review of Management of Clostridium difficile Infection: Primary and Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Vincent

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a potentially fatal illness, especially in the elderly and hospitalized individuals. The recurrence and rates of CDI are increasing. In addition, some cases of CDI are refractory to the currently available antibiotics. The search for improved modalities for the management of primary and recurrent CDI is underway. This review discusses the current antibiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT and other options such as immunotherapy and administration of non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile (CD for the management of both primary and recurrent CDI.

  14. Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis in a paediatric population: comparison of methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J; Putsathit, P; Knight, D R; Sammels, L; Riley, T V; Keil, A

    2014-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in paediatric hospitalised populations, combined with the emergence of hypervirulent strains, community-acquired CDI and the need for prompt treatment and infection control, makes the rapid, accurate diagnosis of CDI crucial. We validated commonly used C. difficile diagnostic tests in a paediatric hospital population. From October 2011 to January 2012, 150 consecutive stools were collected from 75 patients at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Stools were tested using: C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Illumigene C. difficile, GeneOhm Cdiff, cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) culture, and cell culture cytotoxin neutralisation assay (CCNA). The reference standard was growth on CCFA or Cdiff Chromagar and PCR on isolates to detect tcdA, tcdB, cdtA, and cdtB. Isolates were PCR ribotyped. The prevalence of CDI was high (43 % of patients). Quik Chek Complete glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) demonstrated a low negative predictive value (NPV) (93 %). Both CCNA and Quik Chek Complete toxin A/B had poor sensitivity (33 % and 29 % respectively). Molecular methods both had 89 % sensitivity. Algorithms using GDH + Illumigene or GeneOhm reduced the sensitivity to 85 % and 83 % respectively. Ribotype UK014/20 predominated. GDH NPV and GeneOhm and Illumigene sensitivities were reduced compared with adult studies. Quik Chek Complete and CCNA cannot reliably detect toxigenic CDI. A GDH first algorithm showed reduced sensitivity. In a high prevalence paediatric population, molecular methods alone are recommended over the use of GDH algorithm or culture and CCNA, as they demonstrate the best test performance characteristics.

  15. An Economic Analysis of Strategies to Control Clostridium Difficile Transmission and Infection Using an Agent-Based Simulation Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E Nelson

    Full Text Available A number of strategies exist to reduce Clostridium difficile (C. difficile transmission. We conducted an economic evaluation of "bundling" these strategies together.We constructed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection in a hospital setting. This model included the following components: interactions between patients and health care workers; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. Six interventions were introduced alone and "bundled" together: (a aggressive C. difficile testing; (b empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; (c improved adherence to hand hygiene and (d contact precautions; (e improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and (f improved environmental cleaning. Our analysis compared these interventions using values representing 3 different scenarios: (1 base-case (BASE values that reflect typical hospital practice, (2 intervention (INT values that represent implementation of hospital-wide efforts to reduce C. diff transmission, and (3 optimal (OPT values representing the highest expected results from strong adherence to the interventions. Cost parameters for each intervention were obtained from published literature. We performed our analyses assuming low, normal, and high C. difficile importation prevalence and transmissibility of C. difficile.INT levels of the "bundled" intervention were cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year in all importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. OPT levels of intervention were cost-effective for normal and high importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. When analyzed separately, hand hygiene compliance, environmental decontamination, and empiric isolation and treatment were the

  16. Refractory Clostridium difficile Infection Cured With Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonized Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ok; An, Jun Hwan; Jung, Sook-In

    2015-01-01

    The rates and severity of Clostridium difficile infections, including pseudomembranous colitis, have increased markedly. However, there are few effective treatments for refractory or recurrent C. difficile infections and the outcomes are poor. Fecal microbiota transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as an effective and safe intervention in patients with recurrent disease, likely due to the restoration of a disrupted microbiome. Cure rates of >90% are being consistently reported from multiple centers. We cured a case of severe refractory C. difficile infection with fecal microbiota transplantation in a patient colonized by vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. PMID:25691847

  17. Fæcestransplantation som behandling af Clostridium difficile-infektion, colitis ulcerosa og metabolisk syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jeppe West; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2014-01-01

    Faecal transplantation as a treatment for Clostridium difficile infection, ulcerative colitis and the metabolic syndrome Faecal transplantation as a therapeutic tool is increasingly reported in the scientific literature. Faecal transplantation is currently becoming a treatment for nosocomial......, refractory infections with C. difficile. Furthermore, faecal transplantation has been suggested as a treatment for ulcerative colitis as well as for the metabolic syndrome. In the accumulated literature faecal transplantations appear to be safe, effective and superior to current treatments. Faecal...... transplantation remains a sparsely investigated treatment, however, especially for other diagnoses than C. difficile infection....

  18. Outcomes and Risk Factors Associated with Clostridium difficile Diarrhea in Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zilio Larentis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed over time. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk of infection and factors associated with poor prognosis. Objective. To evaluate factors associated with C. difficile infection and with poor prognosis in those with documented C. difficile colitis. Methods. A retrospective case-control study of 75 patients with documented C. difficile colitis and 75 controls with hospital-acquired diarrhea of other causes. Stepwise multiple logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with C. difficile infection among patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea. Results. Previous antibiotic treatment (odds ratio (OR, 13.3; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.40–126.90, abdominal distension (OR, 3.85; 95% CI, 1.35–10.98, and fecal leukocytes (OR, 8.79; 95% CI, 1.41–54.61 are considered as predictors of C. difficile colitis; anorexia was negatively associated with C. difficile infection (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.03–0.66. Enteral tube feeding was independently associated with a composite outcome that included in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit admission, and treatment failure (OR, 3.75; 95%CI, 1.24–11.29. Conclusions. Previous antibiotic use and presence of fecal leukocytes in patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea are associated with C. difficile colitis and enteral tube support with complications associated with C. difficile colitis.

  19. Crystal structure of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator MarR from Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J W; Yuan, H; Tan, X S

    2017-06-01

    Regulators of multiple antibiotic resistance (MarRs) are key players against toxins in prokaryotes. MarR homologues have been identified in many bacterial and archaeal species which pose daunting antibiotic resistance issues that threaten public health. The continuous prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) throughout the world is associated with the abuse of antibiotics, and antibiotic treatments of CDI have limited effect. In the genome of C. difficile strain 630, the marR gene (ID 4913953) encodes a MarR protein. Here, MarR from C. difficile (MarRC.difficile) was subcloned and crystallized for the first time. MarRC.difficile was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli in a soluble form and was purified to near-homogeneity (>95%) by a two-step purification protocol. The structure of MarRC.difficile has been solved at 2.3 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.569, c = 83.654 Å. The structure reported reveals MarRC.difficile to be a dimer, with each subunit consisting of six α-helices and three antiparallel β-hairpins. MarRC.difficile shows high structural similarity to the MarR proteins from E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that MarRC.difficile might be a DNA-binding protein.

  20. International Clostridium difficile animal strain collection and large diversity of animal associated strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janezic, Sandra; Zidaric, Valerija; Pardon, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is an important cause of intestinal infections in some animal species and animals might be a reservoir for community associated human infections. Here we describe a collection of animal associated C. difficile strains from 12 countries based on inclusion criteria...... countries). Conclusions: This results show that although PCR ribotype 078 is often reported as the major animal C. difficile type, especially in pigs, the variability of strains in pigs and other animal hosts is substantial. Most common human PCR ribotypes (014/020 and 002) are also among most prevalent...... animal associated C. difficile strains worldwide. The widespread dissemination of toxigenic C. difficile and the considerable overlap in strain distribution between species furthers concerns about interspecies, including zoonotic, transmission of this critically important pathogen....

  1. Increasing seroprevalence of Clostridium difficile in an adult Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Linneberg, A; Tvede, M

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated infections is increasing, but it remains to be defined whether any change in the seroprevalence of C. difficile has also occurred. In a population-based study of the general adult population, 734 subjects, aged 15-69 years, were examined on two...... occasions 8 years apart (1990 and 1998) for the presence of antibodies against C. difficile in serum. The overall seroprevalence of C. difficile increased significantly from 19% in 1990 to 27% in 1998 (P... was about four times higher in 1998 than in 1990. In conclusion, the observed increase in seroprevalence suggests a higher exposure to C. difficile in the general Danish adult population....

  2. An outbreak of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in piglets in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the substantial role of Clostridium difficile in causing diarrhea in piglets, there have been few reports of the disease caused by this bacterium in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. In this paper, we describe an outbreak of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in a pig farm in Brazil. The diarrhea rate increased in piglets 1-to-7 days old from an average of 2% to approximately 20%. Necropsied piglets showed mesocolon edema, and in a histological evaluation, severe necrotizing neutrophilic colitis was observed. The intestinal contents were positive for the A/B toxins of C. difficile and negative for other tested enteropathogens. The association between the clinical signs, post mortem findings and laboratory exams confirmed the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. The present report confirms C. difficile as a pathogen in swine in Brazil and highlights the need for up to date routine laboratory protocols for the diagnosis of this disease in swine.

  3. Prospects for flavonoid and related phytochemicals as nature-inspired treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Alam, M Z; Feng, L; Tsutsumi, L S; Sun, D; Hurdle, J G

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for novel treatments for Clostridium difficile infection(CDI). Antibacterial flavonoids are part of a large family of polyphenol phytochemicals with a long history of use in ethnomedicine, but are unexamined against Cl. difficile. We explored their anti-difficile properties. Anti-difficile activities were determined for several naturally occurring flavonoids, olympicin A and synthetic 4-chromanone and chalcone analogues. With the exception of olympicin A, most naturally occurring phytochemicals tested were poorly active. Diversified synthetic flavonoids resembling olympicin A retained anti-difficile activity, suggesting olympicin A could act as a pharmacophore to obtain novel agents. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent killing of logarithmic and stationary phase cultures and reduced sporulation and toxin production. Olympicin A and some synthetic flavonoids dissipated the bacterial transmembrane potential. Interestingly, mutants could only be selected with the analogue 207 at a frequency of 10(-9). Based on the potent anti-difficile properties of olympicin A and modified flavonoids, further exploration of this class of phytochemicals is warranted. Clostridium difficile infection is a major problem in developed countries. These studies point to there being an avenue for optimizing plant-derived flavonoids, and related antibacterial phytochemicals, as nature-inspired approaches to treat CDI.

  4. CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC CONSIDERATIONS OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN HARBOR SEALS (PHOCA VITULINA) AT A MARINE MAMMAL REHABILITATION CENTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chelsea E; Haulena, Martin; Zabek, Erin; Habing, Gregory; Raverty, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Between 1998 and 2008, 15 cases of segmental to diffuse hemorrhagic to necrohemorrhagic enterocolitis were diagnosed in neonatal and weaned juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) presented from the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre for rehabilitation. Based on a combination of gross pathology, histopathology, bacterial isolation, and toxin testing, Clostridium difficile enterocolitis was diagnosed. Most pups were anorexic or inappetant and died acutely with few other premonitory signs. Due to ongoing clinical concerns and possible emergence of this pathogen at the facility, efforts to better characterize the disease and understand the epidemiology of C. difficile was initiated in 95 harbor seal pups presented for rehabilitation in a single stranding season. Fecal samples were collected on admission, following completion of antibiotic treatment, and also prerelease or postmortem. All samples were collected fresh and submitted either directly or stored frozen. Fecal samples were inoculated into selective media for culture and screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) for C. difficile toxins A, B, or both. Results of the 95 seals in the study were as follows: on hospital admit 72 seals were sampled, 10 were culture positive, 12 were ELISA positive; following antibiotic therapy 46 seals were sampled noting three culture positive and nine ELISA positive; prior to release 58 seals were sampled noting zero culture positive and one ELISA positive; and on postmortem exam seven seals were sampled noting zero culture positive and two ELISA positive. Clostridium difficile was not deemed to be the cause of death in any of the animals. Although the exact mechanism of disease is unknown, this study suggests that C. difficile infection is not a significant cause of mortality and may be part of the normal flora in harbor seals undergoing rehabilitation. Morbidity and mortality from this bacterium can likely be minimized by judicious use of antibiotics

  5. Procalcitonin levels associate with severity of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Walk, Seth T; Micic, Dejan; Chenoweth, Elizabeth; Deng, Lili; Galecki, Andrzej T; Jain, Ruchika; Trivedi, Itishree; Yu, Marie; Santhosh, Kavitha; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B; Huffnagle, Gary B; Aronoff, David M

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of morbidity and biomarkers that predict severity of illness are needed. Procalcitonin (PCT), a serum biomarker with specificity for bacterial infections, has been little studied in CDI. We hypothesized that PCT associated with CDI severity. Serum PCT levels were measured for 69 cases of CDI. Chart review was performed to evaluate the presence of severity markers and concurrent acute bacterial infection (CABI). We defined the binary variables clinical score as having fever (T >38°C), acute organ dysfunction (AOD), and/or WBC >15,000 cells/mm(3) and expanded score, which included the clinical score plus the following: ICU admission, no response to therapy, colectomy, and/or death. In univariate analysis log10 PCT associated with clinical score (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.69-5.81, PCABI, and extended care facility residence, log10 PCT associated with clinical score (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.5-6.35, P = .002) and expanded score (OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.49-6.26, P = .002). PCT >0.2 ng/mL was 81% sensitive/73% specific for a positive clinical score and had a negative predictive value of 90%. An elevated PCT level associated with the presence of CDI severity markers and CDI was unlikely to be severe with a serum PCT level below 0.2 ng/mL. The extent to which PCT changes during CDI therapy or predicts recurrent CDI remains to be quantified.

  6. Effects of Clostridium difficile infection in patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Vinay; May, Folasade P; Manne, Vignan; Saab, Sammy

    2014-10-01

    Infection increases mortality in patients with alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Little is known about the association between Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and AH. We examined the prevalence and effects of CDI in patients with AH, compared with those of other infections. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data collected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, from 2008 through 2011. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify patients with AH. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine risk factors that affect mortality, negative binomial regression to evaluate the effects of CDI on predicted length of stay (LOS), and Poisson regression to determine the effects of CDI on predicted hospital charges. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum analyses were used to compare mortality, LOS, and hospital charges associated with CDI with those associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Of 10,939 patients with AH, 177 had CDI (1.62%). Patients with AH and CDI had increased odds of inpatient mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.75; P = .04), a longer predicted LOS (10.63 vs 5.75 d; P < .001), and greater predicted hospital charges ($36,924.30 vs $29,136.58; P < .001), compared with those without CDI. Compared with UTI, CDI was associated with similar mortality but greater LOS (9 vs 6 d; P < .001) and hospital charges ($45,607 vs $32,087; P < .001). SBP was associated with higher mortality than CDI (17.3% vs 10.1%; P = .045), but similar LOS and hospital charges. In patients with AH, CDI is associated with greater mortality and health care use. These effects appear similar to those for UTI and SBP. We propose further studies to determine the cost effectiveness of screening for CDI among patients with AH. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multicenter evaluation of the Clostridium difficile TOX A/B TEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, D M; Neville, L M; Evans, D T; Fill, J; Allen, S; Greene, W; Sautter, R; Hnatuck, P; Torpey, D J; Schwalbe, R

    1998-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, the primary cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the United States and many other industrialized countries, is recognized as a major health concern because of its ability to cause severe intestinal disease leading to complications such as relapses and infections due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The disease results from two toxins, toxins A and B, produced by this pathogen. In this study, we evaluated the TOX A/B TEST, a new 1-h enzyme immunoassay (EIA) that detects toxins A and B. We compared the test with the tissue culture assay, which is recognized as the "gold standard" for C. difficile testing. Evaluations were performed in-house at TechLab, Inc. (Blacksburg, Va.) and off-site at four clinical laboratories. Of 1,152 specimens tested, 165 were positive by the TOX A/B TEST and tissue culture and 973 were negative by both tests. The sensitivity and specificity were 92.2 and 100%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 100 and 98.6%, respectively, and the correlation of the TOX A/B TEST with tissue culture was 98.8%. When discrepant samples were resolved by culture, the sensitivity and specificity were 93.2 and 98.9%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 100 and 98.8%, respectively, with a correlation of 99.0%. There were no specimens that were positive by the TOX A/B TEST and negative by tissue culture. Fourteen specimens were negative by the TOX A/B TEST but positive by tissue culture. Of these, two were negative by toxigenic culture, five were positive by toxigenic culture, and seven were not available for further testing. There were no indeterminate results, since the test does not have an indeterminant zone. In a separate study, 102 specimens that were positive by tissue culture and the TOX A/B TEST were examined in toxin A-specific EIAs. Two specimens that presumptively contained toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive (toxA-/toxB+) isolates were identified. One specimen was from a

  8. Characterization of Clostridium difficile Strains in British Columbia, Canada: A Shift from NAP1 Majority (2008 to Novel Strain Types (2013 in One Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha N. Jassem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of gastrointestinal illness. Epidemic NAP1 strains contain toxins A and B, a deletion in repressor tcdC, and a binary toxin. Objectives. To determine the molecular epidemiology of C. difficile in British Columbia and compare between two time points in one region. Methods. C. difficile isolates from hospital and community laboratories (2008 and one Island Health hospital laboratory (2013 were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, PCR-ribotyping, toxin possession, tcdC genotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Results. In 2008, 42.7% of isolates had NAP1 designation. Hospital-collected isolates were associated with older patients and more NAP1 types. Unlike other isolates, most NAP1 isolates possessed binary toxin and a 19 bp loss in tcdC. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. A 2013 follow-up revealed a 28.9% decrease in NAP1 isolates and 20.0% increase in isolates without NAP designation in one region. Then, community-associated cases were seen in younger patients, while NAP types were evenly distributed. Isolates without NAP designation did not cluster with a PFGE pattern or ribotype. Conclusions. Evaluation of C. difficile infections within British Columbia revealed demographic associations, epidemiological shifts, and characteristics of strain types. Continuous surveillance of C. difficile will enable detection of emerging strains.

  9. Real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of asymptomatic Clostridium difficile colonization and rising C. difficile-associated disease rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hoonmo L; Van, John N; Zhao, Meina; Ye, Xunyan; Revell, Paula A; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Grimes, Carolyn Z; Koo, Diana C; Lasco, Todd; Kozinetz, Claudia A; Garey, Kevin W; DuPont, Herbert L

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) detection, after hospital CDAD rates significantly increased following real-time PCR initiation for CDAD diagnosis. Hospital-wide surveillance study following examination of CDAD incidence density rates by interrupted time series design. Large university-based hospital. Hospitalized adult patients. CDAD rates were compared before and after real-time PCR implementation in a university hospital and in the absence of physician and infection control practice changes. After real-time PCR introduction, all hospitalized adult patients were screened for C. difficile by testing a fecal specimen by real-time PCR, toxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and toxigenic culture. CDAD hospital rates significantly increased after changing from cell culture cytotoxicity assay to a real-time PCR assay. One hundred ninety-nine hospitalized subjects were enrolled, and 101 fecal specimens were collected. C. difficile was detected in 18 subjects (18%), including 5 subjects (28%) with either definite or probable CDAD and 13 patients (72%) with asymptomatic C. difficile colonization. The majority of healthcare-associated diarrhea is not attributable to CDAD, and the prevalence of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization exceeds CDAD rates in healthcare facilities. PCR detection of asymptomatic C. difficile colonization among patients with non-CDAD diarrhea may be contributing to rising CDAD rates and a significant number of CDAD false positives. PCR may be useful for CDAD screening, but further study is needed to guide interpretation of PCR detection of C. difficile and the value of confirmatory tests. A gold standard CDAD diagnostic assay is needed.

  10. The association of hospital prevention processes and patient risk factors with the risk of Clostridium difficile infection: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneman, N; Guttmann, A; Wang, X; Ma, X; Gibson, D; Stukel, T A

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of healthcare-acquired infection; the real-world impacts of some proposed C. difficile prevention processes are unknown. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to acute care hospitals between April 2011 and March 2012 in Ontario, Canada. Hospital prevention practices were determined by survey of infection control programmes; responses were linked to patient-level risk factors and C. difficile outcomes in Ontario administrative databases. Multivariable generalised estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to assess the impact of selected understudied hospital prevention processes on the patient-level risk of C. difficile infection, accounting for patient risk factors, baseline C. difficile rates and structural hospital characteristics. C. difficile infections complicated 2341 of 653 896 admissions (3.6 per 1000 admissions). Implementation of the selected C. difficile prevention practices was variable across the 159 hospitals with isolation of all patients at onset of diarrhoea reported by 43 (27%), auditing of antibiotic stewardship compliance by 26 (16%), auditing of cleaning practices by 115 (72%), on-site diagnostic testing by 74 (47%), vancomycin as first-line treatment by 24 (15%) and reporting rates to senior leadership by 52 (33%). None of these processes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of C. difficile after adjustment for baseline C. difficile rates, structural hospital characteristics and patient-level factors. Patient-level factors were strongly associated with C. difficile risk, including age, comorbidities, non-elective and medical admissions. In the largest study to date, selected hospital prevention strategies were not associated with a statistically significant reduction in patients' risk of C. difficile infection. These prevention strategies have either limited effectiveness or were ineffectively implemented during the study

  11. Increase in Clostridium difficile-related Mortality Rates, United States, 1999-2004

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-01-08

    Deaths related to Clostridium difficile are on the rise in the United States. Matthew Redelings from the Los Angeles County Department of Health discusses the increase and what can be done to prevent this infection.  Created: 1/8/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 1/8/2008.

  12. Flooding and Health Care Visits for Clostridium Difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods can contaminate potable water and other resources, thus increasing the potential for fecal-oral transmission of pathogens. Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water and cause acute gastrointestinal illness. It often affects older adults who are hospital...

  13. Probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection: reviewing the need for a multistrain probiotic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hell, M.; Bernhofer, C.; Stalzer, P.; Kern, J.M.; Claassen, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the past two years an enormous amount of molecular, genetic, metabolomic and mechanistic data on the host-bacterium interaction, a healthy gut microbiota and a possible role for probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been accumulated. Also, new hypervirulent strains of C.

  14. Probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection: Reviewing the need for a multistrain probiotic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hell (M.); C. Bernhofer (Christa); P. Stalzer (P.); J.M. Kern (J.); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn the past two years an enormous amount of molecular, genetic, metabolomic and mechanistic data on the host-bacterium interaction, a healthy gut microbiota and a possible role for probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been accumulated. Also, new hypervirulent strains

  15. Tryptophan catabolism restricts IFN-γ-expressing neutrophils and Clostridium difficile immunopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Chang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Min; Franz, Matthew; Shreiner, Andrew; McDermott, Andrew J.; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Lutter, René; Grasberger, Helmut; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Kao, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between Clostridium difficile and the host's metabolome is believed to influence the severity of infection. However, the mechanism for this phenomenon remains unclear. In this study, we model one of these metabolic pathways by focusing on tryptophan metabolism in the host. We found

  16. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile 027 in North Zealand, Denmark, 2008-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacci, S; St-Martin, G; Olesen, B

    2009-01-01

    We report an outbreak of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Denmark. The outbreak includes to date 73 cases from the area north of Copenhagen, but there may be related cases elsewhere in Zealand. Most infections are healthcare-associated and in patients who previously received antibiotic t...

  17. Comment on "A small-molecule antivirulence agent for treating Clostridium difficile infection".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Tam, John; Zhang, Zhifen; Melnyk, Roman A

    2016-12-21

    New insights into the mechanism of action of ebselen, a small-molecule antivirulence agent that reduces disease pathology in a mouse model of Clostridium difficile infection, suggest a different molecular target may be responsible for its efficacy. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Clostridium difficile infection in Polish pediatric outpatients with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Wultánska (Dorota); A. Banaszkiewicz (Aleksandra); A. Radzikowski (Adrzej); P. Obuch-Woszczatynski (Piotr); G. Mlynarczyk (Grazyna); J.S. Brazier; H. Pituch (Hanna); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still not sufficiently recognized. We assessed the prevalence of CDI and recurrences in outpatients with IBD. In addition, the influence of IBD therapy on CDI and

  19. Gut microbiota composition and Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized elderly individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milani, Christian; Ticinesi, Andrea; Gerritsen, Jacoline; Nouvenne, Antonio; Andrea Lugli, Gabriele; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ferrario, Chiara; Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; Vos, de Willem M.; Sinderen, Van Douwe; Meschi, Tiziana; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota composition of elderly hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) exposed to previous antibiotic treatment is still poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the microbiota composition by means of 16S rRNA microbial profiling among three

  20. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea: Clinical characteristics and the presence of Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez-Varón

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: AAD patients were characterized by a high frequency of severe comorbidities and prolonged hospital stay. The presence of Clostridium difficile in only 13.9% of the cases suggests that other causes of diarrhea in the hospitalized patient should be considered.

  1. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, N.; Kiers, D.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected

  2. Emergence of Clostridium difficile infection due to a new hypervirulent strain, polymerase chain reaction ribotype 078

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorhuis, Abraham; Bakker, Dennis; Corver, Jeroen; Debast, Sylvia B.; Harmanus, Celine; Notermans, Daan W.; Bergwerff, Aldert A.; Dekker, Frido W.; Kuijper, Ed J.

    2008-01-01

    Since 2005, an increase in the prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) due to polymerase chain reaction ribotype 078 has been noticed in The Netherlands. This strain has also been identified as the predominant strain in pigs and calves. CDI caused by type 078 was studied in relation to

  3. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Therapeutic Potential for a Multitude of Diseases beyond Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Guido J.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2017-01-01

    The human intestinal tract contains trillions of bacteria, collectively called the gut microbiota. Recent insights have linked the gut microbiota to a plethora of diseases, including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and metabolic diseases such as obesity, type

  4. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile 027 in North Zealand, Denmark, 2008-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacci, S; St-Martin, G; Olesen, B

    2009-01-01

    We report an outbreak of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Denmark. The outbreak includes to date 73 cases from the area north of Copenhagen, but there may be related cases elsewhere in Zealand. Most infections are healthcare-associated and in patients who previously received antibiotic...

  5. Første påvisning af Clostridium difficile type 027 i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian M; Brock, Inger; Torpdahl, Mia

    2009-01-01

    Increasing rates of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) with an unusual, severe course have been reported in Canada, USA and several European countries since 2003. A new virulent strain, PCR ribotype 027 (CD027), is associated with this increase. We report the first Danish case...

  6. Annual Surveillance Summary: Clostridium difficile Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Annual Surveillance Summary: Clostridium difficile Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016...incidence among all beneficiaries seeking care within the Military Health System (MHS). This report is a calendar year (CY) 2016 update to the CY...factors related to CD. Health Level 7 (HL7)-formatted microbiology and chemistry data identified CDI. These infections were matched to HL7-formatted

  7. The value of surgical treatment in abdominal emergencies : fulminant clostridium difficile colitis and severe abdominal trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilden, Gwendolyn Mariëtta

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a combination of traumatic and non-traumatic events in the abdomen, and the optimization of treatment in both entities. The first part describes the very prevalent infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile. The colitis caused by this infection can be severe and

  8. Vermin on pig farms are vectors for Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes 078 and 045

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, S.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140114432; Siemeling, L.; Kuijper, E.J.; Lipman, L.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14008651X

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a gram positive, spore forming, toxin producing, anaerobic bacteria and an opportunistic pathogen for Man and many animal species, causing diarrhea in young piglets. Piglets probably become colonized from the environment. To investigate the possible spread and transmission

  9. WSES guidelines for management of Clostridium difficile infection in surgical patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartelli, M.; Malangoni, M.A.; Abu-Zidan, F.M.; Griffiths, E.A.; Bella, S. Di; McFarland, L.V.; Eltringham, I.; Shelat, V.G.; Velmahos, G.C.; Kelly, C.P.; Khanna, S.; Abdelsattar, Z.M.; Alrahmani, L.; Ansaloni, L.; Augustin, G.; Bala, M.; Barbut, F.; Ben-Ishay, O.; Bhangu, A.; Biffl, W.L.; Brecher, S.M.; Camacho-Ortiz, A.; Cainzos, M.A.; Canterbury, L.A.; Catena, F.; Chan, S.; Cherry-Bukowiec, J.R.; Clanton, J.; Coccolini, F.; Cocuz, M.E.; Coimbra, R.; Cook, C.H.; Cui, Y.; Czepiel, J.; Das, K.; Demetrashvili, Z.; Carlo, I. Di; Saverio, S. Di; Dumitru, I.M.; Eckert, C.; Eckmann, C.; Eiland, E.H.; Enani, M.A.; Faro, M.; Ferrada, P.; Forrester, J.D.; Fraga, G.P.; Frossard, J.L.; Galeiras, R.; Ghnnam, W.; Gomes, C.A.; Gorrepati, V.; Ahmed, M.H.; Herzog, T.; Humphrey, F.; Kim, J.I.; Isik, A.; Ivatury, R.; Lee, Y.Y.; Juang, P.; Furuya-Kanamori, L.; Karamarkovic, A.; Kim, P.K.; Kluger, Y.; Ko, W.C.; LaBarbera, F.D.; Lee, J.G.; Leppaniemi, A.; Lohsiriwat, V.; Marwah, S.; Mazuski, J.E.; Metan, G.; Moore, E.E.; Moore, F.A.; Nord, C.E.; Ordonez, C.A.; Junior, G.A.; Petrosillo, N.; Portela, F.; Puri, B.K.; Ray, A.; Raza, M.; Rems, M.; Sakakushev, B.E.; Sganga, G.; Spigaglia, P.; Stewart, D.B.; Tattevin, P.; Timsit, J.F.; To, K.B.; Trana, C.; Uhl, W.; Urbanek, L.; Goor, H. van; Vassallo, A.; Zahar, J.R.; Caproli, E.; Viale, P.

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), with increases in incidence and severity of disease in many countries worldwide. The incidence of CDI has also increased in surgical patients. Optimization of management of C

  10. Fulminant pseudomembranous colitis caused by Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in a healthy young woman in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Kou, Tadayuki; Kato, Haru; Watanabe, Masaki; Uno, Shoichi; Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Fukuda, Tadashi; Hata, Atsuko; Yazumi, Shujiro

    2014-11-01

    In the past two decades, Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 strain has rapidly emerged as the leading cause of antibiotic-associated colitis in North America and Europe; however, it has been reported only occasionally in Japan. We report a case of fulminant pseudomembranous colitis caused by this strain in a healthy young woman in Japan without any previous medical history. The strain isolated from our patient was susceptible to both gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin, thus representing a historic strain. The acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance was reported as the important key genetic event linked to the virulence of this strain. It is noteworthy that the fluoroquinolone-susceptible 027 strain caused fulminant colitis in a healthy young woman in a non-endemic area. Our experience suggests that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 has the potential virulence factors that are not associated with a fluoroquinolone resistance-conferring mutation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. High metabolic versatility of different toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridioides difficile isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Wetzel, Daniela; Hofmann, Julia Danielle; Plorin, Simon Paul Erich Otto; Dannheim, Henning; Berges, Mareike; Zimmermann, Ortrud; Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Liesegang, Heiko; Jahn, Dieter; Overmann, Jörg; Groß, Uwe; Neumann-Schaal, Meina

    2017-09-01

    Clostridioides difficile (formerly Clostridium difficile) is a major nosocomial pathogen with an increasing number of community-acquired infections causing symptoms from mild diarrhea to life-threatening colitis. The pathogenicity of C. difficile is considered to be mainly associated with the production of genome-encoded toxins A and B. In addition, some strains also encode and express the binary toxin CDT. However; a large number of non-toxigenic C. difficile strains have been isolated from the human gut and the environment. In this study, we characterized the growth behavior, motility and fermentation product formation of 17 different C. difficile isolates comprising five different major genomic clades and five different toxin inventories in relation to the C. difficile model strains 630Δerm and R20291. Within 33 determined fermentation products, we identified two yet undescribed products (5-methylhexanoate and 4-(methylthio)-butanoate) of C. difficile. Our data revealed major differences in the fermentation products obtained after growth in a medium containing casamino acids and glucose as carbon and energy source. While the metabolism of branched chain amino acids remained comparable in all isolates, the aromatic amino acid uptake and metabolism and the central carbon metabolism-associated fermentation pathways varied strongly between the isolates. The patterns obtained followed neither the classification of the clades nor the ribotyping patterns nor the toxin distribution. As the toxin formation is strongly connected to the metabolism, our data allow an improved differentiation of C. difficile strains. The observed metabolic flexibility provides the optimal basis for the adaption in the course of infection and to changing conditions in different environments including the human gut. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. A cfr-like gene cfr(C) conferring linezolid resistance is common in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Thomas; Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Nguyen, Tiep Khac; Lambert, Thierry

    2017-09-01

    Clostridium difficile T10 and Clostridium bolteae 90B3 were co-resistant to phenicols, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, pleuromutilins and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) and harbored an unreported cfr-like determinant that may alter the 23S rRNA by m8A2503 methylation. The cfr-like cfr(C) gene was cloned in C. difficile 630Δerm in which it conferred PhLOPSA resistance. In C. bolteae 90B3: (i) qRT-PCR analysis indicated that cfr(C) was similarly expressed in the absence or presence of either chloramphenicol or clindamycin or linezolid; and (ii) cfr(C) was part of a putative 24 kb-transposon, which generated a detectable circular intermediate. An element differing by a single nucleotide was found in C. difficile DA00203 from GenBank data, consistent with a recent horizontal transfer. In silico analysis showed cfr(C) in 19 out of 274 C. difficile genomes. This gene was also detected by PCR analysis in 9 out of 80 C. difficile from our laboratory strain collection according to resistance to linezolid and florfenicol. The fact that cfr(C) was mainly confined in C. difficile within polymorphic environments indicates this microorganism is a reservoir for PhLOPSA resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Yield of Stool Culture with Isolate Toxin Testing versus a Two-Step Algorithm Including Stool Toxin Testing for Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reller, Megan E.; Lema, Clara A.; Perl, Trish M.; Cai, Mian; Ross, Tracy L.; Speck, Kathleen A.; Carroll, Karen C.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the incremental yield of stool culture (with toxin testing on isolates) versus our two-step algorithm for optimal detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile. Per the two-step algorithm, stools were screened for C. difficile-associated glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen and, if positive, tested for toxin by a direct (stool) cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). In parallel, stools were cultured for C. difficile and tested for toxin by both indirect (isolate) C...

  14. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  15. Antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard L; Suda, Katie J; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2017-03-03

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is recognized as a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review. The aim of this review is to investigate the efficacy and safety of antibiotic therapy for C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD), or C. difficile infection (CDI), being synonymous terms. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Trials Register from inception to 26 January 2017. We also searched clinicaltrials.gov and clinicaltrialsregister.eu for ongoing trials. Only randomised controlled trials assessing antibiotic treatment for CDI were included in the review. Three authors independently assessed abstracts and full text articles for inclusion and extracted data. The risk of bias was independently rated by two authors. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). We pooled data using a fixed-effect model, except where significant heterogeneity was detected, at which time a random-effects model was used. The following outcomes were sought: sustained symptomatic cure (defined as initial symptomatic response and no recurrence of CDI), sustained bacteriologic cure, adverse reactions to the intervention, death and cost. Twenty-two studies (3215 participants) were included. The majority of studies enrolled patients with mild to moderate CDI who could tolerate oral antibiotics. Sixteen of the included studies excluded patients with severe CDI and few patients with severe CDI were included in the other six studies. Twelve different antibiotics were investigated: vancomycin, metronidazole, fusidic acid, nitazoxanide, teicoplanin, rifampin, rifaximin, bacitracin, cadazolid, LFF517, surotomycin and fidaxomicin. Most of the studies were active comparator studies comparing vancomycin with other antibiotics. One small study compared vancomycin to placebo. There were no other studies that

  16. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  17. Clostridium difficile bacteremia: Report of two cases in French hospitals and comprehensive review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Doufair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of bacteremia due to Clostridium difficile from two French hospitals. The first patient with previously diagnosed rectal carcinoma underwent courses of chemotherapy, and antimicrobial treatment, and survived the C. difficile bacteremia. The second patient with colon perforation and newly diagnosed lung cancer underwent antimicrobial treatment in an ICU but died shortly after the episode of C. difficile bacteremia. A review of the literature allowed the identification of 137 cases of bacteremia between July 1962 and November 2016. Advanced age, gastro-intestinal disruption, severe underlying diseases and antimicrobial exposure were the major risk factors for C. difficile bacteremia. Antimicrobial therapy was primarily based on metronidazole and/or vancomycin. The crude mortality rate was 35% (21/60.

  18. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material.

  19. Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in hamsters using a non-toxigenic strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Júnior

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to evaluate five non-toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile (NTCD in vitro and to select one strain to prevent C. difficile (CDI infection in hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus . The NTCD strains were evaluated for spore production in vitro, antimicrobial susceptibility and presence of antimicrobial resistance genes. Approximately 107 spores of the selected strain (Z31 were administered by esophageal gavage in hamsters pretreated with 30mg kg-1 of clindamycin. The challenge with a toxigenic strain of C. difficile was conducted at 36 and 72h, and the animals were observed for 28 days. The NTCD strain of C. difficile (Z31 was able to prevent CDI in all animals that received it.

  20. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Genth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC. Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+. Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+ in mammalian target cells.

  1. Human Clostridium difficile infection: inhibition of NHE3 and microbiota profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engevik, Melinda A; Engevik, Kristen A; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Wang, Jiang; Hassett, Daniel J; Darien, Benjamin; Yacyshyn, Bruce R; Worrell, Roger T

    2015-03-15

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is principally responsible for hospital acquired, antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis and represents a significant financial burden on our healthcare system. Little is known about C. difficile proliferation requirements, and a better understanding of these parameters is critical for development of new therapeutic targets. In cell lines, C. difficile toxin B has been shown to inhibit Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) and loss of NHE3 in mice results in an altered intestinal environment coupled with a transformed gut microbiota composition. However, this has yet to be established in vivo in humans. We hypothesize that C. difficile toxin inhibits NHE3, resulting in alteration of the intestinal environment and gut microbiota. Our results demonstrate that CDI patient biopsy specimens have decreased NHE3 expression and CDI stool has elevated Na(+) and is more alkaline compared with stool from healthy individuals. CDI stool microbiota have increased Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria and decreased Firmicutes phyla compared with healthy subjects. In vitro, C. difficile grows optimally in the presence of elevated Na(+) and alkaline pH, conditions that correlate to changes observed in CDI patients. To confirm that inhibition of NHE3 was specific to C. difficile, human intestinal organoids (HIOs) were injected with C. difficile or healthy and CDI stool supernatant. Injection of C. difficile and CDI stool decreased NHE3 mRNA and protein expression compared with healthy stool and control HIOs. Together these data demonstrate that C. difficile inhibits NHE3 in vivo, which creates an altered environment favored by C. difficile. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Thermal Resistance of Clostridium difficile Spores in Peptone Water and Pork Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Solano, Mauricio; Burson, Dennis E; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2016-09-01

    The thermal resistance of four strains of Clostridium difficile spores (three hypervirulent and one nonhypervirulent) in peptone water (PW) and pork meat was evaluated individually at 70, 75, 80, 85, and 90°C using two recovery methods (taurocholate and lysozyme). PW or meat was inoculated with C. difficile spores and mixed to obtain ca. 5.0 log CFU/ml or 4.0 log CFU/g, respectively. The D-values of C. difficile spores in PW ranged from 7.07 to 22.14 h, 1.42 to 3.82 h, 0.35 to 0.59 h, 4.93 to 5.95 min, and 1.16 to 1.76 min at 70, 75, 80, 85, and 90°C, respectively, for the four strains using the taurocholate method. The D-values of the respective C. difficile spores were greater (P ≤ 0.05) using the lysozyme method, especially at higher temperatures (85 and 90°C). Greater thermal resistance of C. difficile spores was observed in meat than in PW using the lysozyme method. Hypervirulence of the C. difficile strains was not associated with greater thermal resistance in meat. The z-values for C. difficile spores in meat were between 6.21 and 7.21°C, and they were 11.24 and 12.12°C using the taurocholate and the lysozyme recovery methods, respectively. The D- and z-values of C. difficile spores were greater in both PW and pork than the values reported in the literature. C. difficile spores can survive traditional cooking or thermal processing practices and potentially grow in cooked, ready-to-eat products. The use of effective methods to recover heat-injured spores is necessary to obtain accurate thermal destruction parameters for C. difficile spores.

  3. Effectiveness of various cleaning and disinfectant products on Clostridium difficile spores of PCR ribotypes 010, 014 and 027

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenters, N.; Huijskens, E.G.; Wit, S.C.J. de; Sanders, I.; Rosmalen, J. van; Kuijper, E.J.; Voss, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In healthcare facilities, Clostridium difficile infections spread by transmission of bacterial spores. Appropriate sporicidal disinfectants are needed to prevent development of clusters and outbreaks. In this study different cleaning/disinfecting wipes and sprays were tested for their

  4. Effectiveness of various cleaning and disinfectant products on Clostridium difficile spores of PCR ribotypes 010, 014 and 027

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenters, N.; E. Huijskens (Elisabeth); de Wit, S.C.J.; Sanders, I.G.J.M.; J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost); E. Kuijper; Voss, A.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In healthcare facilities, Clostridium difficile infections spread by transmission of bacterial spores. Appropriate sporicidal disinfectants are needed to prevent development of clusters and outbreaks. In this study different cleaning/disinfecting wipes and sprays were tested

  5. A new rapid method for Clostridium difficile DNA extraction and detection in stool: toward point-of-care diagnostic testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freifeld, Alison G; Simonsen, Kari A; Booth, Christine S; Zhao, Xing; Whitney, Scott E; Karre, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Viljoen, Hendrik J

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for the rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection, with stool sample preparation and DNA extraction by heat and physical disruption in a single-use lysis microreactor (LMR...

  6. Surveillance of infection severity: a registry study of laboratory diagnosed Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Schlackow

    Full Text Available Changing clinical impact, as virulent clones replace less virulent ones, is a feature of many pathogenic bacterial species and can be difficult to detect. Consequently, innovative techniques monitoring infection severity are of potential clinical value.We studied 5,551 toxin-positive and 20,098 persistently toxin-negative patients tested for Clostridium difficile infection between February 1998 and July 2009 in a group of hospitals based in Oxford, UK, and investigated 28-day mortality and biomarkers of inflammation (blood neutrophil count, urea, and creatinine concentrations collected at diagnosis using iterative sequential regression (ISR, a novel joinpoint-based regression technique suitable for serial monitoring of continuous or dichotomous outcomes. Among C. difficile toxin-positive patients in the Oxford hospitals, mean neutrophil counts on diagnosis increased from 2003, peaked in 2006-2007, and then declined; 28-day mortality increased from early 2006, peaked in late 2006-2007, and then declined. Molecular typing confirmed these changes were likely due to the ingress of the globally distributed severe C. difficile strain, ST1. We assessed the generalizability of ISR-based severity monitoring in three ways. First, we assessed and found strong (p<0.0001 associations between isolation of the ST1 severe strain and higher neutrophil counts at diagnosis in two unrelated large multi-centre studies, suggesting the technique described might be useful elsewhere. Second, we assessed and found similar trends in a second group of hospitals in Birmingham, UK, from which 5,399 cases were analysed. Third, we used simulation to assess the performance of this surveillance system given the ingress of future severe strains under a variety of assumptions. ISR-based severity monitoring allowed the detection of the severity change years earlier than mortality monitoring.Automated electronic systems providing early warning of the changing severity of infectious

  7. Characterisation of Clostridium difficile hospital ward-based transmission using extensive epidemiological data and molecular typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sarah Walker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and is endemic in hospitals, hindering the identification of sources and routes of transmission based on shared time and space alone. This may compromise rational control despite costly prevention strategies. This study aimed to investigate ward-based transmission of C. difficile, by subdividing outbreaks into distinct lineages defined by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST.All C. difficile toxin enzyme-immunoassay-positive and culture-positive samples over 2.5 y from a geographically defined population of ~600,000 persons underwent MLST. Sequence types (STs were combined with admission and ward movement data from an integrated comprehensive healthcare system incorporating three hospitals (1,700 beds providing all acute care for the defined geographical population. Networks of cases and potential transmission events were constructed for each ST. Potential infection sources for each case and transmission timescales were defined by prior ward-based contact with other cases sharing the same ST. From 1 September 2007 to 31 March 2010, there were means of 102 tests and 9.4 CDIs per 10,000 overnight stays in inpatients, and 238 tests and 15.7 CDIs per month in outpatients/primary care. In total, 1,276 C. difficile isolates of 69 STs were studied. From MLST, no more than 25% of cases could be linked to a potential ward-based inpatient source, ranging from 37% in renal/transplant, 29% in haematology/oncology, and 28% in acute/elderly medicine to 6% in specialist surgery. Most of the putative transmissions identified occurred shortly (≤ 1 wk after the onset of symptoms (141/218, 65%, with few >8 wk (21/218, 10%. Most incubation periods were ≤ 4 wk (132/218, 61%, with few >12 wk (28/218, 13%. Allowing for persistent ward contamination following ward discharge of a CDI case did not increase the proportion of linked cases after allowing for random meeting of matched

  8. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment.

  9. CdtR Regulates TcdA and TcdB Production in Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley A Lyon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a global health burden and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea worldwide, causing severe gastrointestinal disease and death. Three well characterised toxins are encoded by this bacterium in two genetic loci, specifically, TcdB (toxin B and TcdA (toxin A in the Pathogenicity Locus (PaLoc and binary toxin (CDT in the genomically distinct CDT locus (CdtLoc. Toxin production is controlled by regulators specific to each locus. The orphan response regulator, CdtR, encoded within the CdtLoc, up-regulates CDT production. Until now there has been no suggestion that CdtR influences TcdA and TcdB production since it is not carried by all PaLoc-containing strains and CdtLoc is not linked genetically to PaLoc. Here we show that, in addition to CDT, CdtR regulates TcdA and TcdB production but that this effect is strain dependent. Of clinical relevance, CdtR increased the production of TcdA, TcdB and CDT in two epidemic ribotype 027 human strains, modulating their virulence in a mouse infection model. Strains traditionally from animal lineages, notably ribotype 078 strains, are increasingly being isolated from humans and their genetic and phenotypic analysis is critical for future studies on this important pathogen. Here we show that CdtR-mediated toxin regulation did not occur in other strain backgrounds, including a ribotype 078 animal strain. The finding that toxin gene regulation is strain dependent highlights the regulatory diversity between C. difficile isolates and the importance of studying virulence regulation in diverse lineages and clinically relevant strains. Our work provides the first evidence that TcdA, TcdB and CDT production is linked by a common regulatory mechanism and that CdtR may act as a global regulator of virulence in epidemic 027 strains.

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance and Reduced Susceptibility in Clostridium difficile: Potential Consequences for Induction, Treatment, and Recurrence of C. difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D. Baines

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI remains a substantial burden on healthcare systems and is likely to remain so given our reliance on antimicrobial therapies to treat bacterial infections, especially in an aging population in whom multiple co-morbidities are common. Antimicrobial agents are a key component in the aetiology of CDI, both in the establishment of the infection and also in its treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarise the role of antimicrobial agents in primary and recurrent CDI; assessing why certain antimicrobial classes may predispose to the induction of CDI according to a balance between antimicrobial activity against the gut microflora and C. difficile. Considering these aspects of CDI is important in both the prevention of the infection and in the development of new antimicrobial treatments.

  11. Comparison of Culture, Cytotoxin Assay and Two Eia Tests with Clinical Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Binning

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most common etiology of infectious diarrhea in hospitalized patients is Clostridium difficile. No single laboratory test yields a definitive diagnosis. Four methods were evaluated for their sensitivity and specificity in patients who had clinically defined C difficile-associated diarrhea.

  12. Impact of toxigenic Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction testing on the clinical microbiology laboratory and inpatient epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierala, Maureen; Munson, Erik; Skonieczny, Patrice; Rodriguez, Sonia; Riederer, Nancy; Land, Gayle; Luzinski, Mary; Block, Denise; Hryciuk, Jeanne E

    2013-08-01

    Conversion from Clostridium difficile toxin A/B EIA to tcdB polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI) resulted in significant decreases in laboratory testing volume and largely unchanged C. difficile toxin detection rates. Decreases in healthcare-associated CDI rates (P ≤ 0.05) reflected a clinical practice benefit of this conversion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  14. Molecular Characterization of a Clostridium difficile Bacteriophage and Its Cloned Biologically Active Endolysin▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Narbad, Arjan; Gasson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in both frequency and severity, with the emergence of new highly virulent strains highlighting the need for more rapid and effective methods of control. Here, we show that bacteriophage endolysin can be used to inhibit and kill C. difficile. The genome sequence of a novel bacteriophage that is active against C. difficile was determined, and the bacteriophage endolysin gene was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The partially purified endolysin was active against 30 diverse strains of C. difficile, and importantly, this group included strains of the major epidemic ribotype 027 (B1/NAP1). In contrast, a range of commensal species that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, including several representatives of the clostridium-like Firmicutes, were insensitive to the endolysin. This endolysin provides a platform for the generation of both therapeutic and detection systems to combat the C. difficile problem. To investigate a method for the protected delivery and production of the lysin in the gastrointestinal tract, we demonstrated the expression of active CD27L endolysin in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. PMID:18708505

  15. Molecular characterization of a Clostridium difficile bacteriophage and its cloned biologically active endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Narbad, Arjan; Gasson, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasing in both frequency and severity, with the emergence of new highly virulent strains highlighting the need for more rapid and effective methods of control. Here, we show that bacteriophage endolysin can be used to inhibit and kill C. difficile. The genome sequence of a novel bacteriophage that is active against C. difficile was determined, and the bacteriophage endolysin gene was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The partially purified endolysin was active against 30 diverse strains of C. difficile, and importantly, this group included strains of the major epidemic ribotype 027 (B1/NAP1). In contrast, a range of commensal species that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, including several representatives of the clostridium-like Firmicutes, were insensitive to the endolysin. This endolysin provides a platform for the generation of both therapeutic and detection systems to combat the C. difficile problem. To investigate a method for the protected delivery and production of the lysin in the gastrointestinal tract, we demonstrated the expression of active CD27L endolysin in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363.

  16. TcdC does not significantly repress toxin expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bakker

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB, the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC. The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested.

  17. An update on antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussack G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Greg Hussack,1 Jamshid Tanha1–3 1Human Health Therapeutics Portfolio, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, 2School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, 3Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Clostridium difficile continues to be one of the most prevalent hospital-acquired bacterial infections in the developed world, despite the recent introduction of a novel and effective antibiotic agent (fidaxomicin. Alternative approaches under investigation to combat the anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria include fecal transplantation therapy, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies. In this review, we catalog the recent advances in antibody-based approaches under development and in the clinic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. By and large, inhibitory antibodies that recognize the primary C. difficile virulence factors, toxin A and toxin B, are the most popular passive immunotherapies under investigation. We provide a detailed summary of the toxin epitopes recognized by various antitoxin antibodies and discuss general trends on toxin inhibition efficacy. In addition, antibodies to other C. difficile targets, such as surface-layer proteins, binary toxin, motility factors, and adherence and colonization factors, are introduced in this review. Keywords: antibody, Clostridium difficile, immunotherapy, toxin

  18. Tailored Cyclodextrin Pore Blocker Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Roeder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Some Clostridium difficile strains produce, in addition to toxins A and B, the binary toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT, which ADP-ribosylates actin and may contribute to the hypervirulence of these strains. The separate binding and translocation component CDTb mediates transport of the enzyme component CDTa into mammalian target cells. CDTb binds to its receptor on the cell surface, CDTa assembles and CDTb/CDTa complexes are internalised. In acidic endosomes, CDTb mediates the delivery of CDTa into the cytosol, most likely by forming a translocation pore in endosomal membranes. We demonstrate that a seven-fold symmetrical positively charged β-cyclodextrin derivative, per-6-S-(3-aminomethylbenzylthio-β-cyclodextrin, which was developed earlier as a potent inhibitor of the translocation pores of related binary toxins of Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens, protects cells from intoxication with CDT. The pore blocker did not interfere with the CDTa-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of actin or toxin binding to Vero cells but inhibited the pH-dependent membrane translocation of CDTa into the cytosol. In conclusion, the cationic β-cyclodextrin could serve as the lead compound in a development of novel pharmacological strategies against the CDT-producing strains of C. difficile.

  19. Clostridium difficile toxin testing by National Health Service (NHS) acute Trusts in England: 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerver, S M; Johnson, A P; Hope, R J

    2015-09-01

    In October 2007, a governmental 3-year target to reduce Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) by 30%, with financial penalties levied for failure, was introduced in England. This target was met within just 1 year, leading to speculation of 'gaming', with hospitals empirically treating possible CDI in the absence of a microbiological diagnosis, to avoid having to report confirmed cases. An analysis of aggregate mandatory data on levels of testing for C. difficile toxin showed little evidence of a fall in testing during the steepest infection rate reductions, suggesting that this was not a major factor in the decline in CDI. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New insights into transmission of Clostridium difficile infection - a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durovic, Ana; Widmer, Andreas; Tschudin Sutter, Sarah

    2018-02-07

    Traditionally, Clostridium difficile has been considered a typical healthcare-associated pathogen - transmitted within healthcare facilities and thus prevented by implementation of standard infection control measures. More recently, this concept has been challenged by studies suggesting a relevant role for community-acquisition of C. difficile. To discusses the current literature, compiled during the last decade, reporting on sources of acquisition of C. difficile and subsequent transmission. The databases PubMed, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Database were searched for articles published from January 1 st 2007 to June 30 th 2017 and reporting on possible transmission pathways of C. difficile and/or suggesting a source of acquisition of C. difficile. All study types reporting on adult populations were considered, case reports and series were excluded. The PRISMA guidelines for the reporting of systematic reviews were followed. Among 24 original articles included, 63% report on transmission of C. difficile in healthcare settings and 37% investigate sources and transmission of C. difficile in the community. Contact to symptomatic carriers (53.3%), the hospital environment (40.0%) and asymptomatic carriers (20%) were the most commonly reported transmission pathways within healthcare settings. The leading sources for acquisition of C. difficile in the community include direct contact to symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers in the community including infants (30% each) and residents of long-term non-acute care facilities (30% each), followed by contact with contaminated environments in outpatient care settings (20%), and exposure to livestock or livestock farms (20%). In healthcare settings, future control efforts may need to focus on extending cleaning and disinfection procedures beyond the immediate surroundings of symptomatic carriers. Potential targets to prevent acquisition of C. difficile in the community include household settings, long-term care facilities

  1. A genetic switch controls the production of flagella and toxins in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjuwon-Foster, Brandon R; Tamayo, Rita

    2017-03-01

    In the human intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile, flagella promote adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Flagellar gene expression also indirectly impacts production of the glucosylating toxins, which are essential to diarrheal disease development. Thus, factors that regulate the expression of the flgB operon will likely impact toxin production in addition to flagellar motility. Here, we report the identification a "flagellar switch" that controls the phase variable production of flagella and glucosylating toxins. The flagellar switch, located upstream of the flgB operon containing the early stage flagellar genes, is a 154 bp invertible sequence flanked by 21 bp inverted repeats. Bacteria with the sequence in one orientation expressed flagellum and toxin genes, produced flagella, and secreted the toxins ("flg phase ON"). Bacteria with the sequence in the inverse orientation were attenuated for flagellar and toxin gene expression, were aflagellate, and showed decreased toxin secretion ("flg phase OFF"). The orientation of the flagellar switch is reversible during growth in vitro. We provide evidence that gene regulation via the flagellar switch occurs post-transcription initiation and requires a C. difficile-specific regulatory factor to destabilize or degrade the early flagellar gene mRNA when the flagellar switch is in the OFF orientation. Lastly, through mutagenesis and characterization of flagellar phase locked isolates, we determined that the tyrosine recombinase RecV, which catalyzes inversion at the cwpV switch, is also responsible for inversion at the flagellar switch in both directions. Phase variable flagellar motility and toxin production suggests that these important virulence factors have both advantageous and detrimental effects during the course of infection.

  2. In vitro inhibition of Clostridium difficile by commercial probiotics: A microcalorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredua-Agyeman, Mansa; Stapleton, Paul; Basit, Abdul W; Beezer, Anthony E; Gaisford, Simon

    2017-01-30

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of some commercial probiotics on the growth of Clostridium difficile using isothermal microcalorimetry, a technique which can monitor the real time growth of bacteria. Commercial probiotic strains and products, Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5(®), Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12(®), Probio 7(®) and Symprove™ were co-cultured with C. difficile in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth supplemented with 0.1% (w/v) l-cysteine hydrochloride and 0.1% (w/v) sodium taurocholate and monitored in the microcalorimeter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIMB 8628 was also co-cultured with C. difficile and studied. The results indicated inhibition of C. difficile by the probiotics. The inhibition of C. difficile was shown to be pH-dependent using neutralized and unmodified cell free supernatant (CFS) produced by the probiotic strains. However, concentrated CFS of the probiotics also inhibited the intestinal pathogen in a non pH-dependent manner, likely due to specific antimicrobial substances produced. The results also indicated that C. difficile growth was greatly influenced by the presence of sodium taurocholate and by the pH of the medium. A medium pH of between 6.45 and 6.9 demonstrated maximum growth of the organism in the microcalorimeter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Inducible Expression of spo0A as a Universal Tool for Studying Sporulation in Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Dembek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile remains a leading nosocomial pathogen, putting considerable strain on the healthcare system. The ability to form endospores, highly resistant to environmental insults, is key to its persistence and transmission. However, important differences exist between the sporulation pathways of C. difficile and the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis. Amongst the challenges in studying sporulation in C. difficile is the relatively poor levels of sporulation and high heterogeneity in the sporulation process. To overcome these limitations we placed Ptet regulatory elements upstream of the master regulator of sporulation, spo0A, generating a new strain that can be artificially induced to sporulate by addition of anhydrotetracycline (ATc. We demonstrate that this strain is asporogenous in the absence of ATc, and that ATc can be used to drive faster and more efficient sporulation. Induction of Spo0A is titratable and this can be used in the study of the spo0A regulon both in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated using a mouse model of C. difficile infection (CDI. Insights into differences between the sporulation pathways in B. subtilis and C. difficile gained by study of the inducible strain are discussed, further highlighting the universal interest of this tool. The Ptet-spo0A strain provides a useful background in which to generate mutations in genes involved in sporulation, therefore providing an exciting new tool to unravel key aspects of sporulation in C. difficile.

  4. Transcriptional analysis of temporal gene expression in germinating Clostridium difficile 630 endospores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Dembek

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital acquired diarrhoea in industrialised countries. Under conditions that are not favourable for growth, the pathogen produces metabolically dormant endospores via asymmetric cell division. These are extremely resistant to both chemical and physical stress and provide the mechanism by which C. difficile can evade the potentially fatal consequences of exposure to heat, oxygen, alcohol, and certain disinfectants. Spores are the primary infective agent and must germinate to allow for vegetative cell growth and toxin production. While spore germination in Bacillus is well understood, little is known about C. difficile germination and outgrowth. Here we use genome-wide transcriptional analysis to elucidate the temporal gene expression patterns in C. difficile 630 endospore germination. We have optimized methods for large scale production and purification of spores. The germination characteristics of purified spores have been characterized and RNA extraction protocols have been optimized. Gene expression was highly dynamic during germination and outgrowth, and was found to involve a large number of genes. Using this genome-wide, microarray approach we have identified 511 genes that are significantly up- or down-regulated during C. difficile germination (p≤0.01. A number of functional groups of genes appeared to be co-regulated. These included transport, protein synthesis and secretion, motility and chemotaxis as well as cell wall biogenesis. These data give insight into how C. difficile re-establishes its metabolism, re-builds the basic structures of the vegetative cell and resumes growth.

  5. Thinking beyond the colon-small bowel Involvement in clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaneethan Udayakumar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small intestinal Clostridium difficile seems to be increasing in incidence. The spectrum of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has definitely expanded with small bowel involvement. They are more frequently reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD who have undergone total colectomy or patients with Ileal anal pouch anastomosis. The most common presentation is increased ileostomy output with associated dehydration. High clinical suspicion, early recognition and appropriate treatment are the keys to successful resolution. The increase in the number of these patients may actually reflect an increase in the rising incidence of CDI in general or increasing virulence of the organism. Heightened public awareness and initiation of prompt preventive measures are the keystones to control of this infection. This disease is no longer limited to the colon and physicians should be educated to think beyond the colon in patients with CDI.

  6. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile infections in Prato hospital in the years 2010-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Brunelli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile, a Gram positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus, is an important nosocomial enteric pathogen causing diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile in Prato Hospital. Stool samples were collected from 1197 patients hospitalized from January 2010 to December 2011. In all the samples the common antigen GDH was investigated and only in samples positive for the antigen the presence of the A and B toxins was investigated. Our results showed that 170/1197 samples (14% were positive for the antigen, and of these 170 patients, 84 (49% were found positive also for the toxins. In addition the percentage of samples positive for toxins was higher in 2010 (8.6% than in 2011 (5.9%.

  7. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) studies on nitazoxanide-based analogues against Clostridium difficile In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Liu, Xiwang; Yang, Yajun; Li, Jianyong

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) has been established between the various physiochemical parameters of a series of nitazoxanide-based analogues and its antibacterial activity against Clostridium difficile. Genetic function approximation (GFA) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) techniques were used to identify the descriptors that have influence on biological activity. The most influencing molecular descriptors identified in 2D-QSAR include spatial, topological, and electronic descriptors, while electrostatic and stereoscopic fields were the most influencing molecular descriptors identified in 3D-QSAR. Statistical qualities (r2, q2) indicated the significance and predictability of the developed models. The study indicated that antibacterial activity of Clostridium difficile can be improved by increasing molecular connectivity index, local charge surface index, sharp index and decreasing molecular flexibility index.

  8. Epidemiological study of Clostridium difficile infection in critical patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lerma, F; Palomar, M; Villasboa, A; Amador, J; Almirall, J; Posada, M P; Catalan, M; Pascual, C

    2014-12-01

    Data on the epidemiology of infections caused by Clostridium difficile (CDI) in critically ill patients are scarce and center on studies with a limited time framework and/or epidemic outbreaks. To describe the characteristics and risk factors of critically ill patients admitted to the ICU with CDI, as well as the treatments used for the control of such infections. A retrospective study was made of patients included in the ENVIN-ICU registry with CDI in 2012. Patients were followed up to 72 h after discharge from the ICU. A case report form was used to record the following data: demographic variables, risk factors related to CDI, treatment and outcome. Infections were classified as community-acquired, nosocomial out-ICU and nosocomial in-ICU, according to the day on which Clostridium difficile isolates were obtained. Infection rates as episodes per 10,000 days of ICU stay are presented. The global in-ICU and hospital mortality rates were calculated. Sixty-eight episodes of CDI in 33 out of a total of 173 ICUs participating in the registry were recorded (19.1%) (2.1 episodes per 10,000 days of ICU stay). Forty-five patients were men (66.2%), with a mean (SD) age of 63.4 (16.4) years, a mean APACHE II score on ICU admission of 19.9 (7.4), and an underlying medical condition in 44 (64.7%). Sixty-two patients (91.2%) presented more than 3 liquid depositions/day, 40 (58.8%) in association with severe sepsis or septic shock. Community-acquired infection occurred in 13 patients (19.1%), nosocomial out-ICU infection in 13 (19.1%), and in-ICU infection in 42 (61.8%). Risk factors included age>64 years in 39 cases (57.4%), previous hospital admission (3 months) in 32 (45.6%), use of antimicrobials (previous 7 days) in 57 (83.8%), enteral nutrition in 23 (33.8%), and the use of H2 inhibitors in 39 (57.4%). Initial combined treatment was administered to 18 patients (26.5%). Metronidazole was used in 60 (88.2%) and vancomycin in 31 (45.6%). The in-ICU mortality rate was 25.0% (n

  9. New role for human α-defensin 5 in the fight against hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furci, Lucinda; Baldan, Rossella; Bianchini, Valentina; Trovato, Alberto; Ossi, Cristina; Cichero, Paola; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), one of the most common hospital-acquired infections, is increasing in incidence and severity with the emergence and diffusion of hypervirulent strains. CDI is precipitated by antibiotic treatment that destroys the equilibrium of the gut microbiota. Human α-defensin 5 (HD5), the most abundant enteric antimicrobial peptide, is a key regulator of gut microbiota homeostasis, yet it is still unknown if C. difficile, which successfully evades killing by other host microbicidal peptides, is susceptible to HD5. We evaluated, by means of viability assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, and electron microscopy, the antimicrobial activities of α-defensins 1 and 5 against a panel of C. difficile strains encompassing the most prevalent epidemic and hypervirulent PCR ribotypes in Europe (012, 014/020, 106, 018, 027, and 078). Here we show that (i) concentrations of HD5 within the intestinal physiological range produced massive C. difficile cell killing; (ii) HD5 bactericidal activity was mediated by membrane depolarization and bacterial fragmentation with a pattern of damage peculiar to C. difficile bacilli, compared to commensals like Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis; and (iii) unexpectedly, hypervirulent ribotypes were among the most susceptible to both defensins. These results support the notion that HD5, naturally present at very high concentrations in the mucosa of the small intestine, could indeed control the very early steps of CDI by killing C. difficile bacilli at their germination site. As a consequence, HD5 can be regarded as a good candidate for the containment of hypervirulent C. difficile strains, and it could be exploited in the therapy of CDI and relapsing C. difficile-associated disease. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Optimal control of vaccination rate in an epidemiological model of Clostridium difficile transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Brittany; Lanzas, Cristina; Lenhart, Suzanne; Day, Judy

    2017-12-01

    The spore-forming, gram-negative bacteria Clostridium difficile can cause severe intestinal illness. A striking increase in the number of cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) among hospitals has highlighted the need to better understand how to prevent the spread of CDI. In our paper, we modify and update a compartmental model of nosocomial C. difficile transmission to include vaccination. We then apply optimal control theory to determine the time-varying optimal vaccination rate that minimizes a combination of disease prevalence and spread in the hospital population as well as cost, in terms of time and money, associated with vaccination. Various hospital scenarios are considered, such as times of increased antibiotic prescription rate and times of outbreak, to see how such scenarios modify the optimal vaccination rate. By comparing the values of the objective functional with constant vaccination rates to those with time-varying optimal vaccination rates, we illustrate the benefits of time-varying controls.

  11. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea: Clinical characteristics and the presence of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Varón, A; Muñoz, O M; Pulido-Arenas, J; Amado, S B; Tobón-Trujillo, M

    Evidence in Colombia and Latin America has been insufficient for establishing the clinical characteristics of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). The present study attempts to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with AAD and to determine the presence of Clostridium difficile, utilizing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Forty-three patients with AAD, managed at the Hospital Universitario San Ignacio in Bogotá, Colombia, were evaluated. Prospective patient information was collected, with respect to demographic characteristics, profile of the antibiotic management received, clinical manifestations, risk factors, and paraclinical reports. In addition, the real time PCR test for Clostridium difficile (Cepheid Xpert(®), Sunnyvale, CA, United States) was performed. Patient mean age was 58 years (19.31 SD). The majority of the patients received 2 or more antibiotics (62.9%) and the beta-lactams were the most frequently used. Hospital stay ranged from 2 to 104 days with a median of 10 days. The most frequent clinical manifestations were abdominal pain and bloating, followed by fever and tachycardia. At the time of diagnosis, 23 patients had noninflammatory results in the stool sample analyses and 18 had kidney failure. The mean level of albumin was 2.4mg/dl (0.7 SD). The presence of Clostridium difficile was documented through PCR in 6 patients (13.95% of the cases). AAD patients were characterized by a high frequency of severe comorbidities and prolonged hospital stay. The presence of Clostridium difficile in only 13.9% of the cases suggests that other causes of diarrhea in the hospitalized patient should be considered. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Annual Surveillance Summary: Clostridium difficile Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    period) and confirming the diagnosis with laboratory testing for toxigenic strains of CD.23 Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing of CD toxins A and B has...the overall incidence and demographic and clinical characteristics of CDI may be influenced by these restrictions ; therefore, comparisons to the...2007;45(8):992–998. 40. Rousseau, C, Poilane I, De Pontual L, et al. Clostridium difficile carriage in healthy infants in the community: a potential

  13. Mini-Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Proctitis Following Total Colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Robert; King, Kara; Patron, Roberto L; DiBaise, John K; Etzioni, David

    2018-01-06

    Rarely, in fulminant Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), the rectal stump is persistently infected following total abdominal colectomy. We report cure of a septic patient with proctitis by fecal microbiota transplant via rectal swabs (mini-FMT). This novel procedure offers a management option for recurrent CDI following total abdominal colectomy. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection in the Department of Defense (DOD): 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    when CA CDI incidence surpassed HO CDI incidence. As the emerging pattern has only been apparent for approximately two years, future reports will...2014;42(10):1028-32. 6. Beaugerie L, Flahault A, Barbut F, et al. Antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile in the community. Aliment ...infection. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012a;35:613-618. 23. Eastwood K, Else P, Charlett A, Wilcox M. Comparison of nine commercially available

  15. Comparison of Clostridium difficile detection by monolayer and by inhibition of nucleoside uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhr, J.E.; Trent, D.J.; Collmann, I.R.

    1987-02-01

    Detection and identification of Clostridium difficile toxin by traditional monolayer assay were compared with results obtained by a new procedure based on toxin-dependent inhibition of target cell uptake of a radioactive nucleoside. A high degree of correlation was noted between the two determinations. Although the new procedure was quantitative and objective, its value is seen at present as a rapid screen that may support results obtained in monolayers and as a potential assay for other, currently unidentified, toxins.

  16. Epidemiology and risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in critically ill patients in Spain: The PROCRID study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Pizarraya, Antonio; Martín-Villén, Luis; Alcalá-Hernández, Luis; Marín Arriaza, Mercedes; Balandín-Moreno, Bárbara; Aragón-González, César; Ferreres-Franco, José; Chiveli Monleón, Miguel Ángel; Anguita-Alonso, Paloma; Bouza-Santiago, Emilio; Garnacho-Montero, José

    2017-03-06

    Our objectives were to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in critically ill patients and to determine C. difficile PCR-ribotypes. Prospective, observational study in 26 Spanish ICUs. Patients with diarrhea meeting ESCMID criteria for CDI were included. Molecular characterization of isolates was performed using PCR ribotyping. Of 4258 patients admitted to the ICUs, 190 (4.5%) developed diarrhea. Only 16 patients (8.4%) were diagnosed with CDI. Ribotype 078/126 (25.0%) was the most frequently identified. The mortality rate was similar in patients with ICD compared to patients with diarrhea not caused by C. difficile (p=0.115). Chronic renal insufficiency was identified as the only factor independently associated with the development of CDI (OR 5.87, 95% CI 1.24-27.83; p=0.026). The incidence of CDI in Spanish ICUs is low. Only chronic renal insufficiency was observed to be a risk factor for CDI development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Two Novel Myoviruses from the North of Iraq Reveal Insights into Clostridium difficile Phage Diversity and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srwa J. Rashid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages (phages are increasingly being explored as therapeutic agents to combat bacterial diseases, including Clostridium difficile infections. Therapeutic phages need to be able to efficiently target and kill a wide range of clinically relevant strains. While many phage groups have yet to be investigated in detail, those with new and useful properties can potentially be identified when phages from newly studied geographies are characterised. Here, we report the isolation of C. difficile phages from soil samples from the north of Iraq. Two myoviruses, CDKM15 and CDKM9, were selected for detailed sequence analysis on the basis of their broad and potentially useful host range. CDKM9 infects 25/80 strains from 12/20 C. difficile ribotypes, and CDKM15 infects 20/80 strains from 9/20 ribotypes. Both phages can infect the clinically relevant ribotypes R027 and R001. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole genome sequencing revealed that the phages are genetically distinct from each other but closely related to other long-tailed myoviruses. A comparative genomic analysis revealed key differences in the genes predicted to encode for proteins involved in bacterial infection. Notably, CDKM15 carries a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR array with spacers that are homologous to sequences in the CDKM9 genome and of phages from diverse localities. The findings presented suggest a possible shared evolutionary past for these phages and provides evidence of their widespread dispersal.

  18. Fidaxomicin in the treatment of colitis due to Clostridium difficile: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cortese

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI and Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea (CDAD is increasing in Canada, USA, and Europe and represents a considerable clinical problem. Both naïve and hypervirulent strains can be considered as opportunistic bacteria affecting immunocompromised, antibiotic-treated, critical, or subcritical patients with a microbiota disruption. CDI arising is strictly related to antibiotic, single or combined, and/or proton pump inhibitor treatment. CDI can cause a syndrome with systemic involvement and complex treatment, sometimes requiring surgical interventions (e.g. colectomy in fulminant colitis. Antibiotic treatment with metronidazole by mouth is the first choice and generally vancomycin is administered in case of lack of effectiveness. Fidaxomicin is a new macrocyclic antibiotic for C. difficile with microflora-sparing properties. This paper reports our initial experience in 11 patients with non-responder or relapsing CDIs. Fidaxomicin was effective in 10 cases (91%. Only one patient with an active ulcerative colitis did not respond and was treated with fecal-microbiota transplantation. In two patients diarrhea persisted, but just the ulcerative colitis one was C. difficile-related. No adverse events were experienced.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/cmi.v8i1s.956

  19. Review Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to cause pseudomembranous colitis via toxin production, and it has since emerged as a major enteric pathogen.2,3 Its clinical significance ranges from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening colitis, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. C. difficile colonises the large bowel following ingestion of spores, which ...

  20. Clostridium difficile infection: new approaches to prevention, non-antimicrobial treatment, and stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Maria Adriana; Granata, Guido; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2017-10-09

    Despite the large amount of scientific publications exploring the epidemiology and the clinical management of Clostridium difficile (CD) infection, some issues remain unsolved or need further studies. The aim of this review is to give an update on the hot topics on CD prevention, including stewardship programs, and on the non-microbiological treatment of CD infection. Areas covered: This article will review the importance of minimizing the CD spore shedding in the healthcare environment for potentially reducing CD transmission. Moreover, antimicrobial stewardship programs aimed to reduce CD incidence will be reviewed. Finally, new strategies for reducing CD infection recurrence will be described. Expert commentary: Besides the basic infection control and prevention practices, including hand hygiene, contact isolation and environmental cleaning, in the prevention of CD infection other issues should be addressed including minimizing the spread of CD in the healthcare setting, and implementing the best strategy for reducing CD infection occurrence, including tailored antimicrobial stewardship programs. Regarding new advancements in treatment and management of CDI episodes, non-antimicrobial approaches seem to be promising in reducing and managing recurrent CD infection.

  1. Intraluminal Administration of Resiniferatoxin Protects against Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Vigna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile toxin A is a colonic inflammatory agent that acts partially by activation of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1. Resiniferatoxin (RTX is an excitotoxin that activates TRPV1 at low concentrations and defunctionalizes TRPV1 at high concentrations. RTX at various doses was injected intraluminally into isolated ileal segments in anesthetized rats. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. This acute treatment with RTX resulted in biphasic responses: (1 an increase in inflammation similar to that caused by toxin A and capsaicin at low doses of up to 100 ng RTX and (2 no inflammatory effect of RTX at higher doses (1–100 μg, consistent with a defunctionalizing or neurotoxic effect of RTX at high doses. Separately, anesthetized rats were treated with RTX enemas and one or four weeks later were challenged with toxin A. Toxin A-induced colitis was significantly inhibited one week after an RTX enema, and this effect was RTX dose dependent. When tested four weeks after administration of the RTX enema, protection against toxin A colitis was lost. In conclusion, an RTX enema protects against toxin A-induced colitis in rats for at least one week but less than four weeks.

  2. Stool substitute transplant therapy for the eradication of Clostridium difficile infection: ‘RePOOPulating’ the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Fecal bacteriotherapy (‘stool transplant’) can be effective in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, but concerns of donor infection transmission and patient acceptance limit its use. Here we describe the use of a stool substitute preparation, made from purified intestinal bacterial cultures derived from a single healthy donor, to treat recurrent C. difficile infection that had failed repeated standard antibiotics. Thirty-three isolates were recovered from a healthy donor stool sample. Two patients who had failed at least three courses of metronidazole or vancomycin underwent colonoscopy and the mixture was infused throughout the right and mid colon. Pre-treatment and post-treatment stool samples were analyzed by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform. Results Both patients were infected with the hyper virulent C. difficile strain, ribotype 078. Following stool substitute treatment, each patient reverted to their normal bowel pattern within 2 to 3 days and remained symptom-free at 6 months. The analysis demonstrated that rRNA sequences found in the stool substitute were rare in the pre-treatment stool samples but constituted over 25% of the sequences up to 6 months after treatment. Conclusion This proof-of-principle study demonstrates that a stool substitute mixture comprising a multi-species community of bacteria is capable of curing antibiotic-resistant C. difficile colitis. This benefit correlates with major changes in stool microbial profile and these changes reflect isolates from the synthetic mixture. Trial registration Clinical trial registration number: CinicalTrials.gov NCT01372943 PMID:24467987

  3. Bacillus Coagulans GBI-30 (BC30 improves indices of Clostridium difficile-Induced colitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzpatrick Leo R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics have beneficial effects in rodent models of Clostridium difficile (C. diffiicle-induced colitis. The spore forming probiotic strain Bacillus Coagulans GBI-30, 6086 (BC30 has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects in vitro. Our goal was to determine if BC30 improved C. difficile-induced colitis in mice. Starting on study day 0, female C57BL/6 mice were dosed by oro-gastric gavage for 15 days with vehicle (saline or BC30 (2 × 109 CFU per day. Mice in the C. difficile groups received an antibiotic mixture (study days 5 to 8 in the drinking water, and clindamycin (10 mg/kg, i.p., on study day 10. The C. difficile strain VPI 10463 was given by gavage at 104 CFU to induce colitis on day 11. On day 16, stools and colons were collected for further analyses. Results All mice treated with BC30 survived on study day 13, while two mice treated with vehicle did not survive. On day 12, a significant difference (p = 0.0002 in the percentage of mice with normal stools (66.7% was found in the BC30/C. difficile group, as compared to the vehicle/C. diffcile group (13.0%. On study day 16, 23.8% of mice treated with BC30 had normal stools, while this value was 0% with vehicle treatment (p value = 0.0187. On this day, the stool consistency score for the BC30/C. difficile group (1.1 ± 0.2 was significantly lower (p C. difficile cohort (1.9 ± 0.2. BC30 modestly attenuated the colonic pathology (crypt damage, edema, leukocyte influx that was present following C. difficile infection. Colonic MIP-2 chemokine contents (pg/2 cm colon were: 10.2 ± 0.5 (vehicle/no C. difficile, 24.6 ± 9.5 (vehicle/C. difficile and 16.3 ± 4.3 (BC30/C. difficle. Conclusion The probiotic BC30 improved some parameters of C. difficile-induced colitis in mice. BC30 prolonged the survival of C. diffiicle infected mice. Particularly, this probiotic improved the stool consistency of mice, in this infectious colitis model.

  4. Variability in testing policies and impact on reported Clostridium difficile infection rates: results from the pilot Longitudinal European Clostridium difficile Infection Diagnosis surveillance study (LuCID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K; Davis, G; Barbut, F; Eckert, C; Petrosillo, N; Wilcox, M H

    2016-12-01

    Lack of standardised Clostridium difficile testing is a potential confounder when comparing infection rates. We used an observational, systematic, prospective large-scale sampling approach to investigate variability in C. difficile sampling to understand C. difficile infection (CDI) incidence rates. In-patient and institutional data were gathered from 60 European hospitals (across three countries). Testing methodology, testing/CDI rates and case profiles were compared between countries and institution types. The mean annual CDI rate per hospital was lowest in the UK and highest in Italy (1.5 vs. 4.7 cases/10,000 patient bed days [pbds], p testing rate was highest in the UK compared with Italy and France (50.7/10,000 pbds vs. 31.5 and 30.3, respectively, p tested for CDI across all countries. Overall, only 64 % of hospitals used recommended testing algorithms for laboratory testing. Small hospitals were significantly more likely to use standalone toxin tests (SATTs). There was an inverse correlation between hospital size and CDI testing rate. Hospitals using SATT or assays not detecting toxin reported significantly higher CDI rates than those using recommended methods, despite testing similar testing frequencies. These data are consistent with higher false-positive rates in such (non-recommended) testing scenarios. Cases in Italy and those diagnosed by SATT or methods NOT detecting toxin were significantly older. Testing occurred significantly earlier in the UK. Assessment of testing practice is paramount to the accurate interpretation and comparison of CDI rates.

  5. Evolutionary clade affects resistance of Clostridium difficile spores to Cold Atmospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Mairéad; Flynn, Padrig B.; Fairley, Derek J.; Marks, Nikki; Manesiotis, Panagiotis; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.; McGrath, John W.

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore forming bacterium and the leading cause of colitis and antibiotic associated diarrhoea in the developed world. Spores produced by C. difficile are robust and can remain viable for months, leading to prolonged healthcare-associated outbreaks with high mortality. Exposure of C. difficile spores to a novel, non-thermal atmospheric pressure gas plasma was assessed. Factors affecting sporicidal efficacy, including percentage of oxygen in the helium carrier gas admixture, and the effect on spores from different strains representing the five evolutionary C. difficile clades was investigated. Strains from different clades displayed varying resistance to cold plasma. Strain R20291, representing the globally epidemic ribotype 027 type, was the most resistant. However all tested strains displayed a ~3 log reduction in viable spore counts after plasma treatment for 5 minutes. Inactivation of a ribotype 078 strain, the most prevalent clinical type seen in Northern Ireland, was further assessed with respect to surface decontamination, pH, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. Environmental factors affected plasma activity, with dry spores without the presence of organic matter being most susceptible. This study demonstrates that cold atmospheric plasma can effectively inactivate C. difficile spores, and highlights factors that can affect sporicidal activity.

  6. Mucosal Antibodies to the C Terminus of Toxin A Prevent Colonization of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huynh A; Hitri, Krisztina; Hosseini, Siamand; Kotowicz, Natalia; Bryan, Donna; Mawas, Fatme; Wilkinson, Anthony J; van Broekhoven, Annie; Kearsey, Jonathan; Cutting, Simon M

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal immunity is considered important for protection against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We show that in hamsters immunized with Bacillus subtilis spores expressing a carboxy-terminal segment (TcdA 26-39 ) of C. difficile toxin A, no colonization occurs in protected animals when challenged with C. difficile strain 630. In contrast, animals immunized with toxoids showed no protection and remained fully colonized. Along with neutralizing toxins, antibodies to TcdA 26-39 (but not to toxoids), whether raised to the recombinant protein or to TcdA 26-39 expressed on the B. subtilis spore surface, cross-react with a number of seemingly unrelated proteins expressed on the vegetative cell surface or spore coat of C. difficile These include two dehydrogenases, AdhE1 and LdhA, as well as the CdeC protein that is present on the spore. Anti-TcdA 26-39 mucosal antibodies obtained following immunization with recombinant B. subtilis spores were able to reduce the adhesion of C. difficile to mucus-producing intestinal cells. This cross-reaction is intriguing yet important since it illustrates the importance of mucosal immunity for complete protection against CDI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Accessory Gene Regulator-1 Locus Is Essential for Virulence and Pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Darkoh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is responsible for most of the definable cases of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide and is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant anaerobic pathogen, causes disease by producing toxins A and B, which are controlled by an accessory gene regulator (Agr quorum signaling system. Some C. difficile strains encode two Agr loci in their genomes, designated agr1 and agr2. The agr1 locus is present in all of the C. difficile strains sequenced to date, whereas the agr2 locus is present in a few strains. The functional roles of agr1 and agr2 in C. difficile toxin regulation and pathogenesis were unknown until now. Using allelic exchange, we deleted components of both agr loci and examined the mutants for toxin production and virulence. The results showed that the agr1 mutant cannot produce toxins A and B; toxin production can be restored by complementation with wild-type agr1. Furthermore, the agr1 mutant is able to colonize but unable to cause disease in a murine CDI model. These findings have profound implications for CDI treatment because we have uncovered a promising therapeutic target for the development of nonantibiotic drugs to treat this life-threatening emerging pathogen by targeting the toxins directly responsible for disease.

  8. Metabolism of bile salts in mice influences spore germination in Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Giel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile, a spore-forming bacterium, causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In order to produce toxins and cause disease, C. difficile spores must germinate and grow out as vegetative cells in the host. Although a few compounds capable of germinating C. difficile spores in vitro have been identified, the in vivo signal(s to which the spores respond were not previously known. Examination of intestinal and cecal extracts from untreated and antibiotic-treated mice revealed that extracts from the antibiotic-treated mice can stimulate colony formation from spores to greater levels. Treatment of these extracts with cholestyramine, a bile salt binding resin, severely decreased the ability of the extracts to stimulate colony formation from spores. This result, along with the facts that the germination factor is small, heat-stable, and water-soluble, support the idea that bile salts stimulate germination of C. difficile spores in vivo. All extracts able to stimulate high level of colony formation from spores had a higher proportion of primary to secondary bile salts than extracts that could not. In addition, cecal flora from antibiotic-treated mice was less able to modify the germinant taurocholate relative to flora from untreated mice, indicating that the population of bile salt modifying bacteria differed between the two groups. Taken together, these data suggest that an in vivo-produced compound, likely bile salts, stimulates colony formation from C. difficile spores and that levels of this compound are influenced by the commensal gastrointestinal flora.

  9. Rectal prolapse in a child: an unusual presentation of Clostridium difficile-associated pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Ching; Yang, Yao-Jong; Lee, Chung-Ta

    2011-04-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis after short-course antibiotics is rare in children. We report a 14-month-old girl who presented with rectal prolapse complicated with Clostridium difficile-associated pseudomembranous colitis after a 4-day course of oral cefuroxime for treatment of acute otitis media. Abdominal sonogram showed a pelvic mass, and computed tomography revealed thickened wall of the rectum. Sigmoidoscopy demonstrated discrete yellowish plaques adherent to an edematous mucosa. Stool cultures for C difficile were positive and C difficile toxins A and B were detected in her stool. Histological examination of colonic biopsy showed superficial erosion of the mucosa and the adherent pseudomembranes. She achieved a full recovery after discontinuing cefuroxime. Our case implied that C difficile infection should be considered in children presenting with rectal prolapse, especially when they are taking or have recently received antibiotic therapy. Supportive therapy and discontinuation of antibiotics are generally sufficient for patients with C difficile-associated pseudomembranous colitis who present with mild diarrheal illness. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Discovery of LFF571: An Investigational Agent for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMarche, Matthew J.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Amaral, Adam; Brewer, Jason T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Deng, Gejing; Dewhurst, Janetta M.; Ding, Jian; Dzink-Fox, JoAnne; Gamber, Gabriel; Jain, Akash; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Lac; Lister, Troy; McKenney, David; Mullin, Steve; Osborne, Colin; Palestrant, Deborah; Patane, Michael A.; Rann, Elin M.; Sachdeva, Meena; Shao, Jian; Tiamfook, Stacey; Trzasko, Anna; Whitehead, Lewis; Yifru, Aregahegn; Yu, Donghui; Yan, Wanlin; Zhu, Qingming (Novartis)

    2012-11-09

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that infects the lumen of the large intestine and produces toxins. This results in a range of syndromes from mild diarrhea to severe toxic megacolon and death. Alarmingly, the prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection are increasing; thus, associated morbidity and mortality rates are rising. 4-Aminothiazolyl analogues of the antibiotic natural product GE2270 A (1) were designed, synthesized, and optimized for the treatment of C. difficile infection. The medicinal chemistry effort focused on enhancing aqueous solubility relative to that of the natural product and previous development candidates (2, 3) and improving antibacterial activity. Structure-activity relationships, cocrystallographic interactions, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in animal models of infection were characterized. These studies identified a series of dicarboxylic acid derivatives, which enhanced solubility/efficacy profile by several orders of magnitude compared to previously studied compounds and led to the selection of LFF571 (4) as an investigational new drug for treating C. difficile infection.

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile in dogs and cats attended in diverse veterinary clinics from the Madrid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Blanco, José L; Harmanus, Celine; Kuijper, Ed J; García, Marta E

    2017-12-01

    Despite extensive research on the epidemiology of pathogenic clostridia in dogs and cats, most published studies focus on a selected animal population and/or a single veterinary medical centre. We assessed the burden of Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile shedding by small animals in 17 veterinary clinics located within the Madrid region (Spain) and differing in size, number and features of animals attended and other relevant characteristics. In addition, we studied the genetic diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of recovered isolates. Selective culture of all fecal specimens collected during a single week from dogs (n = 105) and cats (n = 37) attended in participating clinics yielded C. perfringens/C. difficile from 31%, 4.8% of the dogs, and 20%, 0% of the cats analyzed, respectively, and three dogs yielded both species. Furthermore, 17 animals (15 dogs and two cats) that yielded a positive culture for either species were recruited for a follow-up survey and C. perfringens was again obtained from nine dogs. Considerable differences in prevalence were observed among participating clinics for both clostridial species. C. perfringens isolates (n = 109) belonged to toxinotypes A (97.2%) and E (three isolates from one dog), whereas C. difficile isolates (n = 18) belonged to the toxigenic ribotypes 106 (33.3%) and 154 (16.7%), a 009-like ribotype (33.3%) and an unknown non-toxigenic ribotype (16.7%). Amplified fragment length polymorphism-based fingerprinting classified C. perfringens and C. difficile isolates into 105 and 15 genotypes, respectively, and tested isolates displayed in vitro resistance to benzylpenicillin (2.8%, 88.8%), clindamycin (0%, 16.7%), erythromycin (0.9%, 16.7%), imipenem (1.8%, 100%), levofloxacin (0.9%, 100%), linezolid (5.5%, 0%), metronidazole (4.6%, 0%) and/or tetracycline (7.3%, 0%). All animals from which multiple isolates were retrieved yielded ≥2 different genotypes and/or antimicrobial susceptibility profiles

  13. UV-visible marker confirms that environmental persistence of Clostridium difficile spores in toilets of patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea is associated with lack of compliance with cleaning protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papetti Selena

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ultraviolet visible marker (UVM was used to assess the cleaning compliance of housekeeping staff for toilets in a tertiary healthcare setting. Methods The UVM was applied to the toilets of patients who were on isolation precautions due to Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD as well as for patients who were not on isolation precautions. Cleaning was visually scored using a numeric system where 0, 1, 2, and 3 represented; no, light, moderate or heavy residual UVM. Rodac plates containing CDMN selective agar were used to test for the presence of C. difficile on the surfaces of patient's toilets. Results Despite twice daily cleaning for the toilets of patients who were on CDAD isolation precautions, the average cleaning score was 1.23 whereas the average cleaning score for toilets of patients not on isolation precautions was 0.9. Even with optimal cleaning (UVM score of 0 C. difficile was detected from 33% of the samples taken from toilets of patients with CDAD (4% detection in toilet samples from patients who had diarrhea not due to CDAD. Conclusion Our data demonstrated the value of UVM for monitoring the compliance of housekeeping staff with the facility's toilet cleaning protocol. In addition to providing good physical cleaning action, agents with some sporicidal activity against C. difficile may be needed to effectively reduce the environmental reservoir.

  14. Genome-wide identification of regulatory RNAs in the human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Soutourina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emergent pathogen, and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In an effort to understand the role of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs in C. difficile physiology and pathogenesis, we used an in silico approach to identify 511 sRNA candidates in both intergenic and coding regions. In parallel, RNA-seq and differential 5'-end RNA-seq were used for global identification of C. difficile sRNAs and their transcriptional start sites at three different growth conditions (exponential growth phase, stationary phase, and starvation. This global experimental approach identified 251 putative regulatory sRNAs including 94 potential trans riboregulators located in intergenic regions, 91 cis-antisense RNAs, and 66 riboswitches. Expression of 35 sRNAs was confirmed by gene-specific experimental approaches. Some sRNAs, including an antisense RNA that may be involved in control of C. difficile autolytic activity, showed growth phase-dependent expression profiles. Expression of each of 16 predicted c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches was observed, and experimental evidence for their regulatory role in coordinated control of motility and biofilm formation was obtained. Finally, we detected abundant sRNAs encoded by multiple C. difficile CRISPR loci. These RNAs may be important for C. difficile survival in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. Altogether, this first experimental genome-wide identification of C. difficile sRNAs provides a firm basis for future RNome characterization and identification of molecular mechanisms of sRNA-based regulation of gene expression in this emergent enteropathogen.

  15. Intestinal calcium and bile salts facilitate germination of Clostridium difficile spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Kochan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile is an anaerobic gram-positive pathogen that is the leading cause of nosocomial bacterial infection globally. C. difficile infection (CDI typically occurs after ingestion of infectious spores by a patient that has been treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. While CDI is a toxin-mediated disease, transmission and pathogenesis are dependent on the ability to produce viable spores. These spores must become metabolically active (germinate in order to cause disease. C. difficile spore germination occurs when spores encounter bile salts and other co-germinants within the small intestine, however, the germination signaling cascade is unclear. Here we describe a signaling role for Ca2+ during C. difficile spore germination and provide direct evidence that intestinal Ca2+ coordinates with bile salts to stimulate germination. Endogenous Ca2+ (released from within the spore and a putative AAA+ ATPase, encoded by Cd630_32980, are both essential for taurocholate-glycine induced germination in the absence of exogenous Ca2+. However, environmental Ca2+ replaces glycine as a co-germinant and circumvents the need for endogenous Ca2+ fluxes. Cd630_32980 is dispensable for colonization in a murine model of C. difficile infection and ex vivo germination in mouse ileal contents. Calcium-depletion of the ileal contents prevented mutant spore germination and reduced WT spore germination by 90%, indicating that Ca2+ present within the gastrointestinal tract plays a critical role in C. difficile germination, colonization, and pathogenesis. These data provide a biological mechanism that may explain why individuals with inefficient intestinal calcium absorption (e.g., vitamin D deficiency, proton pump inhibitor use are more prone to CDI and suggest that modulating free intestinal calcium is a potential strategy to curb the incidence of CDI.

  16. Effect of biotherapeutics on antitoxin IgG in experimentally induced Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recurrent diarrhoea after successful treatment of primary Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD occurs due to bowel flora alterations and failure to mount an effective antibody response. Apart from antibiotics, risk factors include immunosuppressive and acid-suppressive drug administration. Biotherapeutics such as probiotic and epidermal growth factor (EGF may offer potential effective therapy for CDAD. Materials and Methods: The effect of biotherapeutics in mounting an antibody response against C. difficile toxins was studied in BALB/c mice challenged with C. difficile after pre-treatment with ampicillin, lansoprazole or cyclosporin. Sera from sacrificed animals were estimated for antitoxin IgG by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Antitoxin IgG was significantly higher (P0.05 in animals in which C. difficile was given after pre-treatment with cyclosporin compared to those without any pre-treatment, or pre-treatment with antibiotic or lansoprazole. In inter-subgroup comparisons also significant anomaly in production of antitoxin IgG was found. The antitoxin IgG levels were raised in animals administered C. difficile after pre-treatment with ampicillin, but lower in animals administered cyclosporin. High levels of antitoxin IgG were also found in the serum samples of animals receiving lansoprazole and C. difficile. Conclusions: Probiotics showed their beneficial effect by boosting the immune response as seen by production of antitoxin IgG. Oral administration of EGF did not affect the immune response to C. difficile toxins as significant increase was not observed in the serum antitoxin IgG levels in any of the groups investigated.

  17. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Chu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence.

  18. Potential of lactoferrin to prevent antibiotic-induced Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, C H; Crowther, G S; Śpiewak, K; Brindell, M; Singh, G; Wilcox, M H; Monaghan, T M

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a global healthcare problem. Recent evidence suggests that the availability of iron may be important for C. difficile growth. This study evaluated the comparative effects of iron-depleted (1% Fe(3+) saturated) bovine apo-lactoferrin (apo-bLf) and iron-saturated (85% Fe(3+) saturated) bovine holo-lactoferrin (holo-bLf) in a human in vitro gut model that simulates CDI. Two parallel triple-stage chemostat gut models were inoculated with pooled human faeces and spiked with C. difficile spores (strain 027 210, PCR ribotype 027). Holo- or apo-bLf was instilled (5 mg/mL, once daily) for 35 days. After 7 days, clindamycin was instilled (33.9 mg/L, four times daily) to induce simulated CDI. Indigenous microflora populations, C. difficile total counts and spores, cytotoxin titres, short chain fatty acid concentrations, biometal concentrations, lactoferrin concentration and iron content of lactoferrin were monitored daily. In the apo-bLf model, germination of C. difficile spores occurred 6 days post instillation of clindamycin, followed by rapid vegetative cell proliferation and detectable toxin production. By contrast, in the holo-bLf model, only a modest vegetative cell population was observed until 16 days post antibiotic administration. Notably, no toxin was detected in this model. In separate batch culture experiments, holo-bLf prevented C. difficile vegetative cell growth and toxin production, whereas apo-bLf and iron alone did not. Holo-bLf, but not apo-bLf, delayed C. difficile growth and prevented toxin production in a human gut model of CDI. This inhibitory effect may be iron independent. These observations suggest that bLf in its iron-saturated state could be used as a novel preventative or treatment strategy for CDI. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  19. Clinical and endoscopic features in patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Velarde Ruiz-Velasco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims: Clostridium difficile infection is the main cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea, and the clinical and endoscopic findings in those patients have been studied very little in Mexico. The aim of the present study was to describe those findings. Materials and methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted that included patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile diagnosed through polymerase chain reaction. The hypervirulent NAP027 strain was also determined. The clinical and endoscopic findings in the study patients, as well as the variables associated with severity, were analyzed. Results: Of the 127 patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea, 97 were excluded from the study due to lack of colonoscopy. The remaining 39 study patients had a mean age of 48 years, and their most common signs/symptoms were abdominal pain (49%, mucus in stool (41%, and blood in stool (10%. The most common alterations in the laboratory results were leukocytosis in 49%, fecal leukocytes (61%, and hypoalbuminemia (67%. The main risk factor was antibiotic use in 62%, and ceftriaxone was the most widely used. The hypervirulent strain was present in 54% of the cases. Endoscopic abnormalities were found in 87% of the patients. Thirty-eight percent presented with pseudomembranous colitis, with lesions in the left colon in 53%, and in the right colon in 13%. No association was found between proton-pump inhibitor use and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. There was a significant association between hypoalbuminemia (< 3.3 g/dL and a greater risk for severe colitis, with a RR of 8.2 (p = 0.008. Conclusions: Pseudomembranous colitis lesions associated with the hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strain were predominant in the left colon. Hypoalbuminemia was a significant severity predictor. Resumen: Introducción y objetivos: La infección por Clostridium difficile (CD es la causa principal de diarrea en

  20. A hospital-level cost-effectiveness analysis model for toxigenic Clostridium difficile detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoye, E; Vandecandelaere, P; De Beenhouwer, H; Coppens, G; Cartuyvels, R; Van den Abeele, A; Frans, J; Laffut, W

    2015-10-01

    Despite thorough analyses of the analytical performance of Clostridium difficile tests and test algorithms, the financial impact at hospital level has not been well described. Such a model should take institution-specific variables into account, such as incidence, request behaviour and infection control policies. To calculate the total hospital costs of different test algorithms, accounting for days on which infected patients with toxigenic strains were not isolated and therefore posed an infectious risk for new/secondary nosocomial infections. A mathematical algorithm was developed to gather the above parameters using data from seven Flemish hospital laboratories (Bilulu Microbiology Study Group) (number of tests, local prevalence and hospital hygiene measures). Measures of sensitivity and specificity for the evaluated tests were taken from the literature. List prices and costs of assays were provided by the manufacturer or the institutions. The calculated cost included reagent costs, personnel costs and the financial burden following due and undue isolations and antibiotic therapies. Five different test algorithms were compared. A dynamic calculation model was constructed to evaluate the cost:benefit ratio of each algorithm for a set of institution- and time-dependent inputted variables (prevalence, cost fluctuations and test performances), making it possible to choose the most advantageous algorithm for its setting. A two-step test algorithm with concomitant glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin testing, followed by a rapid molecular assay was found to be the most cost-effective algorithm. This enabled resolution of almost all cases on the day of arrival, minimizing the number of unnecessary or missing isolations. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Asymptomatic and yet C. difficile-toxin positive? Prevalence and risk factors of carriers of toxigenic Clostridium difficile among geriatric in-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissle, Klaus; Kopf, Daniel; Rösler, Alexander

    2016-11-15

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are the most frequent cause of diarrhoea in hospitals. Geriatric patients are more often affected by the condition, by a relapse and complications. Therefore, a crucial question is how often colonization with toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains occurs in elderly patients without diarrhoea and whether there is a "risk pattern" of colonized patients that can be defined by geriatric assessment. Furthermore, the probability for those asymptomatic carriers to develop a symptomatic infection over time has not been sufficiently explored. We performed a cohort study design to assess the association of clinical variables with Clostridium difficile colonization. The first stool sample of 262 consecutive asymptomatic patients admitted to a geriatric unit was tested for toxigenic Clostridium difficile using PCR (GeneXpert, Cepheid). A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) including Barthel Index, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and hand grip-strength was performed. In addition, Charlson Comorbidity Index, body mass index, number and length of previous hospital stays, previous treatment with antibiotics, institutionalization, primary diagnoses and medication were recorded and evaluated as possible risk factors of colonization by means of binary logistic regression. Secondly, we explored the association of C. difficile colonization with subsequent development of CDI during hospital stay. At admission, 43 (16.4%) patients tested positive for toxin B by PCR. Seven (16.3%) of these colonized patients developed clinical CDI during hospital stay, compared to one out of 219 patients with negative or invalid PCR testing (Odds ratio 12,3; Fisher's exact test: p = 0.000). Overall, 7 out of 8 (87.5%) CDI patients had been colonized at admission. Risk factors of colonization with C. difficile were a history of CDI, previous antibiotic treatment and hospital stays. The parameters of the CGA were not significantly associated with

  2. Defining the vulnerable period for re-establishment of Clostridium difficile colonization after treatment of C. difficile infection with oral vancomycin or metronidazole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turki Abujamel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is the most common cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea in developed countries. A significant proportion of patients receiving oral vancomycin or metronidazole for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI develop recurrences. However, the period of vulnerability to re-establishment of colonization by C. difficile after therapy is not well defined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective study of CDI patients, we demonstrated that most vancomycin-treated patients maintained inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin in stool for 4 to 5 days after therapy, whereas metronidazole was only detectable during therapy. From the time of elimination of the antibiotics to 14 to 21 days after therapy, a majority of stool suspensions supported growth of C. difficile and deep 16S rRNA sequencing demonstrated persistent marked alteration of the indigenous microbiota. By 21 to 28 days after completion of CDI treatment, a majority of stool suspensions inhibited growth of C. difficile and there was evidence of some recovery of the microbiota. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that there is a vulnerable period for re-establishment of C. difficile colonization after CDI treatment that begins within a few days after discontinuation of treatment and extends for about 3 weeks in most patients.

  3. Determining Clostridium difficile intra-taxa diversity by mining multilocus sequence typing databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Marina; Ríos-Chaparro, Dora Inés; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Ramírez, Juan David

    2017-03-14

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is a highly discriminatory typing strategy; it is reproducible and scalable. There is a MLST scheme for Clostridium difficile (CD), a gram positive bacillus causing different pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract. This work was aimed at describing the frequency of sequence types (STs) and Clades (C) reported and evalute the intra-taxa diversity in the CD MLST database (CD-MLST-db) using an MLSA approach. Analysis of 1778 available isolates showed that clade 1 (C1) was the most frequent worldwide (57.7%), followed by C2 (29.1%). Regarding sequence types (STs), it was found that ST-1, belonging to C2, was the most frequent. The isolates analysed came from 17 countries, mostly from the United Kingdom (UK) (1541 STs, 87.0%). The diversity of the seven housekeeping genes in the MLST scheme was evaluated, and alleles from the profiles (STs), for identifying CD population structure. It was found that adk and atpA are conserved genes allowing a limited amount of clusters to be discriminated; however, different genes such as drx, glyA and particularly sodA showed high diversity indexes and grouped CD populations in many clusters, suggesting that these genes' contribution to CD typing should be revised. It was identified that CD STs reported to date have a mostly clonal population structure with foreseen events of recombination; however, one group of STs was not assigned to a clade being highly different containing at least nine well-supported clusters, suggesting a greater amount of clades for CD. This study shows the usefulness of CD-MLST-db as a tool for studying CD distribution and population structure, identifying the need for reviewing the usefulness of sodA as housekeeping gene within the MLST scheme and suggesting the existence of a greater amount of CD clades. The study also shows the plausible exchange of genetic material between STs, contributing towards intra-taxa genetic diversity.

  4. IN-VITRO GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF COMMERCIAL PROBIOTIC STRAINS AND THEIR POTENTIAL FOR INHIBITION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE AND CLOSTRDIDUM PERFRINGENS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, Anders

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...... aerobic conditions was assessed. To evaluate inhibition of C. difficile and C. perfringens sterile supernatant of the probiotic culture was added to BHI inoculated with a standard C. difficile or C. perfringens suspension. Growth was measured spectrophotometrically at 0 and 24h and compared to the control...... (C. difficile or C. perfringens suspension in BHI). At pH 4 12% of strains showed >50% growth and 24% were unable to grow, however did survive. At pH 2 none of the tested strains grew or survived. Eighty eight percent showed >75% growth in 0.15% bile, 60% showed >75% growth in 0.3% bile. Ninety...

  5. Regulation of Clostridium difficile Spore Formation by the SpoIIQ and SpoIIIA Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sporulation is an ancient developmental process that involves the formation of a highly resistant endospore within a larger mother cell. In the model organism Bacillus subtilis, sporulation-specific sigma factors activate compartment-specific transcriptional programs that drive spore morphogenesis. σG activity in the forespore depends on the formation of a secretion complex, known as the "feeding tube," that bridges the mother cell and forespore and maintains forespore integrity. Even though these channel components are conserved in all spore formers, recent studies in the major nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile suggested that these components are dispensable for σG activity. In this study, we investigated the requirements of the SpoIIQ and SpoIIIA proteins during C. difficile sporulation. C. difficile spoIIQ, spoIIIA, and spoIIIAH mutants exhibited defects in engulfment, tethering of coat to the forespore, and heat-resistant spore formation, even though they activate σG at wildtype levels. Although the spoIIQ, spoIIIA, and spoIIIAH mutants were defective in engulfment, metabolic labeling studies revealed that they nevertheless actively transformed the peptidoglycan at the leading edge of engulfment. In vitro pull-down assays further demonstrated that C. difficile SpoIIQ directly interacts with SpoIIIAH. Interestingly, mutation of the conserved Walker A ATP binding motif, but not the Walker B ATP hydrolysis motif, disrupted SpoIIIAA function during C. difficile spore formation. This finding contrasts with B. subtilis, which requires both Walker A and B motifs for SpoIIIAA function. Taken together, our findings suggest that inhibiting SpoIIQ, SpoIIIAA, or SpoIIIAH function could prevent the formation of infectious C. difficile spores and thus disease transmission.

  6. Clostridium difficile modulates host innate immunity via toxin-independent and dependent mechanism(s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila V Jafari

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is the leading cause of hospital and community-acquired antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and currently represents a significant health burden. Although the role and contribution of C. difficile toxins to disease pathogenesis is being increasingly understood, at present other facets of C. difficile-host interactions, in particular, bacterial-driven effects on host immunity remain less studied. Using an ex-vivo model of infection, we report that the human gastrointestinal mucosa elicits a rapid and significant cytokine response to C. difficile. Marked increase in IFN-γ with modest increase in IL-22 and IL-17A was noted. Significant increase in IL-8 suggested potential for neutrophil influx while presence of IL-12, IL-23, IL-1β and IL-6 was indicative of a cytokine milieu that may modulate subsequent T cell immunity. Majority of C. difficile-driven effects on murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC activation were toxin-independent; the toxins were however responsible for BMDC inflammasome activation. In contrast, human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs released IL-1β even in the absence of toxins suggesting host-specific mediation. Infected DC-T cell crosstalk revealed the ability of R20291 and 630 WT strains to elicit a differential DC IL-12 family cytokine milieu which culminated in significantly greater Th1 immunity in response to R20291. Interestingly, both strains induced a similar Th17 response. Elicitation of mucosal IFN-γ/IL-17A and Th1/Th17 immunity to C. difficile indicates a central role for this dual cytokine axis in establishing antimicrobial immunity to CDI.

  7. Decline in Clostridium difficile-associated disease rates in Singapore public hospitals, 2006 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Prabha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile is the major cause of pseudomembranous colitis associated with antibiotic use, and the spread of the hypervirulent epidemic ribotype 027/NAP-1 strain across hospitals worldwide has re-focused attention on this nosocomial pathogen. The overall incidence and trend of C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD in Singapore is unknown, and a surveillance program to determine these via formal laboratory-based reporting was established. Findings Laboratory and pharmacy data were collated from one tertiary and two secondary hospitals on a quarterly basis between 2006 and 2008. All hospitals tested for C. difficile using Immunocard Toxins A&B (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, OH during this period. Duplicate positive C. difficile results within a 14-day period were removed. The CDAD results were compared with trends in hospital-based prescription of major classes of antibiotics. Overall CDAD incidence-density decreased from 5.16 (95%CI: 4.73 - 5.62 cases per 10,000 inpatient-days in 2006 to 2.99 (95%CI: 2.67 to 3.33 cases per 10,000 inpatient-days in 2008 (p C. difficile testing increased significantly (p Conclusions Our results demonstrate a real decline of CDAD rates in three large local hospitals. The cause is unclear and is not associated with improved infection control measures or reduction in antibiotic prescription. Lack of C. difficile stool cultures as part of routine testing precluded determination of the decline of a major clone as a potential explanation. For more accurate epidemiological trending of CDAD and early detection of epidemic clones, data collection will have to be expanded and resources set in place for reference laboratory culture and typing.

  8. Systems Modeling of Interactions between Mucosal Immunity and the Gut Microbiome during Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leber

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infections are associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and result in an exuberant inflammatory response, leading to nosocomial diarrhea, colitis and even death. To better understand the dynamics of mucosal immunity during C. difficile infection from initiation through expansion to resolution, we built a computational model of the mucosal immune response to the bacterium. The model was calibrated using data from a mouse model of C. difficile infection. The model demonstrates a crucial role of T helper 17 (Th17 effector responses in the colonic lamina propria and luminal commensal bacteria populations in the clearance of C. difficile and colonic pathology, whereas regulatory T (Treg cells responses are associated with the recovery phase. In addition, the production of anti-microbial peptides by inflamed epithelial cells and activated neutrophils in response to C. difficile infection inhibit the re-growth of beneficial commensal bacterial species. Computational simulations suggest that the removal of neutrophil and epithelial cell derived anti-microbial inhibitions, separately and together, on commensal bacterial regrowth promote recovery and minimize colonic inflammatory pathology. Simulation results predict a decrease in colonic inflammatory markers, such as neutrophilic influx and Th17 cells in the colonic lamina propria, and length of infection with accelerated commensal bacteria re-growth through altered anti-microbial inhibition. Computational modeling provides novel insights on the therapeutic value of repopulating the colonic microbiome and inducing regulatory mucosal immune responses during C. difficile infection. Thus, modeling mucosal immunity-gut microbiota interactions has the potential to guide the development of targeted fecal transplantation therapies in the context of precision medicine interventions.

  9. Identification of a Novel Lipoprotein Regulator of Clostridium difficile Spore Germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore-forming pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea. C. difficile infections are transmitted when ingested spores germinate in the gastrointestinal tract and transform into vegetative cells. Germination begins when the germinant receptor CspC detects bile salts in the gut. CspC is a subtilisin-like serine pseudoprotease that activates the related CspB serine protease through an unknown mechanism. Activated CspB cleaves the pro-SleC zymogen, which allows the activated SleC cortex hydrolase to degrade the protective cortex layer. While these regulators are essential for C. difficile spores to outgrow and form toxin-secreting vegetative cells, the mechanisms controlling their function have only been partially characterized. In this study, we identify the lipoprotein GerS as a novel regulator of C. difficile spore germination using targeted mutagenesis. A gerS mutant has a severe germination defect and fails to degrade cortex even though it processes SleC at wildtype levels. Using complementation analyses, we demonstrate that GerS secretion, but not lipidation, is necessary for GerS to activate SleC. Importantly, loss of GerS attenuates the virulence of C. difficile in a hamster model of infection. Since GerS appears to be conserved exclusively in related Peptostreptococcaeace family members, our results contribute to a growing body of work indicating that C. difficile has evolved distinct mechanisms for controlling the exit from dormancy relative to B. subtilis and other spore-forming organisms.

  10. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens as prophylactic treatment for Clostridium difficile-associated disease in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraerts, S; Ducatelle, R; Haesebrouck, F; Van Immerseel, F

    2015-08-01

    Probiotics might offer an attractive alternative for standard antibiotic therapy to treat Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). We specifically selected a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain for its high in vitro antibacterial activity against C. difficile and tested its efficacy to prevent CDI in a mouse model. B. amyloliquefaciens supernatant was tested against a large collection of C. difficile strains using an agar well diffusion test. B. amyloliquefaciens was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice in which CDI was induced using C. difficile VPI 10463, and its effect was compared with control mice receiving no treatment and mice receiving Saccharomyces boulardii. Mice were followed up daily for signs of disease including weight loss. At necropsy, the colon was collected and subjected to histopathological analysis. C. difficile toxin A/B levels and colon weight/length and colon/body weight ratios were calculated. B. amyloliquefaciens supernatant was able to inhibit the growth of all C. difficile strains. Results of the in vivo trial indicated a significant weight loss for untreated and S. boulardii-treated mice as compared to B. amyloliquefaciens-treated mice. C. difficile toxin A and B levels were significantly higher for untreated and S. boulardii-treated mice than B. amyloliquefaciens-treated mice. A significantly lower degree of colon damage was detected for B. amyloliquefaciens-treated mice as compared to untreated and S. boulardii-treated mice, based on histopathological analysis, colon weight/length and colon/body weight ratios. Administration of B. amyloliquefaciens was successful in preventing CDI in a mouse model. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Distinctive Profiles of Infection and Pathology in Hamsters Infected with Clostridium difficile Strains 630 and B1 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Goulding, David; Thompson, Harold; Emerson, Jenny; Fairweather, Neil F.; Dougan, Gordon; Douce, Gill R.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, the Golden Syrian hamster is widely considered an important model of Clostridium difficile disease, as oral infection of this animal pretreated with antibiotics reproduces many of the symptoms observed in humans. Two C. difficile strains, B1 and 630, showed significant differences in the progression and severity of disease in this model. B1-infected hamsters exhibited more severe pathology and a shorter time to death than hamsters infected with 630. Histological changes in the gut ...

  12. Fecal Bacteriotherapy: A Case Report in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Ulcerative Colitis and Recurrent  Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadeel Zainah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of ulcerative colitis (UC and recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI where the patient was on immunomodulatory therapy and had successful CDI eradication after fecal transplantation. This is the first case report in the literature documenting successful C. difficile eradication in an immunosuppressed patient. We feel that fecal transplantation should be studied as a treatment option in these patients.

  13. Method for the typing of Clostridium difficile based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabaqchali, S.; O' Farrell, S.; Holland, D.; Silman, R.

    1986-01-01

    A typing method for Clostridium difficile based on the incorporation of (/sup 35/S)methionine into cellular proteins, their separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their visualization by autoradiography is described. On analysis of the radiolabeled-protein profiles, nine distinct groups were observed (A to E and W to Z). The method, which is simple, reproducible, and readily expandable, has been applied in epidemiological studies to demonstrate cross-infection and hospital acquisition of C. difficile.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmir Geraldo Fraga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2 μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125 μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil.

  15. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, William J. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-19

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmir Geraldo Fraga

    Full Text Available Abstract Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2 μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125 μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil.

  17. Clostridium difficile-induced colitis in mice is independent of leukotrienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Bruno C; Theriot, Casey M; Leslie, Jhansi L; Carlson, Paul E; Bergin, Ingrid L; Peters-Golden, Marc; Young, Vincent B; Aronoff, David M

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis in healthcare settings. However, the host factors involved in the intestinal inflammatory response and pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI) are largely unknown. Here we investigated the role of leukotrienes (LTs), a group of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, in CDI. Notably, the neutrophil chemoattractant LTB4, but not cysteinyl (cys) LTs, was induced in the intestine of C57BL/6 mice infected with either C. difficile strain VPI 10463 or strain 630. Genetic or pharmacological ablation of LT production did not ameliorate C. difficile colitis or clinical signs of disease in infected mice. Histological analysis demonstrated that intestinal neutrophilic inflammation, edema and tissue damage in mice during acute and severe CDI were not modulated in the absence of LTs. In addition, CDI induced a burst of cytokines in the intestine of infected mice in a LT-independent manner. Serum levels of anti-toxin A immunoglobulin (Ig) G levels were also not modulated by endogenous LTs. Collectively, our results do not support a role for LTs in modulating host susceptibility to CDI in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of an Optimised Bacteriophage Cocktail to Clear Clostridium difficile in a Batch Fermentation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Y. Nale

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a major cause of infectious diarrhea. Conventional antibiotics are not universally effective for all ribotypes, and can trigger dysbiosis, resistance and recurrent infection. Thus, novel therapeutics are needed to replace and/or supplement the current antibiotics. Here, we describe the activity of an optimised 4-phage cocktail to clear cultures of a clinical ribotype 014/020 strain in fermentation vessels spiked with combined fecal slurries from four healthy volunteers. After 5 h, we observed ~6-log reductions in C. difficile abundance in the prophylaxis regimen and complete C. difficile eradication after 24 h following prophylactic or remedial regimens. Viability assays revealed that commensal enterococci, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, total anaerobes, and enterobacteria were not affected by either regimens, but a ~2-log increase in the enterobacteria, lactobacilli, and total anaerobe abundance was seen in the phage-only-treated vessel compared to other treatments. The impact of the phage treatments on components of the microbiota was further assayed using metagenomic analysis. Together, our data supports the therapeutic application of our optimised phage cocktail to treat CDI. Also, the increase in specific commensals observed in the phage-treated control could prevent further colonisation of C. difficile, and thus provide protection from infection being able to establish.

  19. Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to Detect Toxigenic Clostridium difficile from Stool Specimens: A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Paul; Hash, Sara; Park, Katherine; Wong, Charlene; Doraisamy, Loganathan; Petterson, Jonas; Petti, Cathy A; Ward, Pamela M; Lee, Seung Heon; Menon, Suresh; She, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the performance of an early prototype core molecular mirroring nuclear magnetic resonance detection platform (Mentor-100) to detect toxigenic Clostridium difficile from stool. This technology uses customized nanoparticles bound to target specific oligonucleotide probes that form binaries in the presence of nucleic acid from the target microorganism. Liquid patient stool specimens were seeded with C. difficile or other Clostridium species to determine the analytical sensitivity and specificity. Samples underwent nucleic acid extraction and target amplification with probes conjugated with iron nanoparticles. Signal from nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin relaxation time was measured to detect the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile. The limit of detection was cross-reactivity was observed with nontoxigenic C. difficile, Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus subtilis, or Paenibacillus polymyxa at 108 colony forming units/mL. Correlation studies using frozen stool samples yielded a sensitivity of 88.4% (61 of 69) and a specificity of 87.0% (40 of 46) as compared with a commercial PCR assay for C. difficile. The area under the curve in the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was 0.922. The prototype molecular mirroring platform showed promising performance for pathogen detection from clinical specimens. The platform design has the potential to offer a novel, low-cost alternative to currently available nucleic acid-based tests. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitamin D deficiency: A potential risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dima Youssef,1 William B Grant,2 Alan N Peiris3,41Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 2Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center, San Francisco, CA USA; 3Department of Medicine, Mountain Home VAMC, 4Department of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, USAIn the July 3, 2012 issue of the journal of Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, Martinez et al present a nice review on Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infections.1 The different manifestations of this challenging disease along with the high cost and burden on the health care system were discussed. While the authors did an admirable job in discussing traditional risk factors, they do not mention vitamin D deficiency.View original paper by Martinez and colleagues.

  1. Fecal microbiota transplantation – methods of treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections and other diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Juszczuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a serious epidemiological problem and particularly dangerous microorganism causing hospital infections. Currently, the treatment of C. difficile infections is the use of metronidazole or vancomycin. However, in some patients, recurrent infection difficult to treat occurs. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a new method used to treat the recurrent CDI. FMT consists in the infusion of the fecal suspension from a healthy donor into the gastrointestinal tract of a patient with CDI to restore the natural intestinal microflora. FMT is safe and effective treatment of recurrent CDI. FMT is extensively described around the world, but to date only two randomized studies confirming the effectiveness of FMT have been conducted. This method was also applied in the treatment of diseases such as pseudomembranous colitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. The review describes the procedure for FMT and the current state of knowledge about the effectiveness of FMT in the treatment of recurrent CDI.

  2. Tests for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: the next generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Karen C

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) causes 25-30% of cases of antibiotic associated diarrhea and most cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Patients presenting with diarrhea after hospitalization for 3 or more days should be tested for C. difficile. There are many options available for testing, each of which has inherent advantages and disadvantages. Most laboratories perform toxin testing using an enzyme immunoassay method. In general these tests have sensitivities ranging from 60 to 70% and specificities of 98%. When using these methods, symptomatic patients with negative tests should be tested by another more sensitive method. Until recently, cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assays (CCNAs) were considered the gold standard in the U.S. A two-step algorithm using an EIA for glutamate dehydrogenase detection followed by testing positives using CCNA, offered an improved alternative until the availability of molecular assays. Although early studies that compared the GDH assay to CCNA demonstrated high sensitivity and negative predictive values, more recent comparisons to toxigenic culture and PCR have shown the sensitivity to be in the mid to high 80's. When testing using a sensitive assay, repeat testing is not cost-effective. Outbreaks caused by a toxin variant epidemic strain have renewed interest in bacterial culture. Toxigenic culture has emerged as the new gold standard against which newer assays should be compared. However, there is no agreed upon standard method for culture performance. At least 4 FDA cleared nucleic acid amplification assays are available to clinical laboratories and several of these have been well evaluated in the literature. Because these assays detect a gene that encodes toxin and not the toxin itself it is important that laboratories test only patients with diarrhea. These molecular assays have been shown to be superior to toxin EIAs, CCNA and 2-step algorithms, but not to toxigenic culture. More studies are needed to assess the

  3. Successful Treatment of Clostridium difficile Bacteremia with Aortic Mycotic Aneurysm in a Patient with Prior Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairav Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical spectrum of Clostridium difficile infection can range from benign gastrointestinal colonization to mild diarrhea and life threatening conditions such as pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Extraintestinal manifestations of C. difficile are rare. Here, we report a patient with a history of an endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR presenting with an endovascular leak complicated by C. difficile bacteremia and a mycotic aneurysm. He was successfully treated with an explant of the EVAR, an aorto-left renal bypass, and aorto-bi-iliac bypass graft placement along with a six-week duration of intravenous vancomycin and oral metronidazole.

  4. Parameters for the mathematical modelling of Clostridium difficile acquisition and transmission: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eroboghene H Otete

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mathematical modelling of Clostridium difficile infection dynamics could contribute to the optimisation of strategies for its prevention and control. The objective of this systematic review was to summarise the available literature specifically identifying the quantitative parameters required for a compartmental mathematical model of Clostridium difficile transmission. METHODS: Six electronic healthcare databases were searched and all screening, data extraction and study quality assessments were undertaken in duplicate. Results were synthesised using a narrative approach. RESULTS: Fifty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Reproduction numbers for hospital based epidemics were described in two studies with a range from 0.55 to 7. Two studies provided consistent data on incubation periods. For 62% of cases, symptoms occurred in less than 4 weeks (3-28 days after infection. Evidence on contact patterns was identified in four studies but with limited data reported for populating a mathematical model. Two studies, including one without clinically apparent donor-recipient pairs, provided information on serial intervals for household or ward contacts, showing transmission intervals of <1 week in ward based contacts compared to up to 2 months for household contacts. Eight studies reported recovery rates of between 75%-100% for patients who had been treated with either metronidazole or vancomycin. Forty-nine studies gave recurrence rates of between 3% and 49% but were limited by varying definitions of recurrence. No study was found which specifically reported force of infection or net reproduction numbers. CONCLUSIONS: There is currently scant literature overtly citing estimates of the parameters required to inform the quantitative modelling of Clostridium difficile transmission. Further high quality studies to investigate transmission parameters are required, including through review of published epidemiological studies where these

  5. Monitoring Clostridium difficile infection in an acute hospital: prevalence or incidence studies?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lavan, A H

    2012-02-15

    BACKGROUND: Surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an essential component of a CDI preventative programme. AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate two methods of CDI surveillance. METHODS: Prevalence of CDI, antibiotic use and associated co-morbidity was assessed weekly on two wards over 6 weeks. In addition, CDI incidence surveillance was performed on all new CDI cases over a 13-week period. Cases were assessed for CDI risk factors, disease severity, response to treatment and outcome at 6 months. RESULTS: Clostridium difficile infection prevalence was 3.5% (range 2.9-6.1%) on the medical ward and 1.1% (range 0-3.5%) on the surgical ward. Patients on the medical ward were older and more likely to be colonised with MRSA; however, recent antibiotic use was more prevalent among surgical patients. Sixty-one new CDI cases were audited. Patients were elderly (mean age 71 years) with significant co-morbidity (median age adjusted Charlson co-morbidity score 5). CDI ribotypes included 027 (29 cases) 078 (5) and 106 (4). Eight patients developed severe CDI, seven due to 027. Antibiotic use was common with 56% receiving three or more antibiotics in the preceding 8 weeks. Twenty-four patients had died at 6 months, five due to CDI. CONCLUSION: Clostridium difficile infection prevalence gives a broad overview of CDI and points to areas that require more detailed surveillance and requires little time. However, patient-based CDI incidence surveillance provides a more useful analysis of CDI risk factors, disease and outcome for planning preventative programmes and focusing antibiotic stewardship efforts.

  6. Calprotectin and lactoferrin faecal levels in patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Swale

    Full Text Available Measurement of both calprotectin and lactoferrin in faeces has successfully been used to discriminate between functional and inflammatory bowel conditions, but evidence is limited for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. We prospectively recruited a cohort of 164 CDI cases and 52 controls with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD. Information on disease severity, duration of symptoms, 30-day mortality and 90-day recurrence as markers of complicated CDI were recorded. Specimens were subject to microbiological culture and PCR-ribotyping. Levels of faecal calprotectin (FC and lactoferrin (FL were measured by ELISA. Statistical analysis was conducted using percentile categorisation. ROC curve analysis was employed to determine optimal cut-off values. Both markers were highly correlated with each other (r2 = 0.74 and elevated in cases compared to controls (p0.85, although we observed a large amount of variability across both groups. The optimal case-control cut-off point was 148 mg/kg for FC and 8.1 ng/µl for FL. Median values for FL in CDI cases were significantly greater in patients suffering from severe disease compared to non-severe disease (104.6 vs. 40.1 ng/µl, p = 0.02, but were not significant for FC (969.3 vs. 512.7 mg/kg, p = 0.09. Neither marker was associated with 90-day recurrence, prolonged CDI symptoms, positive culture results and colonisation by ribotype 027. Both FC and FL distinguished between CDI cases and AAD controls. Although FL was associated with disease severity in CDI patients, this showed high inter-individual variability and was an isolated finding. Thus, FC and FL are unlikely to be useful as biomarkers of complicated CDI disease.

  7. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Environmental Decontamination for the Control of Clostridium difficile Transmission in Healthcare Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintz, Jason; Lenhart, Suzanne; Lanzas, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    We implement an agent-based model for Clostridium difficile transmission in hospitals that accounts for several processes and individual factors including environmental and antibiotic heterogeneity in order to evaluate the efficacy of various control measures aimed at reducing environmental contamination and mitigating the effects of antibiotic use on transmission. In particular, we account for local contamination levels that contribute to the probability of colonization and we account for both the number and type of antibiotic treatments given to patients. Simulations illustrate the relative efficacy of several strategies for the reduction of nosocomial colonizations and nosocomial diseases.

  8. Recidiverende Clostridium Difficile infektion behandlet med fækal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Leutscher, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) poses a clinical challenge. Emerging evidence supports the use of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). An 81-year-old man was admitted with a third recurrent episode of CDI within two months. Because of clinical deterioration with deve...... with development of pancolitis in spite of two weeks of metronidazole and vanco-mycin treatment, FMT was performed using a duodenal tube. The patient recovered completely without further relapse during follow-up. FMT was shown to be an efficient adjuvant treatment of complicated CDI....

  9. Imipenem-induced clostridium difficile diarrhea in a patient with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Enríquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old man was diagnosed to have pneumonia and advanced chronic kidney disease. He presented with anuria and hemodialysis, by temporary femoral catheter, was initiated. He was empirically treated with imipenem/cilastatin 500 mg/24 h after hemodialysis. After 10 days of antibiotic intake, he developed severe diarrhea. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile (CD-associated diarrhea was confirmed by detection of the toxins A and B in his stool. Imipenem therapy was discontinued; Vancomycin 500 mg orally every 6 h and 1000 mg per rectum every day was added. After two weeks of this treatment, the patient reported complete resolution of the diarrhea and stool samples were negative for Clostridium toxin. In this case, the most possible cause of CD colitis was considered to be imipenem because of the temporal relationship between exposure to the drug and onset of symptoms.

  10. Next-Generation Probiotics Targeting Clostridium difficile through Precursor-Directed Antimicrobial Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinler, Jennifer K; Auchtung, Jennifer; Brown, Aaron; Boonma, Prapaporn; Oezguen, Numan; Ross, Caná L; Luna, Ruth Ann; Runge, Jessica; Versalovic, James; Peniche, Alex; Dann, Sara M; Britton, Robert A; Haag, Anthony; Savidge, Tor C

    2017-10-01

    Integration of antibiotic and probiotic therapy has the potential to lessen the public health burden of antimicrobial-associated diseases. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents an important example where the rational design of next-generation probiotics is being actively pursued to prevent disease recurrence. Because intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat CDI (vancomycin, metronidazole, and fidaxomicin) is a desired trait in such probiotic species, we screened several bacteria and identified Lactobacillus reuteri to be a promising candidate for adjunct therapy. Human-derived L. reuteri bacteria convert glycerol to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound reuterin. When supplemented with glycerol, strains carrying the pocR gene locus were potent reuterin producers, with L. reuteri 17938 inhibiting C. difficile growth at a level on par with the level of growth inhibition by vancomycin. Targeted pocR mutations and complementation studies identified reuterin to be the precursor-induced antimicrobial agent. Pathophysiological relevance was demonstrated when the codelivery of L. reuteri with glycerol was effective against C. difficile colonization in complex human fecal microbial communities, whereas treatment with either glycerol or L. reuteri alone was ineffective. A global unbiased microbiome and metabolomics analysis independently confirmed that glycerol precursor delivery with L. reuteri elicited changes in the composition and function of the human microbial community that preferentially targets C. difficile outgrowth and toxicity, a finding consistent with glycerol fermentation and reuterin production. Antimicrobial resistance has thus been successfully exploited in the natural design of human microbiome evasion of C. difficile, and this method may provide a prototypic precursor-directed probiotic approach. Antibiotic resistance and substrate bioavailability may therefore represent critical new determinants of probiotic

  11. Clostridium difficile colonization and/or infection during infancy and the risk of childhood allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Gong, Yun Na; Ryoo, Eell

    2017-05-01

    The gut microbiota can influence several diseases through immune modulation; however, the exact role of microbes such as Clostridium difficileand the relationship between microbiota colonization and allergic diseases are not well known. This study aimed to determine the relationship between C. difficilecolonization and/or infection (CDCI) during infancy and allergic diseases during early childhood. Infants 1-12 months of age presenting changes in bowel habits for more than 2 weeks were enrolled in this study. After dividing them into 2 groups according to the presence and absence of C. difficile, the risk of allergic disease development during childhood was identified and compared. Sixty-five patients were included in this study; 22 (33.8%) were diagnosed with CDCI. No significant differences were observed in baseline characteristics between the C. difficile-positive and -negative groups except for antibiotic exposure (22.7% vs. 60.5%, P=0.004). Compared to the C. difficile-negative group, the risk of developing at least one allergic disease was higher in the C. difficile-positive group after adjusting other variables (adjusted odds ratios, 5.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-20.74; P=0.007). Furthermore, food allergies were more prevalent in the C. difficile-positive group (P=0.03). CDCI during infancy were associated with a higher risk of developing allergic diseases during early childhood. These results suggest that CDCI during infancy might reflect the reduced diversity of the intestinal microbiota, which is associated with an increased risk of allergic sensitization. To identify the underlying mechanism, further investigation and a larger cohort study will be needed.

  12. Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease: role in pathogenesis and implications in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Chazan, Bibiana; Raz, Raul; Saliba, Walid

    2013-11-21

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the leading cause of antibiotic associated colitis and nosocomial diarrhea. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk of developing C. difficile infection (CDI), have worse outcomes of CDI-including higher rates of colectomy and death, and experience higher rates of recurrence. However, it is still not clear whether C. difficile is a cause of IBD or a consequence of the inflammatory state in the intestinal environment. The burden of CDI has increased dramatically over the past decade, with severe outbreaks described in many countries, which have been attributed to a new and more virulent strain. A parallel rise in the incidence of CDI has been noted in patients with IBD. IBD patients with CDI tend be younger, have less prior antibiotic exposure, and most cases of CDI in these patients represent outpatient acquired infections. The clinical presentation of CDI in these patients can be unique-including diversion colitis, enteritis and pouchitis, and typical findings on colonoscopy are often absent. Due to the high prevalence of CDI in patients hospitalized with an IBD exacerbation, and the prognostic implications of CDI in these patients, it is recommended to test all IBD patients hospitalized with a disease flare for C. difficile. Treatment includes general measures such as supportive care and infection control measures. Antibiotic therapy with either oral metronidazole, vancomycin, or the novel antibiotic-fidaxomicin, should be initiated as soon as possible. Fecal macrobiota transplantation constitutes another optional treatment for severe/recurrent CDI. The aim of this paper is to review recent data on CDI in IBD: role in pathogenesis, diagnostic methods, optional treatments, and outcomes of these patients.

  13. Persistence of Clostridium difficile in wastewater treatment-derived biosolids during land application or windrow composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C; Wang, D; Huber, A; Weese, S J; Warriner, K

    2016-02-01

    To determine the persistence of Clostridium difficile spores in biosolids during composting or when amended into soil and held under natural environmental climatic conditions. Five log CFU g(-1) Cl. difficile spores (ribotypes 027 or 078) were inoculated into agricultural soils (sandy loam or loam) amended with 10% w/w anaerobically digested biosolids. The inoculated soil : biosolids mixture was then placed into sentinel vials which were introduced at a depth of 15 cm within the field plot consisting of the corresponding soil type. Two trials were performed, the first of which started in late spring (May 2013 through to August 2014) and second from November 2013 through to October 2014 (fall trial). Ribotype 078 endospores in loam or sandy loam soil decreased during the summer but then increased in numbers towards the fall. At the end of the trial, levels of ribotype 078 spores had decreased by 1·5 log CFU g(-1) , with 027 spores decreasing by composting of biosolids decreased Cl. difficile levels from 3·7 log CFU g(-1) down to 0·3 log CFU g(-1) with the greater reduction occurring during the curing phase. In comparison, Cl. perfringens decreased from 6·3 log CFU g(-1) down to 2·4 log CFU g(-1) but mainly in the thermal phase of the composting process. Composting of biosolids is a more effective means of inactivating Cl. difficile compared to land application. Windrow composting represents an effective method to reduce the environmental burden of Cl. difficile associated with biosolids. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Bile salt inhibition of host cell damage by Clostridium difficile toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Darkoh

    Full Text Available Virulent Clostridium difficile strains produce toxin A and/or toxin B that are the etiological agents of diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Treatment of C. difficile infections (CDI has been hampered by resistance to multiple antibiotics, sporulation, emergence of strains with increased virulence, recurrence of the infection, and the lack of drugs that preserve or restore the colonic bacterial flora. As a result, there is new interest in non-antibiotic CDI treatments. The human conjugated bile salt taurocholate was previously shown in our laboratory to inhibit C. difficile toxin A and B activities in an in vitro assay. Here we demonstrate for the first time in an ex vivo assay that taurocholate can protect Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells from the damaging effects of the C. difficile toxins. Using caspase-3 and lactate dehydrogenase assays, we have demonstrated that taurocholate reduced the extent of toxin B-induced apoptosis and cell membrane damage. Confluent Caco-2 cells cultured with toxin B induced elevated caspase-3 activity. Remarkably, addition of 5 mM taurocholate reduced caspase-3 activity in cells treated with 2, 4, 6, and 12 µg/ml of toxin B by 99%, 78%, 64%, and 60%, respectively. Furthermore, spent culture medium from Caco-2 cells incubated with both toxin B and taurocholate exhibited significantly decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity compared to spent culture medium from cells incubated with toxin B only. Our results suggest that the mechanism of taurocholate-mediated inhibition functions at the level of toxin activity since taurocholate did not affect C. difficile growth and toxin production. These findings open up a new avenue for the development of non-antibiotic therapeutics for CDI treatment.

  15. A Clostridium difficile-Specific, Gel-Forming Protein Required for Optimal Spore Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lauren Donnelly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore-forming obligate anaerobe that is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea worldwide. In order for C. difficile to initiate infection, its aerotolerant spore form must germinate in the gut of mammalian hosts. While almost all spore-forming organisms use transmembrane germinant receptors to trigger germination, C. difficile uses the pseudoprotease CspC to sense bile salt germinants. CspC activates the related subtilisin-like protease CspB, which then proteolytically activates the cortex hydrolase SleC. Activated SleC degrades the protective spore cortex layer, a step that is essential for germination to proceed. Since CspC incorporation into spores also depends on CspA, a related pseudoprotease domain, Csp family proteins play a critical role in germination. However, how Csps are incorporated into spores remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that incorporation of the CspC, CspB, and CspA germination regulators into spores depends on CD0311 (renamed GerG, a previously uncharacterized hypothetical protein. The reduced levels of Csps in gerG spores correlate with reduced responsiveness to bile salt germinants and increased germination heterogeneity in single-spore germination assays. Interestingly, asparagine-rich repeat sequences in GerG’s central region facilitate spontaneous gel formation in vitro even though they are dispensable for GerG-mediated control of germination. Since GerG is found exclusively in C. difficile, our results suggest that exploiting GerG function could represent a promising avenue for developing C. difficile-specific anti-infective therapies.

  16. Soy fiber delays disease onset and prolongs survival in experimental Clostridium difficile ileocecitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, W L; Choi, D M; Zhang, W; Roth, J A; Don, S H; Afonso, J J; Lee, F H; Klurfeld, D M; Rombeau, J L

    1994-01-01

    Clostridium difficile colitis is a disabling complication in critically ill patients who commonly receive broad-spectrum antibiotics and liquid diets. To date, there is no experimental model specifically designed to investigate the effects of liquid diets on this type of colitis. The addition of fiber to liquid diets normalizes gut structure and improves absorptive function in selected conditions of intestinal dysfunction. The purposes of this study were the following: (1) to develop a reproducible model to examine the interaction of acute C difficile-induced colitis and liquid diets, (2) to determine whether the addition of soy fiber to a liquid diet improves disease, and (3) to investigate possible mechanisms of fiber-mediated disease improvement. Syrian hamsters were pair-fed with either a polymeric liquid diet or the same diet with 1.4% soy fiber for 10 days. Animals were given either clindamycin and C difficile (to produce ileocecitis), or equivalent volumes of saline. Mean survival time and systematic stool examinations for C difficile toxin positivity, liquidity, and percent water were performed to determine the effect of soy fiber on disease. Survival time was prolonged by 34% (p < .05), and C difficile toxin positivity and stool liquidity were significantly reduced (p < .05) with fiber. Additional animals were studied to determine possible mechanisms for improved survival in fiber-supplemented animals. Cecal histology, colonic water absorption, cecal microflora, and gastric to anus transit time were measured in these animals. Colonic water absorption and gastric to anus transit time were significantly increased (p < .05) and decreased (p < .05) with fiber, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Proton-Pump Inhibitor Exposure Aggravates Clostridium difficile-Associated Colitis: Evidence From a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chou, Po-Han; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Liu, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2015-08-15

    Clostridium difficile is currently the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in hospitalized patients. In addition to the infection due to toxigenic C. difficile in the gastrointestinal tract of susceptible hosts, other predisposing factors for C. difficile infection (CDI) are identified, including advanced age, a prolonged hospital stay, and use of acid-suppressive drugs. Of note, exposure to gastric acid-reducing agents, such as H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), remains a controversial risk factor, and has been associated with CDI in some studies but not in others. A mouse model of antibiotic-associated clostridial colitis was established to examine the role of PPIs for CDI. A mouse model of antibiotic-associated clostridial colitis was set up. NF-κB reporter mice were used to address the in vivo spatial and temporal inflammatory patterns of C. difficile-associated colitis. Serum levels of lipopolysaccharide and dextran-FITC were measured to reflect the barrier permeability of affected intestines. Mice with CDI that were exposed to PPI exhibited greater losses of stool consistency and body and cecal weights than those that were not exposed to PPI. Further, more neutrophilic infiltrations, epithelial damage, and inflammatory cytokine expression were noted in colon specimens of the mice with PPI exposure. More-evident inflammatory responses were detected by in vivo imaging of NF-κB reporter mice with CDI that were exposed to PPI. Gut barrier permeability was increased to a greater extent, as reflected by higher serum levels of lipopolysaccharide and dextran-FITC in mice with CDI that were exposed to PPI. Our mouse model demonstrates that PPI exposure increases the severity of intestinal inflammation in mice with C. difficile-associated colitis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Method for Simultaneous Identification and Toxigenic Type Characterization of Clostridium difficile From Stool Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Abdullah; Alam, Mohammad J; Tisdel, Naradah L; Shah, Dhara N; Yapar, Mehmet; Lasco, Todd M; Garey, Kevin W

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous identification and toxigenic type characterization of Clostridium difficile. The multiplex real-time PCR assay targeted and simultaneously detected triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) and binary toxin (cdtA) genes, and toxin A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) genes in the first and sec tubes, respectively. The results of multiplex real-time PCR were compared to those of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay, targeting the tcdB gene alone. The toxigenic culture was used as the reference, where toxin genes were detected by multiplex real-time PCR. A total of 351 stool samples from consecutive patients were included in the study. Fifty-five stool samples (15.6%) were determined to be positive for the presence of C. difficile by using multiplex real-time PCR. Of these, 48 (87.2%) were toxigenic (46 tcdA and tcdB-positive, two positive for only tcdB) and 11 (22.9%) were cdtA-positive. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) of the multiplex real-time PCR compared with the toxigenic culture were 95.6%, 98.6%, 91.6%, and 99.3%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was determined to be 10(3) colony forming unit (CFU)/g spiked stool sample and 0.0625 pg genomic DNA from culture. Analytical specificity determined by using 15 enteric and non-clostridial reference strains was 100%. The multiplex real-time PCR assay accurately detected C. difficile isolates from diarrheal stool samples and characterized its toxin genes in a single PCR run.

  19. A portrait of the geographic dissemination of the Clostridium difficile North American pulsed-field type 1 strain and the epidemiology of C. difficile-associated disease in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Bruno; Loo, Vivian G; Bourgault, Anne-Marie; Poirier, Louise; Dascal, André; Fortin, Elise; Dionne, Marc; Lorange, Manon

    2007-01-15

    An increase in the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile-associated disease in Québec and the United States has been associated with a hypervirulent strain referred to as North American pulsed-field type 1 (NAP1)/027. In 2005, a prospective study was conducted in 88 Québec hospitals, and 478 consecutive nosocomial isolates of C. difficile were obtained. The isolates were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and detection of binary toxin genes and tcdC gene deletion. Data on patient age and occurrence of complications were collected. PFGE typing of 478 isolates of C. difficile yielded 61 PFGE profiles. Pulsovars A (57%), B (10%), and B1 (8%) were predominant. The PFGE profile of pulsovar A was identical to that of strain NAP1. It showed 67% relatedness with 15 other PFGE patterns, among which 11 had both binary toxin genes and a partial tcdC deletion but different antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Pulsovars B and B1 were identical to strain NAP2/ribotype 001. In hospitals showing a predominant clonal A or B-B1 PFGE pattern, incidence of C. difficile-associated disease was 2 and 1.3 times higher, respectively, than in hospitals without any predominant clonal PFGE pattern. Severe disease was twice as frequent among patients with strains possessing binary toxin genes and tcdC deletion than among patients with strains lacking these virulence factors. This study helped to quantify the impact of strain NAP1 on the incidence and severity of C. difficile-associated disease in Québec in 2005. The identification of the geographic dissemination of this predominant strain may help to focus regional infection-control efforts.

  20. Multicenter clinical evaluation of the portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Blake W; Mackey, Tami-Lea A; Daly, Judy A; Alger, Garrison; Denys, Gerald A; Peterson, Lance R; Kehl, Sue C; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2012-12-01

    We compared the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay, a new semiautomated sample-to-result molecular test, to a toxigenic bacterial culture/cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (TBC/CCNA) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in 549 stool specimens. Stool specimens were also tested by one of three alternative FDA-cleared molecular tests for toxigenic C. difficile (Xpert C. difficile, Illumigene C. difficile, or GeneOhm Cdiff). The sensitivities and specificities of the molecular tests compared to TBC/CCNA were as follows: 98.2% and 92.8% for the Portrait assay, 100% and 91.7% for the Xpert assay, 93.3% and 95.1% for the Illumigene assay, and 97.4% and 98.5% for the GeneOhm assay, respectively. The majority of Portrait false-positive results (20/31; 64.5%) were also positive for C. difficile by an alternative molecular test, suggesting an increased sensitivity compared to the culture-based "gold standard" method. The Portrait test detected an assay input of 30 CFU in 100% of spiked samples and detected an input of 10 CFU in 96.7% of samples tested.

  1. Description and validation of a new automated surveillance system for Clostridium difficile in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaine, M.; Gubbels, S.; Voldstedlund, M.

    2017-01-01

    The surveillance of Clostridium difficile (CD) in Denmark consists of laboratory based data from Departments of Clinical Microbiology (DCMs) sent to the National Registry of Enteric Pathogens (NREP). We validated a new surveillance system for CD based on the Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa). M...... of CD data in MiBa. This nationwide electronic system can greatly strengthen surveillance and research in various applications.......The surveillance of Clostridium difficile (CD) in Denmark consists of laboratory based data from Departments of Clinical Microbiology (DCMs) sent to the National Registry of Enteric Pathogens (NREP). We validated a new surveillance system for CD based on the Danish Microbiology Database (MiBa). Mi......Ba automatically collects microbiological test results from all Danish DCMs. We built an algorithm to identify positive test results for CD recorded in MiBa. A CD case was defined as a person with a positive culture for CD or PCR detection of toxin A and/or B and/or binary toxin. We compared CD cases identified...

  2. Toxin-binding treatment for Clostridium difficile: a review including reports of studies with tolevamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile represents an increasing threat to patients, mainly as a hospital-acquired infection causing antibiotic-associated colitis (AAC). The emergence of a new more virulent strain in North America and Europe has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality. For a long period of time the only available therapeutic options were oral vancomycin and metronidazole. However, both of these antibiotics have limitations either in terms of efficacy, cost, formulation, side effects or the risk of emerging antibiotic resistance among enterococci. Clostridium difficile produces two powerful toxins (A and B) that are responsible for the entire clinical spectrum associated with AAC. As this is exclusively a toxin-mediated disease, agents with the potential of binding these targets have been tested. Data on polymer-based toxin-binding agents such as cholestyramine, Synsorb 90 and tolevamer, designed to target specific bacterial toxins, will be reviewed. Bovine colostrum and specific human monoclonal antibodies aimed at neutralising toxin A, although still at an early stage of development, are also new avenues to be explored. Non-antibiotic-based therapies might become the best available option for a condition almost always caused by antibiotics.

  3. Therapeutic Success of Rifaximin for Clostridium difficile Infection Refractory to Metronidazole and Vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tannous

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 46-year-old white male with confirmed Clostridium difficile infection for >4 weeks after fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient received two courses of metronidazole 500 mg three times daily (t.i.d. during which time diarrhea resolved; however, symptoms recurred 14–15 days after treatment termination. He received a 2-week course of vancomycin 125 mg four times daily, with symptoms recurring 10 days after treatment conclusion. The patient then received a pulsed tapering schedule of vancomycin with adjunctive Saccharomyces boulardii. Diarrhea recurred 12 days after treatment completion. He received rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. while hospitalized for diarrhea-associated complications. Symptoms resolved within 24 h. The patient received a 4-week regimen of rifaximin 400 mg orally t.i.d. after discharge. No further episodes of diarrhea were reported within 6 months after treatment termination. The present case supports the potential benefit of rifaximin for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

  4. Routine Treatment-Resistant Clostridium difficile Infection during Recovery from Myxedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan K. Adamski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of the extreme form of hypothyroidism defined as myxedema is very rare. Acute symptoms and their management have been described in detail previously. However, not much attention has been devoted to therapeutic challenges that are faced in the recovery phase of the treatment, especially pertaining to the gastrointestinal system. The link between myxedema and the appearance of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has not been established so far. A 61-year-old woman with no significant medical record was admitted to hospital because of infected heel pressure and thyroid dysfunction. A week later, due to hypothermia, hypotension, and unconsciousness, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. The clinical picture and the results of laboratory tests confirmed diagnosis of myxedema. After the introduction of resuscitative measures and hormonal substitution, patient’s condition stabilized within 10 days. Due to concomitant sepsis, initially piperacillin/tazobactam and later cefuroxime were administered. After 20 days of antibiotic therapy, the patient developed CDI that was resistant to the routine mode of treatment. The clinical recovery was achieved only after a fecal microbiota transplantation procedure. The function of the digestive tract in myxedema is disturbed by gastric achlorydia and reduced peristalsis, which in turn can predispose the small intestine to overgrowth of bacteria. The use of antibiotics can additionally decrease the intestinal bacterial diversity, favoring the overgrowth of Clostridium difficile. The authors conclude that myxedema may increase the likelihood of a treatment-resistant form of CDI that requires the implementation of fecal microbiota transplantation.

  5. Current challenges in the treatment of severe Clostridium difficile infection: early treatment potential of fecal microbiota transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beurden, Yvette H.; Nieuwdorp, Max; van de Berg, Pablo J. E. J.; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Goorhuis, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a very effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Less is known about the application of FMT as a curative treatment of severe or complicated CDI. In this review, we present and discuss evidence supporting the curative use of

  6. Clinical Characteristics of the Course of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea in Respiratory Infections in Children, the Value of Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Chernyshova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article highlighted the dependence of the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children on risk factors, age, prescribed antibiotics and probiotic preparations; clinical features of its course in children with respiratory infections were shown, Clostridium difficile value was clarified in the etiological structure of diarrhea, associated with antibiotics intake.

  7. A Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectant Containing Germinants Reduces Clostridium difficile Spores on Surfaces by Inducing Susceptibility to Environmental Stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerandzic, Michelle M; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-10-01

    Exposing Clostridium difficile spores to germinants in a quaternary ammonium matrix was an effective method to reduce environmental contamination by sensitizing the spores, leaving them susceptible to ambient conditions and enhancing killing by acid, high-intensity visible light, and radiation.

  8. A Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectant Containing Germinants Reduces Clostridium difficile Spores on Surfaces by Inducing Susceptibility to Environmental Stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Exposing Clostridium difficile spores to germinants in a quaternary ammonium matrix was an effective method to reduce environmental contamination by sensitizing the spores, leaving them susceptible to ambient conditions and enhancing killing by acid, high-intensity visible light, and radiation.

  9. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, S.B.; Bauer, M.P.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness

  10. Faecal microbiota transplantation for recurring Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn's disease and ileorectal anastomosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppfeldt, Asser Mathiassen; Dahlerup, Jens F; Christensen, Lisbet A

    2016-01-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is increasingly being used to treat refractory and recurring Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Although FMT appears to be safe and highly effective in patients with a preserved colon and immunocompetence, its use in patients with inflammatory bowel...

  11. The Effect of Various Inulins and Clostridium difficile on the Metabolic Activity of the Human Colonic Microbiota in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Meyer, P.D.; Venema, K.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of inulins with different average degree of polymerization (ranging from 3 to 25) on the metabolic activity of the human colonic microbiota with or without the addition of Clostridium difficile was investigated in vitro. The in vitro system used was a dynamic, computer-controlled model

  12. A Multi-Center Prospective Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Tool for Severe Clostridium difficile Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Na, Xi

    2015-04-23

    Prediction of severe clinical outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important to inform management decisions for optimum patient care. Currently, treatment recommendations for CDI vary based on disease severity but validated methods to predict severe disease are lacking. The aim of the study was to derive and validate a clinical prediction tool for severe outcomes in CDI.

  13. Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infections and Strain Diversity in Pediatric Hospitals in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saux, Nicole; Gravel, Denise; Mulvey, Michael; Moore, Dorothy; Langley, Joanne M; Richardson, Susan; Quach, Caroline; Choi, Kelly Baekyung; Miller, Mark; Katz, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    Children with healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection were identified. The incidence increased from 3.2/10,000 patient days in 2007 to 5.2/10,000 patient days in 2011 (p < 0.001). Of 169 isolates, the most common North American Pulsed-Field (NAP) types were NAP4 (n = 43; (25.4%), and NAP1 (n = 25;14.8%) while 55 (32.6%) were non-assigned NAP types. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Modeling new immunoregulatory therapeutics as antimicrobial alternatives for treating Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Zoccoli-Rodriguez, Victoria; Stewart, Caroline; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2017-05-01

    The current treatment paradigm in Clostridium difficile infection is the administration of antibiotics contributing to the high rates of recurrent infections. Recent alternative strategies, such as fecal microbiome transplantation and anti-toxin antibodies, have shown similar efficacy in the treatment of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD). However, barriers exist for either treatment or other novel treatments to displace antibiotics as the standard of care. To aid in the comparison of these and future treatments in CDAD, we developed an in silico pipeline to predict clinical efficacy with nonclinical results. The pipeline combines an ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based model, describing the immunological and microbial interactions in the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, with machine learning algorithms to translate simulated output quantities (i.e. time of clearance, quantity of commensal bacteria, T cell ratios) into clinical predictions based on prior preclinical, translational and clinical trial data. As a use case, we compare the efficacy of lanthionine synthetase C-like 2 (LANCL2), a novel immunoregulatory target with promising efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), activation with antibiotics, fecal microbiome transplantation and anti-toxin antibodies in the treatment of CDAD. We further validate the potential of LANCL2 pathway activation, in a mouse model of C. difficile infection in which it displays an ability to decrease weight loss and inflammatory cell types while protecting against mortality. The computational pipeline can serve as an important resource in the development of new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Update of Clostridium difficile infection due to PCR ribotype 027 in Europe, 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kuijper, E J

    2008-07-31

    Outbreaks of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with increased severity, high relapse rate and significant mortality have been related to the emergence of a new, hypervirulent C. difficile strain in North America and Europe. This emerging strain is referred to as PCR ribotype 027 (Type 027). Since 2005, individual countries have developed surveillance studies about the spread of type 027.C. difficile Type 027 has been reported in 16 European countries. It has been responsible for outbreaks in Belgium, Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom (England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland). It has also been detected in Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Hungary, Poland and Spain. Three countries experienced imported patients with CDI due to Type 027 who acquired the infection abroad.The antimicrobial resistance pattern is changing, and outbreaks due to clindamycin-resistant ermB positive Type 027 strains have occurred in three European countries. Ongoing epidemiological surveillance of cases of CDI, with periodic characterisation of the strains involved, is required to detect clustering of cases in time and space and to monitor the emergence of new, highly virulent clones.

  16. Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile PCR-ribotypes exhibit resistance to widely used disinfectants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa F Dawson

    Full Text Available The increased prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has coincided with enhanced transmissibility and severity of disease, which is often linked to two distinct clonal lineages designated PCR-ribotype 027 and 017 responsible for CDI outbreaks in the USA, Europe and Asia. We assessed sporulation and susceptibility of three PCR-ribotypes; 012, 017 and 027 to four classes of disinfectants; chlorine releasing agents (CRAs, peroxygens, quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC and biguanides. The 017 PCR-ribotype, showed the highest sporulation frequency under these test conditions. The oxidizing biocides and CRAs were the most efficacious in decontamination of C. difficile vegetative cells and spores, the efficacy of the CRAs were concentration dependent irrespective of PCR-ribotype. However, there were differences observed in the susceptibility of the PCR-ribotypes, independent of the concentrations tested for Virkon®, Newgenn®, Proceine 40® and Hibiscrub®. Whereas, for Steri7® and Biocleanse® the difference observed between the disinfectants were dependent on both PCR-ribotype and concentration. The oxidizing agent Perasafe® was consistently efficacious across all three PCR ribotypes at varying concentrations; with a consistent five Log10 reduction in spore titre. The PCR-ribotype and concentration dependent differences in the efficacy of the disinfectants in this study indicate that disinfectant choice is a factor for llimiting the survival and transmission of C. difficile spores in healthcare settings.

  17. Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile PCR-ribotypes exhibit resistance to widely used disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Lisa F; Valiente, Esmeralda; Donahue, Elizabeth H; Birchenough, George; Wren, Brendan W

    2011-01-01

    The increased prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has coincided with enhanced transmissibility and severity of disease, which is often linked to two distinct clonal lineages designated PCR-ribotype 027 and 017 responsible for CDI outbreaks in the USA, Europe and Asia. We assessed sporulation and susceptibility of three PCR-ribotypes; 012, 017 and 027 to four classes of disinfectants; chlorine releasing agents (CRAs), peroxygens, quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) and biguanides. The 017 PCR-ribotype, showed the highest sporulation frequency under these test conditions. The oxidizing biocides and CRAs were the most efficacious in decontamination of C. difficile vegetative cells and spores, the efficacy of the CRAs were concentration dependent irrespective of PCR-ribotype. However, there were differences observed in the susceptibility of the PCR-ribotypes, independent of the concentrations tested for Virkon®, Newgenn®, Proceine 40® and Hibiscrub®. Whereas, for Steri7® and Biocleanse® the difference observed between the disinfectants were dependent on both PCR-ribotype and concentration. The oxidizing agent Perasafe® was consistently efficacious across all three PCR ribotypes at varying concentrations; with a consistent five Log10 reduction in spore titre. The PCR-ribotype and concentration dependent differences in the efficacy of the disinfectants in this study indicate that disinfectant choice is a factor for llimiting the survival and transmission of C. difficile spores in healthcare settings.

  18. Temporal differential proteomes of Clostridium difficile in the pig ileal-ligated loop model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavan Janvilisri

    Full Text Available The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI on healthcare is becoming increasingly recognized as it represents a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. A rising number of CDI cases and outbreaks have been reported worldwide. Here, we developed the pig ileal-ligated loop model for semi-quantitative analysis comparing temporal differential proteomes in C. difficile following in vivo incubation with in vitro growth using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ. Proteins retrieved from the in vitro cultures and the loop contents after 4, 8, and 12 h in vivo incubation were subjected to in-solution digestion, iTRAQ labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and statistical analyses. From a total of 1152 distinct proteins identified in this study, 705 proteins were available for quantitative measures at all time points in both biological and technical replicates; 109 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. With analysis of clusters of orthologous group and protein-protein network interactions, we identified the proteins that might play roles in adaptive responses to the host environment, hence enhancing pathogenicity during CDI. This report represents the quantitative proteomic analysis of C. difficile that demonstrates time-dependent protein expression changes under conditions that mimic in vivo infection and identifies potential candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic measures.

  19. Tolevamer, an anionic polymer, neutralizes toxins produced by the BI/027 strains of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkson, Paul L; Dinardo, Carol; DeCiero, Daniel; Klinger, Jeffrey D; Barker, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is caused by the toxins the organism produces when it overgrows in the colon as a consequence of antibiotic depletion of normal flora. Conventional antibiotic treatment of CDAD increases the likelihood of recurrent disease by again suppressing normal bacterial flora. Tolevamer, a novel toxin-binding polymer, was developed to ameliorate the disease without adversely affecting normal flora. In the current study, tolevamer was tested for its ability to neutralize clostridial toxins produced by the epidemic BI/027 strains, thereby preventing toxin-mediated tissue culture cell rounding. The titers of toxin-containing C. difficile culture supernatants were determined using confluent cell monolayers, and then the supernatants were used in assays containing dilutions of tolevamer to determine the lowest concentration of tolevamer that prevented > or =90% cytotoxicity. Tolevamer neutralized toxins in the supernatants of all C. difficile strains tested. Specific antibodies against the large clostridial toxins TcdA and TcdB also neutralized the cytopathic effect, suggesting that tolevamer is specifically neutralizing these toxins and that the binary toxin (whose genes are carried by the BI/027 strains) is not a significant source of cytopathology against tissue culture cells in vitro.

  20. Identification of an epithelial cell receptor responsible for Clostridium difficile TcdB-induced cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Michelle E.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Chandrasekaran, Ramyavardhanee; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. The two main virulence factors of C. difficile are the large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which enter colonic epithelial cells and cause fluid secretion, inflammation, and cell death. Using a gene-trap insertional mutagenesis screen, we identified poliovirus receptor-like 3 (PVRL3) as a cellular factor necessary for TcdB-mediated cytotoxicity. Disruption of PVRL3 expression by gene-trap mutagenesis, shRNA, or CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis resulted in resistance of cells to TcdB. Complementation of the gene-trap or CRISPR mutants with PVRL3 resulted in restoration of TcdB-mediated cell death. Purified PVRL3 ectodomain bound to TcdB by pull-down. Pretreatment of cells with a monoclonal antibody against PVRL3 or prebinding TcdB to PVRL3 ectodomain also inhibited cytotoxicity in cell culture. The receptor is highly expressed on the surface epithelium of the human colon and was observed to colocalize with TcdB in both an explant model and in tissue from a patient with pseudomembranous colitis. These data suggest PVRL3 is a physiologically relevant binding partner that can serve as a target for the prevention of TcdB-induced cytotoxicity in C. difficile infection. PMID:26038560

  1. Fecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile infection in patients with ileal pouches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Nan; Ashburn, Jean; Shen, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Background:Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) has been increasingly recognized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in patients with pouch and CDI. Methods: All consecutive patients that underwent FMT for CDI from 2012 to 2016 were extracted from our IRB-approved, prospectively maintained Registry of Pouch Disorders. The primary outcome was negative stool tests for Clostridium difficile after FMT and the secondary outcomes were symptomatic and endoscopic responses. Results: A total of 13 patients were included in this study, with 10 being Caucasian males (76.9%). All patients had underlying ulcerative colitis for J pouch surgery. After a mean of 2.8±0.8 courses of antibiotic treatments was given and failed, 22 sessions of FMT were administered with an average of 1.7±1.1 sessions each. Within the 22 sessions, 16 were given via pouchoscopy, 4 via esophagogastroduodenoscopy and 2 via enemas. All patients tested negative on C. difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after the initial FMT with a total of 7/12 (58.3%) documented patients showed symptomatic improvements and 3/11 (27.3%) patients showed endoscopic improvement according to the modified Pouchitis Disease Activity Index. During the follow-up of 1.2±1.1 years, there were a total of five patients (38.5%) that had recurrence after the successful initial treatment and four of them were successfully treated again with FMT. Conclusions: FMT appeared to be effective in eradication of CDI in patients with ileal pouches. However, FMT had a modest impact on endoscopic inflammation and recurrence after FMT and recurrence was common.

  2. Structural and functional changes in the gut microbiota associated to Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elena Pérez-Cobas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy is a causative agent of severe disturbances in microbial communities. In healthy individuals, the gut microbiota prevents infection by harmful microorganisms through direct inhibition (releasing antimicrobial compounds, competition, or stimulation of the host’s immune defenses. However, widespread antibiotic use has resulted in short- and long-term shifts in the gut microbiota structure, leading to a loss in colonization resistance in some cases. Consequently, some patients develop Clostridium difficile infection (CDI after taking an antibiotic (AB and, at present, this opportunistic pathogen is one of the main causes of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Here, we analyze the composition and functional differences in the gut microbiota of C. difficile infected (CDI versus non-infected patients, both patient groups having been treated with AB therapy. To do so we used 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic 454-based pyrosequencing approaches. Samples were taken before, during and after AB treatment and were checked for the presence of the pathogen. We performed different analyses and comparisons between infected (CD+ versus non-infected (CD- samples, allowing proposing putative candidate taxa and functions that might protect against C. difficile colonization. Most of these potentially protective taxa belonged to the Firmicutes phylum, mainly to the order Clostridiales, while some candidate protective functions were related to aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and stress response mechanisms. We also found that CDI patients showed, in general, lower diversity and richness than non-infected, as well as an overrepresentation of members of the families Bacteroidaceae, Enterococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae and Clostridium clusters XI and XIVa. Regarding metabolic functions, we detected higher abundance of genes involved in the transport and binding of carbohydrates, ions and others compounds as a response to an antibiotic

  3. Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile protects hamsters against challenge with historic and epidemic strains of toxigenic BI/NAP1/027 C. difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaro, Kristin J; Phillips, S Tyler; Cheknis, Adam K; Sambol, Susan P; Zukowski, Walter E; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2013-11-01

    Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile (NTCD) has been shown to prevent fatal C. difficile infection in the hamster model when hamsters are challenged with standard toxigenic C. difficile strains. The purpose of this study was to determine if NTCD can prevent C. difficile infection in the hamster model when hamsters are challenged with restriction endonuclease analysis group BI C. difficile strains. Groups of 10 hamsters were given oral clindamycin, followed on day 2 by 10(6) CFU of spores of NTCD strain M3 or T7, and were challenged on day 5 with 100 CFU of spores of BI1 or BI6. To conserve animals, results for control hamsters challenged with BI1 or BI6 from the present study and controls from previous identical experiments were combined for statistical comparisons. NTCD strains M3 and T7 achieved 100% colonization and were 100% protective against challenge with BI1 (P ≤ 0.001). M3 colonized 9/10 hamsters and protected against BI6 challenge in the colonized hamsters (P = 0.0003). T7 colonized 10/10 hamsters, but following BI6 challenge, cocolonization occurred in 5 hamsters, 4 of which died, for protection of 6/10 animals (P = 0.02). NTCD colonization provides protection against challenge with toxigenic BI group strains. M3 is more effective than T7 in preventing C. difficile infection caused by the BI6 epidemic strain. Prevention of C. difficile infection caused by the epidemic BI6 strain may be more challenging than that of infections caused by historic BI1 and non-BI C. difficile strains.

  4. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  5. Clostridium difficile infection: main features and occurrence in domestic species in Brazil Infecção por Clostridium difficile: principais características e ocorrência em animais domésticos no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emerging enteropathogen of humans and domestic animals. The bacterium was recently confirmed to be present in foals and dogs in Brazil, with some recent studies suggesting that C. difficile is one of the most important causes of piglet diarrhea in the country. Moreover, some reports also suggest the transmission of this microorganism between animals and humans, raising the possibility that C. difficile is a zoonotic disease. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to describe the main features of C. difficile infection in domestic animals and outline the occurrence of the disease in horses, dogs and pigs in Brazil.Clostridium difficile é considerado um enteropatógeno emergente que acomete humanos e animais domésticos. A presença da doença em equinos e cães já foi relatada no Brasil e trabalhos sugerem que atualmente C. difficile seja um dos principais causadores de diarreia neonatal em suínos no país. Além disso, relatos recentes sugerem a transmissão do agente entre o homem e animais, gerando a hipótese de C. difficile ser um agente zoonótico. Com isso, o presente trabalho tem como objetivo revisar as principais características da doença, além de fornecer dados recentes sobre a ocorrência no Brasil da infecção por C. difficile nas principais espécies de animais domésticos.

  6. A multiplex, internally controlled real-time PCR assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and identification of hypervirulent strain 027/ST-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, A M; Nielsen, J B; Lester, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile and simultaneously identifying C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1 by targeting the toxin genes tcdA, tcdB and cdtA in one reaction and in a separate reaction identifying the Δ...... to confirm the correct identification of the Δ117 deletion in tcdC and C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1, respectively. The PCR assay displayed a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 99.0%, 97.4%, 87.4% and 99.8%, respectively, compared to toxigenic culture on 665 samples evaluable both by PCR and culture....... Sequencing of tcdC, ribotyping and MLST of cultured isolates validated the genotyping assay and confirmed the ability of the assay to correctly identify C. difficile ribotype 027/ST-1 in our current epidemiological setting. We describe the use of a combination of two separate PCR assays for sensitive...

  7. Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host receptor for the binary toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Carette, Jan E; Bell, George W; Schwan, Carsten; Guttenberg, Gregor; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-09-27

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Hypervirulent strains of the pathogen, which are responsible for increased morbidity and mortality of CDI, produce the binary actin-ADP ribosylating toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT) in addition to the Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B. CDT depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton, increases adherence and colonization of Clostridia by induction of microtubule-based cell protrusions and, eventually, causes death of target cells. Using a haploid genetic screen, we identified the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor as the membrane receptor for CDT uptake by target cells. Moreover, we show that Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, which is a related binary actin-ADP ribosylating toxin, enters target cells via the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor. Identification of the toxin receptors is essential for understanding of the toxin uptake and provides a most valuable basis for antitoxin strategies.

  8. Triggering germination represents a novel strategy to enhance killing of Clostridium difficile spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Nerandzic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is the most common cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea in developed countries. Control of C. difficile is challenging because the spores are resistant to killing by alcohol-based hand hygiene products, antimicrobial soaps, and most disinfectants. Although initiation of germination has been shown to increase susceptibility of spores of other bacterial species to radiation and heat, it was not known if triggering of germination could be a useful strategy to increase susceptibility of C. difficile spores to radiation or other stressors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrated that exposure of dormant C. difficile spores to a germination solution containing amino acids, minerals, and taurocholic acid resulted in initiation of germination in room air. Germination of spores in room air resulted in significantly enhanced killing by ultraviolet-C (UV-C radiation and heat. On surfaces in hospital rooms, application of germination solution resulted in enhanced eradication of spores by UV-C administered by an automated room decontamination device. Initiation of germination under anaerobic, but not aerobic, conditions resulted in increased susceptibility to killing by ethanol, suggesting that exposure to oxygen might prevent spores from progressing fully to outgrowth. Stimulation of germination also resulted in reduced survival of spores on surfaces in room air, possibly due to increased susceptibility to stressors such as oxygen and desiccation. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these data demonstrate that stimulation of germination could represent a novel method to enhance killing of spores by UV-C, and suggest the possible application of this strategy as a means to enhance killing by other agents.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brazilian Clostridium difficile strains determined by agar dilution and disk diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Edmir Geraldo; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients worldwide. While metronidazole and vancomycin are the most prescribed antibiotics for the treatment of this infection, teicoplanin, tigecycline and nitazoxanide are alternatives drugs. Knowledge on the antibiotic susceptibility profiles is a basic step to differentiate recurrence from treatment failure due to antimicrobial resistance. Because C. difficile antimicrobial susceptibility is largely unknown in Brazil, we aimed to determine the profile of C. difficile strains cultivated from stool samples of inpatients with diarrhea and a positive toxin A/B test using both agar dilution and disk diffusion methods. All 50 strains tested were sensitive to metronidazole according to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints with an MIC90 value of 2μg/mL. Nitazoxanide and tigecycline were highly active in vitro against these strains with an MIC90 value of 0.125μg/mL for both antimicrobials. The MIC90 were 4μg/mL and 2μg/mL for vancomycin and teicoplanin, respectively. A resistance rate of 8% was observed for moxifloxacin. Disk diffusion can be used as an alternative to screen for moxifloxacin resistance, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and metronidazole susceptibility, but it cannot be used for testing glycopeptides. Our results suggest that C. difficile strains from São Paulo city, Brazil, are susceptible to metronidazole and have low MIC90 values for most of the current therapeutic options available in Brazil. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between sharps disposal containers and Clostridium difficile infections in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika

    2015-10-01

    Sharps disposal containers are ubiquitous in health care facilities; however, there is paucity of data on their potential role in pathogen transmission. This study assessed the relationship between use of single-use versus reusable sharps containers and rates of Clostridium difficile infections in a national sample of hospitals. A 2013 survey of 1,990 hospitals collected data on the use of sharps containers. Responses were linked to the 2012 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset. Bivariate and multivariable negative binomial regression were conducted to examine differences in C difficile rates between hospitals using single-use versus reusable containers. There were 604 hospitals who completed the survey; of these, 539 provided data on use of sharps containers in 2012 (27% response rate). Hospitals had, on average, 289 beds (SD ± 203) and were predominantly non-for-profit (67%) and nonteaching (63%). Most used reusable sharps containers (72%). In bivariate regression, hospitals using single-use containers had significantly lower rates of C difficile versus hospitals using reusable containers (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.846, P = .001). This relationship persisted in multivariable regression (IRR = 0.870, P = .003) after controlling for other hospital characteristics. This is the first study to show a link between use of single-use sharps containers and lower C difficile rates. Future research should investigate the potential for environmental contamination of reusable containers and the role they may play in pathogen transmission. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure-Based Modification of a Clostridium difficile-Targeting Endolysin Affects Activity and Host Range▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Spoerl, Rebecca; Narbad, Arjan; Meijers, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Endolysin CD27L causes cell lysis of the pathogen Clostridium difficile, a major cause of nosocomial infection. We report a structural and functional analysis of the catalytic activity of CD27L against C. difficile and other bacterial strains. We show that truncation of the endolysin to the N-terminal domain, CD27L1–179, gave an increased lytic activity against cells of C. difficile, while the C-terminal region, CD27L180–270, failed to produce lysis. CD27L1–179 also has increased activity against other bacterial species that are targeted by the full-length protein and in addition was able to lyse some CD27L-insensitive strains. However, CD27L1–179 retained a measure of specificity, failing to lyse a wide range of bacteria. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled proteins demonstrated that both CD27L and CD27L1–179 bound to C. difficile cell walls. The crystal structure of CD27L1–179 confirms that the enzyme is a zinc-dependent N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase. A structure-based sequence analysis allowed us to identify four catalytic residues, a proton relay cascade, and a substrate binding pocket. A BLAST search shows that the closest-related amidases almost exclusively target Clostridia. This implied that the catalytic domain alone contained features that target a specific bacterial species. To test this hypothesis, we modified Leu 98 to a Trp residue which is found in an endolysin from a bacteriophage of Listeria monocytogenes (PlyPSA). This mutation in CD27L resulted in an increased activity against selected serotypes of L. monocytogenes, demonstrating the potential to tune the species specificity of the catalytic domain of an endolysin. PMID:21803993

  12. Structure-based modification of a Clostridium difficile-targeting endolysin affects activity and host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Spoerl, Rebecca; Narbad, Arjan; Meijers, Rob

    2011-10-01

    Endolysin CD27L causes cell lysis of the pathogen Clostridium difficile, a major cause of nosocomial infection. We report a structural and functional analysis of the catalytic activity of CD27L against C. difficile and other bacterial strains. We show that truncation of the endolysin to the N-terminal domain, CD27L1-179, gave an increased lytic activity against cells of C. difficile, while the C-terminal region, CD27L180-270, failed to produce lysis. CD27L1-179 also has increased activity against other bacterial species that are targeted by the full-length protein and in addition was able to lyse some CD27L-insensitive strains. However, CD27L1-179 retained a measure of specificity, failing to lyse a wide range of bacteria. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled proteins demonstrated that both CD27L and CD27L1-179 bound to C. difficile cell walls. The crystal structure of CD27L1-179 confirms that the enzyme is a zinc-dependent N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase. A structure-based sequence analysis allowed us to identify four catalytic residues, a proton relay cascade, and a substrate binding pocket. A BLAST search shows that the closest-related amidases almost exclusively target Clostridia. This implied that the catalytic domain alone contained features that target a specific bacterial species. To test this hypothesis, we modified Leu 98 to a Trp residue which is found in an endolysin from a bacteriophage of Listeria monocytogenes (PlyPSA). This mutation in CD27L resulted in an increased activity against selected serotypes of L. monocytogenes, demonstrating the potential to tune the species specificity of the catalytic domain of an endolysin.

  13. Induced Sporicidal Activity of Chlorhexidine against Clostridium difficile Spores under Altered Physical and Chemical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial commonly used to disinfect the skin of patients to reduce the risk of healthcare-associated infections. Because chlorhexidine is not sporicidal, it is not anticipated that it would have an impact on skin contamination with Clostridium difficile, the most important cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea. However, although chlorhexidine is not sporicidal as it is used in healthcare settings, it has been reported to kill spores of Bacillus species under altered physical and chemical conditions that disrupt the spore’s protective barriers (e.g., heat, ultrasonication, alcohol, or elevated pH). Here, we tested the hypothesis that similarly altered physical and chemical conditions result in enhanced sporicidal activity of chlorhexidine against C. difficile spores. Principal Findings C. difficile spores became susceptible to heat killing at 80°C within 15 minutes in the presence of chlorhexidine, as opposed to spores suspended in water which remained viable. The extent to which the spores were reduced was directly proportional to the concentration of chlorhexidine in solution, with no viable spores recovered after 15 minutes of incubation in 0.04%–0.0004% w/v chlorhexidine solutions at 80°C. Reduction of spores exposed to 4% w/v chlorhexidine solutions at moderate temperatures (37°C and 55°C) was enhanced by the presence of 70% ethanol. However, complete elimination of spores was not achieved until 3 hours of incubation at 55°C. Elevating the pH to ≥9.5 significantly enhanced the killing of spores in either aqueous or alcoholic chlorhexidine solutions. Conclusions Physical and chemical conditions that alter the protective barriers of C. difficile spores convey sporicidal activity to chlorhexidine. Further studies are necessary to identify additional agents that may allow chlorhexidine to reach its target within the spore. PMID:25861057

  14. Evaluation of three rapid assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin A and toxin B in stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüssmann, H; Panthel, K; Bader, R-C; Schmitt, C; Schaumann, R

    2007-02-01

    Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease continues to be difficult for clinical microbiology laboratories. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of three enzyme immunoassays for detection of C. difficile toxins A and B: the recently marketed rapid enzyme immunoassay Ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany) and two established enzyme immunoassays, the C. difficile Tox A/B II Assay (TechLab, Blacksburg, VA, USA) and the ProSpecT C. difficile Toxin A/B Microplate Assay (Remel, Lenexa, KS, USA). Stool specimens (n = 383) from patients with a clinical diagnosis of antibiotic-associated diarrhea were examined by these three enzyme immunoassays and were additionally cultured for C. difficile on selective agar. Samples giving discordant enzyme immunoassay results underwent confirmatory testing by tissue culture cytotoxin B assay and by PCR for toxin A (tcdA) and toxin B (tcdB) genes from C. difficile. Using the criteria adopted for this study, 60 (15.7%) samples tested positive for toxins A and/or B. Sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme immunoassays were, respectively, 88.3 and 100% for the TechLab enzyme immunoassay, 91.7 and 100% for the R-Biopharm enzyme immunoassay, and 93.3 and 100% for the Remel enzyme immunoassay. The differences between these results are statistically not significant (p > 0.05). The results show that all three enzyme immunoassays are acceptable tests for the detection of C. difficile toxins A and B directly in fecal specimens or in toxigenic cultures.

  15. Efficacy and Safety of, and Patient Satisfaction with, Colonoscopic-Administered Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Relapsing and Refractory Community- and Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report the efficacy and safety of, and patient satisfaction with, colonoscopic fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT for community- and hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI.

  16. Risk factors for recurrent hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in a Japanese university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikone M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mayu Hikone,1 Yusuke Ainoda,1,2 Sayaka Tago,2 Takahiro Fujita,2 Yuji Hirai,2 Kaori Takeuchi,2 Kyoichi Totsuka31Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh General Hospital, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Kitatama Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a highly prevalent hospital-associated infection. Although most patients respond well to discontinuation of antibiotics, 20%–30% of patients relapse. To initiate early therapeutic measures, the risk factors for recurrent CDI must be identified, although very few Japanese studies have used standard surveillance definitions to identify these risk factors.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with health care facility-onset CDI between August 2011 and September 2013. Patients with diarrhea who were positive for Clostridium difficile (via an enzyme immunoassay were defined as having CDI. Clinical data (eg, demographics, comorbidities, medication, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes were evaluated, and multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors that were associated with recurrent CDI.Results: Seventy-six health care facility-onset CDI cases were identified, with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Fourteen cases (18.4% were recurrent, with 13 patients having experienced a single recurrent episode and one patient having experienced three recurrent episodes. The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 7.9% and 14.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that recurrent patients were more likely to have underlying malignant disease (odds ratio: 7.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–52.2; P=0.03 and a history of intensive care unit hospitalization (odds ratio: 49.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–2,470; P=0.049.Conclusion: Intensive care unit hospitalization and malignancy are risk factors for recurrent

  17. Long-term effects on luminal and mucosal microbiota and commonly acquired taxa in faecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalanka, Jonna; Mattila, Eero; Jouhten, Hanne; Hartman, Jorn; Vos, de Willem M.; Arkkila, Perttu; Satokari, Reetta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI). It restores the disrupted intestinal microbiota and subsequently suppresses C. difficile. The long-term stability of the intestinal microbiota and the recovery of

  18. The vexed relationship between Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease: an assessment of carriage in an outpatient setting among patients in remission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clayton, Evelyn M

    2009-05-01

    Comorbidity with Clostridium difficile may cause diagnostic delay in newly presenting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, trigger relapse in established disease, confound therapies, and serve as an indicator of an underlying defect in innate immunity. Retrospective analyses have suggested community acquisition; to address this we conducted a prospective analysis of C. difficile carriage in IBD patients using molecular methods specifically in an outpatient setting.

  19. The incidence and clinical symptomatology of Clostridium difficile infections in a community setting in a cohort of Danish patients attending general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Holt, H M; Böttiger, B

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is gradually being recognised as a cause of morbidity in the community. We investigated the incidence and clinical characteristics of CDI in a community setting and characterised the C. difficile strains by toxin gene profiling and polymerase chain reaction...

  20. Bacteriophage treatment significantly reduces viable Clostridium difficile and prevents toxin production in an in vitro model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meader, Emma; Mayer, Melinda J; Gasson, Michael J; Steverding, Dietmar; Carding, Simon R; Narbad, Arjan

    2010-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is primarily a nosocomial pathogen, causing thousands of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in the UK each year. In this study, we used a batch fermentation model of a C. difficile colonised system to evaluate the potential of a prophylactic and a remedial bacteriophage treatment regime to control the pathogen. It is shown that the prophylaxis regime was effective at preventing the growth of C. difficile (p = <0.001) and precluded the production of detectable levels of toxins A and B. The remedial treatment regime caused a less profound and somewhat transient decrease in the number of viable C. difficile cells (p = <0.0001), but still resulted in a lower level of toxin production relative to the control. The numbers of commensal bacteria including total aerobes and anaerobes, Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp., Lactobacillus sp., total Clostridium sp., and Enterobacteriaceae were not significantly decreased by this therapy, whereas significant detrimental effects were observed with metronidazole treatment. Our study indicates that phage therapy has potential to be used for the control of C. difficile; it highlights the main benefits of this approach, and some future challenges. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The evaluation of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Aju; Rapose, Alwyn

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a serious reemerging pathogen in Europe and North America. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been of concern over the last decade in view of its significant morbidity and mortality, as well as the high health care costs involved with each case. Although multiple risk factors are known to be associated with CDI, a number of patients develop severe infection even in the absence of known risk factors. CDI is diagnosed by the detection of the toxin A/B in stools by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There is conflicting literature regarding whether any particular group of antibiotics is associated with higher risk for CDI. There is also a tendency to perform repeated stool tests for toxin A/B if the first test is negative. We evaluated 100 consecutive hospitalized patients who tested positive for C. difficile over a one-year period. We performed a retrospective analysis of 100 consecutive patients with CDI admitted to our hospital between July 2008 and June 2009. Patient records were reviewed for risk factors, treatment, and clinical outcomes. We also evaluated the number of stool tests performed for the detection of C. difficile and fecal leukocyte testing in each patient. The majority of the patients were more than 60 years of age (87%). Forty-four percent of patients presented from a nursing facility. More than 50% were on Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) at the time of admission. Co-morbidities in our patients included malignancy in 28%, diabetes mellitus in 25%, and chronic renal disease in 23%. Most of the patients had multiple co-morbidities. Patients who had taken antibiotics in the previous six months constituted 74% of the total study population. A beta-lactam alone or in combination with other antibiotics was prescribed in 48%, quinolones in 13% and clindamycin in 4% of patients. Stool samples were tested only once in 53% of patients and twice or more in 43%. Metronidazole was the initial therapy in 86% of

  2. High prevalence of subclass-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxins in adult cystic fibrosis sera: possible mode of immunoprotection against symptomatic C. difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaghan TM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tanya M Monaghan,1 Ola H Negm,2,3 Brendon MacKenzie,4 Mohamed R Hamed,2,3 Clifford C Shone,5 David P Humphreys,4 K Ravi Acharya,6 Mark H Wilcox7 1Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, NIHR Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, 2Breast Surgery Group, Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine, School of Medicine, Queen’s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; 3Medical Microbiology and Immunology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; 4Antibody Biology, UCB-New Medicines, UCB Celltech, Slough, UK; 5Toxins Group, National Infection Service, Public Health England, Salisbury, UK; 6Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Bath, UK; 7Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Objectives: Despite multiple risk factors and a high rate of colonization for Clostridium difficile, the occurrence of C. difficile infection in patients with cystic fibrosis is rare. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of binding C. difficile toxin-specific immunoglobulin (IgA, IgG and anti-toxin neutralizing antibodies in the sera of adults with cystic fibrosis, symptomatic C. difficile infection (without cystic fibrosis and healthy controls. Methods: Subclass-specific IgA and IgG responses to highly purified whole C. difficile toxins A and B (toxinotype 0, strain VPI 10463, ribotype 087, toxin B from a C. difficile toxin-B-only expressing strain (CCUG 20309 and precursor form of B fragment of binary toxin, pCDTb, were determined by protein microarray. Neutralizing antibodies to C. difficile toxins A and B were evaluated using a Caco-2 cell-based neutralization assay. Results: Serum IgA anti-toxin A and B levels and neutralizing antibodies against toxin A were significantly higher in adult cystic fibrosis patients (n=16 compared with healthy controls (n=17 and

  3. Age can be a Problem: Clostridium difficile and Cytomegalovirus Colitis Coinfection in an Immunocompetent 90-year-old Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsun Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis and cytomegalovirus colitis coinfection has been documented in immunocompromised patients. However, this kind of coinfection has rarely been reported in immunocompetent patient