WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinician role clinical

  1. The role of clinician emotion in clinical reasoning: Balancing the analytical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langridge, Neil; Roberts, Lisa; Pope, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    This review paper identifies and describes the role of clinicians' memory, emotions and physical responses in clinical reasoning processes. Clinical reasoning is complex and multi-factorial and key models of clinical reasoning within musculoskeletal physiotherapy are discussed, highlighting the omission of emotion and subsequent physical responses and how these can impact upon a clinician when making a decision. It is proposed that clinicians should consider the emotions associated with decision-making, especially when there is concern surrounding a presentation. Reflecting on practice in the clinical environment and subsequently applying this to a patient presentation should involve some acknowledgement of clinicians' physical responses, emotions and how they may play a part in any decision made. Presenting intuition and gut-feeling as separate reasoning methods and how these processes co-exist with other more accepted reasoning such as hypothetico-deductive is also discussed. Musculoskeletal physiotherapy should consider the elements of feelings, emotions and physical responses when applying reflective practice principles. Furthermore, clinicians dealing with difficult and challenging presentations should look at the emotional as well as the analytical experience when justifying decisions and learning from practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bridging the gap between basic science and clinical practice: a role for community clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Michelle

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translating the extraordinary scientific and technological advances occurring in medical research laboratories into care for patients in communities throughout the country has been a major challenge. One contributing factor has been the relative absence of community practitioners from the US biomedical research enterprise. Identifying and addressing the barriers that prevent their participation in research should help bridge the gap between basic research and practice to improve quality of care for all Americans. Methods We interviewed over 200 clinicians and other healthcare stakeholders from 2004 through 2005 to develop a conceptual framework and set of strategies for engaging a stable cadre of community clinicians in a clinical research program. Results Lack of engagement of community practitioners, lack of necessary infrastructure, and the current misalignment of financial incentives and research participation emerged as the three primary barriers to community clinician research participation. Although every effort was made to learn key motivators for engagement in clinical research from interviewees, we did not observe their behavior and self-report by clinicians does not always track with their behavior. Conclusions A paradigm shift involving acknowledgement of the value of clinicians in the context of community research, establishment of a stable infrastructure to support a cohort of clinicians across time and research studies, and realignment of incentives to encourage participation in clinical research is required.

  3. Bridging the gap between basic science and clinical practice: The role of organizations in addressing clinician barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Stephanie

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New National Institutes of Health policies call for expansion of practice-based research to improve the clinical research enterprise and facilitate dissemination of evidence-based medicine. Objective This paper describes organizational strategies that influence clinicians' decisions to participate in clinical research. Design We reviewed the literature and interviewed over 200 clinicians and stakeholders. Results The most common barriers to community clinician participation in clinical research relate to beliefs that clinical research is too burdensome and has little benefit for the participating clinician or patient. We identified a number of approaches healthcare organizations can use to encourage clinicians to participate in research, including an outreach campaign to promote the benefits of clinical research; selection of study topics of interest to clinicians; establishment and enforcement of a set of research principles valuing the clinician and patient; development of a transparent schedule of reimbursement for research tasks; provision of technological and technical assistance to practices as needed; and promotion of a sense of community among clinicians involved in practice-based research. Conclusions Many types of existing healthcare organizations could provide the technical and intellectual assistance community clinicians need to participate in clinical research. Multiple approaches are possible.

  4. The role of the national general medical journal: surveys of which journals UK clinicians read to inform their clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Teresa H; Hanney, Stephen; Buxton, Martin J

    2008-12-01

    For biomedical research findings to contribute toward health gains they must reach clinicians. Academic journals have historically been considered important information sources. Birken and Parkin found seven journals to most consistently contain the best pediatric evidence and, of these seven, four were general medical journals. We surveyed clinicians in three UK medical specialties (psychiatry, surgery and pediatrics), asking which journals they read and which they considered important to inform their clinical practice. The readership of general medical journals, in comparison to specialty and sub-specialty journals, is widespread across the three UK medical specialties, although the importance of general medical journals varies widely. The BMJ is the most prominent general medical journal in terms of readership and importance but a dominant specialty or sub-specialty journal was usually more important for most groups. The Lancet is less widely read and less important, although more academics than non-academics consider it important. Overall, key general medical journals play an important role. Journal availability and cost, particularly in relation to membership for UK clinicians, and the position of academics and non-academics have to be considered in any analysis. Three of the four general medical journals containing the best pediatric evidence were found to be widely read by UK pediatricians and two UK-based general medical journals, the BMJ and The Lancet, were also considered important in our survey. Further investigation of the reasons for the importance of a journal and studies that would allow international comparisons would provide greater input to the discussion.

  5. The role of technology in clinician-to-clinician communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Lisa M; Ladner, Daniela P; Holl, Jane L

    2013-12-01

    Incomplete, fragmented and poorly organised communications contribute to more than half the errors that lead to adverse and sentinel events. Meanwhile, communication software and devices with expanding capabilities are rapidly proliferating and being introduced into the healthcare setting. Clinicians face a large communication burden, which has been exacerbated by the additional challenge of selecting a mode of communication. In addition to specific communication devices, some hospitals have implemented advanced technological systems to assist with communication. However, few studies have provided empirical evidence of the specific advantages and disadvantages of the different devices used for communication. Given the increasing quantities of information transmitted to and by clinicians, evaluations of how communication methods and devices can improve the quality, safety and outcomes of healthcare are needed.

  6. Remote clinical decision-making: a clinician's definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mike; Northstone, Kate

    2017-05-12

    Aims Remote clinical decision-making (RCDM), commonly known as 'telephone triage' or 'hear and treat', describes clinicians' non-face-to-face involvement with patient care, and is an established strategy in UK ambulance services for managing increasing demand. However, there is no suitable definition of RCDM that fully explains the roles undertaken by clinicians in 999 hubs, or for its use as an ambulance quality indicator (AQI). The aim of this study, which is part of a larger evaluation of a new RCDM module in higher education, is to determine how clinicians define RCDM. Methods Three participants were asked, during semi-structured interviews, to define RCDM. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Clinicians do not focus on outcomes when defining RCDM, but on the efficacy of the process and the appropriateness of the determined outcome. Conclusion There is no precise description of the role of healthcare professionals in 999 clinical hubs, but there is a need for role clarity, for employees and organisations. The study questions the suitability of the definition of hear and treat as an AQI, as it does not appear to represent fully the various duties undertaken by 999 clinical hub healthcare professionals. More research is needed to consider the definition of RCDM in all its forms.

  7. Once a clinician, always a clinician: a systematic review to develop a typology of clinician-researcher dual-role experiences in health research with patient-participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jean C. Hay-Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health researchers are clinicians. Dual-role experiences are common for clinician-researchers in research involving patient-participants, even if not their own patients. To extend the existing body of literature on why dual-role is experienced, we aimed to develop a typology of common catalysts for dual-role experiences to help clinician-researchers plan and implement methodologically and ethically sound research. Methods Systematic searching of Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase and Scopus (inception to 28.07.2014 for primary studies or first-person reflexive reports of clinician-researchers’ dual-role experiences, supplemented by reference list checking and Google Scholar scoping searches. Included articles were loaded in NVivo for analysis. The coding was focused on how dual-role was evidenced for the clinician-researchers in research involving patients. Procedures were completed by one researcher (MB and independently cross-checked by another (JHS. All authors contributed to extensive discussions to resolve all disagreements about initial coding and verify the final themes. Results Database searching located 7135 records, resulting in 29 included studies, with the addition of 7 studies through reference checks and scoping searches. Two overarching themes described the most common catalysts for dual-role experiences – ways a research role can involve patterns of behaviour typical of a clinical role, and the developing connection that starts to resemble a clinician-patient relationship. Five subthemes encapsulated the clinical patterns commonly repeated in research settings (clinical queries, perceived agenda, helping hands, uninvited clinical expert, and research or therapy and five subthemes described concerns about the researcher-participant relationship (clinical assumptions, suspicion and holding back, revelations, over-identification, and manipulation. Clinician-researchers use their clinical skills in health

  8. Clinicians' experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2012-11-22

    There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals' decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians' journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. We found that there were three phases in clinicians' journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants' experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management "on the fly". Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians' decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary support functions are available locally, especially

  9. Bioethics for clinicians: 25. Teaching bioethics in the clinical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKneally, Martin F.; Singer, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    BIOETHICS IS NOW TAUGHT IN EVERY CANADIAN MEDICAL SCHOOL. Canada needs a cadre of teachers who can help clinicians learn bioethics. Our purpose is to encourage clinician teachers to accept this important responsibility and to provide practical advice about teaching bioethics to clinicians as an integral part of good clinical medicine. We use 5 questions to focus the discussion: Why should I teach? What should I teach? How should I teach? How should I evaluate? How should I learn? PMID:11338804

  10. Randomised clinical trials with clinician-preferred treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, E L; Baumrind, S

    1991-01-19

    The standard design for randomised clinical trials may be inappropriate when the clinician believes that one of the treatments being tested is superior for the patient, or when the clinician has a preference for one of the treatments. For such instances the suggestion is that the patient is randomly allocated to treatment only when there is clinical disagreement about treatment of choice for that patient, and then the patient is assigned to a clinician who had thought that the regimen allocated is the one most appropriate for that patient.

  11. Feelings of Clinician-Patient Similarity and Trust Influence Pain: Evidence From Simulated Clinical Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losin, Elizabeth A Reynolds; Anderson, Steven R; Wager, Tor D

    2017-07-01

    Pain is influenced by many factors other than external sources of tissue damage. Among these, the clinician-patient relationship is particularly important for pain diagnosis and treatment. However, the effects of the clinician-patient relationship on pain remain underexamined. We tested the hypothesis that patients who believe they share core beliefs and values with their clinician will report less pain than patients who do not. We also measured feelings of perceived clinician-patient similarity and trust to see if these interpersonal factors influenced pain. We did so by experimentally manipulating perceptions of similarity between participants playing the role of clinicians and participants playing the role of patients in simulated clinical interactions. Participants were placed in 2 groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire about their personal beliefs and values, and painful thermal stimulation was used as an analog of a painful medical procedure. We found that patients reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their clinician when they were paired with clinicians from their own group. In turn, patients' positive feelings of similarity and trust toward their clinicians-but not clinicians' feelings toward patients or whether the clinician and patient were from the same group-predicted lower pain ratings. Finally, the most anxious patients exhibited the strongest relationship between their feelings about their clinicians and their pain report. These findings increase our understanding of context-driven pain modulation and suggest that interventions aimed at increasing patients' feelings of similarity to and trust in health care providers may help reduce the pain experienced during medical care. We present novel evidence that the clinician-patient relationship can affect the pain experienced during medical care. We found that "patients" in simulated clinical interactions who reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their

  12. Effect of Physical Therapy Students' Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivko, Susan E; Abbruzzese, Laurel D; Duttaroy, Pragati; Hansen, Ruth L; Ryans, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Physical therapy clinical education experiences (CEEs) are difficult to secure, particularly first-level CEEs. Our purpose was to determine 1) what impact student full-time CEEs have on PT clinician productivity and 2) whether there is a productivity difference between first vs final CEEs. Productivity logs, including possible factors impacting productivity, were distributed to clinician-student pairings on first and final CEEs. Two-week baseline data (without a student) were compared to weeks 1 and 6 (with a student) for 31 logs using a 2x4 repeated-measures ANOVA. In a subset of 17 logs for CEEs 8 weeks or longer, a 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. There was a significant increase in the number of patients seen and CPT units billed by both levels of CEEs comparing weeks 1 and 6. In the subset of CEEs, 8 weeks or longer, there was a significant increase in the number of patients treated per hour at week 6 and a trend toward a change at week 8 when compared to baseline week A. The factors selected as impacting productivity were census (59%) and staffing (32%). Physical therapy clinician-student pairings showed an overall increase in productivity during both full-time first and final level CEEs.

  13. Patient satisfaction with clinicians in colorectal 2-week wait clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Karen; Kent, Bridie

    2017-03-23

    To determine if patient satisfaction is affected by the clinician (nurse or doctor), conducting the colorectal 2-week wait (2ww) clinics. A prospective non-randomised comparative cohort study of 339 consecutive patients (divided by blind allocation into nurse-led (n=216) and doctor-led (n=123) cohorts) conducted over a 3-month period. Patient satisfaction in both cohorts was assessed by an adapted version of the Grogan et al validated patient satisfaction questionnaire. The questionnaire was piloted first and was found to have high internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.91). The study had a response rate of 78% (n=258/331) and overall satisfaction scores showed 85% (n=149/175) of patients in the nurse-led cohort and 65% (n=54/83) of patients in the doctor-led cohort strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the care they received. Mean overall satisfaction scores in the two cohorts revealed that the nurse-led cohort achieved significantly more 'strongly agree' responses than the doctor-led cohort (ppatient satisfaction was affected by the clinician conducting the 2ww clinic, in that the nurse-led cohort displayed significantly higher patient satisfaction. However, there are areas that merit further research.

  14. Expert clinician to clinical teacher: developing a faculty academy and mentoring initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Tina P; Hinderer, Katherine A; Jarosinski, Judith M; Mister, Brenda J; Seldomridge, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage. Adequate training for the new role is paramount to promote job satisfaction and reduce attrition. Various models for orienting and preparing expert nurse clinicians as clinical educators are reported in the literature with little consensus or research to support a single approach. This paper describes a collaborative effort to prepare experienced registered nurse clinicians for new roles as part-time clinical faculty. Using a blend of learning strategies (face-to-face, online, simulation, and group mentoring sessions), this training experience was designed to cover content while promoting discussion of issues and challenges and providing much-needed mentorship. Outcomes include 12 new clinical faculty, 25% from groups underrepresented in nursing, with nine newly employed as part-time clinical teachers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gatekeepers or intermediaries? The role of clinicians in commercial genomic testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L McGowan

    Full Text Available Many commentators on "direct-to-consumer" genetic risk information have raised concerns that giving results to individuals with insufficient knowledge and training in genomics may harm consumers, the health care system, and society. In response, several commercial laboratories offering genomic risk profiling have shifted to more traditional "direct-to-provider" (DTP marketing strategies, repositioning clinicians as the intended recipients of advertising of laboratory services and as gatekeepers to personal genomic information. Increasing popularity of next generation sequencing puts a premium on ensuring that those who are charged with interpreting, translating, communicating and managing commercial genomic risk information are appropriately equipped for the job. To shed light on their gatekeeping role, we conducted a study to assess how and why early clinical users of genomic risk assessment incorporate these tools in their clinical practices and how they interpret genomic information for their patients.We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 18 clinicians providing genomic risk assessment services to their patients in partnership with DNA Direct and Navigenics. Our findings suggest that clinicians learned most of what they knew about genomics directly from the commercial laboratories. Clinicians rely on the expertise of the commercial laboratories without the ability to critically evaluate the knowledge or assess risks.DTP service delivery model cannot guarantee that providers will have adequate expertise or sound clinical judgment. Even if clinicians want greater genomic knowledge, the current market structure is unlikely to build the independent substantive expertise of clinicians, but rather promote its continued outsourcing. Because commercial laboratories have the most "skin in the game" financially, genetics professionals and policymakers should scrutinize the scientific validity and clinical soundness of the process by which

  16. Gatekeepers or intermediaries? The role of clinicians in commercial genomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Michelle L; Fishman, Jennifer R; Settersten, Richard A; Lambrix, Marcie A; Juengst, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Many commentators on "direct-to-consumer" genetic risk information have raised concerns that giving results to individuals with insufficient knowledge and training in genomics may harm consumers, the health care system, and society. In response, several commercial laboratories offering genomic risk profiling have shifted to more traditional "direct-to-provider" (DTP) marketing strategies, repositioning clinicians as the intended recipients of advertising of laboratory services and as gatekeepers to personal genomic information. Increasing popularity of next generation sequencing puts a premium on ensuring that those who are charged with interpreting, translating, communicating and managing commercial genomic risk information are appropriately equipped for the job. To shed light on their gatekeeping role, we conducted a study to assess how and why early clinical users of genomic risk assessment incorporate these tools in their clinical practices and how they interpret genomic information for their patients. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 18 clinicians providing genomic risk assessment services to their patients in partnership with DNA Direct and Navigenics. Our findings suggest that clinicians learned most of what they knew about genomics directly from the commercial laboratories. Clinicians rely on the expertise of the commercial laboratories without the ability to critically evaluate the knowledge or assess risks. DTP service delivery model cannot guarantee that providers will have adequate expertise or sound clinical judgment. Even if clinicians want greater genomic knowledge, the current market structure is unlikely to build the independent substantive expertise of clinicians, but rather promote its continued outsourcing. Because commercial laboratories have the most "skin in the game" financially, genetics professionals and policymakers should scrutinize the scientific validity and clinical soundness of the process by which these laboratories

  17. Online Continuing Education for Expanding Clinicians' Roles in Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A; Colchamiro, Rachel; Tolan, Ellen; Browne, Susan; Foley, Mary; Jenkins, Lucia; Mainello, Kristen; Vallu, Rohith; Hanley, Lauren E; Boisvert, Mary Ellen; Forgit, Julie; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Nordstrom, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Lack of health professional support is an important variable affecting mothers' achievement of breastfeeding goals. Online continuing education is a recognized pathway for disseminating content for improving clinicians' knowledge and supporting efforts to change practices. At the time we developed our project, free, accredited continuing education for physicians related to breastfeeding management that could be easily accessed using portable devices (via tablets/smartphones) was not available. Such resources were in demand, especially for facilities pursuing designation through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. We assembled a government, academic, health care provider, and professional society partnership to create such a tutorial that would address the diverse content needed for supporting breastfeeding mothers postdischarge in the United States. Our 1.5-hour-long continuing medical and nursing education was completed by 1606 clinicians (1172 nurses [73%] and 434 physicians [27%]) within 1 year. More than 90% of nurses and over 98% of physicians said the tutorial achieved its 7 learning objectives related to breastfeeding physiology, broader factors in infant feeding decisions and practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement, and breastfeeding management/troubleshooting. Feedback received from the tutorial led to the creation of a second tutorial consisting of another 1.5 hours of continuing medical and nursing education related to breast examination and assessment prior to delivery, provision of anticipatory guidance to pregnant women interested in breastfeeding, maternity care practices that influence breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding preterm infants, breastfeeding's role in helping address disparities, and dispelling common myths. The tutorials contribute to achievement of 8 Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health objectives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Unconscious race and social class bias among acute care surgical clinicians and clinical treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Dossick, Deborah S; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Losonczy, Lia; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A; Freischlag, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Significant health inequities persist among minority and socially disadvantaged patients. Better understanding of how unconscious biases affect clinical decision making may help to illuminate clinicians' roles in propagating disparities. To determine whether clinicians' unconscious race and/or social class biases correlate with patient management decisions. We conducted a web-based survey among 230 physicians from surgery and related specialties at an academic, level I trauma center from December 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. We administered clinical vignettes, each with 3 management questions. Eight vignettes assessed the relationship between unconscious bias and clinical decision making. We performed ordered logistic regression analysis on the Implicit Association Test (IAT) scores and used multivariable analysis to determine whether implicit bias was associated with the vignette responses. Differential response times (D scores) on the IAT as a surrogate for unconscious bias. Patient management vignettes varied by patient race or social class. Resulting D scores were calculated for each management decision. In total, 215 clinicians were included and consisted of 74 attending surgeons, 32 fellows, 86 residents, 19 interns, and 4 physicians with an undetermined level of education. Specialties included surgery (32.1%), anesthesia (18.1%), emergency medicine (18.1%), orthopedics (7.9%), otolaryngology (7.0%), neurosurgery (7.0%), critical care (6.0%), and urology (2.8%); 1.9% did not report a departmental affiliation. Implicit race and social class biases were present in most respondents. Among all clinicians, mean IAT D scores for race and social class were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.37-0.48) and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78), respectively. Race and class scores were similar across departments (general surgery, orthopedics, urology, etc), race, or age. Women demonstrated less bias concerning race (mean IAT D score, 0.39 [95% CI, 0.29-0.49]) and social class (mean IAT D score

  19. Accuracy of intuition in clinical decision-making among novice clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amanda; Zulkosky, Kristen; White, Krista; Pretz, Jean

    2017-05-01

    To assess the reliance on intuitive and analytical approaches during clinical decision-making among novice clinicians and whether that reliance is associated with accurate decision-making. Nurse educators and managers tend to emphasize analysis over intuition during clinical decision-making though nurses typically report some reliance on intuition in their practice. We hypothesized that under certain conditions, reliance on intuition would support accurate decision-making, even among novices. This study utilized an experimental design with clinical complication (familiar vs. novel) and decision phase (cue acquisition, diagnosis and action) as within-subjects' factors, and simulation role (observer, family, auxiliary nurse and primary nurse) as between-subjects' factor. We examined clinical decision-making accuracy among final semester pre-licensure nursing students in a simulation experience. Students recorded their reasoning about emerging clinical complications with their patient during two distinct points in the simulation; one point involved a familiar complication and the other a relatively novel complication. All data were collected during Spring 2015. Although most participants relied more heavily on analysis than on intuition, use of intuition during the familiar complication was associated with more accurate decision-making, particularly in guiding attention to relevant cues. With the novel complication, use of intuition appeared to hamper decision-making, particularly for those in an observer role. Novice clinicians should be supported by educators and nurse managers to note when their intuitions are likely to be valid. Our findings emphasize the integrated nature of intuition and analysis in clinical decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The role of the clinician in the multi-omics era: are you ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Wortmann, Saskia B; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Langeveld, Mirjam; Ferreira, Carlos R; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Hollak, Carla E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Waterham, Hans R; Wevers, Ron A; Haack, Tobias B; Wanders, Ronald J A; Boycott, Kym M

    2018-01-23

    Since Garrod's first description of alkaptonuria in 1902, and newborn screening for phenylketonuria introduced in the 1960s, P4 medicine (preventive, predictive, personalized, and participatory) has been a reality for the clinician serving patients with inherited metabolic diseases. The era of high-throughput technologies promises to accelerate its scale dramatically. Genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics offer an amazing opportunity for holistic investigation and contextual pathophysiologic understanding of inherited metabolic diseases for precise diagnosis and tailored treatment. While each of the -omics technologies is important to systems biology, some are more mature than others. Exome sequencing is emerging as a reimbursed test in clinics around the world, and untargeted metabolomics has the potential to serve as a single biochemical testing platform. The challenge lies in the integration and cautious interpretation of these big data, with translation into clinically meaningful information and/or action for our patients. A daunting but exciting task for the clinician; we provide clinical cases to illustrate the importance of his/her role as the connector between physicians, laboratory experts and researchers in the basic, computer, and clinical sciences. Open collaborations, data sharing, functional assays, and model organisms play a key role in the validation of -omics discoveries. Having all the right expertise at the table when discussing the diagnostic approach and individualized management plan according to the information yielded by -omics investigations (e.g., actionable mutations, novel therapeutic interventions), is the stepping stone of P4 medicine. Patient participation and the adjustment of the medical team's plan to his/her and the family's wishes most certainly is the capstone. Are you ready?

  1. Hospital clinicians' information behaviour and attitudes towards the 'Clinical Informationist': an Irish survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Maura G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians are increasingly expected to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) in order to minimize medical errors and ensure quality patient care, but experience obstacles to information-seeking. The introduction of a Clinical Informationist (CI) is explored as a possible solution. AIMS: This paper investigates the self-perceived information needs, behaviour and skill levels of clinicians in two Irish public hospitals. It also explores clinicians\\' perceptions and attitudes to the introduction of a CI into their clinical teams. METHODS: A questionnaire survey approach was utilised for this study, with 22 clinicians in two hospitals. Data analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Analysis showed that clinicians experience diverse information needs for patient care, and that barriers such as time constraints and insufficient access to resources hinder their information-seeking. Findings also showed that clinicians struggle to fit information-seeking into their working day, regularly seeking to answer patient-related queries outside of working hours. Attitudes towards the concept of a CI were predominantly positive. CONCLUSION: This paper highlights the factors that characterise and limit hospital clinicians\\' information-seeking, and suggests the CI as a potentially useful addition to the clinical team, to help them to resolve their information needs for patient care.

  2. The clinician factor: Personality characteristics of clinicians and their impact upon clinical outcomes in the management of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Fergus J; Russell, Ellyn; McCombe, Julia; O'Connell, Michele A; Skinner, Timothy

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate clinician qualities that influence metabolic outcomes in youth with type 1 diabetes. Data were gathered over two 3 month periods in a large tertiary diabetes center (1500 patients, 8 clinicians) from patients with type 1 diabetes who received continuous care from each clinician. Data included sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen, body mass index (BMI), insulin dose and episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Clinician data included target blood glucose levels, target glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), Diabetes Attitude Scale and Big 5 Personality Inventory Scale. Mean HbA1c per clinician was the primary outcome variable. The 8 clinicians saw a total of 464 patients during the first time period, and 603 in the second time period. Lowest to highest mean HbA1c per clinician varied by 0.7%. There were small but statistically significant differences between clinicians with their patients' age at diagnosis, duration of diabetes, age, gender, treatment type and BMI SD score. After controlling for these differences, the clinician characteristics that were associated with lower mean HbA1c were having no lower limit in target HbA1c and being self-reportedly "less agreeable." The impact of these clinician attitudinal traits was equivalent to the combined effects of patient characteristics and treatment type. There was a significant variation in metabolic outcomes between treating clinicians. After controlling for patient clinical differences, clinician mean HbA1c was associated with lower limit in target HbA1c and being "less agreeable." Clinicians who were more demanding and dogmatic appeared to have better outcomes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Understanding Clinician Information Demands and Synthesis of Clinical Documents in Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farri, Oladimeji Feyisetan

    2012-01-01

    Large quantities of redundant clinical data are usually transferred from one clinical document to another, making the review of such documents cognitively burdensome and potentially error-prone. Inadequate designs of electronic health record (EHR) clinical document user interfaces probably contribute to the difficulties clinicians experience while…

  4. Transferring responsibility and accountability in maternity care: clinicians defining their boundaries of practice in relation to clinical handover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Georgiana S M; Warren, Narelle; Kornman, Louise; Cameron, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective This exploratory study reports on maternity clinicians’ perceptions of transfer of their responsibility and accountability for patients in relation to clinical handover with particular focus transfers of care in birth suite. Design A qualitative study of semistructured interviews and focus groups of maternity clinicians was undertaken in 2007. De-indentified data were transcribed and coded using the constant comparative method. Multiple themes emerged but only those related to responsibility and accountability are reported in this paper. Setting One tertiary Australian maternity hospital. Participants Maternity care midwives, nurses (neonatal, mental health, bed managers) and doctors (obstetric, neontatology, anaesthetics, internal medicine, psychiatry). Primary outcome measures Primary outcome measures were the perceptions of clinicians of maternity clinical handover. Results The majority of participants did not automatically connect maternity handover with the transfer of responsibility and accountability. Once introduced to this concept, they agreed that it was one of the roles of clinical handover. They spoke of complete transfer, shared and ongoing responsibility and accountability. When clinicians had direct involvement or extensive clinical knowledge of the patient, blurring of transition of responsibility and accountability sometimes occurred. A lack of ‘ownership’ of a patient and their problems were seen to result in confusion about who was to address the clinical issues of the patient. Personal choice of ongoing responsibility and accountability past the handover communication were described. This enabled the off-going person to rectify an inadequate handover or assist in an emergency when duty clinicians were unavailable. Conclusions There is a clear lack of consensus about the transition of responsibility and accountability—this should be explicit at the handover. It is important that on each shift and new workplace environment

  5. Gene variants of unknown clinical significance in Lynch syndrome. An introduction for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Genuardi, Maurizio

    Clinicians referring patients for genetic testing for Lynch syndrome will sooner or later receive results for DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes reporting DNA changes that are unclear from a clinical point of view. These changes are referred to as variants of unknown, or unclear, clinical significance

  6. Clinical prioritisations of healthcare for the aged--professional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortvedt, P; Pedersen, R; Grøthe, K H; Nordhaug, M; Kirkevold, M; Slettebø, A; Brinchmann, B S; Andersen, B

    2008-05-01

    Although fair distribution of healthcare services for older patients is an important challenge, qualitative research exploring clinicians' considerations in clinical prioritisation within this field is scarce. To explore how clinicians understand their professional role in clinical prioritisations in healthcare services for old patients. A semi-structured interview-guide was employed to interview 45 clinicians working with older patients. The interviews were analysed qualitatively using hermeneutical content analysis. 20 physicians and 25 nurses working in public hospitals and nursing homes in different parts of Norway. The clinicians struggle with not being able to attend to the comprehensive needs of older patients, and being unfaithful to professional ideals and expectations. There is a tendency towards lowering the standards and narrowing the role of the clinician. This is done in order to secure the vital needs of the patient, but is at the expense of good practice and holistic role modelling. Increased specialisation, advances and increase in medical interventions, economical incentives, organisational structures, and biomedical paradigms, may all contribute to a narrowing of the clinicians' role. Distributing healthcare services in a fair way is generally not described as integral to the clinicians' role in clinical prioritisations. If considerations of justice are not included in clinicians' role, it is likely that others will shape major parts of their roles and responsibilities in clinical prioritisations. Fair distribution of healthcare services for older patients is possible only if clinicians accept responsibility in these questions.

  7. Have Non-physician Clinicians Come to Stay? Comment on "Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monekosso, Gottlieb Lobe

    2016-06-29

    A decade ago, sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 24% of the global disease burden but was served by only 4% of the global health workforce. The chronic shortage of medical doctors has led other health professionals especially nurses to perform the role of healthcare providers. These health workers have been variously named clinical officers, health officers, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, physician associates and non-physician clinicians (NPCs) defined as "health workers who have fewer clinical skills than physicians but more than nurses." Although born out of exigencies, NPCs, like previous initiatives, seem to have come to stay and many more medical doctors are being trained to care for the sick and to supervise other health team members. Physicians also have to assume new roles in the healthcare system with consequent changes in medical education. © 2016 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  8. Clinicians' emotional responses and Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual adult personality disorders: A clinically relevant empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzillo, Francesco; Lingiardi, Vittorio; Del Corno, Franco; Genova, Federica; Bornstein, Robert F; Gordon, Robert M; McWilliams, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between level of personality organization and type of personality disorder as assessed with the categories in the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM; PDM Task Force, 2006) and the emotional responses of treating clinicians. We asked 148 Italian clinicians to assess 1 of their adult patients in treatment for personality disorders with the Psychodiagnostic Chart (PDC; Gordon & Bornstein, 2012) and the Personality Diagnostic Prototype (PDP; Gazzillo, Lingiardi, & Del Corno, 2012) and to complete the Therapist Response Questionnaire (TRQ; Betan, Heim, Zittel-Conklin, & Westen, 2005). The patients' level of overall personality pathology was positively associated with helpless and overwhelmed responses in clinicians and negatively associated with positive emotional responses. A parental and disengaged response was associated with the depressive, anxious, and dependent personality disorders; an exclusively parental response with the phobic personality disorder; and a parental and criticized response with narcissistic disorder. Dissociative disorder evoked a helpless and parental response in the treating clinicians whereas somatizing disorder elicited a disengaged reaction. An overwhelmed and disengaged response was associated with sadistic and masochistic personality disorders, with the latter also associated with a parental and hostile/criticized reaction; an exclusively overwhelmed response with psychopathic patients; and a helpless response with paranoid patients. Finally, patients with histrionic personality disorder evoked an overwhelmed and sexualized response in their clinicians whereas there was no specific emotional reaction associated with the schizoid and the obsessive-compulsive disorders. Clinical implications of these findings were discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Reflection on the Role of the Spirit in Finding Meaning and Healing as Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Reflections on the Role of the Spirit in Finding Meaning and Healing as Clinicians is based on a presentation for the George Washington Spirituality and Health Summer Institute on July 13, 2017. The presentation invited health care professionals to explore contemplative practices as ways to invite the Spirit to strengthening their resilience in caring for themselves and others. As clinicians, there is often a longing to be grounded in a regular contemplative practice centering one's inner life and to acknowledge the creative energy of the Spirit in relationships. This reflection draws on resilience research that finds that contemplative practices such as deep breathing, meditation, reflective writing, and peer or community support enhance ways of meaning making and healing. Contemplative practices are provided, which can connect clinicians to the Spirit with the purpose of leading to increased meaning and healing in self and relationships. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improving health outcomes for young people with long term conditions: The role of digital communication in current and future patient-clinician communication for NHS providers of specialist clinical services for young people - LYNC study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Frances E; Atherton, Helen; Barker, Jack R; Cave, Jonathan Ak; Dennick, Kathryn; Dowdall, Peter; Fraser, Joe; Huxley, Caroline; Kim, Sung-Wook; Madan, Jason J; Matharu, Harjit; Musumadi, Luhanga; Palmer, Tom M; Paul, Moli; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Sujan, Mark A; Sutcliffe, Paul A; Sturt, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Young people living with long term conditions are vulnerable to health service disengagement. This endangers their long term health. Studies report requests for digital forms of communication - email, text, social media - with their health care team. Digital clinical communication is troublesome for the UK NHS. In this article we aim to present the research protocol for evaluating the impacts and outcomes of digital clinical communications for young people living with long term conditions and provide critical analysis of their use, monitoring and evaluation by NHS providers (LYNC study: Long term conditions, Young people, Networked Communications). The research involves: (a) patient and public involvement activities with 16-24 year olds with and without long term health conditions; (b) six literature reviews; (c) case studies - the main empirical part of the study - and (d) synthesis and a consensus meeting. Case studies use a mixed methods design. Interviews and non-participant observation of practitioners and patients communicating in up to 20 specialist clinical settings will be combined with data, aggregated at the case level (non-identifiable patient data) on a range of clinical outcomes meaningful within the case and across cases. We will describe the use of digital clinical communication from the perspective of patients, clinical staff, support staff and managers, interviewing up to 15 young people and 15 staff per case study. Outcome data includes emergency admissions, A&E attendance and DNA (did not attend) rates. Case studies will be analysed to understand impacts of digital clinical communication on patient health outcomes, health care costs and consumption, ethics and patient safety.

  11. Value congruence and depressive symptoms among critical care clinicians: The mediating role of moral distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiani, Giulia; Dordoni, Paola; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2018-02-01

    Clinicians working in intensive care units are often exposed to several job stressors that can negatively affect their mental health. Literature has acknowledged the role of value congruence and job control in determining clinicians' psychological well-being and depressive symptoms. However, potential mediators of this association have been scarcely examined. This study aimed to test the mediating role of moral distress in the relationship between value congruence and job control, on the one hand, and depression, on the other hand. A cross-sectional study involving physicians, nurses, and residents working in 7 intensive care units in the north of Italy was conducted. Clinicians were administered in the Italian Moral Distress Scale-Revised, the value and control subscales of the Areas of Worklife Scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory II. Structural equation modeling was used to test the mediation model. Analysis on 170 questionnaires (response rate 72%) found no relations between job control and moral distress. A total indirect effect of value congruence on depression through moral distress (β = -.12; p = .02) was found. Moral distress contributes to the development of depressive symptoms among critical care clinicians who perceive a value incongruence with their organization and therefore should be addressed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Clinician Survey to Determine Knowledge of Dengue and Clinical Management Practices, Texas, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jessica K; Abeyta, Roman; Smith, Brian; Gaul, Linda; Thomas, Dana L; Han, George; Sharp, Tyler M; Waterman, Stephen H; Tomashek, Kay M

    2017-03-01

    AbstractDengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is increasingly being identified as a cause of outbreaks in the United States. During July-December 2013, a total of three south Texas counties reported 53 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases; 26 were locally acquired, constituting the largest outbreak in Texas since 2005. Because dengue outbreaks are expected to continue in south Texas and early case identification and timely treatment can reduce mortality, we sought to determine clinicians' knowledge of dengue and its clinical management. A survey was sent to 2,375 south Texas clinicians; 217 (9%) completed the survey. Approximately half of participants demonstrated knowledge needed to identify dengue cases, including symptoms (56%), early indicators of shock (54%), or timing of thrombocytopenia (48%). Fewer than 20% correctly identified all prevention messages, severe dengue warning signs, or circumstances in which a dengue patient should return for care. Knowledge of clinical management was limited; few participants correctly identified scenarios when plasma leakage occurred (10%) or a crystalloid solution was indicated (7%); however, 45% correctly identified when a blood transfusion was indicated. Because of the ongoing threat of dengue, we recommend clinicians in south Texas receive dengue clinical management training.

  13. Clinician Survey to Determine Knowledge of Dengue and Clinical Management Practices, Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jessica K.; Abeyta, Roman; Smith, Brian; Gaul, Linda; Thomas, Dana L.; Han, George; Sharp, Tyler M.; Waterman, Stephen H.; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is increasingly being identified as a cause of outbreaks in the United States. During July–December 2013, a total of three south Texas counties reported 53 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases; 26 were locally acquired, constituting the largest outbreak in Texas since 2005. Because dengue outbreaks are expected to continue in south Texas and early case identification and timely treatment can reduce mortality, we sought to determine clinicians' knowledge of dengue and its clinical management. A survey was sent to 2,375 south Texas clinicians; 217 (9%) completed the survey. Approximately half of participants demonstrated knowledge needed to identify dengue cases, including symptoms (56%), early indicators of shock (54%), or timing of thrombocytopenia (48%). Fewer than 20% correctly identified all prevention messages, severe dengue warning signs, or circumstances in which a dengue patient should return for care. Knowledge of clinical management was limited; few participants correctly identified scenarios when plasma leakage occurred (10%) or a crystalloid solution was indicated (7%); however, 45% correctly identified when a blood transfusion was indicated. Because of the ongoing threat of dengue, we recommend clinicians in south Texas receive dengue clinical management training. PMID:28138048

  14. Clinician perceptions and patient experiences of antiretroviral treatment integration in primary health care clinics, Tshwane, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathibe, Maphuthego D; Hendricks, Stephen J H; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2015-10-02

    Primary Health Care (PHC) clinicians and patients are major role players in the South African antiretroviral treatment programme. Understanding their perceptions and experiences of integrated care and the management of people living with HIV and AIDS in PHC facilities is necessary for successful implementation and sustainability of integration. This study explored clinician perceptions and patient experiences of integration of antiretroviral treatment in PHC clinics. An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted in four city of Tshwane PHC facilities. Two urban and two rural facilities following different models of integration were included. A self-administered questionnaire with open-ended items was completed by 35 clinicians and four focus group interviews were conducted with HIV-positive patients. The data were coded and categories were grouped into sub-themes and themes. Workload, staff development and support for integration affected clinicians' performance and viewpoints. They perceived promotion of privacy, reduced discrimination and increased access to comprehensive care as benefits of service integration. Delays, poor patient care and patient dissatisfaction were viewed as negative aspects of integration. In three facilities patients were satisfied with integration or semi-integration and felt common queues prevented stigma and discrimination, whilst the reverse was true in the facility with separate services. Single-month issuance of antiretroviral drugs and clinic schedule organisation was viewed negatively, as well as poor staff attitudes, poor communication and long waiting times. Although a fully integrated service model is preferable, aspects that need further attention are management support from health authorities for health facilities, improved working conditions and appropriate staff development opportunities.

  15. Training clinicians in how to use patient-reported outcome measures in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria J; Haverman, Lotte; Absolom, Kate; Takeuchi, Elena; Feeny, David; Grootenhuis, Martha; Velikova, Galina

    2015-07-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) were originally developed for comparing groups of people in clinical trials and population studies, and the results were used to support treatment recommendations or inform health policy, but there was not direct benefit for the participants providing PROs data. However, as the experience in using those measures increased, it became obvious the clinical value in using individual patient PROs profiles in daily practice to identify/monitor symptoms, evaluate treatment outcomes and support shared decision-making. A key issue limiting successful implementation is clinicians' lack of knowledge on how to effectively utilize PROs data in their clinical encounters. Using a change management theoretical framework, this paper describes the development and implementation of three programs for training clinicians to effectively use PRO data in routine practice. The training programs are in three diverse clinical areas (adult oncology, lung transplant and paediatrics), in three countries with different healthcare systems, thus providing a rare opportunity to pull out common approaches whilst recognizing specific settings. For each program, we describe the clinical and organizational setting, the program planning and development, the content of the training session with supporting material, subsequent monitoring of PROs use and evidence of adoption. The common successful components and practical steps are identified, leading to discussion and future recommendations. The results of the three training programs are described as the implementation. In the oncology program, PRO data have been developed and are currently evaluated; in the lung transplant program, PRO data are used in daily practice and the integration with electronic patient records is under development; and in the paediatric program, PRO data are fully implemented with around 7,600 consultations since the start of the implementation. Adult learning programs teaching clinicians

  16. Professional identity and role transitions in clinical managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how clinicians' professional background influences their transition into the managerial role and identity as clinical managers. The authors interviewed and observed 30 clinicians in managerial positions in Norwegian hospitals. A central finding was that doctors experienced difficulties in reconciling the role as health professional with the role as manager. They maintained a health professional identity and reported to find meaning and satisfaction from clinical work. Doctors also emphasized clinical work as a way of gaining legitimacy and respect from medical colleagues. Nurses recounted a faster and more positive transition into the manager role, and were more fully engaged in the managerial aspects of the role. The authors advance that health care organizations need to focus on role, identity and need satisfaction when recruiting and developing clinicians to become clinical managers. The study suggests that the inclusion of aspects from identity and need satisfaction literature expands on and enriches the study of clinical managers.

  17. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children's Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians with and without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health professionals' decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. Objective: The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) on clinicians' assessment and treatment formulations using…

  18. Clinicians' Judgments of the Clinical Utility of Personality Disorder Trait Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Cristina; Sleep, Chelsea E; Widiger, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Proposed for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) was a five-domain, 25-dimensional trait model that would have constituted a significant part of the diagnostic criteria for each personality disorder. A primary concern with respect to the proposal was that clinicians might find such an approach to be unacceptable. This study provides results from three independent data collections that compared clinicians' clinical utility ratings for each iteration of the DSM-5 dimensional trait assignments, along with an alternative list of traits derived from the Five Factor Form (FFF). The clinicians considered the final trait assignments that were posted for the avoidant, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, and schizoid personality disorders to be significantly less acceptable than the original assignments. They also considered the FFF trait assignments to be preferable to the DSM-5 final postings with respect to the avoidant, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, dependent, and histrionic personality disorders. The implications of these results for future editions of the diagnostic manual are discussed.

  19. The Role of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms: A Clinicians' View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj K. Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The importance of hemodynamics in the etiopathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms (IAs is widely accepted. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is being used increasingly for hemodynamic predictions. However, alogn with the continuing development and validation of these tools, it is imperative to collect the opinion of the clinicians. Methods. A workshop on CFD was conducted during the European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT Teaching Course, Lisbon, Portugal. 36 delegates, mostly clinicians, performed supervised CFD analysis for an IA, using the @neuFuse software developed within the European project @neurIST. Feedback on the workshop was collected and analyzed. The performance was assessed on a scale of 1 to 4 and, compared with experts' performance. Results. Current dilemmas in the management of unruptured IAs remained the most important motivating factor to attend the workshop and majority of participants showed interest in participating in a multicentric trial. The participants achieved an average score of 2.52 (range 0–4 which was 63% (range 0–100% of an expert user. Conclusions. Although participants showed a manifest interest in CFD, there was a clear lack of awareness concerning the role of hemodynamics in the etiopathogenesis of IAs and the use of CFD in this context. More efforts therefore are required to enhance understanding of the clinicians in the subject.

  20. Clinician perceptions and patient experiences of antiretroviral treatment integration in primary health care clinics, Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maphuthego D. Mathibe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary Health Care (PHC clinicians and patients are major role players in the South African antiretroviral treatment programme. Understanding their perceptions and experiences of integrated care and the management of people living with HIV and AIDS in PHC facilities is necessary for successful implementation and sustainability of integration. Objective: This study explored clinician perceptions and patient experiences of integration of antiretroviral treatment in PHC clinics. Method: An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted in four city of Tshwane PHC facilities. Two urban and two rural facilities following different models of integration were included. A self-administered questionnaire with open-ended items was completed by 35 clinicians and four focus group interviews were conducted with HIV-positive patients. The data were coded and categories were grouped into sub-themes and themes. Results: Workload, staff development and support for integration affected clinicians’ performance and viewpoints. They perceived promotion of privacy, reduced discrimination and increased access to comprehensive care as benefits of service integration. Delays, poor patient care and patient dissatisfaction were viewed as negative aspects of integration. In three facilities patients were satisfied with integration or semi-integration and felt common queues prevented stigma and discrimination, whilst the reverse was true in the facility with separate services. Single-month issuance of antiretroviral drugs and clinic schedule organisation was viewed negatively, as well as poor staff attitudes, poor communication and long waiting times. Conclusion: Although a fully integrated service model is preferable, aspects that need further attention are management support from health authorities for health facilities, improved working conditions and appropriate staff development opportunities.

  1. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children's Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians With and Without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J; Jenkins, Melissa M; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F

    2015-02-01

    Mental health professionals' decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments on clinicians' assessment and treatment formulations using case vignettes. Specifically, study aims included using the Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM) cognitive theory to 1) examine potential associations between EBT training and decision-making processes (novice versus expert type), and 2) explore how client and family contextual information affects clinical decision-making. Forty-eight clinicians across two groups (EBT trained=14, Not EBT trained=34) participated. Clinicians were comparable on professional experience, demographics, and discipline. The quasi-experimental design used an analog "think aloud" method where clinicians read case vignettes about a child with disruptive behavior problems and verbalized case conceptualization and treatment planning out-loud. Responses were coded according to NDM theory. MANOVA results were significant for EBT training status such that EBT trained clinicians' displayed cognitive processes more closely aligned with "expert" decision-makers and non-EBT trained clinicians' decision processes were more similar to "novice" decision-makers, following NDM theory. Non-EBT trained clinicians assigned significantly more diagnoses, provided less detailed treatment plans and discussed fewer EBTs. Parent/family contextual information also appeared to influence decision-making. This study offers a preliminary investigation of the possible broader impacts of EBT training and potential associations with development of expert decision-making skills. Targeting clinicians' decision-making may be an important avenue to pursue within dissemination-implementation efforts in mental health practice.

  2. Prostate Clinical Outlook Visualization System for Patients and Clinicians Considering Cyberknife Treatment—A Personalized Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihwan Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a patient presents with localized prostate cancer, referral for radiation oncology consultation includes a discussion of likely outcomes of therapy. Among current radiation treatments for prostate cancers, hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has gained clinical acceptance based on efficacy, short duration of treatment, and the potential radiobiological advantages. The Prostate Clinical Outlook Visualization System (PCOVS was developed to provide the patient and the clinician with a tool to visualize probable treatment outcomes using institutional, patient specific data for comparing results of treatment. Methods: We calculated the prostate cancer outcomes—for each prospective patient using the EPIC-26 quality of life parameters based on clinical outcomes data of 580 prostate cancer patients who were treated with SBRT. We applied Kaplan-Meier analysis using the ASTRO definition for biochemical recurrence (BCR free survival and likely outcome and the PCOVS nomogram to calculate parameters for quality of life. Open-source R, RShiny, and MySQL were used to develop a modularized architecture system. Results: The PCOVS presents patient specific risk scores in a gauge chart style and risk free probability bar plots to compare the treatment data of patients treated with SBRT. The PCOVS generates reports, in PDF, which consists of a comparison charts of risk free probabilities late effects and gauge charts of risk scores. This system is now being expanded as a web-based service to patients. Conclusions: The PCOVS visualized patient specific likely outcomes were compared to treatment data from a single department, helping the patient and the clinician to visualize likely outcomes. The PCOVS approach can be expanded to other specialties of oncology with the flexible, modularized architecture, which can be customized by changing independent modules.

  3. Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Eyal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Responding to critical shortages of physicians, most sub-Saharan countries have scaled up training of nonphysician clinicians (NPCs, resulting in a gradual but decisive shift to NPCs as the cornerstone of healthcare delivery. This development should unfold in parallel with strategic rethinking about the role of physicians and with innovations in physician education and in-service training. In important ways, a growing number of NPCs only renders physicians more necessary – for example, as specialized healthcare providers and as leaders, managers, mentors, and public health administrators. Physicians in sub-Saharan Africa ought to be trained in all of these capacities. This evolution in the role of physicians may also help address known challenges to the successful integration of NPCs in the health system.

  4. Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Nir; Cancedda, Corrado; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Hurst, Samia A

    2015-12-30

    Responding to critical shortages of physicians, most sub-Saharan countries have scaled up training of non-physician clinicians (NPCs), resulting in a gradual but decisive shift to NPCs as the cornerstone of healthcare delivery. This development should unfold in parallel with strategic rethinking about the role of physicians and with innovations in physician education and in-service training. In important ways, a growing number of NPCs only renders physicians more necessary - for example, as specialized healthcare providers and as leaders, managers, mentors, and public health administrators. Physicians in sub-Saharan Africa ought to be trained in all of these capacities. This evolution in the role of physicians may also help address known challenges to the successful integration of NPCs in the health system. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  5. A qualitative study examining methods of accessing and identifying research relevant to clinical practice among rehabilitation clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Drasti; Koehmstedt, Christine; Jones, Rebecca; Coffey, Nathan T; Cai, Xinsheng; Garfinkel, Steven; Shaewitz, Dahlia M; Weinstein, Ali A

    2017-01-01

    Research examining the utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP) specifically among rehabilitation clinicians is limited. The objective of this study was to examine how various rehabilitative clinicians including physical therapists, occupational therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physiatrists are gaining access to literature and whether they are able to implement the available research into practice. A total of 21 total clinicians were interviewed via telephone. Using NVivo, a qualitative analysis of the responses was performed. There were similarities found with respect to the information-seeking behaviors and translation of research across the different clinician types. Lack of time was reported to be a barrier for both access to literature and implementation of research across all clinician types. The majority of clinicians who reported having difficulty with utilizing the published literature indicated that the literature was not applicable to their practice, the research was not specific enough to be put into practice, or the research found was too outdated to be relevant. In addition, having a supportive work environment aided in the search and utilization of research through providing resources central to assisting clinicians in gaining access to health information. Our study identified several barriers that affect EBP for rehabilitation clinicians. The findings suggest the need for researchers to ensure that their work is applicable and specific to clinical practice for implementation to occur.

  6. Structured cues or modafinil for fatigue amelioration in clinicians? A double-blind, randomized controlled trial of critical clinical information recall in fatigued clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flindall, Ian; Leff, Daniel Richard; Goodship, Jonathan; Sugden, Colin; Darzi, Ara

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of modafinil on "free" and "cued" recall of clinical information in fatigued but nonsleep-deprived clinicians. Despite attempts to minimize sleep deprivation through redesign of the roster of residents and staff surgeons, evidence suggests that fatigue remains prevalent. The wake-promoting agent modafinil improves cognition in the sleep-deprived fatigued state and may improve information recall in fatigued nonsleep-deprived clinicians. Twenty-four medical undergraduates participated in a double-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial (modafinil-200 mg:placebo). Medication was allocated 2 hours before a 90-minute fatigue-inducing, continuous performance task (dual 2-back task). A case history memorization task was then performed. Clinical information recall was assessed as "free"(no cognitive aids) and "cued"(using aid memoirs). Open and closed cues represent information of increasing specificity to aid the recall of clinical information. Fatigue was measured objectively using the psychomotor vigilance task at induction, before and after the dual 2-back task. Modafinil decreased false starts and lapses (modafinil = 0.50, placebo = 9.83, P recall (modafinil = 137.8, placebo = 106.0, P recalled with open (modafinil = 62.3, placebo = 52.8, P = .1) and closed cues (modafinil = 80.1, placebo = 75.9, P = .3). Modafinil attenuated fatigue and improved free recall of clinical information without improving cue-based recall under the design of our experimental conditions. Memory cues to aid retrieval of clinical information are convenient interventions that could decrease fatigue-related error without adverse effects of the neuropharmacology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enlisting New Teachers in Clinical Environments (ENTICE; novel ways to engage clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyser B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Peyser,1 Kathryn A Daily,2 Nicholas M Hudak,3 Kenyon Railey,3 Hayden B Bosworth1,41Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Department of Community and Family Medicine, Physician Assistant Program, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAPurpose: To explore the barriers and incentives that affect primary care providers who precept students in outpatient clinics in the US.Method: In 2013, leadership of our large primary care group sent a 20-question survey via e-mail to all of the 180 providers within the network. The survey assessed provider demographics, precepting history, learner preferences, and other issues that might affect future decisions about teaching.Results: The response rate was 50% (90 providers. The top reasons for precepting in the past were enjoyment for teaching and personal interaction with learners. The most commonly cited reason for not precepting previously was a perceived lack of time followed by increased productivity demands. When questioned about the future, 65% (59 respondents indicated that they were likely to precept within the next 6 months. A desired reduction in productivity expectations was the most commonly cited motivator, followed by anticipated monetary compensation and adjusted appointment times. A top barrier to future precepting was a belief that teaching decreases productivity and requires large amounts of time.Conclusion: This survey represents an opportunity to study a change in focus for a cohort of busy clinicians who were mostly new to teaching but not new to clinical practice. The survey provides further insight into clinician educators' perceptions regarding the education of a variety of different learners. The results align with data from previous studies in that time

  8. The Recent Infection Testing Algorithm (RITA) in clinical practice: a survey of HIV clinicians in England and Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Nj; Lattimore, S; Gilbart, Vl; Aghaizu, A; Mensah, G; Tosswill, J; Murphy, G; Delpech, V

    2012-08-01

    In order to estimate HIV incidence among high-risk groups, in January 2009 the Health Protection Agency introduced the Recent Infection Testing Algorithm (RITA) in England and Northern Ireland (E&NI), currently the only regions to inform patients of RITA results. This survey of HIV specialists aimed to investigate the role of RITA in patient management and explore clinicians' views on its role in clinical practice and during partner notification. An online questionnaire was distributed to HIV specialists via the British HIV Association membership email list in February 2011. Forty-two HIV specialists from 32 HIV centres responded to the survey among 90 centres enrolled in the programme (response rate 36%). Testing for recent infection was considered standard of care by 83% of respondents, 80% felt confident in interpreting results and 92% discussed results with patients, particularly in the context of a possible HIV seroconversion illness (96%) or when deciding when to start antiretroviral therapy (70%). A third (36%) of specialists were initially concerned that RITA results may cause additional anxiety among patients; however, no adverse events were reported. The majority (90%) felt that results could assist with contact tracing by prioritizing patients with likely recent infection. However, only a few centres have currently incorporated RITA into their HIV partner notification protocols. RITA has been introduced into clinical practice with no reported patient adverse events. Access to results at centre level should be improved. National guidance regarding use of RITA as a tool for contact tracing is required. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  9. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  10. The discrepancy between patients and informants on clinician-rated measures in major depressive disorder: implications for clinical trials and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselow, Eric D; Karamians, Reneh; Lord, Marie; Tobia, Gabriel; IsHak, Waguih William

    2014-03-01

    Clinician-rated measures are used in clinical trials and measurement-based clinical care settings to assess baseline symptoms and treatment outcomes of major depressive disorder (MDD), with a widely held dictum that they are sufficient in assessing the patient's clinical status. In this study, we examined clinician-rated measures of depressive and global symptom severity, obtained by interviewing patients as well as informants in an attempt to examine the potential difference or similarity between these two sources of information. The sample consisted of 89 treatment seeking, DSM-IV diagnosed MDD outpatients treated between 1995 and 2004. The clinician-rated measures used included the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) for Severity. The scores of the clinician-rated measures collected from patients' interviews were compared with those collected from informants' interviews. Clinician-rated scores, collected by interviewing patients, were significantly higher and indicative of greater symptom severity when compared with those collected by interviewing informants. This was true for both the MADRS before (Ppractical in MDD clinical trials or everyday clinical care. The discrepancies observed between the clinician-rated scores obtained from patients and informants emphasize the importance of incorporating collateral information during the assessment and rating of depressive symptom severity in both clinical trials as well as in clinical practice.

  11. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Doerr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management.

  12. A qualitative study examining methods of accessing and identifying research relevant to clinical practice among rehabilitation clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Drasti Patel,1 Christine Koehmstedt,1 Rebecca Jones,1 Nathan T Coffey,1 Xinsheng Cai,2 Steven Garfinkel,2 Dahlia M Shaewitz,2 Ali A Weinstein1 1Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 2American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC, USA Purpose: Research examining the utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP specifically among rehabilitation clinicians is limited. The objective of this study was to examine how various rehabilitative clinicians including physical therapists, occupational therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physiatrists are gaining access to literature and whether they are able to implement the available research into practice.Methods: A total of 21 total clinicians were interviewed via telephone. Using NVivo, a qualitative analysis of the responses was performed.Results: There were similarities found with respect to the information-seeking behaviors and translation of research across the different clinician types. Lack of time was reported to be a barrier for both access to literature and implementation of research across all clinician types. The majority of clinicians who reported having difficulty with utilizing the published literature indicated that the literature was not applicable to their practice, the research was not specific enough to be put into practice, or the research found was too outdated to be relevant. In addition, having a supportive work environment aided in the search and utilization of research through providing resources central to assisting clinicians in gaining access to health information.Conclusion: Our study identified several barriers that affect EBP for rehabilitation clinicians. The findings suggest the need for researchers to ensure that their work is applicable and specific to clinical practice for implementation to occur. Keywords: health information, information behavior, knowledge utilization

  13. Intrinsic motivation: how can it play a pivotal role in changing clinician behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantha, Yogarabindranath Swarna

    2013-01-01

    In the light of an increasing healthcare burden, this paper seeks to offer insight about how intrinsic motivation could play a pivotal role in improving the pre-existing healthcare service delivery systems by altering clinician behaviour. The paper argues the case for four salient dimensions worth exploring through the lens of intrinsic motivation--non-financial incentives, positive affective states, organizational culture and prescribing quality. This article reviews literature from both social sciences and health management practices to provide rationale on how intrinsic motivational approaches could optimize healthcare service delivery systems. The scrutiny of the body of evidence leads to the assertion that there is neglect in the initiatives to reinforce intrinsic motivation as a method to address the ailing morale of doctors. This seems to have exacerbated negative outcomes that include job dissatisfaction, compromise in the quality of care and poor patient-doctor relationships. Diminution in positive affective states amongst doctors, largely controlled by intrinsic motivation, led to strained doctor-patient communication and poor quality of care. Barriers in a healthcare organizational culture that restricts autonomy and empowerment seem to directly undermine job satisfaction. The article argues that it is crucial to shift away from the conventional tendencies promoting tangible rewards. A more holistic approach should be adopted by conducting formal research into intrinsic motivation and how it could aid the formulation of policies tailored to meet the current demands of the healthcare system.

  14. Accuracy of Clinicians in Predicting the Bacterial Cause of Clinical Bovine Mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    White, Maurice E.; Glickman, Lawrence T.; Barnes-Pallesen, Frances D.; Stem, Edgar S.; Dinsmore, Page; Powers, Michael S.; Powers, Pamela; Smith, Mary C.; Jasko, David

    1986-01-01

    We examined the ability of clinicians to predict the causative organism of bovine mastitis in our practice. We obtained 118 milk culture results from 112 mastitic cows and compared the culture results to the predictions of clinicians at the time of milk sample collection. Sixty of 118 culture results were accurately predicted. The positive predictive value for coliform mastitis was 42% and the negative predictive value was 79% in a study population with a 31% prevalence of coliform mastitis. ...

  15. Real-time feedback on nonverbal clinical communication. Theoretical framework and clinician acceptance of ambient visual design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A L; Patel, R A; Czerwinski, M; Pratt, W; Roseway, A; Chandrasekaran, N; Back, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the focus theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Pervasive Intelligent Technologies for Health". Effective nonverbal communication between patients and clinicians fosters both the delivery of empathic patient-centered care and positive patient outcomes. Although nonverbal skill training is a recognized need, few efforts to enhance patient-clinician communication provide visual feedback on nonverbal aspects of the clinical encounter. We describe a novel approach that uses social signal processing technology (SSP) to capture nonverbal cues in real time and to display ambient visual feedback on control and affiliation--two primary, yet distinct dimensions of interpersonal nonverbal communication. To examine the design and clinician acceptance of ambient visual feedback on nonverbal communication, we 1) formulated a model of relational communication to ground SSP and 2) conducted a formative user study using mixed methods to explore the design of visual feedback. Based on a model of relational communication, we reviewed interpersonal communication research to map nonverbal cues to signals of affiliation and control evidenced in patient-clinician interaction. Corresponding with our formulation of this theoretical framework, we designed ambient real-time visualizations that reflect variations of affiliation and control. To explore clinicians' acceptance of this visual feedback, we conducted a lab study using the Wizard-of-Oz technique to simulate system use with 16 healthcare professionals. We followed up with seven of those participants through interviews to iterate on the design with a revised visualization that addressed emergent design considerations. Ambient visual feedback on non- verbal communication provides a theoretically grounded and acceptable way to provide clinicians with awareness of their nonverbal communication style. We provide implications for the design of such visual feedback that encourages empathic patient

  16. The role of the clinician in the multi-omics era: are you ready?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Karnebeek, Clara D. M.; Wortmann, Saskia B.; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Langeveld, Mirjam; Ferreira, Carlos R.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M.; Hollak, Carla E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Waterham, Hans R.; Wevers, Ron A.; Haack, Tobias B.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Boycott, Kym M.

    2018-01-01

    Since Garrod's first description of alkaptonuria in 1902, and newborn screening for phenylketonuria introduced in the 1960s, P4 medicine (preventive, predictive, personalized, and participatory) has been a reality for the clinician serving patients with inherited metabolic diseases. The era of

  17. Barriers to Primary Care Clinician Adherence to Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Low Back Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slade, Susan C; Kent, Peter; Patel, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    and qualitative methods had been used for both data collection and analysis. We searched major databases up to July 2014. Pairs of reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts, extracted data, appraised method quality using the CASP checklist, conducted thematic analysis and synthesized the results......INTRODUCTION: Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for the management of low back pain that contain consistent messages, large evidence-practice gaps in primary care remain. OBJECTIVES: To perform a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies that have explored...... primary care clinicians' perceptions and beliefs about guidelines for low back pain, including perceived enablers and barriers to guideline adherence. METHODS: Studies investigatingperceptions and beliefs about low back pain guidelines were included if participants were primary care clinicians...

  18. Impact of the role of senior dual disability coordinator on the perceived self-efficacy and job satisfaction of mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren, Amanda Jayne; Kendall, Melissa Bianca

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a new service role in mental health services, namely, the senior dual disability coordinator role (SDDC) for its impact on the perceived self-efficacy of mental health clinicians in managing clients with dual disability (mental illness and acquired brain injury and/or intellectual disability) and their job satisfaction. Mental health clinicians from a health service district in Queensland, Australia who contacted the SDDC for clinical consultation and liaison between July 2011 and July 2013 were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing perceived self-efficacy in working with clients with dual disability as well as their job satisfaction, prior to (T1) and following (T2) their contact with the SDDC. Twenty-five clinicians completed and returned pre- and post-measure questionnaires. Self-reported knowledge of dual disability, clinical skills in dual disability, service knowledge in dual disability as well as perceived self-efficacy, and job satisfaction increased significantly from T1 to T2. There were no significant differences across professional discipline or years of service. The delivery of a clinical consultation liaison service as part of the role of SDDC may assist mental health clinicians with self-efficacy and job satisfaction, regardless of the number of years they have worked in the service or their professional discipline. Mental health clinicians with improved self-efficacy for working with clients with dual disability may be more likely to consider the client suitable for services through mental health and follow-up with treatment and linking the client with other identified suitable services. Implications for Rehabilitation Dual disability (mental illness and acquired brain injury and/or intellectual disability) presents specific challenges for mental health services Specific strategies are needed to build capacity among mental health practitioners in order to meet the needs of people with dual disability and provide

  19. Developing a Clinician Friendly Tool to Identify Useful Clinical Practice Guidelines: G-TRUST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Allen F; Vaswani, Akansha; Andrews, Bonnie K; Erlich, Deborah R; D'Amico, Frank; Lexchin, Joel; Cosgrove, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    Clinicians are faced with a plethora of guidelines. To rate guidelines, they can select from a number of evaluation tools, most of which are long and difficult to apply. The goal of this project was to develop a simple, easy-to-use checklist for clinicians to use to identify trustworthy, relevant, and useful practice guidelines, the Guideline Trustworthiness, Relevance, and Utility Scoring Tool (G-TRUST). A modified Delphi process was used to obtain consensus of experts and guideline developers regarding a checklist of items and their relative impact on guideline quality. We conducted 4 rounds of sampling to refine wording, add and subtract items, and develop a scoring system. Multiple attribute utility analysis was used to develop a weighted utility score for each item to determine scoring. Twenty-two experts in evidence-based medicine, 17 developers of high-quality guidelines, and 1 consumer representative participated. In rounds 1 and 2, items were rewritten or dropped, and 2 items were added. In round 3, weighted scores were calculated from rankings and relative weights assigned by the expert panel. In the last round, more than 75% of experts indicated 3 of the 8 checklist items to be major indicators of guideline usefulness and, using the AGREE tool as a reference standard, a scoring system was developed to identify guidelines as useful, may not be useful, and not useful. The 8-item G-TRUST is potentially helpful as a tool for clinicians to identify useful guidelines. Further research will focus on its reliability when used by clinicians. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  20. Adoption of an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic: initial experience in facilitating clinician consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lepor, Herbert; Taneja, Samir S; Recht, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    The authors describe their initial experience in implementing an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic, including the frequency and nature of clinician consultations and the perceived impact on patient management by clinicians. A radiology reading room was established within an office-based urologic oncology clinic in proximity to the surgeon's work area. A radiologist was present in this reading room for a 3-hour shift each day. The frequency and nature of consultations during these shifts were recorded. Also, the clinic's staff completed a survey assessing perceptions of the impact of the integrated reading room on patient management. One hundred two consultations occurred during 57 included dates (average, 1.8 consultations per shift): 52% for review of external cases brought in by patients on discs, 43% for review of internal cases, and 5% for direct review by the radiologist of imaging with patients. The maximum number of consultations during a single shift was 8. All of the clinic's urologists indicated that >90% of consultations benefited patient care. The clinicians indicated tendencies to view consultations as affecting management in the majority of cases, to be more likely to seek consultation for outside imaging when the radiologist was on site, and to be less likely to repeat outside imaging when the radiologist was on site. The integrated reading room within the clinic has potential to improve the quality of care, for instance by facilitating increased review of outside imaging studies and thereby potentially reducing duplicate ordering and by enabling occasional direct image review with patients by radiologists. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assisted dying in liberalised jurisdictions and the role of psychiatry: a clinician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2012-10-01

    Assisted dying is a contentious and topical issue. Mental disorder is a relevant influence on requests of hastened death. The psychiatry of dying is not a prominent component in the assessment of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in jurisdictions with liberalised assisted dying laws. The literature on the assessment processes, with particular reference to mental status, involved in euthanasia requests is considered. An experienced palliative medicine specialist and psychiatrist selectively reviewed the recent literature published about the mental health issues involved in euthanasia and PAS. Assessments of competency, sustained wish to die prematurely, depressive disorder, demoralisation and 'unbearable suffering' in the terminally ill are clinically uncertain and difficult tasks. There is a growing psychiatric and psychological literature on the mental status of the terminally ill. As yet psychiatry does not have the expertise to 'select' those whose wish for hastened death is rational, humane and 'healthy'. Rarely in those societies with liberalised assisted dying laws are psychiatrists involved in the decision-making for individuals requesting early death. This role is fulfilled by non-specialists. There remain significant concerns about the accuracy of psychiatric assessment in the terminally ill. Mental processes are more relevant influences on a hastened wish to die than are the physical symptoms of terminal malignant disease. Psychiatric review of persons requesting euthanasia is relevant. It is not obligatory or emphasised in those legislations allowing assisted dying. Psychiatry needs to play a greater role in the assessment processes of euthanasia and PAS.

  2. The Evolution of the Physician Role in the Setting of Increased Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Insistence on Timing and Culturally-Sensitive, Purposefully Selected Skill Development; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Binagwaho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As Eyal et al put forth in their piece, Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians, task-shifting across sub-Saharan Africa through non-physician clinicians (NPCs has led to an improvement in access to health services in the context of physician-shortages. Here, we offer a commentary to the piece by Eyal et al, concurring that physician’s roles should evolve into specialized medicine and that skills in mentorship, research, management, and leadership may create more holistic physicians clinical services. We believe that learning such non-clinical skills will allow physicians to improve the outcome of their clinical services. However, at the risk of a local, clinical brain drain as physicians shift to explore beyond the clinical sphere, we advocate strongly for increased caution to be exercised by leadership over the encouragement of this evolution. In the context of still-present physician shortages across many developing countries, we advocate to analyze this changing role and to purposefully select each new skill according to the context, giving careful consideration to the timing and degree of its evolution.

  3. Are self-report scales as effective as clinician rating scales in measuring treatment response in routine clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Walsh, Emily; Friedman, Michael; Boerescu, Daniela A; Attiullah, Naureen

    2018-01-01

    Recent treatment guidelines have suggested that outcome should be measured in routine clinical practice. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we compared three self-report scales of depressive symptoms and the two most widely used clinician administered scales in treatment studies in their sensitivity to change and evaluation of treatment response in depressed patients treated in routine practice. At baseline and 4-month follow-up 153 depressed outpatients with DSM-IV MDD completed the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report version (QIDS-SR), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The patients were rated on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). On each scale treatment response was defined as a 50% or greater reduction in scores from baseline. While there were some differences in the percentage of patients considered to be responders on the different scales, a large effect size was found for each scale, with little variability amongst the scales. The level of agreement between the three self-report scales and the clinician rating scales was approximately the same LIMITATIONS: The present study was conducted in a single clinical practice in which the majority of the patients were white, female, and had health insurance. When measuring outcome in clinical practice the magnitude of change in depressive symptoms is as great on self-report scales as on clinician rating scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Experiencing mental health diagnosis: a systematic review of service user, clinician, and carer perspectives across clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Amorette; Ridler, Joseph; Browes, Daniel; Peryer, Guy; Notley, Caitlin; Hackmann, Corinna

    2018-04-18

    Receiving a mental health diagnosis can be pivotal for service users, and it has been described in both positive and negative terms. What influences service-user experience of the diagnostic process is unclear; consequently, clinicians report uncertainty regarding best practice. This Review aims to understand and inform diagnostic practice through a comprehensive synthesis of qualitative data on views and experiences from key stakeholders (service users, clinicians, carers, and family). We searched five databases and identified 78 papers for inclusion, originating from 13 countries and including 2228 participants. Eligible papers were assessed for quality, and data were coded and then developed into themes, which generated a model representing factors to consider for clinicians conveying, and individuals receiving, mental health diagnoses. Themes included disclosure, information provision, collaboration, timing, stigma, and functional value of diagnosis for recovery. Variations between different stakeholders and clinical contexts are explored. Findings support an individualised, collaborative, and holistic approach to mental health diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Trained Clinician Ratings with Expert Ratings of Aspiration on Videofluoroscopic Images from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gensler, Gary; Brandt, Diane K.; Miller Gardner, Patricia J.; Blumenthal, Loreen; Gramigna, Gary D.; Kosek, Steven; Lundy, Donna; McGarvey-Toler, Susan; Rockafellow, Susan; Sullivan, Paula A.; Villa, Marybell; Gill, Gary D.; Lindblad, Anne S.; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2009-01-01

    Accurate detection and classification of aspiration is a critical component of videofluoroscopic swallowing evaluation, the most commonly utilized instrumental method for dysphagia diagnosis and treatment. Currently published literature indicates that inter-judge reliability for the identification of aspiration ranges from poor to fairly good depending on the amount of training provided to clinicians. The majority of extant studies compared judgments among clinicians. No studies included judgments made during the use of a postural compensatory strategy. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of judgments made by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practicing in hospitals compared with unblinded expert judges when identifying aspiration and using the 8-point Penetration/Aspiration Scale. Clinicians received extensive training for the detection of aspiration and minimal training on use of the Penetration/Aspiration Scale. Videofluoroscopic data were collected from 669 patients as part of a large, randomized clinical trial and include judgments of 10,200 swallows made by 76 clinicians from 44 hospitals in 11 states. Judgments were made on swallows during use of dysphagia compensatory strategies: chin down posture with thin-liquids and thickened liquids (nectar-thick and honey-thick consistencies) in a head neutral posture. The subject population included patients with Parkinson’s disease and/or dementia. Kappa statistics indicate high accuracy for all interventions by SLPs for identification of aspiration (all К > .86) and variable accuracy (range 69%–76%) using the Penetration/Aspiration Scale when compared to expert judges. It is concluded that while the accuracy of identifying the presence of aspiration by SLPs is excellent, more extensive training and/or image enhancement is recommended for precise use of the Penetration/Aspiration Scale. PMID:18953607

  6. Role Modeling for Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ellen Richter

    1991-01-01

    To become better role models, higher educators in institutions of clinical education should be conscious of the behaviors they demonstrate and the broad range of activities and attitudes that students observe and emulate, including clinical competence, professional demeanor, doctor-patient interactions, ethical values, and social consciousness.…

  7. The acceptability among health researchers and clinicians of social media to translate research evidence to clinical practice: mixed-methods survey and interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnecliff, Jacqueline; Ilic, Dragan; Morgan, Prue; Keating, Jennifer; Gaida, James E; Clearihan, Lynette; Sadasivan, Sivalal; Davies, David; Ganesh, Shankar; Mohanty, Patitapaban; Weiner, John; Reynolds, John; Maloney, Stephen

    2015-05-20

    Establishing and promoting connections between health researchers and health professional clinicians may help translate research evidence to clinical practice. Social media may have the capacity to enhance these connections. The aim of this study was to explore health researchers' and clinicians' current use of social media and their beliefs and attitudes towards the use of social media for communicating research evidence. This study used a mixed-methods approach to obtain qualitative and quantitative data. Participation was open to health researchers and clinicians. Data regarding demographic details, current use of social media, and beliefs and attitudes towards the use of social media for professional purposes were obtained through an anonymous Web-based survey. The survey was distributed via email to research centers, educational and clinical institutions, and health professional associations in Australia, India, and Malaysia. Consenting participants were stratified by country and role and selected at random for semistructured telephone interviews to explore themes arising from the survey. A total of 856 participants completed the questionnaire with 125 participants declining to participate, resulting in a response rate of 87.3%. 69 interviews were conducted with participants from Australia, India, and Malaysia. Social media was used for recreation by 89.2% (749/840) of participants and for professional purposes by 80.0% (682/852) of participants. Significant associations were found between frequency of professional social media use and age, gender, country of residence, and graduate status. Over a quarter (26.9%, 229/852) of participants used social media for obtaining research evidence, and 15.0% (128/852) of participants used social media for disseminating research evidence. Most participants (95.9%, 810/845) felt there was a role for social media in disseminating or obtaining research evidence. Over half of the participants (449/842, 53.3%) felt they had a

  8. Role of clinician's experience and implant design on implant stability. An ex vivo study in artificial soft bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Georgios E; Basha-Hijazi, Abdulaziz; Gupta, Bhumija; Ren, Yan-Fang; Malmstrom, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Clinical experience in implant placement is important in order to prevent implant failures. However, the implant design affects the primary implant stability (PS) especially in poor quality bones. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of clinician surgical experience on PS, when placing different type of implant designs. A total of 180 implants (90 parallel walled-P and 90 tapered-T) were placed in freshly slaughtered cow ribs. Bone quality was evaluated by two examiners during surgery and considered as 'type IV' bone. Implants (ø 5 mm, length: 15 mm, Osseotite, BIOMET 3i, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA) were placed by three different clinicians (master/I, good/II, non-experienced/III, under direct supervision of a manufacturer representative; 30 implants/group). An independent observer assessed the accuracy of placement by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) with implant stability quotient (ISQ) values. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test were used to detect the surgical experience of the clinicians and their interaction and effects of implant design on the PS. All implants were mechanically stable. The mean ISQ values were: 49.57(± 18.49) for the P-implants and 67.07(± 8.79) for the T-implants. The two-way ANOVA showed significant effects of implant design (p bone. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The clinical significance of quality of life assessments in oncology: a summary for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloan, Jeff A.; Frost, Marlene H.; Berzon, Rick; Dueck, Amylou; Guyatt, Gordon; Moinpour, Carol; Sprangers, Mirjam; Ferrans, Carol; Cella, David

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A series of six manuscripts with an introduction appeared in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, based upon the collective effort of 30 individuals with an interest and expertise in assessing the clinical significance of quality of life (QOL) assessments. The series of manuscripts described the

  10. Experiences of Student Speech-Language Pathology Clinicians in the Initial Clinical Practicum: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech-language pathology literature is limited in describing the clinical practicum process from the student perspective. Much of the supervision literature in this field focuses on quantitative research and/or the point of view of the supervisor. Understanding the student experience serves to enhance the quality of clinical supervision. Of…

  11. Do clinicians accept the role of Helicobacter pylori in duodenal ulcer disease: a survey of European gastroenterologists and general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Logan, R P; Noach, L A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To examine to what extent clinicians in Europe accepted the theory of the casual role of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) in duodenal ulcer disease in the year 1992, and to what extent the theory had influenced their diagnostic and therapeutic habits in the management of duodenal ulcer ....../315) of the doctors. CONCLUSIONS. H.pylori treatment is frequently used in some countries. However, the role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer disease has not been accepted to the same extent in different European countries.......OBJECTIVES. To examine to what extent clinicians in Europe accepted the theory of the casual role of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) in duodenal ulcer disease in the year 1992, and to what extent the theory had influenced their diagnostic and therapeutic habits in the management of duodenal ulcer...... patients at that time. DESIGN. Postal questionnaire. SETTING. Three European countries: the UK, the Netherlands, and Denmark. SUBJECTS. Three hundred and three gastroenterologists, 250 general practitioners, 83 junior hospital doctors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Number of doctors believing H. pylori...

  12. Best Clinical Practice Guidance for clinicians dealing with children presenting with Molar-Incisor-Hypomineralisation (MIH): An EAPD Policy Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygidakis, N A; Wong, F; Jälevik, B; Vierrou, A-M; Alaluusua, S; Espelid, I

    2010-04-01

    The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) has long recognised the necessity of promoting further research and knowledge regarding the dental defect described as molar-incisor-hypomineralisation (MIH). Following the establishment by EAPD of the defect diagnostic criteria in 2003, the publication of various papers and a whole issue assigned to the defect in the European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry (2008), an Interim Seminar and Workshop on MIH was organized in Helsinki in 2009. The outcome of this event is the present consensus paper on the prevalence, diagnosis, aetiology and treatment for children and adolescents presenting with MIH. A clear diagnostic proposal and a treatment decision-making guide are presented together with suggestions on aetiology and guidance for future research. MIH is an important clinical problem that often concerns both the general dental and specialist paediatric dentists; the present 'best clinical practice guidance' aims to further help clinicians dealing with the condition.

  13. Fostering excellence: roles, responsibilities, and expectations of new family physician clinician investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, William; Kendall, Claire; Muggah, Elizabeth; Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Ziebell, Laura

    2014-02-01

    A key priority in primary health care research is determining how to ensure the advancement of new family physician clinician investigators (FP-CIs). However, there is little consensus on what expectations should be implemented for new investigators to ensure the successful and timely acquisition of independent salary support. Support new FP-CIs to maximize early career research success. This program description aims to summarize the administrative and financial support provided by the C.T. Lamont Primary Health Care Research Centre in Ottawa, Ont, to early career FP-CIs; delineate career expectations; and describe the results in terms of research productivity on the part of new FP-CIs. Family physician CI's achieved a high level of research productivity during their first 5 years, but most did not secure external salary support. It might be unrealistic to expect new FP-CIs to be self-financing by the end of 5 years. This is a career-development program, and supporting new career FP-CIs requires a long-term investment. This understanding is critical to fostering and strengthening sustainable primary care research programs.

  14. Identification and Management of Statin-Associated Symptoms in Clinical Practice: Extension of a Clinician Survey to 12 Further Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenson, Robert S; Gandra, Shravanthi R; McKendrick, Jan; Dent, Ricardo; Wieffer, Heather; Cheng, Lung-I; Catapano, Alberico L; Oh, Paul; Kees Hovingh, G; Stroes, Erik S

    2017-04-01

    Statins are the first-choice pharmacological treatment for patients with hypercholesterolemia and at risk for cardiovascular disease; however, a minority of patients experience statin-associated symptoms (SAS) and are considered to have reduced statin tolerance. The objective of this study was to establish how patients with SAS are identified and managed in clinical practice in Austria, Belgium, Colombia, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Portugal, Switzerland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. A cross-sectional survey was conducted (2015-2016) among clinicians (n = 60 per country; Croatia: n = 30) who are specialized/experienced in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Participants were asked about their experience of patients presenting with potential SAS and how such patients were identified and treated. Muscle-related symptoms were the most common presentation of potential SAS (average: 51%; range across countries [RAC] 17-74%); other signs/symptoms included persistent elevation in transaminases. To establish whether symptoms are due to statins, clinicians required rechallenge after discontinuation of statin treatment (average: 77%; RAC 40-90%); other requirements included trying at least one alternative statin. Clinicians reported that half of high-risk patients with confirmed SAS receive a lower-dose statin (average: 53%; RAC 43-72%), and that most receive another non-statin lipid-lowering therapy with or without a concomitant statin (average: 65%; RAC 52-83%). The specialists and GPs surveyed use stringent criteria to establish causality between statin use and signs or symptoms, and persevere with statin treatment where possible.

  15. Increasing Complexity of Clinical Research in Gastroenterology: Implications for Training Clinician-Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Frank I.; McConnell, Ryan A.; Lewis, Matthew E.; Lewis, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Significant advances have been made in clinical and epidemiologic research methods over the past 30 years. We sought to demonstrate the impact of these advances on published research in gastroenterology from 1980 to 2010. Methods Three journals (Gastroenterology, Gut, and American Journal of Gastroenterology) were selected for evaluation given their continuous publication during the study period. Twenty original clinical articles were randomly selected from each journal from 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2010. Each article was assessed for topic studied, whether the outcome was clinical or physiologic, study design, sample size, number of authors and centers collaborating, and reporting of statistical methods such as sample size calculations, p-values, confidence intervals, and advanced techniques such as bioinformatics or multivariate modeling. Research support with external funding was also recorded. Results A total of 240 articles were included in the study. From 1980 to 2010, there was a significant increase in analytic studies (pgastroenterology and hepatology over the last three decades. This increase highlights the need for advanced training of clinical investigators to conduct future research. PMID:22475957

  16. Training clinicians in how to use patient-reported outcome measures in routine clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santana, Maria J.; Haverman, Lotte; Absolom, Kate; Takeuchi, Elena; Feeny, David; Grootenhuis, Martha; Velikova, Galina

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) were originally developed for comparing groups of people in clinical trials and population studies, and the results were used to support treatment recommendations or inform health policy, but there was not direct benefit for the participants providing PROs

  17. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support : A clinical vignette study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D.; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Van Der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; De Wit, Niek J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current

  18. Measuring patient-centered medical home access and continuity in clinics with part-time clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Krein, Sarah L; Kim, Hyunglin Myra; Greenstone, Clinton L; Tremblay, Adam; Ratz, David; Saffar, Darcy; Kerr, Eve A

    2015-05-01

    Common patient-centered medical home (PCMH) performance measures value access to a single primary care provider (PCP), which may have unintended consequences for clinics that rely on part-time PCPs and team-based care. Retrospective analysis of 110,454 primary care visits from 2 Veterans Health Administration clinics from 2010 to 2012. Multi-level models examined associations between PCP availability in clinic, and performance on access and continuity measures. Patient experiences with access and continuity were compared using 2012 patient survey data (N = 2881). Patients of PCPs with fewer half-day clinic sessions per week were significantly less likely to get a requested same-day appointment with their usual PCP (predicted probability 17% for PCPs with 2 sessions/week, 20% for 5 sessions/week, and 26% for 10 sessions/week). Among requests that did not result in a same-day appointment with the usual PCP, there were no significant differences in same-day access to a different PCP, or access within 2 to 7 days with patients' usual PCP. Overall, patients had >92% continuity with their usual PCP at the hospital-based site regardless of PCP sessions/week. Patients of full-time PCPs reported timely appointments for urgent needs more often than patients of part-time PCPs (82% vs 71%; P Part-time PCP performance appeared worse when using measures focused on same-day access to patients' usual PCP. However, clinic-level same-day access, same-week access to the usual PCP, and overall continuity were similar for patients of part-time and full-time PCPs. Measures of in-person access to a usual PCP do not capture alternate access approaches encouraged by PCMH, and often used by part-time providers, such as team-based or non-face-to-face care.

  19. A clinician-driven home care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, D A; Faubion, W C; Ryan, M L; Haggerty, R H; Wesley, J R

    1993-12-01

    The financial, entrepreneurial, administrative, and legal forces acting within the home care arena make it difficult for clinicians to develop and operate home care initiatives within an academic setting. HomeMed is a clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery system wholly owned by the University of Michigan. The advantages of a clinician-directed system include: Assurance that clinical and patient-based factors are the primary determinants of strategic and procedural decisions; Responsiveness of the system to clinician needs; Maintenance of an important role for the referring physician in home care; Economical clinical research by facilitation of protocol therapy in ambulatory and home settings; Reduction of lengths of hospital stays through clinician initiatives; Incorporation of outcome analysis and other research programs into the mission of the system; Clinician commitment to success of the system; and Clinician input on revenue use. Potential disadvantages of a clinician-based system include: Entrepreneurial, financial, and legal naivete; Disconnection from institutional administrative and data management resources; and Inadequate clinician interest and commitment. The University of Michigan HomeMed experience demonstrates a model of clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery that has been innovative, profitable, and clinically excellent, has engendered broad physician, nurse, pharmacist, and social worker enthusiasm, and has supported individual investigator clinical protocols as well as broad outcomes research initiatives. It is concluded that a clinician-initiated and -directed home care program is feasible and effective, and in some settings may be optimal.

  20. Targeting mental health care attributes by diagnosis and clinical stage: the views of youth mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew P; Hetrick, Sarah E; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Baker, David; Browne, Vivienne; Chanen, Andrew M; Pennell, Kerryn; Purcell, Rosemary; Stavely, Heather; McGorry, Patrick D

    2017-11-20

    To explore the potential utility of clinical stage and mental disorder categories as a basis for determining which attributes of youth mental health care should be offered to which groups of young people. In June 2017, we conducted an online survey of youth mental health clinicians that collected information on the participants' background and areas of expertise, then presented vignettes describing young people with different stages of six mental disorders (disorder-based vignettes were matched to participants' area of expertise). For each vignette, participants were asked to give a quantitative estimate of the proportion of young people with similar mental health problems they thought would clinically benefit from each of twelve attributes of mental health care (other than pharmacological or individual psychological therapies). Survey results were analysed as independent, disorder-based samples, using standard statistical tests of significance, and as a stratified sample using mixed-effects models. A total of 412 clinicians working in 32 countries participated in both parts of the survey. Respondents represented a broad range of clinical disciplines, settings and areas of expertise. Their estimated proportions of young people who would benefit from the mental health care attributes varied by clinical stage and disorder (eg, a mean of 93% [interquartile range (IQR), 90%-100%] of young people with Stage 2 psychosis were estimated to benefit from case management with a multidisciplinary team; while only 15% [IQR, 1%-25%] of young people with Stage 1b generalised anxiety disorder were estimated to benefit from collection and processing of biological samples). Neither the background of the respondents nor the sex of the characters in the vignettes significantly influenced the results. A combination of clinical stage and disorder information might be an appropriate basis for ensuring that the right attributes of early intervention mental health care are provided to the

  1. Developing an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Quality Improvement Leadership Training Program for Clinicians: The Partners Clinical Process Improvement Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sandhya K; Carballo, Victoria; Cummings, Brian M; Millham, Frederick; Jacobson, Joseph O

    Although there has been tremendous progress in quality improvement (QI) education for students and trainees in recent years, much less has been published regarding the training of active clinicians in QI. The Partners Clinical Process Improvement Leadership Program (CPIP) is a 6-day experiential program. Interdisciplinary teams complete a QI project framed by didactic sessions, interactive exercises, case-based problem sessions, and a final presentation. A total of 239 teams composed of 516 individuals have graduated CPIP. On completion, participant satisfaction scores average 4.52 (scale 1-5) and self-reported understanding of QI concepts improved. At 6 months after graduation, 66% of survey respondents reported sustained QI activity. Three opportunities to improve the program have been identified: (1) increasing faculty participation through online and tiered course offerings, (2) integrating the faculty-focused program with the trainee curriculum, and (3) developing a postgraduate curriculum to address the challenges of sustained improvement.

  2. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John H; Patrick, Donald L; Walton, Marc K; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients' health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient's health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment-Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation of

  3. Faculty Development on Clinical Teaching Skills: An Effective Model for the Busy Clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie B. Damp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development program on clinical teaching skills to address barriers to participation and to impact teaching behaviors. Methods Four one-hour workshops were implemented over five months. Evaluation included participant satisfaction and pre/post self-assessment. Pre/post faculty teaching ratings by trainees were compared. Results A total of 82% of faculty ( N = 41 attended. Participants rated workshops highly (mean, 4.43/5.00. Self-assessment of skills and comfort with teaching activities improved. A total of 59% of residents and 40% of fellows felt that teaching received from participating faculty was highly effective. The majority observed targeted teaching behaviors by the faculty. Teaching ratings improved after the workshops ( P = 0.042. Conclusion Our series of short workshops during a standing conference time was associated with increased self-assessed skill and comfort and an increase in faculty ratings on teaching evaluations. Effective faculty development programs can be implemented in flexible formats and overcome common barriers to participation.

  4. Faculty Development on Clinical Teaching Skills: An Effective Model for the Busy Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damp, Julie B.; Dewey, Charlene M.; Wells, Quinn; Horn, Leora; Kroop, Susan F.; Mendes, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development program on clinical teaching skills to address barriers to participation and to impact teaching behaviors. Methods Four one-hour workshops were implemented over five months. Evaluation included participant satisfaction and pre/post self-assessment. Pre/post faculty teaching ratings by trainees were compared. Results A total of 82% of faculty (N = 41) attended. Participants rated workshops highly (mean, 4.43/5.00). Self-assessment of skills and comfort with teaching activities improved. A total of 59% of residents and 40% of fellows felt that teaching received from participating faculty was highly effective. The majority observed targeted teaching behaviors by the faculty. Teaching ratings improved after the workshops (P = 0.042). Conclusion Our series of short workshops during a standing conference time was associated with increased self-assessed skill and comfort and an increase in faculty ratings on teaching evaluations. Effective faculty development programs can be implemented in flexible formats and overcome common barriers to participation. PMID:29349327

  5. Why are clinicians not embracing the results from pivotal clinical trials in severe sepsis? A bayesian analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre C Kalil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Five pivotal clinical trials (Intensive Insulin Therapy; Recombinant Human Activated Protein C [rhAPC]; Low-Tidal Volume; Low-Dose Steroid; Early Goal-Directed Therapy [EGDT] demonstrated mortality reduction in patients with severe sepsis and expert guidelines have recommended them to clinical practice. Yet, the adoption of these therapies remains low among clinicians. OBJECTIVES: We selected these five trials and asked: Question 1--What is the current probability that the new therapy is not better than the standard of care in my patient with severe sepsis? Question 2--What is the current probability of reducing the relative risk of death (RRR of my patient with severe sepsis by meaningful clinical thresholds (RRR >15%; >20%; >25%? METHODS: Bayesian methodologies were applied to this study. Odds ratio (OR was considered for Question 1, and RRR was used for Question 2. We constructed prior distributions (enthusiastic; mild, moderate, and severe skeptic based on various effective sample sizes of other relevant clinical trials (unfavorable evidence. Posterior distributions were calculated by combining the prior distributions and the data from pivotal trials (favorable evidence. MAIN FINDINGS: Answer 1--The analysis based on mild skeptic prior shows beneficial results with the Intensive Insulin, rhAPC, and Low-Tidal Volume trials, but not with the Low-Dose Steroid and EGDT trials. All trials' results become unacceptable by the analyses using moderate or severe skeptic priors. Answer 2--If we aim for a RRR>15%, the mild skeptic analysis shows that the current probability of reducing death by this clinical threshold is 88% for the Intensive Insulin, 62-65% for the Low-Tidal Volume, rhAPC, EGDT trials, and 17% for the Low-Dose Steroid trial. The moderate and severe skeptic analyses show no clinically meaningful reduction in the risk of death for all trials. If we aim for a RRR >20% or >25%, all probabilities of benefits become lower

  6. Executive summary of the Clinical Guidelines of Pharmacotherapy for Neuropathic Pain: second edition by the Japanese Society of Pain Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitani, Masahiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Yoichi; Abe, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Shigeki; Hosokawa, Toyoshi; Fukui, Sei

    2018-06-01

    Neuropathic pain has a substantial effect on quality of life (QOL). The Japanese Society of Pain Clinicians (JSPC) has developed clinical guidelines of pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain. These guidelines offer clarity on recommendations based on both the most recent scientific evidence and expert opinions. Understanding the concept, disease entity, and burden of neuropathic pain, as well as its screening and diagnosis are important steps before starting pharmacotherapy. As well as other guidelines, the guidelines propose several lines of pharmacotherapies in a step-wise manner. To name a few different points, our guidelines propose an extract from inflamed cutaneous tissue of rabbits inoculated with vaccinia virus, which has been found to be effective for post-herpetic neuralgia in Japan, as one of the second-line drugs. When prescribing opioid analgesics, proposed as the third-line drugs, for neuropathic pain, the guidelines recommend physicians continue evaluations on either abuse or addiction. The guidelines do not recommend concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen because of lack of clinical evidence of their efficacy. If patients do not respond well to pharmacotherapy, which is prescribed in a step-wise manner, other treatment strategies should be considered to improve patients' activities of daily living and QOL.

  7. Is the Role of Physicians Really Evolving Due to Non-physician Clinicians Predominance in Staff Makeup in Sub-Saharan African Health Systems?; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin M. Sidat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Health workforce shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa are widely recognized, particularly of physicians, leading the training and deployment of Non-physician clinicians (NPCs. The paper by Eyal et al provides interesting and legitimate viewpoints on evolving role of physicians in context of decisive increase of NPCss in Sub-Saharan Africa. Certainly, in short or mid-term, NPCs will continue to be a proxy solution and a valuable alternative to overcome physicians’ shortages in sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, NPCs have an important role at primary healthcare (PHC level. Physicians at PHC level can certainly have all different roles that were suggested by Eyal et al, including those not directly related to healthcare provision. However, at secondary and higher levels of healthcare, physicians would assume other roles that are mainly related to patient clinical care. Thus, attempting to generalize the role of physicians without taking into account the context where they will work would be not entirely appropriate. It is true that often physicians start the professional carriers at PHC level and progress to other levels of healthcare particularly after clinical post-graduation training. Nevertheless, the training programs offered by medical institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to be periodically reviewed and take into account professional and occupational roles physicians would take in context of evolving health systems in sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Moderate efficiency of clinicians' predictions decreased for blurred clinical conditions and benefits from the use of BRASS index. A longitudinal study on geriatric patients' outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Giulia; Dagani, Jessica; Bulgari, Viola; Ferrari, Clarissa; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prognosis is an essential aspect of good clinical practice and efficient health services, particularly for chronic and disabling diseases, as in geriatric populations. This study aims to examine the accuracy of clinical prognostic predictions and to devise prediction models combining clinical variables and clinicians' prognosis for a geriatric patient sample. In a sample of 329 consecutive older patients admitted to 10 geriatric units, we evaluated the accuracy of clinicians' prognosis regarding three outcomes at discharge: global functioning, length of stay (LoS) in hospital, and destination at discharge (DD). A comprehensive set of sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment-related information were also collected. Moderate predictive performance was found for all three outcomes: area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 and 0.78 for functioning and LoS, respectively, and moderate concordance, Cohen's K = 0.45, between predicted and observed DD. Predictive models found the Blaylock Risk Assessment Screening Score together with clinicians' judgment relevant to improve predictions for all outcomes (absolute improvement in adjusted and pseudo-R(2) up to 19%). Although the clinicians' estimates were important factors in predicting global functioning, LoS, and DD, more research is needed regarding both methodological aspects and clinical measurements, to improve prognostic clinical indices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Computer assisted self interviewing in a sexual health clinic as part of routine clinical care; impact on service and patient and clinician views.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka A Vodstrcil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computer assisted self interviewing (CASI has been used at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC since 2008 for obtaining sexual history and identifying patients' risk factors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs. We aimed to evaluate the impact of CASI operating at MSHC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportion of patients who decline to answer questions using CASI was determined. We then compared consultation times and STI-testing rates during comparable CASI and non-CASI operating periods. Patients and staff completed anonymous questionnaires about their experience with CASI. 14,190 patients completed CASI during the audit period. Men were more likely than women to decline questions about the number of partners they had of the opposite sex (4.4% v 3.6%, p=0.05 and same sex (8.9% v 0%, p<0.001. One third (34% of HIV-positive men declined the number of partners they had and 11-17% declined questions about condom use. Women were more likely than men to decline to answer questions about condom use (2.9% v 2.3%, p=0.05. There was no difference in the mean consultation times during CASI and non-CASI operating periods (p≥0.17. Only the proportion of women tested for chlamydia differed between the CASI and non-CASI period (84% v 88% respectively, p<0.01. 267 patients completed the survey about CASI. Most (72% men and 69% women were comfortable using the computer and reported that all their answers were accurate (76% men and 71% women. Half preferred CASI but 18% would have preferred a clinician to have asked the questions. 39 clinicians completed the staff survey. Clinicians felt that for some STI risk factors (range 11%-44%, face-to-face questioning was more accurate than CASI. Only 5% were unsatisfied with CASI. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that CASI is acceptable to both patients and clinicians in a sexual health setting and does not adversely affect various measures of clinical output.

  10. Supporting students with brain tumors in obtaining school intervention services: the clinician's role from an educator's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinette, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of pediatric patients surviving the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors, many children are returning to school with an alteration in their physical, cognitive, and social-emotional functioning and thus requiring school intervention or services. Physicians and clinicians in hospital and rehabilitation settings serving this population can play a key role in communicating the medical and functional needs these children present as a result of diagnosis and treatment as they transition to an educational setting. Medical and allied health personnel can best support successful school transition when they are aware of the information schools require in order to open the door for students to easily access the interventions, supports, and services available through 504 Accommodation Plans and special education supports and services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Clear communication between medical and school personnel is vital in improving educational, social, and vocational outcomes for students with brain tumors. A streamlined approach to accomplish this task is offered for consideration.

  11. Clinicians' perceptions of organizational readiness for change in the context of clinical information system projects: insights from two cross-sectional surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Balouzakis, George

    2011-02-28

    The adoption and diffusion of clinical information systems has become one of the critical benchmarks for achieving several healthcare organizational reform priorities, including home care, primary care, and integrated care networks. However, these systems are often strongly resisted by the same community that is expected to benefit from their use. Prior research has found that early perceptions and beliefs play a central role in shaping future attitudes and behaviors such as negative rumors, lack of involvement, and resistance to change. In this line of research, this paper builds on the change management and information systems literature and identifies variables associated with clinicians' early perceptions of organizational readiness for change in the specific context of clinical information system projects. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted to test our research model. First, a questionnaire was pretested and then distributed to the future users of a mobile computing technology in 11 home care organizations. The second study took place in a large teaching hospital that had approved a budget for the acquisition of an electronic medical records system. Data analysis was performed using partial least squares. Scale items used in this study showed adequate psychometric properties. In Study 1, four of the hypothesized links in the research model were supported, with change appropriateness, organizational flexibility, vision clarity, and change efficacy explaining 75% of the variance in organizational readiness. In Study 2, four hypotheses were also supported, two of which differed from those supported in Study 1: the presence of an effective project champion and collective self-efficacy. In addition to these variables, vision clarity and change appropriateness also helped explain 75% of the variance in the dependent variable. Explanations for the similarities and differences observed in the two surveys are provided. Organizational readiness is arguably a key

  12. Clinicians' perspectives on patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease clinics--a dimension of health care quality whose time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Gianola, Ann; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Verstappen, Amy; Landzberg, Michael; Gurvitz, Michelle; Jenkins, Kathy; Bates, David W; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care and patient satisfaction represent key dimensions of health care quality. This is relevant for the growing number of patients with life-long conditions. In the present study, our goal was to examine clinicians' attitudes and behavior with respect to patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease outpatient clinics. A 34-question survey was developed to assess adult congenital heart disease clinicians' awareness, attitudes, and behavior relative to patient satisfaction and administered in-person or online to clinicians from the largely U.S.-based Adult Congenital Heart Association's database of adult congenital heart disease health care providers. Overall, 267 questionnaires were filled out: 108 were collected in person (79% response rate) and 159 online (17.5% response rate). Responses were received from physicians (161); nurses (73); physician assistants (20); and others (13). Although 85% of clinicians believed it was important to inquire about patient satisfaction, only 28% reported routinely inquiring about this dimension of care. Only 34% claimed they had adequate training to cope with varying levels of patient satisfaction, 44% stated that their department utilized patient satisfaction surveys, and 37% received feedback from the hospital management in the preceding 12 months. In multivariate analyses, clinicians that received feedback from the hospital management and had adequate training were more likely to inquire about patient satisfaction. Although patient satisfaction is perceived as an important dimension of quality care by adult congenital heart disease clinicians, most of them reported insufficient institutional support to achieve this. Our findings suggest that clinicians would benefit from health care organizations engaging them in the delivery of this dimension of health care quality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment for clinical trials among cancer center leaders, investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians: enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Raegan W; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Scarinci, Isabel C; Paterniti, Debora A; Fouad, Mona N; Hurd, Thelma C; Martin, Michelle Y

    2014-04-01

    The study of disparities in minority recruitment to cancer clinical trials has focused primarily on inquiries among minority populations. Yet very little is known about the perceptions of individuals actively involved in minority recruitment to clinical trials within cancer centers. Therefore, the authors assessed the perspectives of cancer center clinical and research personnel on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. In total, 91 qualitative interviews were conducted at 5 US cancer centers among 4 stakeholder groups: cancer center leaders, principal investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians. All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analyses of response data was focused on identifying prominent themes related to barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. The perspectives of the 4 stakeholder groups were largely overlapping with some variations based on their unique roles in minority recruitment. Four prominent themes were identified: 1) racial and ethnic minorities are influenced by varying degrees of skepticism related to trial participation, 2) potential minority participants often face multilevel barriers that preclude them from being offered an opportunity to participate in a clinical trial, 3) facilitators at both the institutional and participant level potentially encourage minority recruitment, and 4) variation between internal and external trial referral procedures may limit clinical trial opportunities for racial and ethnic minorities. Multilevel approaches are needed to address barriers and optimize facilitators within cancer centers to enhance minority recruitment for cancer clinical trials. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  14. Clinical role of skeletal scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ell, P J

    1975-12-01

    Malignant disease very often spreads to the skeleton. This is particularly true for carcinomas of the breast, the lungs, the prostate, and the thyroid. Knowledge of the state of the skeleton in these disorders is therefore desirable since patient management will largely depend on the early detection of bony deposits. Primary bone disease often spreads to soft tissue (lungs), and the early detection of this may alter significantly the therapeutic approach to the primary lesion. Traditionally, x-ray skeletal surveys and serum enzyme measurements provide indices which can be used in the staging of these disorders. Complementary techniques such as mammography, xeroradiography, thermography, and radionuclide imaging have been used to provide further relevant information. A number of benign bone diseases need early assessment in order to institute the best form of treatment. It is of importance to assess the circulation in localized areas of bone and to predict the appearance of avascular necrosis, to understand the healing mechanisms involved in fractures, and to predict the outcome of bone grafting. In this paper the clinical role of bone scanning is reviewed, particular attention being given to the recent advances brought about by the introduction of the /sup 99m/Tc compounds. It is important that the non-specialist should be aware of the great improvement in the results obtained and in the help they can give him in deciding on the best management of each patient as an individual.

  15. Is the Role of Physicians Really Evolving Due to Non-physician Clinicians Predominance in Staff Makeup in Sub-Saharan African Health Systems? Comment on "Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidat, Mohsin M

    2016-07-02

    Health workforce shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa are widely recognized, particularly of physicians, leading the training and deployment of Non-physician clinicians (NPCs). The paper by Eyal et al provides interesting and legitimate viewpoints on evolving role of physicians in context of decisive increase of NPCss in Sub-Saharan Africa. Certainly, in short or mid-term, NPCs will continue to be a proxy solution and a valuable alternative to overcome physicians' shortages in sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, NPCs have an important role at primary healthcare (PHC) level. Physicians at PHC level can certainly have all different roles that were suggested by Eyal et al, including those not directly related to healthcare provision. However, at secondary and higher levels of healthcare, physicians would assume other roles that are mainly related to patient clinical care. Thus, attempting to generalize the role of physicians without taking into account the context where they will work would be not entirely appropriate. It is true that often physicians start the professional carriers at PHC level and progress to other levels of healthcare particularly after clinical post-graduation training. Nevertheless, the training programs offered by medical institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to be periodically reviewed and take into account professional and occupational roles physicians would take in context of evolving health systems in sub-Saharan Africa. © 2016 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  16. Examining Clinicians' Experiences Providing Sexual Health Services for LGBTQ Youth: Considering Social and Structural Determinants of Health in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R. E.; Shoveller, J. A.; Carson, A. M.; Contreras-Whitney, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Although barriers related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) youth's experiences accessing sexual health services have been examined in detail, research into the experiences and perceptions of clinicians providing these services has been conspicuously absent. The aim of this article is to explore the perceptions and…

  17. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part II: the referring clinician and patient perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Feedback from service users will provide insight into opportunities for improvement so that performance can be optimised. In the context of a formative evaluation referring clinician and patient satisfaction with a teleneurophysiology service was examined during a 20 week pilot period.

  18. Defining the key roles and competencies of the clinician-educator of the 21st century: a national mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbino, Jonathan; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda

    2014-05-01

    To determine a consensus definition of a clinician-educator and the related domains of competence. During September 2010 to March 2011, the authors conducted a two-phase mixed-methods national study in Canada using (1) focus groups of deans of medicine and directors of medical education centers to define the attributes, domains of competence, and core competencies of clinician-educators using a grounded theory analysis, and (2) a survey of 1,130 deans, academic chairs, and residency program directors to validate the focus group results. The 22 focus group participants described being active in clinical practice, applying theory to practice, and engaging in education scholarship-but not holding a particular administrative position-as essential attributes of clinician-educators. Program directors accounted for 68% of the 350 survey respondents, academic chairs for 19%, and deans for 13% (response rate: 31%). Among respondents, 85% endorsed the need for physicians with advanced training in medical education to serve as educational consultants. Domains of clinician-educator competence endorsed by >85% of respondents as important or very important were assessment, communication, curriculum development, education theory, leadership, scholarship, and teaching. With regard to training requirements, 55% endorsed a master's degree in education as effective preparation, whereas 39% considered faculty development programs effective. On the basis of this study's findings, the authors defined a clinician-educator as a clinician active in health professional practice who applies theory to education practice, engages in education scholarship, and serves as a consultant to other health professionals on education issues.

  19. The Evolving Role of Physicians - Don't Forget the Generalist Primary Care Providers Comment on "Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaka, Vincent Kalumire; Schriver, Michael; Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Cotton, Philip

    2016-06-12

    The editorial "Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians" by Eyal et al describes non-physician clinicians' (NPC) need for mentorship and support from physicians. We emphasise the same need of support for front line generalist primary healthcare providers who carry out complex tasks yet may have an inadequate skill mix. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  20. The role of Clinical Officers in the Kenyan health system: a question of perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbindyo, Patrick; Blaauw, Duane; English, Mike

    2013-07-17

    Despite the increasing interest in using non-physician clinicians in many low-income countries, little is known about the roles they play in typical health system settings. Prior research has concentrated on evaluating their technical competencies compared to those of doctors. This work explored perceptions of the roles of Kenyan non-physician clinicians (Clinical Officers (COs). Qualitative methods including in-depth interviews (with COs, nurses, doctors, hospital management, and policymakers, among others), participant observation and document analysis were used. A nomothetic-idiographic framework was used to examine tensions between institutions and individuals within them. A comparative approach was used to examine institutional versus individual notions of CO roles, how these roles play out in government and faith-based hospital (FBH) settings as well as differences arising from three specific work settings for COs within hospitals. The main finding was the discrepancy between policy documents that outline a broad role for COs that covers both technical and managerial roles, while respondents articulated a narrow technical role that focused on patient care and management. Respondents described a variety of images of COs, ranging from 'filter' to 'primary healthcare physician', when asked about CO roles. COs argued for a defined role associated with primary healthcare, feeling constrained by their technical role. FBH settings were found to additionally clarify CO roles when compared with public hospitals. Tensions between formal prescriptions of CO roles and actual practice were reported and coalesced around lack of recognition over COs work, role conflict among specialist COs, and role ambiguity. Even though COs are important service providers their role is not clearly understood, which has resulted in role conflict. It is suggested that their role be redefined, moving from that of 'substitute clinician' to professional 'primary care clinician', with this

  1. Clinicians' perceptions of usefulness of the PubMed4Hh mobile device application for clinical decision making at the point of care: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Brennan, Caitlin W; Wallen, Gwenyth R; Liu, Fang; Smith, Karen G; Fontelo, Paul

    2018-05-08

    Although evidence-based practice in healthcare has been facilitated by Internet access through wireless mobile devices, research on the effectiveness of clinical decision support for clinicians at the point of care is lacking. This study examined how evidence as abstracts and the bottom-line summaries, accessed with PubMed4Hh mobile devices, affected clinicians' decision making at the point of care. Three iterative steps were taken to evaluate the usefulness of PubMed4Hh tools at the NIH Clinical Center. First, feasibility testing was conducted using data collected from a librarian. Next, usability testing was carried out by a postdoctoral research fellow shadowing clinicians during rounds for one month in the inpatient setting. Then, a pilot study was conducted from February, 2016 to January, 2017, with clinicians using a mobile version of PubMed4Hh. Invitations were sent via e-mail lists to clinicians (physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners) along with periodic reminders. Participants rated the usefulness of retrieved bottom-line summaries and abstracts and indicated their usefulness on a 7-point Likert scale. They also indicated location of use (office, rounds, etc.). Of the 166 responses collected in the feasibility phase, more than half of questions (57%, n = 94) were answerable by both the librarian using various resources and by the postdoctoral research fellow using PubMed4Hh. Sixty-six questions were collected during usability testing. More than half of questions (60.6%) were related to information about medication or treatment, while 21% were questions regarding diagnosis, and 12% were specific to disease entities. During the pilot study, participants reviewed 34 abstracts and 40 bottom-line summaries. The abstracts' usefulness mean scores were higher (95% CI [6.12, 6.64) than the scores of the bottom-line summaries (95% CI [5.25, 6.10]). The most frequent reason given was that it confirmed current or tentative diagnostic or

  2. Timely Digital Patient-Clinician Communication in Specialist Clinical Services for Young People: A Mixed-Methods Study (The LYNC Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Frances; Bryce, Carol; Cave, Jonathan; Dritsaki, Melina; Fraser, Joseph; Hamilton, Kathryn; Huxley, Caroline; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Kim, Sung Wook; Kimani, Peter K; Madan, Jason; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Sujan, Mark; Sturt, Jackie

    2017-04-10

    Young people (aged 16-24 years) with long-term health conditions can disengage from health services, resulting in poor health outcomes, but clinicians in the UK National Health Service (NHS) are using digital communication to try to improve engagement. Evidence of effectiveness of this digital communication is equivocal. There are gaps in evidence as to how it might work, its cost, and ethical and safety issues. Our objective was to understand how the use of digital communication between young people with long-term conditions and their NHS specialist clinicians changes engagement of the young people with their health care; and to identify costs and necessary safeguards. We conducted mixed-methods case studies of 20 NHS specialist clinical teams from across England and Wales and their practice providing care for 13 different long-term physical or mental health conditions. We observed 79 clinical team members and interviewed 165 young people aged 16-24 years with a long-term health condition recruited via case study clinical teams, 173 clinical team members, and 16 information governance specialists from study NHS Trusts. We conducted a thematic analysis of how digital communication works, and analyzed ethics, safety and governance, and annual direct costs. Young people and their clinical teams variously used mobile phone calls, text messages, email, and voice over Internet protocol. Length of clinician use of digital communication varied from 1 to 13 years in 17 case studies, and was being considered in 3. Digital communication enables timely access for young people to the right clinician at the time when it can make a difference to how they manage their health condition. This is valued as an addition to traditional clinic appointments and can engage those otherwise disengaged, particularly at times of change for young people. It can enhance patient autonomy, empowerment and activation. It challenges the nature and boundaries of therapeutic relationships but can

  3. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised.

  4. The clinical impact of the radiology report in wheezing and nonwheezing febrile children: a survey of clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H.; Liaw, Kevin; Moore, Paul E.; Patterson, Barron; Chen, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    The chest radiograph is commonly used in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with respiratory illness. The language used to describe the findings is important to ensure appropriate communication with the referring clinician and thereby optimize patient management. In this study we attempted to determine how clinicians interpret specific terms commonly used in a chest radiograph report, and to assess how these terms impact the management of children with respiratory symptoms. An online survey was distributed to 562 pediatric practitioners asking their interpretation of the terms ''peripheral airway disease (PAD),'' ''focal airspace consolidation,'' and ''focal infiltrate'' in a febrile child with or without wheezing. There were 112 respondents. Most practitioners defined the term ''PAD'' as viral pneumonia (61.5%) or asthma (56.9%), ''consolidation'' as atelectasis (83%) followed by pneumonia (69.6%), and ''infiltrate'' as pneumonia (100%), followed by atelectasis (22.3%). Practitioners were more likely to treat a nonwheezing child with antibiotics if the report stated ''focal airspace consolidation'' (80%) or ''focal infiltrate'' (100%; P=0.001). Some radiologic descriptors may lead to diverse and sometimes unintended diagnostic conclusions. Our findings support continued effort to structure and standardize the radiology report and our descriptive terminology. (orig.)

  5. The clinical impact of the radiology report in wheezing and nonwheezing febrile children: a survey of clinicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Liaw, Kevin [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Moore, Paul E. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Pulmonary, Allergy and Immunology, Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Patterson, Barron [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatrics, Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Chen, Heidi [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The chest radiograph is commonly used in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with respiratory illness. The language used to describe the findings is important to ensure appropriate communication with the referring clinician and thereby optimize patient management. In this study we attempted to determine how clinicians interpret specific terms commonly used in a chest radiograph report, and to assess how these terms impact the management of children with respiratory symptoms. An online survey was distributed to 562 pediatric practitioners asking their interpretation of the terms ''peripheral airway disease (PAD),'' ''focal airspace consolidation,'' and ''focal infiltrate'' in a febrile child with or without wheezing. There were 112 respondents. Most practitioners defined the term ''PAD'' as viral pneumonia (61.5%) or asthma (56.9%), ''consolidation'' as atelectasis (83%) followed by pneumonia (69.6%), and ''infiltrate'' as pneumonia (100%), followed by atelectasis (22.3%). Practitioners were more likely to treat a nonwheezing child with antibiotics if the report stated ''focal airspace consolidation'' (80%) or ''focal infiltrate'' (100%; P=0.001). Some radiologic descriptors may lead to diverse and sometimes unintended diagnostic conclusions. Our findings support continued effort to structure and standardize the radiology report and our descriptive terminology. (orig.)

  6. Dimensions of personality: clinicians' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullins-Sweatt, S.N.; Smit, V.; Verheul, R.; Oldham, J.; Widiger, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To obtain the opinions and preferences of practising clinicians about the clinical utility of personality scales included within 8 alternative dimensional models of personality disorder for inclusion within an official diagnostic nomenclature. Method: Psychiatrists (n = 226) and

  7. Helping military children cope with parental deployment: role of attachment theory and recommendations for mental health clinicians and counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence; Miller, Halle B; Bjorklund, David

    2010-01-01

    Military deployment of a parent carries with it a number of stresses for children, all centering around uncertainty, instability and unpredictability. This article conceptualizes military deployment and relocation stress in the context of attachment theory, and describes the types of adverse outcomes that can occur as the result of impaired attachment. It then presents a set of practical recommendations for mental health clinicians and counselors for helping children and families cope productively and negotiate the developmental hurdles associated with maintaining healthy attachment and family stability in the face of military deployment.

  8. The role of emotion in clinical decision making: an integrative literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Desirée; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Rowley, Joanne; Sutherland, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditionally, clinical decision making has been perceived as a purely rational and cognitive process. Recently, a number of authors have linked emotional intelligence (EI) to clinical decision making (CDM) and calls have been made for an increased focus on EI skills for clinicians. The objective of this integrative literature review was to identify and synthesise the empirical evidence for a role of emotion in CDM. Methods A systematic search of the bibliographic databases PubMed,...

  9. How do clinicians actually use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in clinical practice and why we need to know more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Michael B; Bhat, Venkat; Adler, David; Dixon, Lisa; Goldman, Beth; Koh, Steve; Levine, Bruce; Oslin, David; Siris, Sam

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is explicitly stated as a goal for both the DSM Fourth Edition and DSM Fifth Edition (DSM-5) revisions. Many uses assume a relatively faithful application of the DSM diagnostic definitions. However, studies demonstrate significant discrepancies between clinical psychiatric diagnoses with those made using structured interviews suggesting that clinicians do not systematically apply the diagnostic criteria. The limited information regarding how clinicians actually use the DSM raises important questions: a) How can the clinical use be improved without first having a baseline assessment? b) How can potentially significant shifts in practice patterns based on wording changes be assessed without knowing the extent to which the criteria are used as written? Given the American Psychiatric Association's plans for interim revisions to the DSM-5, the value of a detailed exploration of its actual use in clinical practice remains a significant ongoing concern and deserves further study including a number of survey and in vivo studies.

  10. A global survey of clinicians' awareness, accessibility, utilization of e-continuous education, and quality of clinical blood use: policy considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th Smit Sibinga,1 Maruff A Oladejo,2 Olamide Hakeem Adejumo,3 Quentin Eichbaum,4 Midori Kumagawa,5 Shuichi Kino,5 Sima Zolfaghari,6 Silvano Wendel,7 Gordana Rasovic,8 Namjil Erdenebayar,9 Maya Makhmudova,10 Loyiso Mpuntsha,11 Charlotte Ingram,11 Bakyt B Kharabaev,12 Isaac Kajja,13 Zainab Mukhtar Hussain Sanji,14 Maria M M Satti15 1IQM Consulting for International Development of Quality Management in Transfusion Medicine, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Educational Management, University of Lagos, Lagos, 3Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria; 4Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 5Japanese Red Cross Hokkaido Block Blood Center, Japan; 6IBTO, Tehran, Iran; 7Blood Bank, Hospital Sirio Libanês, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 8Montenegro National Blood Transfusion Center, Podgorica, Montenegro; 9National Center for Transfusion Medicine, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 10Consultant IQM Consulting, Tashkent, Uzbekistan; 11South Africa National Blood Transfusion Service, Johannesburg, South Africa; 12National Blood Transfusion Service, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan; 13Department of Orthopedics, Mulago Hospital, Makerere University, Uganda; 14Consultant, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan; 15National Blood Transfusion Service, Khartoum, Sudan Introduction: Clinical use of blood has shown the least developed part in the vein-to-vein transfusion chain. This global study was carried out in order to investigate the level of awareness, accessibility and utilization of continuous e-learning and education, and quality of blood use among blood prescribing clinicians and nurses.Approach: Descriptive ex post facto survey design.Methods: A total of 264 purposively selected blood prescribing clinicians and nurses from the four Human Development Index (HDI groups of countries (low, medium, high, and very high participated in this study

  11. The role of emotion in clinical decision making: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Desirée; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Rowley, Joanne; Sutherland, Joanna

    2017-12-15

    Traditionally, clinical decision making has been perceived as a purely rational and cognitive process. Recently, a number of authors have linked emotional intelligence (EI) to clinical decision making (CDM) and calls have been made for an increased focus on EI skills for clinicians. The objective of this integrative literature review was to identify and synthesise the empirical evidence for a role of emotion in CDM. A systematic search of the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsychINFO, and CINAHL (EBSCO) was conducted to identify empirical studies of clinician populations. Search terms were focused to identify studies reporting clinician emotion OR clinician emotional intelligence OR emotional competence AND clinical decision making OR clinical reasoning. Twenty three papers were retained for synthesis. These represented empirical work from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches and comprised work with a focus on experienced emotion and on skills associated with emotional intelligence. The studies examined nurses (10), physicians (7), occupational therapists (1), physiotherapists (1), mixed clinician samples (3), and unspecified infectious disease experts (1). We identified two main themes in the context of clinical decision making: the subjective experience of emotion; and, the application of emotion and cognition in CDM. Sub-themes under the subjective experience of emotion were: emotional response to contextual pressures; emotional responses to others; and, intentional exclusion of emotion from CDM. Under the application of emotion and cognition in CDM, sub-themes were: compassionate emotional labour - responsiveness to patient emotion within CDM; interdisciplinary tension regarding the significance and meaning of emotion in CDM; and, emotion and moral judgement. Clinicians' experienced emotions can and do affect clinical decision making, although acknowledgement of that is far from universal. Importantly, this occurs in the in the absence of a

  12. Experiences of parenting and clinical intervention for mothers affected by personality disorder: a pilot qualitative study combining parent and clinician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ruth; Weaver, Tim; Michelson, Daniel; Day, Crispin

    2018-05-25

    Evidence-based parenting programmes are recommended for the treatment of child mental health difficulties. Families with complex psychosocial needs show poorer retention and outcomes when participating in standard parenting programmes. The Helping Families Programme (HFP) is a 16-week community-based parenting intervention designed to meet the needs of these families, including families with parental personality disorder. This study aimed to explore the help seeking and participatory experiences of parents with a diagnosis of personality disorder. It further aimed to examine the acceptability of referral and intervention processes for the HFP from the perspectives of (i) clinicians referring into the programme; and (ii) referred parents. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents recruited to receive HFP (n = 5) as part of a research case series and the referring NHS child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) clinicians (n = 5). Transcripts were analysed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Four themes were identified for parents: (i) the experience of parenthood, (ii) being a parent affected by personality disorder, (iii) experience of the intervention, and (iv) qualities of helping. Three themes emerged for clinicians: (i) challenges of addressing parental need, (ii) experience of engaging parents with personality disorders and (iii) limited involvement during HFP. Comparison of parent and clinician themes led to the identification of two key interlinked themes: (i) concerns prior to receiving the intervention, and (ii) the challenges of working together without a mutual understanding. This pilot study identifies potentially significant challenges of working with parents affected by personality disorder and engaging them in HFP and other similar interventions. Results have important wider clinical implications by highlighting potential barriers to engagement and participation and providing insights on how these barriers might be

  13. A web-based clinical decision tool to support treatment decision-making in psychiatry: a pilot focus group study with clinicians, patients and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, Catherine; Marzano, Lisa; Smith, Katharine; Attenburrow, Mary-Jane; Puntis, Stephen; Zlodre, Jakov; Kelly, Kathleen; Broome, Matthew R; Shaw, Susan; Barrera, Alvaro; Molodynski, Andrew; Reid, Alastair; Geddes, John R; Cipriani, Andrea

    2017-07-21

    Treatment decision tools have been developed in many fields of medicine, including psychiatry, however benefits for patients have not been sustained once the support is withdrawn. We have developed a web-based computerised clinical decision support tool (CDST), which can provide patients and clinicians with continuous, up-to-date, personalised information about the efficacy and tolerability of competing interventions. To test the feasibility and acceptability of the CDST we conducted a focus group study, aimed to explore the views of clinicians, patients and carers. The CDST was developed in Oxford. To tailor treatments at an individual level, the CDST combines the best available evidence from the scientific literature with patient preferences and values, and with patient medical profile to generate personalised clinical recommendations. We conducted three focus groups comprising of three different participant types: consultant psychiatrists, participants with a mental health diagnosis and/or experience of caring for someone with a mental health diagnosis, and primary care practitioners and nurses. Each 1-h focus group started with a short visual demonstration of the CDST. To standardise the discussion during the focus groups, we used the same topic guide that covered themes relating to the acceptability and usability of the CDST. Focus groups were recorded and any identifying participant details were anonymised. Data were analysed thematically and managed using the Framework method and the constant comparative method. The focus groups took place in Oxford between October 2016 and January 2017. Overall 31 participants attended (12 consultants, 11 primary care practitioners and 8 patients or carers). The main themes that emerged related to CDST applications in clinical practice, communication, conflicting priorities, record keeping and data management. CDST was considered a useful clinical decision support, with recognised value in promoting clinician

  14. The Evolving Role of Physicians - Don’t Forget the Generalist Primary Care Providers; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kalumire Cubaka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The editorial “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians” by Eyal et al describes non-physician clinicians’ (NPC need for mentorship and support from physicians. We emphasise the same need of support for front line generalist primary healthcare providers who carry out complex tasks yet may have an inadequate skill mix.

  15. Bayesian methodology for the design and interpretation of clinical trials in critical care medicine: a primer for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Andre C; Sun, Junfeng

    2014-10-01

    To review Bayesian methodology and its utility to clinical decision making and research in the critical care field. Clinical, epidemiological, and biostatistical studies on Bayesian methods in PubMed and Embase from their inception to December 2013. Bayesian methods have been extensively used by a wide range of scientific fields, including astronomy, engineering, chemistry, genetics, physics, geology, paleontology, climatology, cryptography, linguistics, ecology, and computational sciences. The application of medical knowledge in clinical research is analogous to the application of medical knowledge in clinical practice. Bedside physicians have to make most diagnostic and treatment decisions on critically ill patients every day without clear-cut evidence-based medicine (more subjective than objective evidence). Similarly, clinical researchers have to make most decisions about trial design with limited available data. Bayesian methodology allows both subjective and objective aspects of knowledge to be formally measured and transparently incorporated into the design, execution, and interpretation of clinical trials. In addition, various degrees of knowledge and several hypotheses can be tested at the same time in a single clinical trial without the risk of multiplicity. Notably, the Bayesian technology is naturally suited for the interpretation of clinical trial findings for the individualized care of critically ill patients and for the optimization of public health policies. We propose that the application of the versatile Bayesian methodology in conjunction with the conventional statistical methods is not only ripe for actual use in critical care clinical research but it is also a necessary step to maximize the performance of clinical trials and its translation to the practice of critical care medicine.

  16. The mind electric: Challenges to clinical categories from a person-centred perspective and the possibilities of metaphysics and art for clinician, patient, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pârvan, Alexandra

    2018-06-21

    The paper proposes that frameworks typical to metaphysics and art could be used in clinical treatment in somatic and psychiatric contexts to ensure improved care. The concept of the "body electric" of somatic patients which I introduced in previous work is developed further and paired with the "mind electric" of psychiatric patients. Both are defined as a patient's personally generated metaphysical possibility of being healthy-within-illness which is experientially actualized. Both concepts are used here to explore the alternative and the serious challenges to treatment approaches focused on clinical categories, disease, provision, and promotion of standardized or "black-box" therapies. An argument against the idea implied by the hope for such mass treatments and corresponding overreliance on science, namely, that health comes from fixing and regularizing, is developed based on cultural history and the evidenced fact that personally assumed health, just like art and metaphysics, is transgressive of scientific data, and accommodates the untrue, the impossible or the irregular as actual and normal. Because normality is created only with the help of disorder and from within it for chronic patients, clinicians should offer them the metaphysical care they need to produce and actualize their possibility of irregular normality or their body/mind electric. Better treatments can only be provided when scientific advances will be matched with advances in the humanistic competence of clinicians. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Achieving organisational competence for clinical leadership: the role of high performance work systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Balding, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    While there has been substantial discussion about the potential for clinical leadership in improving quality and safety in healthcare, there has been little robust study. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a qualitative study with clinicians and clinician managers to gather opinions on the appropriate content of an educational initiative being planned to improve clinical leadership in quality and safety among medical, nursing and allied health professionals working in primary, community and secondary care. In total, 28 clinicians and clinician managers throughout the state of Victoria, Australia, participated in focus groups to provide advice on the development of a clinical leadership program in quality and safety. An inductive, thematic analysis was completed to enable the themes to emerge from the data. Overwhelmingly the participants conceptualised clinical leadership in relation to organisational factors. Only four individual factors, comprising emotional intelligence, resilience, self-awareness and understanding of other clinical disciplines, were identified as being important for clinical leaders. Conversely seven organisational factors, comprising role clarity and accountability, security and sustainability for clinical leaders, selective recruitment into clinical leadership positions, teamwork and decentralised decision making, training, information sharing, and transformational leadership, were seen as essential, but the participants indicated they were rarely addressed. The human resource management literature includes these seven components, with contingent reward, reduced status distinctions and measurement of management practices, as the essential organisational underpinnings of high performance work systems. The results of this study propose that clinical leadership is an organisational property, suggesting that capability frameworks and educational programs for clinical leadership need a broader organisation focus. The paper

  18. Information management for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil B; Martin, Stephen A; Maypole, Jack; Andrews, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians are bombarded with information daily by social media, mainstream television news, e-mail, and print and online reports. They usually do not have much control over these information streams and thus are passive recipients, which means they get more noise than signal. Accessing, absorbing, organizing, storing, and retrieving useful medical information can improve patient care. The authors outline how to create a personalized stream of relevant information that can be scanned regularly and saved so that it is readily accessible. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  19. Is the Role of Physicians Really Evolving Due to Non-physician Clinicians Predominance in Staff Makeup in Sub-Saharan African Health Systems?; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsin M. Sidat

    2016-01-01

    Health workforce shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa are widely recognized, particularly of physicians, leading the training and deployment of Non-physician clinicians (NPCs). The paper by Eyal et al provides interesting and legitimate viewpoints on evolving role of physicians in context of decisive increase of NPCss in Sub-Saharan Africa. Certainly, in short or mid-term, NPCs will continue to be a proxy solution and a valuable alternative to overcome physicians’ shortages in sub-Saharan Africa. ...

  20. Effects of clinical communication interventions in hospitals: a systematic review of information and communication technology adoptions for improved communication between clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert C; Tran, Kim; Lo, Vivian; O'Leary, Kevin J; Morra, Dante; Quan, Sherman D; Perrier, Laure

    2012-11-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify, describe and assess interventions of information and communication technology on the processes of communication and associated patient outcomes within hospital settings. Studies published from the years 1996 to 2010 were considered and were selected if they described an evaluation of information and communication technology interventions to improve clinical communication within hospitals. Two authors abstracted data from full text articles, and the quality of individual articles were appraised. Results of interventions were summarized by their effect. There were 18 identified studies that evaluated the use of interventions that included alphanumeric paging, hands-free communication devices, mobile phones, smartphones, task management systems and a display based paging system. Most quantitative studies used a before and after study design and were of lower quality. Of all the studies, there was only one prospective randomized study, but this study used only simulated communication events. Quantitative studies identified improved perceptions of communication and some improvement in communication metrics. Qualitative studies described improvements in efficiency of communication but also issues of loss of control and reliability. Despite the rapid advancement in information and communications technology over the last decade, there is limited evidence suggesting improvements in the ability of health professionals to communicate effectively. Given the critical nature of communication, we advocate further evaluation of information and communication technology designed to improve communication between clinicians. Outcome measures should include measures of patient-oriented outcomes and efficiency for clinicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between secure patient-clinician email and clinical services utilisation in a US integrated health system: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Di; Palen, Ted E; Tsai, Joanne; McLeod, Melanie; Garrido, Terhilda; Qian, Heather

    2015-11-09

    To assess associations between secure patient-clinician email use and clinical services utilisation over time. Retrospective cohort study between July 2010 and December 2013. Controlling for a utilisation surge around first secure email use, we analysed difference of differences between propensity score-matched groups of secure patient-clinician email users and non-users for utilisation 1-12 months before and 7-18 months after first email (users) or a randomly assigned index date (non-users). US integrated healthcare delivery system. 9345 adults with first secure email use between July 2011 and July 2012 and continuous enrolment for ≥30 months and 9345 adults without secure email use between July 2010 and July 2012 matched to users on demographics, health status, and baseline utilisation. Rates of office visits, patient-initiated phone calls, scheduled telephone visits, after-hours clinic visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalisations. After controlling for multiple factors, no statistically significant differences in utilisation between secure email users and non-users occurred. Utilisation transiently increased by 88-237% around first email use. Annual rates of patient-initiated phone calls decreased among secure email users, 0.2 fewer calls per person (95% CI -0.3 to -0.1), from a mean of 4.1 calls per person 1-12 months before first use to a mean of 3.8 calls per person 7-18 months after first use. Rates of patient-initiated phone calls also decreased among non-users, 0.1 fewer calls per person (95% CI -0.2 to 0.0), from a mean of 4.2 calls per person 1-12 months before the index date to mean of 4.1 calls per person 7-18 months after the index date. Compared with non-users, patient use of secure email with clinicians was not associated with statistically significant differences in clinical services utilisation 7-18 months after first use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  2. The role of prudent love in the practice of clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2011-10-01

    Virtues are an important component in the practice of clinical medicine. Prudence or wisdom and charity or love are often viewed as crucial for virtuous practice. Generally, the two virtues are discussed separately, with no connection between them; however, a synergy exists between the two virtues as a compound virtue of prudent love in which the properties of the compound virtue transcend those of the individual virtues. To examine the nature of prudent love and to discuss its role in the practice of clinical medicine. Philosophical and conceptual analyses. Prudent love exhibits properties, which are the result of a synergistic interaction between the two individual virtues. Succinctly, prudent love synergism is an outcome of a particular structural relationship between the two virtues in which motivational love prompts the prudent clinician to acquire and utilize clinical competence, which then allows the loving clinician to take care of an individual patient's health care needs. In turn, the virtuous clinician's ability to meet those needs successfully feedbacks onto the motivation to satisfy them initially, thereby encouraging and enhancing the clinician to fulfil them even more prudently and lovingly, not only for the individual patient but also for other patients. The compound virtue of prudent love provides a comprehensive approach to practising medicine that meets not only the needs of patients but also fulfils the physician's sense as healer. Although challenges face teaching virtues in the medical curriculum, strategies are available for incorporating training in virtues into the curriculum. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Pivotal role of families in doctor-patient communication in oncology: a qualitative study of patients, their relatives and cancer clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S S; Tripathi, L; Varghese, R; Logan, J; Gessler, S; Chatterjee, S; Bhaumik, J; Menon, U

    2017-09-01

    Families are a unique source of support for many cancer patients. Most advanced communication skills training for oncologists are patient centred and do not cover interactions with family members. The current study used in-depth qualitative interviews of patients, relatives and cancer clinicians with thematic analysis to explore the role of family members in the communication process. Forty-one participants included 10 cancer patients, 10 relatives ensuring proportionate representation of both gender and primary cancer site and 21 doctors representing both medical and surgical oncology. Nineteen of 20 patients and relatives wanted an "open and honest" discussion with their doctors. All patients, relatives and doctors preferred involvement of the family at most stages of cancer treatment. Five themes were identified in relation to communication with family members. The participants highlighted the "importance of family for physical and psychological care," they emphasised the need to "balance patient autonomy and relatives desire to be protective" using varied "negotiating strategies" that are influenced by "socioeconomic circumstances of both patient and family." The doctor-patient-relative communication process was not static with preferences changing over time. The data suggests that communication skills training of cancer clinicians should incorporate modules on better communication with relatives. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. the surgical role of the clinical officer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practice Points: Bridging the health gap in Uganda: the surgical role of the clinical officer. ... responded to a structured questionnaire to determine their local investigative resources, the ... African Journal of Health Sciences Vol.5(1) 2005: 86-89 ...

  5. Effect of a Quality Improvement Intervention With Daily Round Checklists, Goal Setting, and Clinician Prompting on Mortality of Critically Ill Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Alexandre B; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Machado, Flavia R; Salluh, Jorge I F; Campagnucci, Valquiria Pelisser; Vendramim, Patricia; Guimaraes, Helio Penna; Normilio-Silva, Karina; Damiani, Lucas Petri; Romano, Edson; Carrara, Fernanda; Lubarino Diniz de Souza, Juliana; Silva, Aline Reis; Ramos, Grazielle Viana; Teixeira, Cassiano; Brandão da Silva, Nilton; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Angus, Derek C; Berwanger, Otavio

    2016-04-12

    The effectiveness of checklists, daily goal assessments, and clinician prompts as quality improvement interventions in intensive care units (ICUs) is uncertain. To determine whether a multifaceted quality improvement intervention reduces the mortality of critically ill adults. This study had 2 phases. Phase 1 was an observational study to assess baseline data on work climate, care processes, and clinical outcomes, conducted between August 2013 and March 2014 in 118 Brazilian ICUs. Phase 2 was a cluster randomized trial conducted between April and November 2014 with the same ICUs. The first 60 admissions of longer than 48 hours per ICU were enrolled in each phase. Intensive care units were randomized to a quality improvement intervention, including a daily checklist and goal setting during multidisciplinary rounds with follow-up clinician prompting for 11 care processes, or to routine care. In-hospital mortality truncated at 60 days (primary outcome) was analyzed using a random-effects logistic regression model, adjusted for patients' severity and the ICU's baseline standardized mortality ratio. Exploratory secondary outcomes included adherence to care processes, safety climate, and clinical events. A total of 6877 patients (mean age, 59.7 years; 3218 [46.8%] women) were enrolled in the baseline (observational) phase and 6761 (mean age, 59.6 years; 3098 [45.8%] women) in the randomized phase, with 3327 patients enrolled in ICUs (n = 59) assigned to the intervention group and 3434 patients in ICUs (n = 59) assigned to routine care. There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality between the intervention group and the usual care group, with 1096 deaths (32.9%) and 1196 deaths (34.8%), respectively (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.82-1.26; P = .88). Among 20 prespecified secondary outcomes not adjusted for multiple comparisons, 6 were significantly improved in the intervention group (use of low tidal volumes, avoidance of heavy sedation, use of

  6. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cross-sectional study of characteristics of clinical registries in Australia: a resource for clinicians and policy makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Emdadul Hoque, Dewan; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Lorgelly, Paula; McNeil, John J; Evans, Sue M

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the attributes of Australian clinical quality registries (CQR). Survey of 40 CQRs between September 2015 and April 2016. CQR lead investigators/project managers. None. Registry organization, geographical coverage, data quality, management, characteristics, output and outcomes. Of those who responded (34/40; 85.0%), 12 (34.3%) were binational (Australia and New Zealand); 22 (64.7%) were Australian-only registries; and 13 (38.2%) had national coverage. CQRs covered critical care, infection control, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic diseases, procedures and devices, and transplants. Overall, 24/34 CQRs (70.6%) were public sector funded. In total, 14 (41.2%) scored >75% on a composite score developed to assess data quality. Overall, 29/34 (85.3%) produced an annual multi-centred report; only 15/34 (44.1%) produced provider-specific reports. Mortality/survival and quality of life were collected by 82.4 and 32.4% of CQRs, respectively. Most CQRs displayed data in bar/column charts (28/34, 82.4%) and funnel plots (17/34, 50%). Most CQRs adopted an opt-out consent process (n = 17/31; 54.8%). Linear regression indicated that longer duration of CQR was associated with higher data quality (>20 vs 0-5 years coefficient = 4.76, 95% CI: 0.26, 9.26). Opt-in consent was associated with lower data quality (no active consent vs opt-in approval method, coefficient = -5.22, 95% CI: -8.71, -1.72). Six CQRs self-reported having undertaken an economic evaluation of their registry. CQRs varied in geographical coverage; stage of development, approach to recruitment; method and frequency of reporting their output; and data quality assurance. An accreditation system for CQRs would likely assist in recognizing high-quality registries.

  8. Engaging clinicians in health informatics projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Muñoz, Erika; Hullin Lucay Cossio, Carola M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The importance of the engagement of clinicians within a health informatics project * Strategies required for an effective involvement of clinicians throughout a change management process within a clinical context for the implementation of a health informatics project * The critical aspects for a successful implementation of a health informatics project that involves clinicians as end users * Key factors during the administration of changes during the implementation of an informatics project for an information system in clinical practice.

  9. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting.

  10. The clinical role of lecturers in nursing in Ireland: perceptions from key stakeholder groups in nurse education on the role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskell, Pauline; Murphy, Kathleen; Shaw, David

    2009-10-01

    The clinical role of lecturers in nursing has been a focus of debate since the integration of nurse education into higher education institutions. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from the preliminary phase of a study, undertaken to investigate the perceptions of key stakeholder groups in nurse education, regarding the current clinical role of nurse lecturers in Ireland. A descriptive exploratory design was used involving focus group and individual interviews, soliciting views of purposefully selected educationalists, clinicians, policy formulators and students. The issue was examined from a policy perspective, aiming to collectively represent views of all participant groups. This approach facilitated a more complete picture of perceptions of the role to emerge, to better inform future decision making. Twenty two focus group interviews and twenty one individual interviews were conducted. Content analysis was used to identify themes. All groups were in agreement that role definition was urgently required to dispel ambiguities surrounding what the clinical role should involve. Conflicting views were evident among groups regarding lecturers' clinical credibility, visibility and teaching effectiveness. Findings highlight the essential nature of nurse lecturers engaging with clinical areas to maintain their skills, demonstrate a value for the practice component of the role and provide a link between education and practice.

  11. Application of the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene to the role of the clinician : part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M M; Darby, M

    1993-01-01

    In summary, the theories of Maslow and of Yura and Walsh have been highlighted as background for understanding the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene. In addition, 11 human needs have been identified and defined as being especially related to dental hygiene care, and a sample evaluation tool for their clinical assessment and a dental hygiene care plan have been presented. The four concepts of client, environment, health/oral health, and dental hygiene actions explained in terms of human need theory, and the 11 human needs related to dental hygiene care constitute the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene. Within the framework of the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene, the dental hygiene process is a systematic approach to dental hygiene care that involves assessment of the 11 human needs related to dental hygiene care; analysis of deficits in these needs; determination of the dental hygiene care plan based on identified deficits; implementation of dental hygiene interventions stated in the care plan; and evaluation of the effectiveness of dental hygiene interventions in achieving specific goals, including subsequent reassessment and revision of the dental hygiene care plan. This human needs conceptual model for dental hygiene provides a guide for comprehensive and humanistic client care. This model allows the dental hygienist to view each client (whether an individual or a group) holistically to prevent oral disease and to promote health and wellness. Dental hygiene theorists are encouraged to expand this model or to develop additional conceptual models based on dental hygiene's paradigm.

  12. 'So you want to be a clinician-educator...': designing a clinician-educator curriculum for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Mitchell T; Pinheiro, Sandro; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; McNeill, Diana

    2009-06-01

    Despite a growing demand for skilled teachers and administrators in graduate medical education, clinician-educator tracks for residents are rare and though some institutions offer 'resident-as-teacher' programs to assist residents in developing teaching skills, the need exists to expand training opportunities in this area. The authors conducted a workshop at a national meeting to develop a description of essential components of a training pathway for internal medicine residents. Through open discussion and small group work, participants defined the various roles of clinician-educators and described goals, training opportunities, assessment and resource needs for such a program. Workshop participants posited that the clinician-educator has several roles to fulfill beyond that of clinician, including those of teacher, curriculum developer, administrator and scholar. A pathway for residents aspiring to become clinician educators must offer structured training in each of these four areas to empower residents to effectively practice clinical education. In addition, the creation of such a track requires securing time and resources to support resident learning experiences and formal faculty development programs to support institutional mentors and leaders. This article provides a framework by which leaders in medical education can begin to prepare current trainees interested in careers as clinician-educators.

  13. Role perceptions of nurse clinical research coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carolynn Thomas Jones, Lynda L Wilson School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Nursing roles in clinical research have evolved in the last 3 decades and include diverse responsibilities and job titles. Nurse clinical research coordinators’ (NCRCs roles include study planning, implementation, participant recruitment and retention, assessment of participants’ responses to clinical protocols, data management, and evaluation. The purpose of this study was to examine NCRCs’ perceptions of 59 specific clinical research activities that have been proposed as a taxonomy of NCRC activities. Participants were asked to check whether each of the 59 activities is being performed, and whether those activities should be performed, by NCRCs. The sample included 61 NCRCs who were attending the annual meeting of the International Association of Clinical Research Nurses. The percentage of respondents who indicated that the 59 activities are being performed by NCRCs at their sites ranged from 55%–98.4%. The percentage of respondents who indicated that the 59 activities should be performed by NCRCs ranged from 61.7%–88.5%. There were eight activities that fewer than 70% of the respondents reported should be performed by NCRCs. Chi-square analyses were conducted to determine whether there was a difference in the distribution of responses to the “are performed” versus “should be performed” responses for each of the 59 activities. There were significant differences in the distributions for 49 of the activities. The percentage of nurses responding “are performed” was higher than the percentage of responses to the “should be performed” items for 41 of these 49 activities. Findings suggest that further research is needed to validate the extent to which the taxonomy of clinical research nurse (CRN roles is a valid reflection of the actual practice of NCRCs, and also to explore reasons for the

  14. Essential laboratory knowledge for the clinician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As clinicians place huge emphasis on the numerical values obtained from the clinical ... where clinical management is based on medical decision limits that ... One area of laboratory medicine in which standardisation has been difficult to ...

  15. The clinician and the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A. (Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-09-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.).

  16. The clinician and the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.)

  17. Up-skilling associate clinicians in Malawi in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership: the ETATMBA cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, David R; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Davies, David; Simkiss, Doug; Kamwendo, Francis; Mhango, Chisale; Quenby, Siobhan; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ETATMBA (Enhancing Training And Technology for Mothers and Babies in Africa) project-trained associate clinicians (ACs/clinical officers) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric and neonatal care. This trial aimed to evaluate the impact of training on obstetric health outcomes in Malawi. A cluster randomised controlled trial with 14 districts of Malawi (8 intervention, 6 control) as units of randomisation. Intervention districts housed the 46 ACs who received the training programme. The primary outcome was district (health facility-based) perinatal mortality rates. Secondary outcomes included maternal mortality ratios, neonatal mortality rate, obstetric and birth variables. The study period was 2011-2013. Mortality rates/ratios were examined using an interrupted time series (ITS) to identify trends over time. The ITS reveals an improving trend in perinatal mortality across both groups, but better in the control group (intervention, effect -3.58, SE 2.65, CI (-9.85 to 2.69), p=0.20; control, effect -17.79, SE 6.83, CI (-33.95 to -1.64), p=0.03). Maternal mortality ratios are seen to have improved in intervention districts while worsening in the control districts (intervention, effect -38.11, SE 50.30, CI (-157.06 to 80.84), p=0.47; control, effect 11.55, SE 87.72, CI (-195.87 to 218.98), p=0.90). There was a 31% drop in neonatal mortality rate in intervention districts while in control districts, the rate rises by 2%. There are no significant differences in the other secondary outcomes. This is one of the first randomised studies looking at the effect of structured training on health outcomes in this setting. Notwithstanding a number of limitations, this study suggests that up-skilling this cadre is possible, and could impact positively on health outcomes. ISRCTN63294155; Results.

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Usual Clinical Care for Youth Depression: An Initial Test of Transportability to Community Clinics and Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, John R.; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Gordis, Elana B.; Connor-Smith, Jennifer K.; Chu, Brian C.; Langer, David A.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Updegraff, Alanna; Weiss, Bahr

    2009-01-01

    Community clinic therapists were randomized to (a) brief training and supervision in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth depression or (b) usual care (UC). The therapists treated 57 youths (56% girls), ages 8-15, of whom 33% were Caucasian, 26% were African American, and 26% were Latino/Latina. Most youths were from low-income families…

  19. Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and Practices on Assessment and Measurement at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. ... A standardized questionnaire was administered to 236 hospital – based clinicians including medical doctors, nurses and clinical officers. The questionnaire consisted of ...

  20. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cole, Lisa M; Walker, Theodore J; Nader, Kelly C; Glover, Dennis E; Newkirk, Laura E

    2006-01-01

    A clearly defined role of the Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist (PONS) is not identified. The purpose of this study was to provide recommendations for a delineated role of the PONS that will provide role clarity and practice guidance...

  1. Non-physician Clinicians – A Gain for Physicians’ Working in Sub-Saharan Africa; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delanyo Dovlo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The changing demands on the health sectors in low- and middle-income countries especially sub-Saharan African countries continue to challenge efforts to address critical shortages of the health workforce. Addressing these challenges have led to the evolution of “non-physician clinicians” (NPCs, that assume some physician roles and thus mitigate the continuing shortage of doctors in these countries. While it is agreed that changes are needed in physicians’ roles and their training as part of the new continuum of care that includes NPCs, we disagree that such training should be geared solely at ensuring physicians dominated health systems. Discussions on the workforce models to suit low-income countries must avoid an endorsement of a culture of physician focused health systems as the only model for sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. It is also essential that training for NPCs be harmonized with that of physicians to clarify the technical roles of both.

  2. Improving clinicians' access to cost data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenagy, John; Shah, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Bringing clinical and financial data together is critical to effectively running and operating service lines. Helping clinicians use cost data to make decisions requires a shared vision and a partnership between finance leaders and physicians. Hosting a "jam session" of technical, financial, and clinical experts can accelerate an organization's business intelligence strategy. Labor and supply costs represent the most actionable cost data for clinicians. Clinician buy-in hinges on education and support. It is important to focus on easy wins at the beginning of the project.

  3. "You never know who are Sami or speak Sami" Clinicians' experiences with language-appropriate care to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Northern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2016-01-01

    The Indigenous population in Norway, the Sami, have a statutory right to speak and be spoken to in the Sami language when receiving health services. There is, however, limited knowledge about how clinicians deal with this in clinical practice. This study explores how clinicians deal with language-appropriate care with Sami-speaking patients in specialist mental health services. This study aims to explore how clinicians identify and respond to Sami patients' language data, as well as how they experience provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Sami language administrative districts. Data were collected using qualitative method, through individual interviews with 20 therapists working in outpatient mental health clinics serving Sami populations in northern Norway. A thematic analysis inspired by systematic text reduction was employed. Two themes were identified: (a) identification of Sami patients' language data and (b) experiences with provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients. Findings indicate that clinicians are not aware of patients' language needs prior to admission and that they deal with identification of language data and offer of language-appropriate care ad hoc when patients arrive. Sami-speaking participants reported always offering language choice and found more profound understanding of patients' experiences when Sami language was used. Whatever language Sami-speaking patients may choose, they are found to switch between languages during therapy. Most non-Sami-speaking participants reported offering Sami-speaking services, but the patients chose to speak Norwegian. However, a few of the participants maintained language awareness and could identify language needs despite a patient's refusal to speak Sami in therapy. Finally, some non-Sami-speaking participants were satisfied if they understood what the patients were saying. They left it to patients to address language problems, only to discover patients

  4. Clinician preferences and the estimation of causal treatment differences

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Edward L.; Baumrind, Sheldon

    1998-01-01

    Clinician treatment preferences affect the ability to perform randomized clinical trials and the ability to analyze observational data for treatment effects. In clinical trials, clinician preferences that are based on a subjective analysis of the patient can make it difficult to define eligibility criteria for which clinicians would agree to randomize all patients who satisfy the criteria. In addition, since each clinician typically has some preference for the choice of treatment for a given ...

  5. [Meanings attributed to management as an explanation for clinician managers' attitudes and professional identity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascón-Pereira, Rosalía; Valverde, Mireia

    2014-01-01

    To understand the process by which clinician managers construct their professional identities and develop their attitudes toward managing. A qualitative study was performed, based on grounded theory, through in-depth interviews with 20 clinician managers selected through theoretical sampling in two public hospitals of Catalonia (Spain), participant observation, and documentation. Clinician managers' role meanings are constructed by comparing their roles with those of senior managers and clinicians. In this process, clinician managers seek to differentiate themselves from senior managers through the meanings constructed. In particular, they use proximity with reality and clinical knowledge as the main sources of differentiation. This study sheds light on why clinician managers develop adverse attitudes to managing and why they define themselves as clinicians rather than as managers. The explanation lies in the construction of the meanings they assign to managing as the basis of their attitudes to this role and professional identity. These findings have some practical implications for healthcare management. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  6. "It feels good to be measured": clinical role-play, Walker Percy, and the tingles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Nitin K

    2013-01-01

    A large online community has recently formed around autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), a pleasant and poorly understood somatic reaction to specific interpersonal triggers. Its web-based manifestations include a variety of amateur videos designed to elicit the reaction, many of which feature protracted imitations of a clinician's physical exam. This analysis considers through a literary lens the proximity of this phenomenon to clinical diagnostics, focusing in particular on characterizations of spiritual isolation elaborated in Love in the Ruins (1971), the third novel by physician-writer Walker Percy (1916-1990). Within this speculative framework, the tendency to derive pleasure from clinical milieus, real or constructed, may be interpreted as a quality particular to the postmodern psyche. Viewing web-based clinical role-play in light of Percy's writing also underscores the possibility that routine diagnostic assessments may have independent therapeutic implications.

  7. Nurse prescribing as an aspect of future role expansion: the views of Irish clinical nurse specialists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lockwood, Emily B

    2008-10-01

    AIM: Nurses and midwives are expanding the scope of their professional practice, assuming additional responsibilities including the management and prescribing of medications. The aim of the study was to discover the attitudes of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Ireland to nurse prescribing and to examine perceived barriers to engaging in this aspect of future role expansion. BACKGROUND: The expansion of the nursing role in relation to nurse prescribing is an ongoing process and is subject to incremental iterations of legislation and professional policy. Nurse prescribing as an expanded role function has become a reality in many countries. Ireland has addressed the matter in a formal and systematic way through legislation. METHOD: A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 283 CNSs practising in a variety of care settings in Ireland. Attitudes were measured using Likert-type attitudinal scales, designed specifically for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that the majority of clinical nurse specialists were positively disposed toward nurse prescribing as a future role expansion. The fear of litigation was identified as the most significant barrier to nurse prescribing. The majority of respondents equated nurse prescribing with increased autonomy and holistic care. The findings indicate that there is a need for further examination of the educational requirements of the CNS in relation to nurse prescribing. The legislative implications for nurse prescribing and fear of legal consequences need to be considered prior to any implementation of nurse prescribing. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: While senior clinicians are willing to embrace future role expansion in the area of nurse prescribing, their Nurse Managers should recognize that facilitation of nurse prescribing needs to address the legal and educational requirements for such activity. Failure to address these requirements can represent a barrier to role expansion. This paper offers

  8. Nurse prescribing as an aspect of future role expansion: the views of Irish clinical nurse specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Emily B; Fealy, Gerard M

    2008-10-01

    Nurses and midwives are expanding the scope of their professional practice, assuming additional responsibilities including the management and prescribing of medications. The aim of the study was to discover the attitudes of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Ireland to nurse prescribing and to examine perceived barriers to engaging in this aspect of future role expansion. The expansion of the nursing role in relation to nurse prescribing is an ongoing process and is subject to incremental iterations of legislation and professional policy. Nurse prescribing as an expanded role function has become a reality in many countries. Ireland has addressed the matter in a formal and systematic way through legislation. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 283 CNSs practising in a variety of care settings in Ireland. Attitudes were measured using Likert-type attitudinal scales, designed specifically for the study. Findings indicate that the majority of clinical nurse specialists were positively disposed toward nurse prescribing as a future role expansion. The fear of litigation was identified as the most significant barrier to nurse prescribing. The majority of respondents equated nurse prescribing with increased autonomy and holistic care. The findings indicate that there is a need for further examination of the educational requirements of the CNS in relation to nurse prescribing. The legislative implications for nurse prescribing and fear of legal consequences need to be considered prior to any implementation of nurse prescribing. While senior clinicians are willing to embrace future role expansion in the area of nurse prescribing, their Nurse Managers should recognize that facilitation of nurse prescribing needs to address the legal and educational requirements for such activity. Failure to address these requirements can represent a barrier to role expansion. This paper offers new understandings on the views of senior clinicians concerning nurse prescribing at a

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care in a network of community-based mental health services: a study protocol of a non-randomized, multiple baseline trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlem, Kate; Bowman, Jennifer; Freund, Megan; Wye, Paula; McElwaine, Kathleen; Knight, Jenny; McElduff, Patrick; Gillham, Karen; Wiggers, John

    2013-08-06

    People with a mental illness experience substantial disparities in health, including increased rates of morbidity and mortality caused by potentially preventable chronic diseases. One contributing factor to such disparity is a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors, such as smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake, harmful alcohol consumption, and inadequate physical activity. Evidence supports the effectiveness of preventive care in reducing such risks, and guidelines recommend that preventive care addressing such risks be incorporated into routine clinical care. Although community-based mental health services represent an important potential setting for ensuring that people with a mental illness receive such care, research suggests its delivery is currently sub-optimal. A study will be undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing the routine provision of preventive care by clinicians in community mental health settings. A two-group multiple baseline design will be utilized to assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategic intervention implemented over 12 months in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. The intervention will be implemented sequentially across the two groups of community mental health services to increase provision of client assessment, brief advice, and referral for four health risk behaviors (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and inadequate physical activity). Outcome measures of interest will be collected via repeated cross-sectional computer-assisted telephone interviews undertaken on a weekly basis for 36 months with community mental health clients. This study is the first to assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategic clinical practice change intervention in increasing routine clinician provision of preventive care for chronic disease behavioral risk factors within a network of community mental health services

  10. Role of Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketha, Siva S; Singh, Ravinder J; Ketha, Hemamalini

    2017-09-01

    The advent of mass spectrometry into the clinical laboratory has led to an improvement in clinical management of several endocrine diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry found some of its first clinical applications in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism, in quantitative steroid analysis, and in drug analysis laboratories. Mass spectrometry assays offer analytical sensitivity and specificity that is superior to immunoassays for many analytes. This article highlights several areas of clinical endocrinology that have witnessed the use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bed occupancy monitoring: data processing and clinician user interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Melanie; Joshi, Vilas; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Unobtrusive and continuous monitoring of patients, especially at their place of residence, is becoming a significant part of the healthcare model. A variety of sensors are being used to monitor different patient conditions. Bed occupancy monitoring provides clinicians a quantitative measure of bed entry/exit patterns and may provide information relating to sleep quality. This paper presents a bed occupancy monitoring system using a bed pressure mat sensor. A clinical trial was performed involving 8 patients to collect bed occupancy data. The trial period for each patient ranged from 5-10 weeks. This data was analyzed using a participatory design methodology incorporating clinician feedback to obtain bed occupancy parameters. The parameters extracted include the number of bed exits per night, the bed exit weekly average (including minimum and maximum), the time of day of a particular exit, and the amount of uninterrupted bed occupancy per night. The design of a clinical user interface plays a significant role in the acceptance of such patient monitoring systems by clinicians. The clinician user interface proposed in this paper was designed to be intuitive, easy to navigate and not cause information overload. An iterative design methodology was used for the interface design. The interface design is extendible to incorporate data from multiple sensors. This allows the interface to be part of a comprehensive remote patient monitoring system.

  12. Can training in advanced clinical skills in obstetrics, neonatal care and leadership, of non-physician clinicians in Malawi impact on clinical services improvements (the ETATMBA project): a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, David R; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Davies, David; O'Hare, Joseph Paul; Kamwendo, Francis; Quenby, Siobhan; Griffiths, Frances

    2014-08-12

    The 'enhancing human resources and the use of appropriate technologies for maternal and perinatal survival in sub-Saharan Africa' (ETATMBA) project is training emergency obstetric and new-born care (EmONC) non-physician clinicians (NPCs) as advanced clinical leaders. Our objectives were to evaluate the implementation and changes to practice. A mixed methods process evaluation with the predominate methodology being qualitative. Rural and urban hospitals in 8 of the 14 districts of northern and central Malawi. 54 EmONC NPCs with 3 years' plus experience. Training designed and delivered by clinicians from the UK and Malawi; it is a 2-year plus package of training (classroom, mentorship and assignments). We conducted 79 trainee interviews over three time points during the training, as well as a convenience sample of 10 colleagues, 7 district officers and 2 UK obstetricians. Trainees worked in a context of substantial variation in the rates of maternal and neonatal deaths between districts. Training reached trainees working across the target regions. For 46 trainees (8 dropped out of the course), dose delivered in terms of attendance was high and all 46 spent time working alongside an obstetrician. In early interviews trainees recalled course content unprompted indicating training had been received. Colleagues and district officers reported cascading of knowledge and initial changes in practice indicating early implementation. By asking trainees to describe actual cases we found they had implemented new knowledge and skills. These included life-saving interventions for postpartum haemorrhage and eclampsia. Trainees identified the leadership training as enabling them to confidently change their own practice and initiate change in their health facility. This process evaluation suggests that trainees have made positive changes in their practice. Clear impacts on maternal and perinatal mortality are yet to be elucidated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  13. Increasing consumer demand for tobacco treatments: Ten design recommendations for clinicians and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan Swartz; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Health professionals play an important role in addressing patient tobacco use in clinical settings. While there is clear evidence that identifying tobacco use and assisting smokers in quitting affects outcomes, challenges to improve routine, clinician-delivered tobacco intervention persist. The Consumer Demand Initiative has identified simple design principles to increase consumers' use of proven tobacco treatments. Applying these design strategies to activities across the healthcare system, we articulate ten recommendations that can be implemented in the context of most clinical systems where most clinicians work. The recommendations are: (1) reframe the definition of success, (2) portray proven treatments as the best care, (3) redesign the 5A's of tobacco intervention, (4) be ready to deliver the right treatment at the right time, (5) move tobacco from the social history to the problem list, (6) use words as therapy and language that makes sense, (7) fit tobacco treatment into clinical team workflows, (8) embed tobacco treatment into health information technology, (9) make every encounter an opportunity to intervene, and (10) end social disparities for tobacco users. Clinical systems need to change to improve tobacco treatment implementation. The consumer- and clinician-centered recommendations provide a roadmap that focuses on increasing clinician performance through greater understanding of the clinician's role in helping tobacco users, highlighting the value of evidence-based tobacco treatments, employing shared decision-making skills, and integrating routine tobacco treatment into clinical system routines. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING: CURRENT ROLE FROM THE CLINICAL LABORATORY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Posteraro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite availability of many antifungal agents, antifungal clinical resistance occurs, perhaps as a result of an infecting organism found to be resistant in vitro to one or more antifungals tested. Thus, antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST results, if timely generated by the clinical microbiology and communicated to clinicians, can aid them in the therapeutic decision making, especially for difficult-to-treat invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Although recently refined AFST methods are commercially available to allow a close antifungal resistance surveillance in many clinical setting, novel assays, relying on short-time antifungal drug exposure of fungal isolates, are upcoming tools for AFST. Based on emerging technologies such as flow cytometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and isothermal microcalorimetry, these assays could provide a reliable means for quicker and sensitive assessment of AFST.

  15. The meaning of co- production for clinicians: an exploratory case study of Practitioner Trainers in one Recovery College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Mark; Oates, Jennifer

    2018-05-15

    Co-production between service users and clinicians is a desirable element of recovery-oriented practice in mental health but the effect of co-production on clinicians has not been explored thoroughly. to explore the meaning of co-production for clinicians based on their experience of co-production in a Recovery College Method: Thematic analysis of eight semi-structured interviews with clinicians who have co-produced and co-delivered workshops with a Recovery College Peer Trainer. The 'meaning of co-production' had four themes: definitions, power dynamics, negotiating roles and influence on practice. Clinicians' experience of co-production meant a reassessment of their expert role and power. They said that this altered their clinical practice, particularly the language they used and the personal information they shared. Role negotiation between Practitioner and Peer Trainers is an iterative process, whereby clinicians may revise their perspectives on personal disclosure, professional identity and collegiate support. The Peer and Practitioner Trainer relationship is characterised by reciprocity and mutuality, and there is some evidence that Practitioner involvement in a co-produced activity has the potential to transform service user and provider relationships beyond the Recovery College setting. Engaging in co-produced educational workshops can alter clinicians' perspectives on roles, power and clinical expertise. Findings from this case study must be tested against research on other Recovery Colleges. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Role modelling of clinical tutors: a focus group study among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Goulston, Kerry; Oates, Kim

    2015-02-14

    Role modelling by clinicians assists in development of medical students' professional competencies, values and attitudes. Three core characteristics of a positive role model include 1) clinical attributes, 2) teaching skills, and 3) personal qualities. This study was designed to explore medical students' perceptions of their bedside clinical tutors as role models during the first year of a medical program. The study was conducted with one cohort (n = 301) of students who had completed Year 1 of the Sydney Medical Program in 2013. A total of nine focus groups (n = 59) were conducted with medical students following completion of Year 1. Data were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to code and categorise data into themes. Students identified both positive and negative characteristics and behaviour displayed by their clinical tutors. Characteristics and behaviour that students would like to emulate as medical practitioners in the future included: 1) Clinical attributes: a good knowledge base; articulate history taking skills; the ability to explain and demonstrate skills at the appropriate level for students; and empathy, respect and genuine compassion for patients. 2) Teaching skills: development of a rapport with students; provision of time towards the growth of students academically and professionally; provision of a positive learning environment; an understanding of the student curriculum and assessment requirements; immediate and useful feedback; and provision of patient interaction. 3) Personal qualities: respectful interprofessional staff interactions; preparedness for tutorials; demonstration of a passion for teaching; and demonstration of a passion for their career choice. Excellence in role modelling entails demonstration of excellent clinical care, teaching skills and personal characteristics. Our findings reinforce the important function of clinical bedside tutors as role models, which has implications for faculty development and

  17. Principles, practices and knowledge of clinicians when assessing febrile children: a qualitative study in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooft, Anneka M; Ripp, Kelsey; Ndenga, Bryson; Mutuku, Francis; Vu, David; Baltzell, Kimberly; Masese, Linnet N; Vulule, John; Mukoko, Dunstan; LaBeaud, A Desiree

    2017-09-20

    Clinicians in low resource settings in malaria endemic regions face many challenges in diagnosing and treating febrile illnesses in children. Given the change in WHO guidelines in 2010 that recommend malaria testing prior to treatment, clinicians are now required to expand the differential when malaria testing is negative. Prior studies have indicated that resource availability, need for additional training in differentiating non-malarial illnesses, and lack of understanding within the community of when to seek care play a role in effective diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to examine the various factors that influence clinician behavior in diagnosing and managing children presenting with fever to health centres in Kenya. A total of 20 clinicians (2 paediatricians, 1 medical officer, 2 nurses, and 15 clinical officers) were interviewed, working at 5 different government-sponsored public clinic sites in two areas of Kenya where malaria is prevalent. Clinicians were interviewed one-on-one using a structured interview technique. Interviews were then analysed qualitatively for themes. The following five themes were identified: (1) Strong familiarity with diagnosis of malaria and testing for malaria; (2) Clinician concerns about community understanding of febrile illness, use of traditional medicine, delay in seeking care, and compliance; (3) Reliance on clinical guidelines, history, and physical examination to diagnose febrile illness and recognize danger signs; (4) Clinician discomfort with diagnosis of primary viral illness leading to increased use of empiric antibiotics; and (5) Lack of resources including diagnostic testing, necessary medications, and training modalities contributes to the difficulty clinicians face in assessing and treating febrile illness in children. These themes persisted across all sites, despite variation in levels of medical care. Within these themes, clinicians consistently expressed a need for reliable basic testing

  18. Supervisors' pedagogical role at a clinical education ward - an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice is essential for health care students. The supervisor's role and how supervision should be organized are challenging issues for educators and clinicians. Clinical education wards have been established to meet these challenges and they are units with a pedagogical framework facilitating students' training in real clinical settings. Supervisors support students to link together theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. From students' perspectives, clinical education wards have shown potential to enhance students' learning. Thus there is a need for deeper understanding of supervisors' pedagogical role in this context. We explored supervisors' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward where students are encouraged to independently take care of patients. An ethnographic approach was used to study encounters between patients, students and supervisors. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital. Ten observations with ten patients, 11 students and five supervisors were included in the study. After each observation, individual follow-up interviews with all participants and a group interview with supervisors were conducted. Data were analysed using an ethnographic approach. Supervisors' pedagogical role has to do with balancing patient care and student learning. The students were given independence, which created pedagogical challenges for the supervisors. They handled these challenges by collaborating as a supervisory team and taking different acts of supervision such as allowing students their independence, being there for students and by applying patient-centredness. The supervisors' pedagogical role was perceived as to facilitate students' learning as a team. Supervisors were both patient- and student-centred by making a nursing care plan for the patients and a learning plan for the students. The plans were guided by clinical and pedagogical guidelines, individually adjusted and

  19. A national survey of pain clinics within the United Kingdom and Ireland focusing on the multidisciplinary team and the incorporation of the extended nursing role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailainathan, Pungavi; Humble, Stephen; Dawson, Helen; Cameron, Fiona; Gokani, Shyam; Lidder, Gursimren

    2018-02-01

    Inconsistencies in the availability and quality of pain service provision have been noted nationally, as have lengthy waiting times for appointments and lack of awareness of the Pain Clinic role. The 2013 NHS England report stated that specialist pain services must offer multispecialty and multidisciplinary pain clinics. This national survey of multidisciplinary pain service provision in the United Kingdom and Ireland provides a snapshot of pain service provision in order to review and highlight what variations exist in multidisciplinary team (MDT) provision and working patterns. A common perception among clinicians is that financial pressures have led to alternate ways of staff utilisation with variable degrees of success. The survey included 143 pain clinics, focusing principally on MDT working patterns, MDT composition and adoption of the extended role. The results identified that the majority of Pain Clinics utilise the MDT approach. However, provision of critical components such as regular MDT meetings is highly variable as is the composition of the MDT itself and also working patterns of the individual clinicians. The survey reports the successful use of the extended roles for specialist nurses in follow up clinics. In contrast, the survey highlights that a large proportion of clinicians surveyed have reservations about both the effectiveness and the safety of utilising specialist nurses in the extended role to see new referrals of complex pain patients to pain clinics. This survey underlines the essential requirement for incorporation of greater MDT working locally and nationally and allocation of appropriate resources to facilitate this.

  20. The role of clinic visits: perceptions of doctors | Couper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A range of important themes emerged from the interviews, relating to the intended function of the clinics and their resources, the operationalisation of doctors' visits, the varied roles that doctors play in clinics and the importance of teamwork and support. Doctors working full time in the clinics shared a more positive view.

  1. [An Investigation of the Role Responsibilities of Clinical Research Nurses in Conducting Clinical Trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Yin; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Pai, Ya-Ying; Hu, Wen-Yu

    2015-06-01

    Clinical research nurses (CRNs) play an important role in improving the quality of clinical trials. In Taiwan, the increasing number of clinical trials has increased the number of practicing CRNs. Understanding the role responsibilities of CRNs is necessary to promote professionalism in this nursing category. This study investigates the role responsibilities of CRNs in conducting clinical trials / research. A questionnaire survey was conducted in a medical center in Taipei City, Taiwan. Eighty CRNs that were registered to facilitate and conduct clinical trials at this research site completed the survey. "Subject protection" was the CRN role responsibility most recognized by participants, followed by "research coordination and management", "subject clinical care", and "advanced professional nursing". Higher recognition scores were associated with higher importance scores and lower difficulty scores. Participants with trial training had significantly higher difficulty scores for "subject clinical care" and "research coordination and management" than their peers without this training (p research coordination and management" (p clinical practice.

  2. Online Mental Health Resources in Rural Australia: Clinician Perceptions of Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kristi; Riley, Geoffrey; Auret, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background Online mental health resources have been proposed as an innovative means of overcoming barriers to accessing rural mental health services. However, clinicians tend to express lower satisfaction with online mental health resources than do clients. Objective To understand rural clinicians’ attitudes towards the acceptability of online mental health resources as a treatment option in the rural context. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 rural clinicians (general practitioners, psychologists, psychiatrists, and clinical social workers). Interviews were supplemented with rural-specific vignettes, which described clinical scenarios in which referral to online mental health resources might be considered. Symbolic interactionism was used as the theoretical framework for the study, and interview transcripts were thematically analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Clinicians were optimistic about the use of online mental health resources into the future, showing a preference for integration alongside existing services, and use as an adjunct rather than an alternative to traditional approaches. Key themes identified included perceptions of resources, clinician factors, client factors, and the rural and remote context. Clinicians favored resources that were user-friendly and could be integrated into their clinical practice. Barriers to use included a lack of time to explore resources, difficulty accessing training in the rural environment, and concerns about the lack of feedback from clients. Social pressure exerted within professional clinical networks contributed to a cautious approach to referring clients to online resources. Conclusions Successful implementation of online mental health resources in the rural context requires attention to clinician perceptions of acceptability. Promotion of online mental health resources to rural clinicians should include information about resource effectiveness, enable integration with existing

  3. Role Strain in Collegiate Athletic Training Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jolene M; Weidner, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    Context: Certified athletic trainers who serve as Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) in the collegiate setting are balancing various roles (eg, patient care and related administrative tasks, clinical education). Whether this balancing act is associated with role strain in athletic trainers has not been examined. Objective: To examine the degree of, and contributing factors (eg, socialization experiences, professional and employment demographics, job congruency) to, role strain in collegiate ACIs. Design: Cross-sectional survey design. Setting: Geographically stratified random sample of ACIs affiliated with accredited athletic training education programs at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, II, and III institutions. Patients or Other Participants: 118 collegiate ACIs (47 head athletic trainers, 45 assistant athletic trainers, 26 graduate assistant athletic trainers). Main Outcome Measure(s): The Athletic Training ACI Role Strain Inventory, which measures total degree of role strain, 7 subscales of role strain, socialization experiences, professional and employment characteristics, and congruency in job responsibilities. Results: A total of 49% (n  =  58) of the participants experienced a moderate to high degree of role strain. Role Overload was the highest contributing subscale to total role strain. No differences were noted between total role strain and role occupant groups, NCAA division, or sex. Graduate assistant athletic trainers experienced a greater degree of role incompetence than head athletic trainers did (P  =  .001). Division II ACIs reported a greater degree of inter-role conflict than those in Division I (P  =  .02). Female ACIs reported a greater degree of role incompetence than male ACIs (P  =  .01). Those ACIs who stated that the ACI training provided by their institution did not adequately prepare them for the role as an ACI experienced greater role strain (P < .001). Conclusions: The ACIs in the

  4. The Experiences of Occupational Therapy Clinicians as Educators: The Community College Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Nichelle Lea

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the clinical fieldwork educator role in the community college from the perspective of the clinician. While there are numerous fieldwork studies from the perspectives of the students and the academic institutions, there is a paucity of literature regarding the meaning that fieldwork educators…

  5. The interplay between teamwork, clinicians' emotional exhaustion, and clinician-rated patient safety: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Annalena; Meier, Laurenz L; Manser, Tanja

    2016-04-19

    Effectively managing patient safety and clinicians' emotional exhaustion are important goals of healthcare organizations. Previous cross-sectional studies showed that teamwork is associated with both. However, causal relationships between all three constructs have not yet been investigated. Moreover, the role of different dimensions of teamwork in relation to emotional exhaustion and patient safety is unclear. The current study focused on the long-term development of teamwork, emotional exhaustion, and patient safety in interprofessional intensive care teams by exploring causal relationships between these constructs. A secondary objective was to disentangle the effects of interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork. We employed a longitudinal study design. Participants were 2100 nurses and physicians working in 55 intensive care units. They answered an online questionnaire on interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral aspects of teamwork, emotional exhaustion, and patient safety at three time points with a 3-month lag. Data were analyzed with cross-lagged structural equation modeling. We controlled for professional role. Analyses showed that emotional exhaustion had a lagged effect on interpersonal teamwork. Furthermore, interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork mutually influenced each other. Finally, cognitive-behavioral teamwork predicted clinician-rated patient safety. The current study shows that the interrelations between teamwork, clinician burnout, and clinician-rated patient safety unfold over time. Interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork play specific roles in a process leading from clinician emotional exhaustion to decreased clinician-rated patient safety. Emotionally exhausted clinicians are less able to engage in positive interpersonal teamwork, which might set in motion a vicious cycle: negative interpersonal team interactions negatively affect cognitive-behavioral teamwork and vice versa. Ultimately, ineffective cognitive

  6. The role of a movement disorders clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yssel, J

    2012-02-01

    Ireland\\'s ageing population will result in a substantial increase in neurodegenerative disease with a projected increase in prevalence of Idiopathic Parkinson\\'s disease (IPD) to 9,000 by 2021. There are few published audits of neurology services to assist care planning. As a first step towards evaluating future service needs for this group of patients, we audited a single tertiary referral IPD and Other Movement Disorders clinic for 2006. A total of 497 patients from all counties in Ireland were seen; 225 (59%) of patients had IPD, 32 (8.2%) had atypical parkinsonism, and 22 (5.8%) dystonia. In a subset of 275 patients, 151 (55%) were referred by GPs, 74 (27%) by other consultants, and 49 (18%) by other consultant neurologists. Diagnosis was changed in 22 (38%) and medication was adjusted in 203 (74%). A telephone survey of 50 patients demonstrated 100% satisfaction with the improved access to the clinical nurse specialist, telephone support and improved continuity of care. The IPD and Other Movement Disorders clinic provides an important local, regional, and national diagnostic and therapeutic service for complex movement disorders. It is proposed that a national registry of IPD and audit of the delivery of care to patients with movement disorders is needed.

  7. Distinguishing the Clinical Nurse Specialist From Other Graduate Nursing Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Lynn D; Coke, Lola A

    Today's healthcare environment poses diverse and complex patient care challenges and requires a highly qualified and experienced nursing workforce. To mitigate these challenges are graduate nursing roles, each with a different set of competencies and expertise. With the availability of many different graduate nursing roles, both patients and healthcare professionals can be confused in understanding the benefit of each role. To gain the maximum benefit from each role, it is important that healthcare providers and administrators are able to distinguish the uniqueness of each role to best use the role and develop strategies for effective collaboration and interprofessional interaction. The purpose of this article was to define the role, educational preparation, role differences, and practice competencies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader, and nurse educator/staff development educator roles. A second purpose was to provide role clarity and demonstrate the unique value the CNS brings to the healthcare environment. Using evidence and reviewing role competencies established by varying organizations, each role is presented with similarities and differences among the roles discussed. In addition, collaboration among the identified roles was reviewed, and recommendations were provided for the new and practicing CNSs. Although there are some similarities among the graduate nursing roles such as in educational, licensing, and certification requirements, each role must be understood to gain the full role scope and benefit and glean the anticipated outcomes. Healthcare providers must be aware of the differences in graduate nursing roles, especially in comparing the CNS with other roles to avoid confusion that may lead to roles being underused with a limited job scope. The CNS provides a unique set of services at all system outcome levels and is an essential part of the healthcare team especially in the acute care setting.

  8. The effect of core clinician interpersonal behaviours on depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnicot, K; Wampold, B; Priebe, S

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that core clinician interpersonal behaviours are important when treating depression, but few studies have evaluated whether outcome is determined by clinicians׳ general behaviour rather than by the perception of the individual being treated. In the NIMH TDCRP, 157 patients rated their clinician׳s genuineness, positive regard, empathy and unconditional regard during cognitive behavioural therapy, interpersonal therapy or clinical management with placebo. The association between averaged ratings for each of 27 clinicians and their patients׳ self- and observer-rated depression outcomes was evaluated, adjusting for the deviation of individual patient ratings from the average for their clinician and other potential confounders. Clinicians in the clinical management condition were rated on average as less genuine and less empathic than those in the psychotherapy conditions. Clinicians׳ average genuineness, positive regard and empathy were significantly associated with lower depression severity during treatment, but not with recovery from depression, after adjusting for the deviation of the individual patient׳s rating of their clinician from the average for that clinician, treatment condition and baseline depression severity. Clinician unconditional regard was not significantly associated with outcome. Using averaged ratings of clinician behaviour likely reduced statistical power. Clinicians׳ ability to demonstrate genuineness, positive regard and empathy may represent a stable personal characteristic that influences the treatment of depression beyond the individual clinician-patient relationship or an individual patient׳s perception of their clinician. However, clinicians׳ ability to demonstrate these behaviours may be poorer when delivering an intervention without a specific rationale or treatment techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Clinical roles of vitamins in hematopoietic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Kanamaru, A

    1999-10-01

    Vitamins are essential organisms which promote various metabolisms and physiological systems. Several vitamins play important roles in hematopoietic system. Vitamin B12, C and folic acid are associated with DNA synthesis of erythroid nucleus, the deficiency of which causes the megaloblastic anemia. Some megaloblatic anemia and sideroblastic anemia might response to vitamin B1 and B6, respectively. Vitamin K participates in some coagulation factors in coagulation-fibrinogenolysis system. It has been reported that vitamins A, D and K potentially differentiate leukemic cells and then induce the apoptosis, suggesting that they would be new therapeutic agents in acute leukemia.

  10. Emerging roles of innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory diseases: Clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekaas Krohn, I; Shikhagaie, M M; Golebski, K; Bernink, J H; Breynaert, C; Creyns, B; Diamant, Z; Fokkens, W J; Gevaert, P; Hellings, P; Hendriks, R W; Klimek, L; Mjösberg, J; Morita, H; Ogg, G S; O'Mahony, L; Schwarze, J; Seys, S F; Shamji, M H; Bal, S M

    2018-04-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) represent a group of lymphocytes that lack specific antigen receptors and are relatively rare as compared to adaptive lymphocytes. ILCs play important roles in allergic and nonallergic inflammatory diseases due to their location at barrier surfaces within the airways, gut, and skin, and they respond to cytokines produced by activated cells in their local environment. Innate lymphoid cells contribute to the immune response by the release of cytokines and other mediators, forming a link between innate and adaptive immunity. In recent years, these cells have been extensively characterized and their role in animal models of disease has been investigated. Data to translate the relevance of ILCs in human pathology, and the potential role of ILCs in diagnosis, as biomarkers and/or as future treatment targets are also emerging. This review, produced by a task force of the Immunology Section of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), encompassing clinicians and researchers, highlights the role of ILCs in human allergic and nonallergic diseases in the airways, gastrointestinal tract, and skin, with a focus on new insights into clinical implications, therapeutic options, and future research opportunities. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  11. Transthoracic Ultrasonography for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morné Johan Vorster

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Transthoracic ultrasonography (US has become an essential tool for respiratory, emergency, and critical care physicians. It can be performed with basic equipment and by personnel with minimum training as a modality for the evaluation of a wide range of thoracic pathologies. Its advantages include immediate application at the point of care, low cost, and lack of radiation. The main indications for transthoracic US are the qualitative and quantitative assessment of pleural effusions, pleural thickening, diaphragmatic pathology, as well as chest wall and pleural tumors. Transthoracic US is also useful in visualizing pulmonary pathologies that abut the pleura, such as pneumonic consolidation and interstitial syndromes, including pulmonary edema. Transthoracic US is more sensitive than the traditional chest radiograph in the detection of pneumothoraces, and it is useful in diagnosing skeletal abnormalities such as rib fractures. It is the ideal tool to guide transthoracic procedures, including thoracocentesis and pleural biopsy. Moreover, transthoracic US-guided procedures can be performed by a single clinician with no sedation and minimal monitoring. Transthoracic US-guided fine needle aspiration and/or cutting needle biopsy of extrathoracic lymph nodes and lesions arising from the chest wall, pleura, peripheral lung, and mediastinum are safe to perform and have a high yield in the of hands of experienced clinicians. Transthoracic US can also potentially guide the aspiration and biopsy of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates, consolidations, and lung abscesses. Moreover, transthoracic US may be used in the detection of pulmonary embolism

  12. Clinician researcher career pathway for registered nurses and midwives: A proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheree; Gullick, Janice; Ballard, Jacqueline; Perry, Lin

    2018-06-01

    To consider clinician researcher career frameworks and propose a new pathway, integrating university and health service components to support research career progression within nursing and midwifery practice. Hospitals with research-active clinicians report fewer adverse events and better patient outcomes. Nursing clinician researcher career development is therefore an international priority, yet positions and expectations associated with this are not always well articulated, with nurses and midwives challenged to accommodate research and clinical careers. This discussion paper describes nurse/midwife clinician researcher career frameworks and a new pathway that aligns academic and nursing role descriptions. The new framework was informed by a brief literature search for international framework documents, three Australian state-based Nurses and Midwives Awards: the Australian Qualifications Framework, publically available University Academic (Research) Award schedules and academic staff descriptions, and state health department and health services publications. The implementation of research-based practice is a key element of nursing and midwifery roles and "advanced practice" position descriptions have well-defined research expectations. This paper considers structures to support their achievement. This paper provides a blueprint for clinician researcher career development. It elevates the research domain as an equal alongside clinical, managerial and educational clinical career development. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. 'Learning Organizations': a clinician's primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nick; Kotze, Beth

    2008-06-01

    Most clinicians are poorly informed in relation to the key concepts of organizational learning. Yet the paradigm may offer clinicians a powerful method for using their knowledge and skills to respond to the demands of a changing environment through experimentation and learning. The concept is critically examined. Organizational learning principles are presented, including a conceptual framework for assessing health services as Learning Organizations. Barriers to organizational learning and strategies to overcome these are discussed. The seminal works of Argyris and Senge are reviewed and a framework for assessing organizational learning in health services is proposed. Current area health service actions are evaluated against the 'diagnostic' framework for a Learning Organization. Although critical examination reveals a poor empirical basis for the concept, the metaphor of the Learning Organization provides a useful conceptual framework and tools for individuals and organizations to apply in developing knowledge and effecting change. The Clinical Practice Improvement and Root Cause Analysis programs being conducted across NSW area health services meet the criteria for effective organizational learning. Key concepts from organizational learning theory provide a diagnostic framework for evaluating area health services as Learning Organizations and support two current strategies for overcoming barriers to organizational learning.

  14. [The role of psychologist in clinic of acute poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczyńska-Wdówik, Agnieszka M

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a kind of observations' thesis on the role of psychological treatment of patients of the clinic of acute poisonings. Some proposals of affective treatment of potentially suicidal patients are also presented for doctors and other medical advisors.

  15. Whose decision is it anyway? How clinicians support decision-making participation after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Lucy; Douglas, Jacinta M; Bigby, Christine

    2013-01-01

    To raise professional awareness of factors that may influence the support offered by clinicians to people with acquired brain injury (ABI), and to consider the potential implications of these factors in terms of post-injury rehabilitation and living. A review of the literature was conducted to identify factors that determine how clinicians provide support and influence opportunities for individuals with ABI to participate in decision making across the rehabilitation continuum. Clinical case studies are used to highlight two specific issues: (1) hidden assumptions on the part of the practitioner, and (2) perceptions of risk operating in clinical practice. There are a range of factors which may influence the decision-making support provided by clinicians and, ultimately, shape lifetime outcomes for individuals with ABI. A multidimensional framework may assist clinicians to identify relevant factors and consider their potential implications including those that influence how clinicians involved in supporting decision making approach this task. Participation in decision making is an undisputed human right and central to the provision of person-centred care. Further research is required to understand how clinical practice can maximise both opportunities and support for increased decision-making participation by individuals with ABI. There is an increasing focus on the rights of all individuals to be supported to participate in decision making about their life. A number of changes associated with ABI mean that individuals with ABI will require support with decision making. Clinicians have a critical role in providing this support over the course of the rehabilitation continuum. Clinicians need to be aware of the range of factors that may influence the decision-making support they provide. A multidimensional framework may be used by clinicians to identify influences on the decision-making support they provide.

  16. Turning attention to clinician engagement in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Christine; Hudson, Robyn; Wallace, Euan

    2017-11-16

    The engagement of clinicians with employing organisations and with the broader health system results in better safer care for patients. Concerns about the adequacy of clinician engagement in the state of Victoria led the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services to commission a scoping study. During this investigation more than 100 clinicians were spoken with and 1800 responded to surveys. The result was creation of a clear picture of what engagement and disengagement looked like at all levels - from the clinical microsystem to state health policy making. Multiple interventions are possible to enhance clinician engagement and thus the care of future patients. A framework was developed to guide future Victorian work with four elements: setting the agenda, informing, involving and empowering clinicians. Concepts of work or employee engagement that are used in other industries don't directly translate to healthcare and thus the definition of engagement chosen for use centred on involvement. This was designed to encourage system managers to ensure clinicians are full participants in design, planning and evaluation and in all decisions that affect them and their patients.

  17. An overview of meta-analysis for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho

    2018-03-01

    The number of medical studies being published is increasing exponentially, and clinicians must routinely process large amounts of new information. Moreover, the results of individual studies are often insufficient to provide confident answers, as their results are not consistently reproducible. A meta-analysis is a statistical method for combining the results of different studies on the same topic and it may resolve conflicts among studies. Meta-analysis is being used increasingly and plays an important role in medical research. This review introduces the basic concepts, steps, advantages, and caveats of meta-analysis, to help clinicians understand it in clinical practice and research. A major advantage of a meta-analysis is that it produces a precise estimate of the effect size, with considerably increased statistical power, which is important when the power of the primary study is limited because of a small sample size. A meta-analysis may yield conclusive results when individual studies are inconclusive. Furthermore, meta-analyses investigate the source of variation and different effects among subgroups. In summary, a meta-analysis is an objective, quantitative method that provides less biased estimates on a specific topic. Understanding how to conduct a meta-analysis aids clinicians in the process of making clinical decisions.

  18. An overview of meta-analysis for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho

    2018-01-01

    The number of medical studies being published is increasing exponentially, and clinicians must routinely process large amounts of new information. Moreover, the results of individual studies are often insufficient to provide confident answers, as their results are not consistently reproducible. A meta-analysis is a statistical method for combining the results of different studies on the same topic and it may resolve conflicts among studies. Meta-analysis is being used increasingly and plays an important role in medical research. This review introduces the basic concepts, steps, advantages, and caveats of meta-analysis, to help clinicians understand it in clinical practice and research. A major advantage of a meta-analysis is that it produces a precise estimate of the effect size, with considerably increased statistical power, which is important when the power of the primary study is limited because of a small sample size. A meta-analysis may yield conclusive results when individual studies are inconclusive. Furthermore, meta-analyses investigate the source of variation and different effects among subgroups. In summary, a meta-analysis is an objective, quantitative method that provides less biased estimates on a specific topic. Understanding how to conduct a meta-analysis aids clinicians in the process of making clinical decisions. PMID:29277096

  19. Clinician-scientists in Canada: barriers to career entry and progress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn Lander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinician-scientists play an important role in translating between research and clinical practice. Significant concerns about a decline in their numbers have been raised. Potential barriers for career entry and progress are explored in this study. METHODS: Case-study research methods were used to identify barriers perceived by clinician-scientists and their research teams in two Canadian laboratories. These perceptions were then compared against statistical analysis of data from Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR databases on grant and award performance of clinician-scientists and non-clinical PhDs for fiscal years 2000 to 2008. RESULTS: Three main barriers were identified through qualitative analysis: research training, research salaries, and research grants. We then looked for evidence of these barriers in the Canada-wide statistical dataset for our study period. Clinician-scientists had a small but statistically significant higher mean number of degrees (3.3 than non-clinical scientists (3.2, potentially confirming the perception of longer training times. But evidence of the other two barriers was equivocal. For example, while overall growth in salary awards was minimal, awards to clinician-scientists increased by 45% compared to 6.3% for non-clinical PhDs. Similarly, in terms of research funding, awards to clinician-scientists increased by more than 25% compared with 5% for non-clinical PhDs. However, clinician-scientist-led grants funded under CIHR's Clinical thematic area decreased significantly from 61% to 51% (p-value<0.001 suggesting that clinician-scientists may be shifting their attention to other research domains. CONCLUSION: While clinician-scientists continue to perceive barriers to career entry and progress, quantitative results suggest improvements over the last decade. Clinician-scientists are awarded an increasing proportion of CIHR research grants and salary awards. Given the translational importance of

  20. What are the roles of clinical nurses and midwife specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sheelagh

    Research shows the increasing part the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) plays in healthcare today. But what does a CNS actually do in their day-to day-work? This study, set in the Republic of Ireland, aimed to explore the CNS and clinical midwife specialist (CMS) roles in practice. Quantitative methodology was used to explore the roles and activities of the CNS and CMS. Following ethics approval, a valid and reliable questionnaire was circulated to the total population of CNS/CMS in Ireland. The data were analysed using SPSS. This study articulates the individual role elements and activity level. The findings show the CNS/CMS to be active in the roles of researcher, educator, communicator, change agent, leader and clinical specialist, but the level of activity varies between different roles and individual role elements. The CNS/CMS is seen as a valuable resource in health care today and has potential to have a positive effect on patient care. The majority of CNS/CMSs are active in varying roles but the analysis shows lesser activity in some areas, such as research. The findings merit further study on role activity and possible variables that influence role activity.

  1. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care.

  2. Clinicians and journalists responding to disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Elana; Shapiro, Bruce

    2014-02-01

    Mass casualty events pose dilemmas for community clinicians, often challenging their existing clinical toolkits. However, few clinicians were trained to be experts in explaining the unfolding events to the community, creating resources, and interacting with journalists. The objective of this article is to explain knowledge, skills, and attitudes that mental health professionals need to consider when working with journalists, especially those covering children affected by disaster. In service of these objectives, this article reviews controversies, evidence, and best practices to facilitate effective collaborations and consultations with journalists. Advice includes information on how to be a good source to journalists. Clinicians can ethically and effectively help journalists tell accurate and compelling stories about the psychological effects of disasters when they understand and respect the aims, culture, and ethics of journalism.

  3. AphasiaBank: a resource for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Margaret M; Fromm, Davida; Macwhinney, Brian

    2012-08-01

    AphasiaBank is a shared, multimedia database containing videos and transcriptions of ~180 aphasic individuals and 140 nonaphasic controls performing a uniform set of discourse tasks. The language in the videos is transcribed in Codes for the Human Analysis of Transcripts (CHAT) format and coded for analysis with Computerized Language ANalysis (CLAN) programs, which can perform a wide variety of language analyses. The database and the CLAN programs are freely available to aphasia researchers and clinicians for educational, clinical, and scholarly uses. This article describes the database, suggests some ways in which clinicians and clinician researchers might find these materials useful, and introduces a new language analysis program, EVAL, designed to streamline the transcription and coding processes, while still producing an extensive and useful language profile. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Clinical nurse leader and clinical nurse specialist role delineation in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia; Lulham, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    More than 90 members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and 190 practice sites have partnered to develop the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role. The partnership has created synergy between education and practice and nurtured innovation and diffusion of learning on a national basis. In this ongoing department, the editor, Jolene Tornabeni, MA, RN, FAAN, FACHE, showcases a variety of nurse leaders who discuss their new patient care delivery models in preparation for the CNL role and CNLs who highlight partnerships with their clinical colleagues to improve patient care. In this article, the authors explore differences and similarities between the CNL and the clinical nurse specialist roles, describing the working strategies between a CNL and clinical nurse specialist, and role delineations that have resulted from their cooperation, collaboration, and planning.

  5. Four Roles of Ethical Theory in Clinical Ethics Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magelssen, Morten; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun

    2016-09-01

    When clinical ethics committee members discuss a complex ethical dilemma, what use do they have for normative ethical theories? Members without training in ethical theory may still contribute to a pointed and nuanced analysis. Nonetheless, the knowledge and use of ethical theories can play four important roles: aiding in the initial awareness and identification of the moral challenges, assisting in the analysis and argumentation, contributing to a sound process and dialogue, and inspiring an attitude of reflexivity. These four roles of ethical theory in clinical ethics consultation are described and their significance highlighted, while an example case is used as an illustration throughout.

  6. [Leadership and management courses for clinicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelhaus, Daniel; Fischer, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the benefit of Leadership and Management Courses for clinicians, specifically which leadership and management contents are beneficial to their daily clinical work and whether these contents support their individual career. E-mail invitations to participate in the study were sent to all 543 medical doctors of the University Hospital Hanover, Germany, who had taken part in one of the leadership and management courses offered between June 2005 and June 2015. The enquiry was carried out between June 1 and June 30, 2015. 84 e-mail addresses were no longer active; and so, N=459 clinicians actually received the invitation. Of these, 104 participated (22.7%). The study included 59 items. Six were free text items, twelve items were closed questions which could be answered by choosing from a drop down menu, and 41 were answered on a Likert scale from 0 (not fitting at all) to 10 (perfect fit). Based on the items answered on a Likert scale, the following scales and mean values were deduced: Job Satisfaction (M=7.44); Leadership (M=7.77); Trust (M=7.22); Striving for Power (M=7,45); negative Affect (M=4,91); Target Achievement Motivation (M=8.19); Communication (M=8.30) and Management (M=6.48). Regression analysis showed that Job- and Team Satisfaction can predict to what extent the participants regard themselves as good leaders. The study participants defined the following topics as very important: leadership and management style, managerial functions, team management, human resources development and project management. Further topics included rhetoric skills, presentation techniques, as well as basic economics such as understanding balance sheets, profit & loss statements and contribution margin calculation. 55% of the course contents were described as being directly applicable to their daily working environment. In the clinicians' view, the ideal leader acts as a role model (passing on values like respect, appreciation, honesty

  7. The Role of Oncology Nurses in Discussing Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocke, Susan A; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Daly, Barbara J; Jackson, Brigid; Fulton, Sarah E; Liu, Tasnuva M; Surdam, Jessica; Manne, Sharon; Meropol, Neal J

    2017-09-01

    To describe oncology nurses' experiences discussing clinical trials with their patients, and to assess barriers to these discussions.
. A qualitative study designed to elicit narratives from oncology nurses. 
. Community- and academic-based oncology clinics throughout the United States.
. 33 oncology nurses involved in direct patient care in community-based and large hospital-based settings. The sample was drawn from members of the Oncology Nursing Society. 
. In-depth interviews were conducted and analyzed using a 
immersion/crystallization approach to identify themes and patterns. The analyses highlight specific issues, examples, and contexts that present challenges to clinical trial discussions with patients.
. Oncology nurses view their roles as patient educators and advocates to be inclusive of discussion of clinical trials. Barriers to such discussions include lack of knowledge and strategies for addressing patients' common misconceptions and uncertainty about the timing of discussions.
. These data indicate that enabling nurses to actively engage patients in discussions of clinical trials requires educational interventions to build self-efficacy and close knowledge gaps. 
. Oncology nurses can play a critical role in advancing cancer care by supporting patients in decision making about clinical trial participation. This will require training and education to build their knowledge, reduce barriers, and increase their self-efficacy to fulfill this responsibility in various clinical settings.

  8. The Role of the Clinical Pharmacist in the Identification and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore patients' attitudes and knowledge about corticosteroids, investigate the reasons behind corticophobia (if any), explore the sources and validity of such beliefs, as well as investigate the role of the clinical pharmacist's intervention in minimizing corticophobia and improving patient compliance. Methods: ...

  9. Perspective: Entering uncharted waters: navigating the transition from trainee to career for the nonphysician clinician-scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Sharpe, Heather M; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Larsen, Bodil; MacKay, Lyndsay

    2013-01-01

    The transition from trainee to career clinician-scientist can be a stressful and challenging time, particularly for those entering the less established role of nonphysician clinician-scientist. These individuals are typically PhD-prepared clinicians in the allied health professions, who have either a formal or informal joint appointment between a clinical institution and an academic or research institution. The often poorly defined boundaries and expectations of these developing roles can pose additional challenges for the trainee-to-career transition.It is important for these trainees to consider what they want and need in a position in order to be successful, productive, and fulfilled in both their professional and personal lives. It is also critical for potential employers, whether academic or clinical (or a combination of both), to be fully aware of the supports and tools necessary to recruit and retain new nonphysician clinician-scientists. Issues of relevance to the trainee and the employer include finding and negotiating a position; the importance of mentorship; the value of effective time management, particularly managing clinical and academic time commitments; and achieving work-life balance. Attention to these issues, by both the trainee and those in a position to hire them, will facilitate a smooth transition to the nonphysician clinician-scientist role and ultimately contribute to individual and organizational success.

  10. Going private: clinicians' experience of working in UK independent sector treatment centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Bishop, Simon

    2012-02-01

    With increased possibility that public healthcare services in the UK will be outsourced to the private sector, this study investigates how clinicians working in Independent Sector Treatment Centres perceive the differences between public and private sectors. Qualitative interviews with 35 clinicians recruited from two ISTCs. All participants were transferred to the independent sector from the public National Health Service. Interview data were analysed to identify shared experience about the variable organisation and delivery of services. Clinicians perceived differences between public and independent sectors in the areas of 'environment and facilities', 'management', 'work organisation and care delivery', and 'patient experience'. The independent sector was described as offering a positive alternative to public services in regard to service environment and patient experience, but there were concerns about management priorities and the reconfiguration of work. Clinicians' experience of moving between sectors reveals mixed experiences. Although some improvements might legitimise the growing role of the independent sector, there remain doubts about the commercialisation of services, the motives of managers and the impact of clinical roles and capabilities. With policies looking to expand the mixed economy of public healthcare services, the study suggests clinicians will not automatically embrace a move between sectors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal utilization of a breast care advanced practice clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Katie W; Mone, Mary C; Serpico, Victoria J; Ward, Cori; Lynch, Joanna; Neumayer, Leigh A; Nelson, Edward W

    2014-12-01

    Incorporation of "lean" business philosophy within health care has the goal of adding value by reducing cost and improving quality. Applying these principles to the role of Advance Practice Clinicians (APCs) is relevant because they have become essential members of the healthcare team. An independent surgical breast care clinic directed by an APC was created with measurements of success to include the following: time to obtain an appointment, financial viability, and patient/APC/MD satisfaction. During the study period, there was a trend toward a decreased median time to obtain an appointment. Monthly APC charges increased from $388 to $30,800. The mean provider satisfaction score by Press Ganey was 96% for the APC and 95.8% for the surgeon. Both clinicians expressed significant satisfaction with clinic development. Overall, initiation of an APC breast clinic met the proposed goals of success. The use of lean philosophy demonstrates that implementation of change can result in added value in patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Child Health Disparities: What Can a Clinician Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tina L; Emmanuel, Mickey A; Levy, Daniel J; Jenkins, Renee R

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric primary and specialty practice has changed, with more to do, more regulation, and more family needs than in the past. Similarly, the needs of patients have changed, with more demographic diversity, family stress, and continued health disparities by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. How can clinicians continue their dedicated service to children and ensure health equity in the face of these changes? This article outlines specific, practical, actionable, and evidence-based activities to help clinicians assess and address health disparities in practice. These tools may also support patient-centered medical home recognition, national and state cultural and linguistic competency standards, and quality benchmarks that are increasingly tied to payment. Clinicians can play a critical role in (1) diagnosing disparities in one's community and practice, (2) innovating new models to address social determinants of health, (3) addressing health literacy of families, (4) ensuring cultural competence and a culture of workplace equity, and (5) advocating for issues that address the root causes of health disparities. Culturally competent care that is sensitive to the needs, health literacy, and health beliefs of families can increase satisfaction, improve quality of care, and increase patient safety. Clinical care approaches to address social determinants of health and interrupting the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage include (1) screening for new health "vital signs" and connecting families to resources, (2) enhancing the comprehensiveness of services, (3) addressing family health in pediatric encounters, and (4) moving care outside the office into the community. Health system investment is required to support clinicians and practice innovation to ensure equity. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Patient-Clinician Communication About Pain: A Conceptual Model and Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G; Matthias, Marianne S

    2018-02-01

    Productive patient-clinician communication is an important component of effective pain management, but we know little about how patients and clinicians actually talk about pain in clinical settings and how it might be improved to produce better patient outcomes. The objective of this review was to create a conceptual model of patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain, review and synthesize empirical research in this area, and identify priorities for future research. A conceptual model was developed that drew on existing pain and health communication research. CINAHL, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched to find studies reporting empirical data on patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain; results were supplemented with manual searches. Studies were categorized and analyzed to identify crosscutting themes and inform model development. The conceptual model comprised the following components: contextual factors, clinical interaction, attitudes and beliefs, and outcomes. Thirty-nine studies met inclusion criteria and were analyzed based on model components. Studies varied widely in quality, methodology, and sample size. Two provisional conclusions were identified: contrary to what is often reported in the literature, discussions about analgesics are most frequently characterized by patient-clinician agreement, and self-presentation during patient-clinician interactions plays an important role in communication about pain and opioids. Published studies on patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain are few and diverse. The conceptual model presented here can help to identify knowledge gaps and guide future research on communication about pain. Investigating the links between communication and pain-related outcomes is an important priority for future research. © 2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Interdisciplinary collaboration: the role of the clinical nurse leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam; Connelly, Cynthia D; Brown, Caroline

    2013-01-01

      To explore the feasibility and acceptability of a clinical nurse leader (CNL) role to improve interdisciplinary collaboration (IC) within a fragmented acute-care microsystem.   Fragmented patient care is associated with preventable adverse healthcare outcomes. IC decreases fragmentation and improves patient care quality. The CNL role is theorized to provide the necessary leadership and competency skill base to impact IC at the optimal organizational level, the point of care where most healthcare decisions are made.   This study used a descriptive non-experimental design. CNL daily workflow was developed to target empirical determinants of IC. Descriptive data were collected from multiple stakeholders using an investigator-developed survey.   Findings indicate the integration of the role is feasible and acceptable to the microsystem healthcare team.   Preliminary evidence suggests the CNL role may be an effective intervention to facilitate IC. More research is needed to support the CNL role's association with microsystem IC.   The CNL role presents an innovative opportunity for clinical and administrative leadership to partner together to redesign a healthcare delivery system and improve patient care quality. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Evolution of an innovative role: the clinical nurse leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lauri; Orff, Sonja; Gerry, Terilee; Shirley, Bobbi R; Tabor, Danielle; Caiazzo, Kathryn; Rouleau, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the evolution of the clinical nurse leader (CNL(®) ) role and its utility in a tertiary care and community hospital. In the US, quality and safety metrics are being publically reported and healthcare organizations are just beginning to experience pay-for-performance and its impact. The American Association of the Colleges of Nursing (AACN) developed the role of the CNL to address the complexities and challenges of providing high-quality care in the current environment. Since 2007, a cohort of CNLs in practice has evaluated the effectiveness of the role with measures of clinical outcomes, financial savings and case studies. Having CNLs with a strategic perspective acting as facilitators and integrators of care has proven invaluable. Leadership support has been critical and commitment to maintaining the integrity of the role has ensured its success and sustainability. This role has established its value in risk assessment, strategic quality improvement, interdisciplinary collaboration and the implementation of evidence-based solutions. The flexibility and broad scope of this role allows for its use across practice settings and represents an exciting opportunity for nursing to drive quality of care to new levels while managing costs. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Altruism in clinical research: coordinators' orientation to their professional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Kalbaugh, Corey A

    2012-01-01

    Research coordinators have significant responsibilities in clinical trials that often require them to find unique ways to manage their jobs, thus reshaping their professional identities. The purpose of this study was to identify how research coordinators manage role and ethical conflicts within clinical research trials. A qualitative study combining observation and 63 semistructured interviews at 25 research organizations was used. Altruism is a recurring theme in how research coordinators define and view their work. Altruism is adopted by research coordinators to: (1) Teach patient-subjects the appropriate reasons to participate in clinical research, (2) minimize the conflict between research and care, and (3) contest the undervaluation of coordinating. Altruism is a strategy used to handle the various conflicts they experience in a difficult job, and it has become part of the professional identity of clinical research coordinators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In the Ethos of the Safety Net: An Expanded Role for Clinical Ethics Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Jolion

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ethics mediation is invaluable for resolving intractable disputes in the hospital. But it is also a critical day-to-day skill for clinicians, especially those who serve a disproportionate number of vulnerable patients. While mediation is typically reserved for intractable cases, there are two important opportunities to expand its use. First is preventative mediation, in which clinicians incorporate clinical ethics mediation into their daily routine in order to address value-laden conflicts before they reach the point at which outside consultation becomes necessary. Second is guided mediation, in which clinical teams resolve conflicts with patients or surrogates with guidance from an ethics consultant, who operates at some distance from the conflict and, rather than recommending a single action, counsels clinicians on the process they can use to resolve the conflict on their own. These approaches build the capacity of all clinicians to use clinical ethics mediation to improve the care of vulnerable patients. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinicians' Knowledge and Perception of Telemedicine Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Sarabi, Fatemeh Zahra Pourfard; Langarizadeh, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Telemedicine is an application of information and communication technology in the healthcare environment. This study aimed to compare knowledge and perceptions of telemedicine technology among different groups of clinicians. This survey study was conducted in 2013. The potential participants included 532 clinicians who worked in two hospitals and three clinics in a northern province of Iran. Data were collected using a five-point Likert-scale questionnaire. The content validity of the questionnaire was checked, and the reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α = 0.73). The results showed that most of the clinicians (96.1 percent) had little knowledge about telemedicine. They perceived the advantages of telemedicine at a moderate level and its disadvantages at a low level. The knowledge of dentists about this technology was less than that of other groups, and as a result they were less positive about the advantages of telemedicine compared to nurses, general physicians, and specialists. The limited knowledge of clinicians about telemedicine seems to have influenced their perceptions of the technology. Therefore, providing healthcare professionals with more information about new technologies in healthcare, such as telemedicine, can help to gain a more realistic picture of their perceptions.

  19. Assessment of mood: guides for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toshi A

    2010-06-01

    This article is one of the series of review articles aiming to present a convenient guideline for practicing clinicians in their selection of scales for clinical and research purposes. This article focuses on assessment scales for mood (depression, mania). After reviewing the basic principles of clinical psychometrics, we present a selective review of representative scales measuring depressed or manic mood. We reviewed and reported on reliability, validity, interpretability, and feasibility of the following rating scales: Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), K6, Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR) as self-report scales for depressed mood; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) as clinician-administered measure for depression; and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) as a clinician-administered instrument for mania. Although the rating scales for mood represent a well-trodden terrain, this brief review of the most frequently used scales in the literature revealed there is still some room for improvement and for further research, especially with regard to their clinical interpretability. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical ethics and the role of clinical ethics committees: proposals for a revival. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo; Ricciardi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The issue addressed in the paper published by the Italian National Bioethics Committee (NBC) entitled "Clinical ethics committees", is highly significant for many reasons. One of these is the fact that the ethics committees charged with assessing clinical trials have so much responsibility and such a heavy work-load that they have little time available for other tasks such as engaging directly with patients "at the bedside", as a result of which the role of committees responsible for assessing clinical cases is especially important. According to the NBC, the opinions of clinical ethics committees should be formulated jointly and are non-binding. The NBC offers practical proposals not only for the Italian context. While the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità - ISS) is not involved directly in treating patients, its role in providing guidance is crucial to the national health service and it has always paid special attention to these issues.

  1. Research strategies for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, B B

    2001-12-01

    If there is a story waiting to be told about nurses and research, it is this: research is part of our past, our present, and our future. Research gives "caring" a mental muscle that makes it stronger than caring would be without it. Since the Crimean War, research has been a foundational cornerstone of the profession. Florence Nightingale espoused caring and human touch but not without also observing and measuring important patient outcomes that identified the spread of infection via human contact. As a new generation of nurses emerges, we who have come before might serve them well to role model what we know: that strong research is strong nursing and that obtaining and using evidence in nursing practice results in better outcomes for those patients and families we serve. Is the story waiting to be told your story? Part of the story of nursing waiting to be told is your story. Regardless of why you embarked on your career in nursing and regardless of where your journey has taken you to this point, you are a part of the twenty-first century body of nursing, and your individual contribution is an important one. Listen to your patients with an ear toward measuring and evaluating outcomes. Reflect on the care you provided, the interventions you had to offer, and why. Should something have been different? Could something have been better? Find out ... measure it.

  2. Role and Value of Clinical Pharmacy in Heart Failure Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, W G; Patterson, J H

    2017-08-01

    Effectively managing heart failure requires a multidisciplinary, holistic approach attuned to many factors: diagnosis of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities; medication, device, or surgical management; concomitant treatment of comorbidities; physical rehabilitation; dietary considerations; and social factors. This practice paper highlights the pharmacist's role in the management of patients with heart failure, the evidence supporting their functions, and steps to ensure the pharmacist resource is available to the broad population of patients with heart failure. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  3. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  4. Defining Sub-Saharan Africa’s Health Workforce Needs: Going Forwards Quickly Into the Past; Comment on “Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent proposals for re-defining the roles Africa’s health workforce are a continuation of the discussions that have been held since colonial times. The proposals have centred on basing the continent’s healthcare delivery on non-physician clinicians (NPCs who can be quickly trained and widely distributed to treat majority of the common diseases. Whilst seemingly logical, the success of these proposals will depend on the development of clearly defined professional duties for each cadre of healthcare workers (HCW taking the peculiarities of each country into consideration. As such the continent-wide efforts aimed at health-professional curriculum reforms, more effective utilisation of task-shifting as well as the intra – and inter-disciplinary collaborations must be encouraged. Since physicians play a major role in the training mentoring and supervision of physician and nonphysician health-workers alike, the maintenance of the standards of university medical education is central to the success of all health system models. It must also be recognized that, efforts at improving Africa’s health systems can only succeed if the necessary socio-economic, educational, and technological infrastructure are in place.

  5. Defining Sub-Saharan Africa's Health Workforce Needs: Going Forwards Quickly Into the Past Comment on "Non-physician Clinicians in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Evolving Role of Physicians".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapade-Olaopa, E Oluwabunmi; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Iputo, Jehu E

    2016-08-15

    Recent proposals for re-defining the roles Africa's health workforce are a continuation of the discussions that have been held since colonial times. The proposals have centred on basing the continent's healthcare delivery on non-physician clinicians (NPCs) who can be quickly trained and widely distributed to treat majority of the common diseases. Whilst seemingly logical, the success of these proposals will depend on the development of clearly defined professional duties for each cadre of healthcare workers (HCW) taking the peculiarities of each country into consideration. As such the continent-wide efforts aimed at health-professional curriculum reforms, more effective utilisation of task-shifting as well as the intra - and inter-disciplinary collaborations must be encouraged. Since physicians play a major role in the training mentoring and supervision of physician and non-physician health-workers alike, the maintenance of the standards of university medical education is central to the success of all health system models. It must also be recognized that, efforts at improving Africa's health systems can only succeed if the necessary socio-economic, educational, and technological infrastructure are in place. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  6. Data Science Meets the Clinician: Challenges and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charitos, Efstratios I; Wilbring, Manuel; Treede, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    In the last three decades a profound transformation of the medical profession has taken place. The modern clinician is required to consume vast amounts of information from clinical studies, critically reviewing evidence that may or may not lead to changes in clinical practice. The present article presents some challenges that this era of information poses to clinicians and patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Using case study within a sequential explanatory design to evaluate the impact of specialist and advanced practice roles on clinical outcomes: the SCAPE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Joan G; Casey, Dympna; Elliott, Naomi; Coyne, Imelda; Comiskey, Catherine; Higgins, Agnes; Murphy, Kathy; Devane, Declan; Begley, Cecily

    2013-04-08

    The role of the clinical nurse/midwife specialist and advanced nurse/midwife practitioner is complex not least because of the diversity in how the roles are operationalised across health settings and within multidisciplinary teams. This aim of this paper is to use The SCAPE Study: Specialist Clinical and Advanced Practitioner Evaluation in Ireland to illustrate how case study was used to strengthen a Sequential Explanatory Design. In Phase 1, clinicians identified indicators of specialist and advanced practice which were then used to guide the instrumental case study design which formed the second phase of the larger study. Phase 2 used matched case studies to evaluate the effectiveness of specialist and advanced practitioners on clinical outcomes for service users. Data were collected through observation, documentary analysis, and interviews. Observations were made of 23 Clinical Specialists or Advanced Practitioners, and 23 matched clinicians in similar matched non-postholding sites, while they delivered care. Forty-one service users, 41 clinicians, and 23 Directors of Nursing or Midwifery were interviewed, and 279 service users completed a survey based on the components of CS and AP practice identified in Phase 1. A coding framework, and the generation of cross tabulation matrices in NVivo, was used to make explicit how the outcome measures were confirmed and validated from multiple sources. This strengthened the potential to examine single cases that seemed 'different', and allowed for cases to be redefined. Phase 3 involved interviews with policy-makers to set the findings in context. Case study is a powerful research strategy to use within sequential explanatory mixed method designs, and adds completeness to the exploration of complex issues in clinical practice. The design is flexible, allowing the use of multiple data collection methods from both qualitative and quantitative paradigms. Multiple approaches to data collection are needed to evaluate the impact

  8. CHEST: Home of the Clinician-Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William F; Niven, Alexander S

    2018-03-01

    Many hands can build a house; it takes trust to make that house a home. Trust has two main components: credibility (worthiness based on preparation and past performance) and empathy (the ability to understand and share another person's values). CHEST has maintained its credibility and empathy as the global leader in clinical pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medical education. It follows that the leader in chest clinical education would also be the home of the clinician-educator. You are that educator. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Simulation-Based Communication Skills Training for Experienced Clinicians to Improve Family Conversations About Organ and Tissue Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Julie Elizabeth; Gatward, Jonathan J; Kelly, Michelle A; McKay, Leigh; McCann, Ellie; Elliott, Rosalind M; Perry, Lin

    2017-12-01

    The approach, communication skills, and confidence of clinicians responsible for raising deceased organ donation may influence families' donation decisions. The aim of this study was to increase the preparedness and confidence of intensive care clinicians allocated to work in a "designated requester" role. We conducted a posttest evaluation of an innovative simulation-based training program. Simulation-based training enabled clinicians to rehearse the "balanced approach" to family donation conversations (FDCs) in the designated requester role. Professional actors played family members in simulated clinical settings using authentic scenarios, with video-assisted reflective debriefing. Participants completed an evaluation after the workshop. Simple descriptive statistical analysis and content analysis were performed. Between January 2013 and July 2015, 25 workshops were undertaken with 86 participants; 82 (95.3%) returned evaluations. Respondents were registered practicing clinicians; over half (44/82; 53.7%) were intensivists. Most attended a single workshop. Evaluations were overwhelmingly positive with the majority rating workshops as outstanding (64/80; 80%). Scenario fidelity, competence of the actors, opportunity to practice and receive feedback on performance, and feedback from actors, both in and out of character, were particularly valued. Most (76/78; 97.4%) reported feeling more confident about their designated requester role. Simulation-based communication training for the designated requester role in FDCs increased the knowledge and confidence of clinicians to raise the topic of donation.

  10. Supporting clinical leadership through action: The nurse consultant role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Elizabeth; Grey, Rachael; Neal, Deborah; Reeve, Julie; Smith, Caroline; Valentine, Janine

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an action learning set to enhance clinical leadership and extend their scope and confidence more strategically. As the most senior clinical role in most healthcare systems, the consultant nurse role is a solitary one. They are required to develop personal resilience, commitment and a belief in their ability to lead, with new consultants needing a strong support network to succeed. Following a 2-year action learning set, four nurse consultants, one therapy consultant, and a university educationalist engaged in a cooperative inquiry approach using four cycles of discussion, reflection, analysis and action over an 18-month period from March 2015-July 2016, to learn how to change and enhance their working practices. Data were analysed thematically. Four themes emerged where the action learning set (i) offered structure and support, (ii) enabled a wider influence and (iii) empowered them to lead. The cooperative inquiry helped them realise how much they had gained from their collective learning and they felt empowered to lead. Their motivation to "make a difference" remains palpable. The outcomes of the cooperative inquiry included an enhanced understanding of the importance of openness and trust and a willingness to share and learn from each other in a respectful and confidential environment with a receptiveness to change. Self-leadership has clearly been accepted and embraced, and their collaboration has improved communication across the organisation, enhanced their strategic leadership capability and given confidence to disseminate externally. The action learning set offered structure to support these clinical leaders to keep them focused across the breadth of their role. Additionally, peer review with external facilitation has enabled these clinical leaders to gain a wider influence and empowered them to lead. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Reviewing social media use by clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Muhlen, Marcio; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Adoption studies of social media use by clinicians were systematically reviewed, up to July 26th, 2011, to determine the extent of adoption and highlight trends in institutional responses. This search led to 370 articles, of which 50 were selected for review, including 15 adoption surveys. The definition of social media is evolving rapidly; the authors define it broadly to include social networks and group-curated reference sites such as Wikipedia. Facebook accounts are very common among health science students (64-96%) and less so for professional clinicians (13-47%). Adoption rates have increased sharply in the past 4 years. Wikipedia is widely used as a reference tool. Attempts at incorporating social media into clinical training have met with mixed success. Posting of unprofessional content and breaches of patient confidentiality, especially by students, are not uncommon and have prompted calls for social media guidelines.

  12. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, David

    2012-10-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causation requires population-based studies of adverse events (including information from large clinical trials), which attempt to link unequivocally the adverse outcome to the drug in question. Pharmacovigilance is closely linked to postmarketing surveillance and is important for determining issues such as the long-term effects of drugs, identification of low-frequency ADRs, the effectiveness of drugs for their licensed indications or in new indications and other factors which may modify the efficacy and effectiveness of the drug in question. The related field of drug utilization developed in parallel with the study of adverse drug reactions, in recognition of the dramatic increase in the marketing of new drugs, the wide variations in the patterns and extent of drug prescribing, the growing concern about ADRs and the increasing costs of drugs. With the ever increasing number of recognized adverse effects of drugs, prescribing errors, patients\\' expectations concerning drug safety and the need for appropriate new drug appraisal, the clinical pharmacologist will play an important role both in the introduction of new drugs and in improving the safe and effective use of established drugs.

  13. Professional identity in clinician-scientists: brokers between care and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluijtmans, Manon; de Haan, Else; Akkerman, Sanne; van Tartwijk, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Despite increasing numbers of publications, science often fails to significantly improve patient care. Clinician-scientists, professionals who combine care and research activities, play an important role in helping to solve this problem. However, despite the ascribed advantages of connecting scientific knowledge and inquiry with health care, clinician-scientists are scarce, especially amongst non-physicians. The education of clinician-scientists can be complex because they must form professional identities at the intersection of care and research. The successful education of clinician-scientists requires insight into how these professionals view their professional identity and how they combine distinct practices. This study sought to investigate how recently trained nurse- and physiotherapist-scientists perceive their professional identities and experience the crossing of boundaries between care and research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 nurse- and physiotherapist-scientists at 1 year after they had completed MSc research training. Interviews were thematically analysed using insights from the theoretical frameworks of dialogical self theory and boundary crossing. After research training, the initial professional identity, of clinician, remained important for novice clinician-scientists, whereas the scientist identity was experienced as additional and complementary. A meta-identity as broker, referred to as a 'bridge builder', seemed to mediate competing demands or tensions between the two positions. Obtaining and maintaining a dual work position were experienced as logistically demanding; nevertheless, it was considered beneficial for crossing the boundaries between care and research because it led to reflection on the health profession, knowledge integration, inquiry and innovation in care, improved data collection, and research with a focus on clinical applicability. Novice clinician-scientists experience dual professional identities as care

  14. A Genome-Wide Association Study Primer for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hao Wang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS use high-throughput genotyping technology to relate hundreds of thousands of genetic markers (genotypes to clinical conditions and measurable traits (phenotypes. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to GWAS for clinicians, to allow them to better appreciate the value and limitations of GWAS for genotype-disease association studies. The input of clinicians is vital for GWAS, since disease heterogeneity is frequently a confounding factor that can only really be solved by clinicians. For diseases that are difficult to diagnose, clinicians should ensure that the cases do indeed have the disease; for common diseases, clinicians should ensure that the controls are truly disease-free.

  15. Clinician search behaviors may be influenced by search engine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Annie Y S; Coiera, Enrico; Zrimec, Tatjana; Compton, Paul

    2010-06-30

    Searching the Web for documents using information retrieval systems plays an important part in clinicians' practice of evidence-based medicine. While much research focuses on the design of methods to retrieve documents, there has been little examination of the way different search engine capabilities influence clinician search behaviors. Previous studies have shown that use of task-based search engines allows for faster searches with no loss of decision accuracy compared with resource-based engines. We hypothesized that changes in search behaviors may explain these differences. In all, 75 clinicians (44 doctors and 31 clinical nurse consultants) were randomized to use either a resource-based or a task-based version of a clinical information retrieval system to answer questions about 8 clinical scenarios in a controlled setting in a university computer laboratory. Clinicians using the resource-based system could select 1 of 6 resources, such as PubMed; clinicians using the task-based system could select 1 of 6 clinical tasks, such as diagnosis. Clinicians in both systems could reformulate search queries. System logs unobtrusively capturing clinicians' interactions with the systems were coded and analyzed for clinicians' search actions and query reformulation strategies. The most frequent search action of clinicians using the resource-based system was to explore a new resource with the same query, that is, these clinicians exhibited a "breadth-first" search behaviour. Of 1398 search actions, clinicians using the resource-based system conducted 401 (28.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 26.37-31.11) in this way. In contrast, the majority of clinicians using the task-based system exhibited a "depth-first" search behavior in which they reformulated query keywords while keeping to the same task profiles. Of 585 search actions conducted by clinicians using the task-based system, 379 (64.8%, 95% CI 60.83-68.55) were conducted in this way. This study provides evidence that

  16. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eHill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8 experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with

  17. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andy; MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave; Rodgers, Sheelagh

    2015-01-01

    Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development (TID) become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8) experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with coaches

  18. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andy; MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave; Rodgers, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development (TID) become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8) experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with coaches

  19. Clinical roles in clinical biochemistry: a national survey of practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sirazum M; Williams, Emma L; Barnes, Sophie C; Alaghband-Zadeh, Jamshid; Tan, Tricia M; Cegla, Jaimini

    2017-05-01

    Background Using an online survey, we collected data to present a picture of how clinical authorization is performed in the UK. Methods A 21-question survey was uploaded to www.surveymonkey.com , and responses were invited via the mail base of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The questionnaire examined the intensity and function of the duty biochemist role and how different types of authorization are used to handle and release results. Results Of 70 responses received, 60 were suitable for analysis. Responses were received from every region of the UK. A typical duty biochemist shift started on average at 8:50, and finished at 17:25. The mean duration was 8 h 58 min. Clinical scientists are the most abundantly represented group on duty biochemist rotas. Higher banded clinical scientists and chemical pathologists covered out-of-hours shifts. Results were handled differently depending on the level of abnormality and the requesting area. Normal results tended to be released either directly from the analyser or after technical then autoauthorization (90%). A greater preference for clinical authorization was seen for abnormal and critical results originating from outpatients (49% and 69%, respectively) or general practice (51% and 71%) than for inpatients (33% and 53%) or A&E (25% and 37%). Conclusions The handling and authorization of biochemistry results varies greatly between laboratories. The role is clearly heterogeneous in the UK. Guidance from the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Royal College of Pathologists may help to clarify the essential roles of the duty biochemist.

  20. Assessment of the Clinical Trainer as a Role Model: A Role Model Apperception Tool (RoMAT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochemsen-van der Leeuw, H. G. A. Ria; van Dijk, Nynke; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Positive role modeling by clinical trainers is important for helping trainees learn professional and competent behavior. The authors developed and validated an instrument to assess clinical trainers as role models: the Role Model Apperception Tool (RoMAT). Method On the basis of a 2011

  1. Innovative partnerships: the clinical nurse leader role in diverse clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammon, Carol Ann Barnett; Stanton, Marietta P; Blakney, John L

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing in collaboration with leaders in the health care arena has developed a new role in nursing, the clinical nurse leader (CNL). The CNL is a master's-prepared advanced nurse generalist, accountable for providing high-quality, cost-effective care for a cohort of patients in a specific microsystem. Although initial implementation of the CNL has been predominantly in urban acute care settings, the skill set of the CNL role is equally applicable to diverse clinical settings, such as smaller rural hospitals, home-based home care providers, long-term care facilities, schools, Veteran's Administration facilities, and public health settings. This article reports the strategies used and the progress made at The University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing in the development of innovative partnerships to develop the role of the CNL in diverse clinical settings. With academia and practice working in partnership, the goal of transforming health care and improving patient outcomes can be achieved. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of Beyond the reflection: The role of the mirror paradigm in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelnick, Lawrence

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Beyond the reflection: The role of the mirror paradigm in clinical practice by Paulina Kernberg, Bernadette Buhl-Nielsen, and Lina Normandin (see record 2007-00911-000). This modestly presented volume overflows with insight and new ways of looking at the mirroring experience for children and adolescents. Kernberg and her collaborators present the rich history of the image, metaphor, and pervasive role of the mirror in human experience; they carefully describe the "subjective experience of wonder, admiration, and an objective dimension of truth" in the mirror paradigm (2006, p. xv). For the psychotherapist, Kernberg's work provides a rich resource; the review of past and current research and theorizing about the mirroring function of mothers and primary caregivers is thorough and up-to-date with the most recent advances in neuroscience, attachment theory, and infant research. From Freud to Lacan, from Winnicott to Stern, and from Schore to Gergely, Kernberg presents a sweeping exposition of the various images of the mirror. This volume is worthwhile if only for its presentation of this body of recent research. But there is so much more to be found here. While this is not the first time that Kernberg has presented us with her work with mirror observation and interviews (Kernberg, 1984, 1987), this volume integrates the research about early mother- child experience, and the mirroring paradigm in the psychoanalytic theories about child development, with the phenomenology of child and adolescent psychotherapy. The clinician will find a useful application of the theory to clinical practice and diagnosis that is hard to find in the literature. Beebe and Lachmann (2002) have accomplished this integration between infant research and adult treatment, but Kernberg's application of her research and the demonstrated correlation between the findings of mirror experience, attachment histories, and clinical experience is a rare and welcome addition to the

  3. [Critical role of clinical laboratories in hospital infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The hospital infection control and prevention is recognized to be more and more important according to the advances in modern medical treatment and care. Clinical microbiology laboratory play critical roles in the hospital infection control as a member of infection control team (ICT). They are the first in a hospital to identify outbreak of MRSA in NICU and molecular epidemiological analysis of the isolates lead proper intervention of ICT to the concerned ward. From a viewpoint of infectious disease specialist, rapid and precise microbiological information is essential for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Each medical technologist need to make efforts to understand the characteristics of the examinations for infectious diseases and send out information useful for clinical practices. In our hospital, with the participation of all members of medical technologists, rapid reporting system was developed for blood culture examinations, which greatly contribute to the appropriate treatment of bloodstream infections. Collaborations of clinical microbiology laboratory with other members of ICT realize high quality hospital infection control. They also need to be aware of themselves as good practitioners of infection control measures to prevent hospital infections.

  4. Perinatal pathology: the role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavino Faa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathologists and clinicians come together and exchange views, they instil in one another doubts, they break down barriers. Asphyxia, respiratory distress, sepsis, multi-organ failure (MOF, cerebral ischemia and neuroprotection, necrotizing enteritis, renal and biliary pathology (including congenital nephrotic syndrome, injury caused by drugs, cardiac decompensation, placental pathology, neonatal issues in mothers with tumor: these are the topics debated, in the true sense of the word, by perinatologists and pathologists. In some pathologies (e.g. MOF the pathophysiology is surprisingly the same in the neonate and the adult.  Different disciplines deal for example with immunohistochemistry and metabolomics with the processing of thousands of data in search of something that cannot be found with the classic criteria of anamnesis, objective examination, laboratory tests and imaging. Big data and information science promise to change the world. To come to grips with the extreme biological complexity of our organism and each of our organs, the completeness of enormous amounts of data is of extraordinary value if assessed holistically with the “omic” disciplines. Thus we have the possibility of understanding our extraordinary interindividual variability. The new technologies and their application do not diminish the role of physicians: on the contrary, they represent a formidable instrument for extending their diagnostic potential and make possible 5-P medicine: personalized, prospective, predictive, preventive, participatory.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  5. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, A.S.; Worthy, S.; Keir, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  6. Violence risk prediction. Clinical and actuarial measures and the role of the Psychopathy Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, M; Doyle, M

    2000-10-01

    Violence risk prediction is a priority issue for clinicians working with mentally disordered offenders. To review the current status of violence risk prediction research. Literature search (Medline). Key words: violence, risk prediction, mental disorder. Systematic/structured risk assessment approaches may enhance the accuracy of clinical prediction of violent outcomes. Data on the predictive validity of available clinical risk assessment tools are based largely on American and North American studies and further validation is required in British samples. The Psychopathy Checklist appears to be a key predictor of violent recidivism in a variety of settings. Violence risk prediction is an inexact science and as such will continue to provoke debate. Clinicians clearly need to be able to demonstrate the rationale behind their decisions on violence risk and much can be learned from recent developments in research on violence risk prediction.

  7. Clinical and Pathological Roles of Ro/SSA Autoantibody System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are among the most frequently detected autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens and have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS. Although the presence of these autoantibodies is one of the criteria for the diagnosis and classification of SS, they are also sometimes seen in other systemic autoimmune diseases. In the last few decades, the knowledge of the prevalence of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in various autoimmune diseases and symptoms has been expanded, and the clinical importance of these antibodies is increasing. Nonetheless, the pathological role of the antibodies is still poorly understood. In this paper, we summarize the milestones of the anti-Ro/SSA autoantibody system and provide new insights into the association between the autoantibodies and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Mentoring for clinician-educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Susan E; Digioia, Natalie M; Broderick, Kerry B; Coates, Wendy C

    2004-12-01

    Mentorship has been shown to have a positive impact on academic faculty members in terms of career advancement. The guidance of a mentor has been shown to increase academic outcome measures such as peer-reviewed publications and grant support for junior academic faculty. In addition, career satisfaction of mentored faculty is greater than those with no mentorship. There is little research on the effects of mentorship on the careers of clinician-educators. This group has also been reported to have a lower scholarly productivity rate than the typical research-based faculty. This article addresses the current state of mentorship as it applies specifically to clinician-educators, offers advice on how a potential protégé might seek out a potential mentor, and finally, suggests a possible mentoring system for academic emergency physicians who are focusing on careers in medical education.

  9. [The psychosocial challenges of epilepsy and the role of the clinical nurse specialist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy in children is a complex disease with significant psychosocial consequences for the child and their family. The intervention of a multidisciplinary team enables the care to be adapted and provides support for the families. At Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal, Canada, the nurse clinician specialised in epilepsy plays a key role in this team. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Critical thinking and the role of the clinical ultrasound tutor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Hazel

    2006-01-01

    As radiographers continue to extend their role and take on more procedures associated traditionally with radiologists, it is essential that their critical thinking abilities keep pace with the new practical skills they are learning. This is particularly important in ultrasound where student sonographers must master a number of new skills including the technical dexterity required to perform a scan, the ability to form and discard hypotheses when trying to interpret the image, and the communication of their findings as a written report. Interpreting the image and producing an accurate, appropriate report involves the higher level cognitive processes of analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In other words, the student sonographer must be able to think critically to become a successful practitioner. This paper attempts to define and discuss critical thinking, and considers a range of simple strategies that the clinical teacher of ultrasound can employ to help develop critical thinking skills in their students. These methods are appropriate for use not only by clinical teachers of ultrasound but for all teachers and mentors wishing to improve reasoning skills in their pupils

  11. The role of mental imagery in non-clinical paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Gemma; Newman-Taylor, Katherine; Stopa, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive models of paranoia incorporate many of the processes implicated in the maintenance of anxiety disorders. Despite this, the role of mental imagery in paranoia remains under-researched. The current study examined the impact of a self-imagery manipulation in people with high non-clinical paranoia. We used a mixed design with one between-subjects variable (type of self-imagery) and one within-subjects variable (time--pre and post imagery manipulation). Thirty participants with high trait paranoia were allocated alternately to a positive or negative self-imagery condition. Scripts were used to elicit positive and negative self-imagery. All participants completed self-report state measures of paranoia, mood, self-esteem and self-compassion. Group by time interaction effects were found for each of the dependent variables. Positive imagery led to less state paranoia, anxiety and negative affect, and more positive affect, self-esteem and self-compassion, compared with the negative imagery group. This was a non-blind study, limited by allocation method and a brief time-frame which did not allow us to assess longevity of effects. We recruited a relatively small and predominantly female sample of people with high non-clinical paranoia. The study did not include a neutral control condition, a low paranoia comparison group, or a manipulation check following the imagery task. Self-imagery manipulations may affect paranoia, mood and self-beliefs. If the findings are replicated with clinical groups, and maintained over a longer period, this would suggest that imagery-based interventions targeting persecutory delusions might be usefully examined. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinician's gaze behaviour in simulated paediatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughten, Ben; Hart, Caroline; Gallagher, Stephen; Junk, Carol; Coulter, Patricia; Thompson, Andrew; Bourke, Thomas

    2018-03-07

    Differences in the gaze behaviour of experts and novices are described in aviation and surgery. This study sought to describe the gaze behaviour of clinicians from different training backgrounds during a simulated paediatric emergency. Clinicians from four clinical areas undertook a simulated emergency. Participants wore SMI (SensoMotoric Instruments) eye tracking glasses. We measured the fixation count and dwell time on predefined areas of interest and the time taken to key clinical interventions. Paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) consultants performed best and focused longer on the chest and airway. Paediatric consultants and trainees spent longer looking at the defibrillator and algorithm (51 180 ms and 50 551 ms, respectively) than the PICU and paediatric emergency medicine consultants. This study is the first to describe differences in the gaze behaviour between experts and novices in a resuscitation. They mirror those described in aviation and surgery. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential use of eye tracking as an educational tool. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Clinicians' perception of the preventability of inpatient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert; Srinivasan, Ramya; Kenway, Bruno; Quinn, James

    2018-03-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess whether clinicians have an accurate perception of the preventability of their patients' mortality. Case note review estimates that approximately 5 percent of inpatient deaths are preventable. Design/methodology/approach The design involved in the study is a prospective audit of inpatient mortality in a single NHS hospital trust. The case study includes 979 inpatient mortalities. A number of outcome measures were recorded, including a Likert scale of the preventability of death- and NCEPOD-based grading of care quality. Findings Clinicians assessed only 1.4 percent of deaths as likely to be preventable. This is significantly lower than previously published values ( p<0.0001). Clinicians were also more likely to rate the quality of care as "good," and less likely to identify areas of substandard clinical or organizational management. Research limitations/implications The implications of objective assessment of the preventability of mortality are essential to drive quality improvement in this area. Practical implications There is a wide disparity between independent case note review and clinicians assessing the care of their own patients. This may be due to a "knowledge gap" between reviewers and treating clinicians, or an "objectivity gap" meaning clinicians may not recognize preventability of death of patients under their care. Social implications This study gives some insight into deficiencies in clinical governance processes. Originality/value No similar study has been performed. This has significant implications for the idea of the preventability of mortality.

  14. The making of expert clinicians: reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, J M; Szyld, D; Del Moral, I; Ortiz, G; Rudolph, J W

    2014-05-01

    Debriefing is a rigorous reflection process which helps trainees recognize and resolve clinical and behavioral dilemmas raised by a clinical case. This approach emphasizes eliciting trainees'assumptions about the situation and their reasons for performing as they did (mental models). It analyses their impact on actions, to understand if it is necessary to maintain them or construct new ones that may lead to better performance in the future. It blends evidence and theory from education research, the social and cognitive sciences, and experience drawn from conducting and teaching debriefing to clinicians worldwide, on how to improve professional effectiveness through "reflective practice". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of therapeutic optimism in recruitment to a clinical trial in a peripartum setting: balancing hope and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallowell, Nina; Snowdon, Claire; Morrow, Susan; Norman, Jane E; Denison, Fiona C; Lawton, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Hope has therapeutic value because it enables people to cope with uncertainty about their future health. Indeed, hope, or therapeutic optimism (TO), is seen as an essential aspect of the provision and experience of medical care. The role of TO in clinical research has been briefly discussed, but the concept, and whether it can be transferred from care to research and from patients to clinicians, has not been fully investigated. The role played by TO in research emerged during interviews with staff involved in a peripartum trial. This paper unpacks the concept of TO in this setting and considers the role it may play in the wider delivery of clinical trials. The Got-it trial is a UK-based, randomised placebo-controlled trial that investigates the use of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) spray to treat retained placenta. Qualitative data were collected in open-ended interviews with obstetricians, research and clinical midwives (n =27) involved in trial recruitment. Data were analysed using the method of constant comparison. TO influenced staff engagement with Got-it at different points in the trial and in different ways. Prior knowledge of, and familiarity with, GTN meant that from the outset staff perceived the trial as low risk. TO facilitated staff involvement in the trial; staff who already understood GTN's effects were optimistic that it would work, and staff collaborated because they hoped that the trial would address what they identified as an important clinical need. TO could fluctuate over the course of the trial, and was sustained or undermined by unofficial observation of clinical outcomes and speculations about treatment allocation. Thus, TO appeared to be influenced by key situational factors: prior knowledge and experience, clinical need and observed participant outcomes. Situational TO plays a role in facilitating staff engagement with clinical research. TO may affect trial recruitment by enabling staff to sustain the levels of uncertainty, or

  16. Information Needs, Infobutton Manager Use, and Satisfaction by Clinician Type: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah A.; Currie, Leanne M.; Bakken, Suzanne; Cimino, James J.

    2009-01-01

    To effectively meet clinician information needs at the point of care, we must understand how their needs are dependent on both context and clinician type. The Infobutton Manager (IM), accessed through a clinical information system, anticipates the clinician's questions and provides links to pertinent electronic resources. We conducted an observational usefulness case study of medical residents (MDs), nurse practitioners (NPs), registered nurses (RNs), and a physician assistant (PA), using the IM in a laboratory setting. Generic question types and success rates for each clinician's information needs were characterized. Question type frequency differed by clinician type. All clinician types asked for institution-specific protocols. The MDs asked about unfamiliar domains, RNs asked about physician order rationales, and NPs asked questions similar to both MDs and RNs. Observational data suggest that IM success rates may be improved by tailoring anticipated questions to clinician type. Clinicians reported that a more visible Infobutton may increase use. PMID:18952943

  17. Copy number variation plays an important role in clinical epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather; Shen, Yiping; Avallone, Jennifer; Sheidley, Beth R.; Pinsky, Rebecca; Bergin, Ann M.; Berry, Gerard T.; Duffy, Frank H.; Eksioglu, Yaman; Harris, David J.; Hisama, Fuki M.; Ho, Eugenia; Irons, Mira; Jacobsen, Christina M.; James, Philip; Kothare, Sanjeev; Khwaja, Omar; Lipton, Jonathan; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Markowitz, Jennifer; Maski, Kiran; Megerian, J. Thomas; Neilan, Edward; Raffalli, Peter C.; Robbins, Michael; Roberts, Amy; Roe, Eugene; Rollins, Caitlin; Sahin, Mustafa; Sarco, Dean; Schonwald, Alison; Smith, Sharon E.; Soul, Janet; Stoler, Joan M.; Takeoka, Masanori; Tan, Wen-Han; Torres, Alcy R.; Tsai, Peter; Urion, David K.; Weissman, Laura; Wolff, Robert; Wu, Bai-Lin; Miller, David T.; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of copy number abnormalities detectable by chromosomal microarray (CMA) testing in patients with epilepsy at a tertiary care center. Methods We identified patients with ICD-9 codes for epilepsy or seizures and clinical CMA testing performed between October 2006 and February 2011 at Boston Children’s Hospital. We reviewed medical records and included patients meeting criteria for epilepsy. We phenotypically characterized patients with epilepsy-associated abnormalities on CMA. Results Of 973 patients who had CMA and ICD-9 codes for epilepsy or seizures, 805 patients satisfied criteria for epilepsy. We observed 437 copy number variants (CNVs) in 323 patients (1–4 per patient), including 185 (42%) deletions and 252 (58%) duplications. Forty (9%) were confirmed de novo, 186 (43%) were inherited, and parental data were unavailable for 211 (48%). Excluding full chromosome trisomies, CNV size ranged from 18 kb to 142 Mb, and 34% were over 500 kb. In at least 40 cases (5%), the epilepsy phenotype was explained by a CNV, including 29 patients with epilepsy-associated syndromes and 11 with likely disease-associated CNVs involving epilepsy genes or “hotspots.” We observed numerous recurrent CNVs including 10 involving loss or gain of Xp22.31, a region described in patients with and without epilepsy. Interpretation Copy number abnormalities play an important role in patients with epilepsy. Given that the diagnostic yield of CMA for epilepsy patients is similar to the yield in autism spectrum disorders and in prenatal diagnosis, for which published guidelines recommend testing with CMA, we recommend the implementation of CMA in the evaluation of unexplained epilepsy. PMID:24811917

  18. Clinicians' Choices in Selecting Orthodontic Archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Izabella Pop

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the choices made by clinicians in selecting archwires during the initial, intermediate and final stages of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Methods: We carried out a questionnaire-based study at the Orthodontics and Pedodontics Clinic Târgu Mureș, between March 2012 and September 2012. The questionnaires consisted of two parts: the first included questions related to the dimension, alloy used in fabrication, section (round or rectangular and manufacturer of the archwires used by the orthodontists in their orthodontic practice, the second part was concerned with their personal opinion about the physical properties and disadvantages of the archwires. Results: From a total number of 90 distributed questionnaires, 62 were returned. The majority of clinicians are using stainless steel (SS and nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi wires in their fixed orthodontic treatments, very few are using beta-titanium (Beta Ti, copper nickel-titanium (Co- NiTi and esthetic archwires. The preferred dimension seem to be 0.022 inches in the appliance system. Regarding the wire dimensions, 0.014, 0.016 inch wires are mostly used from the round section group and 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.017 × 0.025 inch from the rectangular ones. Conclusions: There is a general lack of agreement between the clinicians surveyed regarding the properties of an ideal archwire and the disadvantages of the used wires. The most frequently used alloys seemed to be the SS and NiTi

  19. Prediction of mandibular rotation: an empirical test of clinician performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; West, E E

    1984-11-01

    An experiment was conducted in an attempt to determine empirically how effective a number of expert clinicians were at differentiating "backward rotators" from "forward rotators" on the basis of head-film information which might reasonably have been available to them prior to instituting treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusion. As a result of a previously reported ongoing study, pre- and posttreatment head films were available for 188 patients treated in the mixed dentition for the correction of Class II malocclusion and for 50 untreated Class II subjects. These subjects were divided into 14 groups (average size of group, 17; range, 6 to 23) solely on the basis of type of treatment and the clinician from whose clinic the records had originated. From within each group, we selected the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme backward rotation and the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme forward rotation of the mandible during the interval between films. The sole criterion for classification was magnitude of change in the mandibular plane angle of Downs between the pre- and posttreatment films of each patient. The resulting sample contained 32 backward-rotator subjects and 32 forward-rotator subjects. Five expert judges (mean clinical experience, 28 years) were asked to identify the backward-rotator subjects by examination of the pretreatment films. The findings may be summarized as follows: (1) No judge performed significantly better than chance. (2) There was strong evidence that the judges used a shared, though relatively ineffective, set of rules in making their discriminations between forward and backward rotators. (3) Statistical analysis of the predictive power of a set of standard cephalometric measurements which had previously been made for this set of subjects indicated that the numerical data also failed to identify potential backward rotators at a rate significantly better than chance. We infer from these

  20. Ovarian cancer: the clinical role of US, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togashi, K.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents an overview of ovarian cancer, which addresses the clinical roles of imaging studies, including US, CT, and MR imaging in the course of diagnosis and treatment of this important disease. US is the modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected adnexal masses. Although its accuracy is not sufficient to avert surgery, morphological analysis of adnexal masses with US helps narrow the differential diagnosis, determining the degree of suspicion for malignancy, usually in concert with a serum CA-125 level. Combined morphological and vascular imaging obtained by US appear to further improve the preoperative assessment of adnexal masses. For uncertain or problematic cases, MR imaging helps to distinguish benign from malignant, with an overall accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancy of 93%. The accuracy of MR imaging in the confident diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma, endometrial cysts, and leiomayomas is very high. CT is not indicated for differential diagnosis of adnexal masses because of poor soft tissue discrimination, except for fatty tissue and for calcification, and the disadvantages of irradiation. In the staging of ovarian cancer, CT, US, and MR imaging all have a similarly high accuracy. Although it is difficult to suggest a simple algorithm for evaluating the state of women with adnexal masses, the correct preoperative diagnosis and staging of ovarian cancer with the use of any of these imaging studies will lead to an appropriate referral to a specialist in gynecologic oncology and offer a significant survival advantage for patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  1. Expanding role of MR angiography in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.R.; Meaney, J.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    MRA has higher accuracy, less operator dependence, a larger field-of-view, three-dimensionality and superior contrast resolution than ultrasonography. Additionally, MRA offers a safer alternative to the patient than CTA as neither ionizing radiation nor iodinated contrast agents are used. Contrast-enhanced MRA with extra cellular contrast agents is fast and flow-independent, offers substantially higher spatial and temporal resolution compared to non-contrast techniques and has become the standard of practice. The highly accurate but static anatomical road-map thus generated can be supplemented with time-resolved MRA and blood flow measurement techniques for a more comprehensive assessment of systemic vascular disease. In the context of burgeoning technological advances with rapid translation into clinical MRA practice, this review explores the current position of MRA and the potential role for the new and exciting blood-pool contrast agents for diagnosing and characterizing vascular disease. Blood-pool agents offer the potential to take MRA to the next level by combining first-pass arterial phase imaging with steady state high-resolution images that exploit the persistent high intravascular enhancement generated by blood-pool agents and which is significantly greater than with extra cellular agents. Additional benefits derive from the ability to characterize plaque and to detect internal bleeding. (orig.)

  2. Sleep apps: what role do they play in clinical medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christopher P; Williams, Adrian J

    2017-11-01

    Today's smartphones boast more computing power than the Apollo Guidance Computer. Given the ubiquity and popularity of smartphones, are we already carrying around miniaturized sleep labs in our pockets? There is still a lack of validation studies for consumer sleep technologies in general and apps for monitoring sleep in particular. To overcome this gap, multidisciplinary teams are needed that focus on feasibility work at the intersection of software engineering, data science and clinical sleep medicine. To date, no smartphone app for monitoring sleep through movement sensors has been successfully validated against polysomnography, despite the role and validity of actigraphy in sleep medicine having been well established. Missing separation of concerns, not methodology, poses the key limiting factor: The two essential steps in the monitoring process, data collection and scoring, are chained together inside a black box due to the closed nature of consumer devices. This leaves researchers with little room for influence nor can they access raw data. Multidisciplinary teams that wield complete power over the sleep monitoring process are sorely needed.

  3. Primary caregivers' satisfaction with clinicians' response to them as informal carers of young people with first-episode psychosis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Terence V; Lubman, Dan I; Clark, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    To explore first-time primary caregivers' experience of the way mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians respond to them as carers of young people with first-episode psychosis. Caregivers have a key role in supporting family members/relatives with mental illness, but their contribution is undervalued frequently by mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians. Design.  Qualitative interpretative phenomenological analysis. A qualitative interpretative design was undertaken, using semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews. Twenty primary caregivers were recruited through Orygen Youth Health, a first-episode psychosis centre in Melbourne. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to identify themes in the data. Two competing themes were identified in the data, highlighting caregivers' contrasting experience with mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians. First, most clinical staff were approachable and supportive. Second, several carers felt their contribution was undervalued by some clinical staff. This was as a consequence of being excluded from clinical deliberations because of clinical staffs' concerns and young people's requests about maintaining confidentiality regarding treatment, as well as carers feeling their role was not taken seriously by clinical staff. First-time primary carers have positive and negative experiences with first-episode psychosis mental health nurses and other clinicians, and these competing events are interrelated. Experiences are affected directly by the manner they are treated by clinical staff and this may, in turn, affect carers' commitment to caring, the way they engage with clinical staff on subsequent occasions and towards the first-episode psychosis service generally. Greater appreciation is needed of the contribution, experience and difficulties caregivers encounter in their role and in engaging with mental health nurses and other clinicians. Additional training is required for

  4. Clinician styles of care: transforming patient care at the intersection of leadership and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho P; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-11-01

    A key role of clinicians is to motivate their patients to initiate and maintain beneficial health behaviors. This article integrates research on transformational leadership, clinician-patient communication, and health behavior to introduce a novel approach to understanding and improving clinicians' effectiveness as motivators. We describe three dominant clinician styles or patterned approaches to patient care that derive from leadership theory (in order of least to most effective): laissez-faire, transactional, and transformational. Additionally, we suggest potential mediators and effects of the transformational style of care. Finally, we discuss future research directions for the study of clinician styles of care. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Oral Cancer Knowledge Assessment: Newly Graduated versus Senior Dental Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado de Souza, Ricardo; Gallego Arias Pecorari, Vanessa; Lauria Dib, Luciano

    2018-01-01

    The present study assessed the level of dentists' knowledge regarding oral cancer in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A questionnaire was used to compare the level of knowledge among newly graduated and senior clinicians. A total of 20,154 e-mails were correctly delivered to the dentists registered in the database of the Regional Dentistry Council of São Paulo, and 477 (2.36%) responses were received. This sample consisted of 84 newly graduated clinicians and 105 senior clinicians. For the statistical analysis, the chi-square test and the logistic regression analysis were performed with α = 0.05, and the results were described herein. According to their knowledge level, the results were statistically different between the groups, since 19% of the newly graduated clinicians were evaluated with knowledge grade A (excellent) in comparison to 6.7% of the senior clinicians. In spite of the results indicated that newly graduated clinicians' knowledge regarding oral cancer was 2.1 times higher, 34.5% of the professionals in this group had regular or poor knowledge on the subject, and several questions relating to clinical characteristics and risk factors indicated that there still exist some knowledge gaps, demonstrating that there is a need for further studies and information activities addressing oral cancer. PMID:29666649

  6. Clinician perspectives of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Edna M; Worrall, Linda E; Cherney, Leora R

    2013-01-01

    Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) have increased in number in recent years in the United States and abroad. To describe the experiences of clinicians working in an ICAP. A phenomenological approach was taken. Seven clinicians from 3 ICAPs were interviewed in person or on the phone. Their interviews were transcribed and coded for themes relating to their experiences. Clinicians described 3 major themes. The first theme related to the intensity component of the ICAP that allowed clinicians to provide in-depth treatment and gave them a different perspective with regard to providing treatment and the potential impact on the person with aphasia. The second theme of rewards for the clinicians included learning and support, seeing progress, and developing relationships with their clients and family members. Third, challenges were noted, including the time involved in learning new therapy techniques, patient characteristics such as chronicity of the aphasia, and the difficulty of returning to work in typical clinical settings after having experienced an ICAP. Although there is a potential for bias with the small sample size, this pilot study gives insight into the clinician perspective of what makes working in an ICAP both worthwhile and challenging.

  7. Towards reinforcing telemedicine adoption amongst clinicians in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenuga, Kayode I; Iahad, Noorminshah A; Miskon, Suraya

    2017-08-01

    Telemedicine systems have been considered as a necessary measure to alleviate the shortfall in skilled medical specialists in developing countries. However, the obvious challenge is whether clinicians are willing to use this technological innovation, which has aided medical practice globally. One factor which has received little academic attention is the provision of suitable encouragement for clinicians to adopt telemedicine, in the form of rewards, motivation or incentives. A further consideration for telemedicine usage in developing countries, especially sub-Saharan Africa and Nigeria in particular, are to the severe shortage of available practising clinicians. The researchers therefore explore the need to positively reinforce the adoption of telemedicine amongst clinicians in Nigeria, and also offer a rationale for this using the UTAUT model. Data were collected using a structured paper-based questionnaire, with 252 physicians and nurses from six government hospitals in Ondo state, Nigeria. The study applied SmartPLS 2.0 for analysis to determine the relationship between six variables. Demographic moderating variables, age, gender and profession, were included. The results indicate that performance expectancy (ptelemedicine systems, as predicted using the extended UTAUT model. Our results showed that the use of telemedicine by clinicians in the Nigerian context is perceived as a dual responsibility which requires suitable reinforcement. In addition, performance expectancy, effort expectancy, facilitating condition and reinforcement determinants are influential factors in the use of telemedicine services for remote-patient clinical diagnosis and management by the Nigerian clinicians. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Pain and ketoprofen: what is its role in clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fischer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients fear pain because it causes considerable suffering, and clinicians may not handle it appropriately because they fail to understand it (1. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP defines it as “… is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage” (2. Individual patients perceive it differently, depending on the context of the stimulus, their previous experience, and their current psychological and physical condition. Furthermore, painful stimuli cannot be ignored, disturb behavioural and cognitive activities, and give rise to anxiety and/or depression (3, 4. Acute pain is one of the most frequent reasons for consulting a doctor in all parts of the world (5, and is often associated with already distressing...

  9. Variation in the use of definitive treatment options in the management of Graves' disease: a UK clinician survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookham, Jessica; Collins, Emma E; Allahabadia, Amit; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease can be treated with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioiodine or surgery. Use of definitive treatments (radioiodine or surgery) varies widely across centres. Specific clinical circumstances, local facilities, patient and clinician preferences and perceptions will affect the choice of treatment. Detailed understanding of UK clinicians' views and their rationale for different treatments is lacking. To study the preferences and perceptions of UK clinicians on the role of surgery and radioiodine in the management of Graves' disease. 'British Thyroid Association' (BTA), 'Society for Endocrinology' (SFE) and 'British Association of Endocrine and Thyroid Surgeons' (BAETS) members were invited to complete an online survey examining their management decisions in Graves' disease and factors that influenced their decisions. 158 responses from UK consultants were included. The ratio of physicians to surgeons was 11:5 and males to females was 12:4. Most clinicians would commence ATDs in uncomplicated first presentation of Graves' disease. A wide range of risk estimates on the effectiveness and risks of treatment was given by clinicians. Radioiodine was used most frequently in relapsed Graves' disease. However, severe eye disease and pregnancy strongly influenced choice in favour of surgery. Surgeons underestimated the success of radioiodine (pGraves' disease. The variation appeared to be dependent on patient and disease-specific factors as well as physician experience, gender and specialty. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Model of critical diagnostic reasoning: achieving expert clinician performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjai, Prashant Kumar; Tiwari, Ruby

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic reasoning refers to the analytical processes used to determine patient health problems. While the education curriculum and health care system focus on training nurse clinicians to accurately recognize and rescue clinical situations, assessments of non-expert nurses have yielded less than satisfactory data on diagnostic competency. The contrast between the expert and non-expert nurse clinician raises the important question of how differences in thinking may contribute to a large divergence in accurate diagnostic reasoning. This article recognizes superior organization of one's knowledge base, using prototypes, and quick retrieval of pertinent information, using similarity recognition as two reasons for the expert's superior diagnostic performance. A model of critical diagnostic reasoning, using prototypes and similarity recognition, is proposed and elucidated using case studies. This model serves as a starting point toward bridging the gap between clinical data and accurate problem identification, verification, and management while providing a structure for a knowledge exchange between expert and non-expert clinicians.

  11. Challenges of being a scholarly clinician as perceived by stroke rehabilitation professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Barbara; Rochette, Annie; Girard, Anik

    2014-01-01

    Stroke rehabilitation clinicians are responsible for offering quality services through evidence-based practices. How is this role fulfilled on a daily basis? (1) To explore the perceptions, experiences, and attitudes of rehabilitation professionals regarding their scholar role; (2) To identify factors that facilitate or hinder this role in their practices. Qualitative design of a phenomenological orientation. Face-to-face interviews conducted with professionals with at least 1 year experience in stroke rehabilitation using a pre-tested interview guide. Transcripts were coded using QDA-Miner software. Mean age of the participants was 40.7 years ± 11.2. Participants were mostly women (n = 9/11). The role of scholar emerged as not having great value. Main themes (5) emerging from the analysis are emphasis on tacit knowledge; experience and clinical intuition leading to self-confidence and comfort in clinical practice; dissatisfaction with the lack of knowledge sharing among clinicians; importance of diversifying clinical tasks; and the underdevelopment of reflective practice. Four factors identified as influencing the role of scholar: motivation, critical incident as a main trigger of reflective practice, interns facilitating reflective practice, and lack of time. From these results emerged questions about measures to encourage the scholar role and facilitate reflective practice in stroke rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Reflective practice has to be encouraged in professional rehabilitation of stroke. Managers' involvement is crucial to promote and support the role of scholar among professionals in stroke rehabilitation. The updated knowledge and networking from reading scientific paper, participation in trainings and conferences should be systematically disseminated.

  12. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a clinician's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Edwin J; Olson, Gary S; Weiner, Scott J; Paddock, Christopher D

    2003-04-14

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is still the most lethal tick-vectored illness in the United States. We examine the dilemmas facing the clinician who is evaluating the patient with possible Rocky Mountain spotted fever, with particular attention to the following 8 pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment: (1) waiting for a petechial rash to develop before diagnosis; (2) misdiagnosing as gastroenteritis; (3) discounting a diagnosis when there is no history of a tick bite; (4) using an inappropriate geographic exclusion; (5) using an inappropriate seasonal exclusion; (6) failing to treat on clinical suspicion; (7) failing to elicit an appropriate history; and (8) failing to treat with doxycycline. Early diagnosis and proper treatment save lives.

  13. Exploring the Role and Skill Set of Physiotherapy Clinical Educators in Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Susan; Connaughton, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Clinical educators are under increasing pressures in the workplace to provide quality education of healthcare students within varying supervision frameworks. Along with facilitating the teaching of clinical skills, clinical educators play a support role for students and so require more than expert clinical abilities in their vital position linking…

  14. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the clinician,s perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: 3D radiation treatment planning has enabled dose distributions to be related to the volume of normal tissues irradiated. The dose volume histograms thus derived have been utilized to set NTCP dose constraints to facilitate optimization of treatment planning. However, it is not widely appreciated that a number of important variables other than DYH's which determine NTCP in the individual patient. These variables will be discussed under the headings of patient and treatment related as well as tumour related factors. Patient related factors include age, co-morbidities such as connective tissue disease and diabetes mellitus, previous tissue/organ damage, tissue architectural organization (parallel or serial), regional tissue/organ and individual tissue/organ radiosensitivities as well as the development of severe acute toxicity. Treatment related variables which need to be considered include dose per fraction (if not the conventional 1.8012.00 Gy/fraction, particularly for IMRT), number of fractions and total dose, dose rate (particularly if combined with brachytherapy) and concurrent chemotherapy or other biological dose modifiers. Tumour related factors which impact on NTCP include infiltration of normal tissue/organ usually at presentation leading to compromised function but also with recurrent disease after radiation therapy as well as variable tumour radiosensitivities between and within tumour types. Whilst evaluation of DYH data is a useful guide in the choice of treatment plan, the current state of knowledge requires the clinician to make an educated judgement based on a consideration of the other factors.

  15. Antiretroviral drug resistance: A guide for the southern African clinician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both private and public sector see a bewildering clinical array of patients taking failing antiretroviral (ARV) regimens. We intend this article to provide a practical guide to help clinicians understand and manage ARV drug resistance in an African context. ARV resistance is a rapidly evolving field, requiring expertise in dealing ...

  16. Capitalising on leadership fellowships for clinicians in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Edward D

    2011-04-01

    Clinical leadership has become a primary focus of the NHS with many leadership programmes, particularly those aimed at junior clinicians, being developed. This article illustrates the potential of these programmes but also urges caution when assessing the success of these schemes both from an individual and organisational perspective.

  17. The decision to extract: part II. Analysis of clinicians' stated reasons for extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L; Maxwell, R

    1996-04-01

    In a recently reported study, the pretreatment records of each subject in a randomized clinical trial of 148 patients with Class I and Class II malocclusions presenting for orthodontic treatment were evaluated independently by five experienced clinicians (drawn from a panel of 14). The clinicians displayed a higher incidence of agreement with each other than had been expected with respect to the decision as to whether extraction was indicated in each specific case. To improve our understanding of how clinicians made their decisions on whether to extract or not, the records of a subset of 72 subjects randomly selected from the full sample of 148, have now been examined in greater detail. In 21 of these cases, all five clinicians decided to treat without extraction. Among the remaining 51 cases, there were 202 decisions to extract (31 unanimous decision cases and 20 split decision cases). The clinicians cited a total of 469 reasons to support these decisions. Crowding was cited as the first reason in 49% of decisions to extract, followed by incisor protrusion (14%), need for profile correction (8%), Class II severity (5%), and achievement of a stable result (5%). When all the reasons for extraction in each clinician's decision were considered as a group, crowding was cited in 73% of decisions, incisor protrusion in 35%, need for profile correction in 27%, Class II severity in 15% and posttreatment stability in 9%. Tooth size anomalies, midline deviations, reduced growth potential, severity of overjet, maintenance of existing profile, desire to close the bite, periodontal problems, and anticipation of poor cooperation accounted collectively for 12% of the first reasons and were mentioned in 54% of the decisions, implying that these considerations play a consequential, if secondary, role in the decision-making process. All other reasons taken together were mentioned in fewer than 20% of cases. In this sample at least, clinicians focused heavily on appearance

  18. Supporting Student Nurses Learning in and through Clinical Practice: The Role of the Clinical Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Margaret; Roberts, Debbie

    2003-01-01

    A clinical guide is an experienced nurse who supports nursing students throughout the program, particularly in clinical placements. More than a mentor, a guide is fully involved in promoting deep learning in clinical settings. (SK)

  19. Role of clinical nurse leadership in improving patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jill; Quillinan, Bernie; Carolan, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Leadership in nursing plays a crucial part in the provision of good patient care. However, the terms 'nursing leadership' and 'nursing management' are often confused. This article discusses the difficulties in defining 'clinical leadership', outlines its development in the Republic of Ireland, and identifies issues that must be addressed if clinical nurse leaders are to be effective.

  20. Client and clinician-rated characteristics of problem gamblers with and without history of gambling-related illegal behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jennifer D; Lister, Jamey J; Struble, Cara A; Cairncross, Molly; Carr, Meagan M; Ledgerwood, David M

    2018-03-12

    Individuals with gambling disorder are at an elevated risk for engaging in gambling-related illegal behaviors. The present study examined client (N = 88) and clinician ratings (N = 30) of client characteristics associated with a history of gambling-related illegal behaviors. We also examined client characteristics associated with history of arrest for a gambling-related crime. Gambling-related illegal behaviors and arrest were common (57.3% and 23.9%, respectively) in the present sample. Clients of younger age, and those with greater gambling-related financial consequences, lifetime alcohol problems, impulsivity, mood symptoms, and daily living role difficulties were more likely to report gambling-related illegal behaviors. Clients who had been arrested for a gambling-related crime were more likely to report daily living and role functioning difficulties and lifetime alcohol problems. Clinicians rated clients with a history of gambling-related illegal behaviors and/or gambling-related arrests as more impulsive, and clinicians also endorsed higher rates of treatment failure among these clients. Both client and clinician report suggested that clients with a history of illegal behaviors may have a variety of comorbid problems that may be a focus of clinical intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role and functions of Clinical Nurse Consultants, an Australian advanced practice role: a descriptive exploratory cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Richard; Duffield, Christine Margaret; Fry, Margaret; Roche, Michael; Stasa, Helen; Solman, Annette

    2013-03-01

    The NSW Health Policy Directive (NSW Department of Health, 2000) lists clinical service and consultancy; clinical leadership; research; education; clinical services planning and management as the five domains of practice for nurses appointed as Clinical Nurse Consultants (CNCs), an Australian advanced practice nurse (APN) role. However, there is no clear definition of what is meant by advanced practice in the Australian nursing context. Nowhere is this more evident than in differentiating between the roles of Clinical Nurse Consultants (CNCs) and Nurse Practitioners (NP) in NSW. To date, limited empirical research has been done to characterise or delineate CNC role activity and responsibility. To investigate (i) the nature of CNC roles, activities and responsibilities, (ii) differentiate between CNCs by their work patterns and activities, and (iii) empirically conceptualize and differentiate ways CNCs practice in terms of an APN typology. The study sample was 56 CNCs at one tertiary level public hospital in Australia. A descriptive exploratory cohort study was conducted to explore CNC role characteristics and patterns of activity. Data were triangulated using an online survey, a follow-up survey, and semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics to examine differences between CNC work patterns and role activities. The survey data and the individual reports were thematically analysed to investigate for difference across the population of CNCs. Interpretation of survey and interview data led to an analyst-developed CNC typology of four CNC categories based on the work patterns and activities of Sole Practitioner, Clinic Coordinator, Clinical Team Coordinator and Clinical Leader. The typology was based on the themes interprofessional, role focus, clinical focus and setting as these themes distinguished and differentiated CNC roles. The study provides evidence of great diversity and prioritization within CNC roles. The CNC typology

  2. The role of the visiting doctor in primary care clinics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teams to produce job descriptions for such doctors, groups of clinic nurses in 2 districts in North West Province ... respect as a basis for teamwork, and ensuring networking and co-ordination. ..... expectations on them, with an emphasis.

  3. A framework for understanding moral distress among palliative care clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda H; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Halifax, Joan S

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care clinicians confront suffering as they care for people living with life-limiting conditions. When the degree of suffering becomes unjustified, moral distress can ensue. Promising work from neuroscience and social psychology has yet to be applied to clinical practice. Our objective was to expand a social psychology model focusing on empathy and compassion in response to suffering to include an ethical dimension and to examine how the interrelationships of its proposed components can assist clinicians in understanding their responses to morally distressing situations. In the clinical context, responses to distressing events are thought to include four dimensions: empathy (emotional attunement), perspective taking (cognitive attunement), memory (personal experience), and moral sensitivity (ethical attunement). These dynamically intertwined dimensions create the preconditions for how clinicians respond to a triggering event instigated by an ethical conflict or dilemma. We postulate that if the four dimensions are highly aligned, the intensity and valence of emotional arousal will influence ethical appraisal and discernment by engaging a robust view of the ethical issues, conflicts, and possible solutions and cultivating compassionate action and resilience. In contrast, if they are not, ethical appraisal and discernment will be deficient, creating emotional disregulation and potentially leading to personal and moral distress, self-focused behaviors, unregulated moral outrage, burnout, and secondary stress. The adaptation and expansion of a conceptual framework offers a promising approach to designing interventions that help clinicians mitigate the detrimental consequences of unregulated moral distress and to build the resilience necessary to sustain themselves in clinical service.

  4. Experiences of randomization: interviews with patients and clinicians in the SPCG-IV trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill-Axelson, Anna; Christensson, Anna; Carlsson, Marianne; Norlén, Bo Johan; Holmberg, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of both patients and clinicians to randomized trials is difficult. Low participation carries the risk of terminating studies early and making them invalid owing to insufficient statistical power. This study investigated patients' and clinicians' experiences of randomization with the aim of facilitating trial participation in the future. This was a qualitative study using content analysis. Patients offered to participate in a randomized trial and randomizing clinicians were interviewed. Five participants, four non-participants and five randomizing clinicians were interviewed, 2-8 years from randomization. Clinicians used strategies in interaction with the patients to facilitate decision making. Patients' attitudes differed and experiences of relatives or friends were often stated as reasons for treatment preferences. Patients described that letting chance decide treatment was a difficult barrier to overcome for randomization. The clinicians used a number of different strategies perceived to make randomization more acceptable to their patients. The clinicians' own motivation for randomizing patients for trials depended on the medical relevance of the study question and the clinicians' major obstacle was to maintain equipoise over time. Regular meetings with the study group helped to maintain equipoise and motivation. To establish a good platform for randomization the clinician needs to know about the patient's treatment preferences and the patient's attitude concerning the role of the clinician to facilitate decision making. The strategies used by the clinicians were perceived as helpful and could be tested in an intervention study.

  5. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  6. Clinicians' recognition and management of emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elliott B; Mazzola, Natalia M; Brandano, Jessica; Luff, Donna; Zurakowski, David; Meyer, Elaine C

    2015-10-01

    To examine the most commonly reported emotions encountered among healthcare practitioners when holding difficult conversations, including frequency and impact on care delivery. Interprofessional learners from a range of experience levels and specialties completed self-report questionnaires prior to simulation-based communication workshops. Clinicians were asked to describe up to three emotions they experienced when having difficult healthcare conversations; subsequent questions used Likert-scales to measure frequency of each emotion, and whether care was affected. 152 participants completed questionnaires, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial professionals. Most commonly reported emotions were anxiety, sadness, empathy, frustration, and insecurity. There were significant differences in how clinicians perceived these different emotions affecting care. Empathy and anxiety were emotions perceived to influence care more than sadness, frustration, and insecurity. Most clinicians, regardless of clinical experience and discipline, find their emotional state influences the quality of their care delivery. Most clinicians rate themselves as somewhat to quite capable of recognizing and managing their emotions, acknowledging significant room to grow. Further education designed to increase clinicians' recognition of, reflection on, and management of emotion would likely prove helpful in improving their ability to navigate difficult healthcare conversations. Interventions aimed at anxiety management are particularly needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perspective: Transforming science into medicine: how clinician-scientists can build bridges across research's "valley of death".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Scott F; Fischhoff, Martin A; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2012-03-01

    Significant increases in National Institutes of Health (NIH) spending on medical research have not produced corresponding increases in new treatments and cures. Instead, laboratory discoveries remain in what has been termed the "valley of death," the gap between bench research and clinical application. Recently, there has been considerable discussion in the literature and scientific community about the causes of this phenomenon and how to bridge the abyss. In this article, the authors examine one possible explanation: Clinician-scientists' declining role in the medical research enterprise has had a dilatory effect on the successful translation of laboratory breakthroughs into new clinical applications. In recent decades, the percentage of MDs receiving NIH funding has drastically decreased compared with PhDs. The growing gap between the research and clinical enterprises has resulted in fewer scientists with a true understanding of clinical problems as well as scientists who are unable to or uninterested in gleaning new basic research hypotheses from failed clinical trials. The NIH and many U.S. medical schools have recognized the decline of the clinician-scientist as a major problem and adopted innovative programs to reverse the trend. However, more radical action may be required, including major changes to the NIH peer-review process, greater funding for translational research, and significantly more resources for the training, debt relief, and early career support of potential clinician-scientists. Such improvements are required for clinician-scientists to conduct translational research that bridges the valley of death and transforms biomedical research discoveries into tangible clinical treatments and technologies.

  8. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL STUDENTS, CLINICIANS AND SPORTS SCIENTISTS TOWARDS EXERCISE COUNSELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbyrhamy Gnanendran

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We compared the amount of exercise undertaken by medical students, clinicians, and sport scientists with the National Australian Physical Activity (NAPA Guidelines. A second aim was to compare attitudes to exercise counselling as preventive medicine between university- and clinic-based professionals. The research setting was a university medical school and a sports science sports medicine centre. A 20-item questionnaire was completed by 216 individuals (131 medical students, 43 clinicians and 37 sports scientists. Self-reported physical activity habits, exercise counselling practices and attitudes towards preventive medicine were assessed. The physical activity undertaken by most respondents (70% met NAPA Guidelines. General practitioners had significantly lower compliance rates with NAPA Guidelines than other professionals. More than half of clinicians and medical students (54% were less active now compared with levels of activity undertaken prior to graduate training. Most physicians (68% reported they sometimes discuss physical activity with patients. In contrast, the majority of non-medically qualified respondents (60% said they never discuss physical activity with their doctor. Most respondents (70% had positive attitudes to exercise counselling. Sports scientists and respondents who were highly active in childhood had more positive attitudes to exercise counselling than others. Health professionals in this study were more active than the general population, however healthy exercise habits tend to deteriorate after the commencement of medical training. Despite the important role of doctors in health promotion, the degree of exercise counselling to patients is low

  9. Understanding consumer and clinician preferences and decision making for rehabilitation following arthroplasty in the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhagiar, Mark A; Naylor, Justine M; Simpson, Grahame; Harris, Ian A; Kohler, Friedbert

    2017-06-19

    To understand private consumer and clinician preferences towards different rehabilitation modes following knee or hip arthroplasty, and identify factors which influence the chosen rehabilitation pathway. Mixed methods cross-sectional study involving 95 semi-structured interviews of consumers (patients and carers) and clinicians (arthroplasty surgeons, physiotherapists and rehabilitation physicians) in Sydney, Australia, during 2014-2015. Participants were asked about the acceptability of different modes of rehabilitation provision, and factors influencing their chosen rehabilitation pathway. Interviews were in person or via the telephone. Qualitative analysis software was used to electronically manage qualitative data. An analytical approach guided data analysis. Pre-operative preferences strongly influenced the type of rehabilitation chosen by consumers. Key factors that influenced this were both intrinsic and extrinsic, including; the previous experience of self or known others, the perceived benefits of the chosen mode, a sense of entitlement, the role of orthopaedic surgeons and influence of patient preference, a patient's clinical status post-surgery, the private hospital business model and insurance provider involvement. The acceptability of rehabilitation modes varied between clinician groups. No one rehabilitation mode provided following arthroplasty is singularly preferred by stakeholders. Factors other than the belief that a particular mode was more effective than another appear to dominate the pathway followed by private arthroplasty consumers, indicating evidence-based policies around rehabilitation provision may have limited appeal in the private sector.

  10. Development and Integration of Professional Core Values Among Practicing Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Patricia Quinn; Guenther, Lee Ann; Wainwright, Susan F

    2016-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has adopted professional core values, which define expected values for its members, and developed a self-assessment tool with sample behaviors for each of the 7 core values. However, evidence related to the integration of these core values into practice is limited. The aims of this study were: (1) to gain insight into physical therapists' development of professional core values and (2) to gain insight into participants' integration of professional core values into clinical practice. A qualitative design permitted in-depth exploration of the development and integration of the American Physical Therapy Association's professional core values into physical therapist practice. Twenty practicing physical therapists were purposefully selected to explore the role of varied professional, postprofessional, and continuing education experiences related to exposure to professional values. The Core Values Self-Assessment and résumé sort served as prompts for reflection via semistructured interviews. Three themes were identified: (1) personal values were the foundation for developing professional values, which were further shaped by academic and clinical experiences, (2) core values were integrated into practice independent of practice setting and varied career paths, and (3) participants described the following professional core values as well integrated into their practice: integrity, compassion/caring, and accountability. Social responsibility was an area consistently identified as not being integrated into their practice. The Core Values Self-Assessment tool is a consensus-based document developed through a Delphi process. Future studies to establish reliability and construct validity of the tool may be warranted. Gaining an in-depth understanding of how practicing clinicians incorporate professional core values into clinical practice may shed light on the relationship between core values mastery and its impact on patient care. Findings may

  11. The nature of excellent clinicians at an academic health science center: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahant, Sanjay; Jovcevska, Vesna; Wadhwa, Anupma

    2012-12-01

    To understand the nature of excellent clinicians at an academic health science center by exploring how and why excellent clinicians achieve high performance. From 2008 to 2010, the authors conducted a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Members of the Clinical Advisory Committee in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Toronto nominated peers whom they saw as excellent clinicians. The authors then conducted in-depth interviews with the most frequently nominated clinicians. They audio-recorded and transcribed the interviews and coded the transcripts to identify emergent themes. From interviews with 13 peer-nominated, excellent clinicians, a model emerged. Dominant themes fell into three categories: (1) core philosophy, (2) deliberate activities, and (3) everyday practice. Excellent clinicians are driven by a core philosophy defined by high intrinsic motivation and passion for patient care and humility. They refine their clinical skills through two deliberate activities-reflective clinical practice and scholarship. Their high performance in everyday practice is characterized by clinical skills and cognitive ability, people skills, engagement, and adaptability. A rich theory emerged explaining how excellent clinicians, driven by a core philosophy and engaged in deliberate activities, achieve high performance in everyday practice. This theory of the nature of excellent clinicians provides a holistic perspective of individual performance, informs medical education, supports faculty career development, and promotes clinical excellence in the culture of academic medicine.

  12. Clinical ethics and happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devettere, R J

    1993-02-01

    Most contemporary accounts of clinical ethics do not explain why clinicians should be ethical. Those few that do attempt an explanation usually claim that clinicians should be ethical because ethical behavior provides an important good for the patient--better care. Both these approaches ignore the customary traditional reason for being ethical, namely, the good of the moral agent. This good was commonly called 'happiness'. The following article shows how the personal happiness of the moral agent provided a major reason for being ethical in the ancient philosophical and biblical traditions and how it continues to play a role in the more modern rights-based, Kantian and utilitarian theories. This history suggests that the personal happiness of the clinician, rightly understood, is a legitimate and important goal of clinical ethics.

  13. Financial capacity in older adults: a growing concern for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paul A; Byrne, Gerard J; Mitchell, Leander K; Pachana, Nancy A

    2015-02-02

    Older people with cognitive impairment and/or dementia may be particularly vulnerable to diminished financial decision-making capacity. Financial capacity refers to the ability to satisfactorily manage one's financial affairs in a manner consistent with personal self-interest and values. Impairment of financial capacity makes the older individual vulnerable to financial exploitation, may negatively affect their family's financial situation and places strain on relationships within the family. Clinicians are often on the front line of responding to queries regarding decision-making capacity, and clinical evaluation options are often not well understood. Assessment of financial capacity should include formal objective assessment in addition to a clinical interview and gathering contextual data. Development of a flexible, empirically supported and clinically relevant assessment approach that spans all dimensions of financial capacity yet is simple enough to be used by non-specialist clinicians is needed.

  14. Clinical role of non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Massimo; Di Pascoli, Marco; Sacerdoti, David

    2017-01-07

    Measurement of portal pressure is pivotal in the evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis. The measurement of the hepatic venous pressure gradient represents the reference method by which portal pressure is estimated. However, it is an invasive procedure that requires significant hospital resources, including experienced staff, and is associated with considerable cost. Non-invasive methods that can be reliably used to estimate the presence and the degree of portal hypertension are urgently needed in clinical practice. Biochemical and morphological parameters have been proposed for this purpose, but have shown disappointing results overall. Splanchnic Doppler ultrasonography and the analysis of microbubble contrast agent kinetics with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography have shown better accuracy for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension. A key advancement in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension has been the introduction in clinical practice of methods able to measure stiffness in the liver, as well as stiffness/congestion in the spleen. According to the data published to date, it appears to be possible to rule out clinically significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis ( i.e ., hepatic venous pressure gradient ≥ 10 mmHg) with a level of clinically-acceptable accuracy by combining measurements of liver stiffness and spleen stiffness along with Doppler ultrasound evaluation. It is probable that the combination of these methods may also allow for the identification of patients with the most serious degree of portal hypertension, and ongoing research is helping to ensure progress in this field.

  15. Attitudes of Emergency Department Staff towards the Role of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    participation of future Pharm-D graduates in direct patient care in the Saudi health care system. Keywords: Clinical ... errors [3]. According to the findings of the. U.S. Institute of Medicine, ED has the highest ..... human: Building a safer health system. Washington, DC: ... department: A systems approach to minimizing risk.

  16. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    care plans for psychosocial nursing diagnoses. Ostomy Wound Manage, 40(3), 18-22, 24-16. Heath, J., Andrews, J., & Balkstra, C. R. Potential reduction...the clinical nurse specialist. Clin Nurse Spec, 17(2), 83-85. O’Malley, P. (2004). New hope for patients with pulmonary hypertension: endothelin

  17. The role of hypnotherapy in evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M J

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to discuss the place of hypnotherapy in a modern medical world dominated by so-called evidence-based clinical practice. Hypnosis is an easily learned technique that is a valuable adjuvant to many medical, dental and psychological interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A clinical study on etiology, prognosis, outcome and role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal bleed is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz. The aim of this study was to know the cause of upper GI bleed, prognosis of the patients and role of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB). A study of 140 cases was carried out ...

  19. Role of Forensic Pathology in Clinical Practice and Public Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The request for and performance of autopsy have been on the decline despite its obvious merits to medical practice, the patients and public health. Several surveys have exposed some reasons for this decline. Method: This work is a review of the role of forensic pathology to medical practice and public health. The author ...

  20. Relationships between radiologists and clinicians: Results from three surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, L.; Stacul, F.; Meduri, S.; Geitung, J. Te.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To analyse reasons for and the nature of clinico-radiological contacts and their clinical impact. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three different surveys were performed. (1) Data concerning contacts between staff radiologists (n = 20) and clinicians during 10 consecutive working days were collected; (2) staff clinicians (n = 174) filled in a questionnaire asking for their opinions about relationships with radiologists; (3) staff radiologists collected data about contacts with clinicians related to more urgent/complicated cases. Radiologists assessed the clinical impact of the radiological procedure and of the consultation. RESULTS: (1) During 220 working days 20 radiologists had a mean of 3.95 contacts per day (48.2% personal contacts, 51.8% telephone contacts), amounting to a personal total of 21.65 min per day. These contacts amounted to a total of 7.08 h per day, roughly one whole-time equivalent radiologist. (2) These consultations helped to refine the diagnostic strategy often (12.6%) or sometimes (71.4%) and to alter therapeutic decisions often (10.4%) or sometimes (56.6%). (3) The initial clinical diagnosis was changed in 50% of cases and the therapy was substantially changed on the basis of further radiological investigations and clinical-radiological discussion in 60% of cases. CONCLUSION: Clinical-radiological consultations are time consuming but have a beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic impact. Dalla Palma, L. (2000)

  1. Interventions to support and develop clinician-researcher leadership in one health district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Margaret; Dombkins, Anthony

    2017-07-10

    Purpose Clinical leadership, researcher capacity and a culture of clinical inquiry are needed in the clinical workforce. The purpose of this paper is to report on a program which was used to develop and support clinicians to explore practice, implement innovation, translate evidence and build researcher capacity. Design/methodology/approach This pragmatic paper presents a case study of a nursing and midwifery clinician-researcher development program. The multi-site, multi-modal program focused on education, mentoring and support, communication networks, and clinician-university partnerships strategies to build workforce capacity and leadership. Findings Over 2,000 staff have been involved in the program representing a range of health disciplines. The study day program has been delivered to 500 participants with master classes having over 1,500 attendees. The research mentor program has demonstrated that participants increased their confidence for research leadership roles and are pursuing research and quality assurance projects. Communication strategies improved the visibility of nursing and midwifery. Research limitations/implications This case study was conducted in one health district, which may not have relevance to other geographical areas. The small numbers involved in the research mentor program need to be considered when reviewing the findings. Practical implications The program has been a catalyst for developing a research culture, clinical leadership and research networks that strengthen workforce capacity. Building researcher skills in the workforce will better support quality healthcare and the examination of everyday practice. Social implications Building a culture of healthcare that is based on inquiry and evidence-based practice will lead to more appropriate and consistent healthcare delivery. Consumers have the right to expect health clinicians will challenge everyday practice and have the skills and capability to translate or generate best evidence

  2. Clinicians' management strategies for patients with dyspepsia: a qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlsson Bodil

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms from the upper gastrointestinal tract are frequently encountered in clinical practice and may be of either organic or functional origin. For some of these conditions, according to the literature, certain management strategies can be recommended. For other conditions, the evidence is more ambiguous. The hypothesis that guided our study design was twofold: Management strategies and treatments suggested by different clinicians vary considerably, even when optimal treatment is clear-cut, as documented by evidence in the literature. Clinicians believe that the management strategies of their colleagues are similar to their own. Methods Simulated case histories of four patients with symptoms from the upper gastrointestinal tract were presented to 27 Swedish clinicians who were specialists in medical gastroenterology, surgery, and general practice and worked at three hospitals in the southern part of Sweden. The patients' histories contained information on the patient's sex and age and the localisation of the symptoms, but descriptions of subjective symptoms and findings from examinations differed from history to history. Interviews containing open-ended questions were conducted. Results For the same patient, the management strategies and treatments suggested by the clinicians varied widely, as did the strategies suggested by clinicians in the same speciality. Variation was more pronounced if the case history noted symptoms but no organic findings than if the case history noted unambiguous findings and symptoms. However, even in cases with a consensus in the scientific literature on treatment, the variations in clinicians' opinion on management were pronounced. Conclusion Despite these variations, the clinicians believed that the decisions made by their colleagues would be similar to their own. The overall results of this study indicate that we as researchers must make scientific evidence comprehensible and communicate

  3. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Thys; Miravitlles, Marc; Kocks, Janwillem WH

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients’ everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed. PMID:24143085

  4. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome: role of a thorough clinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaghebeur, Jörgen; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) presents with a variety of symptoms affecting multiple systems. There is no universal treatment that can be given to all patients with CPPS. The results of treatment depend greatly on an accurate diagnosis. A thorough clinical assessment, including a "four-step plan", should include paying special attention to the musculoskeletal system. This assessment is not difficult to perform and provides valuable information on possible muscular problems and neuropathy.

  5. Rain dance: the role of randomization in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz JB

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Juliana Belo Diniz,1 Victor Fossaluza,2 Carlos Alberto de Bragança Pereira,1,2 Sergio Wechsler2 1Institute of Psychiatry, Clinics Hospital University of São Paulo Medical School, 2Department of Statistics, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Randomized clinical trials are the gold standard for testing efficacy of treatment interventions. However, although randomization protects against deliberately biased samples, it does not guarantee random imbalances will not occur. Methods of intentional allocation that can overcome such deficiency of randomization have been developed, but are less frequently applied than randomization. Initially, we introduce a fictitious case example to revise and discuss the reasons of researchers' resistance to intentionally allocate instead of simply randomizing. We then introduce a real case example to evaluate the performance of an intentional protocol for allocation based on compositional data balance. A real case of allocation of 50 patients in two arms was compared with an optimal allocation of global instead of sequential arrivals. Performance was measured by a weighted average of Aitchison distances, between arms, of prognostic factors. To compare the intentional allocation with simple random allocation, 50,000 arrival orderings of 50 patients were simulated. To each one of the orders, both kinds of allocations into two arms were considered. Intentional allocation performed as well as optimal allocation in the case considered. In addition, out of the 50,000 simulated orders, 61% of them performed better with intentional allocation than random allocation. Hence, we conclude that intentional allocation should be encouraged in the design of future interventional clinical trials as a way to prevent unbalanced samples. Our sequential method is a viable alternative to overcome technical difficulties for study designs that require sequential inclusion of

  6. The role of the standard EEG in clinical psychiatry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The EEG is a commonly requested test on patients attending psychiatric services, predominantly to investigate for a possible organic brain syndrome causing behavioural changes. AIMS: To assess referrals for EEG from psychiatric services in comparison with those from other sources. We determine which clinical factors were associated with an abnormal EEG in patients referred from psychiatric sources. METHODS: A retrospective review of EEG requests in a 1-year period was performed. Analysis of referral reasons for psychiatric patients was undertaken, and outcome of patients referred from psychiatric services post-EEG was reviewed. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred and seventy EEGs were reviewed, of which 91 (6.2%) were referred from psychiatry. Neurology service referrals had detection rates of abnormal EEGs of 27%, with psychiatric referrals having the lowest abnormality detection rate of 17.6% (p < 0.1). In psychiatric-referred patients the only significant predictors found of an abnormal EEG were a known history of epilepsy (p < 0.001), being on clozapine (p < 0.05), and a possible convulsive seizure (RR = 6.51). Follow-up data of 53 patients did not reveal a significant clinical impact of EEG results on patient management. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients are referred for EEG from psychiatric sources despite a relatively low index of suspicion of an organic brain disorders, based on reasons for referral documented, with an unsurprising low clinical yield.

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies ... parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, ...

  8. The clinician-educator track: training internal medicine residents as clinician-educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C Christopher; McCormick, Ian; Huang, Grace C

    2014-06-01

    Although resident-as-teacher programs bring postgraduate trainees' teaching skills to a minimum threshold, intensive, longitudinal training is lacking for residents who wish to pursue careers in medical education. The authors describe the development, implementation, and preliminary assessment of the novel track for future clinician-educators that they introduced in the internal medicine residency program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in 2010. Categorical medical interns with a career interest in medical education apply to participate in the clinician-educator track (CET) at the midpoint of their first postgraduate year. CET residents complete a 2.5-year curriculum in which they review foundations of medical education, design and assess new curricula, and evaluate learners and programs. They apply these skills in a variety of clinical settings and receive frequent feedback from faculty and peers. All CET residents design and implement at least one medical education research project. A comprehensive evaluation plan to assess the impact of the CET on resident teaching skills, scholarly productivity, career selection, and advancement is under way. A preliminary evaluation demonstrates high satisfaction with the track among the first cohort of CET residents, who graduated in 2012. Compared with residents in the traditional resident-as-teacher program, CET residents reported higher gains in their confidence in core medical education skills. Although these preliminary data are promising, data will be collected over the next several years to explore whether the additional curricular time, faculty time, and costs and potential expansion to other institutions are justified.

  9. Expert searcher, teacher, content manager, and patient advocate: an exploratory study of clinical librarian roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maria C; Maggio, Lauren A

    2013-01-01

    The research explored the roles of practicing clinical librarians embedded in a patient care team. Six clinical librarians from Canada and one from the United States were interviewed to elicit detailed descriptions of their clinical roles and responsibilities and the context in which these were performed. Participants were embedded in a wide range of clinical service areas, working with a diverse complement of health professionals. As clinical librarians, participants wore many hats, including expert searcher, teacher, content manager, and patient advocate. Unique aspects of how these roles played out included a sense of urgency surrounding searching activities, the broad dissemination of responses to clinical questions, and leverage of the roles of expert searcher, teacher, and content manager to advocate for patients. Detailed role descriptions of clinical librarians embedded in patient care teams suggest possible new practices for existing clinical librarians, provide direction for training new librarians working in patient care environments, and raise awareness of the clinical librarian specialty among current and budding health information professionals.

  10. Self-monitored blood pressure: a role in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padfield, Paul L

    2002-02-01

    Electronic self-monitoring of blood pressure is increasing in popularity and most international guidelines on the management of hypertension approve cautious use of the technique in the assessment of potentially hypertensive individuals. A recent editorial in the Archives of Internal Medicine suggested that it was "appropriate to encourage the widespread use of self recorded BP as an important adjunct to the clinical care of the patient with hypertension". Such a statement is based on increasing evidence that self-monitoring of blood pressure gives similar information to daytime ambulatory blood pressure -- a now well-established technology in the management of hypertension. Suggested strategies for the use of self-monitoring of blood pressure include monitoring in individuals whose clinical risk status is low enough that they need not necessarily be given medical therapy simply on the basis of a clinic pressure (i.e. at a 10 year risk of cardiovascular disease below 20%). The threshold for defining 'normotension/hypertension' is now regarded as being broadly similar for ABPM and SBPM and is set at 135/85 mmHg. In a recent meta-analysis of all available studies the average difference between these techniques, using the same patients, is -1.7/1.2 mmHg. There is some evidence that careful use of self-monitoring may improve blood pressure control in patients who are otherwise resistant to care. Self-monitoring of blood pressure has now been shown in at least one major prospective study to predict outcome better than clinic pressures and in that setting it now has equivalence to the use of ABPM. There remain issues regarding the availability of validated devices, the quality of training of patients in their use and the possibility that inaccurate recording might occur, either deliberately or by accident. Self-monitoring of blood pressure may well not give the same readings as carefully measured blood pressure by research nurses but its use is clearly superior to

  11. Patients' Contexts and Their Effects on Clinicians' Impressions of Conduct Disorder Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Marsh, Jessecae K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether contextual information about patients' clinical presentations affected clinicians' judgments of conduct disorder symptoms. Forty-five clinicians read vignettes describing hypothetical patients who displayed one conduct disorder symptom alongside information about the patients' home, school, and peer…

  12. Inclusion of Minority Patients in Breast Cancer Clinical Trials: The Role of the Clinical Trial Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaplan, Celia P

    2007-01-01

    .... While inroads to increasing minority inclusion in breast cancer clinical trials have been made, recent reports continue to demonstrate lower enrollment among African Americans, Asian Americans...

  13. The role of self-esteem in the development of psychiatric problems: a three-year prospective study in a clinical sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ingvild Oxås; Ranøyen, Ingunn; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø; Stenseng, Frode

    2017-01-01

    Self-esteem is fundamentally linked to mental health, but its' role in trajectories of psychiatric problems is unclear. In particular, few studies have addressed the role of self-esteem in the development of attention problems. Hence, we examined the role of global self-esteem in the development of symptoms of anxiety/depression and attention problems, simultaneously, in a clinical sample of adolescents while accounting for gender, therapy, and medication. Longitudinal data were obtained from a sample of 201 adolescents-aged 13-18-referred to the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Trondheim, Norway. In the baseline study, self-esteem, and symptoms of anxiety/depression and attention problems were measured by means of self-report. Participants were reassessed 3 years later, with a participation rate of 77% in the clinical sample. Analyses showed that high self-esteem at baseline predicted fewer symptoms of both anxiety/depression and attention problems 3 years later after controlling for prior symptom levels, gender, therapy (or not), and medication. Results highlight the relevance of global self-esteem in the clinical practice, not only with regard to emotional problems, but also to attention problems. Implications for clinicians, parents, and others are discussed.

  14. Exploring dialectical behaviour therapy clinicians' experiences of team consultation meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Cian; Ryan, Patrick; Flynn, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a detailed idiographic analysis of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) clinicians' experiences of team consultation meetings. DBT is an evidence-based psychological intervention with a demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Team consultation meetings encompass one of the primary components involved in this treatment model; where DBT clinicians regularly meet to discuss client work and enhance further learning. The present study's aim was to assess what are DBT clinicians' experiences of the consultation meeting component and whether it is useful or not. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 11 DBT clinicians (nine females, two males) from three different consultation teams. The research project utilised an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) framework. Audio-recorded interview data was analysed using this framework. Four superordinate themes emerged from the interview data, which included ten subordinate themes. The superordinate themes focused on: (1) the acquisition of DBT technical knowledge and other MDT related expertise (2) participants' emotional experiences of DBT and consultation meetings, and how this can evolve over time (3) the underlying processes that occur in the consultation team including the development of a team bond and the impact of membership changes and (4) the largely consistent and reliable nature of consultation meetings and how they help maintain clinician motivation. Team consultation meetings were found to be supportive; playing an important role in maintaining clinician motivation through the availability of team support, opportunities to reflect and learn, and assistance in regulating emotions. Challenges arose in relation to team membership changes and acclimatisation to the type of feedback utilised in team consultation. The study's implications for practise are considered.

  15. Strengthening the working alliance through a clinician's familiarity with the 12-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cory B; Roland, Brian D; Loneck, Barry M

    2018-01-01

    The working alliance plays an important role in the substance use disorder treatment process. Many substance use disorder treatment providers incorporate the 12-Step approach to recovery into treatment. With the 12-Step approach known among many clients and clinicians, it may well factor into the therapeutic relationship. We investigated how, from the perspective of clients, a clinician's level of familiarity with and in-session time spent on the 12-Step approach might affect the working alliance between clients and clinicians, including possible differences based on a clinician's recovery status. We conducted a secondary study using data from 180 clients and 31 clinicians. Approximately 81% of client participants were male, and approximately 65% of clinician participants were female. We analyzed data with Stata using a population-averaged model. From the perspective of clients with a substance use disorder, clinicians' familiarity with the 12-Step approach has a positive relationship with the working alliance. The client-estimated amount of in-session time spent on the 12-Step approach did not have a statistically significant effect on ratings of the working alliance. A clinician's recovery status did not moderate the relationship between 12-Step familiarity and the working alliance. These results suggest that clinicians can influence, in part, how their clients perceive the working alliance by being familiar with the 12-Step approach. This might be particularly salient for clinicians who provide substance use disorder treatment at agencies that incorporate, on some level, the 12-Step approach to recovery.

  16. Implementing the new clinical nurse leader role while gleaning insights from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Leahy, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of clinical nurse leaders (CNLs) as they implemented this new role. Twenty-four CNLs participated. Data were collected via an e-mail-distributed questionnaire. Data from open-ended questions were used to conduct a qualitative content analysis. Data were categorized according to question, key thoughts and phrases were established, and themes were determined. Findings revealed that nonsystematic role introduction was common. Two challenges to role implementation included role confusion and being overworked. The most positive aspect of the role was remaining close to the point of care. Participants noted that the overall response of the health care team to the role was positive despite participants' belief that the greatest roadblock to role success was the lack of support by nurse administrators. The support of nurse administrators and clear role expectations were viewed as essential for role sustain-ability. Understanding the experiences of CNLs as they launch this new role can provide insights for educators, administrators, CNLs, and other health care providers regarding the success and sustainability of the role. In addition, understanding the similarities between the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role initiation in the past and the CNL role initiation today can foster the development of strategies for confronting the challenges of new role implementation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current role of melatonin in pediatric neurology: clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Oliviero; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Besag, Frank; Biran, Valerie; Braam, Wiebe; Cortese, Samuele; Moavero, Romina; Parisi, Pasquale; Smits, Marcel; Van der Heijden, Kristiaan; Curatolo, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin, an indoleamine secreted by the pineal gland, plays a key role in regulating circadian rhythm. It has chronobiotic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging properties. A conference in Rome in 2014 aimed to establish consensus on the roles of melatonin in children and on treatment guidelines. The best evidence for efficacy is in sleep onset insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome. It is most effective when administered 3-5 h before physiological dim light melatonin onset. There is no evidence that extended-release melatonin confers advantage over immediate release. Many children with developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability have sleep disturbance and can benefit from melatonin treatment. Melatonin decreases sleep onset latency and increases total sleep time but does not decrease night awakenings. Decreased CYP 1A2 activity, genetically determined or from concomitant medication, can slow metabolism, with loss of variation in melatonin level and loss of effect. Decreasing the dose can remedy this. Animal work and limited human data suggest that melatonin does not exacerbate seizures and might decrease them. Melatonin has been used successfully in treating headache. Animal work has confirmed a neuroprotective effect of melatonin, suggesting a role in minimising neuronal damage from birth asphyxia; results from human studies are awaited. Melatonin can also be of value in the performance of sleep EEGs and as sedation for brainstem auditory evoked potential assessments. No serious adverse effects of melatonin in humans have been identified. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Economic evaluation of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles: A methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, Elena; Donald, Faith; DiCenso, Alba; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Carter, Nancy; Reid, Kim; Marshall, Deborah A

    2017-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (e.g., nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists) have been introduced internationally to increase access to high quality care and to tackle increasing health care expenditures. While randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated the effectiveness of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles, their cost-effectiveness has been challenged. The poor quality of economic evaluations of these roles to date raises the question of whether current economic evaluation guidelines are adequate when examining their cost-effectiveness. To examine whether current guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles. Our methodological review was informed by a qualitative synthesis of four sources of information: 1) narrative review of literature reviews and discussion papers on economic evaluation of advanced practice nursing roles; 2) quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials; 3) review of guidelines for economic evaluation; and, 4) input from an expert panel. The narrative literature review revealed several challenges in economic evaluations of advanced practice nursing roles (e.g., complexity of the roles, variability in models and practice settings where the roles are implemented, and impact on outcomes that are difficult to measure). The quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials identified methodological limitations of these studies. When we applied the Guidelines for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies: Canada to the identified challenges and limitations, discussed those with experts and qualitatively synthesized all findings, we concluded that standard guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic

  19. Clinical role of Cefixime in community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshaj, Sh; Doda-Ejupi, T; Tolaj, I Q; Mustafa, A; Kabashi, S; Shala, N; Geca, Nj; Aliu, A; Daka, A; Basha, N

    2011-01-01

    Cefixime is an oral third generation cephalosporin, frequently used in respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the pediatric population. However, in some publications cefixime has demonstrated poor efficacy against staphylococci and streptococci. of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cefixime in the treatment of community-acquired infections in a country where parenteral third generation cephalosporins have been used for a long time. The present study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy, bacteriological eradication rates and tolerability of cefixime in children with community-acquired upper RTI (URTI), lower RTI (LRTI) and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The study was prospective, open, and included 89 patients, from 6 months to 28 years, of both sexes, with the diagnosis of community-acquired URTI, LRTI and UTI. The treatment with cefixime was successful in 30/30 (100%) patients suffering from acute otitis media (AOM), in 10/12 (83.3%) with acute sinusitis, in 12/12 patients (100%) with pneumonia, in 31/35 (88.57) with uncomplicated UTI. The antibiotic was well tolerated. In 10 days treatment we recorded one case (1.3%) with acute gastroenteritis and two cases (2.6%) of maculopapular rash. Side-effects were transient and disappeared after finishing therapy in all three of the cases. Community-acquired infections, such as AOM, LRTI and UTI, caused by susceptible pathogens, can be treated with cefixime, as a good choice for a successful clinical response.

  20. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Molen T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thys van der Molen,1,2 Marc Miravitlles,3 Janwillem WH Kocks1,21Department of General Practice, 2GRIAC (Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; 3Pneumology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients' everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, symptoms, questionnaires

  1. Ethical Diversity and the Role of Conscience in Clinical Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Lipp, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In a climate of plurality about the concept of what is “good,” one of the most daunting challenges facing contemporary medicine is the provision of medical care within the mosaic of ethical diversity. Juxtaposed with escalating scientific knowledge and clinical prowess has been the concomitant erosion of unity of thought in medical ethics. With innumerable technologies now available in the armamentarium of healthcare, combined with escalating realities of financial constraints, cultural differences, moral divergence, and ideological divides among stakeholders, medical professionals and their patients are increasingly faced with ethical quandaries when making medical decisions. Amidst the plurality of values, ethical collision arises when the values of individual health professionals are dissonant with the expressed requests of patients, the common practice amongst colleagues, or the directives from regulatory and political authorities. In addition, concern is increasing among some medical practitioners due to mounting attempts by certain groups to curtail freedom of independent conscience—by preventing medical professionals from doing what to them is apparently good, or by compelling practitioners to do what they, in conscience, deem to be evil. This paper and the case study presented will explore issues related to freedom of conscience and consider practical approaches to ethical collision in clinical medicine. PMID:24455248

  2. The role of fluorescence diagnosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieroń A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aleksander Sieroń,1 Karolina Sieroń-Stołtny,1 Aleksandra Kawczyk-Krupka,1 Wojciech Latos,1 Sebastian Kwiatek,1 Dariusz Straszak,1 Andrzej M Bugaj1,2 1Clinical Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine, Center for Laser Diagnostics and Therapy, Silesian Medical University, Bytom, 2College of Health, Beauty Care and Education, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Fluorescence diagnosis is a fast, easy, noninvasive, selective, and sensitive diagnostic tool for estimation of treatment results in oncology. In clinical practice the use of photodynamic diagnosis is focused on five targets: detection for prevention of malignant transformation precancerous changes, detection of neoplasmatic tissue in the early stages for fast removal, prevention of expansion and detection of recurrence of the cancer, monitoring therapy, and the possibility of excluding neoplasmatic disease. In this article, selected applications of fluorescence diagnosis at the Center for Laser Diagnostics and Therapy in Bytom, Poland, for each of these targets are presented. Keywords: autofluorescence, cancer, fluorescence, imaging, photodynamic diagnosis, photodynamic therapy 

  3. Childhood agricultural injuries: an update for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Suzanne; Marlenga, Barbara; Lee, Barbara C

    2013-02-01

    Every three days a child dies in an agriculture-related incident, and every day 45 children are injured in the United States. These tragedies should not be regarded as "accidents," as they often follow predictable and preventable patterns. Prevention is not only possible, but vital, since many of these injuries are almost immediately fatal. Major sources of fatal injuries are machinery, motor vehicles, and drowning. Tractor injuries alone account for one-third of all deaths. The leading sources of nonfatal injuries are structures and surfaces, animals (primarily horses), and vehicles (primarily all-terrain vehicles [ATVs]). Children living on farms are at a higher risk than hired workers, and are unprotected by child labor laws. Preschool children and older male youth are at the highest risk for fatal injury, while nonfatal injury was most common among boys aged 10-15 years. Multiple prevention strategies have been developed, yet economic and cultural barriers often impede their implementation. Educational campaigns alone are often ineffective, and must be coupled with re-engineering of machines and safety devices to reduce fatalities. Legislation has the potential to improve child safety, yet political and economic pressures often prohibit changes in child labor laws and mandated safety requirements. Clinicians play a pivotal role in injury prevention, and should actively address common rural risk-taking behaviors as part of the routine office visit in order to help prevent these tragedies. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Varieties of clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Jonathan W

    2015-06-01

    Clinical reasoning comprises a variety of different modes of inference. The modes that are practiced will be influenced by the sociological characteristics of the clinical settings and the tasks to be performed by the clinician. This article presents C.S. Peirce's typology of modes of inference: deduction, induction and abduction. It describes their differences and their roles as stages in scientific argument. The article applies the typology to reasoning in clinical settings. The article describes their differences, and their roles as stages in scientific argument. It then applies the typology to reasoning in typical clinical settings. Abduction is less commonly taught or discussed than induction and deduction. However, it is a common mode of inference in clinical settings, especially when the clinician must try to make sense of a surprising phenomenon. Whether abduction is followed up with deductive and inductive verification is strongly influenced by situational constraints and the cognitive and psychological stamina of the clinician. Recognizing the inevitability of abduction in clinical practice and its value to discovery is important to an accurate understanding of clinical reasoning. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A systematic review of clinician and staff views on the acceptability of incorporating remote monitoring technology into primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Melinda M; Freeman, Michele; Kaye, Jeffrey; Vuckovic, Nancy; Buckley, David I

    2014-05-01

    Remote monitoring technology (RMT) may enhance healthcare quality and reduce costs. RMT adoption depends on perceptions of the end-user (e.g., patients, caregivers, healthcare providers). We conducted a systematic review exploring the acceptability and feasibility of RMT use in routine adult patient care, from the perspectives of primary care clinicians, administrators, and clinic staff. We searched the databases of Medline, IEEE Xplore, and Compendex for original articles published from January 1996 through February 2013. We manually screened bibliographies of pertinent studies and consulted experts to identify English-language studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Of 939 citations identified, 15 studies reported in 16 publications met inclusion criteria. Studies were heterogeneous by country, type of RMT used, patient and provider characteristics, and method of implementation and evaluation. Clinicians, staff, and administrators generally held positive views about RMTs. Concerns emerged regarding clinical relevance of RMT data, changing clinical roles and patterns of care (e.g., reduced quality of care from fewer patient visits, overtreatment), insufficient staffing or time to monitor and discuss RMT data, data incompatibility with a clinic's electronic health record (EHR), and unclear legal liability regarding response protocols. This small body of heterogeneous literature suggests that for RMTs to be adopted in primary care, researchers and developers must ensure clinical relevance, support adequate infrastructure, streamline data transmission into EHR systems, attend to changing care patterns and professional roles, and clarify response protocols. There is a critical need to engage end-users in the development and implementation of RMT.

  6. A Qualitative Case Study of Smartphone-Connected Hearing Aids: Influences on Patients, Clinicians, and Patient-Clinician Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella L; Phelan, Shanon; Leonard, MaryAnn; Galster, Jason

    2017-06-01

    patients' perceptions of themselves as technologically competent or incompetent, and descriptions of how they learned to use the new technology. Between cases, the study found a difference in the response to how the connected hearing aid changed the clinician-patient relationship. While clinicians valued the increased time they spent "getting to know" their patients, patients experienced some frustration specific to the additional troubleshooting related to Bluetooth connectivity. Across cases, there was a resounding theme of "normalization" of hearing aids via their integration with a "normal" technology (mobile phones) and general lack of concern about privacy in relation to the smartphone application and its tracking and geotagging features. Both audiologists and patients credited the connected hearing aids with increased opportunities to participate more fully in everyday life. The introduction of smartphone-connected hearing aids influenced the identities and candidate profiles of hearing aid users, and the nature of time spent in clinical interactions, in important and interesting ways. The influence of connected hearing aids on patient experience and audiology practice calls for continued research and clinical consideration, with implications for clinical decision-making regarding hearing aid candidacy. Further study should look critically at normalization and possible unintended stigmatizing effects of making hearing aids increasingly discreet. American Academy of Audiology

  7. The clinician's guide to composing effective business plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Alan B; Blondell, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In today's challenging healthcare environment, clinicians need to understand the fundamentals of financial analysis, which are the underpinnings of their clinical programs, especially when seeking administrative support for new initiatives. The business plan for new clinical program initiatives is composed of diverse elements such as the mission statement, market and competitive analyses, operations plan, and financial analysis. Armed with a basic knowledge of financial analysis of clinical programs, as well as forward-looking analysis of an initiative's added value, the healthcare provider can work much more effectively with administration in developing or creating new healthcare program initiatives.

  8. The Transition of Primary Care Group Practices to Next Generation Models: Satisfaction of Staff, Clinicians, and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Therese; Kralewski, John; Dowd, Bryan

    Restructuring primary care is essential to achieve the triple aim. This case study examines the human factors of extensive redesign on 2 midsized primary care clinics (clinics A and B) in the Midwest United States that are owned by a large health care system. The transition occurred when while the principles for patient-centered medical home were being rolled out nationally, and before the Affordable Care Act. After the transition, interviews and discussions were conducted with 5 stakeholder groups: health system leaders, clinic managers, clinicians, nurses, and reception staff. Using a culture assessment instrument, the responses of personnel at clinics A and B were compared with comparison clinics from another health system that had not undergone transition. Patient satisfaction scores are presented. Clinics A and B were similar in size and staffing. Three human factor themes emerged from interviews: responses to change, professional and personal challenges due to role redefinition, and the importance of communication. The comparison clinics had an equal or higher mean culture scores compared with the transition clinics (A and B). Patient satisfaction in improved in Clinic A. The transition took more time than expected. Health system leaders underestimated the stress and the role adjustments for clinicians and nurses. Change leaders need to anticipate the challenge of role redefinition until health profession schools graduate trainees with more experience in new models of team-based care. Incorporating experience with team based, interprofessional care into training is essential to properly prepare future health professionals. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  9. [The role of gonadal peptides in clinical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlou, N; Bouvattier, C; Linglart, A; Rodrigue, D; Teinturier, C

    2009-01-01

    Inhibins, activins, and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) are gonadal dimeric peptides produced in ovaries and testes by homologous cells, granulosa cells and Sertoli cells, respectively. The production of inhibins is driven by FSH, that of AMH may indirectly depends on FSH, while it is down regulated, at least in the male, by testosterone. In the past decade, measurements of serum inhibin and AMH have provided useful tools for clinical investigation in gonadal disorders: pseudohermaphroditism, androgen insensitivity, anorchidism, gonadal dysgenesis, disorders of pubertal developpement. Inhibins, activins, and AMH are also reliable markers of gonadal tumors. They are extensively used as indexes of fertility: in the male the production of inhibin B reflects the spermatogenetic activity, in women both inhibin B and AMH levels are correlated with the number of preantral and early antral follicles and reflect the ovarian reserve of follicles available for recruitment.

  10. What motivates senior clinicians to teach medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Cathy

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to assess the motivations of senior medical clinicians to teach medical students. This understanding could improve the recruitment and retention of important clinical teachers. Methods The study group was 101 senior medical clinicians registered on a teaching list for a medical school teaching hospital (The Canberra Hospital, ACT, Australia. Their motivations to teach medical students were assessed applying Q methodology. Results Of the 75 participants, 18 (24% were female and 57 (76% were male. The age distribution was as follows: 30–40 years = 16 participants (21.3%, 41–55 years = 46 participants (61.3% and >55 years = 13 participants (17.3%. Most participants (n = 48, 64% were staff specialists and 27 (36% were visiting medical officers. Half of the participants were internists (n = 39, 52%, 12 (16% were surgeons, and 24 (32% were other sub-specialists. Of the 26 senior clinicians that did not participate, two were women; 15 were visiting medical officers and 11 were staff specialists; 16 were internists, 9 were surgeons and there was one other sub-specialist. The majority of these non-participating clinicians fell in the 41–55 year age group. The participating clinicians were moderately homogenous in their responses. Factor analysis produced 4 factors: one summarising positive motivations for teaching and three capturing impediments for teaching. The main factors influencing motivation to teach medical students were intrinsic issues such as altruism, intellectual satisfaction, personal skills and truth seeking. The reasons for not teaching included no strong involvement in course design, a heavy clinical load or feeling it was a waste of time. Conclusion This study provides some insights into factors that may be utilised in the design of teaching programs that meet teacher motivations and ultimately enhance the effectiveness of the medical teaching workforce.

  11. Leadership, clinician managers and a thing called "hybridity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, Liz

    2012-01-01

    In many countries leadership theories and leadership development programs in healthcare have been dominated by individualistic and heroic approaches that focus on developing the skills and competencies of health professionals. Alternative approaches have been proffered but mainly in the form of post-heroic and distributed forms of leadership. The notion of "hybridity" has emerged to challenge the assumptions of distributed leadership. The paper seeks to explore how the concept of hybridity can be used to re-theorize leadership in healthcare as it relates to clinician managers (or hybrid-professional managers). The theoretical developments are explored and empirical material is presented from research in Australian public hospitals to support the case for the existence of hybridized forms of leadership in healthcare. The paper discusses whether hybridity needs re-theorizing to adequately account for clinician leadership. It contributes to debates surrounding the role of clinician leadership in healthcare reform particularly in relation to those doctors who occupy management positions at the division or unit levels as distinct to CEOs. The study uses qualitative research, i.e. interactive interviews to present accounts of how healthcare professionals describe leadership. It undertakes both deductive and inductive theme analysis of the interview material. There is support for hybridized configurations of leadership in interview materials of healthcare professionals but other aspects were also noted that cannot be explained by this approach alone. The paper is the first to examine the concept of hybridity in the context of clinician leadership. Many approaches to leadership in healthcare fail to address the complexity of leadership within the ranks of clinician managers and thus are unable to deal adequately with the role of leadership in healthcare reform and change.

  12. Therapeutic roles of curcumin: lessons learned from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Subash C; Patchva, Sridevi; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research over the past half century has shown that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of the golden spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), can modulate multiple cell signaling pathways. Extensive clinical trials over the past quarter century have addressed the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of this nutraceutical against numerous diseases in humans. Some promising effects have been observed in patients with various pro-inflammatory diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, uveitis, ulcerative proctitis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel disease, tropical pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, gastric ulcer, idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor, oral lichen planus, gastric inflammation, vitiligo, psoriasis, acute coronary syndrome, atherosclerosis, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic microangiopathy, lupus nephritis, renal conditions, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, β-thalassemia, biliary dyskinesia, Dejerine-Sottas disease, cholecystitis, and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Curcumin has also shown protection against hepatic conditions, chronic arsenic exposure, and alcohol intoxication. Dose-escalating studies have indicated the safety of curcumin at doses as high as 12 g/day over 3 months. Curcumin's pleiotropic activities emanate from its ability to modulate numerous signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, apoptotic proteins, NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-LOX, STAT3, C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E(2), prostate-specific antigen, adhesion molecules, phosphorylase kinase, transforming growth factor-β, triglyceride, ET-1, creatinine, HO-1, AST, and ALT in human participants. In clinical trials, curcumin has been used either alone or in combination with other agents. Various formulations of curcumin, including nanoparticles, liposomal encapsulation, emulsions, capsules, tablets, and powder, have been examined. In this review, we discuss in detail the various human diseases in which the

  13. Breast-feeding and human immunodeficiency virus infection: assessment of knowledge among clinicians in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murila, Florence; Obimbo, Moses M; Musoke, Rachel; Tsikhutsu, Isaac; Migiro, Santau; Ogeng'o, Julius

    2015-02-01

    In Kenya, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence ranks among the highest in the world. Approximately 60 000 infections yearly are attributed to vertical transmission including the process of labour and breast-feeding. The vast of the population affected is in the developing world. Clinical officers and nurses play an important role in provision of primary health care to antenatal and postnatal mothers. There are a few studies that have explored the clinicians' knowledge on breast-feeding in the face of HIV and in relation to vertical transmission this being a vital component in prevention of maternal-to-child transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicians' knowledge on HIV in relation to breast-feeding in Kenya. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess knowledge of 161 clinical officers and nurses serving in the maternity and children' wards in various hospitals in Kenya. The participants were derived from all district and provincial referral facilities in Kenya. A preformatted questionnaire containing a series of questions on HIV and breast-feeding was administered to clinicians who were then scored and analyzed. All the 161 participants responded. Majority of clinicians (92%) were knowledgeable regarding prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Regarding HIV and breast-feeding, 49.7% thought expressed breast milk from HIV-positive mothers should be heated before being given. Majority (78.3%) thought breast milk should be given regardless of availability of alternatives. According to 74.5% of the participants, exclusive breast-feeding increased chances of HIV transmission. Two-thirds (66.5%) would recommend breast-feeding for mothers who do not know their HIV status (66.5%). This study observes that a majority of the clinicians have inadequate knowledge on breast-feeding in the face of HIV. There is need to promote training programmes on breast-feeding and transmission of HIV from mother to child. This can be done as in

  14. PDA Use by Clinicians has a Positive Impact on Clinical Decision Making. A review of: Dee, Cheryl R., Marilyn Teolis, and Andrew D. Todd. “Physicians’ use of the personal digital assistant (PDA in clinical decision making.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 93.4 (October 2005: 480-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne P. Lewis

    2006-06-01

    users of PDAs, and chi square testing was used to assess differences between these two groups regarding the influence of PDA use on clinical care. A significance value of PMain results – Ninety‐four (87% of the 108 respondents used PDAs for patient encounters. Of this group, 59 were frequent users and 35 were occasional users. There were no significant differences between attending physicians and physicians in training with regard to frequency of PDA use in patient encounters. Sixty-seven percent of the 108 respondents reported that using a PDA had influenced their clinical decision making; over 50% reported that PDA use had influenced changes in patient treatment; 16% reported that PDA use had helped avoid unnecessary tests; 10% reported that PDA use had helped change a patient’s diagnosis; and 6% reported that PDA use had helped shorten a patient’s length of stay. Within these results, there were no statistically significant differences between the attending physicians and the physicians in training. More than 85% of the frequent PDA users (n=59, and 60% of the occasional PDA users (n=35, reported that PDA use had influenced their clinical decision making. The difference between these two groups was statistically significant (PConclusion – PDA use has a positive impact on clinical decision making and patient care. Frequency of PDA use appears to be a factor in determining the perceived impact of PDAs on clinical decision making. However, even those physicians who used PDAs only occasionally reported a positive impact of PDA use on clinical decision making. The status of physicians (attending or in training does not appear to be a determining factor in the frequency of PDA use for patient encounters. Health sciences librarians are well positioned to provide resources and training for PDA use by clinicians.

  15. Moving beyond 'not enough time': factors influencing paediatric clinicians' participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Simon P; Caldwell, Patrina H Y; Murphy, Joyce; Lilischkis, Kimberley J; Morrow, Angie M

    2017-03-01

    Increasing the amount of clinical research that occurs in healthcare settings has been identified as an important mechanism to improve healthcare outcomes. While clinicians are key persons in achieving this aim, research participation amongst clinicians is generally limited. To identify the factors (barriers and facilitators) influencing clinician research participation and determine how professional culture impacts on these factors. Forty clinicians working at a tertiary children's hospital participated in six discipline-specific focus groups. Thematic analysis was performed using an inductive process based in grounded theory. Four major themes (cultural factors, personal factors, resources and solutions) and 16 subthemes were identified. Participants described how the current health system discourages clinician research. They reported that their research participation requires personal sacrifice of their own time; income or career progression. Research participation was seen to compete with other priorities in clinicians' workload and is disadvantaged because of the primacy of clinical work and the lack of immediate tangible benefit from research projects. Solutions suggested by our participants included better alignment of clinical and research goals, improved availability of research mentors and collaborative opportunities. Nurses and allied health professionals reported a changing professional culture that values research. Only doctors identified research participation to be important for career progression. For clinician research participation to flourish, significant changes in healthcare structure and priorities will be required that result in research becoming more embedded in healthcare delivery. Initiatives to improve collaboration between clinicians and universities may also support these aims. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have pushed the field forward. Additionally, the review provides a vision for moving the field forward through linking advances in genomic and proteomic analysis to develop new, molecularly targeted interventions.

  17. [The role of clevidipine in hypertension management: clinical results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta-Alarcón, A; Castellón-Larios, K; Bergese, S

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in general population is from 30% to 45%(.) Anesthesiologists frequently deal with the challenge of maintaining adequate control of perioperative blood pressure. On sudden elevations, a precise control is required to prevent end-organ damage. Recently, clevidipine, an ultra-short acting calcium antagonist has been approved by the FDA (www.accessdata.fda.gov), as a strategy for the intravenous treatment of hypertension; and by the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices (www.aemps.gob.es) for the rapid reduction of arterial blood pressure in the perioperative setting. This medication has shown to have a rapid onset, easy titratability, and to exert a precise control of blood pressure. In addition, clevidipine has shown to be highly effective as monotherapy, and to have an excellent transition to oral antihypertensive therapy. For this article, an online search of the Medline literature was conducted up to February 2014 and "clevidipine" and "hypertension" used as keywords in order to analyze pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clevidipine. There are also clinical studies that provide evidence of the rapid and effective control that clevidipine has on blood pressure, especially in acute perioperative and emergency settings. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Work-role transition: from staff nurse to clinical nurse educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Liz; Neville, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the findings of a study describing Clinical Nurse Educators' experiences, as they recall their transition from staff nurse to the Clinical Nurse Educator role, within a New Zealand District Health Board. Nurse Educator roles influence clinical practice and professional development of nurses, and although designated as a senior role nationally, the complexities and size of the role are poorly understood. A qualitative descriptive methodology utilising transition theory as a conceptual framework underpinned the study. A sample of eight Clinical Nurse Educators from a New Zealand District Health Board were interviewed about their transition from experienced staff nurse to inexperienced senior nurse. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Participants found the Clinical Nurse Educator role was more complex than anticipated, with no preparation for the role and sub-optimal orientation periods being provided by the District Health Board. As a result, signs of stress were evident as the enormity of the role became apparent. Consequently, employers need to ensure that appropriate orientation programmes and mentorship are inherent in health care organisations.

  19. How Should Clinicians Counsel a Woman with a Strong Family History of Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease about Her Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Marianna V; O'Brien, Barbara M; King, Louise P

    2017-07-01

    Counseling patients regarding the benefits, harms, and dilemmas of genetic testing is one of the greatest ethical challenges facing reproductive medicine today. With or without test results, clinicians grapple with how to communicate potential genetic risks as patients weigh their reproductive options. Here, we consider a case of a woman with a strong family history of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). She is early in her pregnancy and unsure about learning her own genetic status. We address the ethical ramifications of each of her options, which include genetic testing, genetic counseling, and termination versus continuation of the pregnancy. Our analysis foregrounds clinicians' role in helping to ensure autonomous decision making as the patient reflects on these clinical options in light of her goals and values. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication addresses the shortfall of well trained and clinically qualified medical physicists working in radiation medicine. The roles, responsibilities and clinical training requirements of medical physicists have not always been well defined or well understood by health care professionals, health authorities and regulatory agencies. To fill this gap, this publication provides recommendations for the academic education and clinical training of clinically qualified medical physicists, including recommendations for their accreditation certification and registration, along with continuous professional development. The goal is to establish criteria that support the harmonization of education and clinical training worldwide

  1. The academic story: introducing the clinical nurse leader role in a multifacility health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Introducing the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role in a multifacility health care system is an exciting but obstacle-filled journey. This story includes facilitating factors, opportunities, and successes plus suggestions for other academic-practice partners considering implementing the CNL role. A sample course sequence with course descriptions is provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of clinical pathologists in the management of male infertility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Male infertility is receiving increasing attention in Africa as up to 50% of cases of infertility are ascribed to it. In the management of this condition, the clinical laboratory plays a crucial role especially in the proper identification of causes of infertility. The role of the pathologists in this respect stems from the choice of laboratory ...

  3. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Sami; Saini, Bandana; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy. Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software. Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients. This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future policies for the

  4. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Isaac

    Full Text Available Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy.Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software.Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients.This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future

  5. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  6. Carboxyhemoglobin: a primer for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2018-01-01

    One of carbon monoxide's several mechanisms of toxicity is binding with circulating hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, resulting in a functional anemia. While patients with carbon monoxide poisoning are often said to be "cherry-red," such discoloration is rarely seen. Carboxyhemoglobin levels cannot be measured with conventional pulse oximetry, can be approximated with pulse CO-oximetry, and are most accurately measured with a laboratory CO-oximeter. Carboxyhemoglobin levels are quite stable and can be accurately measured on a transported blood sample. For clinical purposes, arterial and venous carboxyhemoglobin levels can be considered to be equivalent. Carboxyhemoglobin levels are typically lower than 2% in non-smokers and lower than 5% in smokers. A level over 9% is almost always due to exogenous carbon monoxide exposure, even among smokers. Conversely, a low level does not exclude significant exposure under certain circumstances. As carboxyhemoglobin levels of poisoned patients do not correlate with symptoms or outcome, their greatest utility is a marker of exposure. Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

  7. Commentary: Taking the Pulse on the Integration of the Clinical Nurse Specialist Role in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Josette

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is pleased to provide this update on the integration of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role in Canada. Many advances have occurred since the publication of the Canadian Journal of Nursing Leadership special issue focused on advanced practice nursing (APN) in 2010. The CNA continues to promote and advance this APN role, and views the CNS as an essential and critical role for better care to Canadians.

  8. Introduction to health economics and decision-making: Is economics relevant for the frontline clinician?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeree, Ron; Diaby, Vakaramoko

    2013-12-01

    In a climate of escalating demands for new health care services and significant constraints on new resources, the disciplines of health economics and health technology assessment (HTA) have increasingly been turned to as explicit evidence-based frameworks to help make tough health care access and reimbursement decisions. Health economics is the discipline of economics concerned with the efficient allocation of health care resources, essentially trying to maximize health benefits to society contingent upon available resources. HTA is a broader field drawing upon several disciplines, but which relies heavily upon the tools of health economics and economic evaluation. Traditionally, health economics and economic evaluation have been widely used at the political (macro) and local (meso) decision-making levels, and have progressively had an important role even at informing individual clinical decisions (micro level). The aim of this paper is to introduce readers to health economics and discuss its relevance to frontline clinicians. Particularly, the content of the paper will facilitate clinicians' understanding of the link between economics and their medical practice, and how clinical decision-making reflects on health care resource allocation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Are Clinicians Better Than Lay Judges at Recalling Case Details? An Evaluation of Expert Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher A; Keeley, Jared W; Eakin, Deborah K

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the role of expertise in clinicians' memory for case details. Clinicians' diagnostic formulations may afford mechanisms for retaining and retrieving information. Experts (N = 41; 47.6% males, 23.8% females; 28.6% did not report gender; age: mean [M] = 54.69) were members of the American Board of Professional Psychologists. Lay judges (N = 156; 25.4% males, 74.1% females; age: M = 18.85) were undergraduates enrolled in general psychology. Three vignettes were presented to each group, creating a 2 (group: expert, lay judge) x 3 (vignettes: simple, complex-coherent, complex-incoherent) mixed factorial design. Recall accuracy for vignette details was the dependent variable. Data analyses used multivariate analyses of variance to detect group differences among multiple continuous variables. Experts recalled more information than lay judges, overall. However, experts also exhibited more false memories for the complex-incoherent case because of their schema-based knowledge. This study supported clinical expertise as beneficial. Nonetheless, negative influences from experts' schema-based knowledge, as exhibited, could adversely affect clinical practices. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Expediting Clinician Adoption of Safety Practices: The UCSF Venous Access Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donaldson, Nancy E; Plank, Rosemary K; Williamson, Ann; Pearl, Jeffrey; Kellogg, Jerry; Ryder, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    ...) Venous Access Device (VAD) Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project was to develop a 30-hour/one clinical academic unit VAD patient safety course with the aim of expediting clinician adoption of critical concepts...

  11. Professional identity in clinician-scientists: brokers between care and science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijtmans, M; de Haan, Else; Akkerman, Sanne; van Tartwijk, Jan

    CONTEXT: Despite increasing numbers of publications, science often fails to significantly improve patient care. Clinician-scientists, professionals who combine care and research activities, play an important role in helping to solve this problem. However, despite the ascribed advantages of

  12. A Scoping Review of Maternal and Child Health Clinicians Attitudes, Beliefs, Practice, Training and Perceived Self-Competence in Environmental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamin Daddy Massaquoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians regularly assess, diagnose and manage illnesses which are directly or indirectly linked to environmental exposures. Yet, various studies have identified gaps in environmental assessment in routine clinical practice. This review assessed clinicians’ environmental health practices, attitudes and beliefs, and competencies and training. Relevant articles were sought using a systematic search strategy using five databases, grey literature and a hand search. Search strategies and protocols were developed using tailored mesh terms and keywords. 43 out of 11,291 articles were eligible for inclusion. Clinicians’ attitudes and beliefs towards environmental health and routine clinical practice were generally positive, with most clinicians believing that environmental hazards affect human health. However, with the exception of tobacco smoke exposure, environmental health assessment was infrequently part of routine clinical practice. Clinicians’ self-competence in environmental assessment was reported to be inadequate. Major challenges were the time required to complete an assessment, inadequate training and concerns about negative patients’ responses. Clinicians have strong positive attitudes and beliefs about the importance of environmental health assessments. However, more concerted and robust strategies will be needed to support clinicians in assuming their assessment and counselling roles related to a wider range of environmental hazards.

  13. Mesotherapy, definition, rationale and clinical role: a consensus report from the Italian Society of Mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, M; Gatti, A; Maggiori, S; Bartoletti, C A; Sabato, A F

    2011-06-01

    Since its introduction in the 1950s, the use of mesotherapy has generated much interest among clinicians and patients. The Italian Society of Mesotherapy (SIM) brought together a panel of experts to review available evidence and to draw up a series of recommendations on the use of intradermal therapy (LIT) in clinical practice. There was overwhelming agreement among Consensus Group members that, when used correctly, LIT is a valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of painful, loco-regional conditions. They also emphasised that the clinical efficacy of LIT has been demonstrated in the management of chronic venous lymphatic insufficiency, oedematous fibrosclerotic panniculopathy and facial skin aging. The experts were unanimous on the use of LIT in vaccination. Mesotherapy is not a substitute for other therapeutic options and should only be used when the patient has been fully informed of its advantages and limitations. Likewise the procedure should only be carried out by an experienced qualified physician. Although there was widespread agreement among the Consensus Group on the place of LIT in several indications, the Authors reiterated the need for more large-scale clinical trials to determine the specific benefits and limitations in some areas of the application of intradermal therapy.

  14. The clinician's dilemma: two dimensions of ethical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Grant; Chamberlain, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    There is a continuing intense medico-ethico-legal debate around legalized euthanasia and physician assisted suicide such that ethically informed clinicians often agree with the arguments but feel hesitant about the conclusion, especially when it may bring about a change in law. We argue that this confusion results from the convergence of two continua that underpin the conduct of a clinician and are especially prominent in psychiatry. The two continua concern the duty of care and the importance of patient autonomy and they do not quite map into traditional divides in debates about sanctity of life, paternalism, and autonomy. As ethical dimensions, they come into sharp focus in the psychological complexities of end-of-life care and they form two key factors in most ethical and legal or disciplinary deliberations about a clinician's actions. Whereas both dimensions are important when a clinician reflects on what s/he has done or should do, they need careful balancing in a request for euthanasia or physician assisted suicide where the patient wants to take a decisive role in his or her own end-of-life care. However, end-of-life is also a situation where clinicians often encounter 'cries for help' so that both continua are importantly in play. Balancing these two continua without using blunt legal instruments is often required in psychiatric care in such a way as to problematize the idea that patient decisions should dominate the care options available. A simplistic approach to that issue arguably plays into what has been called an 'impoverished construction of life and death' and, some would say, devalues the basic commitments fundamental to medical care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Percussion use and training: a survey of music therapy clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Stephanie; Matney, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Percussion instruments are commonly used in music therapy practice; however, the body of published literature regarding music therapy-related percussion training and practice is limited. The purpose of our survey study was to describe: (a) clinician perspectives of their academic percussion training; (b) use of percussion testing during academic training; (c) clinician perspectives on relevance, adequacy, and importance of academic percussion training; (d) clinician perspectives of their nonacademic percussion training; and (e) current use of percussion in clinical practice. Through comparisons of these parameters, we sought to provide information that may inform future percussion use and training. Participants were selected using an email list from the Certification Board for Music Therapists. Board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) were provided with a researcher-created survey about academic percussion training, nonacademic percussion training, and use of percussion in clinical practice. Survey response rate was 14.4% (611/4234). We used demographic data to address potential nonresponse error and ensure population representation for region of residence and region of academic training. Results revealed concerns about perceived adequacy of percussion training received during music therapy education (14.6% reported receiving no academic percussion training; 40.6% reported training was not adequate), and absence of percussion-specific proficiency exams. Of the training received, 62.8% indicated that training was relevant; however, a majority (76.5%) recommended current music therapy students receive more percussion training on instruments and skills most relevant to clinical practice. Comparisons between academic training, perceived needs in academic training, and clinical usage may inform future training and clinical competency. We provide suggestions for developing future training, as well as for furthering clinical implementation and research. © the American

  16. Lyme Disease in West Virginia: An Assessment of Distribution and Clinicians' Knowledge of Disease and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarah; Parker, David; Mark-Carew, Miguella; White, Robert; Fisher, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease case misclassification, a top public health concern, may be attributed to the current disconnect between clinical diagnosis and surveillance. This study examines Lyme disease distribution in West Virginia (WV) and determines clinicians' knowledge of both disease and surveillance. Lyme disease surveillance data for 2013 were obtained from the WV Bureau for Public Health. A validated survey, distributed to clinicians at an academic medical center, assessed clinicians' knowledge of disease diagnosis and surveillance. There were 297 adult Lyme disease cases of which 83 were confirmed. Clinician survey responses resulted in a correct response rate of 70% for Lyme disease knowledge questions. Fewer than half of all clinicians were aware of the surveillance criteria for confirming Lyme disease cases. Neither medical specialty nor previous treatment of patients with Lyme disease were significantly associated with clinicians' knowledge of the disease. Clinicians in WV are familiar with symptoms and clinical management of Lyme disease. However, they are less knowledgeable about diagnosis and public health surveillance comprising reporting and confirming cases of the disease. Clinicians and public health authorities should collaborate more closely to promote education and awareness as a key step to successfully reducing the burden of Lymne disease.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to sexual and reproductive health communication between pediatric oncology clinicians and adolescent and young adult patients: The clinician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Natasha N; Campbell, Kevin; Kenney, Lisa B; Moss, Kerry; Speckhart, Ashley; Bober, Sharon L

    2018-04-26

    Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is identified by adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer as an important but often neglected aspect of their comprehensive cancer care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of pediatric oncology clinicians towards discussing SRH with AYAs, and to understand perceived barriers to effective communication in current practice. Pediatric oncology clinicians (physicians, certified nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews investigating attitudes about SRH communication with AYAs and barriers to such conversations. Twenty-two clinicians participated from seven institutions in the Northeastern United States. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using a thematic analysis approach. Interviews with pediatric oncology clinicians revealed the following five primary themes: the role for pediatric oncology clinicians to discuss SRH, the focus of current SRH conversations on fertility, the meaning of "sexual health" as safe sex and contraception only, clinician-reported barriers to SRH conversations, and the need for education and support. Communication barriers included lack of knowledge/experience, lack of resources/referrals, low priority, parents/family, patient discomfort, clinician discomfort, time, and lack of rapport. Clinicians identified resource and support needs, including formal education and SRH education materials for patients and families. Although the study participants identified a role for pediatric oncology clinicians in SRH care for AYA patients with cancer, multiple barriers interfere with such discussions taking place on a regular basis. Future efforts must focus on resource development and provider education and training in SRH to optimize the care provided to this unique patient population. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Structural and Process Factors That Influence Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Tchouaket, Eric; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; DiCenso, Alba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of structure and process on clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role implementation. We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data. The study was performed in Canada. The authors included 445 of 471 questionnaires (94.5%) of graduate-prepared CNSs. Based on Donabedian's framework, we conducted a secondary analysis of CNS responses using hierarchical regression. The internal consistency of the 6 CNS role dimensions and team dynamics subscales was excellent. The use of a framework to guide CNS role implementation influences all the role dimensions. Employer understanding of the CNS role, working in an urban catchment area, specialty certification, and more years in a CNS role had a direct positive influence on team dynamics. Full-time employment exerted a direct negative influence on this dimension. Furthermore, team dynamics (as a mediator variable), seeing patients in practice, and having an office in the clinical unit exerted a direct positive influence on the clinical dimension. Having an annual performance appraisal and a job description exerted a direct negative influence on the clinical dimension. Employer understanding, working in an urban area, full-time employment, and specialty certification had an indirect effect on the clinical dimension. Accountability to a nonnurse manager exerted a direct negative influence on the education dimension. The research and scholarly/professional development dimensions were influenced by more years in a CNS role. Accountability to a nurse manager exerted a direct positive influence on the organizational leadership dimension; unionization and seeing patients in practice had a direct negative influence on this dimension. Seeing patients in practice and full-time employment exerted a direct positive influence on the consultation dimension. The identification of structures and processes that influence CNS role implementation may inform strategies used by

  19. Canary: An NLP Platform for Clinicians and Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmasi, Shervin; Sandor, Nicolae L; Hosomura, Naoshi; Goldberg, Matt; Skentzos, Stephen; Turchin, Alexander

    2017-05-03

    Information Extraction methods can help discover critical knowledge buried in the vast repositories of unstructured clinical data. However, these methods are underutilized in clinical research, potentially due to the absence of free software geared towards clinicians with little technical expertise. The skills required for developing/using such software constitute a major barrier for medical researchers wishing to employ these methods. To address this, we have developed Canary, a free and open-source solution designed for users without natural language processing (NLP) or software engineering experience. It was designed to be fast and work out of the box via a user-friendly graphical interface.

  20. The microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay: the role of a drug-induced apoptosis assay in drug development and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosserman, Linda; Prendergast, Franklyn; Herbst, Roy; Fleisher, Martin; Salom, Emery; Strickland, Steven; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Rajurkar, Swapnil; Karimi, Misagh; Rogers, Karl; Davidson, Dirk; Willis, Carl; Penalver, Manuel; Homesley, Howard; Burrell, Matthew; Garrett, Audrey; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Presant, Cary A

    2012-08-15

    A drug-induced apoptosis assay, termed the microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay, has been developed. Blinded clinical trials have shown higher response rates and longer survival in groups of patients with acute myelocytic leukemia and epithelial ovarian cancer who have been treated with drugs that show high apoptosis in the MiCK assay. Unblinded clinical trials in multiple tumor types have shown that the assay will be used frequently by clinicians to determine treatment, and when used, results in higher response rates, longer times to relapse, and longer survivals. Model economic analyses suggest possible cost savings in clinical use based on increased generic drug use and single-agent substitution for combination therapies. Two initial studies with drugs in development are promising. The assay may help reduce costs and speed time to drug approval. Correlative studies with molecular biomarkers are planned. This assay may have a role both in personalized clinical therapy and in more efficient drug development. ©2012 AACR.

  1. The cultural divide: exploring communication barriers between scientists and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restifo, Linda L; Phelan, Gerald R

    2011-07-01

    Despite remarkable advances in basic biomedical science that have led to improved patient care, there is a wide and persistent gap in the abilities of researchers and clinicians to understand and appreciate each other. In this Editorial, the authors, a scientist and a clinician, discuss the rift between practitioners of laboratory research and clinical medicine. Using their first-hand experience and numerous interviews throughout the United States, they explore the causes of this 'cultural divide'. Members of both professions use advanced problem-solving skills and typically embark on their career paths with a deeply felt sense of purpose. Nonetheless, differences in classroom education, professional training environments, reward mechanisms and sources of drive contribute to obstacles that inhibit communication, mutual respect and productive collaboration. More than a sociological curiosity, the cultural divide is a significant barrier to the bench-to-bedside goals of translational medicine. Understanding its roots is the first step towards bridging the gap.

  2. The cultural divide: exploring communication barriers between scientists and clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L. Restifo

    2011-07-01

    Despite remarkable advances in basic biomedical science that have led to improved patient care, there is a wide and persistent gap in the abilities of researchers and clinicians to understand and appreciate each other. In this Editorial, the authors, a scientist and a clinician, discuss the rift between practitioners of laboratory research and clinical medicine. Using their first-hand experience and numerous interviews throughout the United States, they explore the causes of this ‘cultural divide’. Members of both professions use advanced problem-solving skills and typically embark on their career paths with a deeply felt sense of purpose. Nonetheless, differences in classroom education, professional training environments, reward mechanisms and sources of drive contribute to obstacles that inhibit communication, mutual respect and productive collaboration. More than a sociological curiosity, the cultural divide is a significant barrier to the bench-to-bedside goals of translational medicine. Understanding its roots is the first step towards bridging the gap.

  3. Phronesis: practical wisdom the role of professional practice knowledge in the clinical reasoning of Bobath instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan-Graham, Julie; Cott, Cheryl

    2017-10-01

    Clinical reasoning is an essential aspect of clinical practice, however is largely ignored in the current rehabilitation sciences evidence base. Literature related to clinical reasoning and clinical expertise has evolved concurrently although rehabilitation reasoning frameworks remain relatively generic. The purpose of this study was to explicate the clinical reasoning process of Bobath instructors of a widely used neuro-rehabilitation approach, the Bobath concept. A qualitative interpretive description approach consisting of stimulated recall using video-recorded treatment sessions and in-depth interviews. Purposive sampling was used to recruit members of the International Bobath Instructors Training Association (IBITA). Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim providing the raw data. Data analysis was progressive, iterative, and inductive. Twenty-two IBITA instructors from 7 different countries participated. Ranging in clinical experience from 12 to 40 years, and instructor experience from 1 to 35 years. Three themes were developed, (a) a Bobath clinical framework, (b) person-centered, and (c) a Bobath reasoning approach, highlighting the role of practical wisdom, phronesis in the clinical reasoning process. In particular the role of visuospatial-kinesthetic perception, an element of technical expertise, was illuminated as an integral aspect of clinical reasoning in this expert group. This study provides an interpretive understanding of the clinical reasoning process used by IBITA instructors illustrating an inactive embodied view of clinical reasoning, specifically the role of phronesis, requiring further investigation in nonexpert Bobath therapists, as well as in novice and experienced therapists in other specialty areas. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Modeling eye gaze patterns in clinician-patient interaction with lag sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Enid; Xu, Jie; Chen, Ping-Yu; Asan, Onur; Barrett, Bruce P; Chewning, Betty

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether lag sequential analysis could be used to describe eye gaze orientation between clinicians and patients in the medical encounter. This topic is particularly important as new technologies are implemented into multiuser health care settings in which trust is critical and nonverbal cues are integral to achieving trust. This analysis method could lead to design guidelines for technologies and more effective assessments of interventions. Nonverbal communication patterns are important aspects of clinician-patient interactions and may affect patient outcomes. The eye gaze behaviors of clinicians and patients in 110 videotaped medical encounters were analyzed using the lag sequential method to identify significant behavior sequences. Lag sequential analysis included both event-based lag and time-based lag. Results from event-based lag analysis showed that the patient's gaze followed that of the clinician, whereas the clinician's gaze did not follow the patient's. Time-based sequential analysis showed that responses from the patient usually occurred within 2 s after the initial behavior of the clinician. Our data suggest that the clinician's gaze significantly affects the medical encounter but that the converse is not true. Findings from this research have implications for the design of clinical work systems and modeling interactions. Similar research methods could be used to identify different behavior patterns in clinical settings (physical layout, technology, etc.) to facilitate and evaluate clinical work system designs.

  5. On a learning curve for shared decision making: Interviews with clinicians using the knee osteoarthritis Option Grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Rasmussen, Julie; Kinsey, Katharine; Firth, Jill; Marrin, Katy; Edwards, Adrian; Wood, Fiona

    2018-02-01

    Tools used in clinical encounters to illustrate to patients the risks and benefits of treatment options have been shown to increase shared decision making. However, we do not have good information about how these tools are viewed by clinicians and how clinicians think patients would react to their use. Our aim was to examine clinicians' views about the possible and actual use of tools designed to support patients and clinicians to collaborate and deliberate about treatment options, namely, Option Grid decision aids. We conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews embedded in the intervention phase of a trial of an Option Grid decision aid for osteoarthritis of the knee. Interviews were conducted with 6 participating clinicians before they used the tool and again after clinicians had used the tool with 6 patients. In the first interview, clinicians voiced concerns that the tool would lead to an increase in encounter duration, patient resistance regarding involvement in decision making, and potential information overload. At the second interview, after minimal training, the clinicians reported that the tool had changed their usual way of communicating, and it was generally acceptable and helpful to integrate it into practice. After experiencing the use of Option Grids, clinicians became more willing to use the tools in their clinical encounters with patients. How best to introduce Option Grids to clinicians and adopt their use into practice will need careful consideration of context, workflow, and clinical pathways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Sponsorship in non-commercial clinical trials: definitions, challenges and the role of Good Clinical Practices guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinetto, Raffaella; De Nys, Katelijne; Boelaert, Marleen; Diro, Ermias; Meintjes, Graeme; Adoke, Yeka; Tagbor, Harry; Casteels, Minne

    2015-12-30

    Non-commercial clinical research plays an increasingly essential role for global health. Multiple partners join in international consortia that operate under the limited timeframe of a specific funding period. One organisation (the sponsor) designs and carries out the trial in collaboration with research partners, and is ultimately responsible for the trial's scientific, ethical, regulatory and legal aspects, while another organization, generally in the North (the funder), provides the external funding and sets funding conditions. Even if external funding mechanisms are key for most non-commercial research, the dependence on an external funder's policies may heavily influence the choices of a sponsor. In addition, the competition for accessing the available external funds is great, and non-commercial sponsors may not be in a position to discuss or refuse standard conditions set by a funder. To see whether the current definitions adequately address the intricacies of sponsorship in externally-funded trials, we looked at how a "sponsor" of clinical trials is defined in selected international guidelines, with particular focus on international Good Clinical Practices codes, and in selected European and African regulations/legislations. Our limited analysis suggests that the sponsors definition from the 1995 WHO Good Clinical Practices code has been integrated as such into many legislations, guidelines and regulations, and that it is not adequate to cover today's reality of funding arrangements in global health, where the legal responsibility and the funding source are de facto split. In agreement with other groups, we suggest that the international Good Clinical Practices codes should be updated to reflect the reality of non-commercial clinical research. In particular, they should explicitly include the distinction between commercial and non-commercial sponsors, and provide guidance to non-commercial sponsors for negotiating with external funding agencies and other

  7. The Role of Physiotherapy Extended Scope Practitioners in Musculoskeletal care with Focus on Decision Making and Clinical Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Quantitative and Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jonathan; Yoward, Samantha; Dawson, Pamela

    2017-06-01

    Physiotherapy extended scope practitioner (ESP) roles are widely utilized in the management of musculoskeletal conditions. The present article reviews the current literature, with particular emphasis on the decision-making process, patient/clinician interaction and clinical outcomes. A systematic review of musculoskeletal extended scope practice was carried out. The review focused on the outcome of interventions, and the interactions and decision-making processes between ESPs and their patients. A wide search strategy was employed, through multiple databases, grey literature and experts in the field. Qualitative and quantitative studies alike were included and a mixed-methods synthesis approach was undertaken in analysing the findings of included studies. A total of 476 articles were identified for inclusion, 25 of which (22 quantitative and three qualitative) meeting the criteria for full quality appraisal and synthesis. It was not possible to conduct a meta-analysis owing to data heterogeneity. The results showed high patient satisfaction with the ESP role, support for ESP staff listing patients for orthopaedic surgery, a high positive correlation of decision making between ESPs and orthopaedic surgeons and evidence of a positive impact on patient outcomes. Qualitative themes reflected the importance of ESP clinical decision making and interpersonal skills and their role in patient education. There is broad support for the physiotherapy ESP role and evidence of favourable outcomes from ESP intervention. Clinical decisions made by ESPs correlate well with those of medical colleagues, although there is a lack of detail explaining the ESP decision-making process itself and the influences and mechanisms by which this occurs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Clinicians' perspective on an app for patient self-monitoring in eating disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgreen, Pil; Clausen, Loa; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2018-04-01

    The Recovery Record smartphone app is a self-monitoring tool for individuals recovering from eating disorders. Oppositely to traditional pen-and-paper meal diaries, the app allows for in-app patient-clinician linkage enabling clinicians to access patient app data anytime. The aim of our study was to explore the interdisciplinary clinical perspective on Recovery Record and its impact on treatment. Thirty-one clinicians from a Danish eating disorder treatment facility participated in field studies and 23 of these in interviews. Data were generated and analyzed concurrently applying the inductive methodology of Interpretive Description. We found two overarching themes: "Access to app data between treatment sessions", and "The patient-clinician relationship". Sub-themes associated with the former were "Online obligations" in relation to the added workload of continuously monitoring patient app data, and "Prepared or prejudiced" relating to advantages and disadvantages of using patient app data as preparation for treatment sessions. Sub-themes pertaining to the latter were "Expectation discrepancy" in relation to patients' and clinicians' divergent expectations for app usage, and "Pacified patients" regarding the clinicians' experience that the app potentially compromised the patient initiative in treatment sessions. Recovery Record induced new and affected pre-existing treatment and work conditions for clinicians. Clinicians were preoccupied with challenges associated with the app, for example, an added work load and potential harm to the patient-clinician collaboration. Thus, prior to adopting the app, we encourage clinicians and managements to discuss the objectives, advantages and disadvantages of adopting the app, and outline specific guidelines for patient and clinician app usage. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Theoretical and Empirical Study of the Core of the Psychosomatic Approach to Obstetrics and Gynecology : Meta-Competences, Clinical Roles, and POG Competency Profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Frederik; van de Wiel, Henricus; Paarlberg, K.M.; Paarlberg, KM; van de Wiel, HBM

    2017-01-01

    The professional roles that are relevant for all clinicians are summarized in the CanMEDS model. Their relevance lies in the behavioral repertoire associated with the various roles; these behaviors can be used to deal with a variety of complex problems in a wide range of situations. The advantage of

  10. Wonder and the clinical encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H M

    2012-04-01

    In terms of intervening in embodied experience, medical treatment is wonder-full in its ambition and its metaphysical presumption; yet, wonder's role in clinical medicine has received little philosophical attention. In this paper, I propose, to doctors and others in routine clinical life, the value of an openness to wonder and to the sense of wonder. Key to this is the identity of the central ethical challenges facing most clinicians, which is not the high-tech drama of the popular conceptions of medical ethics but, rather, the routine of patients' undramatic but unremitting demands for the clinician's time and respectful attention. Wonder (conceived as an intense and transfiguring attentiveness) is a ubiquitous ethical source, an alternative to the more familiar respect for rational autonomy, a source of renewal galvanizing diagnostic imagination, and a timely recalling of the embodied agency of both patient and clinician.

  11. Implementing the clinical nurse leader role using the Virginia Mason Production System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Charleen; Nelson-Peterson, Dana L

    2007-11-01

    More than 90 members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and 190 practice sites have partnered to develop the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role. The partnership has created synergy between education and practice and nurtured innovation and diffusion of learning on a national basis. In this ongoing department, the editor, Jolene Tornabeni, MA, RN, FAAN, FACHE, showcases a variety of nurse leaders who discuss their new patient care delivery models in preparation for the CNL role and CNLs who highlight partnerships with their clinical colleagues to improve patient care. In this article, the authors discuss the needs for changes in the nursing care delivery model, the implementation of the role of the CNL using the tools of the Virginia Mason Production System, as well as early outcomes and future opportunities for the expansion of the CNL role.

  12. Advanced clinical practice for radiographers in Great Britain: professional roles, accountability and the educational provision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogg, P.

    2004-01-01

    A change in British health care has resulted in a broadening of roles and responsibilities beyond 'traditional boundaries' for a range of health care professionals. This has occurred because of staff shortages (particularly within the medical profession) and the recognition that many 'non-doctor' health care staff can make safe, competent and effective contributions outside their 'normal' sphere of responsibilities. In the context of advanced clinical practice, this paper will explain the current arrangements for radiographers' roles and responsibilities, their accountability and the educational provision that underpins the development of competencies at these higher clinical levels. Some advanced roles that British radiographers perform, within their current normal responsibilities, will be identified and some British legislation and professional body guidance that make role advancement possible will be outlined. The article will conclude with an indication of the educational level at which the advanced competencies are learned and assessed. (author)

  13. Interaction between the microbiology laboratory and clinician: what the microbiologist can provide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J

    1999-01-01

    The work of the clinical microbiologist comprises three major areas: diagnostic work in the laboratory, advice to clinicians about treatment of infected patients, and infection control. By clinical alertness, either from work in the laboratory or from clinical contacts, the microbiologist may...

  14. Defining your role in ambulatory care: clinical nurse specialist or nurse practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyers, J E

    1993-01-01

    A collaborative practice was established at the University of Southern California/Kenneth Norris Jr. Cancer Hospital utilizing combined roles of the CNS and nurse practitioner. The role was created out of a specific need of the physicians of the gastrointestinal malignancy service. Increased administrative and clinical responsibilities necessitated another clinical expert to be readily available for the management of the acute care private practice patients. As a CNS for both the departments of medicine and nursing, my primary responsibilities are focused within the ambulatory care area. This paper presents the concept for this position, the professional and personal benefits, advantages and disadvantages, and recommendations for nursing practice.

  15. The Role of Tissue-Resident Donor T Cells in Rejection of Clinical Face Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    cells contribute to VCA rejection, and that pathogenic T cells (both donor and recipient-derived) are detectable in blood during rejection to serve as...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0760 TITLE: The role of tissue-resident donor T cells in rejection of clinical face transplants PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE The role of tissue-resident donor T cells in rejection of clinical face transplants 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1

  16. The clinical nurse specialist in New Zealand: how is the role defined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer; Floyd, Sue; Thompson, Shona

    2011-07-01

    New Zealand, like many countries, is developing new advanced nursing practice roles to meet emerging needs. While much has been written about the Nurse Practitioner (NP), the role of Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) remains relatively unexplored and lacks national definition. This paper reports the findings from research designed to investigate the role of the CNS and how it is defined by New Zealand District Health Boards (DHBs). The study sought to identify the current requirements and expectations for the CNS role and how it is defined in practice. In 2008, 15 CNS job descriptions were collected from eight DHBs throughout the country generating data that were treated both quantitatively and qualitatively. Overall, few areas of consensus were found regarding the essential requirements for the CNS role and there were inconsistencies in how the roles were defined, most notably concerning requirements for postgraduate qualifications and Professional Development Recognition Programmes. Thematic analysis of the documents generated four key areas relevant to the CNS role. These described the CNS as a leader, a clinical expert, a co-ordinator and an educator. The findings indicate that the CNS role is inconsistently defined in New Zealand, particularly with respect to the postgraduate qualifications required and what is meant by 'expertise'.

  17. Impact of neurocognition on social and role functioning in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Ricardo E; Goldberg, Terry E; McLaughlin, Danielle; Auther, Andrea M; Correll, Christoph U; Cornblatt, Barbara A

    2011-08-01

    Cognitive deficits have been well documented in schizophrenia and have been shown to impair quality of life and to compromise everyday functioning. Recent studies of adolescents and young adults at high risk for developing psychosis show that neurocognitive impairments are detectable before the onset of psychotic symptoms. However, it remains unclear how cognitive impairments affect functioning before the onset of psychosis. The authors assessed cognitive impairment in adolescents at clinical high risk for psychosis and examined its impact on social and role functioning. A sample of 127 treatment-seeking patients at clinical high risk for psychosis and a group of 80 healthy comparison subjects were identified and recruited for research in the Recognition and Prevention Program. At baseline, participants were assessed with a comprehensive neurocognitive battery as well as measures of social and role functioning. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, clinical high-risk patients showed significant impairments in the domains of processing speed, verbal memory, executive function, working memory, visuospatial processing, motor speed, sustained attention, and language. Clinical high-risk patients also displayed impaired social and role functioning at baseline. Among patients with attenuated positive symptoms, processing speed was related to social and role functioning at baseline. These findings demonstrate that cognitive and functional impairments are detectable in patients at clinical high risk for psychosis before the onset of psychotic illness and that processing speed appears to be an important cognitive predictor of poor functioning.

  18. Origin, functional role, and clinical impact of Fanconi anemia FANCA mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Castella, Maria; Pujol, Roser; Callén, Elsa; Trujillo, Juan P.; Casado, José A.; Gille, Hans; Lach, Francis P.; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Schindler, Detlev; Benítez, Javier; Porto, Beatriz; Ferro, Teresa; Muñoz, Arturo; Sevilla, Julián; Madero, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. To investigate the origin, functional role, and clinical impact of FANCA mutations, we determined a FANCA mutational spectrum with 130 pathogenic alleles. Some of these mutations were further characterized for their distribution in populations, mode of emergence, or functional consequences at cellular and clinical level. The world most frequent FANCA mutation is not the result of a mut...

  19. Transition From Clinical to Educator Roles in Nursing: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Elizabeth

    This review identified barriers to and facilitators of nurses' transition from clinical positions into nursing professional development and other nurse educator roles. The author conducted literature searches using multiple databases. Twenty-one articles met search criteria, representing a variety of practice settings. The findings, both barriers and facilitators, were remarkably consistent across practice settings. Four practice recommendations were drawn from the literature to promote nurses' successful transition to nursing professional development roles.

  20. Knowledge management strategies: Enhancing knowledge transfer to clinicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Lorrie K; Rocha, Roberto A; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Bradshaw, Richard L; Hanna, Timothy P; Hulse, Nathan C

    2006-01-01

    At Intermountain Healthcare (Intermountain), executive clinical content experts are responsible for disseminating consistent evidence-based clinical content throughout the enterprise at the point-of-care. With a paper-based system it was difficult to ensure that current information was received and was being used in practice. With electronic information systems multiple applications were supplying similar, but different, vendor-licensed and locally-developed content. These issues influenced the consistency of clinical practice within the enterprise, jeopardized patient and clinician safety, and exposed the enterprise and its employees to potential financial penalties. In response to these issues Intermountain is developing a knowledge management infrastructure providing tools and services to support clinical content development, deployment, maintenance, and communication. The Intermountain knowledge management philosophy includes strategies guiding clinicians and consumers of health information to relevant best practice information with the intention of changing behaviors. This paper presents three case studies describing different information management problems identified within Intermountain, methods used to solve the problems, implementation challenges, and the current status of each project.

  1. Disseminating effective clinician communication techniques: Engaging clinicians to want to learn how to engage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Kathryn I; Back, Anthony L; Tulsky, James A

    2017-10-01

    Patient-clinician communication that promotes patient engagement enhances health care quality. Yet, disseminating effective communication interventions to practicing clinicians remains challenging. Current methods do not have large and sustainable effects. In this paper, we argue that both top-down approaches (mandated by institutions) should be coupled with bottom-up approaches that address clinician motivation, confidence, and barriers. We need to engage clinicians in the same way we ask them to engage patients - strategically and with empathy. We discuss potentially innovative strategies to integrate top-down and bottom-up approaches in ways that fit clinicians' busy schedules and can inform policy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Career development for the clinician-educator. Optimizing impact and maximizing success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David H; Schwartzstein, Richard M; Weinberger, Steven E

    2014-02-01

    Health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine play key roles as teachers for learners of all levels in both clinical care and scientific investigation. Teaching excellence requires training in principles of adult learning and the acquisition and practice of key professional skills including assessment and feedback techniques, curriculum development, and strategies for effective teaching across venues ranging from the bedside to the lecture hall. Those interested in pursuing teaching as the focus of their academic career and basis for promotion should invest in professional development as a teacher and educator. Professional development activities include obtaining additional training as a teacher in dedicated medical education fellowships or serving as a peer observer or being observed by a fellow teacher. Numerous additional options for training as a teacher and educator are now available including resource repositories, continuing medical education courses, and online training modules. Those with an interest in medical education research may benefit from enrollment in masters or other advanced degree programs focused on the qualitative and quantitative methods and other key research skills. Aspiring clinician-educators should also seek out opportunities to participate in a community of medical educators locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. At each of these levels, there exist opportunities to contribute to course or program design, development, and evaluation. Finally, for those interested in promotion as an academic clinician-educator, there are increasing requirements to produce academic scholarship ranging from curricular materials to journal articles focused on education and education research.

  3. Reiki Reduces Burnout Among Community Mental Health Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosada, Renee M; Rubik, Beverly; Mainguy, Barbara; Plummer, Julie; Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians working in community mental health clinics are at high risk for burnout. Burnout is a problem involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Reiki is a holistic biofield energy therapy beneficial for reducing stress. The purpose of this study was to determine if 30 minutes of healing touch could reduce burnout in community mental health clinicians. We utilized a crossover design to explore the efficacy of Reiki versus sham Reiki, a pseudo treatment designed to mimic true Reiki, as a means to reduce symptoms of burnout. Subjects were randomized to whether they started with Reiki or sham. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile Version 2 (MYMOP-2) were used as outcome measures. Multilevel modeling was used to represent the relations among variables. Reiki was statistically significantly better than sham Reiki in reducing burnout among community mental health clinicians (p=0.011). Reiki was significant in reducing depersonalization (pReiki reduced the primary symptom on the MYMOP also only among single people (p=0.03). The effects of Reiki were differentiated from sham Reiki. Reiki could be helpful in community mental health settings for the mental health of the practitioners.

  4. The potential role for a pharmacist in a multidisciplinary general practitioner super clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata; LeMay, Kate; Gunn, Kate; Armour, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The Australian government's General Practitioner (GP) super clinics programme aims to provide well-integrated, multidisciplinary, patient-centred care for people with chronic disease. However, there is no research into the current role of pharmacists in this setting. To explore the perspectives of GP super clinic staff on current and potential (future) pharmacist-led services provided in this setting. Individual interviews (facilitated using a semi-structured interview guide and thematically analysed) were conducted with purposively sampled staff of a GP super clinic in a semirural location in the state of New South Wales, until theme saturation. Participating staff included (n=9): three GPs, one pharmacist, one nurse, one business manager, and three reception staff. Three themes emerged conveying perspectives on: working relationships between staff; a pharmacist's current role; and potential future roles for a pharmacist. All clinic staff actively engaged the pharmacist in their "team approach". Currently established roles for home medicines reviews (HMRs) and drug information were well supported, but needed to be expanded, for example, with formalised case conferences between GPs, pharmacists, and other staff. New roles needed be explored in auditing medication use, optimising medication records, specialised drug information, dispensing, and prescribing. Although GPs had differing views about opportunities for pharmacists' prescribing in this setting, they saw several benefits to this service, such as reducing the time pressure on GPs to enable more effective consultations. Results suggest a pharmacist's services can potentially be better used within the multidisciplinary super clinic model of care to address current gaps within the semi-rural practice setting. Any future role for the pharmacist could be addressed as part of a formalised, strategic approach to creating an integrated healthcare team, with attention to funding and government legislation.

  5. Elder Abuse: What's a Clinician To Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Bruce E.

    Incidence rates are critically examined in light of varying definitions of what constitutes elder abuse. It is suggested that the clinician's position of mandatory reporting is an unrealistic response in many cases of elder abuse due to the lack of adequate support services for either the abuser or the elder. Outcome studies are used to support…

  6. Staff Clinician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Neuro-Oncology Branch (NOB), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) is seeking staff clinicians to provide high-quality patient care for individuals with primary central nervous system (CNS) malignancies.  The NOB is comprised of a multidisciplinary team of physicians, healthcare providers, and scientists who

  7. The role of social media in recruiting for clinical trials in pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahvash Shere

    Full Text Available Recruitment of women in the periconceptional period to clinical studies using traditional advertising through medical establishments is difficult and slow. Given the widespread use of the internet as a source for medical information and research, we analyze the impact of social media in the second phase of an ongoing randomized, open-label clinical trial among pregnant women. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of social media as a recruitment tool through the comparison of diverse recruitment techniques in two different phases of the trial.Recruitment in Phase 1 of the study consisted solely of traditional healthcare-based sources. This was compared to Phase 2 of the study where traditional recruitment was continued and expanded, while social media was used as a supplementary source. Yearly recruitment and recruitment rates in the two phases were compared using the Mann Whitney U test. The contributions of each recruitment source to overall recruitment were analyzed, and the impact of potential confounders on recruitment rate was evaluated using a multiple regression and Interrupted Time Series Analysis.In the first phase of the study, with over 56 months of recruitment using traditional sources, 35 women were enrolled in the study, resulting in a mean rate of ±0.62 recruits/month. In the 6 months implementing recruitment through social media, 45 women were recruited, for a 12-fold higher rate of ±7.5 recruits/month. Attrition rates remained constant, suggesting that social media had a positive impact on recruitment. The Interrupted Time Series Analysis detected a significant difference in recruitment after the intervention of social media (p<0.0001 with an evident increase in the number of recruits observed after the use of social media.Clinicians and scientists recruiting for clinical studies should learn how to use online social media platforms to improve recruitment rates, thus increasing recruitment efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

  8. The role of social media in recruiting for clinical trials in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shere, Mahvash; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Koren, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment of women in the periconceptional period to clinical studies using traditional advertising through medical establishments is difficult and slow. Given the widespread use of the internet as a source for medical information and research, we analyze the impact of social media in the second phase of an ongoing randomized, open-label clinical trial among pregnant women. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of social media as a recruitment tool through the comparison of diverse recruitment techniques in two different phases of the trial. Recruitment in Phase 1 of the study consisted solely of traditional healthcare-based sources. This was compared to Phase 2 of the study where traditional recruitment was continued and expanded, while social media was used as a supplementary source. Yearly recruitment and recruitment rates in the two phases were compared using the Mann Whitney U test. The contributions of each recruitment source to overall recruitment were analyzed, and the impact of potential confounders on recruitment rate was evaluated using a multiple regression and Interrupted Time Series Analysis. In the first phase of the study, with over 56 months of recruitment using traditional sources, 35 women were enrolled in the study, resulting in a mean rate of ±0.62 recruits/month. In the 6 months implementing recruitment through social media, 45 women were recruited, for a 12-fold higher rate of ±7.5 recruits/month. Attrition rates remained constant, suggesting that social media had a positive impact on recruitment. The Interrupted Time Series Analysis detected a significant difference in recruitment after the intervention of social media (precruits observed after the use of social media. Clinicians and scientists recruiting for clinical studies should learn how to use online social media platforms to improve recruitment rates, thus increasing recruitment efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

  9. The Role of Social Media in Recruiting for Clinical Trials in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shere, Mahvash; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Koren, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruitment of women in the periconceptional period to clinical studies using traditional advertising through medical establishments is difficult and slow. Given the widespread use of the internet as a source for medical information and research, we analyze the impact of social media in the second phase of an ongoing randomized, open-label clinical trial among pregnant women. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of social media as a recruitment tool through the comparison of diverse recruitment techniques in two different phases of the trial. Methods Recruitment in Phase 1 of the study consisted solely of traditional healthcare-based sources. This was compared to Phase 2 of the study where traditional recruitment was continued and expanded, while social media was used as a supplementary source. Yearly recruitment and recruitment rates in the two phases were compared using the Mann Whitney U test. The contributions of each recruitment source to overall recruitment were analyzed, and the impact of potential confounders on recruitment rate was evaluated using a multiple regression and Interrupted Time Series Analysis. Results In the first phase of the study, with over 56 months of recruitment using traditional sources, 35 women were enrolled in the study, resulting in a mean rate of ±0.62 recruits/month. In the 6 months implementing recruitment through social media, 45 women were recruited, for a 12-fold higher rate of ±7.5 recruits/month. Attrition rates remained constant, suggesting that social media had a positive impact on recruitment. The Interrupted Time Series Analysis detected a significant difference in recruitment after the intervention of social media (psocial media. Conclusions Clinicians and scientists recruiting for clinical studies should learn how to use online social media platforms to improve recruitment rates, thus increasing recruitment efficiency and cost-effectiveness. PMID:24671210

  10. Working together: a joint initiative between academics and clinicians to prepare undergraduate nursing students to work in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Janette

    2007-08-01

    There is ongoing concern among mental health professionals regarding the recruitment of newly graduated nurses to this specialist nursing area. Many reasons for the problem have been identified, including the perceived inadequate preparation by the tertiary sector, students' prejudices and anxieties about mental illness, a perceived lack of support while undertaking clinical placement, and the quality of the clinical placement itself. This paper describes a collaborative response to these issues undertaken in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. The implementation of preclinical undergraduate workshops using problem-based learning and role plays were undertaken. Mental health nursing scenarios were developed in association with experienced clinicians to introduce core concepts in a supportive learning environment. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation data were collected immediately following the workshop and again after the students returned to the university following a mental health clinical placement. A further survey of one cohort was undertaken 12 months after initial state registration and the beginning of a career in mental health nursing. Results showed that both students' and clinicians' attitudes to the workshops were consistently positive and indicated that the workshops were beneficial in preparing students for their clinical placement. Importantly, since the implementation of the workshops and other collaborative initiatives, an increasing number of newly graduated nurses from the region are choosing to work in mental health.

  11. Clinical Skills Performed By Iranian Emergency Nurses: Perceived Competency Levels and Attitudes Toward Expanding Professional Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Hasanzadeh, Firooz; Powers, Kelly A; Dadash Zadeh, Abbas; Rajaie, Rouzbeh

    2018-03-01

    Emergency nurses play an important role in the care of critically ill and injured patients, and their competency to perform clinical skills is vital to safe and effective patient care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of clinical skills performed and perceived competency levels among Iranian emergency nurses. In addition, attitudes toward expanding the professional roles of Iranian emergency nurses were also assessed. In this descriptive correlational study, 319 emergency nurses from 30 hospitals in northwest Iran participated. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to present the findings. Overall competency of the emergency nurses was 73.31 ± 14.2, indicating a good level of perceived competence. The clinical skills most frequently performed were in the domains of organizational and workload competencies (3.43 ± 0.76), diagnostic function (3.25 ± 0.82), and the helping role (3.17 ± 0.83). A higher level of perceived competence was found for skills within these domains. Less frequently, participants performed skills within the domains of effective management of rapidly changing situations (2.70 ± 0.94) and administering and monitoring therapeutic interventions (2.60 ± 0.97); a lower perceived level of competence was noted for these clinical skills. There was a significant correlation between frequency of performing clinical skills and perceived competency level (r = 0.651, P skills. This has implications for nurse managers and educators who may consider offering more frequent experiential and educational opportunities to emergency nurses. Expansion of nurses' roles could also result in increased experience in clinical skills and higher levels of competency. Research is needed to investigate nurses' clinical competence using direct and observed measures. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Insights From Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies on the Role of Innate Inflammation in Atherosclerosis Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma Rahman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of coronary artery (CAD and other cardiovascular diseases, is initiated by macrophage-mediated immune responses to lipoprotein and cholesterol accumulation in artery walls, which result in the formation of plaques. Unlike at other sites of inflammation, the immune response becomes maladaptive and inflammation fails to resolve. The most common treatment for reducing the risk from atherosclerosis is low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C lowering. Studies have shown, however, that while significant lowering of LDL-C reduces the risk of heart attacks to some degree, there is still residual risk for the majority of the population. We and others have observed “residual inflammatory risk” of atherosclerosis after plasma cholesterol lowering in pre-clinical studies, and that this phenomenon is clinically relevant has been dramatically reinforced by the recent Canakinumab Anti-inflammatory Thrombosis Outcomes Study (CANTOS trial. This review will summarize the role of the innate immune system, specifically macrophages, in atherosclerosis progression and regression, as well as the pre-clinical and clinical models that have provided significant insights into molecular pathways involved in the resolution of plaque inflammation and plaque regression. Partnered with clinical studies that can be envisioned in the post-CANTOS period, including progress in developing targeted plaque therapies, we expect that pre-clinical studies advancing on the path summarized in this review, already revealing key mechanisms, will continue to be essential contributors to achieve the goals of dampening plaque inflammation and inducing its resolution in order to maximize the therapeutic benefits of conventional risk factor modifications, such as LDL-C lowering.

  13. Emerging role of bioinformatics tools and software in evolution of clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Kaur Gill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical research is making toiling efforts for promotion and wellbeing of the health status of the people. There is a rapid increase in number and severity of diseases like cancer, hepatitis, HIV etc, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Clinical research involves drug discovery and development whereas clinical trials are performed to establish safety and efficacy of drugs. Drug discovery is a long process starting with the target identification, validation and lead optimization. This is followed by the preclinical trials, intensive clinical trials and eventually post marketing vigilance for drug safety. Softwares and the bioinformatics tools play a great role not only in the drug discovery but also in drug development. It involves the use of informatics in the development of new knowledge pertaining to health and disease, data management during clinical trials and to use clinical data for secondary research. In addition, new technology likes molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, proteomics and quantitative structure activity relationship in clinical research results in faster and easier drug discovery process. During the preclinical trials, the software is used for randomization to remove bias and to plan study design. In clinical trials software like electronic data capture, Remote data capture and electronic case report form (eCRF is used to store the data. eClinical, Oracle clinical are software used for clinical data management and for statistical analysis of the data. After the drug is marketed the safety of a drug could be monitored by drug safety software like Oracle Argus or ARISg. Therefore, softwares are used from the very early stages of drug designing, to drug development, clinical trials and during pharmacovigilance. This review describes different aspects related to application of computers and bioinformatics in drug designing, discovery and development, formulation designing and clinical research.

  14. A description of the roles, activities, and skills of clinical nurse specialists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R A

    1999-07-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) frequently adapt to meet the challenging and changing needs of patients, families, nurses, physicians, and institutions, thus creating an advance practice role that is problematic in definition and description. The two dilemmas associated with CNSs have been role confusion and ambiguity, and the inability to explicate CNSs' value in economic terms. The purpose of this study was to describe the roles, activities, skills, and the cost-saving and revenue-generating activities of Master's-prepared nurses who function in traditional CNS roles in the United States. A descriptive research design was employed, using Role Theory as a framework to guide the study. The tool used to measure CNS practice included a 68-item instrument. It was pretested and used in two pilot studies. Content validity was supported by three experienced CNSs who were, at the time, in a doctoral nursing program. Instrument reliability was 0.89. Surveys were mailed to all individuals who subscribed (n = 2379) to the Clinical Nurse Specialist Journal. From the convenience sample, 724 CNSs participated, providing a margin of error of +/- 4 percentage points with a 99% confidence level. Regarding the five role components, CNSs reported (listed from most frequently to least frequently) spending time in the role of expert practitioner, educator, consultant, administrator, and researcher. Most of the activities listed in each of the roles were typical of CNS practice. Of the advanced practice roles, the two with the most surprising results were the expert practitioner and administrator roles. The results indicated a trend toward performing advanced skills that have been in the past considered solely medical practice and toward increasing administrative responsibilities. A small number of CNSs were able to identify cost-saving and revenue-generating activities, including the monetary value of the activity.

  15. Perceptions of the role of the clinical nurse practitioner in the Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , support. Abstract. Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the clinical nurse practitioner (CNP) in a doctor- driven primary health .... CNPs have a need for financial reward and .... filling the same function as a CNP. In.

  16. Role Expectations for United States Air Force Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    perspective of symbolic interactionism . Symbolic interactionism provides a matrix within which to understand how humans perceive and interact with the...theoretical framework for understanding role theory in this study is that tradition in social psychology derived from symbolic interactionism (Clayton...influence of the clinical nurse specialist. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 6(l), 53-63. Blumer, H. (1969). Symbolic interactionism : Perspective and

  17. Assessing Career Outcomes of a Resident Academic Administrator, Clinician Educator Track: A Seven-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Anne E; Lundblad, Wynne; Azzam, Pierre N; Gopalan, Priya; Jacobson, Sansea L; Travis, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    This study reports the academic outcomes, including scholarly productivity, of the graduates of one residency training track for future clinician educators and academic administrators. Since its implementation in 2008, the Academic Administrator, Clinician Educator (AACE) track at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic - UPMC has grown in popularity with reports of participants achieving post-graduate academic success; however, there has been no prior assessment of outcomes. In 2015 all graduates of the track were surveyed using an anonymous, web-based survey. Twenty-nine total graduates were surveyed RESULTS: Twenty-four graduates responded to the survey (83% response rate). The graduates are very active in academic psychiatry with 23 (96%) holding an academic appointment with different administrative roles, medical director (50%) and training director (17%) being the most frequent. Participants have also been active in pursuing scholarship with 80% presenting their scholarly projects at local and national conferences and producing post-graduate, peer-reviewed articles (50%). This study underscores the benefits of a clinician educator track and suggests areas for future growth.

  18. How can clinician-educator training programs be optimized to match clinician motivations and concerns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Brendan; Marton, Gregory E; Ramnanan, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have implemented programs aimed at supporting clinician-educators with formal mentoring, training, and experience in undergraduate medical teaching. However, consensus program design has yet to be established, and the effectiveness of these programs in terms of producing quality clinician-educator teaching remains unclear. The goal of this study was to review the literature to identify motivations and perceived barriers to clinician-educators, which in turn will improve clinician-educator training programs to better align with clinician-educator needs and concerns. Review of medical education literature using the terms "attitudes", "motivations", "physicians", "teaching", and "undergraduate medical education" resulted in identification of key themes revealing the primary motivations and barriers involved in physicians teaching undergraduate medical students. A synthesis of articles revealed that physicians are primarily motivated to teach undergraduate students for intrinsic reasons. To a lesser extent, physicians are motivated to teach for extrinsic reasons, such as rewards or recognition. The key barriers deterring physicians from teaching medical students included: decreased productivity, lack of compensation, increased length of the working day, patient concerns/ethical issues, and lack of confidence in their own ability. Our findings suggest that optimization of clinician-educator training programs should address, amongst other factors, time management concerns, appropriate academic recognition for teaching service, and confidence in teaching ability. Addressing these issues may increase the retention of clinicians who are active and proficient in medical education.

  19. Supporting clinician educators to achieve “work-work balance”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry M Maniate

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinician Educators (CE have numerous responsibilities in different professional domains, including clinical, education, research, and administration. Many CEs face tensions trying to manage these often competing professional responsibilities and achieve “work-work balance.” Rich discussions of techniques for work-work balance amongst CEs at a medical education conference inspired the authors to gather, analyze, and summarize these techniques to share with others. In this paper we present the CE’s “Four Ps”; these are practice points that support both the aspiring and established CE to help improve their performance and productivity as CEs, and allow them to approach work-work balance.

  20. The Clinical Nurse Leader--new nursing role with global implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baernholdt, M; Cottingham, S

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the development of the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL ©) role and education, the CNL's impact and potential to improve quality globally. The need for clinical nurse leadership to improve the quality of health care systems while controlling costs is recognized in reports internationally. In the USA, a new nursing role, the CNL, was developed in response to such reports. CNLs are master's level nurse graduates (although not necessarily recruited from a nursing background) with the skills and knowledge to create change within complex systems and improve outcomes while they remain direct care providers. This innovative role can be adapted worldwide to improve the quality of health care systems. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  1. Internet treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Davies, Matthew; McIntyre, Karen; Robinson, Emma; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-08

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for depression is effective when guided by a clinician, less so if unguided. Would guidance from a technician be as effective as guidance from a clinician? Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program, and 141 participants with major depressive disorder were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for depression comprising 6 online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 8 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Patient Health QUESTIONnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9). Completion rates were high, and at post-treatment, both treatment groups reduced scores on the BDI-II (ptechnician-assisted groups respectively, and on the PHQ-9, were 1.54 and 1.60 respectively. At 4-month follow-up participants in the technician group had made further improvements and had significantly lower scores on the PHQ-9 than those in the clinician group. A total of approximately 60 minutes of clinician or technician time was required per participant during the 8-week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for depression. This form of treatment has potential to increase the capacity of existing mental health services. Australian New

  2. Inter-Rater Agreement of Auscultation, Palpable Fremitus, and Ventilator Waveform Sawtooth Patterns Between Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Marc P; Martí, Joan-Daniel; Ntoumenopoulos, George

    2016-10-01

    Clinicians often use numerous bedside assessments for secretion retention in participants who are receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. This study aimed to evaluate inter-rater agreement between clinicians when using standard clinical assessments of secretion retention and whether differences in clinician experience influenced inter-rater agreement. Seventy-one mechanically ventilated participants were assessed by a research clinician and by one of 13 ICU clinicians. Each clinician conducted a standardized assessment of lung auscultation, palpation for chest-wall (rhonchal) fremitus, and ventilator inspiratory/expiratory flow-time waveforms for the sawtooth pattern. On the presence of breath sounds, agreement ranged from absolute to moderate in the upper zones and the lower zones, respectively. Kappa values for abnormal and adventitious lung sounds achieved moderate agreement in the upper zones, less than chance agreement to substantial agreement in the middle zones, and moderate agreement to almost perfect agreement in the lower zones. Moderate to almost perfect agreement was established for palpable fremitus in the upper zones, moderate to substantial agreement in the middle zones, and less than chance to moderate agreement in the lower zones. Inter-rater agreement on the presence of expiratory sawtooth pattern identification showed moderate agreement. The level of percentage agreement between the research and ICU clinicians for each respiratory assessment studied did not relate directly to level of clinical experience. Inter-rater agreement for all assessments showed variability between lung regions but maintained reasonable percentage agreement in mechanically ventilated participants. The level of percentage agreement achieved between clinicians did not directly relate to clinical experience for all respiratory assessments. Therefore, these respiratory assessments should not necessarily be viewed in isolation but interpreted within the context of a full

  3. Attitudes of Medical Students, Clinicians and Sports Scientists Towards Exercise Counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanendran, Abbyrhamy; Pyne, David B.; Fallon, Kieran E.; Fricker, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the amount of exercise undertaken by medical students, clinicians, and sport scientists with the National Australian Physical Activity (NAPA) Guidelines. A second aim was to compare attitudes to exercise counselling as preventive medicine between university- and clinic-based professionals. The research setting was a university medical school and a sports science sports medicine centre. A 20-item questionnaire was completed by 216 individuals (131 medical students, 43 clinicians an...

  4. Role of the teneurins, teneurin C-terminal associated peptides (TCAP) in reproduction: clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, David A; Pavlović, Téa

    2015-11-01

    In humans, the teneurin gene family consists of four highly conserved paralogous genes that are the result of early vertebrate gene duplications arising from a gene introduced into multicellular organisms from a bacterial ancestor. In vertebrates and humans, the teneurins have become integrated into a number of critical physiological systems including several aspects of reproductive physiology. Structurally complex, these genes possess a sequence in their terminal exon that encodes for a bioactive peptide sequence termed the 'teneurin C-terminal associated peptide' (TCAP). The teneurin/TCAP protein forms an intercellular adhesive unit with its receptor, latrophilin, an Adhesion family G-protein coupled receptor. It is present in numerous cell types and has been implicated in gamete migration and gonadal morphology. Moreover, TCAP is highly effective at reducing the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress response. As a result, TCAP may also play a role in regulating the stress-associated inhibition of reproduction. In addition, the teneurins and TCAP have been implicated in tumorigenesis associated with reproductive tissues. Therefore, the teneurin/TCAP system may offer clinicians a novel biomarker system upon which to diagnose some reproductive pathologies.

  5. Facilitating the implementation of clinical technology in healthcare: what role does a national agency play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Gill; Llewellyn, Sue; Maniatopoulos, Greg; Boyd, Alan; Procter, Rob

    2018-05-10

    Accelerating the implementation of new technology in healthcare is typically complex and multi-faceted. One strategy is to charge a national agency with the responsibility for facilitating implementation. This study examines the role of such an agency in the English National Health Service. In particular, it compares two different facilitation strategies employed by the agency to support the implementation of insulin pump therapy. The research involved an empirical case study of four healthcare organisations receiving different levels of facilitation from the national agency: two received active hands-on facilitation; one was the intended recipient of a more passive, web-based facilitation strategy; the other implemented the technology without any external facilitation. The primary method of data collection was semi-structured qualitative interviews with key individuals involved in implementation. The integrated-PARIHS framework was applied as a conceptual lens to analyse the data. The two sites that received active facilitation from an Implementation Manager in the national agency made positive progress in implementing the technology. In both sites there was a high level of initial receptiveness to implementation. This was similar to a site that had successfully introduced insulin pump therapy without facilitation support from the national agency. By contrast, a site that did not have direct contact with the national agency made little progress with implementation, despite the availability of a web-based implementation resource. Clinicians expressed differences of opinion around the value and effectiveness of the technology and contextual barriers related to funding for implementation persisted. The national agency's intended roll out strategy using passive web-based facilitation appeared to have little impact. When favourable conditions exist, in terms of agreement around the value of the technology, clinician receptiveness and motivation to change, active

  6. Notifications of hospital events to outpatient clinicians using health information exchange: a post-implementation survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Altman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The trend towards hospitalist medicine can lead to disjointed patient care. Outpatient clinicians may be unaware of patients’ encounters with a disparate healthcare system. Electronic notifications to outpatient clinicians of patients’ emergency department (ED visits and inpatient admissions and discharges using health information exchange can inform outpatient clinicians of patients’ hospital-based events.Objective Assess outpatient clinicians’ impressions of a new, secure messaging-based, patient event notification system.Methods Twenty outpatient clinicians receiving notifications of hospital-based events were recruited and 14 agreed to participate. Using a semi-structured interview, clinicians were asked about their use of notifications and the impact on their practices.Results Nine of 14 interviewed clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 10% of ED visits before the patient’s next visit. Nine clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 25% of inpatient admissions and discharges before the patient’s next visit. Six clinicians (43% reported that they call the inpatient team more often because of notifications. Eight users (57% thought that notifications improved patient safety by increasing their awareness of the patients’ clinical events and their medication changes. Key themes identified were the importance of workflow integration and a desire for more clinical information in notifications.Conclusions The notification system is perceived by clinicians to be of value. These findings should instigate further message-oriented use of health information exchange and point to refinements that can lead to even greater benefits.

  7. How do occupational rehabilitation clinicians approach participants on long-term sick leave in order to facilitate return to work? A focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eftedal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to explore occupational rehabilitation clinicians’ experiences on how to approach their participants on long-term sick leave in order to facilitate return to work (RTW. Methods An exploratory qualitative design was used. Four focus groups were conducted with 29 clinicians working on interdisciplinary inpatient and outpatient occupational rehabilitation teams in Norway. The clinicians shared narratives from clinical practice. Transcripts were analysed, and results were reported by use of systematic text condensation. Results The clinicians used several approaches to facilitate RTW among individuals on sick leave. Three themes emerged as especially important in order to succeed: 1 To get a basic understanding of the participant’s life-world through a mapping process; 2 To build a therapeutic alliance through communication characterised by sensitivity to the participants’ needs and emotional concerns; and 3 To initiate processes of change that increase the possibilities for RTW. Four main areas targetable for change were identified, three directed at the individual and one encompassing the participants’ surroundings. These approaches were: a To increase feelings of confidence and coping; b To increase the participants’ awareness of their own limits; c To challenge inefficient and negative attitudes and thoughts related to the sick-role; and d Close and immediate dialogue with key stakeholders. Conclusions To increase the possibilities for RTW among individuals on long-term sick leave, a thorough mapping process and the construction of a therapeutic alliance are seen as crucial elements in approaches by occupational rehabilitation clinicians. By gaining the participants’ trust and identifying their barriers and possibilities for work, the clinicians can target modifiable factors, especially at the individual level, and obstacles for RTW in their individual surroundings. This study

  8. The core role of the nurse practitioner: practice, professionalism and clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carryer, Jenny; Gardner, Glenn; Dunn, Sandra; Gardner, Anne

    2007-10-01

    To draw on empirical evidence to illustrate the core role of nurse practitioners in Australia and New Zealand. Enacted legislation provides for mutual recognition of qualifications, including nursing, between New Zealand and Australia. As the nurse practitioner role is relatively new in both countries, there is no consistency in role expectation and hence mutual recognition has not yet been applied to nurse practitioners. A study jointly commissioned by both countries' Regulatory Boards developed information on the core role of the nurse practitioner, to develop shared competency and educational standards. Reporting on this study's process and outcomes provides insights that are relevant both locally and internationally. This interpretive study used multiple data sources, including published and grey literature, policy documents, nurse practitioner program curricula and interviews with 15 nurse practitioners from the two countries. Data were analysed according to the appropriate standard for each data type and included both deductive and inductive methods. The data were aggregated thematically according to patterns within and across the interview and material data. The core role of the nurse practitioner was identified as having three components: dynamic practice, professional efficacy and clinical leadership. Nurse practitioner practice is dynamic and involves the application of high level clinical knowledge and skills in a wide range of contexts. The nurse practitioner demonstrates professional efficacy, enhanced by an extended range of autonomy that includes legislated privileges. The nurse practitioner is a clinical leader with a readiness and an obligation to advocate for their client base and their profession at the systems level of health care. A clearly articulated and research informed description of the core role of the nurse practitioner provides the basis for development of educational and practice competency standards. These research findings provide

  9. How can clinician-educator training programs be optimized to match clinician motivations and concerns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullough B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brendan McCullough, Gregory E Marton, Christopher J Ramnanan Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Background: Several medical schools have implemented programs aimed at supporting clinician-educators with formal mentoring, training, and experience in undergraduate medical teaching. However, consensus program design has yet to be established, and the effectiveness of these programs in terms of producing quality clinician-educator teaching remains unclear. The goal of this study was to review the literature to identify motivations and perceived barriers to clinician-educators, which in turn will improve clinician-educator training programs to better align with clinician-educator needs and concerns. Methods: Review of medical education literature using the terms “attitudes”, “motivations”, “physicians”, “teaching”, and “undergraduate medical education” resulted in identification of key themes revealing the primary motivations and barriers involved in physicians teaching undergraduate medical students. Results: A synthesis of articles revealed that physicians are primarily motivated to teach undergraduate students for intrinsic reasons. To a lesser extent, physicians are motivated to teach for extrinsic reasons, such as rewards or recognition. The key barriers deterring physicians from teaching medical students included: decreased productivity, lack of compensation, increased length of the working day, patient concerns/ethical issues, and lack of confidence in their own ability. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that optimization of clinician-educator training programs should address, amongst other factors, time management concerns, appropriate academic recognition for teaching service, and confidence in teaching ability. Addressing these issues may increase the retention of clinicians who are active and proficient in medical education. Keywords: clinician-educators, teaching, undergraduate medical

  10. The 2nd Annual Clinical Scientist Trainee Symposium, August 22, 2017, London, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Charles; Blom, Jessica N; Lewis, James F

    2018-03-27

    Clinician scientists play a critical role in bridging research and clinical practice. Unfortunately, the neglect of research training in medical schools has created clinicians who are unable to translate evidence from literature to practice. Furthermore, the erosion of research training in medical education has resulted in clinicians who lack the skills required for successful scientific investigation. To counteract this, the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry has made an effort to engage trainees, at all levels, in the research process. The 2nd Annual Clinician Scientist Trainee Symposium was held in London, Ontario, Canada on August 22, 2017. Organized each year since 2016 by the Schulich Research Office, the symposium features research being conducted by trainees in Schulich's Clinical Research Training Program. The focus this year was on the current state of clinician-scientist training in Canada and visions for the path ahead.

  11. Concordance between patient and clinician assessment of dry eye severity and treatment response in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po-Ting; Chien, Hsu-Chih; Ng, Kwong; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Chen, Wei-Li; Hou, Yu-Chih; Wang, I-Jong; Chu, Hsiao-Sung; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2015-05-01

    Accurate diagnosis and early recognition of dry eye symptoms are important in the management of dry eye disease (DED). This study aimed to evaluate concordance between patient and clinician assessment of DED severity and treatment response. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 ophthalmology clinics in Taiwan. Clinicians assessed severity based on the Dry Eye Workshop severity grading (levels 1-4; where 4 = most severe), whereas patients completed the Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire. To evaluate the treatment response, patients completed the Subject Global Assessment scale, and clinicians independently assessed patients using the Clinical Global Impression scale. A total of 466 patients were included. Clinicians graded 88.3% of patients as level 1/2, 9.0% as level 3, and 2.7% as level 4 Dry Eye Workshop severity, whereas 44.9% of patients reported normal/mild symptoms, 17.1% with moderate severity, and 38.0% with severe DED. Patients were primarily treated with artificial tears. The clinician assessed 10.3% of patients as unchanged on disease severity after treatment and 88.0% as improved, whereas 49.2% of patients reported dry eye symptoms being almost the same after treatment and 34.6% reported improved symptoms. There was low agreement between clinician and patient assessments in terms of disease severity (rho = 0.17, P treatment response (rho = 0.22, P treatment response between patient and clinician assessment. Clinicians may underestimate DED severity and persistence of dry eye symptoms after treatment with artificial tears.Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01942226.

  12. Emotional exhaustion and workload predict clinician-rated and objective patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Annalena; Meier, Laurenz L.; Manser, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the role of clinician burnout, demographic, and organizational characteristics in predicting subjective and objective indicators of patient safety. Background: Maintaining clinician health and ensuring safe patient care are important goals for hospitals. While these goals are not independent from each other, the interplay between clinician psychological health, demographic and organizational variables, and objective patient safety indicators is poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Method: Participants were 1425 physicians and nurses working in intensive care. Regression analysis (multilevel) was used to investigate the effect of burnout as an indicator of psychological health, demographic (e.g., professional role and experience) and organizational (e.g., workload, predictability) characteristics on standardized mortality ratios, length of stay and clinician-rated patient safety. Results: Clinician-rated patient safety was associated with burnout, trainee status, and professional role. Mortality was predicted by emotional exhaustion. Length of stay was predicted by workload. Contrary to our expectations, burnout did not predict length of stay, and workload and predictability did not predict standardized mortality ratios. Conclusion: At least in the short-term, clinicians seem to be able to maintain safety despite high workload and low predictability. Nevertheless, burnout poses a safety risk. Subjectively, burnt-out clinicians rated safety lower, and objectively, units with high emotional exhaustion had higher standardized mortality ratios. In summary, our results indicate that clinician psychological health and patient safety could be managed simultaneously. Further research needs to establish causal relationships between these variables and support to the development of managerial guidelines to ensure clinicians’ psychological health and patients’ safety. PMID:25657627

  13. Emotional Exhaustion and Workload Predict Clinician-Rated and Objective Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalena eWelp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate the role of clinician burnout, demographic and organizational characteristics in predicting subjective and objective indicators of patient safety. Background: Maintaining clinician health and ensuring safe patient care are important goals for hospitals. While these goals are not independent from each other, the interplay between clinician psychological health, demographic and organizational variables and objective patient safety indicators is poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Method: Participants were 1425 physicians and nurses working in intensive care. (Multilevel regression analysis was used to investigate the effect of burnout as an indicator of psychological health, demographic (e.g., professional role and experience and organizational (e.g., workload, predictability characteristics on standardized mortality ratios, length of stay and clinician-rated patient safety. Results: Clinician-rated patient safety were associated with burnout, trainee status, and professional role. Mortality was predicted by emotional exhaustion. Length of stay was predicted by workload. Contrary to our expectations, burnout did not predict length of stay, and workload and predictability did not predict standardized mortality ratios.Conclusion: At least in the short-term, clinicians seem to be able to maintain safety despite high workload and low predictability. Nevertheless, burnout poses a safety risk. Subjectively, burnt-out clinicians rated safety lower, and objectively, units with high emotional exhaustion had higher standardized mortality ratios. In summary, our results indicate that clinician psychological health and patient safety could be managed simultaneously. Further research needs to establish causal relationships between these variables or and support the development of managerial guidelines to ensure clinicians’ psychological health and patients’ safety.

  14. Guiding role of typical cases in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the change of the concept of graduate enrollment, the recruiting proportion of clinical medicine professional degree graduate students is more and more, and the training of professional degree graduate students is increasingly focusing on practical. In our experience in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students, increasing the ward clinical practice time is important. For particular emphasis on the guiding role of the typical cases, each professional group combined their professional characteristics of the typical cases to instruct the graduate students, training their clinical diagnosis and treatment ability, training their microsurgical techniques. From clinical medical writing, record summary, literature review, professional degree graduate students could expand their knowledge structure, practice their thesis writing ability. Based on the typical cases, expansion of knowledge coverage, they could improve the ability of diagnosis and treatment for special disease cases. In this rigorous training system, professional degree graduate students can learn by analogy, and focus on typical cases to get the most intuitive panoramic understanding of the diseases, with a minimum of time to master the most clinical knowledge, to enrich clinical experience, and to lay the foundation for future work in the assessment.

  15. The role of blended learning in the clinical education of healthcare students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael; Frantz, Jose; Bozalek, Vivienne

    2012-01-01

    Developing practice knowledge in healthcare is a complex process that is difficult to teach. Clinical education exposes students to authentic learning situations, but students also need epistemological access to tacit knowledge and clinical reasoning skills in order to interpret clinical problems. Blended learning offers opportunities for the complexity of learning by integrating face-to-face and online interaction. However, little is known about its use in clinical education. To determine the impact of blended learning in the clinical education of healthcare students. Articles published between 2000 and 2010 were retrieved from online and print sources, and included multiple search methodologies. Search terms were derived following a preliminary review of relevant literature. A total of 71 articles were retrieved and 57 were removed after two rounds of analysis. Further methodological appraisals excluded another seven, leaving seven for the review. All studies reviewed evaluated the use of a blended learning intervention in a clinical context, although each intervention was different. Three studies included a control group, and two were qualitative in nature. Blended learning was shown to help bridge the gap between theory and practice and to improve a range of selected clinical competencies among students. Few high-quality studies were found to evaluate the role of blended learning in clinical education, and those that were found provide only rudimentary evidence that integrating technology-enhanced teaching with traditional approaches have potential to improve clinical competencies among health students. Further well-designed research into the use of blended learning in clinical education is therefore needed before we rush to adopt it.

  16. Obesity in Women: Insights for the Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauqeer, Zujaja; Gomez, Gricelda; Stanford, Fatima Cody

    2018-04-01

    As a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide, obesity is a disease that is frequently encountered in clinical practice today and requires a range of medical interventions. While obesity affects both men and women across all ages, multiple issues are particularly germane to women's health, particularly as obesity is more prevalent among women than men in the United States and obesity among women of reproductive health relates to the growing issue of childhood obesity. Discussed herein are the epidemiology and pathophysiology of obesity along with the impact of perinatal obesity on fetal programming. Guidance on screening and management of obesity through lifestyle intervention, pharmacologic therapy, and bariatric surgery, as well as avoidance of weight-promoting medications wherever possible, is elaborated. Particular attention is paid to the contribution of these modalities to weight loss as well as their impact on obesity-related comorbidities that affect a woman's overall health, such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension, and her reproductive and gynecologic health. With modest weight loss, women with obesity can achieve notable improvements in chronic medical conditions, fertility, pregnancy outcomes, and symptoms of pelvic floor disorders. Moreover, as children born to women after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss show improved metabolic outcomes, this demonstrates a role for maternal weight loss in reducing risk of development of metabolic disturbances in children. In light of the immense cost burden and mortality from obesity, it is important to emphasize the role of lifestyle intervention, pharmacologic management, and bariatric surgery for weight loss in clinical practice to mitigate the impact of obesity on women's health.

  17. Balancing collaborative and independent practice roles in clinical pharmacy: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Megan B; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Park, Angela M; Ourth, Heather; Morreale, Anthony P; Rose, Adam J

    2015-02-01

    Clinical pharmacists (CPs) with a scope of practice operate as direct care providers and health care team members. Research often focuses on one role or the other; little is understood about the dynamic relationship between roles in practice settings. To identify the challenges CPs face in balancing dual roles as direct care providers and health care team members and the implications for CP effectiveness and quality of care. Pharmacists were interviewed with a primary purpose of informing an implementation effort. Besides the implementation, there were emergent themes regarding the challenges posed for CPs in negotiating dual roles. This study is, therefore, a secondary analysis of semistructured interviews and direct observation of 48 CPs, addressing this phenomenon. Interview data were entered into NVivo 10 and systematically analyzed using an emergent thematic coding strategy. Pharmacists describe role ambiguity, where they perform as direct providers or team members simultaneously or in quick succession. They note the existence of a "transaction cost," where switching causes loss of momentum or disruption of work flow. Additionally, pharmacists feel that fellow providers lack an understanding of what they do and that CP contributions are not evaluated accurately by other health professionals. It is a challenge for CPs to balance the distinct roles of serving as collaborators and primary providers. Frequent role switching is not conducive to optimal work efficiency or patient care. Our findings suggest concrete steps that medical centers can take to improve both CP worklife and quality of patient care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. [Formula: see text]The effect of stereotype threat on older people's clinical cognitive outcomes: investigating the moderating role of dementia worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresson, Megan; Dardenne, Benoit; Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown that stereotype threat (ST) reduces older people's cognitive performance, but few have studied its impact on clinical cognitive outcomes. Our study was designed to further examine the impact of ST on the clinical assessment of older subjects' cognitive functioning, as well as the moderating role of fear of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) (or 'dementia worry'). Seventy-two neurologically normal (MMSE > 26) participants aged between 59 and 70 completed a set of neuropsychological tasks in either an ST or a positive condition (condition in which negative stereotypes were invalidated). Regression-based path analyses showed that only participants who expressed moderate or high fear of AD underperformed on executive tasks in the ST condition compared to their counterparts in the positive condition. Moreover, in the ST condition, participants' performance on executive tasks was more impaired (relative to normative data) than in the positive condition. However, ST had no effect on memory and attention performance. Our results showed that ST can cause older people to perform at pathological levels on executive tasks. Results highlight the need for clinicians to be cautious when conducting neuropsychological assessments of older people who express high levels of dementia worry.

  19. The Role of Clinical Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in China: Current Status and the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Chen, MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases. The state-of-the-art CMR imaging has many advantages in cardiac imaging, including excellent spatial and temporal resolution, unrestricted imaging field, no exposure to ionizing radiation, excellent tissue contrast, and unique myocardial tissue characterization. Clinical CMR imaging is used during the cardiovascular diagnostic workup in the United States and some European countries. Use of CMR imaging is emerging in hospitals in China and has a promising future. This review briefly describes the real-world clinical application of CMR imaging in China and discuss obstacles for its future development.

  20. The role of diabetes on the clinical manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George Amani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is associated with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), possibly due to impaired immunity, and diabetes may exacerbate the clinical manifestations of TB. Our aim was to assess the role of diabetes in the clinical manifestations of TB. Methods: We studied 1250 patients with pulmonary TB...... in an urban population in a cross-sectional study in Tanzania. All participants were tested for diabetes and HIV co-infection, and TB culture intensity was assessed. Levels of white blood cells, haemoglobin, acute phase reactants, CD4 count and HIV viral load were measured, and a qualitative morbidity...

  1. An Innovative Program to Support Internationally Educated Health Professionals and Their Instructors: Role of the Clinical Practice Facilitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sylvia; Lee, Annemarie L; Switzer-McIntyre, Sharon; Evans, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Internationally educated health professionals immigrating to other countries may experience difficulty in clinical practice, due to linguistic and cultural factors. An important element of bridging is the opportunity for internationally educated health professionals to practice in a clinical environment. To support these health professionals and their clinical instructors, a Clinical Practice Facilitator (CPF) role was created. This study aimed to examine the CPF from internationally educated health professionals and clinical instructors' perspective. A quantitative survey was conducted with two cohorts (2013 and 2015) of internationally educated physical therapists and clinical instructors who were asked about the nature of interaction with CPFs, mentor, and education roles and the benefits and challenges of the role. Thirty-five internationally educated physical therapists and 37 clinical instructors participated and were satisfied with the interaction with CPFs via face-to-face or e-mail communication. There was strong agreement (>80%) that the CPF educator role was to facilitate learner's reflection on clinical practice while the mentor role (>70%) was to answer questions, provide feedback, and investigate clinical concerns and conflicts. There was insufficient time for access to CPFs and resolution of learners' learning needs. There were differences (P = 0.04) in perspective on the benefit of the CPF in assisting with cultural differences. An innovative CPF role provided support encouragement, clinical, and professional advice. There were discordant views regarding the benefits of the CPF role in addressing cultural issues, which requires further examination.

  2. Differences between patients' and clinicians' research priorities from the Anaesthesia and Peri-operative Care Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boney, O; Nathanson, M H; Grocott, M P W; Metcalf, L

    2017-09-01

    The James Lind Alliance Anaesthesia and Peri-operative Care Priority Setting Partnership was a recent collaborative venture bringing approximately 2000 patients, carers and clinicians together to agree priorities for future research into anaesthesia and critical care. This secondary analysis compares the research priorities of 303 service users, 1068 clinicians and 325 clinicians with experience as service users. All three groups prioritised research to improve patient safety. Service users prioritised research about improving patient experience, whereas clinicians prioritised research about clinical effectiveness. Clinicians who had experience as service users consistently prioritised research more like clinicians than like service users. Individual research questions about patient experience were more popular with patients and carers than with clinicians in all but one case. We conclude that patients, carers and clinicians prioritise research questions differently. All groups prioritise research into patient safety, but service users also favour research into patient experience, whereas clinicians favour research into clinical effectiveness. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Who would become a successful Dean of Faculty of Medicine: academic or clinician or administrator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert; Hoyle, Eric

    2002-11-01

    It has been a long tradition that the medical school dean is an expert in a specialist field with a well-established reputation in research and clinical services. Medical education is no longer simply disease orientated; it is required to put an emphasis on prevention, the need for better management of the health care system, and the need for a better understanding of the sociopolitical aspects of medical care. The deans of medical schools must appreciate the social role of medical education, and the social contract with the community. Although doctors might have difficulties with leadership because they are trained to work as individuals and to value highly their independence and autonomy, good communication skills are an asset for clinicians in management roles. It does not matter whether the background of the dean is academic, clinical or administrative; the most important thing is to possess the managerial skills to tackle the three-way tension between management, academic leadership and professional leadership. The job should be open to people with a good knowledge of and background in health and fiscal expertise, and also a high degree of management, diplomatic and interpersonal skills. Those skills should also be emphasized in the medical curriculum.

  4. Severe bronchial asthma in children: the role of clinical and anamnestic indices in diagnosis verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyubakina L.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents comparative analysis of results of clinical and anamnestic examination of children depending on the asthma severity. Severe asthma in schoolchildren relative to moderate phenotype characterized by birth overweight, more burdened individual allergic history, highly infectious index, drug or combined (medication, food and household allergies, seasonal exacerbations (mainly from November to March, what associated with the trigger role of ARVI and meteorological factors, inadequate asthma control during standard basic therapy.

  5. The role and clinical value of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Tomoyoshi; Nakamori, Hisato; Kurimoto, Toru; Karakawa, Masahiro; Matsuura, Takashi; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Inada, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    1990-01-01

    To define the role and clinical value of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in ischemic heart disease, 967 consecutive patients refered to our laboratory since 1985 were studied. The purpose of scintigraphy have changed from diagnosing of myocardial ischemia to assessing myocardial viability with the progress of coronary angioplasty. At present, thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy have become indispensable noninvasive method for the management of patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  6. Clinical Impact of the Immunome in Lymphoid Malignancies: The Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetro, Calogero; Romano, Alessandra; Ancora, Flavia; Coppolino, Francesco; Brundo, Maria V.; Raccuia, Salvatore A.; Puglisi, Fabrizio; Tibullo, Daniele; La Cava, Piera; Giallongo, Cesarina; Parrinello, Nunziatina L.

    2015-01-01

    The better definition of the mutual sustainment between neoplastic cells and immune system has been translated from the bench to the bedside acquiring value as prognostic factor. Additionally, it represents a promising tool for improving therapeutic strategies. In this context, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have gained a central role in tumor developing with consequent therapeutic implications. In this review, we will focus on the biological and clinical impact of the study of MDSCs in the settings of lymphoid malignancies. PMID:26052505

  7. Creating safety by strengthening clinicians' capacity for reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This commentary explores the nature of creating safety in the here-and-now. Creating safety encompasses two dimensions: revisiting specific behaviours by focusing on substandard performance (reflection), and a more broad-ranging attention to everyday behaviours that are taken as given (reflexivity). The piece pays particular attention to this second dimension of creating safety. Two techniques that promote reflexivity are discussed: video-filming real-time, everyday clinical practice and inviting clinicians' feedback about their own footage, and reflecting on the knowledge and questions that patients and families have about their care, and about unexpected outcomes and clinical incidents. The piece concludes that feedback about everyday practice using these methods is critical to enhancing the safety of everyday activity. PMID:21450780

  8. Collaborative research between clinicians and researchers: a multiple case study of implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlund Carrie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bottom-up, clinician-conceived and directed clinical intervention research, coupled with collaboration from researcher experts, is conceptually endorsed by the participatory research movement. This report presents the findings of an evaluation of a program in the Veterans Health Administration meant to encourage clinician-driven research by providing resources believed to be critical. The evaluation focused on the extent to which funded projects: maintained integrity to their original proposals; were methodologically rigorous; were characterized by collaboration between partners; and resulted in sustained clinical impact. Methods Researchers used quantitative (survey and archival and qualitative (focus group data to evaluate the implementation, evaluation, and sustainability of four clinical demonstration projects at four sites. Fourteen research center mentors and seventeen clinician researchers evaluated the level of collaboration using a six-dimensional model of participatory research. Results Results yielded mixed findings. Qualitative and quantitative data suggested that although the process was collaborative, clinicians' prior research experience was critical to the quality of the projects. Several challenges were common across sites, including subject recruitment, administrative support and logistics, and subsequent dissemination. Only one intervention achieved lasting clinical effect beyond the active project period. Qualitative analyses identified barriers and facilitators and suggested areas to improve sustainability. Conclusions Evaluation results suggest that this participatory research venture was successful in achieving clinician-directed collaboration, but did not produce sustainable interventions due to such implementation problems as lack of resources and administrative support.

  9. Developing education tailored to clinical roles: genetics education for haemophilia nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sarah; Barker, Colin; Marshall, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Genetics is an important component of the clinical work of haemophilia nurses, but little was known about the genetic education needs of haemophilia nurses. To develop, deliver and evaluate genetic education for haemophilia nurses, based on clinical roles. Perceived relevance of genetics to haemophilia nursing practice was explored using electronic voting (response rate 75%, 58/77). A follow-on questionnaire to a volunteer sample of participants explored educational preferences (response rate 41%, 17/41). Results informed development of a two-hour genetics workshop session, evaluated by questionnaire (response rate 67%, 47/70). Genetic competences were considered relevant to the clinical practice of haemophilia nurses, and learning needs were identified. Preference was expressed for education focused on practical skills. During the subsequent workshop, participant confidence ratings significantly increased in the four areas addressed. Planned changes to clinical care and training were reported. Within new areas of advanced nursing practice, learning needs can be addressed by: identifying relevant clinical activities and associated learning needs; creating a strategy and resources using preferred forms of delivery; implementing the strategy; and evaluating its effect. This will enable development of education that addresses the real needs of practising nurses, grounded in their daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceived Maternal Role Competence among the Mothers Attending Immunization Clinics of Dharan, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrooti, Shah; Mangala, Shrestha; Nirmala, Pokharel; Devkumari, Shrestha; Dharanidhar, Baral

    2016-04-01

    Being a mother is considered by many women as their most important role in life. Women's perceptions of their abilities to manage the demands of parenting and the parenting skills they posses are reflected by perceived maternal role competence. The present study was carried out to assess the perceived maternal role competence and its associated factors among mothers. A descriptive cross-sectional research study was carried out on 290 mothers of infant in four immunization clinics of Dharan, Nepal. Data were collected using a standardized predesigned, pretested questionnaire (Parent sense of competence scale, Rosenberg's self esteem scale, Maternity social support scale). The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics and multiple regression analysis at 0.05 level of significance. The mean score of the perceived maternal role competence obtained by mothers was 64.34±7.90 and those of knowledge/skill and valuing/comfort subscale were 31±6.01 and 33±3.75, respectively. There was a significant association between perceived maternal role competence and factors as the age of the mother (Pself esteem (r=0.379, Pself esteem. The factors associated with perceived maternal role competence were age, education, occupation, per capita income, self esteem, social support, and the number of support persons.

  11. The patient perspective: arthritis care provided by Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care program-trained clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmington K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kelly Warmington,1 Carol A Kennedy,2 Katie Lundon,3 Leslie J Soever,4 Sydney C Brooks,5 Laura A Passalent,6 Rachel Shupak,7 Rayfel Schneider,8 1Learning Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, 2Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St Michael’s Hospital, 3Continuing Professional Development, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 4University Health Network, 5Ontario Division, Arthritis Society, 6Toronto Western Hospital, 7Division of Rheumatology, St Michael's Hospital, 8Division of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: To assess patient satisfaction with the arthritis care services provided by graduates of the Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC program. Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional evaluation using a self-report questionnaire for data collection. Participants completed the Patient–Doctor Interaction Scale, modified to capture patient–practitioner interactions. Participants completed selected items from the Group Health Association of America's Consumer Satisfaction Survey, and items capturing quality of care, appropriateness of wait times, and a comparison of extended-role practitioner (ERP services with previously received arthritis care. Results: A total of 325 patients seen by 27 ERPs from 15 institutions completed the questionnaire. Respondents were primarily adults (85%, female (72%, and living in urban areas (79%. The mean age of participants was 54 years (range 3–92 years, and 51% were not working. Patients with inflammatory (51% and noninflammatory conditions (31% were represented. Mean (standard deviation Patient–Practitioner Interaction Scale subscale scores ranged from 4.50 (0.60 to 4.63 (0.48 (1 to 5 [greater satisfaction]. Overall satisfaction with the quality of care was high (4.39 [0.77], as was satisfaction with wait times (referral to appointment, 4.27 [0.86]; in clinic, 4.24 [0.91]. Ninety-eight percent of

  12. God and Genes in the Caring Professions: Clinician and Clergy Perceptions of Religion and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Virginia L; Johnson, Rolanda L

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how care providers’ perceptions of religion and genetics affect interactions with patients/parishioners. This study investigates clinicians’ and clergy’s perceptions of and experiences with religion and genetics in their clinical and pastoral interactions. An exploratory qualitative study designed to elicit care providers’ descriptions of experiences with religion and genetics in clinical or pastoral interactions. Thirteen focus groups were conducted with members of the caring professions: physicians, nurses, and genetics counselors (clinicians), ministers and chaplains (clergy). Preliminary analysis of qualitative data is presented here. Preliminary analysis highlights four positions in professional perceptions of the relationship between science and faith. Further, differences among professional perceptions appear to influence perceptions of needed or available resources for interactions with religion and genetics. Clinicians’ and clergy’s perceptions of how religion and genetics relate are not defined solely by professional affiliation. These non-role-defined perceptions may affect clinical and pastoral interactions, especially regarding resources for patients and parishioners. PMID:19170091

  13. The role of dosimetry audit in lung SBRT multi-centre clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catharine H; Hurkmans, Coen W; Kry, Stephen F

    2017-12-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) in the lung is a challenging technique which requires high quality clinical trials to answer the un-resolved clinical questions. Quality assurance of these clinical trials not only ensures the safety of the treatment of the participating patients but also minimises the variation in treatment, thus allowing the lowest number of patient treatments to answer the trial question. This review addresses the role of dosimetry audits in the quality assurance process and considers what can be done to ensure the highest accuracy of dose calculation and delivery and it's assessment in multi-centre trials. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are ...

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, ...

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes ... for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  18. Emotion Recognition and Social/Role Dysfunction in Non-Clinical Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Andrea L.; Dean, Derek J.; Lunsford-Avery, Jessica R.; Smith, Ashley K.; Orr, Joseph M.; Gupta, Tina; Millman, Zachary B.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2013-01-01

    As researchers continue to understand non-clinical psychosis (NCP- brief psychotic-like experiences occurring in 5–7% of the general population; van Os et al., 2009), it is becoming evident that functioning deficits and facial emotion recognition (FER) impairment characterize this phenomenon. However, the extent to which these domains are related remains unclear. Social/role functioning and FER were assessed in 65 adolescents/young adults exhibiting Low and High-NCP. Results indicate that FER and social/role functioning deficits were present in the High-NCP group, and that the domains were associated in this group alone. Taken together, findings suggest that a core emotive deficit is tied to broader social/role dysfunction in NCP. PMID:23182437

  19. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting.

  20. What is the role of the consultant responsible for postgraduate education in the clinical department?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, B; Scherpbier, A J J A; Ringsted, C

    2007-01-01

    interviewees expressed a wish for a strong leader at the same time they did not consider the position of the CRE influential. CONCLUSION: Along with improved information about the role of the CRE, formal education, proper job-descriptions and clear leadership in the organisation concerning specialist training......BACKGROUND: The organisation of specialist training is complex and involves many clinical departments. The position of consultants responsible for education (CRE) in specialist training at department level is poorly defined in the literature. AIMS: The aim of the study was to explore expectations...... of stakeholders concerning the role and position of a CRE in specialist training. METHOD: The role and position of the CRE was explored using focus group and semi-structured individual interviews. RESULTS: Knowledge of tasks and responsibilities was limited in all stakeholders except among CREs. The expectations...

  1. Multimedia reviews: multimedia convergence for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taintor, Zebulon

    2003-12-01

    Introduction by the column editor: In this final column of the year, Dr. Taintor provides an overview of exciting technological developments via his report on the 2003 annual meeting of the American Association for Technology in Psychiatry (AATP). Advances-and convergences-in technology are providing clinicians with increasingly useful tools to enhance the effectiveness of their treatments, increase access to care, reduce errors, and save time. As Dr. Taintor notes, AATP's meeting is traditionally held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA). I hope that his report will encourage APA's members to attend some of next year's informative sessions.

  2. Future enhanced clinical role of pharmacists in Emergency Departments in England: multi-site observational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Elizabeth; Terry, David; Huynh, Chi; Petridis, Konstantinos; Aiello, Matthew; Mazard, Louis; Ubhi, Hirminder; Terry, Alex; Wilson, Keith; Sinclair, Anthony

    2017-08-01

    Background There are concerns about maintaining appropriate clinical staffing levels in Emergency Departments. Pharmacists may be one possible solution. Objective To determine if Emergency Department attendees could be clinically managed by pharmacists with or without advanced clinical practice training. Setting Prospective 49 site cross-sectional observational study of patients attending Emergency Departments in England. Method Pharmacist data collectors identified patient attendance at their Emergency Department, recorded anonymized details of 400 cases and categorized each into one of four possible options: cases which could be managed by a community pharmacist; could be managed by a hospital pharmacist independent prescriber; could be managed by a hospital pharmacist independent prescriber with additional clinical training; or medical team only (unsuitable for pharmacists to manage). Impact indices sensitive to both workload and proportion of pharmacist manageable cases were calculated for each clinical group. Main outcome measure Proportion of cases which could be managed by a pharmacist. Results 18,613 cases were observed from 49 sites. 726 (3.9%) of cases were judged suitable for clinical management by community pharmacists, 719 (3.9%) by pharmacist prescribers, 5202 (27.9%) by pharmacist prescribers with further training, and 11,966 (64.3%) for medical team only. Impact Indices of the most frequent clinical groupings were general medicine (13.18) and orthopaedics (9.69). Conclusion The proportion of Emergency Department cases that could potentially be managed by a pharmacist was 36%. Greatest potential for pharmacist management was in general medicine and orthopaedics (usually minor trauma). Findings support the case for extending the clinical role of pharmacists.

  3. Perceived Maternal Role Competence among the Mothers Attending Immunization Clinics of Dharan, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Shrooti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a mother is considered by many women as their most important role in life. Women’s perceptions of their abilities to manage the demands of parenting and the parenting skills they posses are reflected by perceived maternal role competence. The present study was carried out to assess the perceived maternal role competence and its associated factors among mothers. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional research study was carried out on 290 mothers of infant in four immunization clinics of Dharan, Nepal. Data were collected using a standardized predesigned, pretested questionnaire (Parent sense of competence scale, Rosenberg’s self esteem scale, Maternity social support scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics and multiple regression analysis at 0.05 level of significance. Results: The mean score of the perceived maternal role competence obtained by mothers was 64.34±7.90 and those of knowledge/skill and valuing/comfort subscale were 31±6.01 and 33±3.75, respectively. There was a significant association between perceived maternal role competence and factors as the age of the mother (P<0.001, educational status (P=0.015, occupation (P=0.001 and readiness for pregnancy (P=0.022. The study findings revealed a positive correlation between perceived maternal role competence and age at marriage (r=0.132, P=0.024, per capita income (r=0.118, P=0.045, self esteem (r=0.379, P<0.001, social support (r=0.272, P<0.001, and number of support persons (r=0.119, P=0.043. The results of the step wise multiple regression analysis revealed that the major predictor of perceived maternal role competence was self esteem. Conclusion: The factors associated with perceived maternal role competence were age, education, occupation, per capita income, self esteem, social support, and the number of support persons.

  4. Challenges of PhD Graduated Nurses for Role Acceptance as a Clinical Educator: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi Moghadam, Yousef; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Feizi, Aram

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Clinical education is the core component of nursing education. PhD graduated nurses who are faculty members can play a main role in clinical instruction. However, there is not clear understanding about the challenges which they may encounter for accepting their role as clinical educator. The aim of this study was to explore the challenges of role acceptance by PhD aduated nurses who are faculty members. Methods: In this qualitative exploratory study a total of 13 participants (8 PhD graduated in nursing, 3 head of departments of nursing, one educational vice chancellor of nursing school, and one nurse) were selected by purposive sampling method. Data were collected by semi-structured, face to face interview and analyzed by conventional content analysis approach developed by Graneheim and Lundman. Results: The main theme emerged from data analysis was "identity threat". This theme had five categories including expectations beyond ability, lack of staff's rely on the performance of PhD graduated nurses, poor clinical competencies, doubtfulness, and obligation. Conclusion: PhD graduated nurses experienced some worries about their role as clinical educators and argued that they have not been prepared for their role. Therefore, policy makers and authorities of nursing schools should support PhD graduated nurses for accepting their new roles as clinical educators. Moreover, some changes in nursing PhD curriculum is needed to improve the clinical competencies of PhD graduated and prepare them for their role as a clinical educator.

  5. Do self- reported intentions predict clinicians' behaviour: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickinson Heather O

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation research is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of clinical research findings into routine clinical practice. Several interventions have been shown to be effective in changing health care professionals' behaviour, but heterogeneity within interventions, targeted behaviours, and study settings make generalisation difficult. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the 'active ingredients' in professional behaviour change strategies. Theories of human behaviour that feature an individual's "intention" to do something as the most immediate predictor of their behaviour have proved to be useful in non-clinical populations. As clinical practice is a form of human behaviour such theories may offer a basis for developing a scientific rationale for the choice of intervention to use in the implementation of new practice. The aim of this review was to explore the relationship between intention and behaviour in clinicians and how this compares to the intention-behaviour relationship in studies of non-clinicians. Methods We searched: PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Science/Social science citation index, Current contents (social & behavioural med/clinical med, ISI conference proceedings, and Index to Theses. The reference lists of all included papers were checked manually. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they had: examined a clinical behaviour within a clinical context, included measures of both intention and behaviour, measured behaviour after intention, and explored this relationship quantitatively. All titles and abstracts retrieved by electronic searching were screened independently by two reviewers, with disagreements resolved by discussion. Discussion Ten studies were found that examined the relationship between intention and clinical behaviours in 1623 health professionals. The proportion of variance in behaviour explained by

  6. Unique roles of SPET brain imaging in clinical and research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibyl, J.; Jennings, D.; Tabamo, R.; Marek, K.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing availability of PET imaging in Nuclear medicine expands the armamentarium of clinical and research tools for improving diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, the role of SPEC imaging remains critical to both research and clinical practice. The development of rational strategies for guiding the selection of imaging modalities flows from primarily the nature of the clinical or research question and the availability of appropriate radiopharmaceuticals. There has been extensive SPECT and PET work in Parkinson's disease (PD) which highlights the value of both these scintigraphic modalities. Three main areas of interest in PD include imaging for improving diagnostic accuracy, for monitoring the progression of disease, and for assessing the therapeutic efficacy of drugs with neoroprotective potential. The demands of the clinical or research question posed to imaging dictates the selection of radiotracer and imaging modality. Diagnosis of PD represents the easiest challenge with many imaging bio markers showing high sensitivity for detecting abnormal reduction of dopaminergic function based on qualitative review of images. On the other hand, using imaging to evaluate treatments which purportedly slow the rate of disease progression, indicated by the reduction of the rate of loss in a quantitative imaging signal in patients studied over time, represents the most rigorous requirement of the imaging measure. In each of these applications presynaptic markers of dopaminergic function using SPECT and PET have been extremely valuable. Review of neuroimaging studies of PD provides a useful example of optimized approaches to clinical and research studies in neuropsychiatric disorders

  7. Role of Transition Zone Index in the Prediction of Clinical Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Güzelsoy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of this study was to determine the role of the transition zone (TZ index (TZI in the prediction of clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH in patients who underwent transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P and to analyze the correlation between the amount of resected tissue and TZ volume (TZV. Materials and Methods Twenty-six male clinical BPH patients with obstructive complaints and 17 male benign prostate enlargement (BPE patients without any complaints were included in the study. Both the groups were over the age of 50. Clinical BPH patients underwent complete TUR-P. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of TZI-as a method of assessing clinical BPH-were measured. Results There was a statistically significant difference in prostate volume, uroflowmetry patterns, prostate-specific antigen (PSA, International prostate symptom score (IPSS, TZV and TZI between the two groups. There was a correlation between TZV and the amount of resected tissue (r=0.97; p0.40 has a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the prediction of clinical BPH among patients who undergo TUR-P due to obstructive symptoms and reported as BPH. There is a strong correlation between the amount of resected tissue and TZV. TZI is a valuable tool in diagnosis, and TZV gives valuable information about the patient to the surgeon.

  8. Developing the Role of a Health Information Professional in a Clinical Research Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M. Seeley

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective ‐ This paper examines the role of a health information professional in a large multidisciplinary project to improve services for head injury.Methods ‐ An action research approach was taken, with the information professional acting as co‐ordinator. Change management processes were guided by theory and evidence. The health information professional was responsible for an ongoing literature review on knowledge management (clinical and political issues, data collection and analysis (from patient records, collating and comparing data (to help develop standards, and devising appropriate dissemination strategies.Results ‐ Important elements of the health information management role proved to be 1 co‐ordination; 2 setting up mechanisms for collaborative learning through information sharing; and 3 using the theoretical frameworks (identified from the literature review to help guide implementation. The role that emerged here has some similarities to the informationist role that stresses domain knowledge, continuous learning and working in context (embedding. This project also emphasised the importance of co‐ordination, and the ability to work across traditional library information analysis (research literature discovery and appraisal and information analysis of patient data sets (the information management role.Conclusion ‐ Experience with this project indicates that health information professionals will need to be prepared to work with patient record data and synthesis of that data, design systems to co‐ordinate patient data collection, as well as critically appraise external evidence.

  9. You Present like a Drug Addict: Patient and Clinician Perspectives on Trust and Trustworthiness in Chronic Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita; Illes, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Past research has demonstrated that trust is central to an effective therapeutic relationship, but the role of trust in chronic pain management is not well understood. The objective of this study was to provide an in-depth examination of how adults living with chronic pain negotiate trust and demonstrate trustworthiness with clinicians in therapeutic encounters. Methods. This qualitative study focused on adults living in an urban setting in British Columbia, Canada. Semi-structured interviews (N = 27) were conducted with participants with chronic low back pain. The results were triangulated by two feedback groups comprising re-contacted interview participants (n = 4) and physicians with expertise in pain and addiction management (n = 6). Results. Grounded theory analysis of the adult patient interviews and feedback groups yielded four major themes: 1) threats to trustworthiness and iatrogenic suffering; 2) communicating the invisible and subjective condition of chronic pain; 3) motive, honesty, and testimony; and 4) stigmatized identities. The following two themes emerged from the analysis of the physician feedback group: 1) challenges of the practice context, and 2) complicated clinical relationships. Conclusions. We found that perceived trustworthiness is important in therapeutic encounters as it helps to negotiate tensions with respect to subjective pain symptoms, addiction, and prescription opioid use. An attitude of epistemic humility may help both clinicians and patients cultivate a trustworthy clinical environment, manage the challenges associated with uncertain testimony, place trust wisely, and promote optimal pain care. PMID:26759389

  10. Eye dosimetry and protective eye wear for interventional clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.J.; Magee, J.S.; Sandblom; Almen, A.; Lundh, C.

    2015-01-01

    Doses to the eyes of interventional clinicians can exceed 20 mSv. Various protective devices can afford protection to the eyes with the final barrier being protective eye wear. The protection provided by lead glasses is difficult to quantify, and the majority of dosimeters are not designed to be worn under lead glasses. This study has measured dose reduction factors (DRFs) equal to the ratio of the dose with no protection, divided by that when lead glasses are worn. Glasses have been tested in X-ray fields using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate the patient and clinician. DRFs for X-rays incident from the front vary from 5.2 to 7.6, while values for orientations reminiscent of clinical practice are between 1.4 and 5.2. Results suggest that a DRF of two is a conservative factor that could be applied to personal dosimeter measurements to account for the dose reduction provided by most types of lead glasses. (authors)

  11. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder. A guide for the treating clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hal

    2002-01-01

    Up to 75% of women report some premenstrual symptoms, but less than 10% have symptoms severe enough to qualify for a diagnosis of PMDD. A key to diagnosis is establishing a pattern of typical PMDD symptoms that recur during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and remit after menses. Underlying psychiatric and medical disorders that might mimic PMDD should be ruled out or addressed. The clinician should recognize that severe PMS and PMDD are most likely caused by sensitivity to hormonal cycling rather than an abnormality of hormone levels. Current treatment is based on the hypothesis that serotonin depletion is responsible for the premenstrual irritability, dysphoria, and poor impulse control in PMDD. There is some evidence that GABA, endogenous opiates, allopregenolone, and various vitamins and minerals might play roles in severe PMS and PMDD. Treatment with oral contraceptives or supplementary progesterone or estrogen has not been effective. For the treating clinician, a reasonable approach to the patient with severe PMS or PMDD is shown in Table 2.

  12. Clinical decision making in cancer care: a review of current and future roles of patient age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Eirik Joakim; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Ottersen, Trygve

    2018-05-09

    Patient age is among the most controversial patient characteristics in clinical decision making. In personalized cancer medicine it is important to understand how individual characteristics do affect practice and how to appropriately incorporate such factors into decision making. Some argue that using age in decision making is unethical, and how patient age should guide cancer care is unsettled. This article provides an overview of the use of age in clinical decision making and discusses how age can be relevant in the context of personalized medicine. We conducted a scoping review, searching Pubmed for English references published between 1985 and May 2017. References concerning cancer, with patients above the age of 18 and that discussed age in relation to diagnostic or treatment decisions were included. References that were non-medical or concerning patients below the age of 18, and references that were case reports, ongoing studies or opinion pieces were excluded. Additional references were collected through snowballing and from selected reports, guidelines and articles. Three hundred and forty-seven relevant references were identified. Patient age can have many and diverse roles in clinical decision making: Contextual roles linked to access (age influences how fast patients are referred to specialized care) and incidence (association between increasing age and increasing incidence rates for cancer); patient-relevant roles linked to physiology (age-related changes in drug metabolism) and comorbidity (association between increasing age and increasing number of comorbidities); and roles related to interventions, such as treatment (older patients receive substandard care) and outcome (survival varies by age). Patient age is integrated into cancer care decision making in a range of ways that makes it difficult to claim age-neutrality. Acknowledging this and being more transparent about the use of age in decision making are likely to promote better clinical decisions

  13. The controversial role of food allergy in infantile colic: evidence and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Rita; Pezzella, Vincenza; Cosenza, Linda; Amoroso, Antonio; Di Scala, Carmen; Amato, Francesco; Iacono, Giuseppe; Canani, Roberto Berni

    2015-03-19

    Food allergies (FAs) are an increasing problem in Western countries, affecting up to 10% of young children. FAs are frequently associated with gastrointestinal manifestations. The role of FAs as a potential causative factor for infantile colic (IC) is still controversial. We report the most recent evidence on the pathogenesis, clinical and diagnostic aspects of FA-induced infantile colic (IC) and suggest a stepwise diagnostic approach. We selected articles on clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis and management of FAs and IC from of 1981 to 2015. Original and review articles were identified through selective searches performed on PubMed, using the following terms: colic, infantile colic, food allergy and infantile colic, infantile colic treatment. The possible relationship between FAs and IC derives from the presence of dysmotility with visceral hypersensitivity and dysbiosis, demonstrated in both conditions, and the clinical response to dietary interventions. Unfortunately, the design of the studies, poor characterization of atopy and different dietary approaches limit the understanding of the importance of FAs in subjects with IC. The role of FAs in IC subjects without other symptoms of atopy remains controversial. However, where there is a suspicion of FAs, a short trial with an extensively hydrolyzed cow's proteins formula or, if breast fed, with maternal elimination diet may be considered a reasonable option.

  14. Concordance Between Administrator and Clinician Ratings of Organizational Culture and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip D; Aarons, Gregory A; Becker-Haimes, Emily M; Evans, Arthur C; Rubin, Ronnie; Adams, Danielle R; Marcus, Steven C

    2018-01-01

    Organizational culture and climate are important determinants of behavioral health service delivery for youth. The Organizational Social Context measure is a well validated assessment of organizational culture and climate that has been developed and extensively used in public sector behavioral health service settings. The degree of concordance between administrators and clinicians in their reports of organizational culture and climate may have implications for research design, inferences, and organizational intervention. However, the extent to which administrators' and clinicians' reports demonstrate concordance is just beginning to garner attention in public behavioral health settings in the United States. We investigated the concordance between 73 administrators (i.e., supervisors, clinical directors, and executive directors) and 247 clinicians in 28 child-serving programs in a public behavioral health system. Findings suggest that administrators, compared to clinicians, reported more positive cultures and climates. Organizational size moderated this relationship such that administrators in small programs (climate in contrast to administrators in large programs (≥466 youth clients served annually) who reported more positive cultures and climates than clinicians. We propose a research agenda that examines the effect of concordance between administrators and clinicians on organizational outcomes in public behavioral health service settings.

  15. Australian clinicians and chemoprevention for women at high familial risk for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keogh Louise A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Effective chemoprevention strategies exist for women at high risk for breast cancer, yet uptake is low. Physician recommendation is an important determinant of uptake, but little is known about clinicians' attitudes to chemoprevention. Methods Focus groups were conducted with clinicians at five Family Cancer Centers in three Australian states. Discussions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed thematically. Results Twenty three clinicians, including genetic counselors, clinical geneticists, medical oncologists, breast surgeons and gynaecologic oncologists, participated in six focus groups in 2007. The identified barriers to the discussion of the use of tamoxifen and raloxifene for chemoprevention pertained to issues of evidence (evidence for efficacy not strong enough, side-effects outweigh benefits, oophorectomy superior for mutation carriers, practice (drugs not approved for chemoprevention by regulatory authorities and not government subsidized, chemoprevention not endorsed in national guidelines and not many women ask about it, and perception (clinicians not knowledgeable about chemoprevention and women thought to be opposed to hormonal treatments. Conclusion The study demonstrated limited enthusiasm for discussing breast cancer chemoprevention as a management option for women at high familial risk. Several options for increasing the likelihood of clinicians discussing chemoprevention were identified; maintaining up to date national guidelines on management of these women and education of clinicians about the drugs themselves, the legality of "off-label" prescribing, and the actual costs of chemopreventive medications.

  16. Patient-clinician mobile communication: analyzing text messaging between adolescents with asthma and nurse case managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woohyun; Kim, Soo Yun; Hong, Yangsun; Chih, Ming-Yuan; Shah, Dhavan V; Gustafson, David H

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of digital mobile devices among adolescents, mobile texting messaging is emerging as a new channel for patient-clinician communication for this population. In particular, it can promote active communication between healthcare clinicians and adolescents with asthma. However, little is known about the content of the messages exchanged in medical encounters via mobile text messaging. Therefore, this study explored the content of text messaging between clinicians and adolescents with asthma. We collected a total of 2,953 text messages exchanged between 5 nurse case managers and 131 adolescents with asthma through a personal digital assistant. The text messages were coded using a scheme developed by adapting categories from the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Nurse case managers sent more text messages (n=2,639) than adolescents with asthma. Most messages sent by nurse case managers were targeted messages (n=2,475) directed at all adolescents with asthma, whereas there were relatively few tailored messages (n=164) that were created personally for an individual adolescent. In addition, both targeted and tailored messages emphasized task-focused behaviors over socioemotional behaviors. Likewise, text messages (n=314) sent by adolescents also emphasized task-focused over socioemotional behaviors. Mobile texting messaging has the potential to play an important role in patient-clinician communication. It promotes not only active interaction, but also patient-centered communication with clinicians. In order to achieve this potential, healthcare clinicians may need to focus on socioemotional communication as well as task-oriented communication.

  17. A Qualitative Study Exploring Moral Distress Among Pediatric Resuscitation Team Clinicians: Challenges to Professional Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tessy A; Thammasitboon, Satid; Balmer, Dorene F; Roy, Kevin; McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-07-01

    Our study objectives were to explore moral distress among pediatric team clinicians within the context of resuscitation experiences, and determine whether there were any distinctively ethical perspectives on moral distress that could be conceptualized as challenges to professional integrity, rather than to previously described psychological responses of clinicians. Descriptive, exploratory qualitative study. A large tertiary pediatric academic hospital in Houston, TX. Twenty-five PICU resuscitation team clinicians were interviewed from December 2012 to April 2013. None. All clinicians reported experiencing moral distress during certain resuscitations. Twenty-one of 25 clinicians reflected and acknowledged that their sense of professional integrity had been challenged during those resuscitation events. Four main components of resuscitation experience that induced moral distress were identified: 1) experiences where there was lack of understanding of the big picture; 2) experiences where there was suboptimal team leadership; 3) experiences where there was variable meanings to the word "resuscitation"; and 4) experiences were there was uncertainty of role responsibility. The perception of moral distress exists among pediatric clinicians during resuscitations and could be conceptualized as challenges to professional integrity. This ethical framework offers an alternative approach to understanding and investigating the complex layers of moral distress.

  18. Factors influencing career progress for early stage clinician-scientists in emerging Asian academic medical centres: a qualitative study in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sungwon; Koh, Woon-Puay; Ong, Marcus E H; Thumboo, Julian

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To explore the factors that influence career progress for early stage clinician-scientists and to identify ways to mitigate these factors in the context of emerging Asian academic medical centres (AMCs). Design Qualitative interviews and thematic data analysis based on grounded theory. Setting and participants Five focus group interviews comprising 29 early career clinician-scientists who have received their first national-level career development award in Singapore. Results Clinical priorities represented an overarching concern with many reporting the difficulty in delineating responsibilities between clinical care and research. Additionally, there was a prevailing perception of the lack of support for research at the institutional level. Participants tended to identify mentors through their own efforts in a relatively haphazard manner, often owing to the dearth of role models and perceived inadequacy of reward systems for mentoring. Support from mentors was thought to be limited in terms of targeted scientific guidance and long-term commitments to the relationship. Most of the participants expressed concerns about how they could secure the next level of funding with diminishing confidence. Notably, the work-life balance was neither conceptualised as a ‘barrier’ to successful pursuit of research career nor was it translated into the reason for leaving the dual clinical-research career pathway. Conclusions Results revealed specific limitations presented by the research environment in newly emerging Asian AMCs. To retain a vibrant clinician-scientist workforce, additional measures are needed, aiming to improve institutional culture of research, build mentoring networks, adopt effective tools for tracking career progress and provide a clear and viable career progression path for clinician-scientist. Further research might explore the cross-cultural differences in managing work-life balance in academic medicine. PMID:29502093

  19. Factors influencing career progress for early stage clinician-scientists in emerging Asian academic medical centres: a qualitative study in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sungwon; Koh, Woon-Puay; Ong, Marcus E H; Thumboo, Julian

    2018-03-03

    To explore the factors that influence career progress for early stage clinician-scientists and to identify ways to mitigate these factors in the context of emerging Asian academic medical centres (AMCs). Qualitative interviews and thematic data analysis based on grounded theory. Five focus group interviews comprising 29 early career clinician-scientists who have received their first national-level career development award in Singapore. Clinical priorities represented an overarching concern with many reporting the difficulty in delineating responsibilities between clinical care and research. Additionally, there was a prevailing perception of the lack of support for research at the institutional level. Participants tended to identify mentors through their own efforts in a relatively haphazard manner, often owing to the dearth of role models and perceived inadequacy of reward systems for mentoring. Support from mentors was thought to be limited in terms of targeted scientific guidance and long-term commitments to the relationship. Most of the participants expressed concerns about how they could secure the next level of funding with diminishing confidence. Notably, the work-life balance was neither conceptualised as a 'barrier' to successful pursuit of research career nor was it translated into the reason for leaving the dual clinical-research career pathway. Results revealed specific limitations presented by the research environment in newly emerging Asian AMCs. To retain a vibrant clinician-scientist workforce, additional measures are needed, aiming to improve institutional culture of research, build mentoring networks, adopt effective tools for tracking career progress and provide a clear and viable career progression path for clinician-scientist. Further research might explore the cross-cultural differences in managing work-life balance in academic medicine. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All

  20. Ethical implications of digital communication for the patient-clinician relationship: analysis of interviews with clinicians and young adults with long term conditions (the LYNC study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Elder, Patrick; Bryce, Carol; Hamilton, Kathryn; Huxley, Caroline; Forjaz, Vera; Sturt, Jackie; Griffiths, Frances

    2018-02-23

    Digital communication between a patient and their clinician offers the potential for improved patient care, particularly for young people with long term conditions who are at risk of service disengagement. However, its use raises a number of ethical questions which have not been explored in empirical studies. The objective of this study was to examine, from the patient and clinician perspective, the ethical implications of the use of digital clinical communication in the context of young people living with long-term conditions. A total of 129 semi-structured interviews, 59 with young people and 70 with healthcare professionals, from 20 United Kingdom (UK)-based specialist clinics were conducted as part of the LYNC study. Transcripts from five sites (cancer, liver, renal, cystic fibrosis and mental health) were read by a core team to identify explicit and implicit ethical issues and develop descriptive ethical codes. Our subsequent thematic analysis was developed iteratively with reference to professional and ethical norms. Clinician participants saw digital clinical communication as potentially increasing patient empowerment and autonomy; improving trust between patient and healthcare professional; and reducing harm because of rapid access to clinical advice. However, they also described ethical challenges, including: difficulty with defining and maintaining boundaries of confidentiality; uncertainty regarding the level of consent required; and blurring of the limits of a clinician's duty of care when unlimited access is possible. Paradoxically, the use of digital clinical communication can create dependence rather than promote autonomy in some patients. Patient participants varied in their understanding of, and concern about, confidentiality in the context of digital communication. An overarching theme emerging from the data was a shifting of the boundaries of the patient-clinician relationship and the professional duty of care in the context of use of clinical

  1. Clinician identification of elevated symptoms of depression among individuals seeking treatment for substance misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobden, Breanne; Carey, Mariko; Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Oldmeadow, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Depression is common among those experiencing alcohol and other drug (AOD) disorders. It has been suggested that identifying depressive symptoms among this group is important for case management. Despite this, there is a lack of research examining how well clinicians perform this task within this setting. To determine the: (i) accuracy of clinician identified elevated symptoms of depression among clients seeking treatment for AOD misuse as compared to a standardized self-report psychiatric screening tool; and (ii) clinician and client characteristics associated with accurate identification of elevated symptoms of depression. The study used a descriptive cohort design. Participants from two Australian AOD outpatient clinics reported demographic data and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to identify elevated symptoms of depression. Clinicians were asked to indicate the presence or absence of depression for individual clients. Client and clinician data were compared. Sensitivity of clinician identified elevated symptoms of depression, compared with the PHQ-9, was moderate at 73.0% (95% CI=63.7, 81.0) and specificity was low with 49.5% (95% CI=39.9, 61.2) accurately identified as not having elevated symptoms of depression. AOD clinicians' years' of experience, clients' main substance and length of treatment were associated with accuracy of identification. Clinicians identify elevated symptoms of depression with moderate accuracy amongst individuals with AOD disorders. There is a tendency to over-identify which may contribute to inaccuracies. Routine screening may assist in improving identification of depressive symptoms and place greater focus on mental health comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical role of Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum presence in female lower urogenital tract: Is there a place for routine screening and treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruška Marovt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections represent major health problem in females all over the world if remained undiagnosed and untreated. They can have adverse influence on reproduction and health of a mother and a newborn. The development of molecular methods has permitted the detection of an array of microbes whose pathologic roles in urogenital infections need to be further studied. Ureaplasmas (Ureaplasma spp., being originally found in 1954 from male urogenital tract, are prokaryotic cells without a cell wall, ranging from 0.1 to 1 μm in length. Fourteen known Ureaplasma serovars have been divided in two species based on their phenotypic and genotypic features, Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum detected and identified separately using polymerase chain reaction assays. Both are generally considered as genital tract commensals. U. urealyticum is most probably associated with male urethritis which has not been found for U. parvum. Recent studies with supposedly healthy women reported their detection rate between 18-87 % for U. parvum and 6-10 % for U. urealyticum. Even though they have been found to be associated with chorioamnionitis, preterm birth and perinatal complications more commonly then other commensals in this region the rising question regarding their pathogenic role in females remains unsolved and the guidelines regarding the diagnostic screening and treatment are inconsistent. The aim of our paper is to review the microbiological characteristics, diagnostic methods and epidemiology of newly differentiated U. parvum and U. urealyticum, and to assess evidence speaking pro and contra their clinical role in causing lower urogenital tract infection in women. Since both bacteria are susceptible to antimicrobials it is of utmost importance for clinicians to decide whether or not to search for one or both of them routinely and treat accordingly in order to prevent ascending upper genital tract infection as well as complications in

  3. Autoantibodies against complement components in systemic lupus erythematosus - role in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, M H; Stoyanova, V S

    2017-12-01

    Many complement structures and a number of additional factors, i.e. autoantibodies, receptors, hormones and cytokines, are implicated in the complex pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Genetic defects in the complement as well as functional deficiency due to antibodies against its components lead to different pathological conditions, usually clinically presented. Among them hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, different types of glomerulonephritis as dense deposit disease, IgA nephropathy, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome and lupus nephritis are very common. These antibodies cause conformational changes leading to pathological activation or inhibition of complement with organ damage and/or limited capacity of the immune system to clear immune complexes and apoptotic debris. Finally, we summarize the role of complement antibodies in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and discuss the mechanism of some related clinical conditions such as infections, thyroiditis, thrombosis, acquired von Willebrand disease, etc.

  4. Role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Ritika; Tan-Koi, Wei Chuen; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacogenomics has been lauded as an important innovation in clinical medicine as a result of advances in genomic science. As one of the cornerstones in precision medicine, the vision to determine the right medication in the right dosage for the right treatment with the use of genetic information has not exactly materialised, and few genetic tests have been implemented as the standard of care in health systems worldwide. Here we review the findings from a SWOT analysis to examine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats around the role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care, at the micro, meso and macro levels corresponding to the perspectives of the individuals (scientists, patients and physicians), the health-care institutions and the health systems, respectively.

  5. [Quality use of commercial laboratory for clinical testing services - considering laboratory's role].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    The number of commercial laboratories for clinical testing in Japan run privately has decreased to about 30 companies, and their business is getting tougher. Branch Lab. and FMS businesses have not expanded recently due to the new reimbursement system which adds an additional sample management fee, becoming effective in 2010. This presentation gives an outline of each role for hospital and commercial laboratories, and their pros & cons considering the current medical situation. Commercial laboratories have investigated how to utilize ICT systems for sharing test information between hospitals and our facilities. It would be very helpful to clarify issues for each hospital. We will develop and create new values for clinical laboratory testing services and forge mutually beneficial relationships with medical institutions. (Review).

  6. [What role for paraclinical investigations within clinical trials conducted in psychiatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladjian, A; Adida, M; Simon, N; Belzeaux, R; Blin, O; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    As in the usual care of patients, paraclinical investigations have today only a very modest role in clinical trials in psychiatry, mainly to complete the pre-therapeutical assessments prior to inclusion of subjects or to monitor treatment tolerance. Yet, the accumulation of data in neurosciences suggests the next emergence of biomarkers, whose interest is that they are closely associated to the biological disturbances underlying psychiatric illnesses, and that they are accessible by means of technological tools such as imaging devices. These tools allow to explore the effects on brain of psychotropic medications, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood stabilizers, in relation to their therapeutic action. The obtained results allow to consider the use of such biomarkers in clinical trials in addition to more conventional approaches. In particular, they could be used as targets to measure brain response to treatment in association with clinical response, to predict a therapeutic response from the neurofunctional characteristics of patients, or to establish the safety profile of drugs on the nervous system. The use of such biomarkers in clinical trials would help to better define the explored populations and their characteristics, as well as the variables to assess, and to better measure the impact of the treatments and their potential harmful effects on the nervous system. © L’Encéphale, Paris, 2016.

  7. Physiotherapy clinical educators' perceptions of student fitness to practise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kristin; Curtis, Heather; Keating, Jennifer L; Bearman, Margaret

    2017-01-17

    Health professional students are expected to maintain Fitness to Practise (FTP) including clinical competence, professional behaviour and freedom from impairment (physical/mental health). FTP potentially affects students, clinicians and clients, yet the impact of supervising students across the spectrum of FTP issues remains relatively under-reported. This study describes clinical educators' perceptions of supporting students with FTP issues. Between November 2012 and January 2013 an online survey was emailed to physiotherapy clinical educators from 34 sites across eight health services in Australia. The self-developed survey contained both closed and open ended questions. Demographic data and Likert scale responses were summarised using descriptive statistics. The hypotheses that years of clinical experience increased clinical educator confidence and comfort in supporting specific student FTP issues were explored with correlational analysis. Open text questions were analysed based on thematic analysis. Sixty-one percent of the 79 respondents reported supervising one or more students with FTP issues. Observed FTP concerns were clinical competence (76%), mental health (51%), professional behaviour (47%) and physical health (36%). Clinicians considered 52% (95% CI 38-66) of these issues avoidable through early disclosure, student and clinician education, maximising student competency prior to commencing placements, and human resources. Clinicians were confident and comfortable supporting clinical competence, professional behaviour and physical health issues but not mental health issues. Experience significantly increased confidence to support all FTP issues but not comfort. Student FTP issues affects the clinical educator role with 83% (95% CI 75-92) of clinicians reporting that work satisfaction was affected due to time pressures, emotional impact, lack of appreciation of educator time, quality of care conflict and a mismatch in role perception. Educators also

  8. Clinical impact of the immunome in lymphoid malignancies: the role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogero eVetro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The better definition of the mutual sustainment between neoplastic cells and immune system has been translated from the bench to the bedside acquiring value as prognostic factor. Additionally, it represents a promising tool for improving therapeutic strategies. In this context, myeloid-derived suppressor cells have gained a central role in tumor developing with consequent therapeutic implications. In this review, we will focus on the biological and clinical impact of the study of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the settings of lymphoid malignancies.

  9. [The analytical reliability of clinical laboratory information and role of the standards in its support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the factors impacting the reliability of clinical laboratory information. The differences of qualities of laboratory analysis tools produced by various manufacturers are discussed. These characteristics are the causes of discrepancy of the results of laboratory analyses of the same analite. The role of the reference system in supporting the comparability of laboratory analysis results is demonstrated. The project of national standard is presented to regulate the requirements to standards and calibrators for analysis of qualitative and non-metrical characteristics of components of biomaterials.

  10. Effectiveness of teaching quality improvement to clinicians: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyasai, Romsai T; Windish, Donna M; Chakraborti, Chayan; Feldman, Leonard S; Rubin, Haya R; Bass, Eric B

    2007-09-05

    Accreditation requirements mandate teaching quality improvement (QI) concepts to medical trainees, yet little is known about the effectiveness of teaching QI. To perform a systematic review of the effectiveness of published QI curricula for clinicians and to determine whether teaching methods influence the effectiveness of such curricula. The electronic literature databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ERIC were searched for English-language articles published between January 1, 1980, and April 30, 2007. Experts in the field of QI were queried about relevant studies. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion if the curriculum taught QI principles to clinicians and the evaluation used a comparative study design. Information about the features of each curriculum, its use of 9 principles of adult learning, and the type of educational and clinical outcomes were extracted. The relationship between the outcomes and the number of educational principles used was assessed. Of 39 studies that met eligibility criteria, 31 described team-based projects; 37 combined didactic instruction with experiential learning. The median number of adult learning principles used was 7 (range, 2-8). Evaluations included 22 controlled trials (8 randomized and 14 nonrandomized) and 17 pre/post or time series studies. Fourteen studies described educational outcomes (attitudes, knowledge, or skills or behaviors) and 28 studies described clinical process or patient outcomes. Nine of the 10 studies that evaluated knowledge reported only positive effects but only 2 of these described a validated assessment tool. The 6 assessments of attitudes found mixed results. Four of the 6 studies on skill or behavior outcomes reported only positive effects. Eight of the 28 studies of clinical outcomes reported only beneficial effects. Controlled studies were more likely than other studies to report mixed or null effects. Only 4 studies evaluated both educational and clinical outcomes

  11. Action and resistance mechanisms of antibiotics: A guide for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Kapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections account for a major cause of death throughout the developing world. This is mainly due to the emergence of newer infectious agents and more specifically due to the appearance of antimicrobial resistance. With time, the bacteria have become smarter and along with it, massive imprudent usage of antibiotics in clinical practice has resulted in resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. The antimicrobial resistance is recognized as a major problem in the treatment of microbial infections. The biochemical resistance mechanisms used by bacteria include the following: antibiotic inactivation, target modification, altered permeability, and “bypass” of metabolic pathway. Determination of bacterial resistance to antibiotics of all classes (phenotypes and mutations that are responsible for bacterial resistance to antibiotics (genetic analysis are helpful. Better understanding of the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance will help clinicians regarding usage of antibiotics in different situations. This review discusses the mechanism of action and resistance development in commonly used antimicrobials.

  12. Approach to Peripheral Neuropathy for the Primary Care Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher T; Seyedsadjadi, Reza

    2018-02-02

    Peripheral neuropathy is commonly encountered in the primary care setting and is associated with significant morbidity, including neuropathic pain, falls, and disability. The clinical presentation of neuropathy is diverse, with possible symptoms including weakness, sensory abnormalities, and autonomic dysfunction. Accordingly, the primary care clinician must be comfortable using the neurologic examination-including the assessment of motor function, multiple sensory modalities, and deep tendon reflexes-to recognize and characterize neuropathy. Although the causes of peripheral neuropathy are numerous and diverse, careful review of the medical and family history coupled with limited, select laboratory testing can often efficiently lead to an etiologic diagnosis. This review offers an approach for evaluating suspected neuropathy in the primary care setting. It will describe the most common causes, suggest an evidence-based workup to aid in diagnosis, and highlight recent evidence that allows for selection of symptomatic treatment of patients with neuropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding clinicians' attitudes toward a mobile health strategy to childhood asthma management: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cushing, Anna; Melvin, Emilie; McGowan, Bryanna; Cloutier, Michelle M; Manice, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Mobile technology for childhood asthma can provide real-time data to enhance care. What real-time adherence information clinicians want, how they may use it, and if the data meet their clinical needs have not been fully explored. Our goal was to determine whether pediatric primary care and pulmonary clinicians believe if a sensor-based mobile intervention is useful in caring for patients with asthma. We recruited participants from 3 urban, primary care and 1 pulmonary practice from July to September 2015 in Hartford, CT. Forty-one participated in four focus groups, which included a demonstration of the technology. Participants were probed with open-ended questions on the type, frequency, and format of inter-visit patient information they found useful. 41 participants (mean age 49 (±13.7) years) were board-certified clinicians (41% MDs and 20% mid-level practitioners), practiced medicine on an average of 19 (±14) years, were primarily white (59%) and women (78%). Clinicians wanted 1) adherence to prescribed inhaler therapy and 2) data on inhaler technique. Clinicians wanted it at the time of a scheduled clinic visit but also wanted inter-visit alerts for excessive use of rescue therapy. Pulmonologists liked the mobile spirometer's provision of inter-visit lung function data; pediatricians did not share this view. Concerns with data accuracy were raised due to families who shared inhalers, access to smartphones, and protection of health information. Overall, clinicians view an asthma mobile health technology as enhancing the patient-centered medical home. Pediatric primary care clinicians and pulmonologists want different information from a mobile app.

  14. Pain management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: insights for the clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, Arvind Iyengar; Walter, Chelsea; Newara, Melissa C.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and has a profound negative impact on patients’ lives. There are growing data suggesting that pain is variably related to the degree of active inflammation. Given the multifactorial etiologies underlying the pain, the treatment of abdominal pain in the IBD population is best accomplished by individualized plans. This review covers four clinically relevant categories of abdominal pain in patients with IBD, namely, inflammation, surgical complications, bacterial overgrowth, and neurobiological processes and how pain management can be addressed in each of these cases. The role of genetic factors, psychological factors, and psychosocial stress in pain perception and treatment will also be addressed. Lastly, psychosocial, pharmacological, and procedural pain management techniques will be discussed. An extensive review of the existing literature reveals a paucity of data regarding pain management specific to IBD. In addition, there is growing consensus suggesting a spectrum between IBD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. Thus, this review for adult and pediatric clinicians also incorporates the literature for the treatment of functional abdominal pain and the clinical consensus from IBD and IBS experts on pharmacological, behavioral, and procedural methods to treat abdominal pain in this population. PMID:22973418

  15. The clinician's guide to diagnostic imaging: Cost-effective pathways. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Z.D.; Chew, F.S.; Ellis, D.A.; Brigham, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed a cost-effective approach to imaging studies, based on initial selection of an exam that best addresses the specific clinical problem and obviates the need for additional diagnostic tests. Tightly reasoned arguments compare available imaging options with respect to diagnostic yield, feasibility, risk, and cost. To aid the clinician in making cost comparisons, each paper of the Second Edition lists the dollar cost of relevant imaging studies. The Second Edition has been thoroughly revised to reflect the important advances in diagnostic imaging of the past three years, highlighting CT's expanding role in thoracic and abdominal problems, magnetic resonance imaging as a spectacular diagnostic tool for the central nervous system, and the clinical application of many newly-developed radiopharmaceuticals. New chapters cover breast cancer screening, acute spinal trauma, search for primary cancer of unknown origin, acute anuria, blunt chest trauma, new onset seizures, and spinal cord compression from metastases. Other papers have been rewritten for greater clarity and to incorporate new techniques, like dipyridamole stress testing. A glossary and an introduction define and explain the capabilities and limitations of current techniques

  16. Hope for recovery - how clinicians may facilitate this in their work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Mia; Baker, Martyn

    2012-04-01

    The importance of having hope for recovery has been highlighted in numerous qualitative studies of recovery. It is identified as a vital part of this process, and guidelines suggest that service providers should therefore facilitate hope in their clinical work; however, they do not indicate how this guidance can be operationalised. To identify the sources of hope for recovery based on the accounts of people with experience of recovery; to ascertain how these accounts show service providers can facilitate such hope in their therapeutic work. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight people with experience of recovering from mental health problems. A grounded theory analysis was undertaken. A model conceptualising the role of hope in recovery was developed with three categories: "influence of others on hope", "personal hope" and "doing recovery". The model indicates a complex interaction between hope and recovery with an important role for social context and interpersonal relationships, including those with clinicians. Mental health service providers occupy a powerful position in relation to service users' hope, and must carefully consider how they communicate their own hopefulness about clients' recovery. Suggestions are made about facilitating hope for recovery.