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Sample records for clostridium beijerinckii clostridium

  1. Emended descriptions of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii, and descriptions of Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keis, S; Shaheen, R; Jones, DT

    2001-01-01

    ... clostridia have been assigned to four species. In this study, the phenotypic characteristics of Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, 'Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum', and an unnamed Clostridium sp...

  2. Improving biohydrogen production using Clostridium beijerinckii immobilized with magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelert, Trevor; Ghosh, Dipankar; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    In order to supplement the need for alternative energy resources within the near future, enhancing the production of biohydrogen with immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB8052 was investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were functionalized, with chitosan and alginic acid polyelectrolytes using a layer-by-layer method, to promote bacterial attachment. Cultivating C. beijerinckii with these nanoparticles resulted in a shorter lag growth phase and increased total biohydrogen production within 100-ml, 250-ml and 3.6-L reactors compared with freely suspended organisms. The greatest hydrogen yield was obtained in the 250-ml reactor with a value of 2.1 ± 0.7 mol H2/mol glucose, corresponding to substrate conversion and energy conversion efficiencies of 52 ± 18 and 10 ± 3 %, respectively. The hydrogen yields obtained using the immobilized bacteria are comparable to values found in literature. However, to make this process viable, further improvements are required to increase the substrate and energy conversion efficiencies.

  3. CRISPR-based genome editing and expression control systems in Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Jun; Minton, Nigel P; Zhang, Ying; Wen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinle; Yang, Haifeng; Zeng, Zhe; Ren, Xiaodan; Yang, Junjie; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Solventogenic clostridia are important industrial microorganisms that produce various chemicals and fuels. Effective genetic tools would facilitate physiological studies aimed both at improving our understanding of metabolism and optimizing solvent productivity through metabolic engineering. Here we have developed an all-in-one, CRISPR-based genome editing plasmid, pNICKclos, that can be used to achieve successive rounds of gene editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 with efficiencies varying from 6.7% to 100% and 18.8% to 100%, respectively. The plasmid specifies the requisite target-specific guide RNA, the gene encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nickase and the genome editing template encompassing the gene-specific homology arms. It can be used to create single target mutants within three days, with a further two days required for the curing of the pNICKclos plasmid ready for a second round of mutagenesis. A S. pyogenes dCas9-mediated gene regulation control system, pdCASclos, was also developed and used in a CRISPRi strategy to successfully repress the expression of spo0A in C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii. The combined application of the established high efficiency CRISPR-Cas9 based genome editing and regulation control systems will greatly accelerate future progress in the understanding and manipulation of metabolism in solventogenic clostridia. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Butanol production from wheat straw hydrolysate using Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nasib; Saha, Badal C; Cotta, Michael A

    2007-11-01

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) in batch cultures using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation 48.9 g L(-1) glucose (initial sugar 62.0 g L(-1)) was used to produce 20.1 g L(-1) ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1) and 0.41, respectively. In a similar experiment where WSH (60.2 g L(-1) total sugars obtained from hydrolysis of 86 g L(-1) wheat straw) was used, the culture produced 25.0 g L(-1) ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.60 g L(-1 )h(-1) and 0.42, respectively. These results are superior to the control experiment and productivity was improved by 214%. When WSH was supplemented with 35 g L(-1) glucose, a reactor productivity was improved to 0.63 g L(-1 )h(-1) with a yield of 0.42. In this case, ABE concentration in the broth was 28.2 g L(-1). When WSH was supplemented with 60 g L(-1) glucose, the resultant medium containing 128.3 g L(-1) sugars was successfully fermented (due to product removal) to produce 47.6 g L(-1) ABE, and the culture utilized all the sugars (glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose). These results demonstrate that C. beijerinckii P260 has excellent capacity to convert biomass derived sugars to solvents and can produce over 28 g L(-1) (in one case 41.7 g L(-1) from glucose) ABE from WSH. Medium containing 250 g L(-1) glucose resulted in no growth and no ABE production. Mixtures containing WSH + 140 g L(-1) glucose (total sugar approximately 200 g L(-1)) showed poor growth and poor ABE production.

  5. Enhanced butanol production by coculture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Ai, Hongxia; Zhang, Shexi; Li, Shuang; Liang, Zexin; Wu, Zhen-Qiang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2013-09-01

    Cocultures of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum in free-cell and immobilized-cell fermentation modes were investigated as a means of enhancing butanol production. The immobilized fermentation was performed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB). The results demonstrated that two-strain coculture significantly enhanced butanol production, yield and volumetric productivity compared with those in pure culture with or without butyric acid. Further, continuous immobilized-cell cocultures in two FBBs using glucose, cassava starch, or cane molasses were conducted at a dilution rate of 0.144 h(-1). The butanol production (6.66 g/L), yield (0.18 g/g), and productivity (0.96 g/L/h) were obtained with cassava starch as the substrate. Meanwhile, the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) yield (0.36 g/g) was the highest among all processes investigated, suggesting that this continuous coculture mode may be suitable for industrial ABE production with no need for repeated sterilization and inoculation.

  6. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Máté De Gérando, H.; Fayolle-Guichard, F.; Rudant, L.; Millah, S.K.; Monot, F.; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of putat

  7. Reclassification of non-type strain Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598 as Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-598.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, Karel; Kolek, Jan; Provaznik, Ivo; Patakova, Petra

    2017-02-20

    The complete genome sequence of non-type strain Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598 was introduced last year; it is an oxygen tolerant, spore-forming, mesophilic heterofermentative bacterium with high hydrogen production and acetone-butanol fermentation ability. The basic genome statistics have shown its similarity to C. beijerinckii rather than the C. pasteurianum species. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the strain with several other complete clostridial genome sequences. Besides a 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, digital DNA-DNA hybridization (dDDH) and phylogenomic analysis confirmed an inaccuracy of the taxonomic status of strain Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598. Therefore, we suggest its reclassification to be Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-598. This is a specific strain and is not identical to other C. beijerinckii strains. This misclassification explains its unexpected behavior, different from other C. pasteurianum strains; it also permits better understanding of the bacterium for a future genetic manipulation that might increase its biofuel production potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a triplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Stefano; Cremonesi, Paola; Silvetti, Tiziana; Castiglioni, Bianca; Brasca, Milena

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium tyrobutyricum are considered the leading bacteria implicated in late blowing defects affecting semi-hard and hard cheese production. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex Real-Time PCR (qPCR) analysis for a rapid and simultaneous detection of C. beijerinckii, C. sporogenes and C. tyrobutyricum, using specific primers respectively targeting the nifH, gerAA and enr genes. The limits of detection in raw milk were 300 CFU/50 mL in the case of C. beijerinckii, 2 CFU/50 mL for C. sporogenes and 5 CFU/50 mL for C. tyrobutyricum spores. The qPCR method was applied to artificially contaminated raw milk samples, and molecular quantification showed good correlation (R(2) = 0.978) with microbiological counting. Our results demonstrate that this method, combined with a DNA extraction protocol optimized for spore lysis, could be a useful tool for the direct quantification of the considered clostridia species.

  9. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria...... digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility...... of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development...

  10. Expression Analysis of Genes in the Nif Cluster of Clostridium beijerinckii

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The nif genes of Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 occupy a region of about 16 kilobases. Besides the two glnB-like genes, five other genes are interspersed between the nifNB and the nifVw genes. An expression analysis of the nif genes in nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing cells with probes generated from various regions of the nif cluster by northern blot analysis revealed the presence of four different transcripts in nitrogen-fixing cells. Two of these transcripts had the predicted si...

  11. Soy molasses as fermentation substrate for production of butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, N; Lolas, A; Blaschek, H P

    2001-05-01

    Spray-dried soy molasses (SDSM) contains the sugars dextrose, sucrose, fructose, pinitol, raffinose, verbascose, melibiose, and stachyose. Of the 746 g kg(-1) total sugars in SDSM, 434 g kg(-1) is fermentable using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101. SDSM was used to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by C. beijerinckii BA101 in batch cultures. Using 80 g l(-1) SDSM, 10.7 g l(-1) ABE was produced in P2 medium. Higher concentrations of SDSM resulted in poor solvent production due to the presence of excessive salt and inhibitory components. C. beijerinckii BA101 in SDSM at 80 g l(-1) concentration produced 22.8 g l(-1) ABE when supplemented with 25.3 g l(-1) glucose. SDSM contains 57.4 g kg(-1) mineral ash and 2% tri-calcium phosphate. Tri-calcium phosphate up to 43.1 g l(-1) was not inhibitory and at a tri-calcium phosphate concentration of 28.8 g l(-1), the culture produced more solvents (30.1 g l(-1)) than the control experiment (23.8 g l(-1)). In contrast, sodium chloride was a strong inhibitor of C. beijerinckii BA101 cell growth. At a concentration of 10 g l(-1) sodium chloride, a maximum cell concentration of 0.6 g l(-1) was achieved compared to 1.7 g l(-1) in the control experiment. The effects of two salts on specific growth rate constant (mu) and specific rate of ABE production (nu) for C. beijerinckii BA101 were examined.

  12. Process integration for simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR): Production of butanol from corn stover using Clostridium beijerinckii P260

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR) process was developed for production of acetone butanol ethanol (AB or ABE), of which butanol is the main product, from corn stover employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Of the 86 gL^-1^ corn stover, over 97% of the sugars were r...

  13. Genome Sequence of the Solvent-Producing Clostridium beijerinckii Strain 59B, Isolated from Staffordshire Garden Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Gareth T.; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of the solvent-producing, spore-forming, saccharolytic, mesophilic bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii strain 59B, isolated from Staffordshire garden soil, was obtained via a combination of sequencing with the 454 and Illumina platforms. This information will allow for metabolic engineering of a potentially industrially useful strain.

  14. Functional analysis of the gene cluster involved in production of the bacteriocin circularin A by Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 25752

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, R; Jonker, M; Nauta, A; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J

    2003-01-01

    A region of 12 kb flanking the structural gene of the cyclic antibacterial peptide circularin A of Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 25752 was sequenced, and the putative proteins involved in the production and secretion of circularin A were identified. The genes are tightly organized in overlapping ope

  15. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérando, H Máté de; Fayolle-Guichard, F; Rudant, L; Millah, S K; Monot, F; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A M

    2016-06-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of putatively improved strains was done by submitting the mutants to toxic levels of inhibitory chemicals or by screening for their tolerance to isopropanol (>35 g/L). Suicide substrates, such as ethyl or methyl bromobutyrate or alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors like allyl alcohol, were tested and, finally, 36 mutants were isolated. The fermentation profiles of these NTG mutant strains were characterized, and the best performing mutants were used for consecutive rounds of genome shuffling. Screening of strains with further enhancement in isopropanol tolerance at each recursive shuffling step was then used to spot additionally improved strains. Three highly tolerant strains were finally isolated and able to withstand up to 50 g/L isopropanol on plates. Even if increased tolerance to the desired end product was not always accompanied by higher production capabilities, some shuffled strains showed increased solvent titers compared to the parental strains and the original C. beijerinckii DSM 6423. This study confirms the efficiency of genome shuffling to generate improved strains toward a desired phenotype such as alcohol tolerance. This tool also offers the possibility of obtaining improved strains of Clostridium species for which targeted genetic engineering approaches have not been described yet.

  16. Identification, purification and characterization of furfural transforming enzymes from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ujor, Victor; Wick, Macdonald; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-06-01

    Generation of microbial inhibitory compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is a formidable roadblock to fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars to butanol. Bioabatement offers a cost effective strategy to circumvent this challenge. Although Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 can transform 2-3 g/L of furfural and HMF to their less toxic alcohols, higher concentrations present in biomass hydrolysates are intractable to microbial transformation. To delineate the mechanism by which C. beijerinckii detoxifies furfural and HMF, an aldo/keto reductase (AKR) and a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) found to be over-expressed in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami™ B(DE3)pLysS, and purified by histidine tag-assisted immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Protein gel analysis showed that the molecular weights of purified AKR and SDR are close to the predicted values of 37 kDa and 27 kDa, respectively. While AKR has apparent Km and Vmax values of 32.4 mM and 254.2 mM s(-1) respectively, using furfural as substrate, SDR showed lower Km (26.4 mM) and Vmax (22.6 mM s(-1)) values on the same substrate. However, AKR showed 7.1-fold higher specific activity on furfural than SDR. Further, both AKR and SDR were found to be active on HMF, benzaldehyde, and butyraldehyde. Both enzymes require NADPH as a cofactor for aldehydes reduction. Based on these results, it is proposed that AKR and SDR are involved in the biotransformation of furfural and HMF by C. beijerinckii.

  17. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); He, Yan, E-mail: yhe2006@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Feng, Xiaoli [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liang, Luyi [Experiment Teaching Center for Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Brookes, Philip C.; Wu, Jianjun [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-03-01

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants.

  18. Enhanced butanol production by immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461 using zeolite 13X as a carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichuviwat, Rapeephat; Boonsombuti, Akarin; Luengnaruemitchai, Apanee; Wongkasemjit, Sujitra

    2014-11-01

    Butanol production by cell immobilization onto porous materials-brick and zeolite 13X-was investigated using Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461. Characterization results of two materials were completed to evaluate their potential as an immobilization carrier. Although zeolite has greater porosity than brick, it cannot be used for cell aggregation without treating with chemical. After immobilization, both materials can enhance butanol titers from 5.29 to 5.80g/L and 8.58g/L using brick and zeolite, respectively. Butanol to glucose yield also improved from 0.14 to 0.16g/g after immobilization. It was found that butanol production significantly increased due to an increase in buffering capacity, strong bonding between the zeolite surface and cell, and butanol tolerance. In addition, repeated batch fermentation was performed, demonstrating that cells immobilized onto zeolite 13X have high stability and potential for long-term use in continuous fermentation.

  19. Continuous production of isopropanol and butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survase, Shrikant A; Jurgens, German; van Heiningen, Adriaan; Granström, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 was studied using different continuous production methods to give maximum and stable production of isopropanol and n-butanol. In a single-stage continuous culture, when wood pulp was added as a cell holding material, we could increase the solvent productivity from 0.47 to 5.52 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹ with the yield of 54% from glucose. The overall solvent concentration of 7.51 g L⁻¹ (39.4% isopropanol and 60.6% n-butanol) with the maximum solvent productivity of 0.84 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹ was obtained with two-stage continuous culture. We were able to run the process for more than 48 overall retention times without losing the ability to produce solvents.

  20. Evaluation of biobutanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-592 using sweet sorghum as carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Jardel Visioli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research it was evaluated the production of biobutanol by Clostridium beijerinckiiNRRL B-592 using sweet sorghum juice as carbon source. Operational variables, like pH and initial inoculum size, as well as supplementation of industrial media with yeast extract and tryptone, were evaluated. The maximum butanol obtained was 2.12g kg-1 using 12.5% of inoculum size, 0.05g 100mL-1 of tryptone and 0.1g 100mL-1 of yeast extract and initial pH of 5.5. The main contribution of this research was to show a systematic procedure for development of a low cost industrial media for biobutanol production from sweet sorghum.

  1. Ex situ product recovery for enhanced butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Eom, Moon-Ho; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-05-01

    In situ butanol recovery fermentation has been intensively studied as an effective alternative to conventional butanol production, which is limited due to the cellular toxicity of butanol. However, the low biocompatibility of adsorbents often leads to failure of in situ recovery fermentations. In this study, Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was cultured in flasks without shaking and in situ recovery fermentation was performed by using an adsorbent L493. The amounts of acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) increased by 34.4 % in the presence of the adsorbent. In contrast, cell growth and production of organic acids and ABE were retarded in the 7-L batch fermentations with in situ butanol recovery. Cell damage occurred in the fermentor upon agitation in the presence of the adsorbent, unlike in static flask cultures with in situ recovery. Ex situ recovery fermentation using circulation of fermentation broth after mid-exponential phase of cell growth was developed to avoid adsorbent-cell incompatibility. No apparent cell damage was observed and 25.7 g/L of ABE was produced from 86.2 g/L glucose in the fed-batch mode using 7 L fermentors. Thus, ex situ recovery fermentation with C. beijerinckii is effective for enhancing butanol fermentation.

  2. Enhanced butanol production in a microbial electrolysis cell by Clostridium beijerinckii IB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ai-Yong; Yin, Chun-Yan; Xu, Hao; Kong, Xiang-Ping; Xue, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Jing; Jiang, Min; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Reducing power such as NADH is an essential factor for acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium spp. The objective of this study was to increase available NADH in Clostridium beijerinckii IB4 by a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with an electron carrier to enhance butanol production. First of all, a MEC was performed without electron carrier to study the function of cathodic potential applying. Then, various electron carriers were tested, and neutral red (NR)-amended cultures showed an increase of butanol concentration. Optimal NR concentration (0.1 mM) was used to add in a MEC. Electricity stimulated the cell growth obviously and dramatically diminished the fermentation time from 40 to 28 h. NR and electrically reduced NR improved the final butanol concentration and inhibited the acetone generation. In the MEC with NR, the butanol concentration, yield, proportion and productivity were increased by 12.2, 17.4, 7.2 and 60.3 %, respectively. To further understand the mechanisms of NR, cathodic potential applying and electrically reduced NR, NADH and NAD(+) levels, ATP levels and hydrogen production were determined. NR and electrically reduced NR also improved ATP levels and the ratio of NADH/NAD(+), whereas they decreased hydrogen production. Thus, the MEC is an efficient method for enhancing the butanol production.

  3. Purification and characterization of a primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from two strains of Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, A A; Zhu, C X; Colby, G D; Chen, J S

    1993-01-01

    Two primary alcohols (1-butanol and ethanol) are major fermentation products of several clostridial species. In addition to these two alcohols, the secondary alcohol 2-propanol is produced to a concentration of about 100 mM by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii. An alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been purified to homogeneity from two strains (NRRL B593 and NESTE 255) of 2-propanol-producing C. beijerinckii. When exposed to air, the purified ADH was stable, whereas the partially purified ADH was inactivated. The ADHs from the two strains had similar structural and kinetic properties. Each had a native M(r) of between 90,000 and 100,000 and a subunit M(r) of between 38,000 and 40,000. The ADHs were NADP(H) dependent, but a low level of NAD(+)-linked activity was detected. They were equally active in reducing aldehydes and 2-ketones, but a much lower oxidizing activity was obtained with primary alcohols than with secondary alcohols. The kcat/Km value for the alcohol-forming reaction appears to be a function of the size of the larger alkyl substituent on the carbonyl group. ADH activities measured in the presence of both acetone and butyraldehyde did not exceed activities measured with either substrate present alone, indicating a common active site for both substrates. There was no similarity in the N-terminal amino acid sequence between that of the ADH and those of fungi and several other bacteria. However, the N-terminal sequence had 67% identity with those of two other anaerobes, Thermoanaerobium brockii and Methanobacterium palustre. Furthermore, conserved glycine and tryptophan residues are present in ADHs of these three anaerobic bacteria and ADHs of mammals and green plants. Images PMID:8349550

  4. Genome-wide dynamic transcriptional profiling in clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 using single-nucleotide resolution RNA-Seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium beijerinckii is a prominent solvent-producing microbe that has great potential for biofuel and chemical industries. Although transcriptional analysis is essential to understand gene functions and regulation and thus elucidate proper strategies for further strain improvement, limited information is available on the genome-wide transcriptional analysis for C. beijerinckii. Results The genome-wide transcriptional dynamics of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 over a batch fermentation process was investigated using high-throughput RNA-Seq technology. The gene expression profiles indicated that the glycolysis genes were highly expressed throughout the fermentation, with comparatively more active expression during acidogenesis phase. The expression of acid formation genes was down-regulated at the onset of solvent formation, in accordance with the metabolic pathway shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. The acetone formation gene (adc, as a part of the sol operon, exhibited highly-coordinated expression with the other sol genes. Out of the > 20 genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase in C. beijerinckii, Cbei_1722 and Cbei_2181 were highly up-regulated at the onset of solventogenesis, corresponding to their key roles in primary alcohol production. Most sporulation genes in C. beijerinckii 8052 demonstrated similar temporal expression patterns to those observed in B. subtilis and C. acetobutylicum, while sporulation sigma factor genes sigE and sigG exhibited accelerated and stronger expression in C. beijerinckii 8052, which is consistent with the more rapid forespore and endspore development in this strain. Global expression patterns for specific gene functional classes were examined using self-organizing map analysis. The genes associated with specific functional classes demonstrated global expression profiles corresponding to the cell physiological variation and metabolic pathway switch. Conclusions The results from this

  5. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detoxification of model phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysates with peroxidase for butanol production from Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae Haeng; Lee, Yun Jie; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the peroxidase-catalyzed detoxification of model phenolic compounds and evaluated the inhibitory effects of the detoxified solution on butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii National Collection of Industrial and Marine Bacteria Ltd. 8052. The six phenolic compounds, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringaldehyde, and vanillin, were selected as model fermentation inhibitors generated during pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulose. The enzyme reaction was optimized as a function of the reaction conditions of pH, peroxidase concentration, and hydrogen peroxide to substrate ratio. Most of the tested phenolics have a broad optimum pH range of 6.0 to 9. Removal efficiency increased with the molar ratio of H(2)O(2) to each compound up to 0.5-1.25. In the case of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vanillic acid, and vanillin, the removal efficiency was almost 100% with only 0.01 microM of enzyme. The tested phenolic compounds (1 g/L) inhibited cell growth by 64-74%, while completely inhibiting the production of butanol. Although syringaldehyde and vanillin were less toxic on cell growth, the level of inhibition on the butanol production was quite different. The detoxified solution remarkably improved cell growth and surprisingly increased butanol production to the level of the control. Hence, our present study, using peroxidase for the removal of model phenolic compounds, could be applied towards the detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates for butanol fermentation.

  7. Allopurinol-mediated lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitor tolerance by Clostridium beijerinckii during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-04-01

    In addition to glucans, xylans, and arabinans, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates contain significant levels of nonsugar components that are toxic to the microbes that are typically used to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. To enhance the tolerance of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE)-generating Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to these lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs; e.g., furfural), we have been examining different metabolic perturbation strategies to increase the cellular reductant pools and thereby facilitate detoxification of LDMICs. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the effect of allopurinol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H-generating xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), on C. beijerinckii grown in furfural-supplemented medium and found that it unexpectedly increased the rate of detoxification of furfural by 1.4-fold and promoted growth, butanol, and ABE production by 1.2-, 2.5-, and 2-fold, respectively. Since NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) levels in C. beijerinckii were largely unchanged upon allopurinol treatment, we postulated and validated a possible basis in DNA repair to account for the solventogenic gains with allopurinol. Following the observation that supplementation of allopurinol in the C. beijerinckii growth media mitigates the toxic effects of nalidixic acid, a DNA-damaging antibiotic, we found that allopurinol elicited 2.4- and 6.7-fold increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases, key purine-salvage enzymes. Consistent with this finding, addition of inosine (a precursor of hypoxanthine) and xanthine led to 1.4- and 1.7-fold increase in butanol production in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii. Taken together, our results provide a purine salvage-based rationale for the unanticipated effect of allopurinol in improving furfural tolerance of the ABE-fermenting C. beijerinckii.

  8. Modulation of the Acetone/Butanol Ratio during Fermentation of Corn Stover-derived Hydrolysate by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-Yong; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Ze-Jie; Zhang, Yong-Yu; Li, Fu-Li

    2017-01-27

    Producing biobutanol from lignocellulosic biomass has shown promise to ultimately reduce greenhouse gases and alleviate the global energy crisis. However, because of the recalcitrance of a lignocellulosic biomass, a pretreatment of the substrate is needed which in many cases releases soluble lignin compounds (SLCs), which inhibit growth of butanol-producing clostridia. In this study, we found that SLCs changed the acetone/butanol ratio (A/B ratio) during butanol fermentation. The typical A/B molar ratio during Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 batch fermentation with glucose as the carbon source is about 0.5. In the present study, the A/B molar ratio during batch fermentation with a lignocellulosic hydrolysate as the carbon source was 0.95 at the end of fermentation. Structural and redox potential changes of the SLCs were characterized before and after fermentation by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and electrochemical analyses, which indicated that some exogenous SLCs were involved in distributing electron flow to C. beijerinckii, leading to modulation of the redox balance. This was further demonstrated by the NADH/NAD(+) ratio and trxB gene expression profile assays at the onset of solventogenic growth. As a result, the A/B ratio of end-products changed significantly during C. beijerinckii fermentation using corn stover-derived hydrolysate as the carbon source compared to that with glucose. These results revealed that SLCs not only inhibited cell growth, but also modulated the A/B ratio during C. beijerinckii butanol fermentation.

  9. Continuous butanol fermentation and feed starch retrogradation: butanol fermentation sustainability using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeji, T C; Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    2005-01-26

    Use of starch solution as feed for butanol bioconversion processes employing Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 may have added economic advantage over the use of glucose. Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced from 30 gL(-1) starch solution using a continuous process. The bioreactor was fed at a dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1) and starch solution/feed volume (3 L) was replaced every 72 h. The continuous reactor fed with cornstarch solution (feed temperature 19 degrees C) produced approximately 6.0 gL(-1) total ABE. Increasing the feed storage temperature to 37 degrees C improved ABE production to 7.2 gL(-1) suggesting that retrogradation was occurring more rapidly at 19 degrees C. In both these cases the fermentation drifted toward acid production after approximately 260 h, consistent with the retrogradation of starch overtime. The use of soluble starch, which is less prone to retrogradation, resulted in the production of 9.9 gL(-1) ABE at 37 degrees C feed storage temperature, as compared to 7.2 gL(-1) ABE when cornstarch was used. It should be noted that gelatinized starch retrogradation takes place after sterilization and prior to use of the feed medium, and does not occur during long-term storage of the raw corn material in the months leading up to processing. The degree of hydrolysis of gelatinized starch decreased from 68.8 to 56.2% in 3 days when stored at 37 degrees C. Soluble starch which does not retrograde demonstrated no change in the degree of hydrolysis.

  10. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium beijerinckii sequential culture: effect of feedstock particle size on gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermentation of cellulosic biomass can be done in a single step with cellulolytic, solventogenic bacteria, such as Clostridium thermocellum. However, the suite of products is limited in consolidated bioprocessing. Fortunately, the thermophilic nature of C. thermocellum can be exploited in sequenti...

  11. Glycerol supplementation of the growth medium enhances in situ detoxification of furfural by Clostridium beijerinckii during butanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural adversely affect fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity on fermenting microbes. To harness the potential of lignocellulose as a cheap source of fermentable sugars, in situ detoxification of furfural and other lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors is essential. To enhance in situ detoxification and tolerance of furfural by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, the effect of glycerol on NADH/NADPH generation and ABE production by furfural (4, 5, and 6 g/L)-challenged cultures was investigated in this study. In all instances, beneficial outcomes were observed. For example, the fermentation medium supplemented with glycerol and subjected to 5 g/L furfural elicited up to 1.8- and 3-fold increases, respectively, in NADH and NADPH levels in C. beijerinckii 8052 relative to the control culture. These critical changes are the likely underpinnings for the glycerol-mediated 2.3-fold increase in the rate of detoxification of 5 g/L furfural, substrate consumption, and ABE production compared to the unsupplemented medium. Collectively, these results demonstrate that increased intracellular NADH/NADPH in C. beijerinckii 8052 due to glycerol utilization engenders favorable effects on many aspects of cellular metabolism, including enhanced furfural reduction and increased ABE production.

  12. Artificial symbiosis for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs by co-culture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium cellulovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Mianbin; Lin, Yijun; Yang, Lirong; Lin, Jianping; Cen, Peilin

    2014-07-15

    Butanol is an industrial commodity and also considered to be a more promising gasoline substitute compared to ethanol. Renewed attention has been paid to solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production from the renewable and inexpensive substrates, for example, lignocellulose, on account of the depletion of oil resources, increasing gasoline prices and deteriorating environment. Limited to current tools for genetic manipulation, it is difficult to develop a genetically engineered microorganism with combined ability of lignocellulose utilization and solvents production. Mixed culture of cellulolytic microorganisms and solventogenic bacteria provides a more convenient and feasible approach for ABE fermentation due to the potential for synergistic utilization of the metabolic pathways of two organisms. But few bacteria pairs succeeded in producing biobutanol of high titer or high productivity without adding butyrate. The aim of this work was to use Clostridium cellulovorans 743B to saccharify lignocellulose and produce butyric acid, instead of adding cellulase and butyric acid to the medium, so that the soluble sugars and butyric acid generated can be subsequently utilized by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to produce butanol in one pot reaction. A stable artificial symbiotic system was constructed by co-culturing a celluloytic, anaerobic, butyrate-producing mesophile (C. cellulovorans 743B) and a non-celluloytic, solventogenic bacterium (C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052) to produce solvents by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) with alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs (AECC), a low-cost renewable feedstock, as the sole carbon source. Under optimized conditions, the co-culture degraded 68.6 g/L AECC and produced 11.8 g/L solvents (2.64 g/L acetone, 8.30 g/L butanol and 0.87 g/L ethanol) in less than 80 h. Besides, a real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was performed to study the dynamics of the abundance of each strain during the co

  13. Artificial symbiosis for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs by co-culture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium cellulovorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Butanol is an industrial commodity and also considered to be a more promising gasoline substitute compared to ethanol. Renewed attention has been paid to solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production from the renewable and inexpensive substrates, for example, lignocellulose, on account of the depletion of oil resources, increasing gasoline prices and deteriorating environment. Limited to current tools for genetic manipulation, it is difficult to develop a genetically engineered microorganism with combined ability of lignocellulose utilization and solvents production. Mixed culture of cellulolytic microorganisms and solventogenic bacteria provides a more convenient and feasible approach for ABE fermentation due to the potential for synergistic utilization of the metabolic pathways of two organisms. But few bacteria pairs succeeded in producing biobutanol of high titer or high productivity without adding butyrate. The aim of this work was to use Clostridium cellulovorans 743B to saccharify lignocellulose and produce butyric acid, instead of adding cellulase and butyric acid to the medium, so that the soluble sugars and butyric acid generated can be subsequently utilized by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to produce butanol in one pot reaction. Results A stable artificial symbiotic system was constructed by co-culturing a celluloytic, anaerobic, butyrate-producing mesophile (C. cellulovorans 743B) and a non-celluloytic, solventogenic bacterium (C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052) to produce solvents by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) with alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs (AECC), a low-cost renewable feedstock, as the sole carbon source. Under optimized conditions, the co-culture degraded 68.6 g/L AECC and produced 11.8 g/L solvents (2.64 g/L acetone, 8.30 g/L butanol and 0.87 g/L ethanol) in less than 80 h. Besides, a real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was performed to study the dynamics of the abundance of each strain

  14. Transcriptional Analysis of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and the Hyper-Butanol-Producing Mutant BA101 during the Shift from Acidogenesis to Solventogenesis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Blaschek, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii is an anaerobic bacterium used for the fermentative production of acetone and butanol. The recent availability of genomic sequence information for C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 has allowed for an examination of gene expression during the shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis over the time course of a batch fermentation using a ca. 500-gene set DNA microarray. The microarray was constructed using a collection of genes which are orthologs of members of gene families previously found to be important to the physiology of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Similar to the onset of solventogenesis in C. acetobutylicum 824, the onset of solventogenesis in C. beijerinckii 8052 was concurrent with the initiation of sporulation. However, forespores and endospores developed more rapidly in C. beijerinckii 8052 than in C. acetobutylicum 824, consistent with the accelerated expression of the sigE- and sigG-regulated genes in C. beijerinckii 8052. The comparison of gene expression patterns and morphological changes in C. beijerinckii 8052 and the hyper-butanol-producing C. beijerinckii strain BA101 indicated that BA101 was less efficient in sporulation and phosphotransferase system-mediated sugar transport than 8052 but that it exhibited elevated expression of several primary metabolic genes and chemotaxis/motility genes. PMID:18849451

  15. Outgrowth inhibition of Clostridium beijerinckii spores by a bacteriocin-producing lactic culture in ovine milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sonia; Avila, Marta; Arias, Ramón; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2011-10-17

    In the manufacture of model cheeses, ovine milk was deliberately contaminated with spores of Clostridium beijerinckii INIA 63, a wild isolate from Manchego cheese with late blowing defect, and inoculated with nisin- and lacticin 481-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 as starter, to test its potential to prevent the late blowing defect, or with L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415-2, a spontaneous mutant not producing bacteriocins. Cheeses made individually with the lactococcal strains, without clostridial spores, served as controls. Cheese made with clostridial spores and L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415-2 showed late blowing defect after 120days of ripening. Spoilt cheese also showed lower concentrations of lactic acid, and higher levels of acetic, propionic and butyric acids, and of other volatile compounds such as 2-propanol and 1-butanol, than control cheese. In addition, cheese made with the bacteriocin producer did not show any late blowing symptoms, despite its spore counts similar to those of blown cheese, pointing to outgrowth inhibition of C. beijerinckii spores by bacteriocins. Besides, cheese made with the bacteriocin producer showed similar concentrations of lactic acid and volatile compounds than control cheese. Inclusion of L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 in starter cultures seems a feasible method to prevent late blowing defect in cheese without altering its sensory characteristics.

  16. Pilot-scale production of butanol by Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 using a low-cost fermentation medium based on corn steep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parekh, M.; Formanek, J.; Blaschek, H.P. [Illinois Univ., Urbana (United States). Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition

    1999-10-01

    To improve the economic competitiveness of the acetone/butanol/ethanol fermentation process, glucose/corn steep water (CSW) medium was used on a pilot scale for the production of solvents. The production of butanol by the Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 parent strain and the solvent-hyperproducing BA101 mutant was compared. In a 20-l fermentation using 5% glucose/CSW medium, C. beijerinckii 8052 produced 8.5 g butanol/l and 5 g acetone/l, while C. beijerinckii BA101 produced 16 g butanol/l and 7.5 g acetone/1. Further studies were carried out on a larger scale using an optimized 6% glucose/CSW medium. In a 200-l pilot-scale fermentor, C. beijerinckii 8052 produced 12.7 g butanol/l and 6 g acetone/l following 96 h of fermentation. C. beijerinckii BA101 produced 17.8 g/l and 5.5 g/l butanol and acetone respectively, following 130 h of fermentation. These results represent a 40% increase in final butanol concentration by the C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain when compared to the 8052 parent strain. The total solvents (acetone, butanol, and ethanol) produced by C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and BA101 in a 200-l fermentation were 19.2 g/l and 23.6 g/l respectively. This is the first report of pilot-scale butanol production by the solvent-hyperproducing C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant employing an inexpensive glucose/CSW medium. (orig.)

  17. Process integration for simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR): production of butanol from corn stover using Clostridium beijerinckii P260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, N; Singh, V; Liu, S; Ezeji, T C; Saha, B C; Cotta, M A

    2014-02-01

    A simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR) process was developed for the production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (AB or ABE), of which butanol is the main product, from corn stover employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Of the 86 g L(-1) corn stover provided, over 97% of the sugars were released during hydrolysis and these were fermented completely with an ABE productivity of 0.34 g L(-1)h(-1) and yield of 0.39. This productivity is higher than 0.31 g L(-1)h(-1) when using glucose as a substrate demonstrating that AB could be produced efficiently from lignocellulosic biomass. Acetic acid that was released from the biomass during pretreatment and hydrolysis was also used by the culture to produce AB. An average rate of generation of sugars during corn stover hydrolysis was 0.98 g L(-1)h(-1). In this system AB was recovered using vacuum, and as a result of this (simultaneous product recovery), 100% sugars were used by the culture.

  18. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium beijerinckii from wheat straw hydrolysates: efficient use of penta and hexa carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Carolina; Loureiro Pinto, Marina; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2014-09-01

    ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii of steam-exploded and ozonated wheat straw hydrolysates was investigated. In steam-exploded hydrolysates, highest yields of 0.40 g/g ABE yield and 127.71 g ABE/kg wheat straw were achieved when the whole slurry from the pretreatment was used. In ozonated hydrolysates, 0.32 g/g ABE yield and 79.65 g ABE/kg wheat straw were obtained from washed ozonated wheat straw. Diverse effects were observed in steam explosion and ozonolysis of wheat straw which resulted in hemicellulose removal and acid insoluble lignin solubilization, respectively. SEM analysis showed structural differences in untreated and pretreated biomass. Depending on the operational strategy, after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, the glucose recovery ranged between 65.73-66.49% and 63.22-65.23% and the xylose recovery ranged between 45.19-61.00% and 34.54-40.91% in steam-exploded and ozonated hydrolysates, respectively. The effect of the main inhibitory compounds found in hydrolysates (oxalic acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural) was studied through ABE fermentation in model media.

  19. Use of proteomic analysis to elucidate the role of calcium in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bei; Ujor, Victor; Lai, Lien B; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2013-01-01

    Calcium carbonate increases growth, substrate utilization, and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. Toward an understanding of the basis for these pleiotropic effects, we profiled changes in the C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 proteome that occur in response to the addition of CaCO(3). We observed increases in the levels of different heat shock proteins (GrpE and DnaK), sugar transporters, and proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair, recombination, and replication. We also noted significant decreases in the levels of proteins involved in metabolism, nucleic acid stabilization, sporulation, oxidative and antibiotic stress responses, and signal transduction. We determined that CaCO(3) enhances ABE fermentation due to both its buffering effects and its ability to influence key cellular processes, such as sugar transport, butanol tolerance, and solventogenesis. Moreover, activity assays in vitro for select solventogenic enzymes revealed that part of the underpinning for the CaCO(3)-mediated increase in the level of ABE fermentation stems from the enhanced activity of these catalysts in the presence of Ca(2+). Collectively, these proteomic and biochemical studies provide new insights into the multifactorial basis for the stimulation of ABE fermentation and butanol tolerance in the presence of CaCO(3).

  20. Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) production in fermentation of enzymatically hydrolyzed cassava flour by Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and solvent separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépiz-Aguilar, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Arias, María Laura; Lutz, Giselle

    2013-08-01

    Cassava constitutes an abundant substrate in tropical regions. The production of butanol in ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 using cassava flour (CF) was scaled-up to bioreactor level (5 L). Optimized fermentation conditions were applied; that is, 40℃, 60 g/l CF, and enzymatic pretreatment of the substrate. The batch fermentation profile presented an acidogenic phase for the first 24 h and a solventogenic phase afterwards. An average of 37.01 g/l ABE was produced after 83 h, with a productivity of 0.446 g/l/h. Butanol production was 25.71 g/l with a productivity of 0.310 g/l/h, high or similar to analogous batch processes described for other substrates. Solvent separation by different combinations of fractioned and azeotropic distillation and liquid-liquid separation were assessed to evaluate energetic and economic costs in downstream processing. Results suggest that the use of cassava as a substrate in ABE fermentation could be a cost-effective way of producing butanol in tropical regions.

  1. Identification of Clostridium beijerinckii, Cl. butyricum, Cl. sporogenes, Cl. tyrobutyricum isolated from silage, raw milk and hard cheese by a multiplex PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Paola; Vanoni, Laura; Silvetti, Tiziana; Morandi, Stefano; Brasca, Milena

    2012-08-01

    Late blowing, caused by the outgrowth of clostridial spores present in raw milk and originating from silage, can create considerable product loss, especially in the production of hard and semi-hard cheeses. The conventional method for the isolation of Clostridium spp. from cheeses with late-blowing symptoms is very complicated and the identification of isolates is problematic. The aim of this work was the development of a multiplex PCR method for the detection of the main dairy-related clostridia such as: Cl. beijerinckii, Cl. butyricum, Cl. sporogenes, Cl. tyrobutyricum. Samples derived from silage, raw milk and hard cheese were analysed by the most probable number (MPN) enumeration. Forty-four bacterial strains isolated from gas positive tubes were used to check the reliability of the multiplex PCR assay. The specificity of the primers was tested by individually analysing each primer pair and the primer pair combined in the multiplex PCR. It was interesting to note that the samples not identified by the multiplex PCR assay were amplified by V2-V3 16S rRNA primer pair and the sequencing revealed the aligned 16S rRNA sequences to be Paenibacillus and Bacillus spp. This new molecular assay provides a simple promising alternative to traditional microbiological methods for a rapid, sensitive detection of clostridia in dairy products.

  2. Bacterial Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas9: Deletion, Integration, Single Nucleotide Modification, and Desirable "Clean" Mutant Selection in Clostridium beijerinckii as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhong-Tian; Seo, Seung-Oh; Lynn, Patrick; Lu, Ting; Jin, Yong-Su; Blaschek, Hans P

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR-Cas9 has been demonstrated as a transformative genome engineering tool for many eukaryotic organisms; however, its utilization in bacteria remains limited and ineffective. Here we explored Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas9 for genome editing in Clostridium beijerinckii (industrially significant but notorious for being difficult to metabolically engineer) as a representative attempt to explore CRISPR-Cas9 for genome editing in microorganisms that previously lacked sufficient genetic tools. By combining inducible expression of Cas9 and plasmid-borne editing templates, we successfully achieved gene deletion and integration with high efficiency in single steps. We further achieved single nucleotide modification by applying innovative two-step approaches, which do not rely on availability of Protospacer Adjacent Motif sequences. Severe vector integration events were observed during the genome engineering process, which is likely difficult to avoid but has never been reported by other researchers for the bacterial genome engineering based on homologous recombination with plasmid-borne editing templates. We then further successfully employed CRISPR-Cas9 as an efficient tool for selecting desirable "clean" mutants in this study. The approaches we developed are broadly applicable and will open the way for precise genome editing in diverse microorganisms.

  3. 高抗逆高丁比拜氏梭菌的选育及其性能考察%Screening of Clostridium beijerinckii mutant with high inhibitor tolerance and high proportions of butanol for butanol production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺爱永; 尹春燕; 孔祥平; 陈佳楠; 姜岷; 吴昊

    2014-01-01

    以抗逆突变株Clostridium beijerinckii IB4为出发菌株,通过常压室温等离子体诱变( ARTP ),刃天青平板初筛,摇瓶发酵复筛,筛选出1株高抗逆高丁比的突变菌株C.beijerinckii IT111。发酵结果表明:该突变菌株利用多种C源时均展现其高丁醇比的特性,以玉米芯酸解糖液为C源时,溶剂产量达到10.5 g/L,丁醇8.0 g/L,丁醇比高达76%。抑制物抗逆性测试结果显示:糠醛和酸类对C.beijerinckii发酵影响较小,酚类物质对C.beijerinckii抑制作用较强,其中以香草醛为最。综上所述,C.beijerinckii IT111是1株极具潜力的利用木质纤维原料制备丁醇的菌株。%Clostridium beijerinckii IT111,a tolerance mutant strain with high proportions of butanol,was obtained by atmospheric and room temperature plasma ( ARTP ) and high-throughput screening.Fermentation results showed that the mutant had a high butanol proportions using a variety of carbon sources.When non-detoxified hemicellulosic hydrolysate of corn fiber treated with dilute sulfuric acid ( SAHHC) was used as a substrate,total solvent( ABE) and butanol production of 10.5 g/L and 8.0 g/L were obtained,respectively.The butanol proportion was up to 76%.The results of toxicity evaluation of model inhibitors showed that acetates,furfural and 5-HMF were not inhibitory to ABE production,while phenolic compounds were potent inhibitors of growth and ABE production, especially vanillin.C.beijerinckii IT111 was a promising strain for ABE production from lignocellulosic materials.

  4. Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation from cane molasses by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6422%一株拜氏梭菌利用甘蔗废糖蜜发酵生产丙酮丁醇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙珊; 汪维云; 倪晔; 王云; 宋钢; 孙志浩

    2012-01-01

    以甘蔗废糖蜜作为原料,利用Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6422菌株进行丙酮丁醇发酵的初步研究.结果表明:采用H2SO4预处理糖蜜,初糖质量浓度60 g/L,(NH4)2SO4 2g/L,CaCO3 10 g/L,温度30℃,pH 5.5~7.0,接种量6%(体积分数),在5L发酵罐中发酵培养96 h,总溶剂产量为16.17 g/L,其中丁醇质量浓度为10.07 g/L,总溶剂产率为30.2%,糖利用率为89.3%.%Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using sugar cane molasses by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6422 was studied. The molasses were pretreated with H2SO4 and the fermentation conditions including carbon source, nitrogen source, temperature and pH, etc. , were optimized. The results showed that the optimal fermentation conditions was as follows; initial sugar concentration 60 g/L, (NH4)2SO4 2 g/L, CaCO3 10 g/L, inoculation amount 6% ( V/V), pH 5. 5-7. 0, fermented at 30 ℃, for 96 h. Under these conditions, the total solvent, butanol ratio, solvent productivity, and sugar utilization in the 5-L bioreac-tor were 16. 17 g/L, 10. 07 g/L, 30. 2% , and 89. 3%, respectively.

  5. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is used to treat Dupuytren's contracture (a painless thickening and tightening of tissue [cord] beneath ... of tissue can be felt upon examination. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is also used to treat Peyronie's ...

  6. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acetone, butanol, and ethanol production from cane molasses using Clostridium beijerinckii mutant obtained by combined low-energy ion beam implantation and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-guang; Luo, Wei; Gu, Qiu-ya; Wang, Qiang; Hu, Wen-jun; Yu, Xiao-bin

    2013-06-01

    In order to obtain mutant strains showing higher solvent tolerance and butanol production than those of wild-type strains, the butanol-producing strain Clostridium beijerinckii L175 was subjected to mutagenesis using a combined method of low-energy ion beam implantation and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induction. With this effort, mutant strain MUT3 was isolated. When it was used for butanol fermentation in P2 medium, the production of butanol was 15.8±0.7 g/L 46% higher than the wild-type strain. Furthermore, after optimization of butanol production from cane molasses with MUT3, the maximum butanol production of 14.9±0.5 g/L were obtained in crew-capped bottles. When ABE production by MUT3 was carried out in a bioreactor, the production of butanol and total solvent were 15.1±0.8 g/L and 22.1±0.9 g/L, respectively. The remarkable butanol production and solvent tolerance of MUT3 make it promising for butanol production from cane molasses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  9. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis for studying Clostridium cell response to conversion of enzymatically hydrolyzed hay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Nescerecka, Alina; Tihomirova, Kristina; Mezule, Linda; Juhna, Talis

    2013-07-01

    Grass hay is one of assailable cellulose containing non-food agricultural wastes that can be used as a carbohydrate source by microorganisms producing biofuels. In this study three Clostridium strains Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tetanomorphum, capable of producing acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) were adapted to convert enzymatically hydrolyzed hay used as a growth media additive. The results of growth curves, substrate degradation kinetics and FT-IR analyses of bacterial biomass macromolecular composition showed diverse strain-specific cell response to the growth medium composition.

  10. A roadmap for gene system development in Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Nigel P; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Humphreys, Christopher M; Little, Gareth T; Baker, Jonathan; Henstra, Anne M; Liew, Fungmin; Kelly, Michelle L; Sheng, Lili; Schwarz, Katrin; Zhang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium species are both heroes and villains. Some cause serious human and animal diseases, those present in the gut microbiota generally contribute to health and wellbeing, while others represent useful industrial chassis for the production of chemicals and fuels. To understand, counter or exploit, there is a fundamental requirement for effective systems that may be used for directed or random genome modifications. We have formulated a simple roadmap whereby the necessary gene systems maybe developed and deployed. At its heart is the use of 'pseudo-suicide' vectors and the creation of a pyrE mutant (a uracil auxotroph), initially aided by ClosTron technology, but ultimately made using a special form of allelic exchange termed ACE (Allele-Coupled Exchange). All mutants, regardless of the mutagen employed, are made in this host. This is because through the use of ACE vectors, mutants can be rapidly complemented concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele and restoration of uracil prototrophy. This avoids the phenotypic effects frequently observed with high copy number plasmids and dispenses with the need to add antibiotic to ensure plasmid retention. Once available, the pyrE host may be used to stably insert all manner of application specific modules. Examples include, a sigma factor to allow deployment of a mariner transposon, hydrolases involved in biomass deconstruction and therapeutic genes in cancer delivery vehicles. To date, provided DNA transfer is obtained, we have not encountered any clostridial species where this technology cannot be applied. These include, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium pasteurianum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium autoethanogenum and even Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  12. Clostridium tetani bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallit, Rabih Riad; Afridi, Muhammad; Sison, Raymund; Salem, Elie; Boghossian, Jack; Slim, Jihad

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a neuromuscular disease in which Clostridium tetani exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produces muscle spasms, incapacitating its host. To our knowledge, C. tetani bacteraemia has never been reported in the literature. The ideal management of this entity remains unresolved given that there is no literature to guide the therapy.

  13. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B F; Olsen, K E P; Nielsen, X C;

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) requires the detection of toxigenic C. difficile or its toxins and a clinical assessment. We evaluated the performance of four nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) detecting toxigenic C. difficile directly from faeces compared to routine...... of PCR ribotypes 066 and 078. Furthermore, the presence of the PCR enhancer bovine serum albumin (BSA) was found to be related to high sensitivity and low inhibition rate. Rapid laboratory diagnosis of toxigenic C. difficile by RT PCR was accurate....

  14. Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a significant and increasing medical problem, surpassing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as the most common hospital-onset or facility-associated infection, and a key element in the challenging battle against hospital-acquired infections. This Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming colonizes the intestinal tract after antibiotics have altered the normal intestinal flora.

  15. Physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) NCP 262 chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keis, S; Sullivan, J T; Jones, D T

    2001-07-01

    A physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP 262 chromosome was constructed. The order of macrorestriction fragments was determined by analysing fragments generated after single and double digestion with the restriction enzymes BssHII, I-CeuI, Sse8387I, RsrII and SfiI and separation by PFGE. The I-CeuI backbone of C. saccharobutylicum was constructed by indirect end-labelling with rrs- and 3' rrl-specific probes located on either side of the I-CeuI site in the rrn operon, and reciprocal separation of BssHII and I-CeuI digestion products by two-dimensional PFGE. The positions of BssHII fragments on the physical map were determined using a library of linking clones containing BssHII cleavage sites. The size of the circular genome was estimated to be 5.3 Mb with a mean resolution of approximately 140 kb. The chromosome of C. saccharobutylicum contains 12 rrn operons, located on 46% of the chromosome, which are transcribed divergently from the deduced origin of replication. The genetic map was constructed by determining the location of 28 genes involved in house-keeping, heat-shock response, sporulation, electron transfer and acid- and solvent-formation. Comparison of the C. saccharobutylicum genetic map with those of the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium beijerinckii indicated C. saccharobutylicum to be most similar to the latter two Clostridium species, with the order of the genes within the gyrAB and recA loci being conserved.

  16. [Oncologic aspects of Clostridium difficile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telekes, András

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent among cancer patients. Its diagnosis is complicated by the fact that the symptoms of the infection and the side effects of the anticancer treatments could be similar. Chemotherapy itself might facilitate Clostridium difficile infection. Several risk factors are known but Clostridium difficile infection can develop in the absence of these. Neutreopenia is a risk factor for fatal Clostridium difficile infection and also the side effect of chemotherapy. Therefore, if symptoms of the potential infection develop (eg. diarrhoea more than three times a day, fever above 38.5 °C, colitis, rapid increase of serum creatinin) Clostridium difficile infection should be excluded. If the infection is confirmed it should be managed in the most efficient way. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1110-1116.

  17. Electrochemical detoxification of phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for Clostridium fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Min; Min, Kyoungseon; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Han, Sung Ok; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is being preferred as a feedstock in the biorefinery, but lignocellulosic hydrolysate usually contains inhibitors against microbial fermentation. Among these inhibitors, phenolics are highly toxic to butyric acid-producing and butanol-producing Clostridium even at a low concentration. Herein, we developed an electrochemical polymerization method to detoxify phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for efficient Clostridium fermentation. After the electrochemical detoxification for 10h, 78%, 77%, 82%, and 94% of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vanillin, and syringaldehyde were removed, respectively. Furthermore, 71% of total phenolics in rice straw hydrolysate were removed without any sugar-loss. Whereas the cell growth and metabolite production of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium beijerinckii were completely inhibited in un-detoxified hydrolysate, those in detoxifying rice straw hydrolysate were recovered to 70-100% of the control cultures. The electrochemical detoxification method described herein provides an efficient strategy for producing butanol and butyric acid through Clostridium fermentation with lignocellulosic hydrolysate.

  18. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Collas, Florent; Kuit, Wouter; Clément, Benjamin; Marchal, Rémy; López-Contreras, Ana M.; Monot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase isopropanol production, the gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme from C. beijerinckii NRRL B593 (adh) which catalyzes the reduction of acetone to isoprop...

  19. Small RNAs in the genus Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2011-01-25

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny.

  20. Clostridium difficile-associated colitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Mark W.; Beck, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the basic microbiology, pathogenesis of disease, and diagnosis of the nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile and to examine therapies recommended by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE: was searched using MeSH headings. Controlled trials for therapy were sought, but case-control studies and observational reviews were included. MAIN MESSAGE: Clostridium difficile causes approximately 20% of cases of diarrhea associated with ant...

  1. Inhibitory activity of reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and nitrite against vegetative cells and spores of dairy-related Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Hernández, Marta; Garde, Sonia

    2014-02-17

    The butyric acid fermentation, responsible for late blowing of cheese, is caused by the outgrowth in cheese of some species of Clostridium, resulting in texture and flavor defects and economical losses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial compounds against vegetative cells and spores of C. tyrobutyricum, C. butyricum, C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes strains isolated from cheeses with late blowing defect. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and sodium nitrite were determined against Clostridium strains in milk and modified RCM (mRCM) after 7d exposure. Although the sensitivity of Clostridium to the tested antimicrobials was strain-dependent, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii generally had higher MIC values than the rest of Clostridium species. The majority of Clostridium strains were more resistant to antimicrobials in milk than in mRCM, and vegetative cells exhibited higher sensitivity than spores. Reuterin (MIC values 0.51-32.5 mM) and nisin (MIC values 0.05-12.5 μg/ml) were able to inhibit the growth of vegetative cells and spores of all assayed Clostridium strains in milk and mRCM. Strains of C. tyrobutyricum exhibited the highest sensitivity to lysozyme (MIC valuesClostridium spp. spores and vegetative cells, may be the best options to control Clostridium growth in dairy products and to prevent associated spoilage, such as late blowing defect of cheese. However, further studies in cheese would be necessary to validate this hypothesis.

  2. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens. PMID:24637887

  3. Tips to Prevent Illness from Clostridium Perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. perfringens Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Clostridium perfringens ( C. perfringens ) is one of the most ... gov More Information More Information Learn more about Clostridium perfringens Find out safe minimum cooking temperatures for ...

  4. Proposal to restrict the genus Clostridium (Prazmowski) to Clostridium butyricum and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Paul A; Rainey, Fred A

    2015-12-07

    The genus Clostridium as presently constituted is phylogenetically and phenotypically incoherent. Polyphasic taxonomic data indicate that the genus comprises a collection of very heterogeneous species. Numerous phylogenetic studies, principally based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicate that the genus Clostridium should be restricted to Clostridium cluster I as Clostridium sensu stricto. Despite these findings, authors continue to add new species to the genus Clostridium that do not fall within the radiation of cluster I and the type species C. butryicum thus perpetuating the confusion associated with the taxonomy of this group. Here we formally propose that members of the Clostridium (Prazmowski) be restricted to the type species Clostridium butyricum and cluster I species. Eubacterium moniliforme, Eubacterium tarantellae, Sarcina maxima, and Sarcina ventriculi should be transferred to the genus Clostridium as Clostridium moniliforme comb. nov., Clostridium tarantellae comb. nov., Clostridium maximum comb. nov., and Clostridium ventriculi comb. nov. A novel genus Hathewaya gen. nov.is proposed for the species Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium limosum and Clostridium proteolyticum as Hathewaya histolytica gen. nov. com. nov., Hathewaya limosa com. nov. and Hathewaya proteolytica comb. nov. The type species of Hathewaya is Hathewaya histolytica.

  5. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collas, Florent; Kuit, Wouter; Clément, Benjamin; Marchal, Rémy; López-contreras, Ana M.; Monot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase

  6. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collas, Florent; Kuit, Wouter; Clément, Benjamin; Marchal, Rémy; López-contreras, Ana M.; Monot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase

  7. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  8. Production of butanol and isopropanol with an immobilized Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Hoogewind, Adam; Moon, Young Hwan; Day, Donal

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii optinoii is a Clostridium species that produces butanol, isopropanol and small amounts of ethanol. This study compared the performances of batch and continuous immobilized cell fermentations, investigating how media flow rates and nutritional modification affected solvent yields and productivity. In 96-h batch cultures, with 80 % of the 30 g L(-1) glucose consumed in synthetic media, solvent concentration was 9.45 g L(-1) with 66.0 % as butanol. In a continuous fermentation using immobilized C. beijerinckii optinoii cells, also with 80 % of 30 g L(-1) glucose utilization, solvent productivity increased to 1.03 g L(-1) h(-1). Solvent concentration reached 12.14 g L(-1) with 63.0 % as butanol. Adjusting the dilution rate from 0.085 to 0.050 h(-1) to allow extended residence time in column was required when glucose concentration in fresh media was increased from 30 to 50 g L(-1). When acetate was used to improve the buffer capacity in media, the solvent concentration reached 12.70 on 50 g L(-1) glucose. This continuous fermentation using immobilized cells showed technical feasibility for solvent production.

  9. Autism and Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, E R

    1998-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disability believed to have multiple etiologies. This paper outlines the possibility of a subacute, chronic tetanus infection of the intestinal tract as the underlying cause for symptoms of autism observed in some individuals. A significant percentage of individuals with autism have a history of extensive antibiotic use. Oral antibiotics significantly disrupt protective intestinal microbiota, creating a favorable environment for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Clostridium tetani is an ubiquitous anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Intestinal colonization by C. tetani, and subsequent neurotoxin release, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals which were fed vegetative cells. The vagus nerve is capable of transporting tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and provides a route of ascent from the intestinal tract to the CNS. This route bypasses TeNT's normal preferential binding sites in the spinal cord, and therefore the symptoms of a typical tetanus infection are not evident. Once in the brain, TeNT disrupts the release of neurotransmitters by the proteolytic cleavage of synaptobrevin, a synaptic vesicle membrane protein. This inhibition of neurotransmitter release would explain a wide variety of behavioral deficits apparent in autism. Lab animals injected in the brain with TeNT have exhibited many of these behaviors. Some children with autism have also shown a significant reduction in stereotyped behaviors when treated with antimicrobials effective against intestinal clostridia. When viewed as sequelae to a subacute, chronic tetanus infection, many of the puzzling abnormalities of autism have a logical basis. A review of atypical tetanus cases, and strategies to test the validity of this paper's hypothesis, are included.

  10. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  11. Atypical Glycolysis in Clostridium thermocellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.; Olson, D.G.; Argyros, D.A.; Deng, Y; Van Gulik, W.M.; Van Dijken, J.P.; Lynd, L.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cofactor specificities of glycolytic enzymes in Clostridium thermocellum were studied with cellobiose-grown cells from batch cultures. Intracellular glucose was phosphorylated by glucokinase using GTP rather than ATP. Although phosphofructokinase typically uses ATP as a phosphoryl donor, we found o

  12. ClosTron-mediated engineering of Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Sarah A; Heap, John T; Cooksley, Clare M; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium is a diverse assemblage of Gram positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria. Whilst certain species have achieved notoriety as important animal and human pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium perfringens), the vast majority of the genus are entirely benign, and are able to undertake all manner of useful biotransformations. Prominent amongst them are those species able to produce the biofuels, butanol and ethanol from biomass-derived residues, such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinkii, Clostridium thermocellum, and Clostridium phytofermentans. The prominence of the genus in disease and biotechnology has led to the need for more effective means of genetic modification. The historical absence of methods based on conventional strategies for "knock-in" and "knock-out" in Clostridium has led to the adoption of recombination-independent procedures, typified by ClosTron technology. The ClosTron uses a retargeted group II intron and a retro-transposition-activated marker to selectively insert DNA into defined sites within the genome, to bring about gene inactivation and/or cargo DNA delivery. The procedure is extremely efficient, rapid, and requires minimal effort by the operator.

  13. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from substandard and surplus dates by Egyptian native Clostridium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Zohri, Abdel-Naser Ahmed; El-Enany, Abdel-Wahab Elsadek; Ali, Shimaa Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    One hundred and seven mesophilic isolates of Clostridium were isolated from agricultural soils cultivated with different plants in Assuit Governorate, Egypt. Eighty isolates (out of 107) showed the ability to produce ABE (Acetone, butanol and ethanol) on T6 medium ranging from 0.036 to 31.89 g/L. The highest numbers of ABE producing isolates were obtained from soil samples of potato contributing 27 isolates, followed by 18 isolates from wheat and 10 isolates from onion. On the other hand, there were three native isolates that produced ABE more than those produced by the reference isolate Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (11.543 g/L). The three isolates were identified based on phenotypic and gene encoding 16S rRNA as Clostridium beijerinckii ASU10 (KF372577), Clostridium chauvoei ASU55 (KF372580) and Clostridium roseum ASU58 (KF372581). The highest ABE level from substandard and surplus dates was produced by C. beijerinckii ASU10 (24.07 g/L) comprising butanol 67.15% (16.16 g/L), acetone 30.73% (7.4 g/L) and ethanol 2.12% (0.51 g/L), while C. roseum ASU58 and C. chauvoei ASU55 produced ABE contributing 20.20 and 13.79 g/L, respectively. ABE production by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was 15.01 g/L. This study proved that the native strains C. beijerinckii ASU10 and C. roseum ASU58 have high competitive efficacy on ABE production from economical substrate as substandard and surplus date fruits. Additionally, using this substrate without any nutritional components is considered to be a commercial substrate for desired ABE production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 9 CFR 113.106 - Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.106 Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin shall...

  15. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium...

  16. Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    REPORT Final Report on Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene...Among different microorganisms that act in TNT biodegradation, clostridium species were distinguished for their rapid degradation rate. Here we compared...TERMS clostridium , TNT, genes, electron carriers, metabolism George N. Bennett William Marsh Rice University Office of Sponsored Research 6100 Main St

  17. Syntrophic co-culture of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium for bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Ho, Cheng-Yu.; Chen, Wei-En; Huang, Chieh-Chen [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chou, Chia-Hung; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi [Department of Science and Technology, National Kaohsiung First University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2008-10-15

    By using brewery yeast waste and microflora from rice straw compost, an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen-producing system has been established. For the purpose of industrialization, the major players of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial strains in the system were isolated and their combination for an effective production of bio-hydrogen and other bio-fuels was examined in this study. The phylogenetic analysis found that four anaerobic isolates (Clostridium beijerinckii L9, Clostridium diolis Z2, Clostridium roseum Z5-1, and C. roseum W8) were highly related with each other and belongs to the cluster I clostridia family, the family that many of solvent-producing strains included. On the other hand, one of the aerobic isolates, the Bacillus thermoamylovorans strain I, shown multiple extracellular enzyme activities including lipase, protease, {alpha}-amylase, pectinase and cellulase, was suggested as a good partner for creating an anaerobic environment and pre-saccharification of substrate for those co-cultured solventogenic clostridial strain. Among these clostridial strains, though C. beijerinckii L9 do not show as many extracellular enzyme activities as Bacillus, but it performs the highest hydrogen-producing ability. The original microflora can be updated to a syntrophic bacterial co-culture system contended only with B. thermoamylovorans I and C. beijerinckii L9. The combination of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium may play the key role for developing the industrialized bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen-producing system from biomass. (author)

  18. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Song F.; Forsberg, Cecil W.; Gibbins, L N

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 w...

  19. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  20. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  1. Clostridium difficile causing acute renal failure: Case presentation and review

    OpenAIRE

    Arrich, Jasmin; Sodeck, Gottfried H.; Sengölge, Gürkan; Konnaris, Christoforos; Müllner, Marcus; Anton N Laggner; Domanovits, Hans

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Clostridium difficile infection is primarily a nosocomial infection but asymptomatic carriers of Clostridium difficile can be found in up to 5% of the general population. Ampicillin, cephalosporins and clindamycin are the antibiotics that are most frequently associated with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea or colitis. Little is known about acute renal failure as a consequence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

  2. Clostridium difficile in Retail Meats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-16

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea in healthcare settings but little is known about what causes cases in the community. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. L. Clifford McDonald discusses two papers in the May 2009 edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases that explore whether the organism could be found in meat samples purchased in grocery stores in Arizona and Canada.  Created: 4/16/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/16/2009.

  3. Regulation of toxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Chloé; Denève, Cécile; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes, whereas tetanus toxin (TeNT) does not form any complex. The BoNT and ANTP genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus, which has different genomic localization (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in the various Clostridium botulinum types and subtypes. The botulinum locus genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha/orfX operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. A gene called botR lying between the two operons in C. botulinum type A encodes an alternative sigma factor which regulates positively the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs at the late exponential growth phase and beginning of the stationary phase. In Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of tent encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR, which is related to BotR. C. botulinum and C. tetani genomes contain several two-component systems and predicted regulatory orphan genes. In C. botulinum type A, four two-component systems have been found that positively or negatively regulate the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs independently of BotR/A. The synthesis of neurotoxin in Clostridia seems to be under the control of complex network of regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Clostridium tetani (Welloner, 1982). They differ in that whereas BoNT acts at the nerve periphery, TeTx blocks the release of inhibitory amino acids...AD-A27 2 939 GRANT NO: DAMDl7-90-Z-0033 TITLE: PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN GENES PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nigel P...Characterization of Clostridium Grant No. Botulinum. Neurotoxin Genes DAMD 17-90- Z-0033 6. AUTHOR(S) Nigel P. Minton, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  5. Acetone production in solventogenic Clostridium species: new insights from non-enzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bei; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2011-08-01

    Development of a butanologenic strain with high selectivity for butanol production is often proposed as a possible route for improving the economics of biobutanol production by solventogenic Clostridium species. The acetoacetate decarboxylase (aadc) gene encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase (AADC), which catalyzes the decarboxylation of acetoacetate into acetone and CO(2), was successfully disrupted by homologous recombination in solventogenic Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to generate an aadc ( - ) mutant. Our fermentation studies revealed that this mutant produces a maximum acetone concentration of 3 g/L (in P2 medium), a value comparable to that produced by wild-type C. beijerinckii 8052. Therefore, we postulated that AADC-catalyzed decarboxylation of acetoacetate is not the sole means for acetone generation. Our subsequent finding that non-enzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate in vitro, under conditions similar to in vivo acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, produces 1.3 to 5.2 g/L acetone between pH 6.5 and 4 helps rationalize why various knock-out and knock-down strategies designed to disrupt aadc in solventogenic Clostridium species did not eliminate acetone production during ABE fermentation. Based on these results, we discuss alternatives to enhance selectivity for butanol production.

  6. Membrane H+ Conductance of Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium acetobutylicum: Evidence for Electrogenic Na+/H+ Antiport in Clostridium thermoaceticum

    OpenAIRE

    Terracciano, Joseph S.; Schreurs, Wilhelmus J. A.; Kashket, Eva R.

    1987-01-01

    H+ conductance in de-energized cells of Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium acetobutylicum was determined from the rate of realkalinization of the medium after an acid pulse. In both organisms, cell membrane proton permeability was increased by fermentation end products and ionophores. In C. thermoaceticum, H+ conductance was increased by Na+ ions compared with K+ as counterions. In these cells, addition of Na+, but not K+, elicited efflux of H+; H+ efflux was stimulated by SCN− and de...

  7. Recent advances in germination of Clostridium spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Members of Clostridium genus are a diverse group of anaerobic spore-formers that includes several pathogenic species. Their anaerobic requirement enhances the importance of the dormant spore morphotype during infection, persistence and transmission. Bacterial spores are metabolically inactive and may survive for long times in the environment and germinate in presence of nutrients termed germinants. Recent progress with spores of several Clostridium species has identified the germinant receptors (GRs) involved in nutrient germinant recognition and initiation of spore germination. Signal transduction from GRs to the downstream effectors remains poorly understood but involves the release of dipicolinic acid. Two mechanistically different cortex hydrolytic machineries are present in Clostridium spores. Recent studies have also shed light into novel biological events that occur during spore formation (accumulation of transcriptional units) and transcription during early spore outgrowth. In summary, this review will cover all of the recent advances in Clostridium spore germination. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Current status of Clostridium difficile infection epidemiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lessa, Fernanda C; Gould, Carolyn V; McDonald, L Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge...

  9. Clostridium difficile colitis: A clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gabie K B; Reidy, Tobi J; Huk, Matthew D; Lane, Frederick R

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium difficile colitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the surgical patient. In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have shown marked increases in frequency, severity, and resistance to standard treatment. With urgent operative interventions and novel endoscopic approaches, pseudomembranous colitis is being seen more commonly in surgical practices. In this paper, we will review a number of papers from the literature. We will discuss the epidemiology, evaluation and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Fulminant colitis may require emergency operation. For the surgical endoscopist, fecal microbiota transplantation restores the gastrointestinal flora, and has been shown to be effective in more than 80% of patients. Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of healthcare-related diarrhea leading to increased morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Increases in failure rates and resistance to current treatments are clinical and economic challenges in the healthcare situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Special Concerns for Seniors: Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stewardship Hygiene and Infection Control Resources NEWS Upcoming Events APUA ... - an introduction Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) is a potentially fatal pathogenic bacterial species that lives in the inner lining of ...

  11. Vancomycin-resistant Clostridium innocuum bacteremia following oral vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Yeh, Fang Hao; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-12-01

    An 85 year-old male initially admitted for septic shock due to urinary tract infection experienced Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea during hospitalization and was treated by oral vancomycin. His clinical course was complicated by cytomegalovirus colitis and then vancomycin-resistant Clostridium innocuum bacteremia, which was cured by uneventfully parenteral piperacillin-tazobactam therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan E; Wang, Rong; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wu, Wells W; Keller, James E

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome): a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a common ancestor.

  13. Presence and molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in intestinal compartments of healthy horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Arroyo, Luis Guillermo; Staempfli, Henry Rolf

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are commonly associated with colitis in equids, but healthy carriers exist. Scarce information is available on the prevalence of Clostridium spp. in gastrointestinal compartments other than faeces in healthy horses, and it is unknown...... colon and rectum. When multiple compartments were positive in a single horse, two different C. difficile ribotypes were always present. Clostridium perfringens Type A (CPE, beta2 toxin gene negative) was recovered from the left ventral colon of one horse (0.74%, 1/135 samples). Agreement between faeces...... and overall C. difficile carrier status was good. CONCLUSIONS: Clostridium difficile can be found in different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract of healthy horses, and multiple strains can be present in an individual horse. The prevalence of C. perfringens in healthy adult hoses was low, consistent...

  14. Postpartum Clostridium sordellii infection associated with fatal toxic shock syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, C; Petersen, Ina Sleimann; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium bacteria are anaerobic Gram positive spore-form-ing bacilli, known to cause distinct clinical syndromes such as botulism, tetanus, pseudomembranous colitis and myonecrosis. The natural habitats of Clostridium species are soil, water and the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans....... In 5-10% of all women, Clostridium species are also found to be normal inhabitants in the microbial flora of the female genital tract. In case of a non-sexually transmitted genital tract infection, Clostridium species are isolated in 4-20%, and clostridium welchii seems to be the most common isolate....... Clostridium sordellii is rarely encountered in clinical specimens (1% of Clostridium species), but it has been described as a human pathogen with fatal potential. Two toxins, a lethal and a hemorrhagic (that antigenically and pathophysiologically appear similar to Clostridium difficile toxins B and A...

  15. Postpartum Clostridium sordellii infection associated with fatal toxic shock syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, C; Petersen, Ina Sleimann; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2000-01-01

    . Clostridium sordellii is rarely encountered in clinical specimens (1% of Clostridium species), but it has been described as a human pathogen with fatal potential. Two toxins, a lethal and a hemorrhagic (that antigenically and pathophysiologically appear similar to Clostridium difficile toxins B and A......Clostridium bacteria are anaerobic Gram positive spore-form-ing bacilli, known to cause distinct clinical syndromes such as botulism, tetanus, pseudomembranous colitis and myonecrosis. The natural habitats of Clostridium species are soil, water and the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans....... In 5-10% of all women, Clostridium species are also found to be normal inhabitants in the microbial flora of the female genital tract. In case of a non-sexually transmitted genital tract infection, Clostridium species are isolated in 4-20%, and clostridium welchii seems to be the most common isolate...

  16. Toxinas de Clostridium perfringens Toxins of Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Morris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens es un bacilo grampositivo anaerobio con capacidad de formar esporas. Es uno de los patógenos bacterianos con mayor distribución en el medio ambiente, ya que puede ser aislado de muestras de suelo y de agua y además forma parte de la microbiota intestinal de animales y humanos. Sin embargo, en ciertas ocasiones puede actuar como patógeno oportunista y causar enfermedades como la gangrena gaseosa, la enterotoxemia del ovino y del caprino y la disentería del cordero, entre otras. En humanos, está asociado a enfermedades como la intoxicación por alimentos, la enterocolitis necrotizante en niños y la enteritis necrótica o pigbel de las tribus de Papúa-Nueva Guinea. El renovado interés que existe actualmente en el estudio de C. perfringens como patógeno veterinario y humano, junto con el avance de la biología molecular, han hecho posible que la ciencia tenga hoy un conocimiento más profundo sobre la biología y la patogenia de esta bacteria. En esta revisión bibliográfica se discuten y actualizan los principales aspectos de la patogenia intestinal de C. perfringens teniendo en cuenta las toxinas con mayor importancia médica descritas hasta el presente.Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic gram-positive spore-forming bacillus. It is one of the pathogens with larger distribution in the environment; it can be isolated from soil and water samples, which also belongs to the intestinal flora of animals and humans. However, on some occasions it can act as an opportunistic pathogen, causing diseases such as gas gangrene, enterotoxemia in sheep and goats and lamb dysentery, among others. In human beings, it is associated to diseases such as food poisoning, necrotic enterocolitis of the infant and necrotic enteritis or pigbel in Papua-New Guinea tribes. The renewed interest existing nowadays in the study of C. perfringens as a veterinarian and human pathogen, together with the advance of molecular biology, had enabled

  17. In-vitro growth characteristics of commercial probiotic strains and their potential for inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...

  18. Adjuvants for Clostridium tetani and Clostridium diphtheriae vaccines updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshanqiti, Fatimah M; Al-Masaudi, Saad B; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2017-01-01

    It's known that diphtheria and tetanus are a contagious lethal diseases over the years, they caused by pathogenic microbes corynebacterium diphtheria and Clostridium tetani, respectively. The diseases result from the production of bacterial toxin. Vaccination with bacterial toxoid vaccines adsorbed on particulates adjuvants still are the best way to prevent this epidemic diseases from spread. The particulate vaccines have been shown to be more efficient than soluble one for the induction of the immune responses. Nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance the immune responses. As well known the immune response to inactivate killed and subunit vaccine enhances by alum adjuvants. The adjuvants examined and tested after reducing its size to particle size, thus mimic size of viruses which is considered smallest units can derive the immune system. The major issue is minimizing the adjuvant particles, to gain insight of resulting immunity types and impact on immune response. The adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles appears to largely be a consequence of their uptake into antigen presenting cells.

  19. Characterization of novel psychrophilic clostridia from an Antarctic microbial mat: description of Clostridium frigoris sp. nov., Clostridium lacusfryxellense sp. nov., Clostridium bowmanii sp. nov. and Clostridium psychrophilum sp. nov. and reclassification of Clostridium laramiense as Clostridium estertheticum subsp. laramiense subsp. nov

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spring, Stefan; Merkhoffer, Birgit; Weiss, Norbert; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Hippe, Hans; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2003-01-01

    .... Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data indicated that these strains are affiliated with cluster I clostridia and form a coherent group with Clostridium estertheticum and Clostridium laramiense...

  20. Polyclonal Antibody Therapies for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Simon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection has emerged as a growing worldwide health problem. The colitis of Clostridium difficile infection results from the synergistic action of C. difficile secreted toxins A and B upon the colon mucosa. A human monoclonal IgG anti-toxin has demonstrated the ability in combination therapy to reduce mortality in C. difficile challenged hamsters. This antibody is currently in a clinical trial for the treatment of human Clostridium difficile infection. More than one group of investigators has considered using polyclonal bovine colostral antibodies to toxins A and B as an oral passive immunization. A significant proportion of the healthy human population possesses polyclonal antibodies to the Clostridium difficile toxins. We have demonstrated that polyclonal IgA derived from the pooled plasma of healthy donors possesses specificity to toxins A and B and can neutralize these toxins in a cell-based assay. This suggests that secretory IgA prepared from such pooled plasma IgA may be able to be used as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.

  1. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S F; Forsberg, C W; Gibbins, L N

    1985-08-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 with cellobiose as the limiting nutrient, maximum production of the endoglucanase and cellobiase occurred at pH values of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively. In the carbon-limited continuous cultures, strain 824 produced similar levels of endoglucanase, cellobiosidase, and cellobiase activities regardless of the carbon source used. However, in ammonium- or phosphate-limited cultures, with an excess of glucose, only 1/10 of the endoglucanase was produced, and neither cellobiosidase nor cellobiase activities were detectable. A crude extracellular enzyme preparation from strain B527 hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose readily and microcrystalline cellulose (A vicel) to a lesser extent. Glucose accounted for more than 90% of the reducing sugar produced by the hydrolysis of acid-swollen cellulose and Avicel. Strain B527 did not grow in medium with acid-swollen cellulose as the sole source of carbohydrate, although it grew readily on the products obtained by hydrolyzing the cellulose in vitro with a preparation of extracellular cellulase derived from the same organism.

  2. ISOLATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI FROM SOIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANADA, I; NISHIDA, S

    1965-03-01

    Sanada, Ichiro (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Shoki Nishida. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from soil. J. Bacteriol. 89:626-629. 1965.-The higher the temperatures applied to soil specimens, the weaker the toxigenicity of Clostridium tetani strains isolated from them. The glucose- and maltose-fermenting ability of these isolates was inversely proportional to their toxigenicity. The biological properties of atoxic strains were indistinguishable from those of C. tetanomorphum. Since a considerable number of toxic strains fermented glucose and maltose, these criteria are of doubtful value for differentiating C. tetani from C. tetanomorphum.

  3. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  4. Description of Clostridium phoceensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosny

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium phoceensis sp. nov., strain GD3T (= CSUR P1929 = DSM 100334 is the type strain of C. phoceensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridium. This strain was isolated from the gut microbiota of a 28-year-old healthy French man. C. phoceensis is a Gram-negative, spore-forming, nonmotile, strictly anaerobic bacterium. We describe its complete genome sequence and annotation, together with its phenotypic characteristics.

  5. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  6. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  7. Clostridium difficile recurrences in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Staffan; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Jorup-Rönström, Christina; Ellström, Kristina; Nord, Carl Erik; Weintraub, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Sixty-eight hospital-admitted patients with a first episode of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were included and followed up during 1 year. Faeces samples were collected at 1, 2, 6 and 12 months after inclusion and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and the MICs of the isolates were determined against eight antimicrobial agents. In 68 patients initially included, antibiotics, clinical signs and co-morbidities were analyzed and 56 were evaluable for recurrences. The mean number of different antibiotics given during 3 months prior to inclusion was 2.6 (range 0-6). Six patients had not received any antibiotics and three of them had diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease. Thirty-two patients (57%) had either a microbiological or clinical recurrence, 16 of whom had clinical recurrences that were confirmed microbiologically (13, 23%) or unconfirmed by culture (3, 5%). Twenty-nine patients were positive in at least one of the follow-up tests, 16 had the same ribotype in follow-up tests, i.e. relapse, and 13 a different ribotype, i.e., reinfection. Most common ribotypes were 078/126, 020, 023, 026, 014/077, 001 and 005. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. Strains ribotype 078/126 and 023 were positive for binary toxin and were the strains most prone to cause recurrence. All strains were sensitive to vancomycin and metronidazole. Patients with recurrences were significantly older (p = 0.02) and all patients had a high burden of comorbidities, which could explain the high fatality rate, 26 (38%) patients died during the 1-year follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological hydrogen production of the genus Clostridium: Metabolic study and mathematical model simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Wu, Yi-Ru; Ren, Wei-Jie; Hsiao, Chia-Jung; Li, Shiue-Lin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Whang, Liang-Ming [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center (SERC), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China)

    2007-08-15

    The biochemical hydrogen potential (BHP) tests were conducted to investigate the metabolism of glucose fermentation and hydrogen production performance of four Clostridial species, including C. acetobutylicum M121, C. butyricum ATCC19398, C. tyrobutyricum FYa102, and C. beijerinckii L9. Batch experiments showed that all the tested strains fermented glucose, reduced medium pH from 7.2 to a value between 4.6 and 5.0, and produced butyrate (0.37-0.67 mmol/mmol-glucose) and acetate (0.34-0.42 mmol/mmol-glucose) as primary soluble metabolites. Meanwhile, a significant amount of hydrogen gas was produced accompanied with glucose degradation and acid production. Among the strains examined, C. beijerinckii L9 had the highest hydrogen production yield of 2.81 mmol/mmol-glucose. A kinetic model was developed to evaluate the metabolism of glucose fermentation of those Clostridium species in the batch cultures. The model, in general, was able to accurately describe the profile of glucose degradation as well as production of biomass, butyrate, acetate, ethanol, and hydrogen observed in the batch tests. In the glucose re-feeding experiments, the C. tyrobutyricum FYa102 and C. beijerinckii L9 isolates fermented additional glucose during re-feeding tests, producing a substantial amount of hydrogen. In contrast, C. butyricum ATCC19398 was unable to produce more hydrogen despite additional supply of glucose, presumably due to the metabolic shift from acetate/butyrate to lactate/ethanol production. (author)

  9. Variability in DPA and calcium content in the spores of Clostridium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jamroskovic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Spores of a number of clostridial species, and their resistance to thermal treatment is a major concern for the food industry. Spore resistance to wet heat is related to the level of spore hydration, which is inversely correlated with the content of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA in the spore core. It is widely believed that the accumulation of DPA and calcium in the spore core is a fundamental component of the sporulation process for all endospore forming species. We have noticed heterogeneity in the heat resistance capacity and overall DPA/calcium content among the spores of several species belonging to Clostridium sensu stricto group: two C. acetobutylicum strains (DSM 792 and 1731, two C. beijerinckii strains (DSM 791 and NCIMB 8052, and a C. collagenovorans strain (DSM 3089. A C. beijerinckii strain (DSM 791 and a C. acetobutylicum strain (DSM 792 display low Ca and DPA levels. In addition, these two species, with the lowest average Ca/DPA content amongst the strains considered, also exhibit minimal heat resistance. There appears to be no correlation between the Ca/DPA content and the phylogenetic distribution of the C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii species based either on the 16S rRNA or the spoVA gene. This finding suggests that a subset of Clostridium sensu stricto species produce spores with low resistance to wet heat. Additionally, analysis of individual spores using STEM-EDS and STXM revealed that DPA and calcium levels can also vary amongst individual spores in a single spore population.

  10. Clostridium jejuense sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunyoung; Yi, Hana; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Kamagata, Yoichi; Chun, Jongsik

    2004-09-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, endospore-forming bacterium, designated strain HY-35-12T, was isolated from a soil sample in Jeju, Korea. Cells of this isolate were Gram-positive, motile rods that formed oval to spherical terminal spores. Strain HY-35-12T grew optimally at 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and 0-0.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The isolate produced pyruvate, lactate, acetate, formate and hydrogen as fermentation end products from glucose. The G + C content of DNA of the isolate was 41 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the organism formed a monophyletic clade with Clostridium xylanovorans and Clostridium aminovalericum in cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium. The closest phylogenetic neighbour was C. xylanovorans, with 96.65 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Several physiological and chemotaxonomic properties were identified that enable strain HY-35-12T to be distinguished from phylogenetically related clostridia. On the basis of polyphasic characteristics, it is proposed that strain HY-35-12T (= IMSNU 40003T = KCTC 5026T = DSM 15929T) represents a novel species, Clostridium jejuense sp. nov.

  11. Clostridium difficile infection : epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the big

  12. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  13. Molecular diagnosis and genotyping of Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Renate Johanna van den

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first discovered in 1935, but it was not until 1977 that this bacterium was found to be associated with pseudomembranous colitis. The disease was considered to be caused by the production of two C. difficile toxins, toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB). TcdA was shown to exhibit

  14. International typing study of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carl E; Merrigan, Michelle M; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N; Riley, Thomas V; Silva, Joseph; Brazier, Jon S

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of an international Clostridium difficile typing study to cross reference strain designations for seven typing methodologies and facilitate inter-laboratory communication. Four genotypic and three phenotypic methods were used to type 100 isolates and compare the results to 39 PCR ribotypes identified among the collection.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enterit...

  16. Molecular diagnosis and genotyping of Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Renate Johanna van den

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first discovered in 1935, but it was not until 1977 that this bacterium was found to be associated with pseudomembranous colitis. The disease was considered to be caused by the production of two C. difficile toxins, toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB). TcdA was shown to exhibit

  17. Clostridium difficile infection : epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the big

  18. Pseudomembranous colitis: Not always Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek M; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-05-01

    Although Clostridium difficile infection is the cause of most cases of pseudomembranous colitis, clinicians should consider less common causes, especially if pseudomembranes are seen on endoscopy but testing remains negative for C difficile or if presumed C difficile infection does not respond to treatment. Histologic review of colonic mucosal biopsy specimens can provide clues to the underlying cause.

  19. Clostridium to treat cancer: dream or reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theys, Jan; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In their paper "Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses", Roberts et al. describe the induction of antitumor responses following local spore administration of an attenuated C. novyi strain (C. novyi-NT). Stereotactic intratumoral spore injection led to signi

  20. Clostridium septicum Empyema in an Immunocompetent Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Granok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a Clostridium septicum empyema in an immunocompetent woman following operation for an incarcerated internal hernia. The patient was successfully treated with pleural decortication and an extended course of postoperative antibiotics. This is the first report of such an infection in the medical literature.

  1. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  2. Felled oil palm trunk as a renewable source for biobutanol production by Clostridium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komonkiat, Itsara; Cheirsilp, Benjamas

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to convert felled oil palm trunk to biobutanol by Clostridium spp. For efficient utilization of oil palm trunk, it was separated into sap and trunk fiber. The sap was used directly while the trunk fiber was hydrolyzed to fermentable sugars before use. Among five clostridia strains screened, Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 1731 was the most suitable strain for butanol production from the sap without any supplementation of nutrients. It produced the highest amount of butanol (14.4 g/L) from the sap (sugar concentration of 50 g/L) with butanol yield of 0.35 g/g. When hydrolysate from the trunk fiber was used as an alternative carbon source (sugar concentration of 30 g/L), of the strains tested Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461 produced the highest amount of butanol (10.0 g/L) with butanol yield of 0.41 g/g. The results presented herein suggest that oil palm trunk is a promising renewable substrate for biobutanol production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for n-butanol production: effects of CoA transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le; Zhao, Jingbo; Xu, Mengmeng; Dong, Jie; Varghese, Saju; Yu, Mingrui; Tang, I-Ching; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-06-01

    The overexpression of CoA transferase (ctfAB), which catalyzes the reaction: acetate/butyrate + acetoacetyl-CoA → acetyl/butyryl-CoA + acetoacetate, was studied for its effects on acid reassimilation and butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum (Δack, adhE2). The plasmid pMTL007 was used to co-express adhE2 and ctfAB from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. In addition, the sol operon containing ctfAB, adc (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and ald (aldehyde dehydrogenase) was also cloned from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and expressed in C. tyrobutyricum (Δack, adhE2). Mutants expressing these genes were evaluated for their ability to produce butanol from glucose in batch fermentations at pH 5.0 and 6.0. Compared to C. tyrobutyricum (Δack, adhE2) without expressing ctfAB, all mutants with ctfAB overexpression produced more butanol, with butanol yield increased to 0.22 - 0.26 g/g (vs. 0.10 - 0.13 g/g) and productivity to 0.35 g/l h (vs. 0.13 g/l h) because of the reduced acetate and butyrate production. The expression of ctfAB also resulted in acetone production from acetoacetate through a non-enzymatic decarboxylation.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  5. Expression and Purification of Clostridium botulinum Type B Light Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-26

    expression system Previously, tetanus toxin fragment C had been expressed in E. coli at 3–4% cell protein. The sequence for Clostridium tetani was...Protein Expression and PuriWcation 46 (2006) 256–267 www.elsevier.com/locate/yprepExpression, puriWcation, and characterization of Clostridium ...mechanical ventilation. Botulism is a neuroparalytic disease caused by seven immunologically distinct neurotoxins (types A-G) produced by Clostridium

  6. Perfringolysin O: the underrated Clostridium perfringens toxin?

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Verherstraeten; Evy Goossens; Bonnie Valgaeren; Bart Pardon; Leen Timbermont; Freddy Haesebrouck; Richard Ducatelle; Piet Deprez; Kristin R. Wade; Rodney Tweten; Filip Van Immerseel

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as theta toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membr...

  7. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keshtkar-Jahromi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS can be associated with different infectious etiologies, but the relationship between pseudomembranous colitis and HUS was first described in the 1970s in some childhood patients. There is very limited published literature on Clostridium difficile-associated HUS. We report a case of C. difficile-related HUS in an adult patient and provide a review of the literature.

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and Clostridium difficile colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Mohebtash, Mahsa

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can be associated with different infectious etiologies, but the relationship between pseudomembranous colitis and HUS was first described in the 1970s in some childhood patients. There is very limited published literature on Clostridium difficile-associated HUS. We report a case of C. difficile-related HUS in an adult patient and provide a review of the literature. PMID:23882375

  9. Clostridium to treat cancer: dream or reality?

    OpenAIRE

    Theys, Jan; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In their paper “Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses”, Roberts et al. describe the induction of antitumor responses following local spore administration of an attenuated C. novyi strain (C. novyi-NT). Stereotactic intratumoral spore injection led to significant survival advantages in a murine orthotopic brain model and local bacterial treatment produced robust responses in a set of spontaneous canine soft tissue carcinomas. Their preclinical findin...

  10. Parameters Affecting Solvent Production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    OpenAIRE

    Dabrock, Birgit; Bahl, Hubert; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100...

  11. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M.; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Cro...

  12. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction...

  13. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: Prevention and treatment strategies

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Fernando J Martinez,1 Daniel A Leffler,2 Ciaran P Kelly21Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral van...

  14. Clostridium celerecrescens, often misidentified as "Clostridium clostridioforme group," is involved in rare human infection cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Philippe; K'Ouas, Guylène; Le Coustumier, Alain; Popoff, Michel R

    2012-11-01

    Misidentification of rare Clostridium species often originated from the environment as clinically relevant species is problematic. A strain isolated from a traumatic leg wound first identified as C. clostridioforme was finally identified as the rare Clostridium celerecrescens. Two similar misidentifications are reported in the literature. In order to help the phenotypic differentiation of C. celerecrescens from the close species of the "C. clostridioforme group", an identification table and differential susceptibilities to 4 selected antibiotics are proposed. Once a clinical isolate is referred to this group, identification should be definitively confirmed by unambiguous methods such as 16s rDNA sequencing. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. New techniques for growing anaerobic bacteria: Experiments with Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, H.I.; Crow, W.D.; Hadden, C.T.; Hall, J.; Machanoff, R.

    1983-01-01

    Stable membrane fragments derived from Escherichia coli produce and maintain strict anaerobic conditions when added to liquid or solid bacteriological media. Techniques for growing Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum in membrane containing media are described. Liquid cultures initiated by very small inocula can be grown in direct contact with air. In solid media, colonies develop rapidly from individual cells even without incubation in anaerobic jars or similar devices. Observations on growth rates, spontaneous mutations, radiation and oxygen sensitivity of anaerobic bacteria have been made using these new techniques.

  16. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Takehara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  17. Postpartum Clostridium sordellii infection associated with fatal toxic shock syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, C; Petersen, Ina Sleimann; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium bacteria are anaerobic Gram positive spore-form-ing bacilli, known to cause distinct clinical syndromes such as botulism, tetanus, pseudomembranous colitis and myonecrosis. The natural habitats of Clostridium species are soil, water and the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans...

  18. 9 CFR 113.108 - Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.108 Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Novyi... Alpha toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following...

  19. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.109 Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium... potency using the toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the...

  20. Clostridium difficile causing acute renal failure: Case presentation and review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jasmin Arrich; Gottfried H. Sodeck; Gürkan Seng(o)lge; Christoforos Konnaris; Marcus Müllner; Anton N. Laggner; Hans Domanovits

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Clostridium difficile infection is primarily a nosocomial infection but asymptomatic carriers of Clostridium difficile can be found in up to 5% of the general population.Ampicillin, cephalosporins and clindamycin are the antibiotics that are most frequently associated with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea or colitis. Little is known about acute renal failure as a consequence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.METHODS: In this case report, we describe the course of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an 82-yearold patient developing acute renal failure. Stopping the offending agent and symptomatic therapy brought a rapid improvement of diarrhea and acute renal failure, full recovery was gained 18 d after admission. In a systematic review we looked for links between the two conditions.RESULTS: The link between Clostridium difficilr-associated diarrhea and acute renal failure in our patient was most likely volume depletion. However, in experimental studies a direct influence of Clostridium difficile toxins on renal duct cells could be shown.CONCLUSION: Rapid diagnosis, nonspecific supportive treatment and specific antibiotic treatment, especially in the elderly, may lower excess mortality Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and renal failure being possible complications.

  1. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  2. Postpartum Clostridium sordellii infection associated with fatal toxic shock syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, C; Petersen, Ina Sleimann; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium bacteria are anaerobic Gram positive spore-form-ing bacilli, known to cause distinct clinical syndromes such as botulism, tetanus, pseudomembranous colitis and myonecrosis. The natural habitats of Clostridium species are soil, water and the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans......, respectively) are responsible for this potential. Reviewing the obstetric literature, only six cases of postpartum endometritis caused by C. sordellii, are described - all being fatal. In addition, one lethal case of spontaneous endometritis resulting from C. sordellii is reported. The clinical aspects....... In 5-10% of all women, Clostridium species are also found to be normal inhabitants in the microbial flora of the female genital tract. In case of a non-sexually transmitted genital tract infection, Clostridium species are isolated in 4-20%, and clostridium welchii seems to be the most common isolate...

  3. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  4. Finished Whole-Genome Sequences of Clostridium butyricum Toxin Subtype E4 and Clostridium baratii Toxin Subtype F7 Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Jessica L; Hill, Karen; Johnson, Shannon L; Bruce, David Carlton; Shirey, T Brian; Dykes, Janet K; Lúquez, Carolina

    2017-07-20

    Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii species have been known to produce botulinum toxin types E and F, respectively, which can cause botulism, a rare but serious neuroparalytic disease. Here, we present finished genome sequences for two of these clinically relevant strains. Copyright © 2017 Halpin et al.

  5. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains.

  6. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Skarin

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum (group III, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains.

  7. Colitis fulminante asociada a Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    BANNURA C,GUILLERMO; ROSS R,GONZALO; GABLER N,FERNANDO; ESPERGUEL G,CARLOS

    2012-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de una paciente de 46 años sometida a una artroplastía de cadera bilateral que presenta diarrea secundaria a infección por Clostridium difficile (CD), que fi1e tratada con metronidazol y vancomicina por 10 días con buena evolución. Reingresa 3 días después con un cuadro caracterizado por fiebre, compromiso del estado general, diarrea, distensión abdominal, deshidratación y signos de hipotensión. La tomografía computada (TC) mostró imágenes compatibles con colitis pseudomem...

  8. Continuous Production of Clostridium tetani Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Bengt; Björklund, Marianne

    1968-01-01

    The continuous production of Clostridium tetani toxin has been carried out in a 1-liter stirred culture vessel for as long as 65 days. Toxin production of approximately 120 flocculating units per ml was maintained with a dilution rate of 0.125 hr-1, a temperature of 34 C, a pH of 7.4, and the addition to the medium of 0.1 g of potassium chloride per liter. The average minimal lethal intraperitoneal dose of the toxin in mice was approximately 106 per ml. PMID:4865906

  9. Nanomechanical analysis of Clostridium tyrobutyricum spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, N; Bassi, D; Cappa, F; Cocconcelli, P S; Parmigiani, F; Ferrini, G

    2010-12-01

    In this work we report on the measurement of the Young modulus of the external surface of Clostridium tyrobutyricum spores in air with an atomic force microscope. The Young modulus can be reliably measured despite the strong tip-spore adhesion forces and the need to immobilize the spores due to their slipping on most substrates. Moreover, we investigate the disturbing factors and consider some practical aspects that influence the measurements of elastic properties of biological objects with the atomic force microscopy indentation techniques.

  10. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  11. Clostridium difficile in Humans and Food Animals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-06-30

    Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that causes diarrhea and sometimes serious intestinal illnesses. In recent years, C. difficile infections have been increasing in number and severity, including among some people outside healthcare settings. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Michael Jhung discusses his recent study that looked at a new, increasingly prevalent strain of C. difficile in people and compared it to a strain historically found in animals to see whether the two might be linked. The study is published in the July 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 6/30/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/3/2008.

  12. Recent changes in Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Silva Júnior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Diarrhea associated with C. difficile has increased incidence, morbidity, and mortality in the last few years. The major related risk factors include use of antibiotics, elderly patients and prolonged hospital stay. Many patients receive combinations of antibiotics or multiple antibiotics, which represents the main risk to develop diarrhea associated to C. difficile or its recurrence. Therefore, interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing, as well as compliance with infection control measures can reduce hospital-acquired C. difficile infections. This review addresses the epidemiological changes in C. difficile disease and its treatment.

  13. Immune responses to Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Rajat; William A. Petri

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the causal agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the US. C. difficile has been known to cause severe diarrhea and colitis for more than 30 years, but the emergence of a newer, hypervirulent strain of C. difficile (BI/NAP1) has further compounded the problem, and recently both number of cases and mortality associated with C. difficile-associated diarrhea has been increasing. One of the major drivers of disease...

  14. Alternative medium for Clostridium perfringens sporulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Tórtora, J C

    1984-01-01

    A medium containing 0.50 g of thiotone peptone, 0.30 g of soluble starch, 0.02 g of MgSO4 X 7H2O, 0.90 g of Na2HPO4 X 2H2O, 100.00 ml of distilled water, and optionally , 166 micrograms of dichloridric thiamine supported sporulation of 138 out of 141 Clostridium perfringens strains. Comparatively this medium gave a greater percentage of sporulation than five other media described previously.

  15. Clostridium difficile infection and fecal bacteriotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Indya; Shropshire, Kasheena; Ruel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, also called "C. diff," is a gram-positive bacillus associated with nosocomial infections involving diarrhea, most often seen in developing countries. The severity of C. diff-associated diarrhea varies tremendously from mild and self-limiting to fulminant and life-threatening. C. diff has become an extremely important pathogen in community health but can be minimized with attention to proper hygiene. This article presents a case study regarding the treatment and management options of C. diff infection using a recent update of clinical guidelines for patient management.

  16. Recombination and Insertion Events Involving the Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex Genes in Clostridium botulinum Types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum Type E Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-05

    Bruggemann H, Baumer S, Fricke WF, Wiezer A, Liesegang H, Decker I, et al.: The genome sequence of Clostridium tetani , the caus- ative agent of... Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E and F and Clostridium butyricum type E strains Karen K Hill*1, Gary Xie2, Brian T Foley3, Theresa J Smith4, Amy C Munk2...ornl.gov; John C Detter - cdetter@lanl.gov * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for at least

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for Isopropanol-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sung Jun; Im, Jung Ae; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung Hee; Seung, Do Young; Papoutsakis, E. Terry; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum naturally produces acetone as well as butanol and ethanol. Since acetone cannot be used as a biofuel, its production needs to be minimized or suppressed by cell or bioreactor engineering. Thus, there have been attempts to disrupt or inactivate the acetone formation pathway. Here we present another approach, namely, converting acetone to isopropanol by metabolic engineering. Since isopropanol can be used as a fuel additive, the mixture of isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) produced by engineered C. acetobutylicum can be directly used as a biofuel. IBE production is achieved by the expression of a primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-593 (i.e., adhB-593) in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. To increase the total alcohol titer, a synthetic acetone operon (act operon; adc-ctfA-ctfB) was constructed and expressed to increase the flux toward isopropanol formation. When this engineering strategy was applied to the PJC4BK strain lacking in the buk gene (encoding butyrate kinase), a significantly higher titer and yield of IBE could be achieved. The resulting PJC4BK(pIPA3-Cm2) strain produced 20.4 g/liter of total alcohol. Fermentation could be prolonged by in situ removal of solvents by gas stripping, and 35.6 g/liter of the IBE mixture could be produced in 45 h. PMID:22210214

  18. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 for isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sung Jun; Im, Jung Ae; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung Hee; Seung, Do Young; Papoutsakis, E Terry; Bennett, George N; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum naturally produces acetone as well as butanol and ethanol. Since acetone cannot be used as a biofuel, its production needs to be minimized or suppressed by cell or bioreactor engineering. Thus, there have been attempts to disrupt or inactivate the acetone formation pathway. Here we present another approach, namely, converting acetone to isopropanol by metabolic engineering. Since isopropanol can be used as a fuel additive, the mixture of isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) produced by engineered C. acetobutylicum can be directly used as a biofuel. IBE production is achieved by the expression of a primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B-593 (i.e., adh(B-593)) in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. To increase the total alcohol titer, a synthetic acetone operon (act operon; adc-ctfA-ctfB) was constructed and expressed to increase the flux toward isopropanol formation. When this engineering strategy was applied to the PJC4BK strain lacking in the buk gene (encoding butyrate kinase), a significantly higher titer and yield of IBE could be achieved. The resulting PJC4BK(pIPA3-Cm2) strain produced 20.4 g/liter of total alcohol. Fermentation could be prolonged by in situ removal of solvents by gas stripping, and 35.6 g/liter of the IBE mixture could be produced in 45 h.

  19. 1,3-Propanediol production potential of Clostridium saccharobutylicum NRRL B-643.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungormusler, Mine; Gonen, Cagdas; Ozdemir, Guven; Azbar, Nuri

    2010-12-31

    Owing to the significant interest in biofuel production in the form of biodiesel, vast amount of glycerol as a waste product is produced all over the world. Among the economically viable and ecologically acceptable solutions for the safe disposal of this waste, biotechnological conversion of glycerol into a valuable bioplastic raw material, namely 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) seems to be very promising. In this study, 1,3-PDO production potential of Clostridium saccharobutylicum NRRL B-643 was studied and the results were compared with other types of anaerobic microorganisms (Clostridium spp., Pantoea agglomerans, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Chyreseomonas luteola, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and aerobic microorganisms (Lactobacillus spp.). The results were important for understanding the significance of C. saccharobutylicum NRRL B-643 among other well-known 1,3-PDO producer species. According to the screening results only C. saccharobutylicum (B-643) was able to consume feed glycerol almost entirely. However, 1,3-PDO production yield was found to be 0.36mol/mol which is lower than that of Clostiridium beijerinckii (B-593). B-593 showed the highest value of production yields with 0.54 mol/mol. This microorganism is seen as a promising type for further 1,3-PDO studies, because it has the highest substrate utilization percentage among others. In this regard, this microorganism may have an important role in tolerating and converting glycerol during fermentation into 1,3-PDO. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clostridium novyi, sordellii, and tetani: mechanisms of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, David M

    2013-12-01

    Clostridia represent a diverse group of spore-forming gram positive anaerobes that include several pathogenic species. In general, diseases caused by clostridia are a result of intoxication of the infected host. Thus, clostridial toxins have been targeted for diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies against infection. Studying the mechanisms of action of clostridial toxins has not only shed light on the pathogenesis of infection but has provided important new insights into cell biology and immunology. A primary purpose of this manuscript is to provide a succinct review on the mechanisms of disease caused by intoxication by the pathogens Clostridium tetani, Clostridium novyi, and Clostridium sordellii.

  1. Key research issues in Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanel, George; Hammond, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen that causes C difficile-associated diarrhea, an important nosocomial infection. Control of this infection remains a challenge, and much needs to be determined about the antimicrobial resistance of the organism, antibiotic stewardship, contamination of the patient environment, and various host factors that determine susceptibility or resistance to infection. A national symposium focusing on C difficile infections, the Clostridium difficile Symposium on Emerging Issues and Research, was hosted on November 23, 2004, by the Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, in partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. This symposium, which aimed to summarize key research issues regarding C difficile infections in Canada, had the following objectives: to provide a forum for learning and discussion about C difficile and its impact on the health of Canadians; to identify the key research issues that should be addressed; and to explore potential research funding opportunities and collaboration. The present report summarizes key research issues identified for C difficile infections in Canada by addressing four major themes: diagnosis and surveillance, infection prevention and control, antibiotic stewardship, and clinical management. PMID:18159559

  2. The Pangenome of the genus Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2017-03-21

    We present the pangenome for the genus Clostridium sensu stricto, which was obtained using highly curated and annotated genomes from 16 species, some of these cause disease, while others are used for the production of added-value chemicals. Multilocus sequencing analysis revealed that species of this genus group into at least two clades that include non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains, suggesting that pathogenicity is dispersed across the phylogenetic tree. The core genome of the genus includes 546 protein families, which mainly comprise those involved in protein translation and DNA repair. The GS-GOGAT may represent the central pathway for generating organic nitrogen from inorganic nitrogen sources. Glycerol and glucose metabolism genes are well represented in the core genome together with a set of energy conservation systems. A metabolic network comprising proteins/enzymes, RNAs and metabolites, whose topological structure is a non-random and scale-free network with hierarchically structured modules was built. These modules shed light on the interactions between RNAs, proteins and metabolites, revealing biological features of transcription and translation, cell wall biosynthesis, C1 metabolism and N metabolism. Network analysis identified four nodes that function as hubs and bottlenecks, namely, coenzyme A, HPr kinases, S-adenosylmethionine and the ribonuclease P-protein, suggesting pivotal roles for them in Clostridium. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman Evans Ii, Martin; Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara; Salama, Joseph John

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26-25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association.

  4. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: prevention and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez FJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fernando J Martinez,1 Daniel A Leffler,2 Ciaran P Kelly21Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral vancomycin use as a first-line agent in severe disease. From 1999 to 2004, 20,642 deaths were attributed to CDI in the United States, almost 7 times the rate of all other intestinal infections combined. Worldwide, several major CDI outbreaks have occurred, and many of these were associated with the NAP1 strain. This ‘epidemic’ strain has contributed to the rising incidence and mortality of CDI. The purpose of this article is to review the current management, treatment, infection control, and prevention strategies that are needed to combat this increasingly morbid disease.Keywords: antibiotic, antimicrobial, infectious colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, nosocomial, iatrogenic, toxin, Clostridium difficile

  5. Clostridium to treat cancer: dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, Jan; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    In their paper "Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses", Roberts et al. describe the induction of antitumor responses following local spore administration of an attenuated C. novyi strain (C. novyi-NT). Stereotactic intratumoral spore injection led to significant survival advantages in a murine orthotopic brain model and local bacterial treatment produced robust responses in a set of spontaneous canine soft tissue carcinomas. Their preclinical findings in both models, provided the basis for a phase 1 investigational clinical study in patients with solid tumors that were either refractory to standard treatment or without an available standard treatment available (NCT01924689). The results of the first patient enrolled in this trial, a 53-year-old female with a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma, are described. Next to the non-armed C. novyi-NT described in this paper, very potent genetically modified Clostridium expressing anti-cancer therapeutic genes are also being developed. Are treatments with these non-pathogenic clostridia a viable alternative cancer treatment?

  6. Genomic approach to studying nutritional requirements of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and other Clostridia causing late blowing defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storari, Michelangelo; Kulli, Sandra; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bruggmann, Rémy; Berthoud, Hélène; Arias-Roth, Emmanuelle

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is the main microorganism responsible for the late blowing defect in hard and semi-hard cheeses, causing considerable economic losses to the cheese industry. Deeper knowledge of the metabolic requirements of this microorganism can lead to the development of more effective control approaches. In this work, the amino acids and B vitamins essential for sustaining the growth of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated using a genomic approach. As the first step, the genomes of four C. tyrobutyricum strains were analyzed for the presence of genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids and B vitamins. Metabolic pathways could be reconstructed for all amino acids and B vitamins with the exception of biotin (vitamin B7) and folate (vitamin B9). The biotin pathway was missing the enzyme amino-7-oxononanoate synthase that catalyzes the condensation of pimeloyl-ACP and l-alanine to 8-amino-7-oxononanoate. In the folate pathway, the missing genes were those coding for para-aminobenzoate synthase and aminodeoxychorismate lyase enzymes. These enzymes are responsible for the conversion of chorismate into para-aminobenzoate (PABA). Two C. tyrobutyircum strains whose genome was analyzed in silico as well as other 10 strains isolated from cheese were tested in liquid media to confirm these observations. 11 strains showed growth in a defined liquid medium containing biotin and PABA after 6-8 days of incubation. No strain showed growth when only one or none of these compounds were added, confirming the observations obtained in silico. Furthermore, the genome analysis was extended to genomes of single strains of other Clostridium species potentially causing late blowing, namely Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium butyricum. Only the biotin biosynthesis pathway was incomplete for C. butyricum and C. beijerincki. In contrast, C. sporogenes showed missing enzymes in biosynthesis pathways of several amino acids as well

  7. [Experience with laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareková, L; Zálabská, E; Hanovcová, I

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is currently a significant cause of nosocomial diarrhea. For several years, the number of infectious cases in the community has also been increasing. Since the beginning of 2010, quite a large increase in the number of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) has been noted in Pardubice Regional Hospital (PRH). The objectives of this study were to describe and evaluate the methods used in the laboratory diagnosis of CDIs in PRH, and to describe the laboratory diagnostic algorithm used here. Samples of stools were taken from symptomatic patients hospitalized or examined in the outpatient departments of PRH from 1 July 2010 to 31 December 2012. For the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A/B, the dual test based upon the principle enzyme immunoassays C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Techlabo (D-EIA) was used. The system GeneXpert PCR Cepheid (PCR) was used for confirmation of laboratory findings. Since the beginning of 2011, all the GDH-positive samples were cultured. A total of 2,040 samples were examined. The D-EIA test was used for examination of 2,014 samples. Of those, 1,373 (68.2 %) samples were GDH- and toxin A/B-negative. In 359 (17.8 %) samples, both GDH and toxin A/B were detected. The D-EIA sensitivity and specificity for detecting toxigenic strains in stool samples were 21.8% and 97.2%, respectively. The PPV and NPV rates calculated for the populations with prevalence rates of disorders of 5%, 10%, 20% and 50 % were 0.29, 0.46, 0.66, 0.88 and 0.96, 0.92, 0.83, 0.55, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of GDH for the detection of Clostridium difficile in stools were 100.0% and 96.2%, respectively. PCR examination was carried out in 140 samples. Of those, 82 samples were PCR-positive. The gene for the production of toxin B was detected in 47%, the finding suspected for ribotype 027 (gene for toxin B, binary toxin and deletion of tcdC) in 48%. In 5% of the samples, the gene for toxin B and the gene for the binary

  8. In vitro inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens by commercial probiotic strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent and control clostridial enteric disease. Limited information is available on the ability of different probiotic bacteria used in food products to inhibit Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. The objective......) on the reference strains of C. difficile and C. perfringens were assessed by an agar well diffusion assay and by a broth culture inhibition assay using cell-free supernatant harvested at different growth phases, with and without pH neutralization. To study growth characteristics, probiotic strains were cultivated...... in different acid and bile environments, and growth in the modified media was compared to growth in standard medium.In the agar well diffusion assay, supernatant obtained from two probiotic strains inhibited the growth of both reference and clinical strains of C. perfringens. This effect as seen when...

  9. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum from food sold in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwu, Emelda E; Nwaokorie, Francisca O; Coker, Akitoye O; Avila-Campos, Mario J; Solis, Rosa L; Llanco, Luis A; Ogunsola, Folasade T

    2016-12-01

    Food-borne diseases contribute to the huge burden of sickness and death globally and in the last decade, have become more frequently reported in Africa. In line with this, food safety is becoming a significant and growing public health problem in Nigeria. Diarrhoea is a common problem in Nigeria and has been reported but there has been little data on the possibility of clostridia as aetiological agents. Clostridium species are ubiquitous in the environment and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals and can serve as a marker for faecal contamination. We set out to determine the potential of these foods to transmit Clostridium species. A total of 220 food commodities from six local governments in Lagos State were sampled. Isolates obtained were identified based on cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Toxinotyping was done using multiplex-PCR with primers specific for alpha, beta, epsilon and iota-toxin genes, enterotoxigenic cpe gene and neurotoxigenic BoNt gene. Fifty (22.7%) clostridial species were isolated of which 29 (58%) were identified as C. perfringens. Toxinotyping of the 29 strains showed that 28 (96.6%) were toxin producing C. perfringens type A while one (3.4%) was C. perfringens type D. Two (4%) C. botulinum species were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, both harbouring BoNt/A gene. The contamination rates of food with Clostridium species show that food hygiene is a problem and Clostridium species may be a source of food borne disease in Lagos State, Nigeria.

  10. Clostridium difficile infections in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.M.; Keessen, A.M.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; Boer, de E.; Lipman, L.J.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known

  11. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martijn P; Notermans, Daan W; van Benthem, Birgit H B;

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance....

  12. Clostridium difficile Infection Worsens the Prognosis of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Negrón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients.

  13. Clostridium Difficile-Associated Diarrhea in 200 Canadian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Morinville

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a major problem in adults. The present study was conducted to assess risk factors and outcomes in children with C difficile-associated diarrhea.

  14. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  15. Characterization of Clostridium sp. RKD producing botulinum-like neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Aparna; Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-07-01

    A Gram positive, motile, rod-shaped, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from intestine of decaying fish was identified as Clostridium sp. RKD and produced a botulinum type B-like neurotoxin as suggested by mouse bioassay and protection with anti botulinum antibodies. The neurotoxicity was functionally characterized by the phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm assay. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence, placed it at a different position from the reported strains of Clostridium botulinum. The strain exhibited differences from both Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani with respect to morphological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics. Botulinum group specific and serotype specific primers amplified the DNA fragments of 260 and 727 bp, respectively, indicating presence of botulinum type 'B' toxin gene. Sequence of nearly 700 bp amplified using primers specific for botulinum neurotoxin type B gene, did not show any significant match in the database when subjected to BLAST search.

  16. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  17. Clostridium difficile infection in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.; Keessen, E.C.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; de Boer, E.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known predisposin

  18. Clostridium difficile infections in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.M.; Keessen, A.M.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; Boer, de E.; Lipman, L.J.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known predisposin

  19. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  20. [Clostridium perfringens septicemia associated with foodborne toxic infection and abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantelme, P; Mohammedi, I; Duperret, S; Vedrinne, J M; Allaouchiche, B; Motin, J

    1995-01-01

    A 32-year-old pregnant woman with poor life and hygiene conditions presented with premature labour, fever and diarrhoea. After admission she gave birth to a stillborn child. The examination revealed a septicaemia with massive haemolysis and renal failure. Six blood cultures obtained on admission yielded Clostridium perfringens. The outcome was favourable after an adapted antibiomicrobial therapy. This case illustrates the potential severity of Clostridium perfringens foodborne toxi-infection which can lead to abortion and septicaemia with massive haemolysis.

  1. Updates on the sporulation process in Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Prabhat K; Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Alnoman, Maryam; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2015-05-01

    Sporulation is an important strategy for certain bacterial species within the phylum Firmicutes to survive longer periods of time in adverse conditions. All spore-forming bacteria have two phases in their life; the vegetative form, where they can maintain all metabolic activities and replicate to increase numbers, and the spore form, where no metabolic activities exist. Although many essential components of sporulation are conserved among the spore-forming bacteria, there are differences in the regulation and the pathways among different genera, even at the species level. While we have gained much information from the most studied spore-forming bacterial genus, Bacillus, we still lack an in-depth understanding of spore formation in the genus Clostridium. Clostridium and Bacillus share the master regulator of sporulation, Spo0A, and its downstream pathways, but there are differences in the activation of the Spo0A pathway. While Bacillus species use a multi-component phosphorylation pathway for phosphorylation of Spo0A, termed phosphorelay, such a phosphorelay system is absent in Clostridium. On the other hand, a number of genes regulated by the different sporulation-specific transcription factors are conserved between different Clostridium and Bacillus species. In this review, we discuss the recent findings on Clostridium sporulation and compare the sporulation mechanism in Clostridium and Bacillus. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Colonization rate of Clostridium Difficile in healthy children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Guo, S; Zhao, C N; Xu, X W

    2017-04-02

    Objective: To learn the colonization of Clostridium difficile in local healthy children and to investigate the colonization rate and toxin types of Clostridium difficile at different ages. Method: From September 2014 to January 2015 in a case observational study, healthy children's fecal specimens from the health care department of Beijing Children's Hospital were collected. The children were divided into four groups according to age: Clostridium difficile toxin genes including tcdA, tcdB, binary toxin CDT (cdtA and cdtB), and toxin regulatory genes including tcdC, tcdD and tcdE. And then the positive samples were sequenced. Measurement data were compared by using t test and rank sum test, while, enumeration data were compared using chi-square test. Result: Fifteen (7.4%) specimens were positive for Clostridium difficile toxin genes in 203 stool specimens. Of the 15 positive specimens, eight(53.3%) were tcdA(+) tcdB(-)(A(+) B(-)), four were A(+) B(+) , 3(20.0%) were A(-)B(+) , the binary toxin-positive specimens were not detected. TcdC, tcdD, tcdE positive specimens were 8, 6 and 11, respectively. Gene mutations were not found in positive samples by DNA sequencing. In the 15 positive samples, four (7.5%) specimens were in Clostridium difficile in healthy children was 7.4%. And toxigenic Clostridium difficile can be detected in all age groups.

  3. Fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Matthew; Mellow, Mark; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have become more frequent, more severe, more refractory to standard treatment, and more likely to recur. Current antibiotic treatment regimens for Clostridium difficile infection alter the normal gut flora, which provide colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in the knowledge of the gut microbiota and its role in health maintenance and disease causation. This has, fortuitously, coincided with the use of a unique microbial replacement therapy, fecal microbiota transplantation, in the treatment of patients with multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. We briefly review current knowledge of the gut microbiota's functions. We then review the indications for use of fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection, the techniques employed, and results of treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be efficacious for patients with multiply recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (reported cure rates of 90%), with an excellent short-term safety profile, and has been included in the American College of Gastroenterology treatment guidelines for this troublesome disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Harbingers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Chaitanya; Madonia, Phillip N; Jordan, Paul; Manas, Kenneth; Bass, Pat

    2009-01-01

    : Recent research has recognized surrogate markers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Among the most consistently identified markers are the leukocyte count, platelet count, and albumin level. Previous investigators failed to exclude patients with hematologic disorders that may have confounded their results. Therefore, the exclusion of this subset from our study lends it a unique perspective. : We undertook a retrospective review of inpatients at our institution that were diagnosed with nosocomial diarrhea and subsequently had a stool sample sent for C. difficile toxins A and B. Patients with major hematologic disorders were excluded. : A total of 77 C. difficile-positive patients and 91 C. difficile-negative patients were studied. Patients with CDAD had a significantly higher leukocyte and platelet count but a lower albumin level compared with patients without CDAD. : Our results support the conclusion of preceding studies that leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia are reliable clinical predictors for CDAD even after careful exclusion of confounding factors.

  5. Engineering clostridium strain to accept unmethylated DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Dong

    Full Text Available It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level.

  6. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course...... of C. difficile infected patients. METHODS: In this prospective, comparative, multicenter study, 211 pediatric patients with IBD were enrolled from October 2010 to October 2011 and tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins A and B in their stools at 0, 6, and 12 months. During the same study.......08, respectively). Hospitalizations were higher at 6 months in C. difficile group (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study demonstrates that pediatric IBD is associated with increased C. difficile detection. Patients with C. difficile tend to have active colonic disease and a more severe disease course....

  7. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Szymanowska-Powałowska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L. A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties.

  8. Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubakka, Alyssa; Vaughn, Byron P

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. This review covers the current epidemiology of CDI (including toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains, risk factors for infection, and recurrent infection), methods of diagnosis, existing first-line therapies in CDI, the role of fecal microbiota transplant for multiple recurrent CDIs, and the potential use of fecal microbial transplant for patients with severe or refractory infection. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Isolating and Purifying Clostridium difficile Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; McBride, Shonna M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability for the obligate anaerobe, Clostridium difficile, to form a metabolically dormant spore is critical for the survival of this organism outside of the host. This spore form is resistant to a myriad of environmental stresses, including heat, desiccation and exposure to disinfectants and antimicrobials. These intrinsic properties of spores allow C. difficile to survive long-term in an oxygenated environment, to be easily transmitted from host-to-host and to persist within the host following antibiotic treatment. Because of the importance of the spore form to the C. difficile lifecycle and treatment and prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI), the isolation and purification of spores are necessary to study the mechanisms of sporulation and germination, investigate spore properties and resistances, and for use in animal models of CDI. This chapter provides basic protocols, in vitro growth conditions and additional considerations for purifying C. difficile spores for a variety of downstream applications. PMID:27507337

  10. PCR multiplex para identificação de isolados de Clostridium chauvoei e Clostridium septicum Multiplex PCR for identification of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Assis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Padronizou-se uma técnica de reação em cadeia da polimerase múltipla (PCR multiplex para detecção de Clostridium chauvoei e Clostridium septicum em culturas puras. Foram utilizados pares de iniciadores para segmentos específicos dos genes que codificam a flagelina de C. chauvoei e a toxina alfa de C. septicum. Para avaliaçã o da PCR multiplex, foram testados 16 isolados clínicos de C. chauvoei e 15 isolados de C. septicum provenientes de ruminantes, quatro sementes vacinais de cada um desses agentes. Amostras de referência de ambos os microrganismos foram usadas como controle. Para avaliar a especificidade, DNAs genômicos dos seguintes microrganismos foram usados: C. sordellii, C. novyi tipo A, C. novyi tipo B, C. perfringens tipo A, C. haemolyticum, C. botulinum tipo D, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli e Salmonella typhimurium. Todos os isolados e sementes vacinais de C. chauvoei e C. septicum foram detectados pela técnica. Não foram observadas reações cruzadas com as outras espécies de clostrídios, outras espécies bacterianas ou entre C. Chauvoei e C. septicum. As menores concentrações de DNA de C. chauvoei e C. septicum detectadas foram 45pg/µl e 30pg/µl, respectivamente. A PCR multiplex pode ser utilizada para a identificação específica de C. chauvoei e C. septicum em culturas puras.Multiplex PCR was optimized to detect Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in pure cultures. In each reaction, a pair of primers for a specific segment of the flagellin gene of C. chauvoei and a pair of primers for a specific segment of alpha toxin gene of C. septicum were employed. Reference strains of both microorganisms were used as control. The multiplex PCR was evaluated by testing 16 clinical isolates of C. chauvoei from ruminants, 15 clinical isolates of C. septicum from ruminants and, four vaccine strains of each one of these agents. Reference strains of both

  11. Clostridium difficile: un patógeno emergente en Medicina Veterinaria - Clostridium difficile: an emergent pathogen in Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Evelyn Thomson Morales

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ResumenClostridium difficile es un bacilo Gram positivo esporulado que forma parte de la microbiota intestinal del hombre y animales domésticos y es una causa establecida de diarrea y colitis pseudomembranosa.AbstractClostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram-positive spore-forming rod that forms part of the intestinal tract of humans and domestic animals. The organism is a recognized cause of diarrhea, and pseudomembranous colitis.

  12. Enhanced isopropanol and n-butanol production by supplying exogenous acetic acid via co-culturing two clostridium strains from cassava bagasse hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaozhi; Qu, Chunyun; Huang, Xiaoyan; Suo, Yukai; Liao, Zhengping; Wang, Jufang

    2016-07-01

    The focus of this study was to produce isopropanol and butanol (IB) from dilute sulfuric acid treated cassava bagasse hydrolysate (SACBH), and improve IB production by co-culturing Clostridium beijerinckii (C. beijerinckii) with Clostridium tyrobutyricum (C. tyrobutyricum) in an immobilized-cell fermentation system. Concentrated SACBH could be converted to solvents efficiently by immobilized pure culture of C. beijerinckii. Considerable solvent concentrations of 6.19 g/L isopropanol and 12.32 g/L butanol were obtained from batch fermentation, and the total solvent yield and volumetric productivity were 0.42 g/g and 0.30 g/L/h, respectively. Furthermore, the concentrations of isopropanol and butanol increased to 7.63 and 13.26 g/L, respectively, under the immobilized co-culture conditions when concentrated SACBH was used as the carbon source. The concentrations of isopropanol and butanol from the immobilized co-culture fermentation were, respectively, 42.62 and 25.45 % higher than the production resulting from pure culture fermentation. The total solvent yield and volumetric productivity increased to 0.51 g/g and 0.44 g/L/h when co-culture conditions were utilized. Our results indicated that SACBH could be used as an economically favorable carbon source or substrate for IB production using immobilized fermentation. Additionally, IB production could be significantly improved by co-culture immobilization, which provides extracellular acetic acid to C. beijerinckii from C. tyrobutyricum. This study provided a technically feasible and cost-efficient way for IB production using cassava bagasse, which may be suitable for industrial solvent production.

  13. Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov., a novel member of the genus Clostridium, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yeseul; Kang, Seok-Seong; Paek, Jayoung; Jin, Tae Eun; Song, Hong Seok; Kim, Hongik; Park, Hee-Moon; Chang, Young-Hyo

    2016-06-01

    Two bacterial strains, YHK0403(T) and YHK0508, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipe line, were revealed as Gram-negative, obligately anaerobic, spore-forming and mesophilic bacteria. The cells were rod-shaped and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates were members of the genus Clostridium and were the most closely related to Clostridium scatologenes KCTC 5588(T) (95.8% sequence similarity), followed by Clostridium magnum KCTC 15177(T) (95.8%), Clostridium drakei KCTC 5440(T) (95.7%) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387(T) (94.9%). The G + C contents of the isolates were 29.6 mol%. Peptidoglycan in the cell wall was of the A1γ type with meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major polar lipid was diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), and other minor lipids were revealed as phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), two unknown glycolipids (GL1 and GL2), an unknown aminoglycolipid (NGL), two unknown aminophospholipids (PN1 and PN2) and four unknown phospholipids (PL1 to PL4). Predominant fatty acids were C16:0 and C16:1cis9 DMA. The major end products from glucose fermentation were identified as butyrate (12.2 mmol) and acetate (9.8 mmol). Collectively, the results from a wide range of phenotypic tests, chemotaxonomic tests, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two isolates represent novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov. (type strain, YHK0403(T) = KCTC 15258(T) = JCM 18719(T)) is proposed.

  14. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Fermentative hydrogen production from glucose and starch using pure strains and artificial co-cultures ofClostridium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masset Julien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pure bacterial strains give better yields when producing H2 than mixed, natural communities. However the main drawback with the pure cultures is the need to perform the fermentations under sterile conditions. Therefore, H2 production using artificial co-cultures, composed of well characterized strains, is one of the directions currently undertaken in the field of biohydrogen research. Results Four pure Clostridium cultures, including C. butyricum CWBI1009, C. pasteurianum DSM525, C. beijerinckii DSM1820 and C. felsineum DSM749, and three different co-cultures composed of (1 C. pasteurianum and C. felsineum, (2 C. butyricum and C. felsineum, (3 C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum, were grown in 20 L batch bioreactors. In the first part of the study a strategy composed of three-culture sequences was developed to determine the optimal pH for H2 production (sequence 1; and the H2-producing potential of each pure strain and co-culture, during glucose (sequence 2 and starch (sequence 3 fermentations at the optimal pH. The best H2 yields were obtained for starch fermentations, and the highest yield of 2.91 mol H2/ mol hexose was reported for C. butyricum. By contrast, the biogas production rates were higher for glucose fermentations and the highest value of 1.5 L biogas/ h was observed for the co-culture (1. In general co-cultures produced H2 at higher rates than the pure Clostridium cultures, without negatively affecting the H2 yields. Interestingly, all the Clostridium strains and co-cultures were shown to utilize lactate (present in a starch-containing medium, and C. beijerinckii was able to re-consume formate producing additional H2. In the second part of the study the co-culture (3 was used to produce H2 during 13 days of glucose fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR. In addition, the species dynamics, as monitored by qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR, showed a stable coexistence of C. pasteurianum and C

  16. Clostridium difficile Carriage Rate in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

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    Mohammad Hosain Salari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Closteridium difficile is a gram positive, anaerobic and spore-forming bacillus. Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation of the intestinal mucosa in these patients can be as a risk factor for colonization of Clostridium difficile. The purpose of this study was to analysis of Clostridium difficile carriage in the IBD outpatients. Materials and methods: Stool specimens were obtained from 50 outpatients with IBD. Stools were cultured on selective media under anaerobic conditions. Filtered extract of bacteria was exposed to HeLa cell culture for analysis of toxin production after identification of Clostridium difficile isolates. Results: The results showed that 3 IBD patients (6% had stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile. Stool cultures were negative in all patients with Crohn's disease. All 3 patients had ulcerative colitis. Only one isolate was positive for toxin production. Conclusion: The ulcerated colitis than Crohn's patients had higher carriage. In general IBD outpatients carriage rates for Clostridium difficile was low.

  17. Cryptic Polyketide Synthase Genes in Non-Pathogenic Clostridium SPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Swantje; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Modular type I polyketide synthases (PKS) produce a vast array of bacterial metabolites with highly diverse biological functions. Notably, all known polyketides were isolated from aerobic bacteria, and yet no example has been reported for strict anaerobes. In this study we explored the diversity and distribution of PKS genes in the genus Clostridium. In addition to comparative genomic analyses combined with predictions of modular type I polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters in sequenced genomes of Clostridium spp., a representative selection of other species inhabiting a variety of ecological niches was investigated by PCR screening for PKS genes. Our data reveal that all studied pathogenic Clostridium spp. are devoid of putative PKS genes. In stark contrast, cryptic PKS genes are widespread in genomes of non-pathogenic Clostridium species. According to phylogenetic analyses, the Clostridium PKS genes have unusual and diverse origins. However, reverse transcription quantitative PCR demonstrates that these genes are silent under standard cultivation conditions, explaining why the related metabolites have been overlooked until now. This study presents clostridia as a putative source for novel bioactive polyketides. PMID:22235310

  18. Organization and regulation of the neurotoxin genes in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffestin, Stéphanie; Marvaud, Jean Christophe; Cerrato, Rosario; Dupuy, Bruno; Popoff, Michel R

    2004-04-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related 150 kDa proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin associates with non-toxic proteins to form complexes of various sizes. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus. This locus is probably located on a mobile or degenerate mobile element, which accounts for the various genomic localizations (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in different Clostridium botulinum types. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. The gene that separates the two operons of the botulinum locus in C. botulinum A encodes a 21 kDa protein BotR/A, which is a positive regulator of the expression of the botulinum locus genes. Similarly, in Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of the tetanus toxin gene, encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR. BotR and TetR are possibly alternative sigma factors related to TxeR and UviA, which regulate C. difficile toxin and C. perfringens bacteriocin production, respectively. TxeR and UviA define a new sub-group of the sigma(70) family of RNA polymerase initiation factors. In addition, the C. botulinum genome contains predicted two-component system genes, some of which are possibly involved in regulation of toxinogenesis.

  19. Genomics of Clostridium botulinum group III strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    In Clostridium botulinum, the characteristics of type C and D strains are quite different from other types, and they are classified as group III. They produce C2 binary toxin and C3 exoenzyme in addition to type C and D neurotoxins. Two different phages and many plasmids are identified in the organisms. The genes of neurotoxin and C3 exoenzyme are converted from toxigenic strains to non-toxigenic strains by the specific bacteriophages (phages), whereas, the C2 toxin gene is carried by large or small plasmids. Classification of type C and D strains has been in confusion because 1) antigenicity of type C and D neurotoxins is complex, 2) the cells produce two types of toxins, neurotoxin and C2 toxin, and 3) some non-toxigenic strains can be converted to produce C or D neurotoxin by the infection with phages. Until now, entire nucleotide sequences of cell chromosomes, phages, and plasmids have been determined. Since both genetic and protein-chemical analyses have been clarifying the above confusions, these data are reviewed historically.

  20. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-05-14

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250-300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.

  1. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  2. A prediction model for Clostridium difficile recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis D. LaBarbera

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a growing problem in the community and hospital setting. Its incidence has been on the rise over the past two decades, and it is quickly becoming a major concern for the health care system. High rate of recurrence is one of the major hurdles in the successful treatment of C. difficile infection. There have been few studies that have looked at patterns of recurrence. The studies currently available have shown a number of risk factors associated with C. difficile recurrence (CDR; however, there is little consensus on the impact of most of the identified risk factors. Methods: Our study was a retrospective chart review of 198 patients diagnosed with CDI via Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR from February 2009 to Jun 2013. In our study, we decided to use a machine learning algorithm called the Random Forest (RF to analyze all of the factors proposed to be associated with CDR. This model is capable of making predictions based on a large number of variables, and has outperformed numerous other models and statistical methods. Results: We came up with a model that was able to accurately predict the CDR with a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 63.1%, and area under curve of 82.6%. Like other similar studies that have used the RF model, we also had very impressive results. Conclusions: We hope that in the future, machine learning algorithms, such as the RF, will see a wider application.

  3. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  4. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  5. The Tcp conjugation system of Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Rood, Julian I

    2017-03-07

    The Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens possesses a family of large conjugative plasmids that is typified by the tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. Since these plasmids may carry antibiotic resistance genes or genes encoding extracellular or sporulation-associated toxins, the conjugative transfer of these plasmids appears to be important for the epidemiology of C. perfringens-mediated diseases. Sequence analysis of members of this plasmid family identified a highly conserved 35kb region that encodes proteins with various functions, including plasmid replication and partitioning. The tcp conjugation locus also was identified in this region, initially based on low-level amino acid sequence identity to conjugation proteins from the integrative conjugative element Tn916. Genetic studies confirmed that the tcp locus is required for conjugative transfer and combined with biochemical and structural analyses have led to the development of a functional model of the Tcp conjugation apparatus. This review summarises our current understanding of the Tcp conjugation system, which is now one of the best-characterized conjugation systems in Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Clostridium perfringens isolate typing by multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Ahsani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen that provokes numerous different diseases. This bacterium is classified into five different types, each of which capable of causing a different disease. There are various methods for the bacterial identification, many are labor-intensive, time-consuming, expensive and also present low sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this research was to identify the different types of C. perfringens using PCR molecular method. In this study, 130 sheep-dung samples were randomly collected from areas around the city of Kerman, southeastern Iran. After processing and culturing of samples, the produced colonies were morphologically studied, gram stain test was also carried out and the genera of these bacteria were identified through biochemical tests. DNA extracted from isolated bacteria for genotyping was tested by multiplex PCR with specific primers. Based on length of synthesized fragments by PCR, toxin types and bacterial strains were detected. C. perfringens isolated types were divided as follows: 17.39% type A, 21.74% type B, 34.78% type C and 26.09% type D. It should be emphasized that, up to the present moment, C. perfringens type A has not been reported in Iran.

  7. Clostridium difficile – emergent hospital flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela V. Dumitrescu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile is a Gram-positive sporogenous bacillus strictly anaerobic, which in the last decade has became the most important anaerobic bacterium in nosocomial human pathology. Cl.dificile is the etiological agent of more than 20% of diarrhea postantibiotics, over 95% of pseudomembranous colitis and the first cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea in adults. Although this bacterium usually colonizes the intestine of vertebrates (the normal microbiota, the toxinogenic strains (tcdA and tcdB are pathogenic in the digestive tract. Given the excessive use of antibiotics and the increased spores resistance, it is possible an environment contamination, with strains which may already be resistant to antibiotics. The main causes of this infection are decreased resistance to antibiotic-induced colonization, contamination with a pathogenic strain of Cl.difficile, secretion of A and/or B toxins and deficient immune response. Due to the increasing worldwide incidence of infections with C. difficile on one hand and to the discovery of new ways of transmitting the infection according with some studies regarding the genetic diversity of bacterium strains on the other hand, a new approach is necessary for C. difficile related topics..

  8. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Verherstraeten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin, a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC. PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.

  9. Diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Tony M

    2015-02-01

    There have been dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), with increases in incidence and severity of disease, attributed to the emergence of a fluoroquinolone-resistant "hypervirulent" strain, ribotype 027. C. difficile is now the most common pathogen causing hospital-acquired infection in U.S. hospitals, and community-acquired infections are increasing. The diagnosis of CDI is based on a combination of signs and symptoms, confirmed by laboratory tests. Clinical manifestations of CDI can range from asymptomatic colonization to severe pseudomembranous colitis and death. Many aspects of laboratory diagnosis of CDI remain contentious. Toxin enzyme immunoassays are too insensitive to be used alone, while nucleic acid amplification tests have emerged as an option, either as a stand-alone test or as part of a multitest algorithm. Oral vancomycin and metronidazole have been the recommended antimicrobial therapy options, and fidaxomicin is an effective new alternative. There is ongoing concern regarding the potential inferiority of metronidazole, in particular for severe CDI. Management of severe CDI and recurrent CDI continue to represent major treatment challenges. Biological therapies for the restoration of the intestinal microbiota (e.g., fecal microbiota transplantation) and monoclonal antibody therapy are promising approaches for CDI management, in particular troublesome recurrent CDI. This review will concentrate on the diagnosis and management of CDI in adults.

  10. Sepsis due to clostridium septicum: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foga, M.M.; McGinn, G.J.; Kroeker, M.A. [Univ. of Manitoba Teaching Hospitals, St. Boniface General Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Guzman, R. [Univ. of Manitoba Teaching Hospitals, St. Boniface General Hospital, Dept. of Surgery, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    2000-04-15

    Clostridium septicum is an unusual anaerobic, gram-positive, gas-producing bacillus, which has been identified as a cause of fulminant rapidly fatal infection in humans. Infection with C. septicum usually occurs in patients with cancer, patients receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapy, or patients with a nonmalignant hematological disorder such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. C. septicum infection most commonly involves the abdomen, and a recent review article has identified 164 cases in the medical literature describing the abdominal findings in this disease. Intracranial manifestation of C. septicum infection are less common and include meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation and pneumocephalus. There have been only 12 documented cases in the English literature describing central nervous system lesions associated with C. septicum. We present a case report of a 56-year-old man in whom septicemia due to C. septicum developed as a complication of Crohn's disease. To our knowledge, there has never been a previous report of C. septicum sepsis related to underlying Crohn's disease. Our case is also remarkable in that an intracerebral gas collection developed at the site of a mycotic infarct related to C. septicum bacteremia, Intracranial, intraparenchymal gas formation related to anaerobic infection is extremely rare; to our knowledge, this radiological finding related to C. septicum sepsis has been described in only 1 previous case report in the medical literature. We also describe the intra-abdominal manifestations of C. septicum sepsis that occurred in this patient as well as the associated radiographic and pathologic findings. (author)

  11. Antibiotic prescribing policy and Clostridium difficile diarrhoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Broad-spectrum antibiotics, particularly intravenous cephalosporins, are associated with Clostridium difficile diarrhoea. Diarrhoea due to C. difficile is a growing problem in hospitals, especially among elderly patients. AIM: To establish whether changing an antibiotic policy with the aim of reducing the use of injectable cephalosporins leads to a reduction in the incidence of C. difficile diarrhoea in elderly patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. METHODS: A group of patients who were subject to the new antibiotic policy from the period following July 2000, were compared with patients who were admitted prior to July 2000 and were not subject to the new policy. Infections, antibiotic prescriptions and mortality rates were determined from case notes, and C. difficle diarrhoea rates from microbiological data. RESULTS: Intravenous cephalosporin use fell from 210 to 28 defined daily doses (p < 0.001) following the change in antibiotic policy, with a corresponding increase in piperacillin-tazobactam (p < 0.001) and moxifloxacin (p < 0.001) use. The new policy led to a significant reduction in C. difficile diarrhoea cases. The relative risk of developing C. difficile infection with the old policy compared to the new policy was 3.24 (95%CI 1.07-9.84, p = 0.03). DISCUSSION: The antibiotic policy was successfully introduced into an elderly care service. It reduced both intravenous cephalosporin use and C. difficile diarrhoea.

  12. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.

  13. Group II intron-anchored gene deletion in Clostridium.

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    Kaizhi Jia

    Full Text Available Clostridium plays an important role in commercial and medical use, for which targeted gene deletion is difficult. We proposed an intron-anchored gene deletion approach for Clostridium, which combines the advantage of the group II intron "ClosTron" system and homologous recombination. In this approach, an intron carrying a fragment homologous to upstream or downstream of the target site was first inserted into the genome by retrotransposition, followed by homologous recombination, resulting in gene deletion. A functional unknown operon CAC1493-1494 located in the chromosome, and an operon ctfAB located in the megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731 were successfully deleted by using this approach, without leaving antibiotic marker in the genome. We therefore propose this approach can be used for targeted gene deletion in Clostridium. This approach might also be applicable for gene deletion in other bacterial species if group II intron retrotransposition system is established.

  14. Botulinum neurotoxin homologs in non-Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Michael J; Adams, Jeremy B; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-30

    Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are the deadliest toxins known and the causative agents of botulism and tetanus. Despite their structural and functional complexity, no CNT homologs are currently known outside Clostridium. Here, we report the first homologs of Clostridium CNTs within the genome of the rice fermentation organism Weissella oryzae SG25. One gene in W. oryzae S25 encodes a protein with a four-domain architecture and HExxH protease motif common to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). An adjacent gene with partial similarity to CNTs is also present, and both genes seem to have been laterally transferred into the W. oryzae genome from an unknown source. Identification of mobile, CNT-related genes outside of Clostridium has implications for our understanding of the evolution of this important toxin family. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Clostridium Sporulation Programs: Diversity and Preservation of Endospore Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σF, σE, σG, and σK) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σK, the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. PMID:25631287

  16. The Clostridium sporulation programs: diversity and preservation of endospore differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K)) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σ(K), the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. An atypical case of infection by Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Neri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive human pathogenic bacterium and nosocomial pathogen; it is the causative agent diarrhoea, colitis and pseudo-membranous colitis associated with antibiotic therapy. The pathogenesis of diarrhoea linked to a Clostridium difficile infection is complex and only partly know. A 75 years old subject with biventricular defibrillator for atrial flutter-fibril slow dilated cardiomyopathy underwent, in february 2008, surgery of mitro-aortic replacement.The subject, in march 2009, followed a rehabilitation therapy with aspirin and esomeprazole, as an outpatient, to Pio Albergo Trivulzio. The patient appeared lucid, oriented in time and space, in good general conditions; objectivity shows mild abdominal bloating, rectal examination negative; reported bowel function tend constipated with 1-2 bowel movements per week with formed stools and recent episodes of melena. Blood tests showed anemia and positive research haemoglobin in stool.The patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and then rettosigmoidoscopia, and decided to carry out biopsies. The sigmoid-rectal endoscopic picture was compatible with a diagnosis of “pseudo-membranous colitis hospitalization, On the basis of symptoms reported was required to search for toxins and bacterial culture for Clostridium difficile, resulting both positive. In literature are reported with increasing frequency of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea in patients home. The clinical case presented shows that in patients from home with symptoms vanished, the presence of formed stool does not exclude the possibility of infection by Clostridium difficile and is therefore useful and absolutely advisable to search for toxins and bacterial culture for Clostridium difficile.

  18. Comparative in vitro activities of SMT19969, a new antimicrobial agent, against 162 strains from 35 less frequently recovered intestinal Clostridium species: implications for Clostridium difficile recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L

    2014-01-01

    We determined the comparative activity of SMT19969 (SMT) against 162 strains representing 35 well-characterized Clostridium species in clusters I to XIX and 13 Clostridium species that had no 16S rRNA match. SMT MICs ranged from 0.06 to >512 μg/ml and were not species related. SMT might have less impact on normal gut microbiota than other Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) antimicrobials.

  19. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the enhanced production of isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fuel mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Lee, Joungmin; Im, Jung Ae; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Julia; Eom, Moon-Ho; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young

    2013-01-01

    Butanol is considered as a superior biofuel, which is conventionally produced by clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Among ABE, only butanol and ethanol can be used as fuel alternatives. Coproduction of acetone thus causes lower yield of fuel alcohols. Thus, this study aimed at developing an improved Clostridium acetobutylicum strain possessing enhanced fuel alcohol production capability. For this, we previously developed a hyper ABE producing BKM19 strain was further engineered to convert acetone into isopropanol. The BKM19 strain was transformed with the plasmid pIPA100 containing the sadh (primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase) and hydG (putative electron transfer protein) genes from the Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 cloned under the control of the thiolase promoter. The resulting BKM19 (pIPA100) strain produced 27.9 g/l isopropanol-butanol-ethanol (IBE) as a fuel alcohols with negligible amount of acetone (0.4 g/l) from 97.8 g/l glucose in lab-scale (2 l) batch fermentation. Thus, this metabolically engineered strain was able to produce 99% of total solvent produced as fuel alcohols. The scalability and stability of BKM19 (pIPA100) were evaluated at 200 l pilot-scale fermentation, which showed that the fuel alcohol yield could be improved to 0.37 g/g as compared to 0.29 g/g obtained at lab-scale fermentation, while attaining a similar titer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest titer of IBE achieved and the first report on the large scale fermentation of C. acetobutylicum for IBE production. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. The purine-utilizing bacterium Clostridium acidurici 9a: a genome-guided metabolic reconsideration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hartwich

    Full Text Available Clostridium acidurici is an anaerobic, homoacetogenic bacterium, which is able to use purines such as uric acid as sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Together with the two other known purinolytic clostridia C. cylindrosporum and C. purinilyticum, C. acidurici serves as a model organism for investigation of purine fermentation. Here, we present the first complete sequence and analysis of a genome derived from a purinolytic Clostridium. The genome of C. acidurici 9a consists of one chromosome (3,105,335 bp and one small circular plasmid (2,913 bp. The lack of candidate genes encoding glycine reductase indicates that C. acidurici 9a uses the energetically less favorable glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway for glycine degradation. In accordance with the specialized lifestyle and the corresponding narrow substrate spectrum of C. acidurici 9a, the number of genes involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism is significantly lower than in other clostridia such as C. acetobutylicum, C. saccharolyticum, and C. beijerinckii. The only amino acid that can be degraded by C. acidurici is glycine but growth on glycine only occurs in the presence of a fermentable purine. Nevertheless, the addition of glycine resulted in increased transcription levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in the glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase and acetate kinase, whereas the transcription levels of formate dehydrogenase-encoding genes decreased. Sugars could not be utilized by C. acidurici but the full genetic repertoire for glycolysis was detected. In addition, genes encoding enzymes that mediate resistance against several antimicrobials and metals were identified. High resistance of C. acidurici towards bacitracin, acriflavine and azaleucine was experimentally confirmed.

  1. Clostridium ramosum bacteremia: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Spain, David A

    2014-06-01

    Clostridium ramosum is a common enteric anaerobe but infrequently also a cause of pathologic infection. Case report and literature review. We reviewed 12 case reports describing infection with C. ramosum. When pathogenic, C. ramosum is cultured most commonly from the inner ear, anaerobic blood samples, or abscesses. Patients with such infections fall into two demographic groups, consisting of young children with ear infections or immunocompromised adults with bacteremia. Resistance of C. ramosum to antibiotics is uncommon. Clostridium ramosum is a common but generally commensal bacterial species. Rarely, it becomes pathogenic in young children or immunosuppressed adults.

  2. Clostridium difficile的中文翻译商讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方忠宏

    2009-01-01

    @@ "艰难梭菌"是近几年来备受关注的专业词.但是,在大量资料上也有"难辨梭菌"一词,其使用频率似乎更高.两者均无英文对照,谈及内容极相似.原来两者均是Clostridium difficile的译名.随着抗菌药物的广泛使用及不合理应用,屡见Clostridium difficile引起的继发感染,具有毒力的耐药菌株也在不断递增.

  3. Identification of Clostridium tyrobutyricum as the causative agent of late blowing in cheese by species-specific PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, N; Nieuwenhof, F F; Hoolwerf, J D; van der Waals, C B; Weerkamp, A H

    1995-08-01

    Butyric acid fermentation, the late-blowing defect in cheese, caused by the outgrowth of clostridial spores present in raw milk, can create considerable loss of product, especially in the production of semihard cheeses like Gouda cheese, but also in grana and Gruyère cheeses. To demonstrate the causative relationship between Clostridium tyrobutyricum and late blowing in cheese, many cheesemaking experiments were performed to provoke this defect by using spores from several strains of the major dairy-related clostridia. A method of PCR amplification of a part of the 16S rRNA gene in combination with hybridization with species-specific DNA probes was developed to allow the specific detection of clostridial sequences in DNAs extracted from cheeses. The sensitivity was increased by using nested PCR. Late blowing was provoked in experimental cheeses with 28 of the 32 C. tyrobutyricum strains tested, whereas experimental cheeses made with spores from C. beijerinckii, C. butyricum, and C. sporogenes showed no signs of butyric acid fermentation. In all experimental and commercial cheeses with obvious signs of late blowing, DNA from C. tyrobutyricum was detected; in some cheeses, signals for C. beijerinckii were also found. It was concluded that only C. tyrobutyricum strains are able to cause butyric acid fermentation in cheese.

  4. Effect of a probiotic on prevention of diarrhea and Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens shedding in foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Staempfli, H R; Abrahams, M;

    2015-01-01

    of incidence and duration of diarrhea and fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile between treatment and age groups. RESULTS: The overall incidence of diarrhea was 41 of 72 (59%) and did not differ (P = 0.37) between treatment groups. Foals treated with probiotics were more likely...... of C. perfringens shedding was 55% with no difference between treatment groups (P = 0.23). The prevalence of C. difficile shedding was 11%. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: There was no benefit of administering a 3-week course of probiotics, but potential adverse effects were noted. Whether...

  5. [Individualized treatment strategies for Clostridium difficile infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbach, P; Dersch, P; Bachmann, O

    2017-07-01

    Upon hospitalization, up to 15.5% of patients are already colonized with a toxigenic Clostridium difficile strain (TCD). The rate of asymptomatic colonization is 0-3% in healthy adults and up to 20-40% in hospitalized patients. The incidence and mortality of C. difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased during recent years. Mortality lies between 3 and 14%. CDI is generally caused by intestinal dysbiosis, which can be triggered by various factors, including antibiotics or immune suppressants. If CDI occurs, ongoing antibiotic therapy should be discontinued. The choice of treatment is guided by the clinical situation: Mild courses of CDI should be treated with metronidazole. Oral vancomycin is suitable as a first-line therapy of mild CDI occurring during pregnancy and lactation, as well as in cases of intolerance or allergy to metronidazole. Severe courses should be treated with vancomycin. Recurrence should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin. Multiple recurrences should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin; if necessary, a vancomycin taper regimen may also be used. An alternative is fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), with healing rates of more than 80%. Bezlotoxumab is the first available monoclonal antibody which neutralizes the C. difficile toxin B, and in combination with an antibiotic significantly reduces the rate of a new C. difficile infection compared to placebo. A better definition of clinical and microbiota-associated risk factors and the ongoing implementation of molecular diagnostics are likely to lead to optimized identification of patients at risk, and an increasing individualization of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches.

  6. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for alcohol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaohu; Peng, Wanfeng; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-06-20

    While Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for large-scale butanol production (ABE fermentation), its by-product acetone cannot be used as a biofuel. In this study, C. acetobutylicum was engineered for alcohol titers (butanol plus ethanol). The adc gene was inactivated to eliminate acetone production, and glutathione biosynthetic capability was introduced into C. acetobutylicum to improve the strain's robustness by expressing Escherichia coli's gshAB genes in the adc locus. Acetone production was reduced from 2.64±0.22 g/L to 0.15±0.08 g/L in the engineered strain 824adc::gsh, whereas butanol production was increased from 5.17±0.26 g/L to 8.27±0.27 g/L. To further improve the alcohol titers, the metabolic flux in the alcohol biosynthesis pathways was enhanced. Overlapping PCR was used to generate expression cassette EC, which expresses the hbd, thl, crt, and bcd genes, and the Sol operon was amplified to express the adhE and ctfAB genes. Butanol and alcohol production reached 14.86±0.26 g/L and 18.11±0.66 g/L, respectively, in 824adc::gsh Sol-EC. Furthermore, the butanol and alcohol yields were 0.336 g/g and 0.409 g/g, respectively, in 824adc::gsh Sol-EC. This study provided a combined strategy for enhancing alcohol production in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical characterization of the regularly arranged surface layers of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, U B; Thorne, K J

    1976-04-01

    Clostridum thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum possess as outermost cell wall layer a tetragonal or hexagonal ordered array of macromolecules. The subunits of the surface layer can be detached from isolated cell walls with urea (8M) or guanidine-HCl (4 to 5 M). Triton X-100, dithiothreitol, ethylenediaminetetracetate, and KCl (3 M) had no visible effect on the regular arrays. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophroesis showed that, in both organisms, the surface layer is composed of glycoprotein of molecular weight 140,000. The glycoprotein from both microorganisms has a predominantly acidic amino acid composition and an acidic isoelectric point after isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gels. The glycocomponent is composed of glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose.

  8. d-2,3-Butanediol Production Due to Heterologous Expression of an Acetoin Reductase in Clostridium acetobutylicum ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerink, Marco A. J.; Kuit, Wouter; López Contreras, Ana M.; Eggink, Gerrit; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetoin reductase (ACR) catalyzes the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Under certain conditions, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (and strains derived from it) generates both d- and l-stereoisomers of acetoin, but because of the absence of an ACR enzyme, it does not produce 2,3-butanediol. A gene encoding ACR from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum under the control of two strong promoters, the constitutive thl promoter and the late exponential adc promoter. Both ACR-overproducing strains were grown in batch cultures, during which 89 to 90% of the natively produced acetoin was converted to 20 to 22 mM d-2,3-butanediol. The addition of a racemic mixture of acetoin led to the production of both d-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. A metabolic network that is in agreement with the experimental data is proposed. Native 2,3-butanediol production is a first step toward a potential homofermentative 2-butanol-producing strain of C. acetobutylicum. PMID:21335380

  9. Influence of milk centrifugation, brining and ripening conditions in preventing gas formation by Clostridium spp. in Gouda cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y C; Ingham, S C

    2000-03-25

    This study examined milk centrifugation, increased salt concentration, and low ripening temperature as potential strategies to prevent late blowing caused by gas-forming Clostridium spp. in Gouda cheese. The survival of clostridia spores in cheese brine and their ability to enter Gouda cheese during brining was also evaluated. Centrifugation (3000 x g for 30 s) of contaminated milk resulted in > 60% spore reduction, with increased spore reduction at greater centrifugal forces. Low levels of C. tyrobutyricum and C. sporogenes spores survived in saturated (23%, w/v) brine with 2% (v/v) added whey at 15 degrees C for 63 days, while C. beijerinckii and C. butyricum spores were not detectable on days 4 and 35, respectively. Spores of C. tyrobutyricum in brine infiltrated Gouda cheese during 2 h of brining at 13 degrees C resulted in production of small gas holes during ripening. In Gouda cheese slurry stored at 13 degrees C, three C. tyrobutyricum strains plus one of three C. sporogenes strains germinated in the slurry with no added salt. Of three C. tyrobutyricum strains stored at 13 degrees C in slurries with higher water-phase salt concentrations of 2.4 and 3.6%, two strains and one strain germinated, respectively. No germination of spores was detected in any cheese slurry stored at 5 or 8 degrees C. Milk centrifugation, increased percent water-phase salt, absence of spores in brine, and decreased ripening temperature are all potentially important measures against gas production by Clostridium spp. in Gouda cheese.

  10. Molecular and cellular basis of microvascular perfusion deficits induced by Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium septicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Hickey

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reduced tissue perfusion leading to tissue ischemia is a central component of the pathogenesis of myonecrosis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The C. perfringens alpha-toxin has been shown capable of inducing these changes, but its potential synergy with perfringolysin O (theta-toxin is less well understood. Similarly, Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent causative agent of spontaneous gas gangrene, but its effect on the microcirculation has not been examined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use intravital microscopy to examine the effects of C. perfringens and C. septicum on the functional microcirculation, coupled with the use of isogenic toxin mutants to elucidate the role of particular toxins in the resultant microvascular perfusion deficits. This study represents the first time this integrated approach has been used in the analysis of the pathological response to clostridial toxins. Culture supernatants from wild-type C. perfringens induced extensive cell death within 30 min, as assessed by in vivo uptake of propidium iodide. Furthermore, significant reductions in capillary perfusion were observed within 60 min. Depletion of either platelets or neutrophils reduced the alteration in perfusion, consistent with a role for these blood-borne cells in obstructing perfusion. In addition, mutation of either the alpha-toxin or perfringolysin O structural genes attenuated the reduction in perfusion, a process that was reversed by genetic complementation. C. septicum also induced a marked reduction in perfusion, with the degree of microvascular compromise correlating with the level of the C. septicum alpha-toxin. Together, these data indicate that as a result of its ability to produce alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O, C. perfringens rapidly induces irreversible cellular injury and a marked reduction in microvascular perfusion. Since C. septicum induces a similar reduction in microvascular perfusion, it is postulated that this function

  11. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Genth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC. Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+. Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+ in mammalian target cells.

  12. Biosynthesis of a thiamin antivitamin in Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa E; O'Leary, Seán E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2014-04-15

    Bacimethrin-derived 2'-methoxythiamin pyrophosphate inhibits microbial growth by disrupting metabolic pathways dependent on thiamin-utilizing enzymes. This study describes the discovery of the bacimethrin biosynthetic gene cluster of Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 19397 and in vitro reconstitution of bacimethrin biosynthesis from cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

  13. Diagnostic multiplex PCR for toxin genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, Christoph G; Schotte, Ulrich; Amtsberg, Gunter; Goethe, Ralph

    2004-05-20

    In this study we provide a protocol for genotyping Clostridium perfringens with a new multiplex PCR. This PCR enables reliable and specific detection of the toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, iap, cpe and cpb2 from heat lysed bacterial suspensions. The efficiency of the protocol was demonstrated by typing C. perfringens reference strains and isolates from veterinary bacteriological routine diagnostic specimens.

  14. Comparison of media for enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E.I. de; Eijhusen, G.P.; Brouwer-Post, E.J.F.; Grand, M.; Johansson, T.; Kärkkäinen, T.; Marugg, J.; Veld, P.H. in 't; Warmerdam, F.H.M.; Wörner, G.; Zicavo, A.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Many media have been developed to enumerate Clostridium perfringens from foods. In this study, six media [iron sulfite (IS) agar, tryptose sulfite cycloserine (TSC) agar, Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar, sulfite cycloserine azide (SCA), differential clostridial agar (DCA), and oleandomycin p

  15. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  16. Four phage endolysins that are lytic for clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens is a bacterial pathogen and the cause of necrotic enteritis in poultry, and a source of food poisoning and gas gangrene in people. C. perfringens can also cause mild to severe enteritis in pigs. In the EU, the occurrence of C. perfringens-associated necrotic enteritis in pou...

  17. Comparison of media for enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E.I. de; Eijhusen, G.P.; Brouwer-Post, E.J.F.; Grand, M.; Johansson, T.; Kärkkäinen, T.; Marugg, J.; Veld, P.H. in 't; Warmerdam, F.H.M.; Wörner, G.; Zicavo, A.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Many media have been developed to enumerate Clostridium perfringens from foods. In this study, six media [iron sulfite (IS) agar, tryptose sulfite cycloserine (TSC) agar, Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar, sulfite cycloserine azide (SCA), differential clostridial agar (DCA), and oleandomycin p

  18. Clostridium difficile-ribotype 027 er en udfordring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Trine Nyboe; Ravn, Pernille; Skinhøj, Ida Elisabeth Gjørup

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Clostridium difficile is the primary infective cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. In 2008, a major outbreak of CD027 took place in North Zealand, Denmark. We described this infection in a single medical department. Patients positive for C. difficile enlisted at Medical...

  19. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  20. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in the community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Holt, H M; Böttiger, B

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Danish patients consulting general practice with gastrointestinal symptoms, a prospective matched case-control study was performed; cases (N = 259) had positive cultures for toxigenic C. difficile and controls (N = 455...

  1. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  2. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  3. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, toxinotype III, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Ed J; Berg, Renate J van den; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; Kooi, Tjallie van der; Hof, Susan van den; Notermans, Daan W

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A-negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017 t

  4. Varied prevalence of Clostridium difficile in an integrated swine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Preliminary results are based on 131 C. d...

  5. Clostridium difficile in mixed populations of animals and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Since 2003, there has been an emergence of BI/NAP1 strain of Clostridium difficile (Cd) in North American hospitals. The origins of this epidemic strain have yet to be determined. However, PFGE analysis has shown ~80% similarity between this strain and some swine isolates. The objecti...

  6. Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals: Optimized isolation and prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two isolation methods were compared for isolation of Clostridium difficile from food animal feces. The single alcohol shock method (SS) used selective enrichment in cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose broth supplemented with 0.1% sodium taurocholate (TCCFB) followed by alcohol shock and isolation on tryp...

  7. Continuous lactose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum - Assessment of solventogenic kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the results of a series of tests on the specific butanol production rate by Clostridium acetobutylicum continuous cultures. The tests were carried out using lactose as carbon source to mimic cheese-whey. A continuous stirred tank reactor equipped with a microfiltration unit was

  8. Continuous lactose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum - Assessment of solventogenic kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the results of a series of tests on the specific butanol production rate by Clostridium acetobutylicum continuous cultures. The tests were carried out using lactose as carbon source to mimic cheese-whey. A continuous stirred tank reactor equipped with a microfiltration unit was

  9. Continuous xylose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum - Assessment of solventogenic kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the specific butanol production rate of Clostridium acetobutylicum using xylose - a relevant fraction of lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuel production - as carbon source. The tests were carried out in a CSTR equipped with a microfiltration unit. The dilution rate (D)

  10. Clostridium perfringens associated with food borne disease : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands LM; van der Mey-Florijn A; Delfgou-van Asch EHM; LZO

    2011-01-01

    Mensen die voedsel eten dat de bacterie Clostridium perfringens bevat, kunnen daar diarree van krijgen. Deze bacterie komt vooral voor in producten die vlees bevatten, zoals soepen en stoofschotels, maar ook in kruiden en specerijen. Mensen worden voornamelijk ziek na het eten van vleesbevattende pr

  11. Clostridium difficile prevalence in an integrated swine operation in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently there has been an epidemic of human disease in North America caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile (Cd). It appears to be a new strain that is more virulent than previous strains, produces more toxins, and causes more severe disease (McDonald et al., 2005). The origin of the new s...

  12. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, toxinotype III, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Ed J; Berg, Renate J van den; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; Kooi, Tjallie van der; Hof, Susan van den; Notermans, Daan W

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A-negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017 t

  13. Reproducible Infection Model for Clostridium perfringens in Broiler Chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to establish an infection and disease model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens. Previous experiments had failed to induce disease and only a transient colonization with challenge strains had been obtained. In the present study, two series of experiments w...

  14. Effect of cooling on Clostridium perfringens in pea soup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Foods associated with Clostridium perfringens outbreaks are usually abused after cooking. Because of their short generation times, C. perfringens spores and cells can grow out to high levels during improper cooling. Therefore, the potential of C. perfringens to multiply in Dutch pea soup during diff

  15. Nutritional aspects of cytotoxin production by Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Osgood, D P; Wood, N. P.; Sperry, J F

    1993-01-01

    Arginine was the only amino acid used by Clostridium difficile that permitted cytotoxin synthesis in a peptone-based medium. Synthesis of cytotoxin was delayed when glucose was used as the substrate. Addition of rifampin or puromycin to cultures prior to release of cytotoxin inhibited the release of cytotoxin, suggesting that a protein essential for cytotoxin release is synthesized after cytotoxin is synthesized.

  16. Fecal Microbiota Transplant Protocol for Clostridium Difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tauxe, William M.; Dhere, Tanvi; Ward, Angela; Racsa, Lori D.; Varkey, Jay B.; Kraft, Colleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplant has become more acceptable as a therapeutic for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. The FDA has an enforcement discretion policy for practitioner's performing this therapy, which includes informed consent for this experimental treatment. This manuscript describes a typical procedure that can be followed that includes the important aspects of this preparation and treatment.

  17. Continuous xylose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum - Assessment of solventogenic kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the specific butanol production rate of Clostridium acetobutylicum using xylose - a relevant fraction of lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuel production - as carbon source. The tests were carried out in a CSTR equipped with a microfiltration unit. The dilution rate (D) range

  18. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-E. Fournier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain.

  19. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain.

  20. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani

    OpenAIRE

    P.-E. Fournier; P.-Y. Levy; M. Million; Croce, O.; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P.; Raoult, D.

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain.

  1. Clostridium glycolicum isolated from a patient with otogenic brain abscesses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leer, C.C. van; Wensing, A.M.; Leeuwen, J.P. van; Zandbergen, E.G.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses with gas formation following otitis media, for which the patient treated himself by placing clay in his ear. Several microorganisms, including Clostridium glycolicum, were cultured from material obtained from the patient. This is the first report of an infection

  2. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L.; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection. PMID:27811092

  3. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sequential culture in a continuous flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study was conducted to evaluate fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum in a continuous-flow, high-solids reactor. Liquid medium was continuously flowed through switchgrass (2 mm particle size) at one of three flow rates: 83.33 mL h-1 (2 L d-1), 41.66 mL h-1(1 ...

  4. Role of probiotics in antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, and recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawicz, Christina M

    2008-07-01

    The role of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile diarrhea, and recurrent C. difficile diarrhea is reviewed. Various probiotics have variable efficacy. More studies are needed to define further their efficacies, roles, and indications.

  5. A LITHOTROPHIC CLOSTRIDIUM STRAIN WITH EXTREMELY THERMORESISTANT SPORES ISOLATED FROM A PECTIN-LIMITED CONTINUOUS CULTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM-THERMOSACCHAROLYTICUM STRAIN HAREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANRIJSSEL, M; VANDERVEEN, [No Value; HANSEN, TA

    1992-01-01

    A thermophilic Clostridium sp. with extremely thermoresistant spores was isolated from a pectin-limited continuous culture of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. The decimal reduction time of the spores was 70 min at 121-degrees-C. Because of the ability of the bacterium to grow both heterotrophicall

  6. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Bayer, Edward A; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn M; Elias, Dwayne; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D

    2016-09-29

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  7. Clostridium Difficile, Colitis, and Colonoscopy: Pediatric Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnie, Randolph; Kastl, Arthur

    2017-08-01

    Review tests available for detection of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) induced disease, including when such tests should be done in children and how they should be interpreted. Multiple tests are available for detecting disease due to C. diff. These include colonoscopy and stool analysis. Colonoscopy with biopsy is the most sensitive test for detecting the presence of colitis. The toxins produced by the C. diff. (toxin A, toxin B, and binary toxin) are the agents that cause injury and disease. Only toxin producing C. diff. Strains will cause disease. Binary toxin by itself is not thought to produce disease. Binary toxin causes disease in humans when present with toxin A and B producing bacteria, and has been implicated with fulminant life threatening disease. Stool analyses vary in sensitivity and specificity depending on the assay used. The presence of toxin producing strains of C diff. in the stool does not equate with disease. The presence of a toxin-producing bacteria or toxins (A or B) only equates with disease if diarrhea or a diseased colon (toxic megacolon, ileus, and sepsis) is present. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), when used in the stool from patients with diarrhea, appears to be the most efficient study to detect the gene that encodes for toxin A and B and thus to diagnose C. diff.-induced disease. Infants have a high carriage rate of C. diff. and are believed not to develop disease from it or its toxins. Infants should not be tested for C. difficile. The NAAT is most specific when done on patients with diarrhea with liquid stools. Testing for C. difficile should only be done on patients with diarrhea. One can assume that a patient who has no diarrhea and is not ill does not have C. diff.-induced disease. Treatment should be limited to patients with diarrhea who test positive for C. diff. toxin (A or B) or toxin-producing bacteria. Direct testing for binary toxin is not commercially available. Binary toxin is only thought to cause disease

  8. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perry Hookman; Jamie S Barkin

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to twothirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficileassociated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  9. Self-Administered Home Series Fecal "Minitransplants" for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection on a Rectal Remnant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Daniel; Laszlo, Mihaela; Ciobanu, Lidia; Ucenic, Elena; Mihalache, Manuela; Pascu, Oliviu

    2015-12-01

    A fecal microbiota transplant has proved to be an extremely effective method for patients with recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. We present the case of a 65-year-old female patient with multiple Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) relapses on the rectal remnant, post-colectomy for a CDI-related toxic megacolon. The patient also evidenced associated symptomatic Clostridium difficile vaginal infection. She was successfully treated with serial fecal "minitransplants" (self-administered at home) and metronidazole ovules.

  10. Evaluation of Lateral-Flow Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Kits for Food Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-08

    samples for each food type (n 3). No mixed results were observed. 3938 SHARMA ET AL. APPL. ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. histolyticum, Clostridium tetani ...of Lateral-Flow Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Kits for Food Analysis Shashi K. Sharma,1* Brian S. Eblen,1 Robert L. Bull,2 Donald H. Burr...detecting Clostridium botulinum neuro- toxins (BoNTs) in an assortment of foods were evaluated. Toxin extraction and preparation methods for various liquid

  11. Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    structure1. Introduction Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani and the seven antigenically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G...2-0011 TITLE: Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug...DATES COVERED (From - To) 28 Jan 2005 – 27 Jan 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed

  12. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  13. Clostridium hydrogeniformans sp. nov. and Clostridium cavendishii sp. nov., hydrogen-producing bacteria from chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kimberly S; Dupré, Rachael E; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2010-02-01

    Four hydrogen-producing, aerotolerant, anaerobic bacterial strains isolated from chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwater were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Three of the strains, designated BL-18, BL-19 and BL-20(T), were found to be identical in 16S rRNA gene sequences and in phenotypic properties. Cells of these strains are Gram-positive-staining, spore-forming, motile rods with peritrichous flagella. Growth occurred at 15-40 degrees C, pH 5.0-10.0 and at NaCl concentrations up to 5 % (w/v). Acid was produced in fermentation of cellobiose, fructose, galactose (weak), glucose, maltose and salicin. Products of fermentation in PYG medium were acetate, butyrate, ethanol, formate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Dominant cellular fatty acids when grown in PYG medium were C(13 : 0) iso, C(16 : 0), C(13 : 0) anteiso, C(15 : 0) iso and C(15 : 0) anteiso. The genomic DNA G+C content was 30.4 mol%. These isolates can be differentiated from their closest phylogenetic relative, the cluster I Clostridium species Clostridium frigidicarnis (97.2 % similar to the type strain in 16S rRNA gene sequence), on the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties. The other strain characterized in this study, BL-28(T), was Gram-positive-staining with spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Growth occurred at 15-46 degrees C, pH 6.0-8.5 and at NaCl concentrations up to 3 % (w/v). Acid was produced from cellobiose, dextran, fructose (weak), glucose, maltose, salicin and trehalose. End products of PYG fermentation included acetate, butyrate, pyruvate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Dominant cellular fatty acids from cells grown in PYG medium at 30 degrees C were C(14 : 0), C(14 : 0) dimethyl aldehyde, C(16 : 0) and C(12 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 28.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain BL-28(T) falls within cluster I of the genus Clostridium, but with Clostridium with the names Clostridium hydrogeniformans sp. nov. and Clostridium

  14. Common Mesophilic Anaerobes, Including Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani, in 21 Soil Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis Ds.

    1975-01-01

    A relatively rich medium was markedly superior to a dilute medium for the isolation of anaerobic bacteria from soil. The obligate anaerobes isolated from 21 soil samples were all clostridia and the counts ranged from 2.7 × 102 to 3.3 × 106 per g. The organisms most frequently isolated were Clostridium subterminale, C. sordellii, C. sporogenes, C. indolis, C. bifermentans, C. mangenoti, and C. perfringens. Seventeen other species were also recognized but almost one-third of the isolates could not be identified with any known species of Clostridum. C. botulinum type A was demonstrated in six soil samples, and type B in one. These soils were neutral to alkaline in reaction (average pH 7.9) and low in organic matter content (1.4%). The association of C. botulinum types A and B with neutral to alkaline soils was statistically significant (P = 0.001) as was their association with soils low in organic matter (P = 0.005). C. botulinum types E and F were found in one soil sample, pH 4.5, with organic matter 13.7%. C. tetani was isolated from two soil samples, both of intermediate pH value and higher than average organic matter content. PMID:238468

  15. Pancreatitis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection with extensive retropneumoperitoneum; Pancreatitis por Clostridium perfringens con retroneumoperitoneo extenso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchante, E.; Garcia, F. J.; Perez, H.; Marquez, J. L. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio. Sevilla (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    We present a case of primary emphysematous pancreatitis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection (also Known as spontaneous pancreatic gas gangrene) in a 66-year-old man with diabetes and a history of recurrent pancreatitis. One notable feature is the absence of a focal distribution, which is seen on radiological studies to be accompanied by extensive retropneumoperitoneum, with dissemination of the gas toward the mesenteric root and pelvic extra peritoneal spaces. This wide diffusion is aided by the C. perfringens toxins and the pancreatic enzymes released, leading to a fulminate course, an elevated rate of early mortality among the cases reviewed. The early diagnosis of this disease is fundamental, enabling aggressive medical treatment and emergency surgery. Diabetes is a known risk factor for anaerobic infection, including C. perfringens, as in the case of emphysematous cholecystitis. A diseased pancreas or pancreatic duct facilitates the development of infections since it eliminates poorly the microorganisms that reach it from the duodenum. Gas gangrene secondary to necrosis-related super infection or pancreatic collections is uncommon, and spontaneous or primary cases are exceptionally are. (Author) 13 refs.

  16. Models for the study of Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Emma L.; Freeman, Jane; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Models of Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) have been used extensively for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) research. The hamster model of C. difficile infection has been most extensively employed for the study of C. difficile and this has been used in many different areas of research, including the induction of C. difficile, the testing of new treatments, population dynamics and characterization of virulence. Investigations using in vitro models for C. difficile introduced the concept of colonization resistance, evaluated the role of antibiotics in C. difficile development, explored population dynamics and have been useful in the evaluation of C. difficile treatments. Experiments using models have major advantages over clinical studies and have been indispensible in furthering C. difficile research. It is important for future study programs to carefully consider the approach to use and therefore be better placed to inform the design and interpretation of clinical studies. PMID:22555466

  17. Necrotizing gastritis associated with Clostridium septicum in a rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Janet; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis; Diab, Santiago S; Uzal, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of histotoxic infections, including malignant edema and braxy (necrotizing abomasitis) in several animal species. The carcass of a 2-year-old, female New Zealand white rabbit with a history of acute depression and obtundation followed by death was received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (San Bernardino, California) for necropsy and diagnostic workup. No gross lesions were detected at necropsy. Microscopically, there was moderate to severe, multifocal fibrinonecrotizing, transmural gastritis with numerous intralesional Gram-positive, sporulated rods, and disseminated thrombosis of the brain, lungs, heart, and liver, with occasional intravascular rods. The rods observed within the gastric wall and thrombi in the stomach and lung were positive for C. septicum by immunohistochemical staining. However, this microorganism was not isolated from stomach content. Clostridium septicum should be included in the list of possible etiologies of gastritis in rabbits.

  18. Infection control and IV therapy in patients with Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Ray

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobe belonging to the family Clostridium, with the bacteria being found in low numbers in approximately 5% of the healthy adult population. Together with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, it is a major healthcare-associated infection and is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. Antibiotics administered to patients can alter normal gut flora, allowing the proliferation of C. difficile and causing antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis. Such diarrhoea, if severe, can lead to dangerous dehydration and even hypovolaemia, especially in the elderly. To limit the physiological impact of diarrhoea, it is sometimes necessary to administer intravenous therapy. Although good clinical practice demands that infection control should be considered in all clinical situations, specific infection control procedures need to be adhered to when administering intravenous therapy to patients with C. difficile.

  19. Genotyping of Clostridium perfringens associated with sudden death in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Miyashiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxigenic types of Clostridium perfringens are significant causative agents of enteric disease in domestic animals, although type E is presumably rare, appearing as an uncommon cause of enterotoxemia of lambs, calves and rabbits. We report herein the typing of 23 C. perfringens strains, by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique, isolated from small intestine samples of bovines that have died suddenly, after manifesting or not enteric or neurological disorders. Two strains (8.7% were identified as type E, two (8.7% as type D and the remainder as type A (82.6%. Commercial toxoids available in Brazil have no label claims for efficacy against type E-associated enteritis; however, the present study shows the occurrence of this infection. Furthermore, there are no recent reports on Clostridium perfringens typing in the country.

  20. Beneficial and harmful roles of bacteria from the Clostridium genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samul, Dorota; Worsztynowicz, Paulina; Leja, Katarzyna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria of the Clostridium genus are often described only as a biological threat and a foe of mankind. However, many of them have positive properties and thanks to them they may be used in many industry branches (e.g., in solvents and alcohol production, in medicine, and also in esthetic cosmetology). During the last 10 years interest in application of C. botulinum and C. tetani in medicine significantly increased. Currently, the structure and biochemical properties of neurotoxins produced by these bacterial species, as well as possibilities of application of such toxins as botulinum as a therapeutic factor in humans, are being intensely researched. The main aim of this article is to demonstrate that bacteria from Clostridium spp. are not only pathogens and the enemy of humanity but they also have many important beneficial properties which make them usable among many chemical, medical, and cosmetic applications.

  1. Asymptomatic carriers contribute to nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Thomas; Gradel, Kim Oren; Homann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects of of as......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects...... of of asymptomatic carriers on nosocomial C difficile infections. METHODS: We performed a population-based prospective cohort study at 2 university hospitals in Denmark, screening all patients for toxigenic C difficile in the intestine upon admittance, from October 1, 2012, to January 31, 2013. Screening results...

  2. The utilization of a commercial soil nucleic acid extraction kit and PCR for the detection of Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei on farms after flooding in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shr-Wei; Chan, Jacky Peng-Wen; Shia, Wei-Yau; Shyu, Chin-Lin; Tung, Kwon-Chung; Wang, Chi-Young

    2013-05-02

    Clostridial diseases are zoonoses and are classified as soil-borne diseases. Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium tetani cause blackleg disease and tetanus, respectively. Since bacteria and spores are re-distributed by floods and then, subsequently, contaminate soils, pastures and water; the case numbers associated with clostridial diseases usually increase after floods. Because Taiwan is often affected by flood damage during the typhoon season, possible threats from these diseases are present. Thus, this study's aim is to apply a combination of a commercial nucleic acid extraction kit and PCR to assess the prevalence of Clostridia spp. in soil and to compare the positivity rates for farms before and after floods. The minimum amounts of Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei that could be extracted from soils and detected by PCR were 10 and 50 colony forming units (cfu), respectively. In total, 76 samples were collected from the central and southern regions of Taiwan, which are the areas that are most frequently damaged by typhoons. Noteworthy, the positive rates for Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei in Pingtung county after the severe floods caused by a typhoon increased significantly from 13.73 and 7.84% to 53.85 and 50.00%, respectively. This study for the first time provides the evidence from surveillance data that there are changes in the environmental distribution of Clostridium spp. after floods. This study indicates that screening for soil-related zoonotic pathogens is a potential strategy that may help to control these diseases.

  3. Historical and current perspectives on Clostridium botulinum diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Theresa J; Hill, Karen K; Raphael, Brian H

    2015-05-01

    For nearly one hundred years, researchers have attempted to categorize botulinum neurotoxin-producing clostridia and the toxins that they produce according to biochemical characterizations, serological comparisons, and genetic analyses. Throughout this period the bacteria and their toxins have defied such attempts at categorization. Below is a description of both historic and current Clostridium botulinum strain and neurotoxin information that illustrates how each new finding has significantly added to the knowledge of the botulinum neurotoxin-containing clostridia and their diversity.

  4. In vitro evaluation of Clostridium septicum alpha toxoid

    OpenAIRE

    F.M. Salvarani; Z.I.P. Lobato; Assis,R.A.; Lima,C.G.R.D.; Silva,R. O. S.; Pires,P.S.; Lobato,F.C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aiming to investigate in vitro alternatives, a test for neutralizing antibody detection using cell culture was developed. This test was more sensitive than previous animal models, allowing for detection of substantially lower alpha toxin and anti-alpha toxin titers. Titers observed during in vivo and in vitro seroneutralization had a correlation of 99.12%, indicating that cell culture is a viable alternative in the evaluation of vaccine potency, screening of vaccinal seeds, and Clostridium se...

  5. Fermentation of oxidized hexose derivatives by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    OpenAIRE

    Servinsky, Matthew D; Liu, Sanchao; Gerlach, Elliot S; Germane, Katherine L; Sund, Christian J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations are promising for production of commodity chemicals from heterogeneous biomass due to the wide range of substrates the organism can metabolize. Much work has been done to elucidate the pathways for utilization of aldoses, but little is known about metabolism of more oxidized substrates. Two oxidized hexose derivatives, gluconate and galacturonate, are present in low cost feedstocks, and their metabolism will contribute to overall metabolic o...

  6. Characterization of Clostridium spp. isolated from spoiled processed cheese products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycken, Lena; Borch, Elisabeth

    2006-08-01

    Of 42 spoiled cheese spread products, 35 were found to harbor Clostridium spp. Typical signs of spoilage were gas production and off-odor. The identity was determined for about half of the isolates (n = 124) by Analytab Products (API), Biolog, the RiboPrinter System, 16S rDNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid analysis, or some combination of these. The majority of isolates were identified as Clostridium sporogenes (in 33% of products), but Clostridium cochlearium (in 12% of products) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum (in 2% of products) were also retrieved. Similarity analysis of the riboprint patterns for 21 isolates resulted in the identification of 10 ribogroups. A high degree of relatedness was observed between isolates of C. sporogenes originating from products produced 3 years apart, indicating a common and, over time, persistent source of infection. The spoilage potential of 11 well-characterized isolates and two culture collection strains was analyzed by inoculating shrimp cheese spread with single cultures and then storing them at 37 degrees C. Tubes inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum did not show any visible signs of growth (e.g., coagulation, discoloration, gas formation) in the cheese spread. After 2 weeks of incubation, tubes inoculated with C. cochlearium or C. sporogenes showed gas-holes, syneresis with separation of coagulated casein and liquid, and a change in color of the cheese. The amount of CO2 produced by C. cochlearium strains was approximately one-third that produced by the majority of C. sporogenes strains. To our knowledge, this is the first study to isolate and identify C. cochlearium as a spoilage organism in cheese spread.

  7. Prevalence of diverticulosis in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; J; Lipp; Odelya; E; Pagovich; David; Rabin; Albert; D; Min; Brett; B; Bernstein

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To re-evaluate the theory that colonic diverticulosis is associated with relapse of Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) in light of data suggesting increasing rates of CDAD infection and relapse.METHODS: Charts were reviewed for patients with recurrent CDAD who had also had a prior colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy. An age and gender matched control group was used to compare the prevalence of diverticulosis.RESULTS: Twenty-two patients met the study criteria, and the prevalence of divert...

  8. Spore Coat Architecture of Clostridium novyi NT Spores▿

    OpenAIRE

    Plomp, Marco; McCaffery, J. Michael; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Xin; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Malkin, Alexander J.

    2007-01-01

    Spores of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi NT are able to germinate in and destroy hypoxic regions of tumors in experimental animals. Future progress in this area will benefit from a better understanding of the germination and outgrowth processes that are essential for the tumorilytic properties of these spores. Toward this end, we have used both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to determine the structure of both dormant and germinating spores. We found th...

  9. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in dialysis patients ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Sook Eui Oh; Seung Min Lee; Young-Ki Lee; Sun Ryoung Choi; Myung-Jin Choi; Jwa-Kyung Kim; Young Rim Song; Soo Jin Kim; Tae Jin Park; Sung Gyun Kim; Jieun Oh; Jang Won Suh; Jong-Woo Yoon; Ja-Ryong Koo; Hyung Jik Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dialysis patients have impaired host defense mechanisms and frequently require antibiotics for various infective complications. In this study, we investigated whether dialysis patients have greater risk for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Methods: During the 4-year study period (2004–2008), 85 patients with CDAD were identified based on a retrospective review of C difficile toxin assay or histology records. Nosocomial diarrheal patients without CDAD were consi...

  10. An ultrasensitive rapid immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting Clostridium difficile toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangyun; Wang, Jufang; Steele, Jennifer; Sun, Xingmin; Nie, Weijia; Tzipori, Saul; Feng, Hanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel ultrasensitive cell-based immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting less then 1 pg/ml of Clostridium difficile toxins in porcine clinical samples. The assay is simple to perform with a turnaround time of approximately 3 hours and capable of detecting less then 1 pg/ml of toxin A. Using this assay, we were able to detect the presence of C. difficile toxins in the fecal and serum specimens of experimentally infected piglets. PMID:19393695

  11. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembrane...

  12. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The disruption of the normal gut microbiota is central to the pathogenesis of CDI, and disruption persists in recurrent disease. The use of FMT for recurrent CDI is characterized by a high response rate and short term safety is excellent, although the long-term effects of FMT are as yet unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genotyping of Clostridium perfringens associated with sudden death in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Toxigenic types of Clostridium perfringens are significant causative agents of enteric disease in domestic animals, although type E is presumably rare, appearing as an uncommon cause of enterotoxemia of lambs, calves and rabbits. We report herein the typing of 23 C. perfringens strains, by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, isolated from small intestine samples of bovines that have died suddenly, after manifesting or not enteric or neurological disorders. Two strains (8.7%) were i...

  14. SEVERE CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTIONS. A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE -review-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Elena NICA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that has been brought to the attention of the medical community recently, as the number of infections related to it has increased dramatically. This is happening mainly because of the excessive and defective use of antibiotic therapy. The pathology of a Clostridium Difficile infection is very complex, as it ranges from easy symptoms like abdominal pain and diarrhea to severe complications, like toxic megacolon. The management of these infections has become even more difficult, as they are not appearing only in the hospital environment anymore, but also outside of it. The bacterium spreads through poor hands hygiene. Also, we don’t have a clear strategy for overcoming an infection like this, so it gets even more difficult as most of the times the doctors need to rely only on their experience and knowledge to find ways of battling it. We would like to underline the research opportunities that are available in this domain as very few things are known about Clostridium difficile and also the crucial importance of research, as these infections are common and dangerous not only for patients, but for the medical staff and their families too.

  15. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  16. Emerging therapies for Clostridium difficile infection – focus on fidaxomicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaparro-Rojas F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fredy Chaparro-Rojas, Kathleen M MullaneDepartment of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI has evolved during the last decades, with an increase in the reported incidence, severity of cases, and rate of mortality and relapses. These increases have primarily affected some special populations including the elderly, patients requiring concomitant antibiotic therapy, patients with renal failure, and patients with cancer. Until recently, the treatment of CDI was limited to either metronidazole or vancomycin. New therapeutic options have emerged to address the shortcomings of current antibiotic therapy. Fidaxomicin stands out as the first-in-class oral macrocyclic antibiotic with targeted activity against C. difficile and minimal collateral damage on the normal colonic flora. Fidaxomicin has demonstrated performance not inferior to what is considered the “gold standard” available therapy for CDI, vancomycin, in two separate Phase III clinical trials, but with significant advantages, including fewer recurrences and higher rates of sustained clinical cures. Fidaxomicin constitutes an important development in targeted antibiotic therapy for CDI and must be considered as a first-line agent for patients with risk factors known to portend relapse and severe infection.Keywords: fidaxomicin, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, CDAD, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI, vancomycin, metronidazole

  17. Effect of a probiotic on prevention of diarrhea and Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens shedding in foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Staempfli, H R; Abrahams, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to 60% of foals develop diarrhea within 6 months after birth. Preventive measures are limited but potentially probiotics could be used. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a newly designed probiotic on the incidence of foal diarrhea in a randomized field trial. ANIMALS: Seventy......-two healthy neonatal foals. METHODS: Randomized, placebo-controlled field trial. Foals were administered a placebo or probiotic for 3 weeks and monitored for an additional week. A total of 3 fecal samples were taken from each foal at biweekly intervals. Statistical modeling was applied for comparison...... of incidence and duration of diarrhea and fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile between treatment and age groups. RESULTS: The overall incidence of diarrhea was 41 of 72 (59%) and did not differ (P = 0.37) between treatment groups. Foals treated with probiotics were more likely...

  18. Butanol production from alkali-pretreated rice straw by co-culture of Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyoshi, Keiji; Furukawa, Masataka; Seyama, Tomoko; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi; Nakayama, Shunichi

    2015-06-01

    The co-culture of cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum NBRC 103400 and butanol-producing Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4 produced 5.5 g/L of butanol from 40 g/L of delignified rice straw pretreated with 1% (wt/vol) NaOH. The addition of cellulase (100 U/g biomass) in a co-culture system significantly increased butanol production to 6.9 g/L using 40 g/L of delignified rice straw. Compared to the control, this increase in butanol production was attributed to the enhancement of exoglucanase activity on lignocellulose degradation in experimental samples. The results showed that the co-culture system in conjunction with enhanced exoglucanase activity resulted in cost-effective butanol production from delignified rice straw. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of long-chain polyphosphate and heat treatment on Clostridium cochlearium and Clostridium sporogenes isolated from processed cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Elisabeth; Lycken, Lena

    2007-03-01

    The outgrowth of Clostridium spp. spores causes spoilage in processed cheese products due to gas and off-odor formation. The present study focuses on the response of spores of Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium cochlearium at 25 degrees C to polyphosphate, both alone and in combination with heat treatment. The two strains used were isolated from spoiled cheese spread. The addition of 1.5% polyphosphate but not 0.75% polyphosphate totally inhibited the growth of C. sporogenes SIK4.3; in contrast, 0.75% polyphosphate was sufficient to totally inhibit C. cochlearium CCUG 45978. The highest polyphosphate concentration tested (1.5%) was sporicidal for C. sporogenes SIK4.3 but not for C. cochlearium CCUG 45978. When 0.75% polyphosphate Bekaplus FS was combined with a holding time of 5 min at 98 degrees C, no survival or growth of C. sporogenes SIK4.3 was detected; however, the same effect was not achieved through heating alone or through application of polyphosphate alone. C. cochlearium CCUG 45978 was more heat tolerant, as shown by higher D-values. In conclusion, the results strongly suggest that polyphosphate Bekaplus FS has the potential to restrict the growth of C. sporogenes and C. cochlearium in cheese spread stored at ambient storage temperature. Experiments with cheese are needed in order to verify this effect.

  20. Prevalence of Clostridium spp. and Clostridium difficile in children with acute diarrhea in São Paulo city, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia EA Ferreira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Species of Clostridium are widely distributed in the environment, inhabiting both human and animal gastrointestinal tracts. Clostridium difficile is an important pathogen associated with outbreaks of pseudomembranous colitis and other intestinal disorders, such as diarrhea. In this study, the prevalence of Clostridium spp. and C. difficile, from hospitalized children with acute diarrhea, was examined. These children were admitted to 3 different hospitals for over 12 months. Eighteen (20% and 19 (21% stool specimens from children with (90 and without (91 diarrhea respectively, were positive to clostridia. Only 10 C. difficile strains were detected in 5.5% of the stool samples of children with diarrhea. None healthy children (without diarrhea harbored C. difficile. From these 10 C. difficile, 9 were considered as toxigenic and genotyped as tcdA+/tcdB+ or tcdA-/tcdB+, and 1 strain as nontoxigenic (tcdA-/tdcB-. They were detected by the citotoxicity on VERO cells and by the multiplex-polymerase chain reaction. Thirty clinical fecal extracts produced minor alterations on VERO cells. The presence of C. difficile as a probable agent of acute diarrhea is suggested in several countries, but in this study, the presence of these organisms was not significant. More studies will be necessary to evaluate the role of clostridia or C. difficile in diarrhoeal processes in children.

  1. Role of the environment in the transmission of Clostridium difficile in health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David J; Anderson, Deverick J; Sexton, Daniel J; Rutala, William A

    2013-05-01

    Recent data demonstrate that the contaminated hospital surface environment plays a key role in the transmission of Clostridium difficile. Enhanced environmental cleaning of rooms housing Clostridium difficile-infected patients is warranted, and, if additional studies demonstrate a benefit of "no-touch" methods (eg, ultraviolet irradiation, hydrogen peroxide systems), their routine use should be considered.

  2. Two Serious Cases of Infection with Clostridium celatum after 40 Years in Hiding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Charlotte Nielsen; Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Holt, Hanne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium celatum [ce.la'tum. L. adj. celatum hidden] has been known since 1974, when it was isolated from human feces. In 40 years no association to human infection has been reported. In this work, we present two serious cases of infection with the anaerobic Gram-positive rod Clostridium celatum....

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from food animals on farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with a spectrum of disease in humans referred to as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) and use of antimicrobials is considered a risk factor for development of disease in humans. Clostridium difficile can also inhabit healthy food animals and transmi...

  4. Clostridium septicum infection of hepatic metastases following alcohol injection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Neam; Sohail, Muhammad R; Hashmey, Rayhan H; Al Kaabi, Mohammed

    2009-12-31

    Clostridium septicum infections are generally associated with gastrointestinal or hematologic malignancies. We report the first case of hepatic metastases infection with Clostridium septicum that followed alcohol injection of liver lesion. Clinicians should consider this possibility in patients with underlying malignancy who present with hepatic abscess, as prompt surgical drainage and empiric antibiotics may be life saving.

  5. Evaluation of Correlation between Pretest Probability for Clostridium difficile Infection and Clostridium difficile Enzyme Immunoassay Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jennie H; Reske, Kimberly A; Hink, Tiffany; Burnham, C A; Dubberke, Erik R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of hospitalized patients tested for Clostridium difficile and determine the correlation between pretest probability for C. difficile infection (CDI) and assay results. Patients with testing ordered for C. difficile were enrolled and assigned a high, medium, or low pretest probability of CDI based on clinical evaluation, laboratory, and imaging results. Stool was tested for C. difficile by toxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and toxigenic culture (TC). Chi-square analyses and the log rank test were utilized. Among the 111 patients enrolled, stool samples from nine were TC positive and four were EIA positive. Sixty-one (55%) patients had clinically significant diarrhea, 19 (17%) patients did not, and clinically significant diarrhea could not be determined for 31 (28%) patients. Seventy-two (65%) patients were assessed as having a low pretest probability of having CDI, 34 (31%) as having a medium probability, and 5 (5%) as having a high probability. None of the patients with low pretest probabilities had a positive EIA, but four were TC positive. None of the seven patients with a positive TC but a negative index EIA developed CDI within 30 days after the index test or died within 90 days after the index toxin EIA date. Pretest probability for CDI should be considered prior to ordering C. difficile testing and must be taken into account when interpreting test results. CDI is a clinical diagnosis supported by laboratory data, and the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in stool does not necessarily confirm the diagnosis of CDI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Cappella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered.

  7. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  8. Fusion of a thermophilic phage endolysin to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  9. A thermophilic phage endolysin fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  10. Simultaneous production of isopropanol, butanol, ethanol and 2,3-butanediol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 engineered strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Isopropanol represents a widely-used commercial alcohol which is currently produced from petroleum. In nature, isopropanol is excreted by some strains of Clostridium beijerinckii, simultaneously with butanol and ethanol during the isopropanol butanol ethanol (IBE) fermentation. In order to increase isopropanol production, the gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme from C. beijerinckii NRRL B593 (adh) which catalyzes the reduction of acetone to isopropanol, was cloned into the acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE)-producing strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The transformants showed high capacity for conversion of acetone into isopropanol (> 95%). To increase isopropanol production levels in ATCC 824, polycistronic transcription units containing, in addition to the adh gene, homologous genes of the acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), and/or the acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA transferase subunits A and B (ctfA and ctfB) were constructed and introduced into the wild-type strain. Combined overexpression of the ctfA and ctfB genes resulted in enhanced solvent production. In non-pH-controlled batch cultures, the total solvents excreted by the transformant overexpressing the adh, ctfA, ctfB and adc genes were 24.4 g/L IBE (including 8.8 g/L isopropanol), while the control strain harbouring an empty plasmid produced only 20.2 g/L ABE (including 7.6 g/L acetone). The overexpression of the adc gene had limited effect on IBE production. Interestingly, all transformants with the adh gene converted acetoin (a minor fermentation product) into 2,3-butanediol, highlighting the wide metabolic versatility of solvent-producing Clostridia. PMID:22909015

  11. Clostridium perfringens type A netF and netE positive and Clostridium difficile co-infection in two adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Oliveira Junior, Carlos Augusto; Pierezan, Felipe; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report two cases of Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium difficile co-infection in adult dogs. Both animals were positive for A/B toxin. Toxigenic C. difficile and C. perfringens type A positive for NetE and NetF-encoding genes were isolated. This report reinforces the necessity of studying a possible synergism of C. difficile and C. perfringens in enteric disorders.

  12. Characterisation of non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. strains, to use as surrogates for non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in chilled food challenge testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M D; Barrett, P I; Shepherd, J; Price, L J; Bull, S D

    2015-01-01

    Under many of the conditions studied, a two-strain cocktail of non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. was found to be suitable as a surrogate for non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, and has the potential for use in chilled food challenge tests measuring growth. Non-toxigenic surrogates could also be used in thermal process screening studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. First isolation of Clostridium indolis in a patient with chronic osteitis: a case report and literature review of human infections related to Clostridium saccharolyticum group species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotte, Romain; Lotte, Laurène; Bouvet, Philippe; Degand, Nicolas; Bal, Antonin; Carles, Michel; de Dompsure, Regis Bernard; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Ruimy, Raymond

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium indolis is an anaerobic spore-forming Gram-positive bacillus belonging to the Clostridium saccharolyticum group. Its clinical significance in human remains poorly known. We describe the first case of osteitis related to C. indolis, identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and provide a literature review of human infections related to C. saccharolyticum group species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. KINETIC PARAMETERS AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF RECOMBINANT METHIONINE γ-LYASE FROM CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI, CLOSTRIDIUM SPOROGENES, PORPHYROMONAS GINGIVALIS AND CITROBACTER FREUNDII

    OpenAIRE

    Morozova, E.; Kulikova, V.; Yashin, D.; Anufrieva, N.; Anisimova, N.; Revtovich, S.; Kotlov, M.; Belyi, Y.; Pokrovsky, V.; Demidkina, T.

    2013-01-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-his...

  15. Enumeration and confirmation of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in silages using neutral red, D-cycloserine, and lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, A

    1990-03-01

    Spores of clostridia in big bale silages, manure, and dairy products were enumerated and distinguished from other spore formers by using Reinforced Clostridium Agar containing .005% neutral red. Spores of Clostridium tyrobutyricum predominated, but spores of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium bifermentans, Clostridium putrificum, and Clostridium sphenoides occurred to a lesser extent. In samples with high bacterial spore counts, growth of Bacillus spp., but not C. tyrobutyricum, was retarded by the addition of 200 ppm D-cycloserine. Clostridia isolated from silages and milk products were identified and tested on lactate dehydrogenase activity. Of 275 investigated strains, only strains identified as C. tyrobutyricum tested positively. Only 65% of the tested strains of C. tyrobutyricum grew in the confirmatory substrate containing minerals, lactic acid, and acetic acid. Tyrobutyricum Broth was not selective for C. tyrobutyricum, since C. butyricum and C. sporogenes also grew in this medium.

  16. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes.

  17. Formate synthesis by Clostridium thermocellum during anaerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, Richard; Islam, Rumana; Cicek, Nazim; Carere, Carlo; Chow, Herman; Levin, David B

    2006-07-01

    We have detected formate synthesis by Clostridium thermocellum 27405 cultured in both cellobiose and alpha-cellulose. While formate synthesis has been reported for one strain of C. thermocellum (strain I-1-B), numerous studies of C. thermocellum 27405 fermentation, conducted under different growth conditions, failed to detect the presence of formate. Thus, the status of formate synthesis as a fermentation end product by C. thermocellum has been uncertain. Formate synthesis competes with the synthesis of hydrogen (H2) as a fermentation end product, and thus would negatively impact H2 yields in processes designed to generate H2 from biomass. Understanding the mechanism of formate synthesis is the first step in devising means of mitigating its production. Transcription of putative pfl, fnr, and adhE genes, encoding pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL), PFL-activating enzyme (PFL-AE), and alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADH-E) enzymes, respectively, were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions using total RNA extracted from stationary phase C. thermocellum cultured on cellobiose. The PCR products observed correspond to the expected amplicon sizes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cloned PCR products followed by BLAST analyses confirmed their identity. Formate production was detected throughout growth, and PFL enzyme activity was detected in late log and stationary phase (OD600 = 0.7 and 0.9, respectively) in extracts of C. thermocellum cultured on cellobiose. BLAST analyses revealed that C. thermocellum PFL and PFL-AE have greater amino acid sequence identity with equivalent enzymes from Bacillus and Thermocynechococcus species than with other Clostridium species, but C. thermocellum ADH-E has greater amino acid sequence identity with Clostridium species.

  18. Distribution of Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Piglets in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Ki-Eun; Lim, Seong-In; SHIN, Seong-Ho; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Kim, Ha-Young; Song, Jae-Young; An, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens causes various digestive system disease symptoms in pigs. In the present study, 11 C. perfringens isolates were obtained from diarrheic piglets and 18 from healthy piglets. All of the C. perfringens isolates were shown to be type A using a multiplex PCR assay. The β2 toxin gene was detected in 27/29 C. perfringens isolates, i.e., 81% (9/11) of diarrheic piglets and 100% (18/18) of healthy piglets, and all of the genes had the same sequence. In conclusion, the ...

  19. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  20. Kinetics of Homoacetic Fermentation of Lactate by Clostridium formicoaceticum

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shang-Tian; Tang, I-Ching; Okos, Martin R.

    1987-01-01

    Clostridium formicoaceticum homofermentatively converted lactate to acetate at mesophilic temperatures (30 to 42°C) and at pHs between 6.6 and 9.6. The production of acetate was found to be growth associated. Approximately 0.96 g of acetic acid and 0.066 g of cells were formed from each gram of lactic acid consumed at 37°C. The concentration of the substrate (lactate) had little or no effect on the growth rate; however, the fermentation was inhibited by acetic acid. The bacterium grew at an o...

  1. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M. Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembranes. Further imaging, endoscopy, and careful histopathology review revealed chronic ischemia as the cause of her pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea. This case highlights the need for gastroenterologists to consider non-C. difficile etiologies when diagnosing pseudomembranous colitis.

  2. Empyema Caused by Clostridium bifermentans: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Edagiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of pneumonia with associated empyema caused by Clostridium bifermentans is described. C bifermentans is an anaerobic, spore-forming, Gram-positive bacillus. This organism is infrequently reported as a cause of infection in humans, and older publications tended to regard it as nonpathogenic. However, in more recent reports, C bifermentans has been documented as a cause of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, soft tissue infection, abdominal infections, brain abscess, bacteremia and endocarditis. The present case is the third reported case of empyema caused by C bifermentans, and it serves to further define the spectrum of illness due to this uncommon organism.

  3. [Clostridium difficile isolation in children hospitalized with diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, B; Guerra, L; García-Morín, M; González, E; Gonzálvez, A; Izquierdo, G; Martos, A; Santos, M; Navarro, M; Hernández-Sampelayo, M T; Saavedra-Lozano, J

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial and antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults, and its incidence has substantially risen over the last few years. The prevalence of this infection in children is difficult to assess due to the high rates of colonization in this setting. A one-year retrospective study was conducted on children under 15 years admitted to hospital with acute diarrhea. Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory findings and outcome of children with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were compared to other causes of diarrhea. Risk factors for CDI were identified by multivariate analysis. Two hundred and fifty children with acute diarrhea were identified. A microbiological pathogen was identified in 79 (45.4%) of 174 patients who underwent complete testing: 19 CDI (25.6%, 13 of which were enterotoxin-producing), 21 other bacteria (28.6%), and 34 viruses (45.8%; rotavirus n=31; adenovirus n=3). The estimated incidence of CDI was 3 cases/1,000 admissions, with 68.4% of them occurring in children younger than 2 years. Overall, 15.8% were community-acquired. Compared to other causes of diarrhea, CDI was associated with comorbidity (P<.0001), recent contact with the health-care system (P<.0001) or intensive care unit stay (P=.003) and exposure to antibiotics in the previous month (P<.0001). The clinical course of children with CDI was less symptomatic. There were no clinical differences between Clostridium difficile toxin-producers and non-toxin producers. Comorbidity was identified as the main risk factor associated with CDI (OR 40.02, 95% CI 6.84-232.32; P<.0001). The isolation of Clostridium difficile is common in hospitalized children with diarrhea in our setting. CDI is more frequent in children with comorbidity and recent contact with the health-care system, presenting a mostly oligosymptomatic clinical course. Further studies are needed to understand the epidemiology of this infection in pediatrics, especially the percentage of

  4. Characteristic strategy of assimilation of various saccharides by Clostridium cellulovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takako; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans can effectively assimilate not only cellulose but also hemicellulose by producing cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes. However, little is known about how C. cellulovorans assimilates various saccharides in media containing polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. In this research, we investigated the property of saccharide incorporation and assimilation by C. cellulovorans. Faster growth in media containing xylan and cellulose was achieved by switching polysaccharides, in which xylan was first assimilated, followed by cellulose. Furthermore, the presence of polysaccharides that can be easily degraded might increase the assimilation rate of lignocellulose by promoting growth. These properties of C. cellulovorans could be suitable for the effective utilization of lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in the orbit: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes, I; Dégi, R; Végh, M

    2013-02-01

    Our report presents a case of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in an unusual, orbital localization. The predisposing factors are typical: colon tumour and lymphatic malignancy. Most probably bacteria from the intestinal flora entered the bloodstream through the compromised intestinal wall and settled in the orbit resulting in the development of an abscess containing gas. At the site of the gas gangrene, an indolent B cell lymphoma was present. After surgery and antibiotic treatment, the patient healed from the C. septicum infection; but subsequently died as a consequence of the tumour.

  6. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek M; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; De Groot, Hannah; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Xie, Guofeng; Ghazi, Leyla J

    2014-01-01

    Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembranes. Further imaging, endoscopy, and careful histopathology review revealed chronic ischemia as the cause of her pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea. This case highlights the need for gastroenterologists to consider non-C. difficile etiologies when diagnosing pseudomembranous colitis.

  7. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans Cellulosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Roy H

    2008-06-01

    Our major goal for this project (2004-2008) was to obtain an understanding ofthe structure, function, and regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosomes. Our specific goals were to select genes for cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes and characterize their products, to study the synergistic action between cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes, to study the composition of cellulosomes when cells were grown with different carbon sources, continue our studies on the scaffolding protein and examine heterologous expression of cellulosomal genes in Bacillus subtilis. We fulfilled the specific goals of our proposal.

  8. [Characteristics of Clostridium tetani and laboratory diagnosis of tetanus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smietańska, Karolina; Rokosz-Chudziak, Natalia; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The causative agent of tetanus is the obligate anaerobic bacterium--Clostridium tetani. These bacteria form endospores that are able to survive long periods of exposure to air and other adverse environmental conditions. Infection generally occurs through wound contamination. We can distinguish several forms of tetanus: generalized, local and neonatal. Diagnosis of tetanus is based primarily on the patient's clinical symptoms (muscle cramps, painful back muscle spasms, generalized contractions of the arcuate curvature of the body) as well as on microbiological diagnosis. This article is a brief review of C. tetani and diagnosis of infections caused by these organisms in humans.

  9. Rectal bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, M; Tinggaard, M; Helms, M

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections. Among other alternatives to standard treatment with vancomycin for recurrent infection are faecal microbiota transplantation and rectal bacteriotherapy with a fixed mixture of intestinal bacterial strains isolated from...... faeces of healthy persons to mimic a theoretical normal microflora. Developed by Dr. Tvede and Dr. Rask-Madsen, the latter method has been in use for selected patients during the last 25 years in Denmark. In this study we reviewed the medical records of patients treated with rectal bacteriotherapy...... that rectal bacteriotherapy is a viable alternative to faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with relapsing C. difficile-associated diarrhoea....

  10. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  11. Controversies Surrounding Clostridium difficile Infection in Infants and Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribeth R. Nicholson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults and older children. However, as many as 80% of infants can be asymptomatically colonized. The reasons for this have not been well established but are believed to be due to differences in toxin receptors or toxin internalization. Determining which children who test positive for C. difficile warrant treatment is exceedingly difficult, especially in the setting of increased rates of detection and the rising risk of disease in children lacking classic risk factors for C. difficile.

  12. Clostridium vulturis sp. nov., isolated from the intestine of the cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Jayoung; Lee, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Byung-Chun; Sang, Byoung-In; Paek, Woon Kee; Jin, Tae-Eun; Shin, Yeseul; Park, In-Soon; Chang, Young-Hyo

    2014-09-01

    A Gram-stain positive, strict anaerobe, spore-forming, motile rod-shaped bacterial strain with peritrichous flagella, designated YMB-57(T), was isolated from the intestine of a cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus) in Korea. Strain YMB-57(T) was found to show optimal growth at 37 °C, pH 7.5 and 1.0 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain YMB-57(T) belongs to the genus Clostridium and is most closely related to the type strains of Clostridium subterminale (96.9 % sequence similarity), Clostridium thiosulfatireducens (96.7 %) and Clostridium sulfidigenes (96.6 %). The main fermentation end-products identified following growth in PYG medium were acetate, butyrate, ethanol, propanol, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Peptone was converted to ethanol, and butanol, whereas glucose was fermented to ethanol. The major cellular fatty acids were identified as C16:0, C18:1 ω9c, and C18:1 ω9c DMA and the DNA G+C content was determined to be 34.0 mol%. Phenotypic and phylogenetic differences indicate that strain YMB-57(T) is distinct from other Clostridium species. It is proposed that strain YMB-57(T) be classified as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Clostridium, with the name Clostridium vulturis sp. nov. The type strain is YMB-57(T) (=KCTC 15114(T) = JCM 17998(T)).

  13. Study on the diversity of Bacteroides and Clostridium in patients with primary gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shi-Chao; Meng, Dong-Mei; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Gang; Liu, Xi-Shuang; Li, Na; Yan, Yao-Yao; Li, Chang-Gui

    2015-03-01

    To analyze the diversity of both Bacteroides and Clostridium in patients with primary gout and the difference from that of normal individuals. And to investigate the relationship between the primary gout and the intestinal flora. Fecal samples of 90 cases with the primary gout and 94 cases normal comparison group were selected, together with the cases that match the filter criteria. The DNA is extracted from the feces. 16S rRNA specific primers of both Bacteroides and Clostridium were adopted for the PCR amplification. The molecular fingerprints of Bacteroides and Clostridium in both the primary gout group and the normal control group were obtained through DGGE and subjected for further analysis on both the diversity and the similarity. Compared with normal individuals, the number of bands and Shannon-Weaver (H') of Bacteroides in patients with primary gout was not reduced, but significantly decreased in Clostridium. Furthermore, the intra-group and inter-group similarity of both Bacteroides and Clostridium were lower. The primary gout has caused the structural change of both Bacteroides and Clostridium, inducing the low similarity, especially for Clostridium. It has statistic significance. The gut predominant flora may play an important role in the development of primary gout.

  14. Clostridium novyi-NT in Cancer Therapy%肿瘤治疗中Clostridium novyi-NT的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石新丽; 张硕; 丁娜娜; 李明远

    2015-01-01

    联合细菌的溶瘤治疗(combined bacteriolytic therapy,COBALT)策略在实体瘤治疗中方兴未艾.此策略是将专性厌氧菌Clostridium novyi-NT联合传统放化疗药物治疗实体瘤,现处于临床Ⅰ期试验阶段.本文分别从有效性及安全性等方面总结了抗肿瘤细菌应具有的标准,并简述了C.novyi-NT的溶瘤机制.

  15. Complementation of a Clostridium perfringens spo0A mutant with wild-type spo0A from other Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Hsiu; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate whether C. perfringens can be used as a model organism for studying the sporulation process in other clostridia, C. perfringens spo0A mutant IH101 was complemented with wild-type spo0A from four different Clostridium species. Wild-type spo0A from C. acetobutylicum or C. tetani, but not from C. botulinum or C. difficile, restored sporulation and enterotoxin production in IH101. The ability of spo0A from C. botulinum or C. difficile to complement the lack of spore formation in IH101 might be due, at least in part, to the low levels of spo0A transcription and Spo0A production.

  16. Recovery of butanol from Clostridium beijerinckii P260 fermentation broth by supercritical CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanol is a superior biofuel to ethanol because of its blend properties and higher energy density. However, its recovery by distillation from the fermentation broth is energy intensive. For this reason, we studied butanol recovery by supercritical CO2 extraction from simulated and actual fermentati...

  17. Introducing a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase into butanol-tolerant Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 switches ABE fermentation to high level IBE fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Zongjie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have developed a butanol tolerant mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8, from the wild type strain DSM 1731. Strain Rh8 can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, with solvent titer improved accordingly, thus exhibiting industrial application potential. To test if strain Rh8 can be used for production of high level mixed alcohols, a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 was overexpressed in strain Rh8 under the control of thl promoter. Results The heterogenous gene sADH was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum Rh8. This simple, one-step engineering approach switched the traditional ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation to IBE (isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fermentation. The total alcohol titer reached 23.88 g/l (7.6 g/l isopropanol, 15 g/l butanol, and 1.28 g/l ethanol with a yield to glucose of 31.42%. The acid (butyrate and acetate assimilation rate in isopropanol producing strain Rh8(psADH was increased. Conclusions The improved butanol tolerance and the enhanced solvent biosynthesis machinery in strain Rh8 is beneficial for production of high concentration of mixed alcohols. Strain Rh8 can thus be considered as a good host for further engineering of solvent/alcohol production.

  18. Introducing a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase into butanol-tolerant Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 switches ABE fermentation to high level IBE fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously we have developed a butanol tolerant mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8, from the wild type strain DSM 1731. Strain Rh8 can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, with solvent titer improved accordingly, thus exhibiting industrial application potential. To test if strain Rh8 can be used for production of high level mixed alcohols, a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 was overexpressed in strain Rh8 under the control of thl promoter. Results The heterogenous gene sADH was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum Rh8. This simple, one-step engineering approach switched the traditional ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation to IBE (isopropanol-butanol-ethanol) fermentation. The total alcohol titer reached 23.88 g/l (7.6 g/l isopropanol, 15 g/l butanol, and 1.28 g/l ethanol) with a yield to glucose of 31.42%. The acid (butyrate and acetate) assimilation rate in isopropanol producing strain Rh8(psADH) was increased. Conclusions The improved butanol tolerance and the enhanced solvent biosynthesis machinery in strain Rh8 is beneficial for production of high concentration of mixed alcohols. Strain Rh8 can thus be considered as a good host for further engineering of solvent/alcohol production. PMID:22742819

  19. Identification and characterization of Clostridium sordellii toxin gene regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirigi Reddy, Apoorva Reddy; Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Zapotocny, Ryan; Govind, Revathi

    2013-09-01

    Toxigenic Clostridium sordellii causes uncommon but highly lethal infections in humans and animals. Recently, an increased incidence of C. sordellii infections has been reported in women undergoing obstetric interventions. Pathogenic strains of C. sordellii produce numerous virulence factors, including sordellilysin, phospholipase, neuraminidase, and two large clostridial glucosylating toxins, TcsL and TcsH. Recent studies have demonstrated that TcsL toxin is an essential virulence factor for the pathogenicity of C. sordellii. In this study, we identified and characterized TcsR as the toxin gene (tcsL) regulator in C. sordellii. High-throughput sequencing of two C. sordellii strains revealed that tcsR lies within a genomic region that encodes TcsL, TcsH, and TcsE, a putative holin. By using ClosTron technology, we inactivated the tcsR gene in strain ATCC 9714. Toxin production and tcsL transcription were decreased in the tcsR mutant strain. However, the complemented tcsR mutant produced large amounts of toxins, similar to the parental strain. Expression of the Clostridium difficile toxin gene regulator tcdR also restored toxin production to the C. sordellii tcsR mutant, showing that these sigma factors are functionally interchangeable.

  20. [Risk factors of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu; Xu, Xi-wei; Dong, Fang

    2012-07-10

    To explore the risk factors of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in children. From December 2010 to March 2011, the hospitalized diarrheal patients under 18 years old at Beijing Children's Hospital were tested for Clostridium difficile. The CDAD(+) patients were selected and their fecal specimens were PCR-positive for tcdA and (or) tcdB genes. And the patients with healthcare facility-associated-CDAD (HCFA-CDAD) were selected from the group of CDAD(+). The CDAD patients were selected and their fecal specimens were PCR-negative for tcdA and (or) tcdB genes. And the 1:3 matched controls per case were selected from those hospitalized patients without diarrhea at the same department with similar diseases during the same period. The potential predictors of CDAD included age, gender, co-morbidities, prior hospitalization, the administration of C. difficile-active antibiotics during prior 24 hours, recent (predictors of CDAD. Among 93 PCR tests, 35 were positive in fecal samples. There were HCFA-CDAD (n = 30) and CDAD(-) (n = 58). Thirty-five CDAD(+) hospitalized patients were compared with 105 controls. According to multivariate analyses, the predictors of CDAD included prior hospitalization (P < 0.01, OR = 0.002), CRP(P = 0.008, OR = 3.465), NSAID (P = 0.015, OR = 13.950) and WBC (P = 0.003, OR = 8.063). The administration of NSAID, elevated CRP and abnormal WBC are significantly associated with CDAD.

  1. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  2. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  3. On the Interaction of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin with Claudins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Veshnyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens causes one of the most common foodborne illnesses, which is largely mediated by the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE. The toxin consists of two functional domains. The N-terminal region mediates the cytotoxic effect through pore formation in the plasma membrane of the mammalian host cell. The C-terminal region (cCPE binds to the second extracellular loop of a subset of claudins. Claudin-3 and claudin-4 have been shown to be receptors for CPE with very high affinity. The toxin binds with weak affinity to claudin-1 and -2 but contribution of these weak binding claudins to CPE-mediated disease is questionable. cCPE is not cytotoxic, however, it is a potent modulator of tight junctions. This review describes recent progress in the molecular characterization of the cCPE-claudin interaction using mutagenesis, in vitro binding assays and permeation studies. The results promote the development of recombinant cCPE-proteins and CPE-based peptidomimetics to modulate tight junctions for improved drug delivery or to treat tumors overexpressing claudins.

  4. Management of Clostridium difficile in a developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clostridium difficile is the most important definable cause of healthcare acquired diarrhea. Recommended treatments for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI are metronidazole, oral vancomycin and fidaxomicin (a new narrow spectrum macrocyclic antibiotic. Aim: The aim of this investigation was to review the treatment of CDI in Iran. Method: 1600 medical records and prescriptions were scrutinized for patients complaining of diarrhea, colitis and gastroenteritis. The therapeutic route was investigated in each individual case bearing in mind the medical and medication history as well as other co-morbidities. Results: The selection of antibiotic by many medical practitioners for the treatment of diarrhea, colitis and gastroenteritis were inappropriate and random. In most cases the chosen antibiotic, can itself be associated with initiation or worsening of CDI. Conclusion: The needs for antimicrobial stewardship program to preserve the effectiveness of current available therapies are strongly recommended. This program must focus on the overall reduction of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and ultimately on enforcing the adherence to the reputable antibacterial guidelines.

  5. FACTORS AFFECTING THE FORMATION OF COBAMIDE COENZYMES IN CLOSTRIDIUM TETANOMORPHUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, J. I.; Barker, H. A.

    1964-01-01

    Toohey, J. I. (University of California, Berkeley), and H. A. Barker. Factors affecting the formation of cobamide coenzymes in Clostridium tetanomorphum. J. Bacteriol. 87:504–509. 1964.—Tests were carried out to determine the optimal culture conditions for the production of cobamide coenzymes in Clostridium tetanomorphum strain H1. A method is described for carrying out coenzyme determinations on the cells from 10-ml cultures of the bacterium. In a basal medium containing magnesium sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, sodium molybdate, calcium chloride, and potassium phosphate, the optimal concentration of monosodium glutamate was 0.1 m and of yeast extract was 3 g per liter. Addition of glucose at a concentration of 0.05 m was found to double the yield of cells and to increase tenfold the specific coenzyme yield. Addition of cobaltous chloride (2 × 10−5m) also increased coenzyme production. Addition of benzimidazole caused an apparent increase in coenzyme production by causing the synthesis of the highly active benzimidazole analogue. Addition of methionine (5 × 10−6m) appeared to inhibit coenzyme production. PMID:14127565

  6. Clostridium Difficile Infection Complicated By Toxic Megacolon In Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganescu Miruna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxic megacolon can be a form of severe clinical course of the infection with Clostridium difficile (ICD, life-threatening, requiring a particular course of treatment. Infection with Clostridium difficile in the Galati Infectious Disease Hospital presents rising number of cases, namely 172 cases in 2014, 271 cases in 2015 and 301 cases in 2016 with clinical evolutions with different severity degrees, including toxic megacolon and death. Among 744 patients with ICD in our clinic, since 1st January 2014 to 31 December 2016. The frequency of toxic megacolon (TM was 0,537%, so: 3 toxic megacolon cases with favorable evolution with treatment with vancomycin and metronidazole and just one case whose evolution was aggravated under this therapy and evolved favorably under treatment with tigecycline. The work presents this last case of ICD occurred in a 69 years old, immunocompetent man with unknown concomitant chronic diseases which undergoes surgery for bilateral inguinal hernia and receives antibiotherapy with cephalosporin IIIrd generation during surgery and after 7 days develops medium degree ICD with score Atlas 3 and receives therapy with oral vancomycin. He presents clinical aggravation during this therapy with the occurrence of colon dilatation, ascites and right pleurisy at ultrasound and therapy associated with metronidazole is decided. Clinical aggravation continues in this combined therapy with defining the clinical, colonoscopy and tomography criteria for TM and is decided surgical monitoring and replacing antibiotherapy with tigecycline. Evolution is favorable with tigecycline without surgical intervention.

  7. [Engineering and metabolic characteristics of a Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guiqing; Liu, Gang; Yang, Changde

    2010-02-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is suitable for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic. It can produce butyric acid, acetic acid as its main fermentation products from a wide variety of carbohydrates such as glucose, xylose, cellobiose and arabinose. In order to decrease acetic acid content and increase butyric acid content in C. tyrobutyricum, we replaced genes on the acetic acid fermentation pathway with genes on the butyric acid fermentation pathway. Three genes were selected. They were acetyl-CoA acetylrtansfers gene (thl) which is the key enzyme gene associated with acetic acid fermentation pathway from Clostridium acetobutylicum, erythromycin gene (em) from plasmid pIMP1 and phosphotransacetylase gene (pta) which is the key enzyme gene associated with butyric acid fermentation pathway from C. tyrobutyricum. We fused these genes with pUC19 to construct nonreplicative integrated plasmids pUC19-EPT. Then we transformed pUC19-EPT into C. tyrobutyricum through electroporation. The recombinant transformants grown on plates containing erythromycin were validated by PCR. A mutant whose pta gene was displaced by thl gene on the chromosome was selected. In the fermentation from glucose, the mutant's yield of butyric acid is 0.47, increased by 34% compared with wild type; and the yield of acetic acid is 0.05, decreased by 29% compared with wild type.

  8. Risk factors for recurrence of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Ahmed Abdel; Traub, Marc; Bachmann, Klaus; Kopischke, Karolin; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) is one of the most common causes of hospital-acquired diarrhea. Despite increasing incidence of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, there are few data on risk factors associated with its relapse. We studied retrospectively possible risk factors for the recurrence of CDAD; 124 patients fulfilled the criteria of CDAD during the study period between January 2006 and July 2009. After successful treatment, recurrence occurred in 20 patients. Nineteen patients (95%, p = 0.029) in the relapse group were on long term proton pump inhibitor therapy compared to 77 patients (74%) in the non-relapse group. There was no statistically significant difference in severity (CRP: p = 0.442, leucocytosis: p = 0.415) and length of hospitalization (p= 0.539) in both studied groups; however, CDAD-relapse was associated with more hospital readmissions and increased health care costs. Proton pump inhibitor therapy may be associated with increased risk of recurrence of CDAD, and represents a relevant, yet correctable risk factor. In patients at risk for CDAD, proton pump inhibitors should be used carefully.

  9. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Essenmacher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis.

  10. Predictors of Mortality and Morbidity in Clostridium Difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F. Menezes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clostridium Difficile (CD is implicated in 20 to 30% of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, in 50 to 70% of those with antibiotic-associated colitis and in more than 90% of those with antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis1-4. The incidence of CD associated diarrhoea ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1,000 hospital discharges depending on the antibiotic prescribing habits of the hospital5-7. Aims: The primary objective of our study was to determine the baseline characteristics of in-patients with hospital acquired Clostridium difficile and to ascertain their eventual outcomes, and thus evaluate the effectiveness of disease severity in predicting mortality, morbidity at discharge and discharge destination. Secondary aims included an analysis of the epidemiology of the infected population and if antibiotic-related infection varied in prognosis to sporadic (antibiotic-unrelated infection. Methods: All patients with diarrhoea admitted to a 24-bedded (cohort ward in at Whiston Hospital, Merseyside – UK over a four week period (May 2008 were prospectively identified and their case-notes were retrospectively reviewed. Results: 16 patients with confirmed CD infection were identified during the period of the study. The mean age of the infected population was 80 years (age range: 59-89 years, median: 82 years. Discussion: The study confirms that CD is a disease that affects a predominantly elderly and frail population with multiple co-morbidities and poor performance status, and carries a large mortality and morbidity burden.

  11. Clostridium difficile infection: A critical analysis of the guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    A recent report by the Department of Health, Clostridium Difficile Infection: How to deal with the problem - a board to ward approach, is a revised set of guidelines based on best practice and key recommendations for the NHS to ensure the control of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). It takes into account a national framework for clinical governance which did not previously exist, a framework that gives significant weight to infection control as a matter of patient safety, and highlights that all clinicians have a personal responsibility for infection prevention and control. It puts the onus on Trust management and PCTs to ensure that measures are in place to prevent and manage CDI according to best evidence. However, the report fails to explain how these measures will have an impact on finance and resources on an already burdened system. The author explains how much of the report is comparable with the one published in 1994, and highlights many of its limitations within the busy hospital setting. Reducing CDI is achievable, as many hospitals are showing large reductions in their CDI rates. Healthcare workers must be applauded for their success in reducing CDI, but there is more to be done.

  12. Use of Clostridium botulinum toxin in gastrointestinalmotility disorders in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    More than a century has elapsed since the identificationof Clostridia neurotoxins as the cause of paralyticdiseases. Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneousgroup of Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming,obligate anaerobic bacteria that produce a potentneurotoxin. Eight different Clostridium botulinumneurotoxins have been described (A-H) and 5 of thosecause disease in humans. These toxins cause paralysisby blocking the presynaptic release of acetylcholine atthe neuromuscular junction. Advantage can be taken ofthis blockade to alleviate muscle spams due to excessiveneural activity of central origin or to weaken a musclefor treatment purposes. In therapeutic applications,minute quantities of botulinum neurotoxin type A areinjected directly into selected muscles. The Food andDrug Administration first approved botulinum toxin (BT)type A in 1989 for the treatment of strabismus andblepharospasm associated with dystonia in patients 12years of age or older. Ever since, therapeutic applicationsof BT have expanded to other systems, including thegastrointestinal tract. Although only a single fatalityhas been reported to our knowledge with use of BTfor gastroenterological conditions, there are significantcomplications ranging from minor pain, rash and allergicreactions to pneumothorax, bowel perforation andsignificant paralysis of tissues surrounding the injection(including vocal cord paralysis and dysphagia). Thiseditorial describes the clinical experience and evidencefor the use BT in gastrointestinal motility disorders inchildren.

  13. Role of collagenase clostridium histolyticum in Peyronie's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peak TC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Taylor C Peak,1 Gregory C Mitchell,2 Faysal A Yafi,2 Wayne J Hellstrom2 1Department of Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, 2Section of Andrology, Department of Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Peyronie's disease is a localized connective tissue disease characterized by an active, inflammatory phase and a stable, quiescent phase, with the eventual development of collagenous plaques within the tunica albuginea of the penis. Risk factors primarily associated with Peyronie's disease include Dupuytren's contracture, penile trauma, and family history. A variety of treatment strategies have been utilized, including oral and topical agents, electromotive drug administration, intralesional injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, penile traction, and surgery. However, most of these strategies are ineffective, with surgery being the only definitive treatment. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is a newly US Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for intralesional injection. It is thought to downregulate many of the disease-related genes, cytokines, and growth factors and degrade collagen fibers. It also suppresses cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum has been clinically proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic option, demonstrating decreases in penile curvature and plaque consistency, as well as increases in patient satisfaction. During clinical evaluation, the Peyronie's Disease Questionnaire was validated as an effective tool for assessing treatment outcomes. Keywords: connective tissue disease, CCH, Xiaflex, Peyronie's Disease Questionnaire

  14. Clostridium difficile infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Deepa; Nanda, Neha

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated infection that causes significant morbidity and an economic impact in the United States. In this review, we provide an overview of Clostridium difficile infection in solid organ transplant recipients with an emphasis on recent literature. C. difficile in solid organ transplant population has unique risk factors. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown favorable results in treatment of recurrent C. difficile in this population. Preliminary data from animal studies suggests excellent efficacy with immunization against C. difficile toxins. Over the last decade, number of individuals receiving solid organ transplants has increased exponentially making peri-transplant complications a common occurrence.C. difficile is a frequent cause of morbidity in solid organ transplant recipients. Early and accurate diagnosis of C. difficile requires a stepwise approach. Differentiating between asymptomatic carriage and infection is a diagnostic challenge. Microbial diversity is inversely proportional to risk of C. difficile infection. Antimicrobial stewardship programs help to retain microbial diversity in individuals susceptible to CDI. Recurrent or relapsing C. difficile infection require fecal microbiota transplantation for definitive cure.

  15. Tequila vinasses acidogenesis in a UASB reactor with Clostridium predominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Marmolejo, E N; Corbalá-Robles, L; Cortez-Aguilar, R C; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Bolaños-Rosales, R E; Davila-Vazquez, G

    2015-01-01

    Tequila vinasses represent an acidic, highly concentrated pollutant effluent generated during the distillation step of Tequila production. Although acidogenesis of Tequila vinasses has been reported for some reactor configurations, a characterization of the bacteria present during this metabolic process is lacking in the literature. Hydraulic retention times (HRT) between 36 and 6 h and organic loading rates (OLR) from 5 to 30 g COD L(-1) d(-1) were assessed in a UASB reactor fed with Tequila vinasses. Results showed that OLR excerted a stronger effect (p ≤ 0.0001) on parameters such as gas production rate, pH, and acidity than HRT. While it was clear that shorter HRT were related to higher volatile fatty acid production levels. Figures above 2 Lgas Lreactor (-1) d(-1) (where "gas" could be a mixture of methane and hydrogen) were attained only with an OLR as high as 30 g COD L(-1) d(-1). Bacterial identification of a sludge sample at the end of the experiment revealed that acid-tolerant microorganisms that remained in the reactor were exclusively affiliated to the Clostridium genera, being the first report of organisms identification for Tequila vinasses acidogenesis. These findings are relevant to the field of biotechnology since acidogenesis of Tequila vinasses using identified and studied microorganism abilities (i.e. Clostridium strains) presents the opportunity of optimizing processes intended for different metabolites production (butanol, volatile fatty acids, hydrogen, solvents).

  16. Reclassification of Clostridium difficile as Clostridioides difficile (Hall and O'Toole 1935) Prévot 1938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Paul A; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Finegold, Sydney M

    2016-08-01

    The recent proposal by Lawson and Rainey (2015) to restrict the genus Clostridium to Clostridium butyricum and related species has ramifications for the members of the genera that fall outside this clade that should not be considered as Clostridium sensu stricto. One such organism of profound medical importance is Clostridioides difficile that is a major cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and mortality in individuals. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the closest relative of Clostridium difficile is Clostridium mangenotii with a 94.7% similarity value and both are located within the family Peptostreptococcaceae that is phylogenetically far removed from C. butyricum and other members of Clostridium sensu stricto. Clostridium difficile is Clostridium mangenotii each produce abundant H2 gas when grown in PYG broth and also produce a range of straight and branched chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with C16:0 as a major product. The cell wall peptidoglycan contains meso-DAP as the diagnostic diamino acid. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, novel genus Clostridioides gen. nov. is proposed for Clostridium difficile as Clostridioides difficile gen. nov. comb. nov. and that Clostridium mangenotii be transferred to this genus as Clostridioides mangenotii comb. nov. The type species of Clostridioides is Clostridioides difficile.

  17. Development and validation of PCR primers to assess the diversity of Clostridium spp. in cheese by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourhis, Anne-Gaëlle; Saunier, Katiana; Doré, Joël; Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Chamba, Jean-François; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Tholozan, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    A nested-PCR temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) approach was developed for the detection of bacteria belonging to phylogenetic cluster I of the genus Clostridium (the largest clostridial group, which represents 25% of the currently cultured clostridial species) in cheese suspected of late blowing. Primers were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, and the specificity was confirmed in PCRs performed with DNAs from cluster I and non-cluster I species as the templates. TTGE profiles of the PCR products, comprising the V5-V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, allowed us to distinguish the majority of cluster I species. PCR-TTGE was applied to analyze commercial cheeses with defects. All cheeses gave a signal after nested PCR, and on the basis of band comigration with TTGE profiles of reference strains, all the bands could be assigned to a clostridial species. The direct identification of Clostridium spp. was confirmed by sequencing of excised bands. C. tyrobutyricum and C. beijerinckii contaminated 15 and 14 of the 20 cheese samples tested, respectively, and C. butyricum and C. sporogenes were detected in one cheese sample. Most-probable-number counts and volatile fatty acid were determined for comparison purposes. Results obtained were in agreement, but only two species, C. tyrobutyricum and C. sporogenes, could be isolated by the plating method. In all cheeses with a high amount of butyric acid (>100 mg/100 g), the presence of C. tyrobutyricum DNA was confirmed by PCR-TTGE, suggesting the involvement of this species in butyric acid fermentation. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the PCR-TTGE method to identify Clostridium in cheeses. The sensitivity of the method was estimated to be 100 CFU/g.

  18. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous and enhanced production of thermostable amylases and ethanol from starch by cocultures of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, H.H.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1985-05-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes produced ethanol and amylases with different components as primary metabolites of starch fermentation. Starch fermentation parameters were compared in mono- and cocultures of these two thermoanaerobes to show that the fermentation was dramatically improved as a consequence of coordinate action of amylolytic enzymes and synergistic metabolic interactions between the two species. Under given monoculture fermentation conditions, neither species completely degraded starch during the time course of the study, whereas in coculture, starch was completely degraded. In monoculture starch fermentation, C. thermohydrosulfuricum produced lower levels of pullulanase and glucoamylase, whereas C. thermosulfurogenes produced lower levels of ..beta..-amylase and glucoamylase. In coculture fermentation, improvement of starch metabolism by each species was noted in terms of increased amounts and rates of increased starch consumption, amylase production, and ethanol formation. The single-step coculture fermentation completely degraded 2.5% starch in 30 h at 60/sup 0/C and produced 9 U of ..beta..-amylase per ml, 1.3 U of pullulanase per ml, 0.3 U of glucoamylase per ml, and > 120 mM ethanol with a yield of 1.7 mol/mol of glucose in starch. The potential industrial applications of the coculture fermentation and the physiological basis for the interspecies metabolic interactions are discussed.

  20. Simultaneous and Enhanced Production of Thermostable Amylases and Ethanol from Starch by Cocultures of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, H H; Zeikus, J G

    1985-05-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes produced ethanol and amylases with different components as primary metabolites of starch fermentation. Starch fermentation parameters were compared in mono- and cocultures of these two thermoanaerobes to show that the fermentation was dramatically improved as a consequence of coordinate action of amylolytic enzymes and synergistic metabolic interactions between the two species. Under given monoculture fermentation conditions, neither species completely degraded starch during the time course of the study, whereas in coculture, starch was completely degraded. In monoculture starch fermentation, C. thermohydrosulfuricum produced lower levels of pullulanase and glucoamylase, whereas C. thermosulfurogenes produced lower levels of beta-amylase and glucoamylase. In coculture fermentation, improvement of starch metabolism by each species was noted in terms of increased amounts and rates of increased starch consumption, amylase production, and ethanol formation. The single-step coculture fermentation completely degraded 2.5% starch in 30 h at 60 degrees C and produced 9 U of beta-amylase per ml, 1.3 U of pullulanase per ml, 0.3 U of glucoamylase per ml, and >120 mM ethanol with a yield of 1.7 mol/mol of glucose in starch. The potential industrial applications of the coculture fermentation and the physiological basis for the interspecies metabolic interactions are discussed.

  1. Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., two phylogenetically closely related hydrogen-producing species isolated from lake sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Danyang; Xu, Shuhong; Guo, Zhanghao; Zhang, Yan; Man, Lin; Jiang, Binhui; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-03-01

    Two novel anaerobic, mesophilic, biohydrogen-producing bacteria, designated strains ZGM211T and G1T, were isolated from lake sediment. 16S rRNA and ATP synthase beta subunit (atpD) gene sequences and phylogenetic analysis of strains ZGM211T and G1T revealed an affiliation to the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (cluster I of the clostridia), with Clostridium acetobutylicum as the closest characterized species, showing the same sequence similarity of 96.4 % to the type strain (98.9 % between the two isolates). Cells of the two strains were rod shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, pH 4.0-8.0 and NaCl concentrations up to 2 % (w/v). Grown on glucose, the main fermentation products were H2, CO2, acetate and butyrate. The major fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C contents of strains ZGM211T and G1T were 40.7 and 41.5 mol%, respectively. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strains ZGM211T (=CICC 24070T=BCRC 80950T) and G1T (=CICC 24069T=BCRC 80949T) are proposed as the type strains of novel species of the genus Clostridium with the names Clostridium guangxiense sp. nov. and Clostridium neuense sp. nov., respectively.

  2. Collaborative study with reference materials containing Clostridium perfringens (strain D10) for water microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manavakis M; van Dommelen JA; Mooijman KA; Havelaar AH; LWL

    1995-01-01

    In december 1993 werd een internationaal ringonderzoek voor watermicrobiologische laboratoria georganiseerd om een nieuw ontwikkeld referentiemateriaal met Clostridium perfringens (stam D10) uit te testen. Aan dit ringonderzoek namen 24 Europese laboratoria deel. Elk laboratorium testte 8 capsules

  3. Survey of diagnostic and typing capacity for Clostridium difficile infection in Europe, 2011 and 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp, S. M.; Notermans, D. W.; Alblas, J.; Gastmeier, P.; Mentula, S.; Nagy, E.; Spigaglia, P.; Ivanova, K.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Barbut, F.; Morris, T.; Wilcox, M. H.; Kinross, P.; Suetens, C.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal laboratory diagnostics for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) impedes its surveillance and control across Europe. We evaluated changes in local laboratory CDI diagnostics and changes in national diagnostic and typing capacity for CDI during the European C. difficile Infection Surveilla

  4. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M.; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin. PMID:25198129

  5. Clostridium difficile infection : the role of antibiotics in outbreak control, epidemiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, Sylvia Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Since a decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased progressively in incidence and severity of disease. Currently, CDI is considered the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea, associated with an increased duration of hospitalization, healthcare expenses, morbidity and mortality. Thi

  6. Toksisk megacolon sekundært til Clostridium difficile-associeret pseudomembranøs kolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Friis, Mikkel Lønborg; Lehnhoff, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    severe colonic dilation, inflammation and oedema consistent with toxic megacolon. Stool samples were positive for Clostridium difficile. Oral vancomycine treatment and colonic decompression were inefficient. Subtotal colectomy was performed after which the condition improved. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-May-5...

  7. Clostridium and bacillus binary enterotoxins: bad for the bowels, and eukaryotic being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Bradley G; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-09-05

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin.

  8. Guidance for the Efficacy Evaluation of Products with Sporicidal Claims Against Clostridium difficile (June 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides an update to the Agency’s interim guidance for the efficacy evaluation of antimicrobial pesticides that are labeled for treating hard non-porous surfaces in healthcare settings contaminated with spores of Clostridium difficile.

  9. Clostridium difficile infection : the role of antibiotics in outbreak control, epidemiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, Sylvia Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Since a decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased progressively in incidence and severity of disease. Currently, CDI is considered the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea, associated with an increased duration of hospitalization, healthcare expenses, morbidity and mortality. Thi

  10. Clostridium difficile infection : the role of antibiotics in outbreak control, epidemiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, Sylvia Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Since a decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased progressively in incidence and severity of disease. Currently, CDI is considered the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea, associated with an increased duration of hospitalization, healthcare expenses, morbidity and mortality.

  11. Modern Recent on the Laboratory Diagnosis of Clostridium Difficile-associated Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kvet naya,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the review the current information on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated infection. Made a critical assessment of the effectiveness and specificity of the modern methods of diagnosis: methods of isolation and identification of Clostridium difficile cultures by studying the biochemical characteristics, the use of test kits – API 20A and Rapid Ana II-tests, determination of protein spectra by means of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Describes how to display toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile based on Dot-immunoblotting, PCR, and immunochromatography, as well as methods for determining the toxin Clostridium difficile in stool samples by determining the cytotoxic effect of toxins on tissue culture, latex agglutination test, ELISA and enzyme-linked fluorescent assay.

  12. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley G. Stiles

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT, Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC, Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST, as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP. These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A and cell-binding (B components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin.

  13. Lyophilized Carnobacterium divergens AS7 bacteriocin preparation improves performance of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jozefiak, D; Sip, A; Rutkowski, A;

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Carnobacterium divergens AS7 bacteriocin (divercin AS7) on growth performance, digestibility, fermentation processes, selected microbial populations, and histomorphology in broiler chickens challenged with a mixture of 3 Clostridium perfringens...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Elise A; Rowe, Kenneth T; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R; Izquierdo, Javier A

    2015-07-23

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain.

  15. Reset of a critically disturbed microbial ecosystem: faecal transplant in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Nood, van E.; Tims, S.; Heikamp-de Jong, I.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Keller, J.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can be effectively treated by infusion of a healthy donor faeces suspension. However, it is unclear what factors determine treatment efficacy. By using a phylogenetic microarray platform, we assessed composition, diversity and dynamics of faecal

  16. Colorectal neoplasm in cases of Clostridium septicum and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus bacteraemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corredoira, J.; Grau, I.; Garcia-Rodriguez, J.F.; Garcia-Pais, M.J.; Rabunal, R.; Ardanuy, C.; Garcia-Garrote, F.; Coira, A.; Alonso, M.P.; Boleij, A.; Pallares, R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteremia with Clostridium septicum (CS) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (SGG) have both been associated with colorectal neoplasms (CRN) and colonoscopic examination is advised, however the differences and similarities in colorectal findings are not well known.

  17. Fæcestransplantation som behandling af Clostridium difficile-infektion, colitis ulcerosa og metabolisk syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jeppe West; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2014-01-01

    Faecal transplantation as a treatment for Clostridium difficile infection, ulcerative colitis and the metabolic syndrome Faecal transplantation as a therapeutic tool is increasingly reported in the scientific literature. Faecal transplantation is currently becoming a treatment for nosocomial...

  18. A review on epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Esfandiari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile is an important factor in the development of the gastrointestinal diseases because of irrational antibiotic prescription and antimicrobial resistance. In the past, this bacterium was introduced as an agent of the infection in the hospitals called "hospital acquired Clostridium difficile infection". This infection is a main cause of morbidity and mortality internationally. But changing in the epidemiology of the infection was observed in recent years. People not taking antibiotics as well as any contact with the clinical system were hospitalized due to the infection named "Community-Associated Clostridium difficile infection". Furthermore, the hypervirulent strains of C. difficile were identified outside of the health care facilities in different sources such as environment, animals and food products. Today the role of C. difficile has not been confirmed as a zoonotic agent or foodborne pathogen. Taking into account, it should be taken attention to the sensitive individuals such as pregnant women, elderly and children for the consumption of the contaminated food products with C. difficile spores and probable cause of the infection in these individuals. For this purpose, presentation of the guidelines or the prevention strategies for the transmission of bacteria in the society as well as the healthcare facilities is important. In this review study, the history, the risk factors of disease and the reports of infection in the healthcare facilities and outside of this environment in Iran were discussed. Finally, we supposed that based on the isolation of C. difficile with different genetic profile in Iran in comparison with international ribotypes, the existence of native strains leading to the infection in the community and the healthcare facilities is possible. This hypothesis shows the significance of regional differences in the epidemiology and microbiology of disease. In addition, according to the present

  19. Analysis of risk factors and clinical manifestations associated with Clostridium difficile disease in Serbian hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Predrag

    Full Text Available Abstract Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors important for the development of hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated disease and clinical manifestations of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. The clinical trial group included 37 hospitalized patients who were selected according to the inclusion criteria. A control group of 74 hospitalized patients was individually matched with cases based on hospital, age (within 4 years, sex and month of admission.Clostridium difficile-associated disease most commonly manifested as diarrhoea (56.76% and colitis (32%, while in 8.11% of patients, it was diagnosed as pseudomembranous colitis, and in one patient, it was diagnosed as fulminant colitis. Statistically significant associations (p < 0.05 were found with the presence of chronic renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident (stroke and haemodialysis. In this study, it was confirmed that all the groups of antibiotics, except for tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were statistically significant risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05. However, it was difficult to determine the individual role of antibiotics in the development of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Univariate logistic regression also found that applying antibiotic therapy, the duration of antibiotic therapy, administration of two or more antibiotics to treat infections, administering laxatives and the total number of days spent in the hospital significantly affected the onset of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (p < 0.05, and associations were confirmed using the multivariate model for the application of antibiotic therapy (p = 0.001, duration of antibiotic treatment (p = 0.01, use of laxatives (p = 0.01 and total number of days spent in the hospital (p = 0.001. In this study

  20. Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Zhang, Linping; Janku, Filip; Collins, Amanda; Bai, Ren-Yuan; Staedtke, Verena; Rusk, Anthony W.; Tung, David; Miller, Maria; Roix, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kristen V.; Murthy, Ravi; Benjamin, Robert S; Helgason, Thorunn; Szvalb, Ariel D.

    2014-01-01

    Species of Clostridium bacteria are notable for their ability to lyse tumor cells growing in hypoxic environments. We show that an attenuated strain of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) induces a microscopically precise, tumor-localized response in a rat orthotopic brain tumor model after intratumoral injection. It is well known, however, that experimental models often do not reliably predict the responses of human patients to therapeutic agents. We therefore used naturally occurring canine tum...

  1. Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Subramanyam Swaminathan...Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-2-0011 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Subramanyam Swaminathan, Ph.D. 5d...on Intact Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design Annual Report for the Period ending January 2008

  2. Primer aislamiento de Clostridium tetani a partir de suelos de la Meseta Central de Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Evelyn; Gamboa, María del Mar; Fernández, Bernal

    2016-01-01

    Clínical evidence has long pointed to the existence of Clostridium tetani in Costa Rica. Thirty soil samples were studied for clostridia, and two yielded six strains of C. tetani, four of which proved to be toxigenic when mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with the culture supemates, These four isolates could be neutralized when their toxic supemates were admixed with tetanus antitoxin. Clínical evidence has long pointed to the existence of Clostridium tetani in Costa Rica. Thirty soil...

  3. Phylogenomic analysis of the family Peptostreptococcaceae (Clostridium cluster XI) and proposal for reclassification of Clostridium litorale (Fendrich et al. 1991) and Eubacterium acidaminophilum (Zindel et al. 1989) as Peptoclostridium litorale gen. nov. comb. nov. and Peptoclostridium acidaminophilum comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y; Brover, Vyacheslav; Tolstoy, Igor; Yutin, Natalya

    2016-12-01

    In 1994, analyses of clostridial 16S rRNA gene sequences led to the assignment of 18 species to Clostridium cluster XI, separating them from Clostridium sensu stricto (Clostridium cluster I). Subsequently, most cluster XI species have been assigned to the family Peptostreptococcaceae with some species being reassigned to new genera. However, several misclassified Clostridium species remained, creating a taxonomic conundrum and confusion regarding their status. Here, we have re-examined the phylogeny of cluster XI species by comparing the 16S rRNA gene-based trees with protein- and genome-based trees, where available. The resulting phylogeny of the Peptostreptococcaceae was consistent with the recent proposals on creating seven new genera within this family. This analysis also revealed a tight clustering of Clostridium litorale and Eubacterium acidaminophilum. Based on these data, we propose reassigning these two organisms to the new genus Peptoclostridium as Peptoclostridium litorale gen. nov. comb. nov. (the type species of the genus) and Peptoclostridium acidaminophilum comb. nov., respectively. As correctly noted in the original publications, the genera Acetoanaerobium and Proteocatella also fall within cluster XI, and can be assigned to the Peptostreptococcaceae. Clostridium sticklandii, which falls within radiation of genus Acetoanaerobium, is proposed to be reclassified as Acetoanaerobium sticklandii comb. nov. The remaining misnamed members of the Peptostreptococcaceae, [Clostridium] hiranonis, [Clostridium] paradoxum and [Clostridium] thermoalcaliphilum, still remain to be properly classified.

  4. Integration of metabolism and virulence in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaut, Laurent; Dubois, Thomas; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Dupuy, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Synthesis of the major toxin proteins of the diarrheal pathogen, Clostridium difficile, is dependent on the activity of TcdR, an initiation (sigma) factor of RNA polymerase. The synthesis of TcdR and the activation of toxin gene expression are responsive to multiple components in the bacterium's nutritional environment, such as the presence of certain sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. This review summarizes current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for repression of toxin synthesis when glucose or branched-chain amino acids or proline are in excess and the pathways that lead to synthesis of butyrate, an activator of toxin synthesis. The regulatory proteins implicated in these mechanisms also play key roles in modulating bacterial metabolic pathways, suggesting that C. difficile pathogenesis is intimately connected to the bacterium's metabolic state.

  5. Blowhole Colostomy for Clostridium difficile-Associated Toxic Megacolon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Kerstens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent urgent blowhole colostomy for toxic megacolon (TM secondary to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. This infection occurred under antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, four days after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in our hospital. Although prospective clinical research regarding the surgical management of TM is lacking, decompressive procedures like blowhole colostomy are reported to carry a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality and are widely regarded as obsolete. Subtotal or total colectomy with end ileostomy is currently considered the procedure of choice. After presenting our case, we discuss the literature available on the subject to argue that the scarce evidence on the optimal surgical treatment for TM is primarily based on TM associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and that there might be a rationale for considering minimally invasive procedures like blowhole colostomy for CDI-associated TM.

  6. Two-component systems and toxinogenesis regulation in Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Chloé; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins ever known. They are mostly produced by Clostridium botulinum but also by other clostridia. BoNTs associate with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. Toxin production is highly regulated through complex networks of regulatory systems involving an alternative sigma factor, BotR, and at least 6 recently described two-component systems (TCSs). TCSs allow bacteria to sense environmental changes and to respond to various stimuli by regulating the expression of specific genes at a transcriptional level. Several environmental stimuli have been identified to positively or negatively regulate toxin synthesis; however, the link between environmental stimuli and TCSs is still elusive. This review aims to highlight the role of TCSs as a central point in the regulation of toxin production in C. botulinum.

  7. Molecular diversity of Clostridium botulinum and phenotypically similar strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenda, T; Kukier, E; Sieradzki, Z; Goldsztejn, M; Kwiatek, K

    2016-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine phenotypic and genetic features of strains preliminary classified as Clostridium botulinum species. The phenotypic characteristics were assessed with different culture media and biochemical tests. The genetic characterization included detection of botulinum toxin genes by PCR and macrorestriction analysis with SmaI, XhoI and SacII by PFGE (Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis). Despite similar biochemical properties of all analysed strains, only 47% of them contained genes determining toxicity specific to C. botulinum species. The most valuable differentiation of C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains was obtained after SmaI digestion. The highest affinity was observed among C. botulinum type B profiles which was even up to 100%. It was found 100% of affinity between C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains, however, the similarity among C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like was generally lower than 80%.

  8. Infección por Clostridium tetani: sospecharla para diagnosticarla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Ríos Prego

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available La infección por Clostridium tetani es una patología con un amplio periodo de incubación, que posee diversos modos de presentación clínica. Este hecho, junto con la baja incidencia de esta infección en los países industrializados, así como no poseer una técnica diagnóstica precisa que podamos obtener en un corto período de tiempo, dificultan el diagnóstico. Por tanto, es importante no olvidarnos de esta patología ante un paciente con espasmos musculares y ausencia o historia incompleta de vacunación.

  9. Inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores by microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Suvash Chandra; Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Singhakaew, Sombat; Ounjai, Puey; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2016-04-01

    Spores are a potent agent for Clostridium difficile transmission. Therefore, factors inhibiting spores have been of continued interest. In the present study, we investigated the influence of microwave irradiation in addition to conductive heating for C. difficile spore inactivation in aqueous suspension. The spores of 15 C. difficile isolates from different host origins were exposed to conductive heating and microwave irradiation. The complete inhibition of spore viability at 10(7) CFU/ml was encountered following microwave treatment at 800 W for 60 s, but was not observed in the conductive-heated spores at the same time-temperature exposure. The distinct patterns of ultrastructural alterations following microwave and conductive heat treatment were observed and the degree of damages by microwave was in the exposure time-dependent manner. Microwave would therefore be a simple and time-efficient tool to inactivate C. difficile spores, thus reducing the risk of C. difficile transmission.

  10. Producing hydrogen from wastewater sludge by Clostridium bifermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Chang, C W; Chu, C P; Lee, D J; Chang, B-V; Liao, C S

    2003-04-10

    Excess wastewater sludge collected from the recycling stream of an activated sludge process is biomass that contains large quantities of polysaccharides and proteins. However, relevant literature indicates that the bio-conversion of wastewater sludge to hydrogen is limited and therefore not economically feasible. This work examined the anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge using a clostridium strain isolated from the sludge as inoculum. A much higher hydrogen yield than presented in the literature was obtained. Also, the effects of five pre-treatments-ultrasonication, acidification, sterilization, freezing/thawing and adding methanogenic inhibitor-on the production of hydrogen were examined. Freezing and thawing and sterilization increased the specific hydrogen yield by 1.5-2.5 times to that of untreated sludge, while adding an inhibitor and ultrasonication reduced the hydrogen yield.

  11. Identifying promoters for gene expression in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Olson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A key tool for metabolic engineering is the ability to express heterologous genes. One obstacle to gene expression in non-model organisms, and especially in relatively uncharacterized bacteria, is the lack of well-characterized promoters. Here we test 17 promoter regions for their ability to drive expression of the reporter genes β-galactosidase (lacZ and NADPH-alcohol dehydrogenase (adhB in Clostridium thermocellum, an important bacterium for the production of cellulosic biofuels. Only three promoters have been commonly used for gene expression in C. thermocellum, gapDH, cbp and eno. Of the new promoters tested, 2638, 2926, 966 and 815 showed reliable expression. The 2638 promoter showed relatively higher activity when driving adhB (compared to lacZ, and the 815 promoter showed relatively higher activity when driving lacZ (compared to adhB.

  12. Recent Insights into Clostridium perfringens Beta-Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Nagahama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin is a key mediator of necrotizing enterocolitis and enterotoxemia. It is a pore-forming toxin (PFT that exerts cytotoxic effect. Experimental investigation using piglet and rabbit intestinal loop models and a mouse infection model apparently showed that beta-toxin is the important pathogenic factor of the organisms. The toxin caused the swelling and disruption of HL-60 cells and formed a functional pore in the lipid raft microdomains of sensitive cells. These findings represent significant progress in the characterization of the toxin with knowledge on its biological features, mechanism of action and structure-function having been accumulated. Our aims here are to review the current progresses in our comprehension of the virulence of C. perfringens type C and the character, biological feature and structure-function of beta-toxin.

  13. Clostridium difficile infection in a patient with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Hui; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2012-06-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder, which is rare in pediatric patients. The definite etiology and mechanism to induce an acute exacerbation of Crohn disease remains mostly unknown. The authors report on a 14-year-old girl with Crohn disease who has acute gastrointestinal symptoms caused by toxin A-producing Clostridium difficile, which mimicked a flare-up of Crohn disease. There was no preceding antibiotic prescription before the episode. The disease activity did not improve after steroid treatment, which is unusual for Crohn disease. However, all symptoms were dramatically relieved after eradication of C difficile, and led to a symptom-free period for more than 3 years. This case report aims to address the unusual presentation of a usual pathogen, C difficile, in a pediatric patient with Crohn disease.

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Goudarzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality rate of Clostridium difficile infection have increased remarkably in both hospital and community settings during the last two decades. The growth of infection may be caused by multiple factors including inappropriate antibiotic usage, poor standards of environmental cleanliness, changes in infection control practices, large outbreaks of C. difficile infection in hospitals, alteration of circulating strains of C. difficile, and spread of hypervirulent strains. Detection of high-risk populations could be helpful for prompt diagnosis and consequent treatment of patients suffering from C. difficile infection. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are recommended antibiotics for the treatment of initial infection. Current treatments for C. difficile infection consist of supportive care, discontinuing the unnecessary antibiotic, and specific antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, novel approaches include fidaxomicin therapy, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation mediated therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown relevant efficacy to overcome C. difficile infection and reduce its recurrence.

  15. Acute Appendicitis: An Extracolonic Manifestation of Clostridium difficile Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ridha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current report is the case of a 30-year-old male patient who presented with symptomatology suggestive of appendicitis. However, careful history-taking and laboratory tests led to the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile colitis, resulting in successful nonsurgical management of this patient. Although both appendicitis and C. difficile colitis are common conditions, they are rarely diagnosed concurrently. This is reflected by paucity of literature describing this manifestation. Given this current presentation, the authors contend that the manifestation of extracolonic colitis within the appendix is possibly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as an acute appendicitis and thus potentially results in unnecessary surgical intervention. This report reminds physicians to consider the medical approach to managing acute appendicitis given the possibility of underlying C. difficile colitis as the causative factor.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of equine and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Båverud, V; Gunnarsson, A; Karlsson, M; Franklin, A

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 Clostridium difficile isolates, 36 of them from horse feces and 14 from environmental sites, was determined by broth microdilution. The antimicrobial agents tested were avilamycin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline, penicillin, spiramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and virginiamycin. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC 16 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (MIC >/=32 microg/ml), spiramycin (MIC > 16 microg/ml), and virginiamycin (MIC 8-16 microg/ml) were higher for 18 isolates. Those were mainly isolated from horses at animal hospitals and further from environmental sites at a stud farm. In contrast, all isolates, except one, from healthy foals had low MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, virginiamycin, and oxytetracycline. The isolates from soil in public parks had also low MICs of these antimicrobial agents. Broth microdilution appeared both reliable and reproducible for susceptibility testing of C. difficile. The method was also readily performed and the MIC endpoints were easily read.

  17. Isolation of Clostridium absonum and its cultural and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, M; Mitsui, N; Tamai, K; Nakamura, S; Nishida, S

    1974-01-01

    A new procedure for isolation of Clostridium absonum was devised. Sixtyseven strains of C. absonum were isolated from 135 soil samples, but no strain of C. absonum could be found from human fecal samples. The lecithinase, hemolysin, and lethal toxin in the culture filtrates of this species exhibited low avidity for C. perfringens type A antitoxin. The three activities were inseparable by the present method of purification. A reinvestigation of biochemical properties revealed that incomplete suppression of lecithinase reaction by C. perfringens type A antitoxin and no fermentation of raffinose, melibiose, and starch are useful criteria to differentiate C. absonum from C. perfringens, and that positive, although weak, gelatin liquefaction and fermentation of trehalose are useful to differentiate it from C. paraperfringens.

  18. Systems Biology of Clostridium Acetobutylicum: Sugar Metabolism and TNT Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Margaret; Sund, Christian; Servinsky, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    Rapid advancements in biotechnology are expected to impact multiple areas of interest to the Army, including decontamination, degradation of toxic chemicals and biofuels. This project is a joint experimental/computational effort to map out the metabolic pathways in Clostridium acetobutylicum, and use this information to develop a systems biology model of this system. This organism has been chosen specifically due to the fact that it has potential application to both biofuel production and nitroaromatic degradation. It is hoped that a systems biology model may provide key information to enhance both of these processes. Details will be presented of a first-generation model of central carbon metabolism in C. Acet., developed upon gene expression data accumulated from bacteria grown on different carbohydrate sources. Additional work will discuss the effect of TNT exposure and potential relevant enhancements of the model.

  19. Single Crossover-Mediated Markerless Genome Engineering in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-04-28

    A novel genome-engineering tool in Clostridium acetobutylicum was developed based on singlecrossover homologous recombination. A small-sized non-replicable plasmid, pHKO1, was designed for efficient integration into the C. acetobutylicum genome. The integrated pHKO1 plasmid backbone, which included an antibiotic resistance gene, can be excised in vivo by Flp recombinase, leaving a single flippase recognition target sequence in the middle of the targeted gene. Since the pSHL-FLP plasmid, the carrier of the Flp recombinase gene, employed the segregationally unstable pAMβ1 replicon, the plasmid was rapidly cured from the mutant C. acetobutylicum. Consequently, our method makes it easier to engineer C. acetobutylicum.

  20. Fatal community-acquired ribotype 002 Clostridium difficile bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauby, Nicolas; Libois, Agnès; Van Broeck, Johan; Delmée, Michel; Vandenberg, Olivier; Martiny, Delphine

    2017-04-01

    Extra-colonic infections, and especially bacteremia, are infrequent manifestations of Clostridium difficile infection. C. difficile bacteremia is generally health-care associated and polymicrobial. We report the case of a patient on hunger strike that presented a C. difficile colitis and mono-microbial bacteremia on its admission to the hospital. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of stool and blood isolates indicated clonality. The strain was characterized as a ribotype 002, an emerging ribotype previously associated with high fatality rate. The patient received treatment by intra-venous amoxicillin-clavulanate and oral vancomycin but eventually died on the seventh day of admission with concomitant pneumonia and pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clostridium difficile infection: molecular pathogenesis and novel therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rineh, Ardeshir; Kelso, Michael J; Vatansever, Fatma; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile produces toxins A and B, which can cause a spectrum of diseases from pseudomembranous colitis to C. difficile-associated diarrhea. A limited number of C. difficile strains also produce a binary toxin that exhibits ADP ribosyltransferase activity. Here, the structure and the mechanism of action of these toxins as well as their role in disease are reviewed. Nosocomial C. difficile infection is often contracted in hospital when patients treated with antibiotics suffer a disturbance in normal gut microflora. C. difficile spores can persist on dry, inanimate surface for months. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are clinically used for treatment of C. difficile infection but clinical failure and concern about promotion of resistance are motivating the search for novel non-antibiotic therapeutics. Methods for controlling both toxins and spores, replacing gut microflora by probiotics or fecal transplant, and killing bacteria in the anaerobic gut by photodynamic therapy are discussed. PMID:24410618

  2. Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection: From Colonization to Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Kelsey; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Alonso, Carolyn D.; Kelly, Ciaran

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly prevalent, dangerous and challenging to prevent and manage. Despite intense national and international attention the incidence of primary and of recurrent CDI (PCDI and RCDI, respectively) have risen rapidly throughout the past decade. Of major concern is the increase in cases of RCDI resulting in substantial morbidity, morality and economic burden. RCDI management remains challenging as there is no uniformly effective therapy, no firm consensus on optimal treatment, and reliable data regarding RCDI-specific treatment options is scant. Novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed to rapidly, accurately, and effectively identify and treat patients with, or at-risk for, RCDI. In this review we consider the factors implicated in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of RCDI, evaluate current management options for RCDI and explore novel and emerging therapies. PMID:25930686

  3. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  4. Improvement of productivity in acetic acid fermentation with Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, M.M.; Cheryan, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Production of acetic acid by a mutant strain of Clostridium thermoaceticum was compared in three types of membrane cell-recycle bioreactors. A modified fed-batch bioreactor (where the product is partially removed at the end of fermentation, but the cells are retained), and a two-stage CSTR (with product being removed continuously and the cells being recycled from the second to the first stage) resulted in better performance than a one-stage CSTR or batch fermenter. The difference in performance was greater at higher acetate concentration. With 45 g/L of glucose in the feed, productivity was 0.75-1.12 g/L-h and acetic acid concentrations were 34-38 g/L. This is more than double the batch system. The nutrient supply rate also appeared to have a strong influence on productivity of the microorganism.

  5. Blowhole Colostomy for Clostridium difficile-Associated Toxic Megacolon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstens, Jeroen; de Gheldere, Charles; Vanclooster, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent urgent blowhole colostomy for toxic megacolon (TM) secondary to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This infection occurred under antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, four days after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in our hospital. Although prospective clinical research regarding the surgical management of TM is lacking, decompressive procedures like blowhole colostomy are reported to carry a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality and are widely regarded as obsolete. Subtotal or total colectomy with end ileostomy is currently considered the procedure of choice. After presenting our case, we discuss the literature available on the subject to argue that the scarce evidence on the optimal surgical treatment for TM is primarily based on TM associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and that there might be a rationale for considering minimally invasive procedures like blowhole colostomy for CDI-associated TM. PMID:28097034

  6. A survey of clostridium botulinum in food poisoning in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modarres Sh

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Food-borne botulism is one of the dangerous food poisonings in human in the world. The specimens of 115 patients (serum and stool with clinical symptoms of botulism, who were inpatient and outpatient were collected at some medical centers in Tehran and other areas of Iran, between April 1984 to August 1994. In this survey, specimens of 73 patients showed the toxin and spore of C.botulinum. Clostridium botulinum type E, was the most common causative agent in food-borne botulism, being responsible for 71.24% of all specimens; other etiologic types, in order of frequency were types A (16.43% and B (12.33%. The results of this study indicate, that the various kinds of fish, salted fish, smoked fish and canned fish, also cans of greenbeans and cucumber were causative of food-borne botulism in patients.

  7. Predisposing factors and prevention of Clostridium perfringens-associated enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaart, Janneke G; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Gröne, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is one of the major causes of intestinal disease in humans and animals. Its pathogenicity is contributed to by the production of a variety of toxins. In addition, predisposing environmental factors are important for the induction of C. perfringens-associated enteritis as shown by infection models. Environmental contamination, gastric and intestinal pH, intestinal microflora, nutrition, concurrent infections, and medical interventions may influence the intestinal colonization, growth, and toxin production by C. perfringens. Prevention of C. perfringens-associated enteritis may be mediated by the use of feed additives like probiotics, prebiotics, organic acids, essential oils, bacteriophages, lysozymes, bacteriocins, and antimicrobial peptides. Here we summarize and discuss published data on the influence of different environmental predisposing factors and preventive measures. Further research should focus on feed composition and feed additives in order to prevent C. perfringens-associated enteritis.

  8. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: the importance of the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella Terrier, Marie Céline; Simonet, Martine Louis; Bichard, Philippe; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2014-06-21

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial diarrhea. Despite effective antibiotic treatments, recurrent infections are common. With the recent emergence of hypervirulent isolates of C. difficile, CDI is a growing epidemic with higher rates of recurrence, increasing severity and mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative treatment for recurrent CDI. A better understanding of intestinal microbiota and its role in CDI has opened the door to this promising therapeutic approach. FMT is thought to resolve dysbiosis by restoring gut microbiota diversity thereby breaking the cycle of recurrent CDI. Since the first reported use of FMT for recurrent CDI in 1958, systematic reviews of case series and case report have shown its effectiveness with high resolution rates compared to standard antibiotic treatment. This article focuses on current guidelines for CDI treatment, the role of intestinal microbiota in CDI recurrence and current evidence about FMT efficacy, adverse effects and acceptability.

  9. Infección por Clostridium tetani: sospecharla para diagnosticarla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Ríos Prego

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available La infección por Clostridium tetani es una patología con un amplio periodo de incubación, que posee diversos modos de presentación clínica. Este hecho, junto con la baja incidencia de esta infección en los países industrializados , así como no poseer una técnica diagnóstica precisa que podamos obtener en un corto período de tiempo, dificultan el diagnóstico. Por tanto, es importante no olvidarnos de esta patología ante un paciente con espasmos musculares y ausencia o historia incompleta de vacunación.

  10. Application of new metabolic engineering tools for Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2014-07-01

    The renewed interests in clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation as a next-generation biofuel source led to significantly intensified research in the past few years. This mini-review focuses on the current status of metabolic engineering techniques available for the model organism of ABE fermentation, Clostridium acetobutylicum. A comprehensive survey of various application examples covers two general issues related to both basic and applied research questions: (i) how to improve biofuel production and (ii) what information can be deduced from respective genotype/phenotype manipulations. Recently developed strategies to engineer C. acetobutylicum are summarized including the current portfolio of altered gene expression methodologies, as well as systematic (rational) and explorative (combinatorial) metabolic engineering approaches.

  11. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxicosis in two Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiffer, D L

    2001-03-01

    Two 6-yr-old male sibling Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) housed together at the Pittsburgh Zoo presented for acute onset of diarrhea with no changes in appetite or behavior. Heat-fixed modified Wright-stained and Gram-stained fecal smears revealed a mixed bacterial population with a large number of gram-positive Clostridium perfringens-like spores (>20 per high-power oil immersion field). In addition, C. perfringens enterotoxin was isolated from one leopard at 1:256, confirming the presence of C. perfringens enterotoxicosis. Treatment with oral metronidazole, tylosin tartrate, and psyllium fiber was prescribed, with return of more normal stool by the third day of treatment. Fecal consistency steadily improved and was considered normal by the time all prescribed treatments were complete. Diarrhea has not recurred. Partially thawed meat in the leopards' diet may have precipitated the production of an endogenous clostridial enterotoxicosis by disrupting digestive tract flora with resultant clostridial overgrowth and sporulation.

  12. Hazard analysis of Clostridium perfringens in the Skylab Food System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Kiser, P. R.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Food System presented unique microbiological problems because food was warmed in null-gravity and because the heat source was limited to 69.4 C (to prevent boiling in null-gravity). For these reasons, the foods were manufactured using critical control point techniques of quality control coupled with appropriate hazard analyses. One of these hazard analyses evaluated the threat from Clostridium perfringens. Samples of food were inoculated with C. perfringens and incubated for 2 h at temperatures ranging from 25 to 55 C. Generation times were determined for the foods at various temperatures. Results of these tests were evaluated taking into consideration: food-borne disease epidemiology, the Skylab food manufacturing procedures, and the performance requirements of the Skylab Food System. Based on this hazard analysis, a limit for C. perfringens of 100/g was established for Skylab foods.

  13. Counterpoint: Is Clostridium difficile a food-borne disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jane W

    2013-06-01

    The increase in community associated Clostridium difficile disease paired with recent data on C. difficile in retail foods has led to speculation that C. difficile is a food-borne pathogen. However, there is no current epidemiologic evidence (i.e. restaurant or food-associated outbreaks) to support this hypothesis. Rates of C. difficile recovery from food vary widely across laboratories and may be due to a number of confounding factors. This commentary discusses the results of two published investigations and suggests that higher prevalence rates observed in some food studies may be due to laboratory contamination. The conclusions are that prevalence of C. difficile in retail foods is relatively low and further investigations are required to determine if C. difficile is food-borne.

  14. Clostridium difficile in a children's hospital: assessment of environmental contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrack, Simone; Duster, Megan; Van Hoof, Sarah; Schmitz, Michelle; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent infectious cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Three cases of CDI, in children age 2, 3, and 14 years, occurred in the hematology/oncology ward of our children's hospital over 48 hours. We aimed to assess environmental contamination with C difficile in the shared areas of this unit, and to determine whether person-to-person transmission occurred. C difficile was recovered from 5 of 18 samples (28%). We compared C difficile isolated from each patient and the environment using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and found that none of the patient strains matched any of the others, and that none matched any strains recovered from the environment, suggesting that person-to-person transmission had not occurred. We found that C difficile was prevalent in the environment throughout shared areas of the children's hospital unit. Molecular typing to identify mechanisms of transmission is useful for devising appropriate interventions.

  15. Clostridium difficile infection: New insights into therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachrimanidou, Melina; Sarmourli, Theopisti; Skoura, Lemonia; Metallidis, Symeon; Malisiovas, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in healthcare settings and represents a major social and economic burden. The major virulence determinants are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), encoded within the pathogenicity locus. Traditional therapies, such as metronidazole and vancomycin, frequently lead to a vicious circle of recurrences due to their action against normal human microbiome. New disease management strategies together with the development of novel therapeutic and containment approaches are needed in order to better control outbreaks and treat patients. This article provides an overview of currently available CDI treatment options and discusses the most promising therapies under development.

  16. Spore coat architecture of Clostridium novyi NT spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Marco; McCaffery, J Michael; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Xin; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Malkin, Alexander J

    2007-09-01

    Spores of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi NT are able to germinate in and destroy hypoxic regions of tumors in experimental animals. Future progress in this area will benefit from a better understanding of the germination and outgrowth processes that are essential for the tumorilytic properties of these spores. Toward this end, we have used both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to determine the structure of both dormant and germinating spores. We found that the spores are surrounded by an amorphous layer intertwined with honeycomb parasporal layers. Moreover, the spore coat layers had apparently self-assembled, and this assembly was likely to be governed by crystal growth principles. During germination and outgrowth, the honeycomb layers, as well as the underlying spore coat and undercoat layers, sequentially dissolved until the vegetative cell was released. In addition to their implications for understanding the biology of C. novyi NT, these studies document the presence of proteinaceous growth spirals in a biological organism.

  17. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Amy S; Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-15

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T) is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755(T) reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species.

  18. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755T is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755T reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species. PMID:25197485

  19. Dentists, antibiotics and Clostridium difficile-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacher, N; Sweeney, M P; Bagg, J

    2015-09-25

    Dentists prescribe significant volumes of antimicrobial drugs within primary care settings. There is good evidence that many of the prescriptions are not justified by current clinical guidance and that that there is considerable misuse of these drugs in dentistry. One of the risks associated with antibiotic administration is Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD), an entity of which many healthcare workers, including dentists, have little knowledge or understanding. This review seeks to identify the extent and nature of the problem and provides an up to date summary of current views on CDAD, with particular reference to community acquired disease. As for all healthcare workers, scrupulous attention to standard infection control procedures and reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are essential to reduce the risks of CDAD, prevent emergence of further resistant strains of microorganisms and maintain the value of the arsenal of antibiotics currently available to us.

  20. Purification and biochemical properties of Clostridium perfringens type A enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, R L; Duncan, C L

    1972-11-01

    The sporulation-specific enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A, which is the toxin active in human food poisoning, has been purified from extracts of sporulating cells. Highly purified enterotoxin was obtained by treatment of crude cell extract with ribonuclease for 30 min, followed by sequential chromatography on Sephadex G-100, Cellex T cellulose, and hydroxylapatite. Recovery was 65 to 75% of the initial activity. Enterotoxin purity was > 99% as indicated by sedimentation velocity, sedimentation equilibrium, disc electrophoresis, and serological methods. Purified enterotoxin focused at pH 4.3 during isoelectric focusing. Molecular weights of 34,000 and 35,000 were obtained by Sephadex G-100 chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium, respectively. An S(20,w) of 3.08 was obtained for the purified enterotoxin. The enterotoxin precipitated heavily at its isoelectric point and at concentrations greater than 4 mg/ml.

  1. Clostridium septicum Sepsis and Colon Carcinoma: Report of 4 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An association exists between colon carcinoma and Clostridium septicum infection, especially bacteremia. We reviewed retrospectively all positive blood cultures for this organism at a 300-bed general hospital over 4 years. Four of 15 cases were associated with concurrent colon carcinoma. C. septicum infection was the presenting feature of previously undiagnosed large bowel malignancy in three patients. We report this small case series to alert clinicians to the diverse spectrum and diagnostic difficulties of this rare, potentially catastrophic association. Although commonly associated with necrotizing skin or soft tissue infections, this bacterium can present with nonspecific or atypical symptoms. All patients with positive blood cultures for C. septicum, even without clinical suspicion of large bowel malignancy, should undergo colonoscopy to evaluate for colon carcinoma.

  2. Acute Hemolysis in the Emergency Department: Think about Clostridium perfringens!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roustit Cécilia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens (CP gives several clinical settings, from an asymptomatic to a massive intravascular hemolysis. We report a case of fatal intravascular hemolysis due to CP septicemia having a hepatic supposed starting point in the emergency department. Like in many cases, the diagnosis was made when patient had already gone into shock and died. The CP septicemia often complicated the course of the digestive or genital pathologies. The alpha toxin can damage the structural integrity of the red cell membrane by means of a phospholipase activity. Nevertheless, a massive intravascular hemolysis arises only rarely in this septicemia, only from 7 to 15% of the cases. The emergency physician has to think about this complication in case of hemoglobinuria and/or signs of hemolysis associated with a septic syndrome. An immediate antibiotic treatment adapted as well as the symptomatic treatment of the spread intravascular coagulation could improve the survival of these patients.

  3. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masao Hashimoto; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Sumihito Tamura; Junichi Kaneko; Yuichi Matsui; Junichi Togashi; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the incidence and analyze the risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD)after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in adult.METHODS: The micobiological data and medical records of 242 adult recipients that underwent LDLT at the Tokyo University Hospital were analyzed retrospectively. The independent risk factors for postoperative CDAD were identified.RESULTS: Postoperative CDAD occurred in 11 (5%)patients. Median onset of CDAD was postoperative d 19(range, 5-54). In the multivariate analyses, male gender (odds ratio, 4.56) and serum creatinine (≥ 1.5 mg/dL,odds ratio, 16.0) independently predicted postoperative CDAD.CONCLUSION: CDAD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with postoperative diarrhea after LDLT.

  4. Fecal microbiota transplantation in treating Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William R

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an increasingly common and severe international health problem. Customary treatment of this infection, usually with antibiotics, is often ineffective and its recurrence is common. In recent years the treatment of recurrent or refractory CDI by the transfer of stool from an uninfected person, so called fecal "microbiota transplantation" has become recognized as effective and generally safe. The effectiveness of this novel treatment is incompletely defined but is likely to be due to its correction of the intestinal dysbiosis that characterizes the disease. Practical methods for the administration of the transplantation have been described. This review summarizes the current reported experiences with fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment for CDI. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Hydrogen production from wastewater sludge using a Clostridium strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Chang, C W; Chu, C P; Lee, D J; Chang, B V; Liao, C S

    2003-09-01

    Limited data in literature revealed a relatively low hydrogen yield from wastewater sludge, ca. 0.16 mg/g-dried solids, using anaerobic fermentation. We demonstrated in this work a much higher hydrogen yield, around 1.1 mg-H2/g-dried solids using a clostridium strain isolated from the sludge sample. The formed hydrogen would be consumed after passing the peak value at around 30-36 h of fermentation. We examined the effects of employing five different pre-treatments on substrate sludge, but noted no appreciable enhancement in hydrogen yield as commonly expected for methane production. Since a vast amount of organic matters had been released to water after hydrogen fermentation, we externally dosed methanogenic bacteria to the fermented liquor to produce methane. The fermented liquor could produce more methane than the non-fermented sample, indicating that the dosed methanogenic bacteria readily utilized the organic matters derived from the fermentation test.

  6. [Clostridium tetani isolated from patients with systemic tetanus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Tomoyo; Nihonyanagi, Shin; Nakamura, Masaki; Ide, Toshimitsu; Hattori, Jun; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Soma, Kazui

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium tetani is widely distributed in ground or mud, especially in field and pond-shore surface layers. C. tetani is rarely isolated from specimens of patients with tetanus, and is generally diagnosed based on clinical symptoms such as trismus or general tonic spasms. This means that positive C. tetani infection is rarely diagnosed bacterially. Using gram straing, we identified C. tetani in specimens from patients suspected of C. tetani infection brought to the Kitasato University Hospital emergency center. Rapid gram staining information in the bacteriology laboratory is expected to improve recovery from C. tetani infection. It is therefore necessary to ensure clinical specimen quality control, and to keep standard strains of rare bacteria for isolation and identification.

  7. [Tetanus and Clostridium tetani--a brief review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2015-02-01

    Tetanus is an acute, often fatal, disease caused by an exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produced by the anaerobic, gram-positive spore-forming bacterium Clostridium tetani. It is characterized by generalized rigidity and convulsive spasms of skeletal muscles. In most industrialized countries, tetanus is a rare disease. However, in many tropical and subtropical countries with low vaccination coverage and poor medical care, it is still widely distributed. This applies in particular for neonatal tetanus. About 50 000 newborns and infants die each year from consequences from this severe illness. Management of tetanus involves neutralization of free circulating toxin, adequate antibacterial and symptomatic therapy as well as intensive care of the patient. For prophylaxis of the disease, active tetanus toxoid vaccination is the method of choice.

  8. Current concepts in the management of Clostridium tetani infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2008-06-01

    This review summarizes the microbiology, management and prevention of tetanus. Tetanus is an acute toxemic illness caused by Clostridium tetani infection at a laceration or break in the skin. It can also occur as a complication of burns, puerperal infections, umbilical stumps (tetanus neonatorum) and surgical-site infection. Tetanus is an intoxication, manifested mostly by neuromuscular dysfunction, caused by tetanal exotoxin (tetanospasmin), a potent exotoxin produced by C. tetani. It starts with tonic spasms of the skeletal muscles and is followed by paroxysmal contractions. The muscle stiffness initially involves the jaw (lockjaw) and neck and later becomes generalized. Treatment goals include interrupting the production of toxin, neutralizating the unbound toxin, controlling muscle spasms, managing dysautonomia and appropriate supportive management. Specific therapy includes intramuscular administration of tetanus immunoglobulin to neutralize circulating toxin before it binds to neuronal cell membranes. The disease can be prevented by immunization with tetanal toxoid and appropriate wound care.

  9. [Distribution of Clostridium tetani in topsoil from Sagamihara, central Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Jun; Shiobara, Yasumasa; Inui, Masami; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Sato, Yoshinori; Takayama, Yoko; Kikuno, Ritsuko; Okuda, Shunji; Inoue, Matsuhisa; Sasahara, Takeshi

    2006-11-01

    Despite reports of Clostridium tetani being isolated from soil in Kanazawa, Okinawa, and Tokyo, Japan, little has been studied about C. tetani distribution in other regions. We studied C. tetani in topsoil samples collected from private gardens, public road shoulders, a university campus, mountains, and fields in Sagamihara. C. tetani occurred in 8 of 35 soil samples (22.9%) and tetanus toxin in 7 of the 8 C. tetani-positive samples (87.5%). Contamination was clearly higher in soils from mountains near Tsukui-gun (Kanagawa Prefecture), Minamitsuru-gun, and Uenohara and Koshu cities (Yamanashi Prefecture) than in other regions. These findings suggest that tetanus toxin-producing strains of C. tetani tend to inhabit the topsoil of western Sagaminaha region, as a geographical feature.

  10. Hydrogen production by Clostridium thermolacticum during continuous fermentation of lactose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collet, C.; Adler, N.; Schwitzguebel, J.P.; Peringer, P. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Lab. for Environmental Biotechnology

    2004-11-01

    In the production of acetate by Clostridium thermolacticum growing on lactose, considerable amounts of hydrogen were generated. Lactose available in large amounts from milk permeate, a waste stream of the dairy industry, appears to be a valuable substrate for cheap production of biohydrogen. In this study, continuous cultivation of C. thermolacticum was carried out in a bioreactor, under anaerobic thermophilic conditions, on minimal medium containing 10 g l{sup -1} lactose. Different dilution rates and pH were tested. C. thermolacticum growing on lactose produced acetate, ethanol and lactate in the liquid phase. For all conditions tested, hydrogen was the main product in the gas phase. Hydrogen specific production higher than 5 mmol H{sub 2} (g cell){sup -1} h{sup -1} was obtained. By operating this fermentation at high-dilution rate and alkaline pH, the hydrogen content in the gas phase was maximized. (author)

  11. Role of cephalosporins in the era of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark H; Chalmers, James D; Nord, Carl E; Freeman, Jane; Bouza, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Europe has increased markedly since 2000. Previous meta-analyses have suggested a strong association between cephalosporin use and CDI, and many national programmes on CDI control have focused on reducing cephalosporin usage. Despite reductions in cephalosporin use, however, rates of CDI have continued to rise. This review examines the potential association of CDI with cephalosporins, and considers other factors that influence CDI risk. EUCLID (the EUropean, multicentre, prospective biannual point prevalence study of CLostridium difficile Infection in hospitalized patients with Diarrhoea) reported an increase in the annual incidence of CDI from 6.6 to 7.3 cases per 10 000 patient bed-days from 2011-12 to 2012-13, respectively. While CDI incidence and cephalosporin usage varied widely across countries studied, there was no clear association between overall cephalosporin prescribing (or the use of any particular cephalosporin) and CDI incidence. Moreover, variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of cephalosporins of the same generation make categorization by generation insufficient for predicting impact on gut microbiota. A multitude of additional factors can affect the risk of CDI. Antibiotic choice is an important consideration; however, CDI risk is associated with a range of antibiotic classes. Prescription of multiple antibiotics and a long duration of treatment are key risk factors for CDI, and risk also differs across patient populations. We propose that all of these are factors that should be taken into account when selecting an antibiotic, rather than focusing on the exclusion of individual drug classes.

  12. Clostridium difficile spore-macrophage interactions: spore survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paredes-Sabja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI, C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host's innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells' ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells.

  13. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium tyrobutyricum for n-butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingrui; Zhang, Yali; Tang, I-Ching; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2011-07-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755, a butyric acid producing bacterium, has been engineered to overexpress aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (adhE2, Genebank no. AF321779) from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, which converts butyryl-CoA to butanol, under the control of native thiolase (thl) promoter. Butanol titer of 1.1g/L was obtained in C. tyrobutyricum overexpressing adhE2. The effects of inactivating acetate kinase (ack) and phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb) genes in the host on butanol production were then studied. A high C4/C2 product ratio of 10.6 (mol/mol) was obtained in ack knockout mutant, whereas a low C4/C2 product ratio of 1.4 (mol/mol) was obtained in ptb knockout mutant, confirming that ack and ptb genes play important roles in controlling metabolic flux distribution in C. tyrobutyricum. The highest butanol titer of 10.0g/L and butanol yield of 27.0% (w/w, 66% of theoretical yield) were achieved from glucose in the ack knockout mutant overexpressing adhE2. When a more reduced substrate mannitol was used, the butanol titer reached 16.0 g/L with 30.6% (w/w) yield (75% theoretical yield). Moreover, C. tyrobutyricum showed good butanol tolerance, with >80% and ∼60% relative growth rate at 1.0% and 1.5% (v/v) butanol. These results suggest that C. tyrobutyricum is a promising heterologous host for n-butanol production from renewable biomass.

  14. CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE ASSOCIATED DISEASE IN THE NEUROINTENSIVECARE UNIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata eTripathy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND- Critically ill patients are at high risk for acquiring Clostridium difficile infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, severity and outcome of Neurointensive Care Unit (NICU acquired Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD. METHODS: Intensive care admission and hospital infection control databases from April 2008 to August 2010 were studied and the case notes reviewed retrospectively. Diarrhoea was classified as mild, moderate or severe based on the frequency and volume. Information on demographics, risk factors for CDAD, presentation and course of the disease was gathered. Admission diagnosis, days of NICU stay and incidence of complications were noted. RESULTS: In the time period studied, 9 out of 2212 patients (prevalence rate 0.4% admitted to the ICU for a total of 10,825 bed days ( incidence rate 8.3 per 10,000 bed days acquired CDAD. Median age was 55 (IQR 20-72 years. The median NICU stay was 26 (IQR 11-103 days. The median duration between ICU admission and development of CDAD was 11 (IQR 3 to 93 days. 4 patients (44% had moderate CDAD. Concurrent infections occurred in 7 (77% patients. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials prior to CDAD were cephalosporins (71%. The apparent risk factors in this group included age > 65 year (22% and antibiotics (67% among others. One patient developed CDAD colitis. Three patients had a perceived delay in discharge from the ICU (1 to 8 days due to their infective status. No mortality was ascribed to CDAD. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate (0.4% and morbidity of CDAD in the unit are low. A larger database is needed to better analyse the associated risk factors in this subgroup of patients. A possible increase in disease burden due to a delay in discharge from the ICU merits further evaluation.

  15. Global analysis of the sporulation pathway of Clostridium difficile.

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    Kelly A Fimlaid

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive, spore-forming pathogen Clostridium difficile is the leading definable cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile infections are difficult to treat because of their frequent recurrence, which can cause life-threatening complications such as pseudomembranous colitis. The spores of C. difficile are responsible for these high rates of recurrence, since they are the major transmissive form of the organism and resistant to antibiotics and many disinfectants. Despite the importance of spores to the pathogenesis of C. difficile, little is known about their composition or formation. Based on studies in Bacillus subtilis and other Clostridium spp., the sigma factors σ(F, σ(E, σ(G, and σ(K are predicted to control the transcription of genes required for sporulation, although their specific functions vary depending on the organism. In order to determine the roles of σ(F, σ(E, σ(G, and σ(K in regulating C. difficile sporulation, we generated loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding these sporulation sigma factors and performed RNA-Sequencing to identify specific sigma factor-dependent genes. This analysis identified 224 genes whose expression was collectively activated by sporulation sigma factors: 183 were σ(F-dependent, 169 were σ(E-dependent, 34 were σ(G-dependent, and 31 were σ(K-dependent. In contrast with B. subtilis, C. difficile σ(E was dispensable for σ(G activation, σ(G was dispensable for σ(K activation, and σ(F was required for post-translationally activating σ(G. Collectively, these results provide the first genome-wide transcriptional analysis of genes induced by specific sporulation sigma factors in the Clostridia and highlight that diverse mechanisms regulate sporulation sigma factor activity in the Firmicutes.

  16. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for production of kerosene and diesel blendstock precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Sebastian; Baer, Zachary C; Sreekumar, Sanil; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Dean Toste, F; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2014-09-01

    Processes for the biotechnological production of kerosene and diesel blendstocks are often economically unattractive due to low yields and product titers. Recently, Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation products acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) were shown to serve as precursors for catalytic upgrading to higher chain-length molecules that can be used as fuel substitutes. To produce suitable kerosene and diesel blendstocks, the butanol:acetone ratio of fermentation products needs to be increased to 2-2.5:1, while ethanol production is minimized. Here we show that the overexpression of selected proteins changes the ratio of ABE products relative to the wild type ATCC 824 strain. Overexpression of the native alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (AAD) has been reported to primarily increase ethanol formation in C. acetobutylicum. We found that overexpression of the AAD(D485G) variant increased ethanol titers by 294%. Catalytic upgrading of the 824(aad(D485G)) ABE products resulted in a blend with nearly 50wt%≤C9 products, which are unsuitable for diesel. To selectively increase butanol production, C. beijerinckii aldehyde dehydrogenase and C. ljungdhalii butanol dehydrogenase were co-expressed (strain designate 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh)), which increased butanol titers by 27% to 16.9gL(-1) while acetone and ethanol titers remained essentially unaffected. The solvent ratio from 824(Cb ald-Cl bdh) resulted in more than 80wt% of catalysis products having a carbon chain length≥C11 which amounts to 9.8gL(-1) of products suitable as kerosene or diesel blendstock based on fermentation volume. To further increase solvent production, we investigated expression of both native and heterologous chaperones in C. acetobutylicum. Expression of a heat shock protein (HSP33) from Bacillus psychrosaccharolyticus increased the total solvent titer by 22%. Co-expression of HSP33 and aldehyde/butanol dehydrogenases further increased ABE formation as well as acetone and butanol yields. HSP33 was

  17. A four-year survey of blown pack spoilage Clostridium estertheticum and Clostridium gasigenes on beef primal cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, D J; Carroll, J; Walsh, D

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of Clostridium estertheticum and Clostridium gasigenes on beef primals taking sample type and season into account. Molecular methods using direct extraction of DNA without enrichment and based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rDNA fragments were used to test for the presence of Cl. estertheticum and Cl. gasigenes in 4826 beef primal samples (1967 drip, 1896 wet swab and 963 dry swab) provided by 10 commercial beef abattoirs over a 4-year period. Overall 1·5% of samples were PCR positive with the incidence of Cl. estertheticum and Cl. gasigenes being 0·8 and 0·7%, respectively. Although the highest incidence of Cl. estertheticum (4·0%) and Cl. gasigenes (5·1%) was observed in June and November, respectively, seasonal differences were not significant (P < 0·05). Drip samples yielded more positive results than swab samples. It was concluded that a low but persistent percentage of beef primal cuts are contaminated with blown pack spoilage Clostridia. There was no seasonal effect and drip may be a more effective test sample than swabs. This study provides data on blown pack spoilage contamination rates of beef primal cuts (pieces of meat initially cut from the carcass during butchering) over an extended period of time. The results show the risk of contamination is low but persistent throughout the year necessitating continuous sporicidal treatment of plant and equipment. Moreover, the higher prevalence of positive meat drip samples suggests sampling regimes should be based on this sample type. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile in cooked beef sold in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Kra Athanase; Dadie, Adjéhi Thomas; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Loukou, Yao Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef sold in the streets in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 395 kidney and flesh samples of cooked beef were collected from vendors at Abidjan and subjected to C. difficile and C. perfringens isolation and identification by using biochemical tests, API 20A system and PCR detection. Subsequently, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for confirmed isolates. Our results showed the prevalence of 12.4% for C. difficile (11.04% in kidney and 13.45% in flesh) and 5.06% for C. perfringens (2.32% in kidney and 7.17% in flesh). Metronidazole and vancomycin remained the most potent antimicrobial agents against C. difficile while metronidazole and penicillin G were the most potent agents against C. perfringens. The resistance rates to tetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol and erythromycin against C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates ranged from 2.05% to 8.16% and from 20% to 50%, respectively. Among all antimicrobial agents tested against C. difficile, percentages of resistance to quinolones ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid as well as to gentamicin and cefotaxime were the highest. Eight resistant phenotypes were defined for C. difficile isolates and eleven resistant phenotypes for C. perfringens isolates. Clindamycin/gentamicin/cefotaxime/ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. difficile (55.10% of isolates) while norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. perfringens (20% of isolates).

  19. Descriptions of Anaerotaenia torta gen. nov., sp. nov. and Anaerocolumna cellulosilytica gen. nov., sp. nov. isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle waste and reclassification of Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium jejuense and Clostridium xylanovorans as Anaerocolumna species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Atsuko; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji

    2016-09-01

    Strictly anaerobic bacterial strains (FH052T and SN021T) belonging to clostridial cluster XIVa were isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Cells of the two strains were Gram-stain-positive, slender or curved rods producing terminal spores. The strains were slightly alkaliphilic. They fermented various carbohydrates including xylan and produced acetate, ethanol and H2. Strain SN021T decomposed cellulose. The genomic DNA G+C contents were 47.2 mol% for strain FH052T and 38.1 mol% for strain SN021T. The two strains had common cellular fatty acids such as C16 : 0, C16 : 0 dimethylacetal and C18 : 1ω7c dimethylacetal as major components. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the two strains was 94.3 % and they shared closely related species such as Clostridium jejuense, Clostridium xylanovorans and Clostridium aminovalericum (92.6-95.7 % sequence similarity). Phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses suggested that these two isolates should be assigned to novel genera other than the genus Clostridium, and thus the genera Anaerotaenia gen. nov. and Anaerocolumna gen. nov. in the family Lachnospiraceae were proposed to accommodate them as Anaerotaenia torta gen. nov., sp. nov. for strain FH052T (=JCM 30820T=DSM 100431T) and Anaerocolumna cellulosilytica gen. nov., sp. nov. for strain SN021T (=JCM 30819T=DSM 100423T). For the three related Clostridium species, Anaerocolumna aminovalerica DSM 1283T (=JCM 11016T=ATCC 13725T) comb. nov., Anaerocolumna jejuensis HY-35-12T (=DSM 15929T=KCTC 5026T) comb. nov. and Anaerocolumna xylanovoransstrain HESP1T (=DSM 12503T=JCM 31057T) comb. nov. are proposed with emended descriptions of these species.

  20. Analysis of the unexplored features of rrs (16S rDNA) of the Genus Clostridium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny based on rrs (16S rDNA) sequencing is being vigorously pursued. In fact, it has been stated that novel biological findings are driven by comparison and integration of massive data sets. In spite of a large reservoir of rrs sequencing data of 1,237,963 entries, this analysis invariably needs supplementation with other genes. The need is to divide the genetic variability within a taxa or genus at their rrs phylogenetic boundaries and to discover those fundamental features, which will enable the bacteria to naturally fall within them. Within the large bacterial community, Clostridium represents a large genus of around 110 species of significant biotechnological and medical importance. Certain Clostridium strains produce some of the deadliest toxins, which cause heavy economic losses. We have targeted this genus because of its high genetic diversity, which does not allow accurate typing with the available molecular methods. Results Seven hundred sixty five rrs sequences (> 1200 nucleotides, nts) belonging to 110 Clostridium species were analyzed. On the basis of 404 rrs sequences belonging to 15 Clostridium species, we have developed species specific: (i) phylogenetic framework, (ii) signatures (30 nts) and (iii) in silico restriction enzyme (14 Type II REs) digestion patterns. These tools allowed: (i) species level identification of 95 Clostridium sp. which are presently classified up to genus level, (ii) identification of 84 novel Clostridium spp. and (iii) potential reduction in the number of Clostridium species represented by small populations. Conclusions This integrated approach is quite sensitive and can be easily extended as a molecular tool for diagnostic and taxonomic identification of any microbe of importance to food industries and health services. Since rapid and correct identification allows quicker diagnosis and consequently treatment as well, it is likely to lead to reduction in economic losses and mortality

  1. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples.

  2. One-Step Multiplex PCR Assay for Differentiating Proposed New Species "Clostridium neonatale" from Closely Related Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Laurent; Schönherr, Sophia; Bouvet, Philippe; Dauphin, Brunhilde; Popoff, Michel; Butel, Marie Jose; Aires, Julio

    2015-11-01

    "Clostridium neonatale" sp. nov., previously involved in an outbreak of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, was recently proposed as a new species of the Clostridium genus sensu stricto. We developed a one-step multiplex colony PCR for C. neonatale identification and investigated C. neonatale intestinal colonization frequency in healthy preterm neonates. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection in patients hospitalized for flare of inflammatory bowel disease: a retrospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnault, Helene; Bourrier, Anne; Lalande, Valerie; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Sokol, Harry; Seksik, Philippe; Barbut, Frederic; Cosnes, Jacques; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a high frequency of Clostridium difficile infections in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. To retrospectively assess the determinants and results of Clostridium difficile testing upon the admission of patients hospitalized with active inflammatory bowel disease in a tertiary care centre and to determine the predicting factors of Clostridium difficile infections. We reviewed all admissions from January 2008 and December 2010 for inflammatory bowel disease flare-ups. A toxigenic culture and a stool cytotoxicity assay were performed for all patients tested for Clostridium difficile. Out of 813 consecutive stays, Clostridium difficile diagnostic assays have been performed in 59% of inpatients. The independent predictive factors for the testing were IBD (ulcerative colitis: OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.9; pClostridium difficile infection was present in 7.0% of the inpatients who underwent testing. In a multivariate analysis, the only independent predictor was the intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs within the two months before admission (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-12.3; p=0.02). Clostridium difficile infection is frequently associated with active inflammatory bowel disease. Our study suggests that a recent intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease -associated Clostridium difficile infection. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  5. Risk assessment of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in canned foie gras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membré, Jeanne-Marie; Diao, Moctar; Thorin, Chantal; Cordier, Grégoire; Zuber, François; André, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a risk assessment of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in canned foie gras was performed, the number of illnesses per year in France due to C. botulinum in foie gras was estimated. Data on initial level in raw materials were collected at manufacturers and analysed using a Negative Binomial distribution. The effect of the usual foie gras heat treatment (equivalent time at 121 °C: F0=0.5 min) was considered at two levels: first, it led to an inactivation (estimated to 2.3 log); second it led to a spore injury and then to a spore inhibition. This latter effect was assessed by analysing data from a challenge test study carried out with Clostridium sporogenes spores in the foie gras product. The probability of spore recovering after thermal inhibition was estimated to 9.5×10(-8) (corresponding to 7.0 log). The data on the consumption pattern were collected on the French market. The Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model and all the assumptions are reported in detail in the study. The initial contamination of raw materials, effect of thermal treatment on microbial inactivation and spore inhibition were handled mathematically using a probabilistic framework, considering only the variability dimension. The model was implemented in Excel and run through Monte Carlo simulation, using @Risk software. In parallel, epidemiological data collected from the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance during the period 2001-2012 were used to estimate an Appropriate Level Of Protection (ALOP) and then a Food Safety Objective (FSO): ALOP equalled to 2.5×10(-3) illnesses per million inhabitant per year, FSO equalled to 1.4×10(-9) foie gras portions containing C. botulinum spore (expressed in decimal logarithm, FSO=-8.9). The QMRA model output values were smaller, but on the same order of magnitude as these two figures: 8.0×10(-4) illnesses per million inhabitants per year, and, 4.5×10(-10) (-9.3 log) foie gras portions containing C

  6. Structural characterization of surface glycans from Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Christopher W; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Jarrell, Harold C; Logan, Susan M; Brisson, Jean-Robert

    2012-06-01

    Whole-cell high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR was employed to survey the surface polysaccharides of a group of clinical and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile. Results indicated that a highly conserved surface polysaccharide profile among all strains studied. Multiple additional peaks in the anomeric region were also observed which prompted further investigation. Structural characterization of the isolated surface polysaccharides from two strains confirmed the presence of the conserved water soluble polysaccharide originally described by Ganeshapillai et al. which was composed of a hexaglycosyl phosphate repeat consisting of [→6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-3)-β-D-GalpNAc-(1-4)-α-D-Glcp-(1-4)-[β-D-Glcp(1-3]-β-D-GalpNAc-(1-3)-α-D-Manp-(1-P→]. In addition, analysis of phenol soluble polysaccharides revealed a similarly conserved lipoteichoic acid (LTA) which could be detected on whole cells by HR-MAS NMR. Conventional NMR and mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the structure of this LTA consisted of the repeat unit [→6)-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1-3)-[→P-6]-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1-2)-D-GroA] where GroA is glyceric acid. The repeating units were linked by a phosphodiester bridge between C-6 of the two GlcNAc residues (6-P-6). A minor component consisted of GlcpN-(1-3) instead of GlcpNAc-(1-3) in the repeat unit. Through a 6-6 phosphodiester bridge this polymer was linked to →6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-1)-Gro, with glycerol (Gro) substituted by fatty acids. This is the first report of the utility of HR-MAS NMR in the examination of surface carbohydrates of Gram positive bacteria and identification of a novel LTA structure from Clostridium difficile.

  7. Cap0037, a Novel Global Regulator of Clostridium acetobutylicum Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Phuong-Thao; Linder, Sonja; Flitsch, Stefanie K; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Dürre, Peter; Soucaille, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    An operon comprising two genes, CA_P0037 and CA_P0036, that encode proteins of unknown function that were previously shown to be highly expressed in acidogenic cells and repressed in solventogenic and alcohologenic cells is located on the pSOL1 megaplasmid of Clostridium acetobutylicum upstream of adhE2 A CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant in which an intron was inserted at position 189/190 in the sense strand of CA_P0037 was successfully generated by the Targetron technique. The resultant mutant showed significantly different metabolic flux patterns in acidogenic (producing mainly lactate, butyrate, and butanol) and alcohologenic (producing mainly butyrate, acetate, and lactate) chemostat cultures but not in solventogenic or batch cultures. Transcriptomic investigation of the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant showed that inactivation of CA_P0037 significantly affected the expression of more than 258 genes under acidogenic conditions. Surprisingly, genes belonging to the Fur regulon, involved in iron transport (CA_C1029-CA_C1032), or coding for the main flavodoxin (CA_C0587) were the most significantly expressed genes under all conditions, whereas fur (coding for the ferric uptake regulator) gene expression remained unchanged. Furthermore, most of the genes of the Rex regulon, such as the adhE2 and ldhA genes, and of the PerR regulon, such as rbr3A-rbr3B and dfx, were overexpressed in the mutant. In addition, the whole CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon was highly expressed under all conditions in the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant, suggesting a self-regulated expression mechanism. Cap0037 was shown to bind to the CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon, sol operon, and adc promoters, and the binding sites were determined by DNA footprinting. Finally, a putative Cap0037 regulon was generated using a bioinformatic approach. Clostridium acetobutylicum is well-known for its ability to produce solvents, especially n-butanol. Understanding the regulatory network of C. acetobutylicum will be

  8. Clostridium Difficile and Fecal Microbial Transplant in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critically-ill patients constitute majority of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards (1, 2. This group of patients demands special considerations and measures of care (3-6. Clostridium difficile infection causes dangerous, painful and persistent diarrhea in critically ill patients. Its treatment consists of enteral metronidazol or vancomycin in combination with IV antibiotics cessation. Recently, probiotics have been considered as an alternative treatment for pseudomembranous colitis. In 1958, fecal microbial transplant was first described from healthy individuals to sick patients to displace pathogenic microbes from the intestine by re-establishing a healthy microbial community. Since then, it has gained value as “express stool treatment” or currently known as “fecal transplant”. Last year, FDA classified stool as drug, which typically requires an Investigational New Drug application (IND. However, in July 2013, the FDA issued guidance stating that it would exercise enforcement discretion for physicians administering FMT to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Accordingly, considering stool as a tissue product or giving it its own classification, as FDA approved for blood, would keep patients safe, ensure broad access and facilitate research (7. It should be taken into consideration that some complications might accompany fecal microbial transplant such as making patients susceptible for conditions like obesity or autoimmune disorders. Safety and quality assurance starts from pre-enrollment donor screening, donor testing (17 serological and stool-based assays, donor monitoring and process control. The composition of the bacterial community has been shown to change when stored at -80oC compared to the samples stored at -20oC and it has been recommended to store the samples of intestinal content at -20oC before use for bacterial community analysis, instead of the current practice at -80oC (7, 8. However, if

  9. Treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile infection using fecal microbiota transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak R

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Pathak,1 Hill Ambrose Enuh,1 Anish Patel,1 Prasanna Wickremesinghe21Department of Internal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Department of Gastrointestinal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USABackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has become a global concern over the last decade. In the United States, CDI escalated in incidence from 1996 to 2005 from 31 to 64/100,000. In 2010, there were 500,000 cases of CDI with an estimated mortality up to 20,000 cases a year. The significance of this problem is evident from the hospital costs of over 3 billion dollars annually. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT was first described in 1958 and since then about 500 cases have been published in literature in various small series and case reports. This procedure has been reported mainly from centers outside of the United States and acceptance of the practice has been difficult. Recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA labeled FMT as a biological drug; as a result, guidelines will soon be required to help establish it as a mainstream treatment. More US experience needs to be reported to popularize this procedure here and form guidelines.Method: We did a retrospective review of our series of patients with relapsing CDI who were treated with FMT over a 3-year period. We present our experience with FMT at a community hospital as a retrospective review and describe our procedure.Results: There were a total of 12 patients who underwent FMT for relapsing C. difficile. Only one patient failed to respond and required a second FMT. There were no complications associated with the transplant and all patients had resolution of symptoms within 48 hours of FMT.Conclusion: FMT is a cheap, easily available, effective therapy for recurrent CDI; it can be safely performed in a

  10. Role of pectinolytic enzymes identified in Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Soumyadeep; Fernandes, Vania O; Dias, Fernando M V; Prates, Jose A M; Ferreira, Luis M A; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Goyal, Arun; Centeno, Maria S J

    2015-01-01

    The cloning, expression and characterization of three cellulosomal pectinolytic enzymes viz., two variants of PL1 (PL1A and PL1B) and PL9 from Clostridium thermocellum was carried out. The comparison of the primary sequences of PL1A, PL1B and PL9 revealed that these proteins displayed considerable sequence similarities with family 1 and 9 polysaccharide lyases, respectively. PL1A, PL1B and PL9 are the putative catalytic domains of protein sequence ABN54148.1 and ABN53381.1 respectively. These two protein sequences also contain putative carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and type-I dockerin. The associated putative CBM of PL1A showed strong homology with family 6 CBMs while those of PL1B and PL9 showed homology with family 35 CBMs. Recombinant derivatives of these three enzymes showed molecular masses of approximately 34 kDa, 40 kDa and 32 kDa for PL1A, PL1B and PL9, respectively. PL1A, PL1B and PL9 displayed high activity toward polygalacturonic acid and pectin (up to 55% methyl-esterified) from citrus fruits. However, PL1B showed relatively higher activity towards 55% and 85% methyl-esterified pectin (citrus). PL1A and PL9 showed higher activity on rhamnogalacturonan than PL1B. Both PL1A and PL9 displayed maximum activity at pH 8.5 with optimum temperature of 50°C and 60°C respectively. PL1B achieved highest activity at pH 9.8, under an optimum temperature of 50°C. PL1A, PL1B and PL9 all produced two or more unsaturated galacturonates from pectic substrates as displayed by TLC analysis confirming that they are endo-pectate lyase belonging to family 1 and 9, respectively. This report reveals that pectinolytic activity displayed by Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome is coordinated by a sub-set of at least three multi-modular enzymes.

  11. Role of pectinolytic enzymes identified in Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyadeep Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The cloning, expression and characterization of three cellulosomal pectinolytic enzymes viz., two variants of PL1 (PL1A and PL1B and PL9 from Clostridium thermocellum was carried out. The comparison of the primary sequences of PL1A, PL1B and PL9 revealed that these proteins displayed considerable sequence similarities with family 1 and 9 polysaccharide lyases, respectively. PL1A, PL1B and PL9 are the putative catalytic domains of protein sequence ABN54148.1 and ABN53381.1 respectively. These two protein sequences also contain putative carbohydrate binding module (CBM and type-I dockerin. The associated putative CBM of PL1A showed strong homology with family 6 CBMs while those of PL1B and PL9 showed homology with family 35 CBMs. Recombinant derivatives of these three enzymes showed molecular masses of approximately 34 kDa, 40 kDa and 32 kDa for PL1A, PL1B and PL9, respectively. PL1A, PL1B and PL9 displayed high activity toward polygalacturonic acid and pectin (up to 55% methyl-esterified from citrus fruits. However, PL1B showed relatively higher activity towards 55% and 85% methyl-esterified pectin (citrus. PL1A and PL9 showed higher activity on rhamnogalacturonan than PL1B. Both PL1A and PL9 displayed maximum activity at pH 8.5 with optimum temperature of 50°C and 60°C respectively. PL1B achieved highest activity at pH 9.8, under an optimum temperature of 50°C. PL1A, PL1B and PL9 all produced two or more unsaturated galacturonates from pectic substrates as displayed by TLC analysis confirming that they are endo-pectate lyase belonging to family 1 and 9, respectively. This report reveals that pectinolytic activity displayed by Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome is coordinated by a sub-set of at least three multi-modular enzymes.

  12. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  13. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance.

  14. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Michael E; Bruder, Mark R; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-05-09

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium.

  15. Clostridium herbivorans sp. nov., a cellulolytic anaerobe from the pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varel, V H; Tanner, R S; Woese, C R

    1995-07-01

    A new cellulolytic anaerobic clostridium was isolated from the intestinal tract of pigs. The single isolate was a gram-positive, motile rod, formed terminal to subterminal swollen sporangia, and required a fermentable carbohydrate for growth. Cellulose, cellobiose, maltose, starch, and glycogen supported growth, but glucose and fructose did not. The major end products from the fermentation of cellobiose were butyrate and formate; minor amounts of hydrogen and ethanol were also formed. Ruminal fluid (15%) or yeast extract (1%) was required for good growth. The optimum temperature for growth was 39 to 42 degrees C, and the optimum pH was 6.8 to 7.2. Cell lysis occurred rapidly once stationary growth was reached. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the strain was related to a group of gram-positive anaerobes that includes Clostridium oroticum and the cellulolytic species Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Clostridium populeti. The DNA base composition of the isolate is 38 mol% G + C. We propose the name Clostridium herbivorans for this organism; strain 54408 (= ATCC 49925) is the type strain.

  16. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

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    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Conditions associated with Clostridium sporogenes growth as a surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in nonthermally processed canned butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R H; Dunn, M L; Ogden, L V; Jefferies, L K; Eggett, D L; Steele, F M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the effect of butter composition and emulsion structure on growth and survival of Clostridium sporogenes, used as a surrogate for C. botulinum in canned butter. The lack of a thermal process step in commercially available canned butter raises questions of potential safety, because it is hermetically sealed and generally exhibits anaerobic growth conditions, which are optimal for Clostridium botulinum growth. Without thermal processing, low-acid canned foods must have inhibitory factors present to prevent C. botulinum growth. Some potential intrinsic inhibitory factors, or hurdles, within butter include: reduced water activity, acidity in cultured products, elevated salt content, and the micro-droplet nature of the aqueous phase in the butter emulsion. It was hypothesized that a normal, intact butter emulsion would have sufficient hurdles to prevent C. botulinum growth, whereas a broken butter emulsion would result in a coalesced aqueous phase that would allow for C. botulinum growth. Batch-churned butter was inoculated with C. sporogenes; butter samples with varying salt contents (0, 0.8, 1.6, and 2.4% wt/wt NaCl) were prepared and stored in coated steel cans for varying times (1 or 2 wk) and temperatures (22 or 41°C) to determine temperature and emulsion structure effects on C. sporogenes growth. Samples stored at 41°C showed a significant increase in C. sporogenes growth compared with those stored at 22°C. Furthermore, NaCl addition was found to have a significant effect on C. sporogenes growth, with 0.8% NaCl promoting more growth than 0%, but with decreases in growth observed at 1.6 and 2.4%. Uninoculated control plates were also found to have bacterial growth; this growth was attributed to other anaerobic bacteria present within the cream. It was concluded that removal of the hurdle created by the micro-droplet size of the emulsion aqueous phase could result in C. botulinum growth even at elevated salt

  18. Quantifying Transmission of Clostridium difficile within and outside Healthcare Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, David P; Olsen, Margaret A; Dubberke, Erik R; Galvani, Alison P; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the effect of hospital and community-based transmission and control measures on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), we constructed a transmission model within and between hospital, community, and long-term care-facility settings. By parameterizing the model from national databases and calibrating it to C. difficile prevalence and CDI incidence, we found that hospitalized patients with CDI transmit C. difficile at a rate 15 (95% CI 7.2-32) times that of asymptomatic patients. Long-term care facility residents transmit at a rate of 27% (95% CI 13%-51%) that of hospitalized patients, and persons in the community at a rate of 0.1% (95% CI 0.062%-0.2%) that of hospitalized patients. Despite lower transmission rates for asymptomatic carriers and community sources, these transmission routes have a substantial effect on hospital-onset CDI because of the larger reservoir of hospitalized carriers and persons in the community. Asymptomatic carriers and community sources should be accounted for when designing and evaluating control interventions.

  19. Bacteriophage-mediated toxin gene regulation in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Revathi; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Rolfe, Rial D; Dupuy, Bruno; Fralick, Joe A

    2009-12-01

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as the most important single identifiable cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis. Virulent strains of C. difficile produce two large protein toxins, toxin A and toxin B, which are involved in pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of lysogeny by PhiCD119 on C. difficile toxin production. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated a decrease in the expression of pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdR, tcdE, and tcdC in PhiCD119 lysogens. During this study we found that repR, a putative repressor gene of PhiCD119, was expressed in C. difficile lysogens and that its product, RepR, could downregulate tcdA::gusA and tcdR::gusA reporter fusions in Escherichia coli. We cloned and purified a recombinant RepR containing a C-terminal six-His tag and documented its binding to the upstream regions of tcdR in C. difficile PaLoc and in repR upstream region in PhiCD119 by gel shift assays. DNA footprinting experiments revealed similarities between the RepR binding sites in tcdR and repR upstream regions. These findings suggest that presence of a CD119-like temperate phage can influence toxin gene regulation in this nosocomially important pathogen.

  20. Bacteriophage-Mediated Toxin Gene Regulation in Clostridium difficile▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Revathi; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Rolfe, Rial D.; Dupuy, Bruno; Fralick, Joe A.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as the most important single identifiable cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis. Virulent strains of C. difficile produce two large protein toxins, toxin A and toxin B, which are involved in pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of lysogeny by ΦCD119 on C. difficile toxin production. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated a decrease in the expression of pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdR, tcdE, and tcdC in ΦCD119 lysogens. During this study we found that repR, a putative repressor gene of ΦCD119, was expressed in C. difficile lysogens and that its product, RepR, could downregulate tcdA::gusA and tcdR::gusA reporter fusions in Escherichia coli. We cloned and purified a recombinant RepR containing a C-terminal six-His tag and documented its binding to the upstream regions of tcdR in C. difficile PaLoc and in repR upstream region in ΦCD119 by gel shift assays. DNA footprinting experiments revealed similarities between the RepR binding sites in tcdR and repR upstream regions. These findings suggest that presence of a CD119-like temperate phage can influence toxin gene regulation in this nosocomially important pathogen. PMID:19776116

  1. Hydrolysis of synthetic polyesters by Clostridium botulinum esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz, Veronika; Baumschlager, Armin; Bleymaier, Klaus; Zitzenbacher, Sabine; Hromic, Altijana; Steinkellner, Georg; Pairitsch, Andris; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Gruber, Karl; Sinkel, Carsten; Küper, Ulf; Ribitsch, Doris; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-05-01

    Two novel esterases from the anaerobe Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 (Cbotu_EstA and Cbotu_EstB) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-Gold(DE3) and were found to hydrolyze the polyester poly(butylene adipate-co-butylene terephthalate) (PBAT). The active site residues (triad Ser, Asp, His) are present in both enzymes at the same location only with some amino acid variations near the active site at the surrounding of aspartate. Yet, Cbotu_EstA showed higher kcat values on para-nitrophenyl butyrate and para-nitrophenyl acetate and was considerably more active (sixfold) on PBAT. The entrance to the active site of the modeled Cbotu_EstB appears more narrowed compared to the crystal structure of Cbotu_EstA and the N-terminus is shorter which could explain its lower activity on PBAT. The Cbotu_EstA crystal structure consists of two regions that may act as movable cap domains and a zinc metal binding site.

  2. Growth of group II Clostridium botulinum strains at extreme temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Lindström, Miia; Selby, Katja; Korkeala, Hannu

    2011-11-01

    The minimum and maximum growth temperatures and the maximum growth rates at 10, 30, 37, and 40°C were determined for 24 group II Clostridium botulinum strains. Genetic diversity of the strains was revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The minimum growth temperatures ranged from 6.2 to 8.6°C, and the maximum growth temperatures ranged from 34.7 to 39.9°C. The mean maximum growth temperatures and mean maximum growth rates of type E strains at 37°C were significantly higher than those of type B and type F strains. A significant correlation between maximum growth rates at 37°C and maximum growth temperatures was found for all strains. Some type E strains with a high minimum growth temperature also had a higher maximum growth rate at 37°C than at 30°C, which suggests that some group II C. botulinum strains are more mesophilic in their growth properties than others. We found relatively small differences between AFLP clusters, indicating that diverse genetic background among the strains was not reflected in the growth properties. The growth characteristics of group II C. botulinum and some type E strains with mesophilic growth properties may have an impact on inoculation studies and predictive modeling for assessing the safety of foods.

  3. Genomic characterization of Italian Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Pittiglio, Valentina; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Lista, Florigio

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a gram-positive bacterium capable of producing the botulinum neurotoxin, a powerful poison that causes botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Its genome has been sequenced entirely and its gene content has been analyzed. To date, 19 full genomes and 64 draft genomes are available. The geographical origin of these genomes is predominantly from the US. In the present study, 10 Italian genomes of C. botulinum group I were analyzed and compared with previously sequenced group I genomes, in order to genetically characterize the Italian population of C. botulinum group I and to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among different lineages. Using the suites of software ClonalFrame and ClonalOrigin to perform genomic analysis, we demonstrated that Italian C. botulinum group I population is phylogenetically heterogeneous encompassing different and distant lineages including overseas strains, too. Moreover, a high recombination rate was demonstrated in the evolution of C. botulinum group I species. Finally, genome sequencing of the strain 357 led us to identify a novel botulinum neurotoxin subtype, F8.

  4. Quantification of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Spore Loads in Food Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Gary C; Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Peck, Michael W

    2016-01-04

    We have produced data and developed analysis to build representations for the concentration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in materials that are used during the manufacture of minimally processed chilled foods in the United Kingdom. Food materials are categorized into homogenous groups which include meat, fish, shellfish, cereals, fresh plant material, dairy liquid, dairy nonliquid, mushroom and fungi, and dried herbs and spices. Models are constructed in a Bayesian framework and represent a combination of information from a literature survey of spore loads from positive-control experiments that establish a detection limit and from dedicated microbiological tests for real food materials. The detection of nonproteolytic C. botulinum employed an optimized protocol that combines selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR, and the majority of tests on food materials were negative. Posterior beliefs about spore loads center on a concentration range of 1 to 10 spores kg(-1). Posterior beliefs for larger spore loads were most significant for dried herbs and spices and were most sensitive to the detailed results from control experiments. Probability distributions for spore loads are represented in a convenient form that can be used for numerical analysis and risk assessments.

  5. DOMESTIC BUTANOL-PRODUCING STRAINS OF THE Clostridium GENUS

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    O. O. Tigunova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to summarize the results of own research concerning obtaining butanol producing strains of Clostridium genus, to identify them by physiological, morphological and genetic methods. Further study of characteristics and biological features of the strains, and various approaches in biotechnological process of butanol production are discussed. The work includes methods to increase butanol accumulation by producer strains. Perspectives of using chemical mutagenesis in Clostridia as a method of increasing butanol production are considered. The feasibility of using non-food raw material as a substrate for fermentation is discussed. Different methods of pretreatment and their impact on the accumulation of butanol in the liquid medium are compared. Butanol accumulation is shown to increase significantly if the synthesis precursors are added as components of enzymatic medium, and the “reverse bard” is used to reduce waste production without affecting the level of butanol synthesis. The problem of conservation of producing strains is given, and protective medium for microorganisms during the freeze-drying is defined.

  6. Host response to Clostridium difficile infection: Diagnostics and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usacheva, Elena A; Jin, Jian-P; Peterson, Lance R

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant healthcare concern worldwide, and C. difficile is recognised as the most frequent aetiological agent of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adult patients. The clinical manifestation of CDI varies from self-limited diarrhoea to life-threatening colitis. Such a broad disease spectrum can be explained by the impact of host factors. Currently, a complex CDI aetiology is widely accepted, acknowledging the interaction between bacteria and the host. C. difficile strains producing clostridial toxins A and B are considered toxigenic and can cause disease; those not producing the toxins are non-pathogenic. A person colonised with a toxigenic strain will not necessarily develop CDI. It is imperative to recognise patients with active disease from those only colonised with this pathogen and to implement appropriate treatment. This can be achieved by diagnostics that rely on host factors specific to CDI. This review will focus on major aspects of CDI pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms, describing host factors in disease progression and assessment of the host response in order to facilitate the development of CDI-specific diagnostics.

  7. Clostridium difficile ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Rupnik, Maja; Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging enteropathogen responsible for pseudomembranous colitis in humans and diarrhoea in several domestic and wild animal species. Despite its known importance, there are few studies about C. difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotypes in Brazil and the actual knowledge is restricted to studies on human isolates. The aim of the study was therefore to compare C. difficile ribotypes isolated from humans and animals in Brazil. Seventy-six C. difficile strains isolated from humans (n = 25), dogs (n = 23), piglets (n = 12), foals (n = 7), calves (n = 7), one cat, and one manned wolf were distributed into 24 different PCR ribotypes. Among toxigenic strains, PCR ribotypes 014/020 and 106 were the most common, accounting for 14 (18.4%) and eight (10.5%) samples, respectively. Fourteen different PCR ribotypes were detected among human isolates, nine of them have also been identified in at least one animal species. PCR ribotype 027 was not detected, whereas 078 were found only in foals. This data suggests a high diversity of PCR ribotypes in humans and animals in Brazil and support the discussion of C. difficile as a zoonotic pathogen.

  8. CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTION: RISK FACTORS, DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xhelil Koleci

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI has changed over the past decade. In addition to dramatic worldwide increases in incidence, new CDI populations are emerging. These populations include patients with community acquired infections with no previous antibiotic exposure, children, pregnant women and patients with IBD. Diagnosis of CDIs requires the identification of C. difficile toxin A or B in diarrheal stool. Current diagnostic tests, however, remains inadequate and an optimal diagnostic testing algorithm has not yet been defined. Metronidazole and vancomycin are currently first-line agents for CDI treatment. Vancomycine, however, has demonstrated superior efficacy and therefore is the preferred agent in patients with severe infections. As with many antibiotics, the incidence of treatment failure with metronidazole is increasing, thereby emphasizing the need to find alternative treatments. Disease recurrence continues to occur in 20-40% of patients and its treatment remains challenging. In patients who develop fulminant colitis from a CDI, early surgical consultation is essential. Intravenous immunoglobulin and tigecycline have been used in patients with severe refractory disease, however delaying surgery may be associated with worse outcomes. Due to the risk of horizontal transmission of C.difficile infection control measures are necessary. Animals may serve as reservoirs for humans. Ongoing research by human and veterinary scientist into, epidemiology, diagnosis, effective treatment protocols and prevention are essential.

  9. Metabolism of lactose by Clostridium thermolacticum growing in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Christophe; Girbal, Laurence; Péringer, Paul; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul; Soucaille, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the metabolism of Clostridium thermolacticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, growing continuously on lactose (10 g l(-1)) and to determine the enzymes involved in the pathways leading to the formation of the fermentation products. Biomass and metabolites concentration were measured at steady-state for different dilution rates, from 0.013 to 0.19 h(-1). Acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were produced at all dilution rates, whereas lactate was detected only for dilution rates below 0.06 h(-1). The presence of several key enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, including beta-galactosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, ethanol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. Finally, the intracellular level of NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP was also measured for different dilution rates. The production of ethanol and lactate appeared to be linked with the re-oxidation of NADH produced during glycolysis, whereas hydrogen produced should come from reduced ferredoxin generated during pyruvate decarboxylation. To produce more hydrogen or more acetate from lactose, it thus appears that an efficient H2 removal system should be used, based on a physical (membrane) or a biological approach, respectively, by cultivating C. thermolacticum with efficient H2 scavenging and acetate producing microorganisms.

  10. Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpke, Michael; Held, Claudia; Hujer, Sandra; Liesegang, Heiko; Wiezer, Arnim; Wollherr, Antje; Ehrenreich, Armin; Liebl, Wolfgang; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Dürre, Peter

    2010-07-20

    Clostridium ljungdahlii is an anaerobic homoacetogen, able to ferment sugars, other organic compounds, or CO(2)/H(2) and synthesis gas (CO/H(2)). The latter feature makes it an interesting microbe for the biotech industry, as important bulk chemicals and proteins can be produced at the expense of CO(2), thus combining industrial needs with sustained reduction of CO and CO(2) in the atmosphere. Sequencing the complete genome of C. ljungdahlii revealed that it comprises 4,630,065 bp and is one of the largest clostridial genomes known to date. Experimental data and in silico comparisons revealed a third mode of anaerobic homoacetogenic metabolism. Unlike other organisms such as Moorella thermoacetica or Acetobacterium woodii, neither cytochromes nor sodium ions are involved in energy generation. Instead, an Rnf system is present, by which proton translocation can be performed. An electroporation procedure has been developed to transform the organism with plasmids bearing heterologous genes for butanol production. Successful expression of these genes could be demonstrated, leading to formation of the biofuel. Thus, C. ljungdahlii can be used as a unique microbial production platform based on synthesis gas and carbon dioxide/hydrogen mixtures.

  11. Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin: Action, Genetics, and Translational Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, John C; Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A

    2016-03-16

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for causing the gastrointestinal symptoms of several C. perfringens food- and nonfood-borne human gastrointestinal diseases. The enterotoxin gene (cpe) is located on either the chromosome (for most C. perfringens type A food poisoning strains) or large conjugative plasmids (for the remaining type A food poisoning and most, if not all, other CPE-producing strains). In all CPE-positive strains, the cpe gene is strongly associated with insertion sequences that may help to assist its mobilization and spread. During disease, CPE is produced when C. perfringens sporulates in the intestines, a process involving several sporulation-specific alternative sigma factors. The action of CPE starts with its binding to claudin receptors to form a small complex; those small complexes then oligomerize to create a hexameric prepore on the membrane surface. Beta hairpin loops from the CPE molecules in the prepore assemble into a beta barrel that inserts into the membrane to form an active pore that enhances calcium influx, causing cell death. This cell death results in intestinal damage that causes fluid and electrolyte loss. CPE is now being explored for translational applications including cancer therapy/diagnosis, drug delivery, and vaccination.

  12. The interaction of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin with receptor claudins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Archana; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has significant medical importance due to its involvement in several common human gastrointestinal diseases. This 35 kDa single polypeptide toxin consists of two domains: a C-terminal domain involved in receptor binding and an N-terminal domain involved in oligomerization, membrane insertion and pore formation. The action of CPE starts with its binding to receptors, which include certain members of the claudin tight junction protein family; bound CPE then forms a series of complexes, one of which is a pore that causes the calcium influx responsible for host cell death. Recent studies have revealed that CPE binding to claudin receptors involves interactions between the C-terminal CPE domain and both the 1st and 2nd extracellular loops (ECL-1 and ECL-2) of claudin receptors. Of particular importance for this binding is the docking of ECL-2 into a pocket present in the C-terminal domain of the toxin. This increased understanding of CPE interactions with claudin receptors is now fostering the development of receptor decoy therapeutics for CPE-mediated gastrointestinal disease, reagents for cancer therapy/diagnoses and enhancers of drug delivery.

  13. Proton pump inhibitors and risk for Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasmita Biswal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI among in-patients is associated with significant increased mortality, morbidity, and stay in the hospitals. This has occurred despite heightened awareness of the risks of broad-spectrum antibiotics, overall reduction in antibiotic use and increased focus on hospital hygiene. So though the main risk factor for CDI is use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs as a novel potential contributor has been implicated, because of their ability to substantially reduce gastric acid secretion which is an important host defense mechanism in suppressing the ingested C. difficile or its spores. Antibiotic disruption of the normal intestinal flora and reduced gastric acidity have been suggested as the risk factors for C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD. Based on such assumptions the use of PPIs may be associated with an increased risk of CDAD. While a definite association between PPI use and CDAD has not yet been confirmed, the possibility and such an association however cannot be ruled out at present. Thus among the identified risk factors, the use of PPI is important, previously unrecognized and modifiable risk factors whose use should be carefully evaluated among hospital in-patients receiving antibiotics, especially in those with a diagnosis of C. difficile diarrhea.

  14. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, N Deborah; Pollard, James; Stupart, Douglas; Knight, Daniel R; Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; Davey, Elise K; Parry, Louise; Riley, Thomas V

    2013-10-04

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased to epidemic proportions in recent years. The carriage of C. difficile among healthy adults and hospital inpatients has been established. We sought to determine whether C. difficile colonization exists among healthcare workers (HCWs) in our setting. A point prevalence study of stool colonization with C. difficile among doctors, nurses and allied health staff at a large regional teaching hospital in Geelong, Victoria. All participants completed a short questionnaire and all stool specimens were tested by Techlab® C.diff Quik Check enzyme immunoassay followed by enrichment culture. Among 128 healthcare workers, 77% were female, of mean age 43 years, and the majority were nursing staff (73%). Nineteen HCWs (15%) reported diarrhoea, and 12 (9%) had taken antibiotics in the previous six weeks. Over 40% of participants reported having contact with a patient with known or suspected CDI in the 6 weeks before the stool was collected. C. difficile was not isolated from the stool of any participants. Although HCWs are at risk of asymptomatic carriage and could act as a reservoir for transmission in the hospital environment, with the use of a screening test and culture we were unable to identify C. difficile in the stool of our participants in a non-outbreak setting. This may reflect potential colonization resistance of the gut microbiota, or the success of infection prevention strategies at our institution.

  15. Muricholic acids inhibit Clostridium difficile spore germination and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Francis

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Clostridium difficile have increased steadily over the past several years. While studies on C. difficile virulence and physiology have been hindered, in the past, by lack of genetic approaches and suitable animal models, newly developed technologies and animal models allow these processes to be studied in detail. One such advance is the generation of a mouse-model of C. difficile infection. The development of this system is a major step forward in analyzing the genetic requirements for colonization and infection. While important, it is equally as important in understanding what differences exist between mice and humans. One of these differences is the natural bile acid composition. Bile acid-mediated spore germination is an important step in C. difficile colonization. Mice produce several different bile acids that are not found in humans. These muricholic acids have the potential to impact C. difficile spore germination. Here we find that the three muricholic acids (α-muricholic acid, β-muricholic acid and ω-muricholic acid inhibit C. difficile spore germination and can impact the growth of vegetative cells. These results highlight an important difference between humans and mice and may have an impact on C. difficile virulence in the mouse-model of C. difficile infection.

  16. Post-traumatic endophthalmitis involving Clostridium tetani and Bacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, M N; Kranias, G; Daun, M E

    2001-07-01

    To report a case of post-traumatic infectious endophthalmitis caused by Clostridium tetani and Bacillus spp. Case report. A 25-year-old man developed endophthalmitis after a traumatic corneoscleral laceration of his right eye by a concrete reinforcement bar. He underwent pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy with aspiration of vitreous fluid and a conjunctival swab for cultures. Cultures from the conjunctival swab were negative for organisms. Cultures of the vitreous aspirate were positive for Bacillus species and C. tetani. He had received a tetanus toxoid booster at the emergency department. By the time the culture results became available, he had developed severe eye pain associated with marked orbital congestion, increased swelling and erythema of the lids, marked injection and chemosis of the conjunctiva, and subsequently underwent evisceration. The inflammation resolved after evisceration of the right eye, and he was discharged to home on doxycycline 100 mg orally two times daily for 10 days. We are unaware of previous reports of endophthalmitis involving C tetani and could find none in a computerized MEDLINE search. Patients with penetrating eye injury should be assessed for tetanus immunization status, and early intervention with tetanus toxoid booster and/or tetanus immune globulin should be considered if cultures are positive.

  17. Novel Actin-like Filament Structure from Clostridium tetani*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  18. High-molecular-weight hemolysin of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, K; Mitsui, N; Kobashi, K; Hase, J

    1982-01-01

    Clostridium tetani excretes hemolysins of two size classes, a high-molecular-weight hemolysin (HMH), which was eluted near void volume of a Sepharose 6B column, and conventional tetanolysin (molecular weight, approximately 50,000). The total hemolysin activity in the culture supernatant increased sharply with growth of bacteria and remained at a high level during autolysis. The content of HMH, however, decreased from 41% at 4 h of culture to 0.4% at the early stage of autolysis. The cell bodies also exhibited hemolytic activity, 70% of which could be solubilized and separated into HMH and the 50,000 Mr tetanolysin as extracellular hemolysins. The activity ratio of HMH to the total solubilized hemolysins was 0.45, on the average, at 6 h of culture but was 0.23 at the middle of logarithmic growth. Partially purified HMH from both sources appeared as broken pieces of cytoplasmic membranes under an electron microscope. The ratio of proteins to phospholipids in HMH was found to 3.26, a value similar to that in cell membrane. The total cell hemolytic activity decreased by 90 or 75% upon addition of chloramphenicol or anti-tetanolysin serum, respectively, into a 6-h-old culture of bacteria. It is suggested that HMH is a complex of tetanolysin with a membrane fragment and releases the conventional tetanolysin during bacterial culture. Images PMID:7040245

  19. Expression and Characterization of Levansucrase from Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Qi, Xianghui; Hart, Darren J; Gao, Herui; An, Yingfeng

    2017-02-01

    The Clostridium acetobutylicum gene Ca-SacB encoding levansucrase was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Ca-SacB is composed of 1287 bp and encodes 428 amino acid residues, which could convert 150 mmol/L sucrose to levan with the liberation of glucose. The optimum pH and temperature of this enzyme for levan formation were pH 6 and 60 °C, respectively. Levansucrase activity of Ca-SacB was completely abolished by 5 mmol/L Ag(+) and Hg(2+). The Km and Vmax values for levansucrase were calculated to be 64 mmol/L and 190 μmol/min/mg, respectively. Interestingly, Ca-SacB was found to have high product specificity, and no fructooligosaccharide was identified in the product, indicating that Ca-SacB may be valuable for industrial production of levan. In addition, Ca-SacB is the first characterized levansucrase isolated from an anaerobic bacterium, which should be valuable for exploring new enzyme resources and deepening the understanding of the catalytic mechanisms of levansucrases.

  20. Redox-switch regulatory mechanism of thiolase from Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Jang, Yu-Sin; Ha, Sung-Chul; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lim, Jae Hong; Cho, Changhee; Ryu, Yong Shin; Lee, Sung Kuk; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2015-09-22

    Thiolase is the first enzyme catalysing the condensation of two acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) molecules to form acetoacetyl-CoA in a dedicated pathway towards the biosynthesis of n-butanol, an important solvent and biofuel. Here we elucidate the crystal structure of Clostridium acetobutylicum thiolase (CaTHL) in its reduced/oxidized states. CaTHL, unlike those from other aerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Zoogloea ramegera, is regulated by the redox-switch modulation through reversible disulfide bond formation between two catalytic cysteine residues, Cys88 and Cys378. When CaTHL is overexpressed in wild-type C. acetobutylicum, butanol production is reduced due to the disturbance of acidogenic to solventogenic shift. The CaTHL(V77Q/N153Y/A286K) mutant, which is not able to form disulfide bonds, exhibits higher activity than wild-type CaTHL, and enhances butanol production upon overexpression. On the basis of these results, we suggest that CaTHL functions as a key enzyme in the regulation of the main metabolism of C. acetobutylicum through a redox-switch regulatory mechanism.

  1. Hierarchy in pentose sugar metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Lewis, Ian A; Park, Junyoung O; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial metabolism of polysaccharides from plant detritus into acids and solvents is an essential component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Understanding the underlying metabolic pathways can also contribute to improved production of biofuels. Using a metabolomics approach involving liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we investigated the metabolism of mixtures of the cellulosic hexose sugar (glucose) and hemicellulosic pentose sugars (xylose and arabinose) in the anaerobic soil bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled xylose or arabinose revealed that,as expected, glucose was preferentially used as the carbon source. Assimilated pentose sugars accumulated in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates with minimal flux into glycolysis. Simultaneous feeding of xylose and arabinose revealed an unexpected hierarchy among the pentose sugars, with arabinose utilized preferentially over xylose. The phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) provides an alternative route of pentose catabolism in C. acetobutylicum that directly converts xylulose-5-phosphate into acetyl-phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, bypassing most of the PPP. When feeding the mixture of pentose sugars, the labeling patterns of lower glycolytic intermediates indicated more flux through the PKP than through the PPP and upper glycolysis, and this was confirmed by quantitative flux modeling. Consistent with direct acetyl-phosphate production from the PKP, growth on the pentose mixture resulted in enhanced acetate excretion. Taken collectively, these findings reveal two hierarchies in clostridial pentose metabolism: xylose is subordinate to arabinose, and the PPP is used less than the PKP.

  2. A New Shuttle Plasmid That Stably Replicates in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kwon, Min-A; Choi, Sunwha; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a new shuttle plasmid, designated as pLK1-MCS that can replicate in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Escherichia coli, by combining the pUB110 and pUC19 plasmids. Plasmid pLK1-MCS replicated more stably than previously reported plasmids containing either the pIM13 or the pAMβ1 replicon in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The transfer frequency of pLK1-MCS into C. acetobutylicum was similar to the transfer frequency of other shuttle plasmids. We complemented C. acetobutylicum ML1 (that does not produce solvents such as acetone, butanol, and ethanol owing to loss of the megaplasmid pSOL1 harboring the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon) by introducing pLK1-MCS carrying the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon into C. acetobutylicum ML1. The transformed cells were able to resume anaerobic solvent production, indicating that the new shuttle plasmid has the potential for practical use in microbial biotechnology.

  3. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Xu, Jiahui; Wang, Yanyan; Chen, Yong; Shen, Xiaoning; Niu, Huanqing; Guo, Ting; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-01-20

    Biofilm-based immobilization of solventogenic Clostridia has been extensively exploited to overcome traditional bottlenecks in biobutanol production like solvent toxicity and low productivities. However, the molecular basis of solventogenic Clostridia biofilm is rarely explored. Here, for the first time, we report DNA array-based study of Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm cells to elucidate the transcriptional modulation. Results showed that 16.2% of the C. acetobutylicum genome genes within the biofilm cells were differentially expressed, with most genes being up-regulated. The most dramatic changes occurred with amino acid biosynthesis, with sulfur uptake and cysteine biosynthesis being the most up-regulated and histidine biosynthesis being the most down-regulated in the biofilm cells. It was demonstrated that C. acetobutylicum biofilm cells increased metabolic activities probably by up-regulating iron and sulfur uptake and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis genes as well as glycolysis genes. Furthermore, genes involved in sporulation, granulose formation, extracellular polymer degradation, pentose catabolisms, and various other processes were also notably regulated, indicating that the biofilm mode of growth rendered the cells a distinct phenotype. This study provides valuable insights into the transcriptional regulation in C. acetobutylicum biofilm cells and should be highly useful for understanding and developing the biofilm-based processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Daniel R.; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J.; Perkins, Timothy T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen. PMID:26085550

  5. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  6. The host immune response to Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common infectious cause of healthcare-acquired diarrhoea. Outcomes of C. difficile colonization are varied, from asymptomatic carriage to fulminant colitis and death, due in part to the interplay between the pathogenic virulence factors of the bacterium and the counteractive immune responses of the host. Secreted toxins A and B are the major virulence factors of C. difficile and induce a profound inflammatory response by intoxicating intestinal epithelial cells causing proinflammatory cytokine release. Host cell necrosis, vascular permeability and neutrophil infiltration lead to an elevated white cell count, profuse diarrhoea and in severe cases, dehydration, hypoalbuminaemia and toxic megacolon. Other bacterial virulence factors, including surface layer proteins and flagella proteins, are detected by host cell surface signal molecules that trigger downstream cell-mediated immune pathways. Human studies have identified a role for serum and faecal immunoglobulin levels in protection from disease, but the recent development of a mouse model of CDI has enabled studies into the precise molecular interactions that trigger the immune response during infection. Key effector molecules have been identified that can drive towards a protective anti-inflammatory response or a damaging proinflammatory response. The limitations of current antimicrobial therapies for CDI have led to the development of both active and passive immunotherapies, none of which have, as yet been formally approved for CDI. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of host immune protection against CDI may provide an exciting opportunity for novel therapeutic developments in the future. PMID:25165542

  7. Clostridium difficile in Crete, Greece: epidemiology, microbiology and clinical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonis, G; Vardakas, K Z; Tansarli, G S; Dimopoulou, D; Papadimitriou, G; Kofteridis, D P; Maraki, S; Karanika, M; Falagas, M E

    2016-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology and microbiology of Clostridium difficile and the characteristics of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) in Crete in three groups of hospitalized patients with diarrhoea: group 1 [positive culture and positive toxin by enzyme immunoassay (EIA)]; group 2 (positive culture, negative toxin); group 3 (negative culture, negative toxin). Patients in group 1 were designated as those with definitive CDI (20 patients for whom data was available) and matched with cases in group 2 (40 patients) and group 3 (40 patients). C. difficile grew from 6% (263/4379) of stool specimens; 14·4% of these had positive EIA, of which 3% were resistant to metronidazole. Three isolates had decreased vancomycin susceptibility. Patients in groups 1 and 2 received more antibiotics (P = 0·03) and had more infectious episodes (P = 0·03) than patients in group 3 prior to diarrhoea. Antibiotic administration for C. difficile did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Mortality was similar in all three groups (10%, 12·5% and 5%, P = 0·49). CDI frequency was low in the University Hospital of Crete and isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  8. Clostridium difficile: A rare cause of pyogenic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger Toprak, Nurver; Balkose, Gulcin; Durak, Deniz; Dulundu, Ender; Demirbaş, Tolga; Yegen, Cumhur; Soyletir, Guner

    2016-12-01

    Extra-intestinal infections due to Clostridium difficile have been reported rarely. Herein we report a case of pyogenic liver abscess from toxigenic C. difficile in an 80-year-old non-hospitalized woman with diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with fever and abdominal pain. There was no history of diarrhea or use of antibiotics. Laboratory parameters revealed signs of inflammation and elevated AST and ALT levels. Abdominal ultrasound and computer tomography showed multiple focal lesions in the bilateral liver lobes and hydropic gallbladder with stones. The patient underwent cholecystectomy and the liver abscesses were drained. Toxigenic C. difficile strains were isolated from the drained pus and also from the stool sample. According to repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) analyses both organisms were the same. The organisms were susceptible to antibiotics. Despite proper antibiotic therapy and surgical drainage, the patient succumbed to her illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heat shock increases conjugation efficiency in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Joseph A; Fagan, Robert P

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection has increased in incidence and severity over the past decade, and poses a unique threat to human health. However, genetic manipulation of C. difficile remains in its infancy and the bacterium remains relatively poorly characterised. Low-efficiency conjugation is currently the only available method for transfer of plasmid DNA into C. difficile. This is practically limiting and has slowed progress in understanding this important pathogen. Conjugation efficiency varies widely between strains, with important clinically relevant strains such as R20291 being particularly refractory to plasmid transfer. Here we present an optimised conjugation method in which the recipient C. difficile is heat treated prior to conjugation. This significantly improves conjugation efficiency in all C. difficile strains tested including R20291. Conjugation efficiency was also affected by the choice of media on which conjugations were performed, with standard BHI media giving most transconjugant recovery. Using our optimised method greatly increased the ease with which the chromosome of R20291 could be precisely manipulated by homologous recombination. Our method improves on current conjugation protocols and will help speed genetic manipulation of strains otherwise difficult to work with. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Clostridium difficile associated reactive arthritis: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Paul; Lalande, Valérie; Eckert, Catherine; Barbut, Fréderic; Fardet, Laurence; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Surgers, Laure

    2016-04-01

    Extra-gastro-intestinal tract manifestations associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including reactive arthritis (ReA), are uncommon. We report a case of ReA associated with a relapse of CDI in a 46-year-old woman. A toxigenic C. difficile strain was isolated from stools and characterized as PCR-ribotype 014/020/077. We conducted a comprehensive literature review of ReA associated with CDI (ReA-CDI). Diagnostic criteria for ReA-CDI were: (i) evidence of aseptic synovitis (confirmed by culture) developing during or immediately after colitis, (ii) presence of a toxigenic C. difficile strain in stool samples, and (iii) absence of other causes of colitis and arthritis. Forty-nine cases of ReA-CDI (excluding the present report) have already been described since 1976. Of these reports, Mean age of patients was 38 years (SD: 18.5), 46% were male, and 68% had HLA B27 genotype. Sixty-nine percent of patients received a β-lactamin treatment before CDI. ReA-CDI occurred a median 10 days (range 0-55 days) after CDI. Outcome was favorable in 90% of patients and oral non anti-inflammatory drugs were required for 55%. ReA-CDI remains uncommon. Compared to the general population, it is more likely observed in younger patients with HLA B27-positive genotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that is the principal etiologic agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Infection with C. difficile (CDI) is characterized by diarrhea in clinical syndromes that vary from self-limited to mild or severe. Since its initial recognition as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis, C. difficile has spread around the world. CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Due to extensive antibiotic usage, the number of CDIs has increased. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with the disease, mainly with regards to antibiotic management. The diagnosis of CDI is primarily based on the clinical signs and symptoms and is only confirmed by laboratory testing. Despite the high burden of CDI and the increasing interest in the disease, episodes of CDI are often misdiagnosed. The reasons for misdiagnosis are the lack of clinical suspicion or the use of inappropriate tests. The proper diagnosis of CDI reduces transmission, prevents inadequate or unnecessary treatments, and assures best antibiotic treatment. We review the options for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI within the settings of the most accepted guidelines for CDI diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of CDI. PMID:28321156

  12. Clostridium difficile presence in Spanish and Belgian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Fernandez, J; Van Broeck, J; Taminiau, B; Avesani, V; Boga, J A; Vazquez, F; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is recognised worldwide as the main cause of infectious bacterial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in hospitals and other healthcare settings. The aim of this study was to first survey C. difficile prevalence during the summer of 2014 at the Central University Hospital of Asturias (Spain). By typing the isolates obtained, it was then possible to compare the ribotype distribution at the Spanish hospital with results from the St Luc University Hospital in Belgium over the same period. The prevalence of positive cases reported in Spain and Belgium was 12.3% and 9.3% respectively. The main PCR-ribotypes previously described in Europe were found in both hospitals, including 078, 014, 012, 020 and 002. In the Spanish hospital, most of the C. difficile-positive samples were referred from oncology, acute care and general medicine services. In the Belgian hospital the majority of positive samples were referred from the paediatric service. However, a high percentage of isolates from this service were non-toxigenic. This study finds that the presence and detection of C. difficile in paediatric and oncology services requires further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rebalancing Redox to Improve Biobutanol Production by Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biobutanol is a sustainable green biofuel that can substitute for gasoline. Carbon flux has been redistributed in Clostridium tyrobutyricum via metabolic cell engineering to produce biobutanol. However, the lack of reducing power hampered the further improvement of butanol production. The objective of this study was to improve butanol production by rebalancing redox. Firstly, a metabolically-engineered mutant CTC-fdh-adhE2 was constructed by introducing heterologous formate dehydrogenase (fdh and bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE2 simultaneously into wild-type C. tyrobutyricum. The mutant evaluation indicated that the fdh-catalyzed NADH-producing pathway improved butanol titer by 2.15-fold in the serum bottle and 2.72-fold in the bioreactor. Secondly, the medium supplements that could shift metabolic flux to improve the production of butyrate or butanol were identified, including vanadate, acetamide, sodium formate, vitamin B12 and methyl viologen hydrate. Finally, the free-cell fermentation produced 12.34 g/L of butanol from glucose using the mutant CTC-fdh-adhE2, which was 3.88-fold higher than that produced by the control mutant CTC-adhE2. This study demonstrated that the redox engineering in C. tyrobutyricum could greatly increase butanol production.

  14. Advances in the Microbiome: Applications to Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culligan, Eamonn P.; Sleator, Roy D.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing over 400,000 infections and approximately 29,000 deaths in the United States alone each year. C. difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the developed world, and, in recent years, the emergence of hyper-virulent (mainly ribotypes 027 and 078, sometimes characterised by increased toxin production), epidemic strains and an increase in the number of community-acquired infections has caused further concern. Antibiotic therapy with metronidazole, vancomycin or fidaxomicin is the primary treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI). However, CDI is unique, in that, antibiotic use is also a major risk factor for acquiring CDI or recurrent CDI due to disruption of the normal gut microbiota. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative, non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat or prevent CDI. Here, we review a number of such potential treatments which have emerged from advances in the field of microbiome research. PMID:27657145

  15. Kinetics of Homoacetic Fermentation of Lactate by Clostridium formicoaceticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S T; Tang, I C; Okos, M R

    1987-04-01

    Clostridium formicoaceticum homofermentatively converted lactate to acetate at mesophilic temperatures (30 to 42 degrees C) and at pHs between 6.6 and 9.6. The production of acetate was found to be growth associated. Approximately 0.96 g of acetic acid and 0.066 g of cells were formed from each gram of lactic acid consumed at 37 degrees C. The concentration of the substrate (lactate) had little or no effect on the growth rate; however, the fermentation was inhibited by acetic acid. The bacterium grew at an optimal pH of 7.6 and an optimal temperature of 37 degrees C. Small amounts of bicarbonate were stimulatory to bacterial growth. Bacterial growth was enhanced, however, by the use of higher concentrations of bicarbonate in the media, only because higher buffer capacities were obtained and proper medium pH could be maintained for growth. Based on its ability to convert lactate to acetate, this homoacetic bacterium may be important in the anaerobic methanogenic process when lactate is a major intermediary metabolite.

  16. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Daniel R; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J; Perkins, Timothy T; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen.

  17. Reprofiled anthelmintics abate hypervirulent stationary-phase Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooyit, Major; Janda, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics disrupts the indigenous gut microbiota, which consequently enables toxigenic Clostridium difficile species to proliferate and cause infection. The burden of C. difficile infections was exacerbated with the outbreak of hypervirulent strains that produce copious amounts of enterotoxins and spores. In recent past, membrane-active agents have generated a surge of interest due to their bactericidal property with a low propensity for resistance. In this study, we capitalized on the antimicrobial property and low oral bioavailability of salicylanilide anthelmintics (closantel, rafoxanide, niclosamide, oxyclozanide) to target the gut pathogen. By broth microdilution techniques, we determined the MIC values of the anthelmintics against 16 C. difficile isolates of defined PCR-ribotype. The anthelmintics broadly inhibited C. difficile growth in vitro via a membrane depolarization mechanism. Interestingly, the salicylanilides were bactericidal against logarithmic- and stationary-phase cultures of the BI/NAP1/027 strain 4118. The salicylanilides were poorly active against select gut commensals (Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species), and were non-hemolytic and non-toxic to mammalian cell lines HepG2 and HEK 293T/17 within the range of their in vitro MICs and MBCs. The salicylanilide anthelmintics exhibit desirable properties for repositioning as anti-C. difficile agents. PMID:27633064

  18. Coexisting cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompetent patients with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Lee, Wen-Ying; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.

  19. Outcomes in patients tested for Clostridium difficile toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polage, Christopher R.; Chin, David L.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Tang, Jevon; Cohen, Stuart H.; Solnick, Jay V.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile testing is shifting from toxin detection to C. difficile detection. Yet, up to 60% of patients with C. difficile by culture test negative for toxins and it is unclear if they are infected or carriers. We reviewed medical records for 7,046 inpatients with a C. difficile toxin test from 2005–2009 to determine the duration of diarrhea and rate of complications and mortality among toxin-positive (toxin+) and toxin− patients. Overall, toxin− patients had less severe diarrhea, fewer diarrhea days and lower mortality (P<0.001, all comparisons) than toxin+ patients. One toxin− patient (n=1/6,121; 0.02%) was diagnosed with pseudomembranous colitis but there were no complications such as megacolon or colectomy for fulminant CDI among toxin− patients. These data suggest that C. difficile-attributable complications are rare among patients testing negative for C. difficile toxins and more studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of C. difficile detection in toxin− patients. PMID:23009731

  20. Substrate utilization by Clostridium estertheticum cultivated in meat juice medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianqin; Balamurugan, Sampathkumar; Gill, Colin O

    2009-01-15

    Blown pack spoilage of vacuum packaged beef, which results in packs being grossly distended with gas, is caused by the psychrophile Clostridium estertheticum. To determine what substrates are utilized by C. estertheticum during growth on beef, C. estertheticum subsp. estertheticum ATCC 51377, the type strain for that organism, and two isolates from blown pack spoiled beef that were identified as C. estertheticum by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing were grown in meat juice medium at 10 degrees C for up to 14 days. Analysis of the growth media showed that all three organisms grew exponentially on glucose with simultaneous hydrolysis of glycogen. Growth ceased when glucose in the media was depleted; but hydrolysis of glycogen continued at a reduced rate, and lactate was consumed rapidly. The pH values of media fell during growth of the organisms, but rose as the concentrations of lactate subsequently decreased. The major products of fermentation during utilization of glucose were butyrate and acetate, with butyrate greatly predominating. During fermentation of lactate the major products were butyrate and butanol, which were produced in similar amounts. The findings suggest that growth of C. estertheticum on vacuum packaged beef may be limited by the availability of glucose, as is the growth of other organisms that usually predominate in the flora of vacuum packaged meat. However, production of gas by fermentation of lactate will likely continue after growth ceases.