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Sample records for clostridial abomasal disease

  1. Etiopathogenesis of abomasal displacement in cattle

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    Šamanc Horea

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abomasal displacement presents topographic gastropathy, where this organ has changed its position, and there is simultaneous dilatation which can vary in intensity. The incidence of this disorder in herds of high-yield dairy cows varies to a great degree (1 to 18 %. Abomasal displacement was established in herds of East-Frisian cows in 1 to 3% animals, and in Holstein cow herds in 5 to 18 % animals. The most frequent abomasal displacement is to the left (88%. There is significant seasonal variation in the incidence of abomasal displacement. About two-thirds of cases of abomasal displacement are diagnosed from October until April. The disorder appears more frequently in cows with repeated lactations. It has been established that it appears after the first calving in 27.8% cases, after the second to fifth calving in 66.7% cases, and after the sixth and seventh calving in 5.5% of the cows. The response of endocrine pancreas B-cells for insulin secretion to hyperglycaemia caused by applying an excess-glucose test is reduced in cows with left abomasal displacement, and there is constant hyperglycaemia in cows with right abomasal displacement. The excess-glucose test indicates a disrupted function of the endocrine pancreas in diseased animals. It has been determined through examinations of Aml genotypes in Holstein cow herds in connection with the appearance of abomasal displacement, that the occurrence of this disorder cannot be attributed to a genetic predisposition.

  2. Experimental induction of abdominal tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration by intraruminal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens type A in neonatal calves.

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    Roeder, B L; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Kennedy, G A

    1988-02-01

    The etiologic role of Clostridum perfringens type A in the acute abdominal syndrome characterized by abomasal and rumen tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration was investigated in neonatal calves. Eight calves, 4 to 12 days old, were inoculated intraruminally with toxigenic C perfringens type A. Before and after C perfringens inoculation, blood samples were collected from all calves for blood gas and serum biochemical analysis and for determination of serum copper concentration; ruminal fluid was obtained for isolation of C perfringens. Calves were monitored daily for clinical signs of the syndrome and, depending on the severity of clinical signs, they were either euthanatized or redosed within 4 to 7 days. After necropsy, specimens obtained from the abomasum and rumen for macroscopic and microscopic examination and for anaerobic bacteriologic culture were processed in routine manner. Intraruminal inoculation of C perfringens type A into healthy calves induced anorexia, depression, bloat, diarrhea, and in some calves, death. Serum copper concentration was within normal range. Necropsy revealed variable degrees of abomasitis, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and ulcers (ranging from pinpoint to nearly perforate) in the abomasum. Seven of those calves also had multiple trichobezoars in the rumen. These necropsy findings were not seen in calves (controls) given distilled H2O only. In affected calves, acute abdominal syndrome was unrelated to copper deficiency, and C perfringens type A given intraruminally was able to induce clinical signs similar to those of the naturally acquired disease.

  3. Metabolomics of Clostridial Biofuel Production

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    Rabinowitz, Joshua D [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Aristilde, Ludmilla [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Amador-Noguez, Daniel [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Members of the genus Clostridium collectively have the ideal set of the metabolic capabilities for fermentative biofuel production: cellulose degradation, hydrogen production, and solvent excretion. No single organism, however, can effectively convert cellulose into biofuels. Here we developed, using metabolomics and isotope tracers, basic science knowledge of Clostridial metabolism of utility for future efforts to engineer such an organism. In glucose fermentation carried out by the biofuel producer Clostridium acetobutylicum, we observed a remarkably ordered series of metabolite concentration changes as the fermentation progressed from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In general, high-energy compounds decreased while low-energy species increased during solventogenesis. These changes in metabolite concentrations were accompanied by large changes in intracellular metabolic fluxes, with pyruvate directed towards acetyl-CoA and solvents instead of oxaloacetate and amino acids. Thus, the solventogenic transition involves global remodeling of metabolism to redirect resources from biomass production into solvent production. In contrast to C. acetobutylicum, which is an avid fermenter, C. cellulolyticum metabolizes glucose only slowly. We find that glycolytic intermediate concentrations are radically different from fast fermenting organisms. Associated thermodynamic and isotope tracer analysis revealed that the full glycolytic pathway in C. cellulolyticum is reversible. This arises from changes in cofactor utilization for phosphofructokinase and an alternative pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. The net effect is to increase the high-energy phosphate bond yield of glycolysis by 150% (from 2 to 5) at the expense of lower net flux. Thus, C. cellulolyticum prioritizes glycolytic energy efficiency over speed. Degradation of cellulose results in other sugars in addition to glucose. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled pentose sugars

  4. Clostridial Strain-Specific Characteristics Associated with Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

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    Schönherr-Hellec, Sophia; Klein, Geraldine L; Delannoy, Johanne; Ferraris, Laurent; Rozé, Jean Christophe; Butel, Marie José; Aires, Julio

    2018-04-01

    We aimed at identifying potential bacterial factors linking clostridia with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We compared the phenotypic traits, stress responses, cellular cytotoxicity, and inflammatory capabilities of the largest collection of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium neonatale strains isolated from fecal samples of NEC preterm neonates (PN) and control PNs. When strain characteristics were used as explanatory variables, a statistical discriminant analysis allowed the separation of NEC and control strains into separate groups. Strains isolated from NEC PN were characterized by a higher viability at 30°C ( P = 0.03) and higher aerotolerance ( P = 0.01), suggesting that NEC strains may have a competitive and/or survival advantage in the environmental gastrointestinal tract conditions of NEC PN. Heat-treated NEC bacteria induced higher production of interleukin-8 in Caco-2 cells ( P = 0.03), suggesting proinflammatory activity. In vitro , bacteria, bacterial components, and fecal filtrates showed variable cytotoxic effects affecting the cellular network and/or cell viability, without specific association with NEC or control samples. Altogether, our data support the existence of a specific clostridial strain signature associated with NEC. IMPORTANCE Clostridia are part of the commensal microbiota in preterm neonates (PN). However, microbiota analyses by culture and metagenomics have linked necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and intestinal colonization with clostridial species. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific characteristics that may be shared by clostridia associated with NEC compared to commensal clostridia. Therefore, our goal was to identify specific bacterial factors linking clostridial strains with NEC. We report the existence of a specific bacterial signature associated with NEC and propose that activation of the innate immune response may be a unifying causative mechanism for the development of NEC independent of a specific pathogenic

  5. Clostridial Binary Toxins: Iota and C2 Family Portraits

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    Stiles, Bradley G.; Wigelsworth, Darran J.; Popoff, Michel R.; Barth, Holger

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathogenic Clostridium species with diverse virulence factors that include protein toxins. Some of these bacteria, such as C. botulinum, C. difficile, C. perfringens, and C. spiroforme, cause enteric problems in animals as well as humans. These often fatal diseases can partly be attributed to binary protein toxins that follow a classic AB paradigm. Within a targeted cell, all clostridial binary toxins destroy filamentous actin via mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin by the A component. However, much less is known about B component binding to cell-surface receptors. These toxins share sequence homology amongst themselves and with those produced by another Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium also commonly associated with soil and disease: Bacillus anthracis. This review focuses upon the iota and C2 families of clostridial binary toxins and includes: (1) basics of the bacterial source; (2) toxin biochemistry; (3) sophisticated cellular uptake machinery; and (4) host–cell responses following toxin-mediated disruption of the cytoskeleton. In summary, these protein toxins aid diverse enteric species within the genus Clostridium. PMID:22919577

  6. Serum amyloid A and haptoglobin concentrations and liver fat percentage in lactating dairy cows with abomasal displacement.

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    Guzelbektes, H; Sen, I; Ok, M; Constable, P D; Boydak, M; Coskun, A

    2010-01-01

    There has been increased interest in measuring the serum concentration of acute phase reactants such as serum amyloid A [SAA] and haptoglobin [haptoglobin] in periparturient cattle in order to provide a method for detecting the presence of inflammation or bacterial infection. To determine whether [SAA] and [haptoglobin] are increased in cows with displaced abomasum as compared with healthy dairy cows. Fifty-four adult dairy cows in early lactation that had left displaced abomasum (LDA, n = 34), right displaced abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV, n = 11), or were healthy on physical examination (control, n = 9). Inflammatory diseases or bacterial infections such as mastitis, metritis, or pneumonia were not clinically apparent in any animal. Jugular venous blood was obtained from all cows and analyzed. Liver samples were obtained by biopsy in cattle with abomasal displacement. [SAA] and [haptoglobin] concentrations were increased in cows with LDA or RDA/AV as compared with healthy controls. Cows with displaced abomasum had mild to moderate hepatic lipidosis, based on liver fat percentages of 9.3 +/- 5.3% (mean +/- SD, LDA) and 10.8 +/- 7.7% (RDA/AV). [SAA] and [haptoglobin] were most strongly associated with liver fat percentage, r(s) = +0.55 (P hepatic lipidosis in cattle with abomasal displacement.

  7. Management of a femoral fracture complicated by clostridial myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, M.J.; Eger, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    A clinical case of clostridial myositis secondary to a comminuted femoral fracture is described. This case is unusual because, despite the severe degree of obvious muscle necrosis and gas production, the dog had minimal signs of systemic toxicity. Union of the fracture was achieved but six months postoperatively muscular contracture had resulted in permanent stifle extension

  8. CD44 Promotes intoxication by the clostridial iota-family toxins.

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    Wigelsworth, Darran J; Ruthel, Gordon; Schnell, Leonie; Herrlich, Peter; Blonder, Josip; Veenstra, Timothy D; Carman, Robert J; Wilkins, Tracy D; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Pauillac, Serge; Gibert, Maryse; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Stiles, Bradley G; Popoff, Michel R; Barth, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Various pathogenic clostridia produce binary protein toxins associated with enteric diseases of humans and animals. Separate binding/translocation (B) components bind to a protein receptor on the cell surface, assemble with enzymatic (A) component(s), and mediate endocytosis of the toxin complex. Ultimately there is translocation of A component(s) from acidified endosomes into the cytosol, leading to destruction of the actin cytoskeleton. Our results revealed that CD44, a multifunctional surface protein of mammalian cells, facilitates intoxication by the iota family of clostridial binary toxins. Specific antibody against CD44 inhibited cytotoxicity of the prototypical Clostridium perfringens iota toxin. Versus CD44(+) melanoma cells, those lacking CD44 bound less toxin and were dose-dependently resistant to C. perfringens iota, as well as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium spiroforme iota-like, toxins. Purified CD44 specifically interacted in vitro with iota and iota-like, but not related Clostridium botulinum C2, toxins. Furthermore, CD44 knockout mice were resistant to iota toxin lethality. Collective data reveal an important role for CD44 during intoxication by a family of clostridial binary toxins.

  9. Epinephrine auto-injection radically increases risk for clostridial infection and necrotizing fasciitis

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    Kenneth Larson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridial perfringens is a bacteria commonly found on skin flora. Due to the optimal growth environment intramuscular epinephrine injections predispose patients to the rapid development of clostridial myonecrosis. There have been only four cases, including this one, reported in the last 60 years of pediatric Clostridium perfringens infections post-epinephrine injection. We detail the successful management of a 16 year old, immunocompetent female who developed gas gangrene and necrotizing fasciitis on her thigh secondary to clostridial infection after utilization of an Epinephrine Auto-Injector and review the pediatric literature of patients with Clostridial perfringens secondary to epinephrine injection. We define common clinical signs and symptoms of clostridial infection from the review of the literature. The relevance of our findings is to raise awareness among emergency physicians when patients present following an injection in order to reduce diagnostic delay that could result in amputation or death.

  10. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines co-infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis

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    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with co-infection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic ente...

  11. Serum concentrations of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis with abomasal ulcer

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    Javad Tajik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the serum concentrations of haptoglobin (Hp and serum amyloid A (SAA in water buffaloes with abomasal ulcers, the abomasums of 100 randomly selected water buffaloes were examined after slaughter. Type I abomasal ulcers were found in 56 out of 100 buffaloes. Serum concentrations of Hp and SAA were measured. There was no significant difference between affected and non-affected buffaloes in the serum concentrations of Hp and SAA. The serum concentrations of Hp and SAA had no significant correlation with age and the serum SAA revealed no significant correlation with the number of abomasal ulcers. A significant correlation was found between the serum Hp and the number of abomasal ulcers (r =0.29, p = 0.04. There was no significant difference in the serum concentrations of Hp and SAA between buffaloes with different ulcer locations in the abomasums. Although more work on a larger number of animals is required in this area, it seems that the measurement of the serum Hp can be used to predict the abundance of type I abomasal ulcers.

  12. Effect of abomasal glucose infusion on plasma concentrations of gut peptides in periparturient dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Relling, A E; Reynolds, C K

    2010-01-01

    Six Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic plasma concentrations of gut peptides. The experimental design was a randomi...

  13. Effect of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic amino acid metabolism in periparturient dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2009-01-01

    Six Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic AA metabolism. The experimental design was a split plot, with cow as the whole...

  14. Clostridial necrotic enteritis in chicken associated with growth rate depression

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    Adin Priadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen causing necrotic enteritis. C. perfringens only causes necrotic enteritis when it transforms from non-toxin producing type to toxin producing type. The alpha toxin, (phospholipase C is believed to be a key to the occurrence of Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE. The best known predisposing factor is mucosal damage, caused by coccidiosis that damages the intestinal lining, making the gut susceptible to infections including C. perfringens. The purpose of this study was to observe the chicken performance in experimental CNE and field cases of CNE. Diagnosis of CNE were made by latex agglutination test, isolation and identification of the agent. Pathological and histopathological changes were also observed. Experimentally, NE could be reproduced when Eimeria sp and C. perfringens spores are inoculated in chicken. Signs of an NE are wet litter and diarrhea, and an increase in mortality is not often obvious. The depression of growth rate and feed efficiency of chicken become noticeable by week 5 because of damage to the intestine and the subsequent reduction in digestion and absorption of food. Subclinical form of CNE was also frequently found in the field, leading to significant decreases in performance. Chicken gut samples examinations revealed that subclinical form of CNE causes damage to the intestinal mucosa caused by C. perfringens leads to decreased digestion and absorption, increased feed conversion ratio and reduced weight gain. Dual infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria sp. was frequently found in field. The results of these studies provide evidence for C. perfringens as a causative bacteria for growth depression.

  15. Effect of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic and whole-body glucose metabolism in periparturient dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2009-01-01

    Six periparturient Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic and whole-body glucose metabolism.......Six periparturient Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic and whole-body glucose metabolism....

  16. Pathomorphological characteristics of abomasal ulcers in high-yielding dairy cows

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    Kureljušić Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the morphology, localization and typization of abomasal ulcers in high-yielding dairy cows, as a contribution to the existing knowledge on the subject. A total of ten high-yielding dairy cows which died during the period of early puerperium and two Holstein heifers which died in late pregnancy after transport to a new location were investigated in this study. Samples of altered abomasal tissue were taken at necropsy for further histopathology and mycology investigations. The disclosed ulcerations of the abomasums in twelve investigated animals differed among them not only as far as localization and morphology are concerned, but also in the degree of intramural penetration. Such differences distinguished them into four types. Ulcerations of type one and type two, recorded in two heifers and six cows, as well as in one cow with lymphoma of the abomasum. Perforating ulcer of type three, with circumscripted peritonitis was diagnosed in one cow in the corpus of the abomasum close to the curvatura major. An interesting finding was the simultaneous occurrence of type four perforating ulcer and ulcer-type one, which were located next to each other. Histopathological examination of the structure of the ulcerated abomasum dyed with the hematoxylin-eosin method showed that coagulation necrosis in the area of the ulceration revealed a moderate inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria. In the cow affected with lymphoma, a copious tumorous lymphoid infiltrate was concurrent. Mycotic ulcerative abomasitis was described in a cow seven days after calving. In these lesions Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor spp. were isolated. Histopathological analysis of tissue samples dyed with the Grocott method, described septed and nonsepted hyphae in the blood vessels and surrounding tissue of the tunica mucosa and submucosa.

  17. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

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    2011-01-01

    The response of the abomasal transcriptome to gastrointestinal parasites was evaluated in parasite-susceptible and parasite-resistant Angus cattle using RNA-seq at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample. These cattle displayed distinctly separate resistance phenotypes as assessed by fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23 632 bovine genes were expressed in the fundic abomasum. Of these, 13 758 genes were expressed in all samples tested and likely represent core components of the bovine abomasal transcriptome. The gene (BT14427) with the most abundant transcript, accounting for 10.4% of sequences in the transcriptome, is located on chromosome 29 and has unknown functions. Additionally, PIGR (1.6%), Complement C3 (0.7%), and Immunoglobulin J chain (0.5%) were among the most abundant transcripts in the transcriptome. Among the 203 genes impacted, 64 were significantly over-expressed in resistant animals at a stringent cutoff (FDR parasite resistance in cattle. Our results provide insights into the development of host immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infection and will facilitate understanding of mechanism underlying host resistance. PMID:22129081

  18. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

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    Li Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The response of the abomasal transcriptome to gastrointestinal parasites was evaluated in parasite-susceptible and parasite-resistant Angus cattle using RNA-seq at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample. These cattle displayed distinctly separate resistance phenotypes as assessed by fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23 632 bovine genes were expressed in the fundic abomasum. Of these, 13 758 genes were expressed in all samples tested and likely represent core components of the bovine abomasal transcriptome. The gene (BT14427 with the most abundant transcript, accounting for 10.4% of sequences in the transcriptome, is located on chromosome 29 and has unknown functions. Additionally, PIGR (1.6%, Complement C3 (0.7%, and Immunoglobulin J chain (0.5% were among the most abundant transcripts in the transcriptome. Among the 203 genes impacted, 64 were significantly over-expressed in resistant animals at a stringent cutoff (FDR

  19. Effects of early rumen development and solid feed composition on growth performance and abomasal health in veal calves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, H.; Reenen, van C.G.; Stockhofe, N.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    The experiment was designed to study the importance of early rumen development and of the composition of solid feed intake on growth performance and abomasal health in milk-fed veal calves. One hundred and six Holstein-Friesian male calves were included in the experiment, and studied during 2

  20. Abomasal protein infusion in postpartum transition dairy cows: Effect on performance and mammary metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Lapierre, H; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2014-01-01

    The effect of increasing the postpartum metabolizable protein (MP) supply on performance and mammary metabolism was studied using 8 Holstein cows in a complete randomized design. At parturition, cows were assigned to abomasal infusion of water (CTRL) or casein (CAS). Arterial and epigastric venous....../d for CTRL, but did not differ at 29 DIM (1,383 ± 48 g/d). The ratio of MP total supply to requirement was numerically greater at 4 DIM for CAS compared with CTRL, indicating less postpartum protein deficiency. In contrast, a greater net energy deficiency tended to be induced with CAS, but the greater milk...... of glucose, lactate, and β-hydroxybutyrate, whereas uptakes of volatile fatty acids were unaffected. Despite similar MP supply by 29 DIM, milk and lactose yields were greater with CAS indicating a persistent response to increased postpartum MP supply. In conclusion, the postpartum MP deficiency can have...

  1. Novel thermostable clostridial strains through protoplast fusion for enhanced biobutanol production at higher temperature—preliminary study

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    Muhammad Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to improve the thermal stability of clostridium strains for enhanced biobutanol production. Thermostable clostridia species were developed through protoplast fusion between mesophilic clostridial species (i.e., Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium acetobutylicum and thermophilic clostridial species (i.e., Clostridium thermocellum. Production of biobutanol was examined in the present preliminary study using the clostridium strains and their protoplast fusants using sugar mixture with composition identical to that of wheat straw acid hydrolysate. Maximum biobutanol production of 9.4 g/L was achieved by a fused strain at 45 °C with total sugar consumption of 66% compared to that at 35 °C (i.e., 8.4 g/L production and 64% total sugar consumption. Glucose and xylose uptake rates were generally higher compared to all other individual sugars in the feedstock. In general, average cell concentrations were in close proximity for all parenting and fused strains at 35 °C; i.e., in the range of 5.12 × 107 to 5.49 × 107 cells/mL. Average cell concentration of fusants between the mesophilic clostridial species and the thermophilic clostridial species slightly increased to ~ 5.62 × 107 cells/mL at a higher temperature of 45 °C. These results, in addition to the ones obtained for the butanol production, demonstrate enhanced thermal stability of both fusants at a higher temperature (45 °C.

  2. Small volume resuscitation with hypertonic sodium chloride solution in cattle undergoing surgical correction of abomasal volvulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickinger, M.; Doll, K.; Roloff, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    .5±2.1 vs. 10.3±3.3cm H2O, respectively). Within the first 60min, the base excess decreased from 5.5±6.9 to 4.7±6.2mmol/L in the hypertonic group whereas it increased from 5.6±5.7 to 6.8±5.4mmol/L in the isotonic group. These results suggest that for cows with abomasal volvulus, IV therapy with hypertonic...... had a significantly greater reduction in volume deficit within the first 10min of therapy than cows treated with isotonic saline (from 5.9±4.8 to 2.1±4.4L/100kg vs. 7.0±4.5 to 4.9±3.8L/100kg, respectively). The central venous pressure (CVP) of the cows given the hypertonic saline rose within the first...... 10 min of therapy from 7.3±3.5 to 10.8±3.4cm H2O, while the CVP of the cattle treated with isotonic saline did not increase significantly during this time.Sixty minutes after the start of the infusion, the CVP of the isotonic group was still significantly lower than that of the hypertonic group (9...

  3. Effects of early rumen development and solid feed composition on growth performance and abomasal health in veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, H; van Reenen, C G; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Gerrits, W J J

    2012-06-01

    The experiment was designed to study the importance of early rumen development and of the composition of solid feed intake on growth performance and abomasal health in milk-fed veal calves. One hundred and six Holstein-Friesian male calves were included in the experiment, and studied during 2 successive 12-wk periods (period 1 and period 2). In a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, effects of partially replacing milk replacer by solid feed during period 1 and partially replacing dry matter (DM) intake from maize silage and barley straw by concentrate during period 2 were tested. Solid feed during period 1 consisted of maize silage, barley straw, and concentrate (25:25:50 on a DM basis). Solid feed during period 2 consisted of maize silage and barley straw (50:50 ratio on DM basis) for the nonconcentrate groups, and maize silage, barley straw and concentrates (25:25:50 on a DM basis) for the concentrate groups. At the end of period 1 (n=16) and at the end of period 2 (n=90), parameters of animal performance, rumen development, rumen fermentation, ruminal drinking, and abomasal damage were examined. Partially replacing milk replacer by solid feed during period 1 resulted in early rumen development (ERD) at the end of period 1, characterized by increased rumen weight, and an increased epithelial and absorptive surface area. Both ERD and partially replacing roughage by concentrates in period 2 increased the rumen development score at the end of period 2. Although ERD calves consumed more solid feed and less milk replacer during period 1 and 2 than non-ERD calves, carcass weight gains at 25 wk were identical, and utilization of the solid feed provided appeared similar to that of milk replacer. Partially replacing roughage by concentrates in period 2 increased dressing percentage and warm carcass weight. Plaque formation at the rumen mucosa was unaffected by ERD or partially replacing roughage by concentrates and generally low in all calves. The prevalence of large scars in

  4. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galindo, C; Larsen, Mogens; Ouellet, D R

    2015-01-01

    -OH-butyrate (BHBA) in postpartum dairy cows according to a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures in time. At calving, cows were blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and were allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (n=4) or abomasal infusion of free...... AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to the same basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half the maximal dose at 1 d in milk (DIM) and then steadily decreased from 791 to 226 g/d from DIM 2 to 29 to cover the estimated essential AA deficit. On DIM 5, 15, and 29, D[6,6-(2)H2]-glucose...... (23.7 mmol/h) was infused into a jugular vein for 5h, and 6 blood samples were taken from arterial, portal, hepatic, and mammary sources at 45-min intervals, starting 1h after the initiation of the D[6,6-(2)H2]glucose infusion. Trans-organ fluxes were calculated as veno-arterial differences times...

  5. Effect of grape seed extract, Cistus ladanifer L., and vegetable oil supplementation on fatty acid composition of abomasal digesta and intramuscular fat of lambs.

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    Jerónimo, Eliana; Alves, Susana P; Dentinho, Maria T P; Martins, Susana V; Prates, José A M; Vasta, Valentina; Santos-Silva, José; Bessa, Rui J B

    2010-10-13

    Thirty-six lambs were used in a 6 week experiment to evaluate the effect of vegetable oil blend supplementation (0 vs 60 g/kg of dry matter (DM)) and two dietary condensed tannin sources, grape seed extract (0 vs 25 g/kg of DM) and Cistus ladanifer L. (0 vs 250 g/kg of DM), on fatty acid (FA) composition of abomasal digesta and intramuscular polar and neutral lipids. Grape seed extract did not affect the FA profile of abomasal digesta or muscle lipid fractions. C. ladanifer had a minor effect in lambs fed diets with no oil but greatly changed the abomasal and muscle FA profiles in oil-supplemented lambs. It decreased 18:0 and increased 18:1 trans-11 in abomasal digesta and increased 18:1 trans-11 and 18:2 cis-9,trans-11 (P = 0.062) in muscle neutral lipids, resulting in an important enrichment of meat 18:2 cis-9,trans-11 when compared to other oil-supplemented diets (19.2 vs 41.7 mg/100 g of muscle).

  6. Mechanism of action of clostridial glycine reductase: Isolation and characterization of a covalent acetyl enzyme intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkowitz, R.A.; Abeles, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Clostridial glycine reductase consists of proteins A, B, and C and catalyzes the reaction glycine + P i + 2e - → acetyl phosphate + NH 4 + . Evidence was previously obtained that is consistent with the involvement of an acyl enzyme intermediate in this reaction. The authors now demonstrate that protein C catalyzes exchange of [ 32 P]P i into acetyl phosphate, providing additional support for an acetyl enzyme intermediate on protein C. Furthermore, they have isolated acetyl protein C and shown that it is qualitatively, catalytically competent. Acetyl protein C can be obtained through the forward reaction from protein C and Se-(carboxymethyl)selenocysteine-protein A, which is generated by the reaction of glycine with proteins A and B. Acetyl protein C can also be generated through the reverse reaction by the addition of acetyl phosphate to protein C. Both procedures lead to the same acetyl enzyme. The acetyl enzyme reacts with P i to give acetyl phosphate. When [ 14 C]acetyl protein C is denaturated with TCA and redissolved with urea, radioactivity remained associated with the protein. Treatment with KBH 4 removes all the radioactivity associated with protein C, resulting in the formation of [ 14 C]ethanol. They conclude that a thiol group on protein C is acetylated. Proteins A and C together catalyze the exchange of tritium atoms from [ 3 H]H 2 O into acetyl phosphate. This exchange reaction supports the proposal that an enol of the acetyl enzyme is an intermediate in the reaction sequence

  7. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-07-22

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo.

  8. Diversity of gastrointestinal helminths in Dall's sheep and the negative association of the abomasal nematode, Marshallagia marshalli, with fitness indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleuy, O Alejadro; Ruckstuhl, Kathreen; Hoberg, Eric P; Veitch, Alasdair; Simmons, Norman; Kutz, Susan J

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal helminths can have a detrimental effect on the fitness of wild ungulates. Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems are ideal for the study of host-parasite interactions due to the comparatively simple ecological interactions and limited confounding factors. We used a unique dataset assembled in the early seventies to study the diversity of gastrointestinal helminths and their effect on fitness indicators of Dall's sheep, Ovis dalli dalli, in the Mackenzie Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. Parasite diversity included nine species, among which the abomasal nematode Marshallagia marshalli occurred with the highest prevalence and infection intensity. The intensity of M. marshalli increased with age and was negatively associated with body condition and pregnancy status in Dall's sheep across all the analyses performed. The intensity of the intestinal whipworm, Trichuris schumakovitschi, decreased with age. No other parasites were significantly associated with age, body condition, or pregnancy. Our study suggests that M. marshalli might negatively influence fitness of adult female Dall's sheep.

  9. Metabolic profiles in five high-producing Swedish dairy herds with a history of abomasal displacement and ketosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stengärde Lena

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body condition score and blood profiles have been used to monitor management and herd health in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to examine BCS and extended metabolic profiles, reflecting both energy metabolism and liver status around calving in high-producing herds with a high incidence of abomasal displacement and ketosis and to evaluate if such profiles can be used at herd level to pinpoint specific herd problems. Methods Body condition score and metabolic profiles around calving in five high-producing herds with high incidences of abomasal displacement and ketosis were assessed using linear mixed models (94 cows, 326 examinations. Cows were examined and blood sampled every three weeks from four weeks ante partum (ap to nine weeks postpartum (pp. Blood parameters studied were glucose, fructosamine, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, insulin, β-hydroxybutyrate, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin and cholesterol. Results All herds had overconditioned dry cows that lost body condition substantially the first 4–6 weeks pp. Two herds had elevated levels of NEFA ap and three herds had elevated levels pp. One herd had low levels of insulin ap and low levels of cholesterol pp. Haptoglobin was detected pp in all herds and its usefulness is discussed. Conclusion NEFA was the parameter that most closely reflected the body condition losses while these losses were not seen in glucose and fructosamine levels. Insulin and cholesterol were potentially useful in herd profiles but need further investigation. Increased glutamate dehydrogenase suggested liver cell damage in all herds.

  10. Metabolic profiles in five high-producing Swedish dairy herds with a history of abomasal displacement and ketosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengärde, Lena; Tråvén, Madeleine; Emanuelson, Ulf; Holtenius, Kjell; Hultgren, Jan; Niskanen, Rauni

    2008-01-01

    Background Body condition score and blood profiles have been used to monitor management and herd health in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to examine BCS and extended metabolic profiles, reflecting both energy metabolism and liver status around calving in high-producing herds with a high incidence of abomasal displacement and ketosis and to evaluate if such profiles can be used at herd level to pinpoint specific herd problems. Methods Body condition score and metabolic profiles around calving in five high-producing herds with high incidences of abomasal displacement and ketosis were assessed using linear mixed models (94 cows, 326 examinations). Cows were examined and blood sampled every three weeks from four weeks ante partum (ap) to nine weeks postpartum (pp). Blood parameters studied were glucose, fructosamine, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), insulin, β-hydroxybutyrate, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin and cholesterol. Results All herds had overconditioned dry cows that lost body condition substantially the first 4–6 weeks pp. Two herds had elevated levels of NEFA ap and three herds had elevated levels pp. One herd had low levels of insulin ap and low levels of cholesterol pp. Haptoglobin was detected pp in all herds and its usefulness is discussed. Conclusion NEFA was the parameter that most closely reflected the body condition losses while these losses were not seen in glucose and fructosamine levels. Insulin and cholesterol were potentially useful in herd profiles but need further investigation. Increased glutamate dehydrogenase suggested liver cell damage in all herds. PMID:18687108

  11. Clostridial collagenase ointment and medicinal honey utilization for pressure ulcers in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Jill; Delhougne, Gary; James, Roberta; Gayle, Julie; Waycaster, Curtis

    2018-04-01

    To describe the utilization of clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) and medicinal honey debridement methods in real-world inpatient and outpatient hospital settings among pressure ulcer (PU) patients and compare the frequency of healthcare re-encounters between CCO- and medicinal honey-treated patients. De-identified hospital discharge records for patients receiving CCO or medicinal honey methods of debridement and having an ICD-9 code for PU were extracted from the US Premier Healthcare Database. Multivariable analysis was used to compare the frequency of inpatient and outpatient revisits up to 6 months after an index encounter for CCO- vs medicinal honey-treated PUs. The study identified 48,267 inpatients and 2,599 outpatients with PUs treated with CCO or medicinal honeys. Among study inpatients, n = 44,725 (93%) were treated with CCO, and n = 3,542 (7%) with medicinal honeys. CCO and medicinal honeys accounted for 1,826 (70%) and 773 (30%), respectively, of study outpatients. In adjusted models, those treated with CCO had lower odds for inpatient readmissions (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.80-0.94) after inpatient index visits, and outpatient re-encounters both after inpatient (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.67-0.79) and outpatient (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64-0.95) index visits in 6 months of follow-up. The study was observational in nature, and did not adjust for reasons why patients were hospitalized initially, or why they returned to the facility. Although the study adjusted for differences in a variety of demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics between the treatments, we are not able to rule out selection bias. Patients with CCO-treated PUs returned to inpatient and outpatient hospital settings less often compared with medicinal honey-treated PUs. These results from real-world administrative data help to gain a better understanding of the clinical characteristics of patients with PUs treated with these two debridement methods and

  12. Analysis of the mucosal immune responses induced by single and trickle infections with the bovine abomasal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihi, B; van Meulder, F; Vancoppernolle, S; Rinaldi, M; Chiers, K; van den Broeck, W; Goddeeris, B M; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E; Geldhof, P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide more information on the kinetics of the immunological changes occurring in the abomasal mucosa after single and trickle infections with the bovine parasite Ostertagia ostertagi. The time course analysis of gene expression revealed that the major changes coincided with the emergence of adult worms from the gastric glands. These changes consisted of a simultaneous upregulation of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines. In addition, a single O. ostertagi infection elicited an upregulation of the epithelial-derived cytokine IL33, while TSLP expression levels were not impacted. Apart from the massive increase in inflammatory cytokines IL6, IL17 and IL21, O. ostertagi infection also elicited an upregulation of the immunosuppressors TGFB, IL10 and ARG1, as well as NK and γδ-T cell markers. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factors granulysin, perforin and granzyme B were upregulated following an O. ostertagi infection. Analysis of cytokine transcript levels in animals receiving trickle infections for 60 days showed a similar trend as observed following a single infection except for IL33, IL6, GATA-3, TBX21 and NCR1, which were no longer upregulated after trickle infections. Finally, the long trickle infections were associated with mucosal eosinophilia and mastocytosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Capturing one of the human gut microbiome’s most wanted: reconstructing the genome of a novel butyrate-producing, clostridial scavenger from metagenomic sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio eJeraldo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the microbiome in health and disease is attracting great attention, yet we still know little about some of the most prevalent microorganisms inside our bodies. Several years ago, Human Microbiome Project (HMP researchers generated a list of most wanted taxa: bacteria both prevalent among healthy volunteers and distantly related to any sequenced organisms. Unfortunately, the challenge of assembling high-quality genomes from a tangle of metagenomic reads has slowed progress in learning about these uncultured bacteria. Here, we describe how recent advances in sequencing and analysis allowed us to assemble most wanted genomes from metagenomic data collected from four stool samples. Using a combination of both de novo and guided assembly methods, we assembled and binned over 100 genomes from an initial data set of over 1,300 Gbp. One of these genome bins, which met HMP’s criteria for a most wanted taxa, contained three essentially complete genomes belonging to a previously uncultivated species. This species is most closely related to Eubacterium desmolans and the clostridial cluster IV/Clostridium leptum subgroup species Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum (71–76% average nucleotide identity. Gene function analysis indicates that the species is an obligate anaerobe, forms spores, and produces the anti-inflammatory short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate. It also appears to take up metabolically costly molecules such as cobalamin, methionine, and branch-chained amino acids from the environment, and to lack virulence genes. Thus, the evidence is consistent with a secondary degrader that occupies a host-dependent, nutrient-scavenging niche within the gut; its ability to produce butyrate, which is thought to play an anti-inflammatory role, makes it intriguing for the study of diseases such as colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion, we have assembled essentially complete genomes from stool metagenomic data, yielding

  14. Effect of abomasal infusion of oligofructose on portal-drained visceral ammonia and urea-nitrogen fluxes in lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røjen, B A; Larsen, M; Kristensen, N B

    2012-12-01

    The effects of abomasal infusion of oligofructose in lactating dairy cows on the relationship between hindgut fermentation and N metabolism, and its effects on NH(3) absorption and transfer of blood urea-N across the portal-drained viscera versus ruminal epithelia were investigated. Nine lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in major splanchnic blood vessels were used in an unbalanced crossover design with 14-d periods. Treatments were continuous abomasal infusion of water or 1,500 g/d of oligofructose. The same basal diet was fed with both treatments. Eight sample sets of arterial, portal, hepatic, and ruminal vein blood, ruminal fluid, and urine were obtained at 0.5h before the morning feeding and at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, and 6.5 h after feeding. It was hypothesized that an increased supply of fermentable substrate to the hindgut would increase the uptake of urea-N from blood to the hindgut at the expense of urea-N uptake to the forestomach. The study showed that abomasal oligofructose infusion decreased the total amount of urea-N transferred from the blood to the gut, NH(3) absorption, and arterial blood urea-N concentration. Subsequently, hepatic NH(3) uptake and urea-N production also decreased with oligofructose infusion. Additionally, urea-N concentration in milk and urinary N excretion decreased with oligofructose treatment. The oligofructose infusion did not affect ruminal NH(3) concentrations or any other ruminal variables, nor did it affect ruminal venous - arterial concentration differences for urea-N and NH(3). The oligofructose treatment did not affect milk yield, but did decrease apparent digestibility of OM, N, and starch. Nitrogen excreted in the feces was greater with the oligofructose infusion. In conclusion, the present data suggest that increased hindgut fermentation did not upregulate urea-N transfer to the hindgut at the expense of urea-N uptake by the rumen, and the observed reduction

  15. Effects of dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate on peripheral insulin action in dairy cows 5 days after surgical correction of abomasal displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenda, M; Kaske, M; Piechotta, M; Locher, L; Starke, A; Huber, K; Rehage, J

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone frequently is used for treatment of ketosis in dairy cows, but its effects are not fully understood. Dexamethasone treatment affects whole body insulin sensitivity. Twelve German Holstein cows, 2-4 weeks postpartum, 5 days after omentopexy to correct left abomasal displacement. Randomized, blinded, case-control study. Treatment with dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate (DG; 40 μg/kg IM; n = 6) or saline (control group [CG], 15 mL IM, n = 6) on day 0 (d0). Blood samples were obtained before (d0) and after treatment (d1 and d2), and analyzed for glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. Hepatic triglycerides (TAG) were measured in liver samples taken on d0 and d2. Five consecutive hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (HEC-I-V; insulin dosages: 0.1, 0.5, 2, 5, 10 mU/kg/min, respectively) were performed on d1 and steady state glucose infusion rate (SSGIR), insulin concentration (SSIC), insulin sensitivity index (ISI = SSGIR/SSIC), and plasma NEFA concentration (SSNEFA) were assessed. Compared with CG-cows, DG-cows on d1 had higher plasma glucose (P = .004) and insulin (P insulin-stimulated decrease in SSNEFA (HEC-II, P = .006; HEC-III, P = .01; HEC-IV, P = .003; HEC-V, P = .011). Decrease in hepatic TAG content in DG-cows was higher compared with CG-cows (P insulin sensitivity and affects glucose and lipid metabolism in early lactating dairy cows. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Effect of abomasal infusion of oligofructose on portal-drained visceral ammonia and urea-nitrogen fluxes in lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Larsen, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2012-01-01

    by reduced NH3 input to hepatic urea-N synthesis caused by increased sequestration of NH3 in the hindgut and excretion in feces. Increasing the hindgut fermentation in lactating dairy cows by abomasal infusion of 1,500 g/d of oligofructose shifted some N excretion from the urine to feces and possibly reduced......The effects of abomasal infusion of oligofructose in lactating dairy cows on the relationship between hindgut fermentation and N metabolism, and its effects on NH3 absorption and transfer of blood urea-N across the portal-drained viscera versus ruminal epithelia were investigated. Nine lactating...... treatments. Eight sample sets of arterial, portal, hepatic, and ruminal vein blood, ruminal fluid, and urine were obtained at 0.5 h before the morning feeding and at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, and 6.5 h after feeding. It was hypothesized that an increased supply of fermentable substrate to the hindgut...

  17. Preoperative cow-side lactatemia measurement predicts negative outcome in Holstein dairy cattle with right abomasal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, G; Francoz, D; Doré, E; Dufour, S; Veillette, M; Badillo, M; Bélanger, A-M; Buczinski, S

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the current study were (1) to determine the gain in prognostic accuracy of preoperative l-lactate concentration (LAC) measured on farm on cows with right displaced abomasum (RDA) or abomasal volvulus (AV) for predicting negative outcome; and (2) to suggest clinically relevant thresholds for such use. A cohort of 102 cows with on-farm surgical diagnostic of RDA or AV was obtained from June 2009 through December 2011. Blood was drawn from coccygeal vessels before surgery and plasma LAC was immediately measured by using a portable clinical analyzer. Dairy producers were interviewed by phone 30 d following surgery and the outcome was determined: a positive outcome if the owner was satisfied of the overall evolution 30 d postoperatively, and a negative outcome if the cow was culled, died, or if the owner reported being unsatisfied 30 d postoperatively. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic curve for LAC was 0.92 and was significantly greater than the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic curve of heart rate (HR; 0.77), indicating that LAC, in general, performed better than HR to predict a negative outcome. Furthermore, the ability to predict a negative outcome was significantly improved when LAC measurement was considered in addition to the already available HR data (area under the curve: 0.93 and 95% confidence interval: 0.87, 0.99). Important inflection points of the misclassification cost term function were noted at thresholds of 2 and 6 mmol/L, suggesting the potential utility of these cut-points. The 2 and 6 mmol/L thresholds had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for predicting a negative outcome of 76.2, 82.7, 53.3, and 93.1%, and of 28.6, 97.5, 75, and 84%, respectively. In terms of clinical interpretation, LAC ≤2 mmol/L appeared to be a good indicator of positive outcome and could be used to support a surgical treatment decision. The

  18. Detection of the clostridial hydrogenase gene activity as a bio-index in a molasses wastewater bio-hydrogen producing system by real time PCR and FISH/ flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jui-Jen Chang; Ping-Chi Hsu; Chi-Wa Choi; Sian-Jhong Yu; Cheng-Yu Ho; Wei-En Chen; Jiunn-Jyi Lay; Chieh-Chen Huang; Fu-Shyan Wen

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenase is a key enzyme that is used by obligate, anaerobic clostridial to produce hydrogen. In this study a fermentative system with molasses wastewater as nutrient was used to produce hydrogen. For establishing the relationship between the vicissitude of clostridial hydrogenase gene activity and the hydrogen production of this system during the culturing period, total cellular RNA isolated at different growing stages were subjected to real time PCR using primer pair, which were designed according to the conserved sequence of clostridial hydrogenase genes. Cell samples at corresponding growing stages were subjected to in situ reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT-PCR) using the same primers and then to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using clostridial hydrogenase gene-specific DNA probe. Those clostridial cells expressed hydrogenase gene activity could be detected by fluorescence microscopy. This is the first time hydrogen-producing activity in a mixed culture could be successfully studied by means of FISH of hydrogenase mRNA. Besides, 16S rDNA was amplified from total cellular DNA analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to reveal the bacterial diversity in the fermentative system; FISH and flow cytometry aiming at 16S rRNA were also carried out to calculate the population of clostridia and total eubacteria in the system. (authors)

  19. The small intestinal epithelia of beef steers differentially express sugar transporter messenger ribonucleic acid in response to abomasal versus ruminal infusion of starch hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S F; Harmon, D L; Vanzant, E S; McLeod, K R; Boling, J A; Matthews, J C

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, the absorption of monosaccharides from small intestinal lumen involves at least 3 sugar transporters (SugT): sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1; gene SLC5A1) transports glucose and galactose, whereas glucose transporter (GLUT) 5 (GLUT5; gene SLC2A5) transports fructose, across the apical membrane of enterocytes. In contrast, GLUT2 (gene SLC2A2) transports all of these sugars across basolateral and apical membranes. To compare the distribution patterns and sensitivity with nutritional regulation of these 3 SugT mRNA in beef cattle small intestinal tissue, 18 ruminally and abomasally catheterized Angus steers (BW approximately 260 kg) were assigned to water (control), ruminal cornstarch (partially hydrolyzed by alpha-amylase; SH), or abomasal SH infusion treatments (n = 6) and fed an alfalfa-cube-based diet at 1.3 x NE(m) requirement. The SH infusions amounted to 20% of ME intake. After 14- or 16-d of infusion, steers were killed; duodenal, jejunal, and ileal epithelia harvested; and total RNA extracted. The relative amount of SugT mRNA in epithelia was determined using real-time reverse transcription-PCR quantification methods. Basal expression of GLUT2 and SGLT1 mRNA was greater (P content of GLUT5 mRNA was greater (P content of GLUT5 mRNA in small intestinal epithelia was not affected (P > or = 0.16) by either SH infusion treatment. In contrast, GLUT2 and SGLT1 mRNA content in the ileal epithelium was increased (P content also was increased (P = 0.07) by 64% after ruminal SH infusion. These results demonstrate that the ileum of beef cattle small intestine adapts to an increased luminal supply of glucose by increasing SGLT1 and GLUT2 mRNA content, whereas increased ruminal SH supply results in duodenal upregulation of SGLT1 mRNA content. These adaptive responses of GLUT2 and SGLT1 mRNA to abomasal or ruminal SH infusion suggest that beef cattle can adapt to increase their carbohydrate assimilation through small intestinal epithelia, assuming

  20. Effect of plane of milk replacer intake and age on glucose and insulin kinetics and abomasal emptying in female Holstein Friesian dairy calves fed twice daily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, J A R; Berends, H; Leal, L N; Cant, J P; Martín-Tereso, J; Steele, M A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how preweaning plane of milk replacer intake and age can affect insulin and glucose kinetics as well as abomasal emptying rate in dairy calves fed twice a day. A total of 12 female Holstein Friesian calves were blocked by cow parity, paired by colostrum origin, and were randomly assigned to a high plane of milk replacer intake (8 L/d, 1.2kg of milk replacer/d; n=6) or a low plane of nutrition (4 L/d, 0.6kg of milk replacer/d; n=6). All calves received 4 L of colostrum over 2 meals (1 and 6h after birth) and were then directly transferred to their assigned feeding plans until they were stepped-down from milk by 50% during wk 7 and weaned on wk 8. Milk replacer (24% crude protein, 18% crude fat) was fed at 150g/L twice daily (0700 and 1700h) and all calves had ad libitum access to pelleted calf starter, chopped wheat straw, and water. Jugular catheters were placed in all calves at 4, 7, and 10wk of age. Then, postprandial response to plasma glucose, insulin, and acetaminophen (supplied with the meal) were determined to measure abomasal emptying. The next day, a glucose tolerance test was conducted by infusing glucose via the jugular catheter. At 4 and 7wk of age, the rate constant (%/h) for abomasal emptying of the meal was lower in high calves (0.21±0.02 in wk 4; 0.27±0.02 in wk 7) compared with low (0.34±0.02 in wk 4; 0.47±0.02 in wk 7). The postprandial plasma insulin area under the curve over 420min was greater in high calves (18,443±7,329; low=5,834±739 µU/mL) compared with low. We found no differences in glucose tolerance test kinetics between the high and low dairy calves at 4, 7, or 10wk of age. The findings from this study suggest that feeding dairy calves an elevated plane of nutrition in 2 meals of milk replacer per day does not decrease insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cost effectiveness of adding clostridial collagenase ointment to selective debridement in individuals with stage IV pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Marissa J; Gilligan, Adrienne M; Waycaster, Curtis R; Schaum, Kathleen; Fife, Caroline E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cost effectiveness (from a payer's perspective) of adding clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) to selective debridement compared with selective debridement alone (non-CCO) in the treatment of stage IV pressure ulcers among patients identified from the US Wound Registry. A 3-state Markov model was developed to determine costs and outcomes between the CCO and non-CCO groups over a 2-year time horizon. Outcome data were derived from a retrospective clinical study and included the proportion of pressure ulcers that were closed (epithelialized) over 2 years and the time to wound closure. Transition probabilities for the Markov states were estimated from the clinical study. In the Markov model, the clinical outcome is presented as ulcer-free weeks, which represents the time the wound is in the epithelialized state. Costs for each 4-week cycle were based on frequencies of clinic visits, debridement, and CCO application rates from the clinical study. The final model outputs were cumulative costs (in US dollars), clinical outcome (ulcer-free weeks), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) at 2 years. Compared with the non-CCO group, the CCO group incurred lower costs ($11,151 vs $17,596) and greater benefits (33.9 vs 16.8 ulcer-free weeks), resulting in an economically dominant ICER of -$375 per ulcer. Thus, for each additional ulcer-free week that can be gained, there is a concurrent cost savings of $375 if CCO treatment is selected. Over a 2-year period, an additional 17.2 ulcer-free weeks can be gained with concurrent cost savings of $6,445 for each patient. In this Markov model based on real-world data from the US Wound Registry, the addition of CCO to selective debridement in the treatment of pressure ulcers was economically dominant over selective debridement alone, resulting in greater benefit to the patient at lower cost.

  2. [Diagnosis and treatment of suppurative processes caused by non-clostridial anaerobic microflora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofanesian, S S

    1989-06-01

    One hundred and fifty patients suffering from various purulent diseases (60 persons) and postoperative purulent complications (90 persons) caused by nonclostridial anaerobes were examined. Nonclostridial anaerobic bacteria were isolated most frequently in acute mastitis, paraproctitis, and postinfectious abscesses among patients of the first group and after appendectomy and resection of the large intestine among those of the second group. The character of the wound discharge, the location of the focus of infection, the tendency of the purulent process to form a great number of cavities and fistules, bacterioscopy of the native material, etc. help in establishing the diagnosis (before the results of bacteriological tests are obtained). Purulent processes caused by a combination of anaerobic cocci and aerobic flora take a particularly unfavourable course. Antibiotic therapy should consists of high doses of one or two antibiotics combined with metronidazole and nystatin.

  3. Therapeutic tests on methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma and transplanted fibrosarcoma of the mouse - clostridial oncolysis and its enhancement by high-frequency hyperthermia and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirlet, T.

    1982-01-01

    Tests aimed at a conditioning of tumours by means of x-ray irradiation and high-frequency hyperthermia. Methyl cholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma (IMCM) and its transplant version (T-IMCM) produced at the neck of NMRI-mice at a critical localization immediately next to vital organs, served as a test system since it is almost resistant to simple oncolysis. Individual therapy components were compared for their mutual enhancement of efficacy in 16 test groups, and the triple combination (Cl + X-ray + HFH) was tested in relapse application as well. A 2000-R-x-ray irradiation was followed by almost simultaneous 4 min HF heating and i.v. spore administration at 12 h intervals. Assessment criteria were tumour growth, survival rates and times, absence of recidivity and healing, analysis of post-mortem findings and dimension or duration of lyses. In addition, the two tumour types of induction and transplant tumour were compared. The typical course of clostridial oncolysis can be confirmed in principle. Results show that it is possible by means of additional physical methods as were applied, to increase the systemically apathogenic and selective therapy principle of rather negligible oncolysis to over 80% (IMCM) or 97% (T-IMCM). Concerning the MCA fibrosarcoma which is very resistant to clostridial oncolysis in this mouse-tumour model, marked prolongations of survival or healing are possible even in extremely critical localization. In principle, this provides the preconditions for including oncolysis in clinical studies in human medicine. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Clostridial constipation's broad pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S

    2001-04-01

    Clostridia are normally found in the healthy colon, where their numbers are kept in check by other bacteria. However, when they establish themselves in the ileum they become formidable foes. They produce medium-length fatty acids that increase water absorption, causing hypertension and drying up the feces, causing constipation.Furthermore, they can deconjugate bile (impaired fat absorption), metabolyze tryptophan (the most scarce of the essential amino acids), digest fiber (so that the more fiber the patient takes, the more the constipation is exacerbated), digest lecithin, produce carcinogenic metabolites and copious amounts of extremely foul smelling gas, etc. They can also prevent vitamin B12 absorption in the ileum, causing anemia. The synthetic sugar lactulose, which can only be digested by lactobacilli, can help displace the clostridia and resolve the constipation by causing the lactobacilli to produce short fatty acids that have the opposite effect to that of the medium fatty acids produced by clostridia and their accomplices: they cause water retention in the intestines. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  5. Novel clostridial fusants in comparison with co-cultured counterpart species for enhanced production of biobutanol using green renewable and sustainable feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Kashif; Dahman, Yaser

    2015-11-01

    In this work, biobutanol was produced through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of wheat straw (WS) that traditionally produces acetone, butanol and ethanol solvents (ABE). Thermal stability was imparted to two mesophilic clostridial wild strains (Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium acetobutylicum) through protoplast fusion with that of a corresponding thermophilic clostridial species (Clostridium thermocellum). Production was pursued by the fused strains at 45 °C compared to that of the corresponding co-cultures at 35 °C. Results showed that the fused strains generally achieved higher production at 45 °C than that of the corresponding co-cultures at 35 °C. Highest butanol production of 13.82 g/L was recorded with C. beijerinckii fusant, with ABE solvents production of 23 g/L (yields of 0.17 and 0.57, respectively). Total sugar consumption of this strain was the highest among all strains and was 84%. Fused strains also showed immense level of tolerance towards butanol toxicity compared to the wild strains. Filter paper enzyme assay demonstrated that fused strains were able to produce cellulolytic enzymes in the range of 58.73-68.52 FPU/ml. Cellulosome producing C. thermocellum and its ability to ferment sugars offers a promising future in biofuels through eliminating the need to add external enzymes. Generally, productions reported in the present study were higher than literature where biobutanol stripping systems were employed to eliminate toxicity during production. This demonstrates a clear potential for improving productivity and yield at a larger-scale facility.

  6. Economic analysis and budget impact of clostridial collagenase ointment compared with medicinal honey for treatment of pressure ulcers in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mearns ES

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth S Mearns,1 Michael Liang,1 Brendan L Limone,1 Adrienne M Gilligan,1 Jeffrey D Miller,1 Kathleen D Schaum,2 Curtis R Waycaster2 1Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Smith & Nephew, Inc., Fort Worth, TX, USA Objectives: Pressure ulcer (PU treatment poses significant clinical and economic challenges to health-care systems. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of enzymatic debridement with clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO compared with autolytic debridement with medicinal honey (MH for PU treatment from a US payer/Medicare perspective in the hospital outpatient department setting.Methods: A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model was developed using a 1-week cycle length across a 1-year time horizon. The three health states were inflammation/senescence, granulation/proliferation (ie, patients achieving 100% granulation, and epithelialization. Data sources included the US Wound Registry, Medicare fee schedules, and other published clinical and cost studies about PU treatment.Results: In the base case analysis over a 1-year time horizon, CCO was the economically dominant strategy (ie, simultaneously conferring greater benefit at less cost. Patients treated with CCO experienced 22.7 quality-adjusted life weeks (QALWs at a cost of $6,161 over 1 year, whereas MH patients experienced 21.9 QALWs at a cost of $7,149. Patients treated with CCO achieved 11.5 granulation weeks and 6.0 epithelization weeks compared with 10.6 and 4.4 weeks for MH, respectively. The number of clinic visits was 40.1 for CCO vs 43.4 for MH, and the number of debridements was 12.3 for CCO compared with 17.6 for MH. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined CCO dominant in 72% of 10,000 iterations and cost-effective in 91%, assuming a benchmark willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/quality-adjusted life year ($962/QALW. The budget impact analysis showed that for every 1% of patients

  7. Improved n-butanol production via co-expression of membrane-targeted tilapia metallothionein and the clostridial metabolic pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Wei-Chih; Lin, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Chun-Chi; Tsuge, Kenji; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2017-04-11

    N-Butanol has favorable characteristics for use as either an alternative fuel or platform chemical. Bio-based n-butanol production using microbes is an emerging technology that requires further development. Although bio-industrial microbes such as Escherichia coli have been engineered to produce n-butanol, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated toxicity may limit productivity. Previously, we show that outer-membrane-targeted tilapia metallothionein (OmpC-TMT) is more effective as an ROS scavenger than human and mouse metallothioneins to reduce oxidative stress in the host cell. The host strain (BUT1-DE) containing the clostridial n-butanol pathway displayed a decreased growth rate and limited n-butanol productivity, likely due to ROS accumulation. The clostridial n-butanol pathway was co-engineered with inducible OmpC-TMT in E. coli (BUT3-DE) for simultaneous ROS removal, and its effect on n-butanol productivity was examined. The ROS scavenging ability of cells overexpressing OmpC-TMT was examined and showed an approximately twofold increase in capacity. The modified strain improved n-butanol productivity to 320 mg/L, whereas the control strain produced only 95.1 mg/L. Transcriptomic analysis revealed three major KEGG pathways that were significantly differentially expressed in the BUT3-DE strain compared with their expression in the BUT1-DE strain, including genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, fructose and mannose metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that OmpC-TMT can increase n-butanol production by scavenging ROS. The transcriptomic analysis suggested that n-butanol causes quinone malfunction, resulting in oxidative-phosphorylation-related nuo operon downregulation, which would diminish the ability to convert NADH to NAD + and generate proton motive force. However, fructose and mannose metabolism-related genes (fucA, srlE and srlA) were upregulated, and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis-related genes (pfkB, pgm) were

  8. Fatores de risco, achados clínicos, laboratoriais e avaliação terapêutica em 36 bovinos com deslocamento de abomaso Risk factors, clinical and laboratorial findings and therapeutic evaluation in 36 cattle with abomasal displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Lopes Câmara

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A contínua seleção genética para maior produção de leite em conjunto com o aumento da capacidade digestiva e profundidade corporal aumentou a susceptibilidade à ocorrência de abomasopatias, incluindo o deslocamento do abomaso. Este trabalho objetivou realizar um estudo retrospectivo sobre o deslocamento de abomaso em 36 bovinos atendidos na Clínica de Bovinos, Campus Garanhuns da Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, durante o período de janeiro de 2000 a fevereiro de 2009. Foram diagnosticados 27 casos de deslocamento do abomaso à direita, seis casos de deslocamento do abomaso à esquerda e três casos de vólvulo abomasal. Onze casos considerados moderados, sem grave distensão abdominal, apetite presente para a forragem e delimitação de som metálico até o 8º espaço intercostal, foram tratados clinicamente; enquanto 20 casos com distensão abdominal moderada a severa, associada a distúrbios sistêmicos, foram considerados graves e tratados cirurgicamente. Duas vacas foram eutanasiadas devido peritonite difusa ou alterações graves na serosa do abomaso, totalizando 18 animais submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico. Dois animais foram encaminhados para abate e três vacas chegaram prostradas e morreram sem receber nenhum tratamento. A análise dos fatores de risco identificou a estação chuvosa como estatisticamente significativa. O maior número de deslocamento do abomaso ocorreu em vacas mestiças com 24 casos (66,6%, seguida por bovinos da raça Holandesa com 11 (30,5% e Gir com um (2,9% caso. A composição da alimentação oferecida variou bastante e caracterizou-se por conter excesso de carboidratos e, na maioria dos casos, fibra de baixa qualidade. Os sinais clínicos mais frequentes foram comportamento apático, desidratação, timpanismo ruminal leve a severo com motilidade ausente ou diminuída, som de líquido ao balotamento do flanco direito, som de chapinhar metálico e/ou observação de uma estrutura similar a

  9. An Examination by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Putative Key Residues in the Determination of Coenzyme Specificity in Clostridial NAD+-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Griffin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence and structure comparisons of various glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH and other nicotinamide nucleotide-dependent dehydrogenases have potentially implicated certain residues in coenzyme binding and discrimination. We have mutated key residues in Clostridium symbiosum NAD+-specific GDH to investigate their contribution to specificity and to enhance acceptance of NADPH. Comparisons with E. coli NADPH-dependent GDH prompted design of mutants F238S, P262S, and F238S/P262S, which were purified and assessed at pH 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0. They showed markedly increased catalytic efficiency with NADPH, especially at pH 8.0 (∼170-fold for P262S and F238S/P262S with relatively small changes for NADH. A positive charge introduced through the D263K mutation also greatly increased catalytic efficiency with NADPH (over 100-fold at pH 8 and slightly decreased activity with NADH. At position 242, “P6” of the “core fingerprint,” where NAD+- and NADP+-dependent enzymes normally have Gly or Ala, respectively, clostridial GDH already has Ala. Replacement with Gly produced negligible shift in coenzyme specificity.

  10. The currently used commercial DNA-extraction methods give different results of clostridial and actinobacterial populations derived from human fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maukonen, Johanna; Simões, Catarina; Saarela, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Recently several human health-related microbiota studies have had partly contradictory results. As some differences may be explained by methodologies applied, we evaluated how different storage conditions and commonly used DNA-extraction kits affect bacterial composition, diversity, and numbers of human fecal microbiota. According to our results, the DNA-extraction did not affect the diversity, composition, or quantity of Bacteroides spp., whereas after a week's storage at -20 °C, the numbers of Bacteroides spp. were 1.6-2.5 log units lower (P Eubacterium rectale (Erec)-group, Clostridium leptum group, bifidobacteria, and Atopobium group were 0.5-4 log units higher (P < 0.05) after mechanical DNA-extraction as detected with qPCR, regardless of storage. Furthermore, the bacterial composition of Erec-group differed significantly after different DNA-extractions; after enzymatic DNA-extraction, the most prevalent genera detected were Roseburia (39% of clones) and Coprococcus (10%), whereas after mechanical DNA-extraction, the most prevalent genera were Blautia (30%), Coprococcus (13%), and Dorea (10%). According to our results, rigorous mechanical lysis enables detection of higher bacterial numbers and diversity from human fecal samples. As it was shown that the results of clostridial and actinobacterial populations are highly dependent on the DNA-extraction methods applied, the use of different DNA-extraction protocols may explain the contradictory results previously obtained. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Compactação primária do abomaso em 14 bovinos no estado de Pernambuco Primary abomasal impaction in 14 cattle from Pernambuco State, northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Lopes Câmara

    2009-05-01

    roughage for feeding cows in many regions, especially during the dry season, impaction of the abomasum has been poorly reported in Brazil, probably because the condition is misdiagnosed by practitioners. The present paper aimed to accomplish a retrospective study on primary abomasal impaction in 14 cattle from Pernambuco State, northeastern Brazil. Eight moderate cases, without severe abdominal distention and with no rumen compaction, were treated conservatively, and four severe cases, with severe abdominal distention and rumen compaction, were treated surgically. One bull was slaughtered and one cow died without treatment. The greater number of abomasal impaction cases was in Holstein cows with six cases (42.9%, followed by crossbred cattle with five cases (35.8%, and the breeds Brown-Swiss, Nelore and Marchigiana, each with one case (21.3%. The food composition was characterized by low quality fibers and varied greatly among cases. Most frequent clinical signs were apathy, dehydration, hypomotility and ruminal bloat, intestinal hypomotility and scanty or absent feces with mucus. The hematological findings revealed leukocytosis with neutrophilia and hyperfibrinogenemia in most cases. Ruminal fluid analysis showed compromised flora and fauna dynamics and increased chlorine ion concentration. Clinical (4/8 and chirurgical (2/4 recovery rate achieved 50%. The clinical and chirurgical methods remain as viable options for the treatment of light and severe impaction, but the prognosis is always reserved especially when associated to late pregnancy.

  12. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  13. Bovine Endotoxicosis – Some Aspects of Relevance to Production Diseases. A Review*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Pia

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some circumstances where endotoxins of Gram negative bacteria may be related to the pathogenesis of some common production diseases. Decisive evidence for the pathogentical role of endotoxins remains scarce, and therefore an interdisciplinary background covering epidemiological, biological, biochemical, clinical and experimental aspects is given. Several authors have suggested that endotoxins play a significant role for the development of diseases such as laminitis, abomasal displacement, sudden death syndrome of feed-lot steers ect. While the biological, biochemical and clinical pictures of bovine endotoxicosis is quite well known, and certainly may resemble the clinical and biochemical pictures seen in some of the before mentioned diseases, it is however still not clear how or when endotoxins would gain parenteral access. This review describes excerpts of the biology of endotoxins, key clinical signs and the biochemistry associated to these. It is described how ruminal acidosis may facilitate the translocation of endotoxin from the intestinal/ruminal contents to the portal and eventually the systemic bloodstream. The function of the liver hence becomes central, and the role of hepatic fatty infiltration around parturition is discussed. The review finally suggest that acute ruminal acidosis may be viewed as an analogue to the human syndrome Gut-Derived Infectious Toxic Shock (GITS, where shock is propagated primarily by the translocation of bacterial endotoxin from the gut.

  14. Acute and chronic disease associated with naturally occurring T-2 mycotoxicosis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreras, M C; Benavides, J; García-Pariente, C; Delgado, L; Fuertes, M; Muñoz, M; García-Marín, J F; Pérez, V

    2013-02-01

    A flock of approximately 1,000 sheep were exposed intermittently to food contaminated with T-2 toxin (T-2), a potent type-A trichothecene mycotoxin produced primarily by Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium poae. In the acute stage of the intoxication, affected sheep developed anorexia, decreased water consumption, ruminal atony, soft faeces and apathy. One hundred and ninety of the exposed sheep died. The main gross lesions observed in animals dying during the acute disease were rumenitis and ulcerative abomasitis, depletion of lymphocytes in lymphoid organs, necrosis of the exocrine pancreas, myocarditis and intense oedema of the skin and brain. Sheep developing the chronic stage of disease showed weight loss and reproductive inefficiency and the main pathological features observed in animals dying during this stage were gastrointestinal inflammation, myocardial fibrosis and necrotic and suppurative lesions in the oral cavity. Opportunistic infections (e.g. mycotic mastitis or parasitic pneumonia) were also identified in these animals. Increased serum concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were observed, most likely related to heart lesions. T-2 toxins were detected in all samples of the diet of these animals that were analyzed. The changes in the sheep reported here are similar to those described previously in experimental studies. Lesions observed in the present animals suggest an additional cardiotoxic effect of T-2 in sheep. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrogen retention response to the abomasal infusion of amino acids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HESTER LINDE

    Hatfield, 1968; Nimrick et al., 1970), in diets containing high levels of urea ... body protein synthesis, determined by the ideal protein concept, are histidine, .... The first two days were an adaptation period, and sampling of urine and faeces.

  16. Cryopreservation of roe deer abomasal nematodes for morphological identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldo, Paola; Pascotto, Ernesto

    2014-02-01

    Conventional methods to preserve adult nematodes for taxonomic purposes involve the use of fixative or clearing solutions (alcohol, formaldehyde, AFA and lactophenol), which cause morphological alterations and are toxic. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative method based on glycerol-cryopreservation of nematodes for their subsequent identification. Adults of trichostrongylid nematodes from the abomasum of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus Linnaeus) were glycerol-cryopreserved and compared with those fixed in formaldehyde, fresh and frozen without cryoprotectans. Morphology, transparency and elasticity of the anterior and posterior portion of male nematodes were compared, especially the caudal cuticular bursa and genital accessories. The method presented is quick and easy to use, and the quality of nematode specimens is better than that of nematodes fixed by previously used fixatives. Moreover, glycerol cryopreserved nematodes can be stored for a long time at -20 degrees C in perfect condition and they could be suitable for further analyses, such as histological or ultrastructural examinations.

  17. Survey of farmer knowledge and attitudes to endemic disease management in South Australia, with a focus on bovine viral diarrhoea (bovine pestivirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, S R; Anderson, M L; Reichel, M P

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to establish the attitudes of South Australian cattle farmers towards endemic animal disease prevention and control, with a particular focus on the awareness of and attitudes towards bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD). This cross-sectional postal survey involved mailing a questionnaire to all South Australian cattle owners with 35 or more head of cattle. Worms and lice were the most common animal disease concerns. Less than half of responding farmers were adequately vaccinating their herds against clostridial diseases, but 53.0% stated that they utilised quarantine procedures. Less than 20% of respondents had actively taken part in BVD educational opportunities, or had vaccinated or tested their herd for BVD; less than 20% of respondents were actively involved in any systematic control of Johne's disease. Overall, farmers' actual knowledge of BVD was lower than their perceived understanding, although their interest in BVD and its control was high. Disease prevention measures such as vaccination, quarantine and participation in systematic control schemes were used by a minority of respondents. The results suggest that respondents acknowledge BVD as an important and relevant disease, despite many believing it was not a problem in their herd. Interest in BVD appears to be high and it is likely that an education program would be well received. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  18. Molecular structures and functional relationships in clostridial neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2011-12-01

    The seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (A-G) are the deadliest poison known to humans. They share significant sequence homology and hence possess similar structure-function relationships. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) act via a four-step mechanism, viz., binding and internalization to neuronal cells, translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol and finally cleavage of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) causing blockage of neurotransmitter release leading to flaccid paralysis. Crystal structures of three holotoxins, BoNT/A, B and E, are available to date. Although the individual domains are remarkably similar, their domain organization is different. These structures have helped in correlating the structural and functional domains. This has led to the determination of structures of individual domains and combinations of them. Crystal structures of catalytic domains of all serotypes and several binding domains are now available. The catalytic domains are zinc endopeptidases and share significant sequence and structural homology. The active site architecture and the catalytic mechanism are similar although the binding mode of individual substrates may be different, dictating substrate specificity and peptide cleavage selectivity. Crystal structures of catalytic domains with substrate peptides provide clues to specificity and selectivity unique to BoNTs. Crystal structures of the receptor domain in complex with ganglioside or the protein receptor have provided information about the binding of botulinum neurotoxin to the neuronal cell. An overview of the structure-function relationship correlating the 3D structures with biochemical and biophysical data and how they can be used for structure-based drug discovery is presented here. Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  19. Lignocellulosic biomass utilization toward biorefinery using meshophilic Clostridial species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamaru, Yutaka; Lopez Contreras, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as agricultural, industrial, and forestry residues as well as
    dedicated crops constitute renewable and abundant resources with great potential for a lowcost
    and uniquely sustainable bioconversion to value-added bioproducts. Thus, many
    organic fuels and

  20. Genetic Diversity Among Botulinum Neurotoxin Producing Clostridial Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, K K; Smith, T J; Helma, C H; Ticknor, L O; Foley, B T; Svennson, R T; Brown, J L; Johnson, E A; Smith, L A; Okinaka, R T; Jackson, P J; Marks, J D

    2006-07-06

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for many diverse anaerobic spore forming rod-shaped bacteria which have the common property of producing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The BoNTs are exoneurotoxins that can cause severe paralysis and even death in humans and various other animal species. A collection of 174 C. botulinum strains were examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and BoNT genes to examine genetic diversity within this species. This collection contained representatives of each of the seven different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT A-G). Analysis of the16S rRNA sequences confirmed earlier reports of at least four distinct genomic backgrounds (Groups I-IV) each of which has independently acquired one or more BoNT serotypes through horizontal gene transfer. AFLP analysis provided higher resolution, and can be used to further subdivide the four groups into sub-groups. Sequencing of the BoNT genes from serotypes A, B and E in multiple strains confirmed significant sequence variation within each serotype. Four distinct lineages within each of the BoNT A and B serotypes, and five distinct lineages of serotype E strains were identified. The nucleotide sequences of the seven serotypes of BoNT were compared and show varying degrees of interrelatedness and recombination as has been previously noted for the NTNH gene which is linked to BoNT. These analyses contribute to the understanding of the evolution and phylogeny within this species and assist in the development of improved diagnostics and therapeutics for treatment of botulism.

  1. Starch-degrading enzymes from anaerobic non-clostridial bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, H; Schepers, H J; Troesch, W [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaechen- und Bioverfahrenstechnik (IGB), Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.)

    1990-08-01

    A number of meso- and thermophilic anaerobic starch-degrading non-spore-forming bacteria have been isolated. All the isolates belonging to different genera are strictly anaerobic, as indicated by a catalase-negative reaction, and produce soluble starch-degrading enzymes. Compared to enzymes of aerobic bacteria, those of anaerobic origin mainly show low molecular mass of about 25 000 daltons. Some of the enzymes may have useful applications in the starch industry because of their unusual product pattern, yielding maltotetraose as the main hydrolysis product. (orig.).

  2. Caratterizzazione biomolecolare di Clostridi isolati da latte e formaggi

    OpenAIRE

    Demarco, Fabiana

    2006-01-01

    Il latte è una miscela complessa di sostanze di notevole importanza biologica e nutrizionale (proteime, grassi, lattosio, vitamine, sali, etc.) e costituisce, da solo un sistema dietetico bilanciato e capace di favorire la moltiplicazione della flora intestinale simbiotica. E’ ampiamente utilizzato sia tal quale nella preparazione del cibo, sia trasformato, da solo, o in combinazione con altri alimenti. Il formaggio, che rappresenta il più antico e valido metodo conosciuto dall’uomo per co...

  3. Short communication: Prepartum plasma insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations based on day of insemination are lower in cows developing postpartum diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, M; Sander, A K; Kastelic, J P; Wilde, R; Heppelmann, M; Rudolphi, B; Schuberth, H J; Bollwein, H; Kaske, M

    2012-03-01

    Because peripartal production diseases are prevalent in dairy cows, early recognition is crucial. Several studies reported metabolic variables as risk predictors for subsequent diseases. To improve on-farm testing and application of those methods, the sampling procedure should take into account variation in gestation length. Furthermore, additional variables indicating cows at risk of any production disease should be sought. Therefore, the objective was to characterize differences between cows with and without postpartum production disease (retained fetal membranes, ketosis, hypocalcemia, abomasal displacement, metritis, mastitis) by prepartum measurement of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations relative to the artificial insemination (AI) that established pregnancy. Blood was collected from 41 Holstein Friesian cows on 235 to 241, 242 to 248, 249 to 255, 256 to 262, 263 to 269, 270 to 276, 277 to 283, and 284 to 290 d after AI. Health status was assessed daily for 3 wk after calving; 25 cows (66%) had at least one production disease. Cows developing postpartum diseases had higher mean serum NEFA concentrations (450 ± 26 μmol/L; mean ± SE) and lower plasma IGF-I concentrations (78 ± 6 ng/mL) prepartum compared with healthy cows (259 ± 19 μmol/L and 117 ± 8 ng/mL, respectively). In conclusion, because of substantial variation among cows in gestation length, blood samples should be collected and studies performed on risk prediction relative to AI rather than expected date of calving. As the somatotropic axis is one of the key regulators of metabolic adaption for onset of lactation, IGF-I might be a useful variable to differentiate between cows susceptible to production diseases and cows that are able to adapt adequately within the transition period and remain healthy. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Swamp Buffalo in South Kalimantan : Problem, Disease and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Natalia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies have been carried out to evaluate and investigate the important diseases of swamp buffaloes (Bubalus carabanensis in Kalimantan . More attention has been focused on the case of acute infectious diseases and sudden death in the buffaloes . Fasciolosis black disease, acute enteritis, especially fatal enterotoxaemia haemorrhagic septicaemia . and trypanosomiasis (Surra, are some of the important diseases found in these animals . Black disease caused by toxigenic Clostridium novyi occurs in the presence of the organism in the liver and the degree of liver fluke Fasciola gigantica infestation . In regions where black disease is enzootic, Cl. novvi can be isolated from livers of normal healthy animals . In Hulu Sungai Utara district, South Kalimantan, the prevalence of fasciolosis caused by Fasciola gigantica in swamp buffalo was 77% in 1991 . A gross sudden change in diet due to seasonal changes could induce rumen and intestinal stasis, which provide a favourable environment for the rapid proliferation of commensal toxigenic Clostridium perfringens in the small intestine . Subsequent absorption of the toxin produced through the gut wall and its generalized dissemination culminated in a fatal enterotoxaemia . Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS is an acute, fatal disease affecting swamp buffalo, and caused by Pasteurella multocida B : 2 . The swamp buffalo is particularly susceptible for HS, and the reported greatest losses of swamp buffalo in Kalimantan due to HS is recorded in 1980s. The clinical signs of Surra in swamp buffalo were also found in certain areas in Danau Panggang area . Hulu Sungai Utara district . Vaccination is the accepted method for controlling Black disease, enterotoxaemia and HS. Multi component vaccine, alum adjuvant containing at least 5 types of clostridial toxoids and P. multocida B2 bacterin have been used and provide good protection to the animals . Control and treatment of liver fluke infestation

  5. Farber's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ...

  6. Diseases, reproductive performance, and changes in milk production associated with subclinical ketosis in dairy cows: a meta-analysis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboisson, D; Mounié, M; Maigné, E

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have shown that subclinical ketosis (SCK) is associated with an increased risk of developing various diseases, reproductive disorders, and changes in milk production. The present work aims at producing an overview between this disorder and theses outcomes. A meta-analysis of the literature, including 131 different models from 23 papers, or a review when the literature was scarce was conducted. For each outcome, the odds ratio (OR), relative risk, or hazard ratio was presented for various moderators to reduce heterogeneity among the studies. The raw change in milk production associated with SCK was estimated and adjusted, taking into consideration the outcomes known to interact with milk production during the peripartum period. The results showed that 2 main categories of moderators had a significant effect on the adjusted risk. First, the adjustment made by defining SCK as (1) β-hydroxybutyrate concentration >1.4 mM, (2) nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration >0.4 mM prepartum, or (3) NEFA concentration >1.0 mM postpartum corrected the underestimated risk (despite low significance). This is because several trials reported the relevant risks using lower thresholds for the β-hydroxybutyrate or NEFA values. Using a low threshold leads to lower risk of disease compared with using a high threshold. Second, the correction produced using the polyfactorial terms corrected the overestimation of risk because many trials reported only univariable models. The relative risk or OR (95% confidence interval) related to abomasal displacement, clinical ketosis, early culling and death, metritis, placental retention, clinical mastitis, lameness, and a doubling of the SCC in cases with SCK were 3.33 (2.60-4.25), 5.38 (3.27-8.83), 1.92 (1.60-2.30), 1.75 (1.54-2.01), 1.52 (1.20-1.93), 1.61 (1.24-2.09), 2.01(1.64-2.44), and 1.42 (1.26-1.60), respectively. The precision level of the estimate depended on the outcome. The direct mean ± standard deviation of the 305-d

  7. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Primary Hyperparathyroidism Prolactinoma Thyroid Tests Turner Syndrome Contact Us The National ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  8. Ribbing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  9. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  10. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But some of them can make you sick. Infectious diseases are diseases that are caused by germs. There ... many different ways that you can get an infectious disease: Through direct contact with a person who is ...

  11. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semantic dementia; Dementia - semantic; Frontotemporal dementia; FTD; Arnold Pick disease; 3R tauopathy ... doctors tell Pick disease apart from Alzheimer disease. (Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, symptom ...

  12. Prion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Prion Diseases Prion diseases are a related group of ... deer and elk. Why Is the Study of Prion Diseases a Priority for NIAID? Much about TSE ...

  13. Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  14. Addison's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of potassium and low levels of sodium. What causes Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease is caused by injury to your ... example, a problem with your pituitary gland can cause secondary Addison’s disease. Or, you may develop Addison’s disease if you ...

  15. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  16. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  17. Relationships between metabolite and IGF1 concentrations with fertility and production outcomes following left abomasal displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, N A; Cooke, J S; Wilson, S; van Winden, S C; Gordon, P J; Wathes, D C

    2014-06-28

    Left displacement of the abomasum (LDA) is an important periparturient disorder of dairy cows. This study evaluated differences in metabolic parameters between case-control pairs of cows (n=67) from 24 farms, and related these to outcomes in fertility and production. Cows with an assisted delivery were ×3 more likely to develop LDA, and affected cows tended to have had a longer dry period. At recruitment, cows with LDA tended to be in lower body condition accompanied by significantly higher circulating concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and glucose and lower IGF1. Overall culling rate for all cows in the subsequent lactation was 22.5 per cent. Cows with LDA were not at increased odds of being culled but they produced, on average, 2272 l less milk and tended to have longer intervals to conception. Considering all cows irrespective of LDA status, the mean IGF1 level at recruitment was the only measured parameter associated with subsequent risk of culling (culled 11.7 ng/ml, not culled 23.5 ng/ml; P=0.005). Our findings support previous work indicating that poor insulin sensitivity through an uncoupling of the somatotrophic axis may be an important factor associated with LDA. Improved nutritional management of dry cows should reduce the incidence of both LDA and culling. British Veterinary Association.

  18. The reindeer abomasal nematode (Ostertagia gruehneri) is naturally transmitted to sheep when sharing pastures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manninen, Saana-Maaria; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Laaksonen, Sauli

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of sheep (Ovis aries) in northern Finland, often alternately corralled with winter-fed reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus), creates potential for cross-infection of gastrointestinal nematodes. The aim of this study was to elucidate this possibility with 43 animals. Eleven...... reindeer and 8 sheep had shared a corral by turns, reindeer during winters, and sheep in summers. Another 12 reindeer had no known contact with sheep. Twelve sheep had no close contact to other ruminants. Both reindeer groups were free-ranging during summers. During slaughter in September to November, 2003......, abomasa and parts of intestines were collected. Gastrointestinal nematodes were counted and identified. The species found were the following: in reindeer, Ostertagia gruehneri/Ostertagia arctica, Mazamastrongylus dagestanica, Nematodirus tarandi, Nematodirella longissimespiculata and Bunostomum...

  19. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types ...

  20. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell's palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of Lyme disease ... My Lyme Disease Risk? Bug Bites and Stings Bell's Palsy Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Meningitis View more About ...

  1. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation Fighting Blindness supports research studying lipofuscin build up and ways to prevent it. A decrease in color perception also occurs in Stargardt disease. This is ...

  2. Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  3. Addison Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  4. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely need to plan for their loved one's future care. The final phase of the disease may ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  5. Menkes Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ... arteries. Weakened bones (osteoporosis) may result in fractures. × Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ...

  6. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ... severe symptoms similar to males with the disorder. × Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ...

  7. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  8. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  9. Digestive Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lactose Intolerance Liver Disease Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel Pancreatitis Peptic Ulcers (Stomach ... and outreach materials. Clinical Trials Clinical trials offer hope for many people and opportunities to help researchers ...

  10. Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidney Disease What's in ... Coping With Kidney Conditions Print What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  11. Sandhoff Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ...

  12. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  13. Cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori

    1992-01-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss the involvement of delayed radiation effects of A-bomb exposure in cardiovascular diseases. First, the relationship between radiation and cardiovascular diseases is reviewed in the literature. Animal experiments have confirmed the relationship between ionizing radiation and vascular lesions. There are many reports which describe ischemic heart disease, cervical and cerebrovascular diseases, and peripheral disease occurring after radiation therapy. The previous A-bomb survivor cohort studies, i.e., the RERF Life Span Study and Adult Health Study, have dealt with the mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, the prevalence or incidence of cardiovascular diseases, pathological findings, clinical observation of arteriosclerosis, ECG abnormality, blood pressure abnormality, and cardiac function. The following findings have been suggested: (1) A-bomb exposure is likely to be involved in the mortality rate and incidence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases; (2) similarly, the involvement of A-bomb exposure is considered in the prevalence of the arch of aorta; (3) ECG abnormality corresponding to ischemic heart disease may reflect the involvement of A-bomb exposure. To confirm the above findings, further studies are required on the basis of more accurate information and the appropriate number of cohort samples. Little evidence has been presented for the correlation between A-bomb exposure and both rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart disease. (N.K.) 88 refs

  14. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaranda P, Edgar; Spinel B, Nestor; Restrepo, Jose F; Rondon H, Federico; Millan S, Alberto; Iglesias G Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We present a review article on the autoinflammatory diseases, narrating its historical origin and describing the protein and molecular structure of the Inflammasome, the current classification of the autoinflammatory diseases and a description of the immuno genetics and clinical characteristics more important of every disease.

  15. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  16. Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gaucher disease is a rare genetic disorder in which a person lacks an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase (GBA). Causes Gaucher disease is rare in the general population. People of Eastern and Central European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage are more likely to have this disease. It ...

  17. Dent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina R Rus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dent disease is an x-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction that occurs almost exclusively in males. It is characterized by significant, mostly low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and chronic kidney disease. Signs and symptoms of this condition appear in early childhood and worsen over time. There are two forms of Dent disease, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of signs and symptoms (type 1 and type 2. Dent disease 2 is characterized by the features described above and also associated with extrarenal abnormalities (they include mild intellectual disability, hypotonia, and cataract. Some researchers consider Dent disease 2 to be a mild variant of a similar disorder called Lowe syndrome.We represent a case of a 3-year old boy with significant proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. We confirmed Dent disease type 1 by genetic analysis.

  18. Morgellons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  19. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  20. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  1. Simultaneous clostridial fermentation, lipase-catalyzed esterification, and ester extraction to enrich diesel with butyl butyrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, C. van den; Heeres, A.S.; Wielen, L.A.M. van der; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of 1-butanol from fermentation broth is energy-intensive since typical concentrations in fermentation broth are below 20gL -1. To prevent butanol inhibition and high downstream processing costs, we aimed at producing butyl esters instead of 1-butanol. It is shown that it is possible to

  2. Fatal clostridial enterotoxemia (Clostrium glycolcum) in an ornate nile monitor (Veranus ornarus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Weese, J. Scott

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxemia caused by Clostridium glycolium was identified as the cause of circulatory collapse and death in a female, 3-year old, captive-bred ornate Nile monitor (Veranus ornatus). Anaerobic culture af fecal samples from 12 other monitor lizards from collection failed to demonstrate the prese......Enterotoxemia caused by Clostridium glycolium was identified as the cause of circulatory collapse and death in a female, 3-year old, captive-bred ornate Nile monitor (Veranus ornatus). Anaerobic culture af fecal samples from 12 other monitor lizards from collection failed to demonstrate...

  3. Peyronie's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick L; Levine, Laurence A

    2007-11-01

    Peyronie's disease is a psychologically and physically devastating disorder that is manifest by a fibrous inelastic scar of the tunica albuginea, resulting in palpable penile scar in the flaccid condition and causing penile deformity, including penile curvature, hinging, narrowing, shortening, and painful erections. Peyronie's disease remains a considerable therapeutic dilemma even to today's practicing physicians.

  4. Parasitogenic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiological semiotics of parasitogenic diseases of the intestinal tract is presented. The problem of radiological examination in the case of the diseases consists in the determination of the large intestine state, depth and extension of lesions, and also in solution of treatment efficiency problem

  5. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the country. NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. Much of NINDS’ research on Batten disease and the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses focuses on gaining a better understanding of the disease, gene therapy, and developing novel drugs to treat the disorders. ...

  6. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  7. Leigh's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-linked form of Leigh’s disease, a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may be recommended. View Full Treatment Information Definition Leigh's disease is a rare inherited neurometabolic disorder that affects the central nervous system. This progressive disorder begins in infants between the ...

  8. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ears and head) special tests that check your balance and how well your ears work. Can Meniere’s disease be prevented or avoided? Because ... find ways to limit the stress in your life or learn how to deal with stress ... Let your family, friends, and co-workers know about the disease. Tell ...

  9. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  10. Angara disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... 1988). Since the disease emerged in this specific geographic area, HHS was initially referred to as “Angara. Disease”. The disease is caused by an avian adenovirus serotype-iv in Pakistan. This virus is responsible for development of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of liver, pancreas and kidneys.

  11. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor a disease) for HD. A large and related NINDS-supported study aims to identify additional genetic factors in people that influence the course of the disease. Other research hopes to identify variations in the genomes of individuals with HD that may point to new targets ...

  12. Coeliac disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-08

    Mar 8, 2013 ... Two factors are involved in the development of coeliac disease, namely the ... degradation by gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush ... epithelial layer with chronic inflammatory cells in patients ... Coeliac disease increases the risk of malignancies, such as small bowel adenocarcinoma and enteropathy-.

  13. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  14. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It

  15. Thyroid diseases and cerebrovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Stam, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Acute cerebral ischemia has been described in different diseases of the thyroid gland, and not only as a result of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation and cardioembolic stroke. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on the relationship between thyroid diseases and

  16. Morgellons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  17. [Infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis-Taillard, Caroline; de Vallière, Serge; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-07

    In 2008, several publications have highlighted the role of climate change and globalization on the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Studies have shown the extension towards Europe of diseases such as Crimea-Congo fever (Kosovo, Turkey and Bulgaria), leismaniosis (Cyprus) and chikungunya virus infection (Italy). The article also contains comments on Plasmodium knowlesi, a newly identified cause of severe malaria in humans, as well as an update on human transmission of the H5NI avian influenza virus. It also mentions new data on Bell's palsy as well as two vaccines (varicella-zoster and pneumococcus), and provides a list of recent guidelines for the treatment of common infectious diseases.

  18. Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Georgeson, Keith E

    2008-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a relatively common condition managed by pediatric surgeons. Significant advances have been made in understanding its etiologies in the last decade, especially with the explosion of molecular genetic techniques and early diagnosis. The surgical management has progressed from a two- or three-stage procedure to a primary operation. More recently, definitive surgery for Hirschsprung disease through minimally invasive techniques has gained popularity. In neonates, the advancement of treatment strategies for Hirschsprung disease continues with reduced patient morbidity and improved outcomes.

  19. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  20. Norries disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini J

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old male infant was found to have Norrie′s disease. The clinical presentation and detailed histological features diagnostic of the disease are discussed. This is the first authentic, histologically proven case of Norrie′s disease from India. The absence of hearing loss and mental retardation at the time of presentation at the early stage of infancy and the fact that the case was sporadic do not detract from the diagnosis. However the child at the age of one year developed hearing loss.

  1. Blount disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unlike bowlegs , which tend to straighten as the child develops, Blount disease slowly gets worse. It can cause severe bowing of one or both legs. This condition is more common among African American children. It is also associated with obesity ...

  2. Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people over the age of 65 who gets it. ... A second PPSV23 vaccine is recommended for these persons five years after the first PPSV23. CDC recommends only ...

  3. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  4. Coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, Norelle R; Husby, Steffen; Sanders, David S

    2018-01-01

    Coeliac disease is increasingly recognized as a global problem in both children and adults. Traditionally, the findings of characteristic changes of villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis identified in duodenal biopsy samples taken during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy have...... been required for diagnosis. Although biopsies remain advised as necessary for the diagnosis of coeliac disease in adults, European guidelines for children provide a biopsy-sparing diagnostic pathway. This approach has been enabled by the high specificity and sensitivity of serological testing. However......, these guidelines are not universally accepted. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of a biopsy-avoiding pathway for the diagnosis of coeliac disease, especially in this current era of the call for more biopsies, even from the duodenal bulb, in the diagnosis of coeliac disease. In addition, a contrast...

  5. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of Addison disease include: Chronic diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting Darkening of the skin in some places Dehydration Dizziness when standing up Low-grade fever Extreme weakness , fatigue , and slow, sluggish movement Darker ...

  6. Alpers' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying liver disease, failure to thrive, infection-associated encephalopathy, spasticity, myoclonus (involuntary jerking of a muscle or group of muscles), seizures, or liver failure. An increased protein level is seen in ...

  7. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  8. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research ... Disease Information Page What research is being done? Recent discoveries show that most individuals (approximately 90 percent) with ...

  9. Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  10. Sever's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... boys 10 years to 12 years of age. Soccer players and gymnasts often get Sever’s disease, but ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  11. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The disease leads to shaking ( tremors ) and trouble walking and moving . ... include: Difficulty starting movement, such as starting to walk or ... are not moving. This is called resting tremor. Occur when your ...

  12. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement. The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal ...

  13. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010380 Evaluation non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and its influence on ability of daily living. WANG Rongfei(王荣飞),et al. Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Guangzhou Med Coll,Guangzhou 510000. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):273-276. Objective To evaluate the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD),and its influence on ability of daily living (ADL) in PD

  14. Menkes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...... of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms....

  15. Elm diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Dutch elm disease was found in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1930, and is now in most of the contiguous 48 states. The disease is caused by a fungus that has killed millions of wild and planted elms. Losses have been the greatest in the eastern United States. The fungus attacks all elms, but our native species, American, slippery, and rock elm have little or no resistance to the...

  16. Ollier disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüppner Harald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enchondromas are common intraosseous, usually benign cartilaginous tumors, that develop in close proximity to growth plate cartilage. When multiple enchondromas are present, the condition is called enchondromatosis also known as Ollier disease (WHO terminology. The estimated prevalence of Ollier disease is 1/100,000. Clinical manifestations often appear in the first decade of life. Ollier disease is characterized by an asymmetric distribution of cartilage lesions and these can be extremely variable (in terms of size, number, location, evolution of enchondromas, age of onset and of diagnosis, requirement for surgery. Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformities, limb-length discrepancy, and the potential risk for malignant change to chondrosarcoma. The condition in which multiple enchondromatosis is associated with soft tissue hemangiomas is known as Maffucci syndrome. Until now both Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome have only occurred in isolated patients and not familial. It remains uncertain whether the disorder is caused by a single gene defect or by combinations of (germ-line and/or somatic mutations. The diagnosis is based on clinical and conventional radiological evaluations. Histological analysis has a limited role and is mainly used if malignancy is suspected. There is no medical treatment for enchondromatosis. Surgery is indicated in case of complications (pathological fractures, growth defect, malignant transformation. The prognosis for Ollier disease is difficult to assess. As is generally the case, forms with an early onset appear more severe. Enchondromas in Ollier disease present a risk of malignant transformation of enchondromas into chondrosarcomas.

  17. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the potential to affect ... control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary ...

  18. Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Roon, Alexander C; Reese, George E; Orchard, Timothy R; Tekkis, Paris P

    2007-11-07

    Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty.

  19. Dent's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  20. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  1. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosed with hypothyroidism or had not yet started treatment for hypothyroidism. 4 Problems during pregnancy. The unborn baby's brain ... can last up to a year and requires treatment. Most often, thyroid function returns to normal as the ... from Hashimoto's disease treated during pregnancy? During pregnancy, ...

  2. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  3. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  4. Grover's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the ... dermatosis) is a condition that appears suddenly as itchy red spots on the trunk, most often in older men. Minor cases of Grover's disease may be rather common. ...

  5. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  6. Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects how the body breaks down and uses aspartic acid . ... scan Head MRI scan Urine chemistry for elevated aspartic acid ... Matalon KM, Matalon RK. Aspartic acid (Canavan disease). In: ... JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. ...

  7. DEVIC'S DISEASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had been poor in the right eye and he had found it hard to pass urine. ... right optic:-nerve disease, and was followed in 1880 by mention pupil was large and reacted very sluggishly to light, and the left .... The enzyme theory is that an enzyme-.

  8. Wilson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eye (jaundice) Golden-brown eye discoloration (Kayser-Fleischer rings) Fluid buildup ... is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that to develop the disease you must inherit one copy of the ...

  9. Morgellons disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  10. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  11. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  12. [Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinkler, M

    2012-09-01

    The clinical signs and symptoms of primary adrenal insufficiency are unspecific often causing a delayed diagnosis or even misdiagnosis. In the diagnostic work-up the short synacthen test is regarded as the gold standard. Hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone are the preferred therapy for Addison's disease. The management and surveillance of therapy requires experience and several aspects need to be followed to prevent side effects which might occur due to overtreatment or undertreatment. Very important aspects in therapy are the repeated teaching of the patient and relatives, the issuing of an emergency steroid card and the prescription of a glucocorticoid emergency set. Acute adrenal failure (adrenal crisis), which might be the first manifestation of adrenal insufficiency, is a life-threatening situation requiring immediate glucocorticoid administration and fluid substitution. The most common causes for an adrenal crisis are gastrointestinal infections and fever and discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy. This article gives an up-to-date overview of diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Addison's disease.

  13. Joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  14. Thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  15. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  16. Gaucher's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainaux, B.; Christophe, C.; Hanquinet, S.; Perlmutter, N.

    1992-01-01

    We report our observations made by conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3 1/2-year-old girl with Gaucher's disease. The interest of the case consists in the exceptional lungs involvement, the demonstration by MRI of the bone marrow involvement and the necrosis and fibrosis of the liver, as shown by CT. This liver complication has been previously reported only once. (orig.)

  17. Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  18. Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Esteche, V.; Menafra Prieto, M.; Ormaechea Gorricho, R.; Vignolo Scalone, G.; Larre Borges, A.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the Cushings disease in its various aspects. It highlights the importance of early diagnosis to avoid repercussions hypercortisolism secondary to parenchymal. We describe the findings in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), noting that the pituitary adenoma is often of small size and sometimes not visible on MRI. The treatment of choice remains surgical treatment other contingencies exist for particular cases (Author) [es

  19. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  20. Heavy Chain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  1. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  2. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  3. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  4. Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  6. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  7. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  8. Celiac Disease Changes Everything

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  9. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... by Barbara Goldstein, MD (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  10. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gland in the neck, thick and coarse hair. Addison’s Disease Arare disease involving the adrenal gland. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with addison’s disease is significant. Symptoms of Addison’s may include weight ...

  11. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  12. Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Mad Cow Disease What's ... are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal ...

  13. Niemann-Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPD; Sphingomyelinase deficiency; Lipid storage disorder - Niemann-Pick disease; Lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick ... lipofuscinoses or Batten disease (Wolman disease, cholesteryl ... metabolism of lipids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  14. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  15. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  16. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  17. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  18. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  19. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  20. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  1. Osler's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Mueller, U.; Lieb, J.; Schneider, G.; Ulmer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Osler's disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes and often in organs, such as the lungs, liver and brain (arteriovenous malformations AVM). Various types are known. Patients may present with epistaxis. Teleangiectasia can be identified by visual inspection during physical examination of the skin or oral cavity or by endoscopy. Diagnosis is made after clinical examination and genetic testing based on the Curacao criteria. Modern imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become more important as they can depict the AVMs. Pulmonary AVMs can be depicted in CT imaging even without the use of a contrast agent while other locations including the central nervous system (CNS) usually require administration of contrast agents. Knowledge of possible clinical manifestations in various organs, possible complications and typical radiological presentation is mandatory to enable adequate therapy of these patients. Interventional procedures are becoming increasingly more important in the treatment of HHT patients. (orig.) [de

  2. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  3. Hematopoietic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Hiroo

    1992-01-01

    A-bombing panicked many people with anxiety because they suffered from various symptoms after A-bombing (ie, they generally called them A-bomb disease). In this chapter, major two conditions (ie, leukopenia and anemia), which caused their symptoms, are reviewed based on the early data soon after A-bombing. According to the chronological changes in both white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, both leukopenia and anemia are discussed. The findings can be divided into acute (one week or at least 10 days), subacute (2 weeks to one month), and delayed (thereafter) periods. During an acute period, some exposed even at ≤200 m from the hypocenter showed WBC count of 6,000/mm 3 or more one week after exposure but others exposed at 1,500-2,000 m showed WBC count of less than 3,000/mm 3 , suggesting the influence of shielding on WBC count. WBC count sometimes became the lowest during a subacute period, although it was normal during an acute period. A survey for WBC count during a delayed period (one year later) showed that WBC count of less than 4,000/mm 3 was more frequent in the exposed group (78/523 A-bomb survivors, 14.9%) than the non-exposed group (6/173 persons, 3.5%). In the exposed group, leukopenia was independent of distance and symptoms at the time of exposure. For anemia, there was no data available during an acute period. Anemia frequently occurred during a subacute period. Morphological abnormality of RBC tended to be high in death cases. A delayed survey on anemia 10 years after exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the factors, such as hemoglobin, RBC count, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, between the exposed and non-exposed groups. (N.K.)

  4. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Galindo, C; Ouellet, D R

    2015-01-01

    Nine Holstein cows with rumen cannulas and indwelling catheters in splanchnic blood vessels were used in a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures to study the effect of increased early postpartum AA supply on splanchnic and mammary AA metabolism. At calving, cows we...

  5. Suplementação nitrogenada ruminal e/ou abomasal em bovinos alimentados com forragem tropical

    OpenAIRE

    Rufino, Luana Marta de Almeida

    2011-01-01

    Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar os efeitos da suplementação com compostos nitrogenados no rúmen e/ou no abomaso sobre o consumo, a digestiblidade, a dinâmica ruminal dos compostos fibrosos e os parâmetros do metabolismo dos compostos nitrogenados em bovinos alimentados com forragem tropical. O experimento foi conduzido entre os meses de junho de 2010 e fevereiro de 2011, sendo utilizados 4 novilhos Nelore, não castrados, com peso corporal médio (PC) de 227±11 kg, fistulados no rúmen e ...

  6. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Weidlich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia. Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  7. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  8. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  9. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington's disease is an inherited intricate brain illness. It is a neurodegenerative, insidious disorder; the onset of the disease is very late to diagnose. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin gene, which encodes an abnormally long polyglutamine repeat in the Huntingtin protein. Huntington's disease ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  11. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  13. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  14. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  16. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  17. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  18. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  19. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  20. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Who Gets ALS? Although this disease can strike anyone, ALS is extremely rare in kids. According ... home to provide care that the family cannot handle alone. Living With Lou Gehrig's Disease Living with ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Does Caregiving Change from Day to Day? Unconditional Love How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  2. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... materials Why is CDC concerned about Lyme disease? Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... sixth most common Nationally Notifiable disease . Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  3. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? CareMAP: Dealing ...

  5. Chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease, together with other related non -communicable diseases. (NCDs), poses not only a threat ... but because if we do not act against NCDs we will also be increasing individual and ... respiratory diseases and cancer. This is in recognition ...

  6. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  7. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  8. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  9. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  10. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  12. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  13. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  14. Conjugative transfer of clostridial shuttle vectors from Escherichia coli to Clostridium difficile through circumvention of the restriction barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Des; O'Keeffe, Triona A T; Elmore, Michael; Herbert, Mike; McLeod, Anne; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Ostrowski, Anna; Minton, Nigel P

    2002-10-01

    Progress towards understanding the molecular basis of virulence in Clostridium difficile has been hindered by the lack of effective gene transfer systems. We have now, for the first time, developed procedures that may be used to introduce autonomously replicating vectors into this organism through their conjugative, oriT-based mobilization from Escherichia coli donors. Successful transfer was achieved through the use of a plasmid replicon isolated from an indigenous C. difficile plasmid, pCD6, and through the characterization and subsequent circumvention of host restriction/modification (RM) systems. The characterized replicon is the first C. difficile plasmid replicon to be sequenced and encodes a large replication protein (RepA) and a repetitive region composed of a 35 bp iteron sequence repeated seven times. Strain CD6 has two RM systems, CdiCD6I/M.CdiCD6I and CdiCD6II/M. CdiCD6II, with equivalent specificities to Sau96I/M. Sau96I (5'-GGNMCC-3') and MboI/M. MboI (5'-GMATC-3') respectively. A second strain (CD3) possesses a type IIs restriction enzyme, Cdi I, which cleaves the sequence 5'-CATCG-3' between the fourth and fifth nucleotide to give a blunt-ended fragment. This is the first time that an enzyme with this specificity has been reported. The sequential addition of this site to vectors showed that each site caused between a five- and 16-fold reduction in transfer efficiency. The transfer efficiencies achieved with both strains equated to between 1.0 x 10-6 and 5.5 x 10-5 transconjugants per donor.

  15. Genome-scale modeling using flux ratio constraints to enable metabolic engineering of clostridial metabolism in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Michael J; Yen, Jiun Y; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S

    2012-05-14

    Genome-scale metabolic networks and flux models are an effective platform for linking an organism genotype to its phenotype. However, few modeling approaches offer predictive capabilities to evaluate potential metabolic engineering strategies in silico. A new method called "flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio)" was developed in this research and applied to a new genome-scale model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (iCAC490) that contains 707 metabolites and 794 reactions. FBrAtio was used to model wild-type metabolism and metabolically engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum where only flux ratio constraints and thermodynamic reversibility of reactions were required. The FBrAtio approach allowed solutions to be found through standard linear programming. Five flux ratio constraints were required to achieve a qualitative picture of wild-type metabolism for C. acetobutylicum for the production of: (i) acetate, (ii) lactate, (iii) butyrate, (iv) acetone, (v) butanol, (vi) ethanol, (vii) CO2 and (viii) H2. Results of this simulation study coincide with published experimental results and show the knockdown of the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase increases butanol to acetone selectivity, while the simultaneous over-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase greatly increases ethanol production. FBrAtio is a promising new method for constraining genome-scale models using internal flux ratios. The method was effective for modeling wild-type and engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum.

  16. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of

  17. Characterization of the human predominant fecal microbiota - With special focus on the Clostridial clusters IV and XIVa

    OpenAIRE

    Maukonen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is considered to be a complex fermentor with a metabolic potential rivaling that of the liver. In addition to its primary function in digestion, it affects the human host in numerous ways: maturation and modulation of the immune system, production of short-chain fatty acids and gases, transformation of bile acids, formation of vitamins, and also potential formation of mutagenic, toxic, and carcinogenic substances. Commensal bacteria are able to modulate the expression...

  18. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  19. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  20. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... Schuppan D, Kelly CP. Etiologies and predictors of diagnosis in nonresponsive celiac disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5 : 445–50. Finding ...

  1. The integrated disease network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  2. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  3. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  5. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  6. Health management practices and disease prevalence in dairy sheep systems in Argentina Práticas de manejo sanitário e frequência de doenças em ovinos leiteiros na Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H. Suárez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional survey of 19 dairy sheep farms in Argentina was carried out with the purpose to know farm management, health practices, and occurrence and mortality of diseases. The survey comprised 40% of all sheep milking farms in Argentina. A questionnaire was conducted by way of personal interviews with sheep owners during farm visits. The proportions of farms reporting routine vaccination for clostridial diseases, contagious ecthyma, pneumonia and mineral and vitamin parenteral administration were 63%, 47.3%, 16.6% and 42.1% respectively. Regular treatment against lice was used in 37.5% of the farms, and 89.5% o the farmers treated against gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN. The mean number of GIN drenches per farm was 2.26±1.78 annually. In 68.4% of the milking flocks the California Mastitis Test was regularly done and 55.6% of the farmer managers had sampled their flocks once a year for Brucella ovis antibodies. During the pre-mating period respectively 68.4% and 50% of farmers clinically examined their rams and ewe for general health and teeth condition. The udders of ewes were frequently inspected at the start of each milking period. The most important parasite problems noticed were GIN (reported by 57.9% of farmers, lice (57.9% and scabies (10.5% and the most frequent infectious diseases were ecthyma (73.7%, pneumonia and other respiratory problems (57.9%, clinical mastitis (55.6%, clostridial diseases (36.9% and foot lameness (35.2%. Photosensitivity (47.4% and ruminal acidosis (42.1% were reported as other frequent toxic or metabolic disorders. Owners mentioned that the mean lifespan or milk productive time per ewe was 4.5±1.4 years. Perinatal lamb mortality was 8.5% and the total flock mortality rates, above the first 24 h of life was 6.9%. The high rates of lamb mortality during the pre-weaning (10.3% and post-weaning (5.9% periods indicate that this problem, as well as the most prevalent diseases, should be the subject of further

  7. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  8. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  9. Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsania, Mitali; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2017-05-01

    Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Wilson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Hanağası

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Clinical phenotypes include hepatic, haemolytic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Wilson’s disease is caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. ATP7B encodes a hepatic copper-transporting protein, which is important for copper excretion into bile. Neurological symptoms in Wilson’s disease include variable combinations of dysathria, ataxia, parkinsonism, dystonia and tremor. Wilson’s disease is lethal if untreated. This review discusses the epidemiology, genetics, clinical features, etiopathophysiology, diagnostic tests, and treatment of Wilson’s disease

  11. Lysosomal storage diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Library is an extensive collection of books, fact sheets, videos, podcasts, and more. To get started, use ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  15. Lyme Disease Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not known to transmit Lyme disease include Lone star ticks ( Amblyomma americanum ), the American dog tick ( Dermacentor ... of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Beckham Leads Stretches Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? What Are Some Practical Strategies ...

  17. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in clinical ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? Why Is It Important to Continue Self-Care ...

  20. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: ...

  3. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  4. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting celiac disease, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia , and ... Celiac tests are usually ordered for people with symptoms suggesting celiac disease, including anemia and abdominal pain. Sometimes celiac testing ...

  5. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  6. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, Parte 1 ...

  10. Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  11. Gum Disease and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ... to Know? Why Is Comprehensive Care or Team Approach Important? 2013 PSA Featuring Katie Couric What Are ...

  13. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for Following a Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 What Is Patient-Centered Care? ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Changes Around the ...

  16. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parkinson's Care Partners OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Progression ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? Hallucinations and ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... the Helpline? What are some strategies to prevent falls in PD patients? How Does Speech Therapy Help ...

  19. Machado-Joseph Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Machado-Joseph Disease Fact Sheet What is Machado-Joseph disease? What are the ... the repeat is in a protein-producing or coding region of the gene. Modifications of the mutant ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... or Exercise Programs Are Recommended? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: Treatment ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Patients with Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movimientos y Caídas, Parte 2 What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Caregiver ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Getting Dressed What ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Putting Things in Place ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert Care Research shows people with Parkinson’s who ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: ... and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model ... Disease Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease ...

  8. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Who Were Treated with hGH Thyroid Disease & Pregnancy Thyroid disease is a group of disorders that ... prescribes. What role do thyroid hormones play in pregnancy? Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... your quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  10. Glomerular Disease in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wiles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences exist in the prevalence of glomerular diseases. Data based on histological diagnosis underestimate the prevalence of preeclampsia, which is almost certainly the commonest glomerular disease in the world, and uniquely gender-specific. Glomerular disease affects fertility via disease activity, the therapeutic use of cyclophosphamide, and underlying chronic kidney disease. Techniques to preserve fertility during chemotherapy and risk minimization of artificial reproductive techniques are considered. The risks, benefits, and effectiveness of different contraceptive methods for women with glomerular disease are outlined. Glomerular disease increases the risk of adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including preeclampsia; yet, diagnosis of preeclampsia is complicated by the presence of hypertension and proteinuria that precede pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in pregnancy is examined, in addition to the use of emerging angiogenic biomarkers. The safety of drugs prescribed for glomerular disease in relation to reproductive health is detailed. The impact of both gender and pregnancy on long-term prognosis is discussed.

  11. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has used its fundraising efforts to help further research programs at Mount Sinai. Spotlight: Gaucher Gaucher Disease is the most common of the lipid storage diseases. Learn about its symptoms, how it ...

  12. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better understanding of how neurological deficits arise in lipid storage diseases and on the development of new treatments targeting disease mechanisms. Specific research on the gangliodisoses including expanding the use of ...

  13. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  14. Maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000373.htm Maple syrup urine disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a disorder in ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Las Actividades en ...

  16. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Help is just a click away. ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Misconceptions About Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Pensamiento y el Comportamiento, Parte 2 CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Musica en vivo ...

  20. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this disease. Learn more In your area About Shop A A ... Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model Interventions Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease Psychosis: ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Is There a Cure ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary ... Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? Caregiver Summit 2016: Maintaining Dignity & Identity What to Expect Emotionally Walking for ... Around the House: Part 2 What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? Tips for Caregivers ...

  7. Gallstone disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cohort study was to determine whether subjects with gallstone disease identified by screening of a general population had increased overall mortality when compared to gallstone-free participants and to explore causes of death. METHODS: The study population (N...... built. RESULTS: Gallstone disease was present in 10%. Mortality was 46% during median 24.7 years of follow-up with 1% lost. Overall mortality and death from cardiovascular diseases were significantly associated to gallstone disease. Death from unknown causes was significantly associated to gallstone...... disease and death from cancer and gastrointestinal disease was not associated. No differences in mortality for ultrasound-proven gallstones or cholecystectomy were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Gallstone disease is associated with increased overall mortality and to death from cardiovascular disease. Gallstones...

  8. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rule out conditions such as asthma , cystic fibrosis , acid reflux, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, and immune deficiency. Various ... a lung infection. Acid-blocking medicines can prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's Expert ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Otros Trastornos que Tienen Síntomas Similares? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... Disease? Are There Disorders That Have Similar Symptoms? How Does Parkinson's Disease ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Help is just a click away. ...

  12. Takayasu's disease and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basic disease appears to be unaffected by pregnancy. S Afr Med J ... Takayasu's disease is an idiopathic chronic granulomatous .... prevalence of tuberculosis in Asia." In our 3 .... lower limbs may be significantly lower than the central blood.

  13. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth / For Kids / Chronic Kidney Diseases What's ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  14. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  15. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... About Sexual Dysfunction? Attachment: consultation.jpg CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Briefings: Dealing with Dementia in PD Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's ... and Tomorrow Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving ...

  2. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  3. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  4. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Credit: NIAID Some classic histopathologic changes ... as Mycobacterium leprae . Why Is the Study of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) a Priority for NIAID? At the ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexual Dysfunction? Attachment: consultation.jpg What Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story CareMAP: ...

  6. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, Alana Y.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Massey, Brandon Z.; Graham, Anna R.; Friend, Christopher J.; Walsh, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by intermittent episodes of acute inflammation manifested by oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. We report a rare case of myonecrosis associated with Behcet's disease. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease can mimic soft tissue abscess and therefore awareness of this entity in the appropriate clinical setting is important for initiation of appropriate and timely treatment. (orig.)

  7. Addison′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Brata Sarkar; Subrata Sarkar; Supratim Ghosh; Subhankar Bandyopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrinal disorder, with several oral and systemic manifestations. A variety of pathological processes may cause Addison's disease. Classically, hyperpigmentation is associated with the disease, and intraoral pigmentation is perceived as the initial sign and develops earlier than the dermatological pigmentation. The symptoms of the disease usually progress slowly and an event of illness or accident can make the condition worse and may lead to a life-threatening cr...

  8. Parkinson's disease and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, K; Bennett, G

    2001-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the subject of anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease. Up to 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience clinically significant anxiety. This anxiety may be a psychological reaction to the stress of the illness or may be related to the neurochemical changes of the disease itself. Antiparkinsonian drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis of the anxiety. The anxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease patients appear to be clustered in th...

  9. [Tick-borne diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot Dupont, H; Raoult, D

    1993-05-01

    Due to their worldwide distribution, from hottest to coldest climates, and due to their behaviour, ticks are capable of transmitting numerous human and animal bacterial viral or parasitous diseases. Depending on the disease, they play the role of biological vector or intermediate host. In France, six tick borne diseases are of epidemiologic importance. Q fever (not often tick-borne), Mediterranean Spotted Fever, Lyme disease, Turalemia (human and animal), Babesiosis and Tick-borne Viral Encephalitis.

  10. Gender and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Ruijter, Hester M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    More women than men die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year in every major developed country and most emerging economies. Nonetheless, CVD has often been considered as men’s disease due to the higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) of men at younger age. This has led to the

  11. Diseases of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth

    1964-01-01

    Diseases are a major concern to forest managers throughout the lodgepole pine type. In many areas, diseases constitute the primary management problem. As might be expected for a tree that has a distribution from Baja California, Mexico to the Yukon and from the Pacific to the Dakotas, the diseases of chief concern vary in different parts of the tree's range. For...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: La Alimentación y la Deglución, ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Walk at Moving Day CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress Aware in Care: Real Stories CareMAP: End-of- ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Overview of Parkinson's Disease ...

  14. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tested for celiac disease and if negative the test should be repeated on a periodic basis. These conditions include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (requiring insulin therapy), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Turner’s syndrome, Williams syndrome, Graves disease and Sjogren’s disease. what turns ...

  15. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site ACG Patients Home / Digestive Health Topic / Peptic Ulcer Disease Peptic Ulcer Disease Basics Overview An “ulcer” is an open ... for pain in patients at risk for peptic ulcer disease. Peptic – caused by acid. PPIs – P roton P ump ...

  16. Armillaria Root Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Williams; C.G. III Shaw; P.M. Wargo; W.H. Sites

    1986-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is found throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world. In the continental United States, the disease has been reported in nearly every State. Hosts include hundreds of species of trees, shrubs, vines, and forbs growing in forests, along roadsides, and in cultivated areas. The disease is caused by fungi, which live as parasites on...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Parkinson's Disease? Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  18. diseases free body

    OpenAIRE

    thararose

    2018-01-01

    Diseases are very common now a days . It is our food habits itself that causes this diseases. Diseases can cause many health problems. goiter causes and symptoms It is very important to follow healthy food habits and to maintain good health. A healthy body is always a treasure to every person.

  19. Granulomatous diseases in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczkowski, J.; Barcinski, G.; Narozny, W.

    1994-01-01

    The authors describe clinical material of 49 patients treated in period 1960-1992 at the Dept. of Otolaryngology Medical Acad. of Gdansk on reason various granulomatous diseases. On the ground of retrospective analysis 44 cases with mild granulomas disease and 5 cases with malignant granulomatous disease were separated. Clinical course diagnosis, treatment and prognosis were discussed. (author)

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part ... There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? CareMAP: ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part ... There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? CareMAP: ...

  2. Lyme Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lyme Disease KidsHealth / For Kids / Lyme Disease What's in this article? Ticks Want to Suck ... and summer, you might hear about something called Lyme disease. It has nothing to do with limes, but ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Foundation How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  4. Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Walters

    1992-01-01

    Since its discovery in the United States in 1930, Dutch elm disease has killed thousands of native elms. The three native elms, American, slippery, and rock, have little or no resistance to Dutch elm disease, but individual trees within each species vary in susceptibility to the disease. The most important of these, American elm, is scattered in upland stands but is...

  5. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  6. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory...... pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future...... prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline- based recommendations...

  7. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not as great as men's. Heredity (Including Race) Children of parents with heart disease are more likely to develop it themselves. African Americans have more severe high blood pressure than Caucasians and a higher risk of heart ...

  8. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  9. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  10. Diagnosis of Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Lukacs, Zoltan; Straub, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) in children and adults can be challenging because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and considerable overlap of signs and symptoms found in other neuromuscular diseases. This review evaluates some...... to identify late-onset Pompe disease often leads to false-negative results and subsequent delays in identification and treatment of the disorder. Serum creatine kinase level can be normal or only mildly elevated in late-onset Pompe disease and is not very helpful alone to suggest the diagnosis...

  11. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Didde; Andreassen, Bente Utoft; Heegaard, Niels Henrik H

    2018-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease has been reported in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is regarded an extraintestinal manifestation or more rarely a side effect of the medical treatment. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we describe the extent of kidney pathology in a cohort of 56...... children with IBD. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for markers of kidney disease and ultrasonography was performed to evaluate pole-to-pole kidney length. Results: We found that 25% of the patients had either previously reported kidney disease or ultrasonographic signs of chronic kidney disease...... are at risk of chronic kidney disease, and the risk seems to be increased with the severity of the disease....

  12. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  13. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  14. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  15. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  16. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  17. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...... to the number of patients suffering from the disease. This hypothesis is based on a study of bipolar disorder....

  18. Castleman disease (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melikyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes – a rare benign lymphoproliferative disease with prolonged asymptomatic course, associated with a wide variety of autoimmune and oncological diseases and the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The rare occurrence of this disease and a variety of clinical course did not allow for a complete and consistent research on the etiology and pathogenesis and the standard therapies development. In recent years, the number of patients with Castleman disease in the Russian Federation has increased, which requires its recognition among non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphadenopathy. The article provides an overview about clinical and histological variants of Castleman’s disease, its pathogenesis concepts, classification and treatment.

  19. Celiac disease in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malekzadeh R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until a few decades ago, celiac disease was considered to be essentially a disease of European people and to be very rare in Middle Eastern countries. During the last two decades, having met the criteria for the WHO general screening, the advent and application of novel serological assays used to screen for celiac disease and the use of endoscopic small bowel biopsy have led to increasing numbers of diagnoses of celiac disease in western countries. With this new data, our knowledge on both the clinical pattern and epidemiology of celiac disease has increased, and is now known to be a relatively common autoimmune disorder. Studies performed in different parts of the developing world have shown that the prevalence of celiac disease in this area is similar to or even higher than that in western countries. In fact, celiac disease is known to be the most common form of chronic diarrhea in Iran. However, contrary to common belief, celiac disease is more than a pure digestive alteration. It is a protean systemic disease, and, with a 95 percent genetic predisposition, has a myriad of symptoms including gastrointestinal, dermatological, dental, neurological and behavioral that can occur at a variety of ages. Monosymptomatic, oligosymptomatic, atypical (without gastrointestinal symptoms, silent and latent forms of celiac disease have been identified. In this study we review the epidemiology of celiac disease based on the studies performed in Iran and discuss its pathogenesis, the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of celiac disease and the importance of its diagnosis and treatment in Iran.

  20. [Male breast diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin-Lefebvre, D; Misery, L

    2013-01-01

    Because andrology is relatively undeveloped in France, the dermatologist is often the doctor first consulted for diseases of the nipple in men. All dermatological diseases can in fact occur at this site. There are some specific nipple diseases such as gynaecomastia, congenital abnormalities, hyperplasia, benign tumours and breast cancer. All clinical examinations and laboratory examinations should focus on diagnosis of this type of cancer and its elimination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Diseases Transmitted by Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    Although many people these days actually work very hard at leisure time activities, diseases are most commonly acquired from birds during the course of work in the usual sense of the term, not leisure. However, travel for pleasure to areas where the diseases are highly endemic puts people at risk of acquiring some of these bird-related diseases (for example, histoplasmosis and arbovirus infections), as does ownership of birds as pets (psittacosis).

  2. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  3. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most ... blood vessels in your kidneys. Other causes of kidney disease Other causes of kidney disease include a genetic ...

  4. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Hispanic Women “I thought it couldn’t be true,” says ... disease is their No. 1 killer. Why Hispanic women? While heart disease doesn’t discriminate, you could ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not have celiac disease . On average, a diagnosis of celiac disease is not made until 6 to 10 years ... and tissues and leads to the signs and symptoms of celiac disease . Almost all people with celiac disease have specific ...

  6. Mad Cow Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Parents / Mad Cow Disease What's ... Is Being Done About It Print About Mad Cow Disease Mad cow disease has been in the ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  8. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 3,2018 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  9. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with Freezing Episodes? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of ... or Team Approach Important? OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & ...

  11. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia......, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  12. "Diseases and natural kinds".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2005-01-01

    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease can be understood as making necessary reference to living natural kinds without invoking the claim that diseases themselves are natural kinds. The idea that natural kinds have a natural disposition to flourish as the kinds of things that they are provides a telos to which to tether the notion of disease - an objective telos that is broader than mere survival and narrower than subjective choice. It is argued that while nosology is descriptive and may have therapeutic implications, disease classification is fundamentally explanatory. Sickness and illness, while referring to the same state of affairs, can be distinguished from disease phenomenologically. Scientific and diagnostic fallibility in making judgments about diseases do not diminish the objectivity of this notion of disease. Diseases are things, not kinds. Injury is a concept parallel to disease that also makes necessary reference to living natural kinds. These ideas provide a new possibility for the development of a philosophy of medicine with implications for medical ethics.

  13. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers of Excellence Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert ...

  15. Moyamoya disease: Diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Kułakowska, Alina; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Korneluk-Sadzyńska, Alicja; Brzozowska, Joanna; Drozdowski, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a progressive vasculopathy leading to stenosis of the main intracranial arteries. The incidence of moyamoya disease is high in Asian countries; in Europe and North America, the prevalence of the disease is considerably lower. Clinically, the disease may be of ischaemic, haemorrhagic and epileptic type. Cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbance are atypical symptoms of moyamoya disease. Characteristic angiographic features of the disease include stenosis or occlusion of the arteries of the circle of Willis, as well as the development of collateral vasculature. Currently, magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography with multi-row systems are the main imaging methods of diagnostics of the entire range of vascular changes in moyamoya disease. The most common surgical treatment combines the direct arterial anastomosis between the superficial temporal artery and middle cerebral, and the indirect synangiosis involving placement of vascularised tissue in the brain cortex, in order to promote neoangiogenesis. Due to progressive changes, correct and early diagnosis is of basic significance in selecting patients for surgery, which is the only effective treatment of the disease. An appropriate qualification to surgery should be based on a comprehensive angiographic and imaging evaluation of brain structures. Despite the rare occurrence of moyamoya disease in European population, it should be considered as one of causes of ischaemic or haemorrhagic strokes, especially in young patients

  16. Immunologic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references

  17. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  18. Neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Main purposes of neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease have been moved from diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's disease to diagnosis of very early Alzheimer's disease at a prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment, prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, and differential diagnosis from other diseases causing dementia. Structural MRI studies and functional studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and brain perfusion SPECT are widely used in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Outstanding progress in diagnostic accuracy of these neuroimaging modalities has been obtained using statistical analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis after spatial normalization of individual scans to a standardized brain-volume template instead of visual inspection or a conventional region of interest technique. In a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease, this statistical approach revealed gray matter loss in the entorhinal and hippocampal areas and hypometabolism or hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex. These two findings might be related in view of anatomical knowledge that the regions are linked through the circuit of Papez. This statistical approach also offers accurate evaluation of therapeutical effects on brain metabolism or perfusion. The latest development in functional imaging relates to the final pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease-amyloid plaques. Amyloid imaging might be an important surrogate marker for trials of disease-modifying agents. (author)

  19. Chronic Diseases Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Templates All Chronic Surveillance Systems Communications Center Social Media Press Room Press Release Archives Multimedia Communication Campaigns Publications Chronic Disease Overview 2016–2017 At A ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Dealing with Dementia OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, ... Care or Team Approach Important? What Is the Relationship Between Depression and ...

  1. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M.M.; Salama, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  2. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  3. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, M M; Salama, R P [Ajman Univ. of Science and Technology Network, Abu-Dhabi Campus (United Arab Emirates)

    2004-06-01

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  4. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future.

  5. Disease quantification in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the House: Part 1 What Are the Neuroprotective Benefits of Exercise for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Falls: Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Changes Around the House: Part 2 CareMAP: ...

  8. Insects and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Couston

    2009-01-01

    Insects and diseases are a natural part of forested ecosystems. Their activity is partially regulated by biotic factors, e.g., host abundance, host quality; physical factors, e.g., soil, climate; and disturbances (Berryman 1986). Insects and diseases can influence both forest patterns and forest processes by causing, for example, defoliation and mortality. These...

  9. Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure High blood cholesterol Coronary heart disease Stroke Metabolic syndrome Screening and Prevention Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) and its complications. Know your family history of health problems related to P.A. ...

  10. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    women with rheumatic diseases constitute a high-risk population, with potential adverse fetal ... who are not actively planning a pregnancy, or are taking drugs that are ... disease.[9] Fetal loss (miscarriage or stillbirth) occurs in about 20% of ..... trimester,[3] with up to 70% of patients needing NSAIDs. .... No. Use low dose.

  11. Coeliac disease and lymphangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Perisic, V N; Kokai, G

    1992-01-01

    Two out of 74 children with coeliac disease demonstrated severe intestinal protein loss. In both children a serial small bowel biopsy specimen showed intestinal lymphangiectasia to be also present. Intestinal lymphangiectasia is another disorder that may be associated with coeliac disease.

  12. Beech Bark Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Houston; James T. O' Brien

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark disease causes significant mortality and defect in American beech, Fagus grandifolia (Ehrh.). The disease results when bark, attacked and altered by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind., is invaded and killed by fungi, primarily Nectria coccinea var. faginata Lohman, Watson, and Ayers, and sometimes N. galligena Bres.

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... for PD Patients? How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Bathroom: Part 2 CareMAP: El Vestirse ¿Cómo ...

  15. Kashin-Beck's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, J.; Uyttendaele, D.; Broecke, van den W.; Claessens, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    A case of Kashin-Beck's disease is presented. It is an acquired, disabling, polyarthritic, degenerative condition of early onset, sometimes leading to a variable degree of dwarfism. It occurs endemically in certain Asian areas. Treatment is, if possible, preventive. In the established disease the

  16. Myopathy in Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mor, F; Green, P; Wysenbeek, A J

    1987-01-01

    Since the first description of primary adrenocortical insufficiency by Thomas Addison in 1855 several large series of patients with Addison's disease have been published. The common signs and symptoms include: weakness, hyperpigmentation, weight loss, gastrointestinal complaints, and hypotension. It is rare for patients with Addison's disease to present with musculoskeletal symptoms including flexion contractures, hyperkalaemic neuromyopathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, migratory myalgia, sciati...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Functioning? CareMAP: Las Actividades en Casa CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Música en vivo ...

  18. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Medicinal: “Terapia fisica para el Parkinson” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  20. Imaging in hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the diagnostic and interventional use of imaging techniques in hepatobiliary disease. The first of the book's two sections describes the role of imaging in the diagnostic work up of common clinical syndromes. The second part is concerned with therapy and reviews interventional techniques for hepatobiliary disease

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Disease Affect the Urinary System? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: ... Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: Getting Dressed CareMAP: End-of-Life Care ... Care: Real Stories How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's Disease CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  3. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et.al. Clinical manifestations of kidney disease among US adults with diabetes. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;316( ... of Washington, Associate Director, Kidney Research Institute ... The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Health Information Center ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rest and Sleep: Part 2 What Are the Causes of Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have Similar Symptoms? How ... What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive Behavior in a Loved One with PD? How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? CareMAP: Getting Dressed Adolfo Diaz, PTA, NPF - ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for ... Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios para Realizar en Casa, ...

  6. Cushing's disease and craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, F M; Stanhope, R; Preece, M A

    1987-01-01

    A 14-year old girl presented with growth failure and Cushing's disease. Histological examination confirmed a craniopharyngioma but failed to show that the tumour secreted adrenocorticotrophic hormone. We suggest that her Cushing's disease was caused by hypothalamic dysfunction associated with increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone secretion, secondary to the craniopharyngioma. Images Figure PMID:2823728

  7. Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jesse S.; Adriaanse, Bryan A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2017-01-01

    Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged...

  8. Malignent diseases in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havers, W.

    1980-01-01

    As malignant diseases in childhood are rare, and only a small group of radiotherapists have been able to gain experience in this field, this chapter treats the particularities of childhood from this aspect. The side effects of radiotherapy are particularly important here for the growing and developing organism of the child. The most frequently occuring malignant diseases are treated individually. (MG) [de

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ... Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story When and What Type of Treatment Is Initiated After Diagnosis? CareMAP: Las ...

  10. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  11. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Psychosis What Medications Help with Cognitive Impairment? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 2 Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life What Treatments Exist for Parkinson's Disease Patients with a ... Learned Unconditional Love How Does the DBS Device ... When and What Type of Treatment Is Initiated After Diagnosis? Building ...

  14. Hodgkin's disease in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szelc, S.; Szeliga, E.

    1993-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome and its influence on the effect of the MOPP chemotherapy for 30 patients with Hodgkin's disease were analyzed. During the first 6 months after completing the treatment 305 of pregnancies were interrupted. Pregnancy during complete remission of Hodgkin's disease after combined treatment does not increase the risk of relapse and is not a risk to delivery and foetus. (author)

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Learned Unconditional Love How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Rest and Sleep: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  16. Pathology of Gaucher's Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-01

    Jun 1, 1974 ... disability in 2 of them. One patient also developed restric- tive lung disease, presumably on the ... Brother of case 9; diagnosed as Gaucher's. 8500 g disease at age 6 yrs on basis of hepato- ... other siblings, one of whom is said to have an enlarged spleen. Estimations of ,a-glucosidase on lymphocytes from.

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Health Part 2 How Does the DBS Device Work? ¿Cómo Se Diagnostica el Parkinson? CareMAP: Cambios para ...

  18. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Medication Schedule? CareMAP: Medicamentos y la Salud en General, Parte 2 CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Day to Day? CareMAP: Is a Care Facility Needed? CareMAP: Caring from Afar CareMAP: Dressing CareMAP: ... Overview of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ...

  1. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Parkinson's Disease Patients with a Depression Diagnosis? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 CareMAP: Ayudando a una ...

  3. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Day? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? NPF Caregiver Summit 2016: Tools For Family Caregivers: Caremap and Caring & Coping OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 2 CareMAP: ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Benefits of DBS Surgery? CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress Caregiver Summit 2016: Embracing The Challenge: A Panel ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Panel de Expertos: Sesión ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 Hallucinations and Delusions CareMAP: ...

  7. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... MAPC - Parkinson- Pasion, Positivismo y Participacion” CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 1 ...

  9. Bowel Diseases and Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Dorofeiev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review of contemporary publications analyzes the prevalence of combinations of bowel and renal diseases. Special attention is paid to the problem of correlation between bowel diseases and urolithiasis. We consider the possible pathogenic mechanisms of lesions, such as genetically determined violations of intestinal absorption and secretion, changes in the intestinal microbiota, systemic inflammatory response, water and electrolyte disturbances.

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's CareMAP: End-of-Life Care CareMAP: Thinking Changes: Part 1 Ask the ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Care: Real Stories How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Movement and Falls: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  12. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Patients with Parkinson's Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Movimientos y Caídas, ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Transportation: Part 1 How Does the DBS Device Work? CareMAP: Mealtime and Swallowing: Part 1 CareMAP: Cambios ...

  15. Kidney Disease Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, you can continue to live a productive life, work, spend time with friends and family, stay physically active, and do other things you enjoy. You may need to change what you eat and add healthy ... active, and enjoy life. Will my kidneys get better? Kidney disease is ...

  16. Diarrheal Diseases PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about the risk of diarrheal diseases after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  17. Tick-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, Robert L; Corey, Ralph

    2005-06-15

    Tick-borne diseases in the United States include Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, tularemia, babesiosis, Colorado tick fever, and relapsing fever. It is important for family physicians to consider these illnesses when patients present with influenza-like symptoms. A petechial rash initially affecting the palms and soles of the feet is associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever, whereas erythema migrans (annular macule with central clearing) is associated with Lyme disease. Various other rashes or skin lesions accompanied by fever and influenza-like illness also may signal the presence of a tick-borne disease. Early, accurate diagnosis allows treatment that may help prevent significant morbidity and possible mortality. Because 24 to 48 hours of attachment to the host are required for infection to occur, early removal can help prevent disease. Treatment with doxycycline or tetracycline is indicated for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, and relapsing fever. In patients with clinical findings suggestive of tick-borne disease, treatment should not be delayed for laboratory confirmation. If no symptoms follow exposure to tick bites, empiric treatment is not indicated. The same tick may harbor different infectious pathogens and transmit several with one bite. Advising patients about prevention of tick bites, especially in the summer months, may help prevent exposure to dangerous vector-borne diseases.

  18. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs. PMID:28496445

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? CareMAP: Life Beyond This Life CareMAP: El Vestirse What Are ...

  20. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.

  1. Membrane microparticles and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z-H; Ji, C-L; Li, H; Qiu, G-X; Gao, C-J; Weng, X-S

    2013-09-01

    Membrane microparticles (MPs) are plasma membrane-derived vesicles shed by various types of activated or apoptotic cells including platelets, monocytes, endothelial cells, red blood cells, and granulocytes. MPs are being increasingly recognized as important regulators of cell-to-cell interactions. Recent evidences suggest they may play important functions not only in homeostasis but also in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases such as vascular diseases, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes mellitus. Accordingly, inhibiting the production of MPs may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for these diseases. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism underlying the generation of MPs and the role of MPs in vascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, and pathogen infection.

  2. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  3. Obesity and kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity has been pointed out as an important cause of kidney diseases. Due to its close association with diabetes and hypertension, excess weight and obesity are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD. Obesity influences CKD development, among other factors, because it predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis and focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Excess weight and obesity are associated with hemodynamic, structural and histological renal changes, in addition to metabolic and biochemical alterations that lead to kidney disease. Adipose tissue is dynamic and it is involved in the production of "adipokines", such as leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor-β and angiotensin-II. A series of events is triggered by obesity, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and hypertension. There is evidence that obesity itself can lead to kidney disease development. Further studies are required to better understand the association between obesity and kidney disease.

  4. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  5. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  6. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  7. Hyperosmia in Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Puri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurological involvement in Lyme disease has been reported to include meningitis, cranial neuropathy and radiculoneuritis. While it is known that in some cases of asceptic meningitis patients may develop hyperosmia, the association between hyperosmia and Lyme disease has not previously been studied. Objective To carry out the first systematic study to ascertain whether hyperosmia is also a feature of Lyme disease. Method A questionnaire regarding abnormal sensory sensitivity in respect of the sense of smell was administered to 16 serologically positive Lyme disease patients and to 18 control subjects. Results The two groups were matched in respect of age, sex and body mass. None of the 34 subjects was suffering from migraine. Eight (50% of the Lyme patients and none (0% of the controls suffered from hyperosmia (p=0.0007. Conclusion This first systematic controlled study showed that Lyme disease is associated with hyperosmia.

  8. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  9. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederik; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment but strongly interacts with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on micro- and astroglia and trigger an innate immune response, characterized by the release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome wide analysis suggests that several genes, which increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease en-code for factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity are likely to interfere with the immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. This re-view provides an overview on the current knowledge and focuses on the most recent and exciting findings. Modulation of risk factors and intervention with the described immune mechanisms are likely to lead to future preventive or therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25792098

  10. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease.

  11. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  12. Peyronie's Disease: Still a Surgical Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Daniel; Ercole, Cesar E; Hakky, Tariq S; Kramer, Andrew; Carrion, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peyronie's Disease (PD) remains a challenging and clinically significant morbid condition. Since its first description by François Gigot de la Peyronie, much of the treatment for PD remains nonstandardized. PD is characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques at the level of the tunica albuginea. Clinical manifestations include morphologic changes, such as curvatures and hourglass deformities. Here, we review the common surgical techniques for the management of patients with PD.

  13. Dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, Chris

    2004-02-17

    Dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease) is a parasitic disease that is limited to remote, rural villages in 13 sub-Saharan African countries that do not have access to safe drinking water. It is one the next diseases targeted for eradication by the World Health Organization. Guinea worm disease is transmitted by drinking water containing copepods (water fleas) that are infected with Dracunculiasis medinensis larvae. One year after human ingestion of infected water a female adult worm emerges, typically from a lower extremity, producing painful ulcers that can impair mobility for up to several weeks. This disease occurs annually when agricultural activities are at their peak. Large proportions of economically productive individuals of a village are usually affected simultaneously, resulting in decreased agricultural productivity and economic hardship. Eradication of guinea worm disease depends on prevention, as there is no effective treatment or vaccine. Since 1986, there has been a 98% reduction in guinea worm disease worldwide, achieved primarily through community-based programs. These programs have educated local populations on how to filter drinking water to remove the parasite and how to prevent those with ulcers from infecting drinking-water sources. Complete eradication will require sustained high-level political, financial and community support.

  14. Management of pilonidal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Michelle P; Maloney, Caroline; Lipskar, Aaron M

    2018-06-01

    Pilonidal disease, and the treatment associated with it, can cause significant morbidity and substantial burden to patients' quality of life. Despite the plethora of surgical techniques that have been developed to treat pilonidal disease, discrepancies in technique, recurrence rates, complications, time to return to work/school and patients' aesthetic satisfaction between treatment options have led to controversy over the best approach to this common acquired disease of young adults. The management of pilonidal disease must strike a balance between recurrence and surgical morbidity. The commonly performed wide excision without closure has prolonged recovery, while flap closures speed recovery time and improve aesthetics at the expense of increased wound complications. Less invasive surgical techniques have recently evolved and are straightforward, with minimal morbidity and satisfactory results. As with any surgical intervention, the ideal treatment for pilonidal disease would be simple and cost-effective, cause minimal pain, have a limited hospital stay, low recurrence rate and require minimal time off from school or work. Less invasive procedures for pilonidal disease may be favourable as an initial approach for these patients reserving complex surgical treatment for refractory disease.

  15. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  16. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  17. Cardiovascular diseases and periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, R A; Preshaw, P M; Thomason, J M; Ellis, J S; Steele, J G

    2003-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a widespread heterogeneous group of conditions that have significant morbidity and mortality. The various diseases and their treatments can have an impact upon the periodontium and the delivery of periodontal care. In this paper we consider three main topics and explore their relationship to the periodontist and the provision of periodontal treatment. The areas reviewed include the effect of cardiovascular drugs on the periodontium and management of patients with periodontal diseases; the risk of infective endocarditis arising from periodontal procedures; the inter-relationship between periodontal disease and coronary artery disease. Calcium-channel blockers and beta-adrenoceptor blockers cause gingival overgrowth and tooth demineralisation, respectively. Evidence suggests that stopping anticoagulant therapy prior to periodontal procedures is putting patients at a greater risk of thromboembolic disorders compared to the risk of prolonged bleeding. The relationship between dentistry and infective endocarditis remains a controversial issue. It would appear that spontaneous bacteraemia arising from a patient's oral hygiene practices is more likely to be the cause of endocarditis than one-off periodontal procedures. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis is uncertain (and unlikely to be proven), and the risk of death from penicillin appears to be greater than the risk of death arising from infective endocarditis. Finally, the association between periodontal disease and coronary artery disease has been explored and there seem to be many issues with respect to data handling interpretation. Many putative mechanisms have been suggested; however, these only further highlight the need for intervention studies.

  18. Osteomalacia in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, Meryem; Garip, Yesim; Bodur, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Osteomalacia is a metabolic bone disorder characterized by impaired mineralization of the bone matrix. Vitamin D deficiency due to malabsorption syndromes may cause osteomalacia. This is a case of a patient with a 6-year history of seronegative spondyloarthropathy associated with Crohn's disease who was admitted to our outpatient clinic with symptoms of osteomalacia. Osteomalacia is a metabolic bone disease characterized by an impaired mineralization of the bone matrix, frequently caused by disorders in vitamin D or phosphate metabolism. Vitamin D deficiency due to malabsorption syndromes (e.g., Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, and jejuno-ileal bypass for obesity) may cause osteomalacia. A 43-year-old male presented with fatigue, low back pain, and morning stiffness. He had a 6-year history of seronegative spondyloarthropathy associated with Crohn's disease. Laboratory findings revealed low serum calcium, low 25-hydroxy vitamin D3, normal phosphorus, elevated parathyroid hormone, and alkaline phosphatase levels. Radiographs revealed grade IV sacroiliitis and Looser zones. He was diagnosed with osteomalacia due to the malabsorption of vitamin D. His symptoms and signs were relieved with supplements of vitamin D and calcium. Osteomalacia should be considered in differential diagnosis when assessing low back pain in the patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Vitamin D deficiency should be treated with vitamin D supplementation in patients with Crohn's disease to prevent osteomalacia.

  19. Gaucher′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Bohra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher′s disease (GD is the most common amongst the various disorders classified under the lysosomal storage disorders. GD is a model for applications of molecular medicine to clinical delineation, diagnosis, and treatment. The multiorgan and varied presentation of the disease makes it a challenge to diagnose GD early. The advent of enzyme replacement therapy in the early 1990s changed the management, and survival, of patients with GD. In addition to this, development of substrate reduction, pharmacological chaperone, and gene therapies has broadened the horizon for this rare disease. However, in resource-poor countries like ours, optimal management is still a distant dream.

  20. Rare Disease Video Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Bocanegra, Carlos Luis

    2011-01-01

    Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) is a portal web where contains videos from Youtube including all details from 12 channels of Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) es un portal web que contiene los vídeos de Youtube incluyendo todos los detalles de 12 canales de Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) és un portal web que conté els vídeos de Youtube i que inclou tots els detalls de 12 Canals de Youtube.

  1. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2011-11-01

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  2. Lateralisation in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riederer, P.; Jellinger, K. A.; Kolber, P.

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetry of dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequent lateralisation of motor symptoms are distinctive features of Parkinson’s disease compared to other forms of neurodegenerative or symptomatic parkinsonism. Even 200 years after the first description of the disease, the underlying causes...... for this striking clinicopathological feature are not yet fully understood. There is increasing evidence that lateralisation of disease is due to a complex interplay of hereditary and environmental factors that are reflected not only in the concept of dominant hemispheres and handedness but also in specific...

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jian-rong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a degenerative central nervous system (CNS disease caused by infection of prion protein (PrP, with clinical features including short course, rapid development and 100% mortality. This article aims to discuss the pathogenesis, histopathological features, clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram (EEG findings, imaging data and treatment progress of this disease based on literature review. Cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein detection, EEG and MRI are three important methods to make an early diagnosis on patients with suspected CJD, such as elderly patients with rapidly progressive dementia (RPD and young patients with mental symptoms involving multiple systems (MS.

  4. Black lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramani, R.V.; Frantz, R.L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal workers` pneumoconiosis (CWP), often called Black Lung Disease is a occupational disease which results from inhalation of coal mine dust which usually contains small amounts of free crystalline silica. This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the epidemiology and clinical aspects of CWP and how it has been controlled in the USA through the 1969 Coal Mine Act and dust level standards. It describes the sampling methods used. Medical control methods and engineering control of the disease is discussed. Work of the Generic Mineral Technology Center for Respirable Dust is described. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a rapidly emerging chronic liver disease and is reported to affect up to 70-80% of overweight and obese individuals. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from simple hepatic steatosis, to a more severe and treatment resistant stage...... that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...

  6. The Vitality of Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2017-01-01

    of what we might be conceptualised as the vitality of disease. Medical interventions are increasingly as much about improving (quality of) life as they are about saving and prolonging life. As a consequence, morbid living has come to be disciplined, for example, in patient schools aimed at teaching...... patients to learn how to live with their disease, through rating scales used to measure treatment effect on the ‘quality of life’ of patients in clinical trials and through disease-specific ‘Living with’ guides aimed at patients and carers....

  7. Connexins and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delmar, Mario; Laird, Dale W; Naus, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Inherited or acquired alterations in the structure and function of connexin proteins have long been associated with disease. In the present work, we review current knowledge on the role of connexins in diseases associated with the heart, nervous system, cochlea, and skin, as well as cancer...... of connexins are fundamental components in the pathophysiology of multiple connexin related disorders, many of them highly debilitating and life threatening. Improved understanding of connexin biology has the potential to advance our understanding of mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of disease....

  8. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Why We Walk at ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ... Briefings: Complementary Approaches to Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Understanding Pain in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: The Parkinson's Pipeline 2011: ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Recognizing the ... Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for PD Patients? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? What ... 2 What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? Dra. Claudia ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Motor Symptoms in PD Expert Briefings: Swallowing and Dental Challenges Expert Briefings: Caregiving and Parkinson's: Laying the ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New in Genetics and ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... for Following a Medication Schedule? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners CareMAP: Medications and ...

  15. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  16. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...... of acute pancreatitis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Although randomised trials showing cardiovascular benefit of triglyceride reduction are scarce, new triglyceride-lowering drugs are being developed, and large-scale trials have been initiated that will hopefully provide conclusive evidence...

  17. Krabbe Disease (GLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... properly. Children with Krabbe disease have difficulty with memory, learning, speaking, understanding, and other mental functions. They ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTA, NPF - National Parkinson Foundation CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: End-of-Life ... Is the Relationship Between Depression and Parkinson's Disease? What Are the ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PD Library Search library Topic Type Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse ... PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing ...

  20. Comorbidity of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an independent association between periodontitis and a range of comorbidities, for example cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, psoriasis, and respiratory infections. Shared....... The present article presents an overview of the evidence linking periodontitis with selected systemic diseases and calls for increased cooperation between dentists and medical doctors to provide optimal screening, treatment, and prevention of both periodontitis and its comorbidities....... inflammatory pathways are likely to contribute to this association, but distinct causal mechanisms remain to be defined. Some of these comorbid conditions may improve by periodontal treatment, and a bidirectional relationship may exist, where, for example, treatment of diabetes can improve periodontal status...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Why We Walk at ...

  2. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and

  3. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, M.T.; Carson, M.J.; Khoury, J. El; Landreth, G.E.; Brosseron, F.; Feinstein, D.L.; Jacobs, A.H.; Wyss-Coray, T.; Vitorica, J.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Herrup, K.; Frautschy, S.A.; Finsen, B.; Brown, G.C.; Verkhratsky, A.; Yamanaka, K.; Koistinaho, J.; Latz, E.; Halle, A.; Petzold, G.C.; Town, T.; Morgan, D.; Shinohara, M.L.; Perry, V.H.; Holmes, C.; Bazan, N.G.; Brooks, D.J.; Hunot, S.; Joseph, B.; Deigendesch, N.; Garaschuk, O.; Boddeke, E.; Dinarello, C.A.; Breitner, J.C.; Cole, G.M.; Golenbock, D.T.; Kummer, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and

  4. Epidemiology of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-08-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Swallowing: Part 1 How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? What Do I Do if I Suspect Compulsive ... What Does a Caregiver Need to Know About Cognitive Impairment? How Do I Manage Non-Motor Problems ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story CareMAP: Thinking Changes: Part ... Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? What Is the Impact of PD Medications ...

  7. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: Planning Ahead When You are Living with Parkinson's ... Care or Team Approach Important? Expert Briefings: Cognitive Issues: Advice for Parkinson's Care Partners Jose Maria Lobo: ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Ask the Helpline: What Is a Movement Disorder Specialist? What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? How Do I Know ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal and Medical Planning Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ... Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: Travel and Transportation: Part 2 What Is the Progression ...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Soy el compas de otra canción” Expert Briefings: Diagnosis PD, Now What? Managing the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert Briefings: Parkinson's Disease: Financial, Legal ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nursing Solutions: Recognizing the Impact of ... Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's in ...

  14. Mad Cow Disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mad Cow Disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is one of ... humoral immunity is developed against such infections. ... Most infecti ve agents, ranging from the more complex protozoans to bacteri(! and viruses, contain nucleic.

  15. Asbestos and its diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibbs, A. R; Craighead, John E

    2008-01-01

    ... Chapter 8. Malignant Diseases of the Pleura, Peritoneum, and Other Serosal Surfaces Allen R. Gibbs and John E. Craighead 190 Chapter 9. Nonthoracic Cancers Possibly Resulting from Asbestos Exposu...

  16. Treatment of autoinflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ter Haar, Nienke; Lachmann, Helen; Özen, Seza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response to treatment of autoinflammatory diseases from an international registry and an up-to-date literature review. METHODS: The response to treatment was studied in a web-based registry in which clinical information on anonymised patients with autoinflammatory...... diseases was collected retrospectively as part of the Eurofever initiative. Participating hospitals included paediatric rheumatology centres of the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organisation network and adult centres with a specific interest in autoinflammatory diseases. The following...... diseases were included: familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), pyogenic arthritis pustulosis acne (PAPA) syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexuality and Intimacy in Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Improving Communication in Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert ... You Need to Know Expert Briefings: What's Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who seek skilled care are at a lower risk of complications and have better quality of life. ... Disease Affect the Urinary System? What Are the Risks and Benefits of DBS Surgery? NPF Caregiver Summit ...

  19. Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be increased in women because their digestive system may be less able to process alcohol, thus increasing the amount of alcohol reaching the liver. Genetic makeup Genetic makeup is thought to be involved because alcoholic liver disease often ...

  20. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , including lymphoma and Hodgkin disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , lung abscess, hepatitis B or hepatitis C Symptoms Anemia of ...

  1. Gum Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... With Find a Periodontist Gum Disease In Children Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are ...

  2. Lipid Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes of Health (NIH), the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. As part of its mission, ... develop treatments, which has enabled ongoing and promising research to develop gene therapy for this disease. The NINDS, along with other ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Parkinson's Nurse: Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Recognizing the Impact of Genitourinary Symptoms in PD Expert Briefings: Is ... With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? What Is the Impact of PD Medications on Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? What ...

  4. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  5. Metabolism and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grodzicker, Terri; Stewart, David J; Stillman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    ...), cellular, organ system (cardiovascular, bone), and organismal (timing and life span) scales. Diseases impacted by metabolic imbalance or dysregulation that were covered in detail included diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer...

  6. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detect CKD: blood pressure, urine albumin and serum creatinine. What causes CKD? The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure , which are responsible for up to ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis PD, Now What? Managing the First Few Years with Parkinson's Expert Briefings: Pain in PD Expert ... What Is a Movement Disorder Specialist? Are There Any Interactions With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? Dealing with ...

  8. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprue; Nontropical sprue; Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... intestines will heal if you follow a lifelong gluten-free diet . Do not eat foods, drink beverages, or take ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Cognitive Impairment? How Do I Manage Non-Motor Problems Such as Hypersexuality? Are There Any Interactions With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? What to Expect Emotionally What are some ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... library Topic Type Living Alone: Home Safety and Management in PD Expert Briefings: Marijuana and PD: What ... Program: Step by Step OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Ask the Helpline: What ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping Skills for Parkinson's Care Partners Expert Briefings: What's New ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? CareMAP: When Is It Time to Get ...

  12. Lewy Body Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... range of symptoms, including Changes in alertness and attention Hallucinations Problems with movement and posture Muscle stiffness Confusion Loss of memory Lewy body disease can be hard to diagnose, ...

  13. Polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't have other diseases may be good candidates for a kidney transplant. Possible Complications Health problems ... www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. ...

  14. Pregnancy and Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... half of pregnancy. Testing for Parvovirus B19 during Pregnancy A blood test for parvovirus B19 can show ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en General, Parte 1 Expert Briefings: Apathy or Depression: Which One Is It? Expert Briefings: What's in ... Expert Briefings: A Closer Look at Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Driving and Parkinson's: ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

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  17. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee...... et al., Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11 (2009) 407-420). The finding is surprising in view of the fact that other neurodegenerative diseases are associated with relatively modest effects on the circulating levels of 24S-OH. We determined the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of 24S-OH and 27......-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH) in patients with PD with different disease duration using a highly accurate method based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry. All the patients had plasma levels of the different oxysterols within the normal range. When analyzing CSF, 10% of the PD patients were found to have levels of 24...

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