WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinician information identification

  1. Information management for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil B; Martin, Stephen A; Maypole, Jack; Andrews, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians are bombarded with information daily by social media, mainstream television news, e-mail, and print and online reports. They usually do not have much control over these information streams and thus are passive recipients, which means they get more noise than signal. Accessing, absorbing, organizing, storing, and retrieving useful medical information can improve patient care. The authors outline how to create a personalized stream of relevant information that can be scanned regularly and saved so that it is readily accessible. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  2. Clinician identification of elevated symptoms of depression among individuals seeking treatment for substance misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobden, Breanne; Carey, Mariko; Bryant, Jamie; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Oldmeadow, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Depression is common among those experiencing alcohol and other drug (AOD) disorders. It has been suggested that identifying depressive symptoms among this group is important for case management. Despite this, there is a lack of research examining how well clinicians perform this task within this setting. To determine the: (i) accuracy of clinician identified elevated symptoms of depression among clients seeking treatment for AOD misuse as compared to a standardized self-report psychiatric screening tool; and (ii) clinician and client characteristics associated with accurate identification of elevated symptoms of depression. The study used a descriptive cohort design. Participants from two Australian AOD outpatient clinics reported demographic data and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to identify elevated symptoms of depression. Clinicians were asked to indicate the presence or absence of depression for individual clients. Client and clinician data were compared. Sensitivity of clinician identified elevated symptoms of depression, compared with the PHQ-9, was moderate at 73.0% (95% CI=63.7, 81.0) and specificity was low with 49.5% (95% CI=39.9, 61.2) accurately identified as not having elevated symptoms of depression. AOD clinicians' years' of experience, clients' main substance and length of treatment were associated with accuracy of identification. Clinicians identify elevated symptoms of depression with moderate accuracy amongst individuals with AOD disorders. There is a tendency to over-identify which may contribute to inaccuracies. Routine screening may assist in improving identification of depressive symptoms and place greater focus on mental health comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Shared leadership and group identification in healthcare: The leadership beliefs of clinicians working in interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Craig; Mason, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Despite the proposed benefits of applying shared and distributed leadership models in healthcare, few studies have explored the leadership beliefs of clinicians and ascertained whether differences exist between professions. The current article aims to address these gaps and, additionally, examine whether clinicians' leadership beliefs are associated with the strength of their professional and team identifications. An online survey was responded to by 229 healthcare workers from community interprofessional teams in mental health settings across the East of England. No differences emerged between professional groups in their leadership beliefs; all professions reported a high level of agreement with shared leadership. A positive association emerged between professional identification and shared leadership in that participants who expressed the strongest level of profession identification also reported the greatest agreement with shared leadership. The same association was demonstrated for team identification and shared leadership. The findings highlight the important link between group identification and leadership beliefs, suggesting that strategies that promote strong professional and team identifications in interprofessional teams are likely to be conducive to clinicians supporting principles of shared leadership. Future research is needed to strengthen this link and examine the leadership practices of healthcare workers.

  4. Information Needs, Infobutton Manager Use, and Satisfaction by Clinician Type: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sarah A.; Currie, Leanne M.; Bakken, Suzanne; Cimino, James J.

    2009-01-01

    To effectively meet clinician information needs at the point of care, we must understand how their needs are dependent on both context and clinician type. The Infobutton Manager (IM), accessed through a clinical information system, anticipates the clinician's questions and provides links to pertinent electronic resources. We conducted an observational usefulness case study of medical residents (MDs), nurse practitioners (NPs), registered nurses (RNs), and a physician assistant (PA), using the IM in a laboratory setting. Generic question types and success rates for each clinician's information needs were characterized. Question type frequency differed by clinician type. All clinician types asked for institution-specific protocols. The MDs asked about unfamiliar domains, RNs asked about physician order rationales, and NPs asked questions similar to both MDs and RNs. Observational data suggest that IM success rates may be improved by tailoring anticipated questions to clinician type. Clinicians reported that a more visible Infobutton may increase use. PMID:18952943

  5. Hospital clinicians' information behaviour and attitudes towards the 'Clinical Informationist': an Irish survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Maura G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians are increasingly expected to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) in order to minimize medical errors and ensure quality patient care, but experience obstacles to information-seeking. The introduction of a Clinical Informationist (CI) is explored as a possible solution. AIMS: This paper investigates the self-perceived information needs, behaviour and skill levels of clinicians in two Irish public hospitals. It also explores clinicians\\' perceptions and attitudes to the introduction of a CI into their clinical teams. METHODS: A questionnaire survey approach was utilised for this study, with 22 clinicians in two hospitals. Data analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Analysis showed that clinicians experience diverse information needs for patient care, and that barriers such as time constraints and insufficient access to resources hinder their information-seeking. Findings also showed that clinicians struggle to fit information-seeking into their working day, regularly seeking to answer patient-related queries outside of working hours. Attitudes towards the concept of a CI were predominantly positive. CONCLUSION: This paper highlights the factors that characterise and limit hospital clinicians\\' information-seeking, and suggests the CI as a potentially useful addition to the clinical team, to help them to resolve their information needs for patient care.

  6. Foraging for Information in the EHR: The Search for Adherence Related Information by Mental Health Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Bryan; Butler, Jorie; Zirkle, Maryan; Hammond, Kenric; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    In this project we sought to qualitatively describe clinician's search for information related to the complex construct of adherence. Nineteen think aloud observations and semi-structured interviews were conducted with mental health providers as they prepared for a patient visit. The transcripts were coded according to constructs from information foraging theory (information goal, patch, scent, enrichment, and opportunity cost). The search strategies uncovered were complicated: provider's searches were sometimes multi-staged (e.g. a search of the EHR led to further enquiry when interviewing the patient), and involved multiple 'patches' (i.e. data from the EHR, the patient and other providers were all sought out). In addition, some information that providers considered relevant to understand adherence related questions was non-obvious (e.g. the absence of specific information was considered a useful cue). Providers' information search strategies for complex constructs are at times non-intuitive; implications for the design of EHR summarization tools are discussed.

  7. Notifications of hospital events to outpatient clinicians using health information exchange: a post-implementation survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Altman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The trend towards hospitalist medicine can lead to disjointed patient care. Outpatient clinicians may be unaware of patients’ encounters with a disparate healthcare system. Electronic notifications to outpatient clinicians of patients’ emergency department (ED visits and inpatient admissions and discharges using health information exchange can inform outpatient clinicians of patients’ hospital-based events.Objective Assess outpatient clinicians’ impressions of a new, secure messaging-based, patient event notification system.Methods Twenty outpatient clinicians receiving notifications of hospital-based events were recruited and 14 agreed to participate. Using a semi-structured interview, clinicians were asked about their use of notifications and the impact on their practices.Results Nine of 14 interviewed clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 10% of ED visits before the patient’s next visit. Nine clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 25% of inpatient admissions and discharges before the patient’s next visit. Six clinicians (43% reported that they call the inpatient team more often because of notifications. Eight users (57% thought that notifications improved patient safety by increasing their awareness of the patients’ clinical events and their medication changes. Key themes identified were the importance of workflow integration and a desire for more clinical information in notifications.Conclusions The notification system is perceived by clinicians to be of value. These findings should instigate further message-oriented use of health information exchange and point to refinements that can lead to even greater benefits.

  8. Employment-related information for clients receiving mental health services and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joanne; Cleary, Catherine; Harris, Meredith G; Lloyd, Chris; Waghorn, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Clients receiving public mental health services and clinicians require information to facilitate client access to suitable employment services. However, little is known about the specific employment-related information needs of these groups. This study aimed to identify employment-related information needs among clients, clinicians and employment specialists, with a view to developing a new vocational information resource. Employment-related information needs were identified via a series of focus group consultations with clients, clinicians, and employment specialists (n=23). Focus group discussions were guided by a common semi-structured interview schedule. Several categories of information need were identified: countering incorrect beliefs about work; benefits of work; disclosure and managing personal information; impact of earnings on welfare entitlements; employment service pathways; job preparation, planning and selection; and managing illness once working. Clear preferences were expressed about effective means of communicating the key messages in written material. This investigation confirmed the need for information tailored to clients and clinicians in order to activate clients' employment journey and to help them make informed decisions about vocational assistance.

  9. Inexperienced clinicians can extract pathoanatomic information from MRI narrative reports with high reproducability for use in research/quality assurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Briggs, Andrew M; Albert, Hanne Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Background Although reproducibility in reading MRI images amongst radiologists and clinicians has been studied previously, no studies have examined the reproducibility of inexperienced clinicians in extracting pathoanatomic information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) narrative reports and t...

  10. Shared Decision Making: The Need For Patient-Clinician Conversation, Not Just Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargraves, Ian; LeBlanc, Annie; Shah, Nilay D; Montori, Victor M

    2016-04-01

    The growth of shared decision making has been driven largely by the understanding that patients need information and choices regarding their health care. But while these are important elements for patients who make decisions in partnership with their clinicians, our experience suggests that they are not enough to address the larger issue: the need for the patient and clinician to jointly create a course of action that is best for the individual patient and his or her family. The larger need in evidence-informed shared decision making is for a patient-clinician interaction that offers conversation, not just information, and care, not just choice. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians. The number of malaria cases reported in the United States in 2011 was the largest since 1971, representing a 14 percent increase from 2010 and a 48 percent increase from 2008. A CDC subject matter expert describes malaria prevention strategies aimed at reducing the risk of malaria in travelers, discusses the diagnosis of malaria in patients with suspect malaria, and explains the treatment options for confirmed malaria cases.

  12. Understanding students' and clinicians' experiences of informal interprofessional workplace learning: an Australian qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E; Crampton, Paul; Kent, Fiona; Brown, Ted; Hood, Kerry; Leech, Michelle; Newton, Jennifer; Storr, Michael; Williams, Brett

    2018-04-17

    While postgraduate studies have begun to shed light on informal interprofessional workplace learning, studies with preregistration learners have typically focused on formal and structured work-based learning. The current study investigated preregistration students' informal interprofessional workplace learning by exploring students' and clinicians' experiences of interprofessional student-clinician (IPSC) interactions. A qualitative interview study using narrative techniques was conducted. Student placements across multiple clinical sites in Victoria, Australia. Through maximum variation sampling, 61 participants (38 students and 23 clinicians) were recruited from six professions (medicine, midwifery, nursing, occupational therapy, paramedicine and physiotherapy). We conducted 12 group and 10 individual semistructured interviews. Themes were identified through framework analysis, and the similarities and differences in subthemes by participant group were interrogated. Six themes relating to four research questions were identified: (1) conceptualisations of IPSC interactions; (2) context for interaction experiences; (3) the nature of interaction experiences; (4) factors contributing to positive or negative interactions; (5) positive or negative consequences of interactions and (6) suggested improvements for IPSC interactions. Seven noteworthy differences in subthemes between students and clinicians and across the professions were identified. Despite the results largely supporting previous postgraduate research, the findings illustrate greater breadth and depth of understandings, experiences and suggestions for preregistration education. Educators and students are encouraged to seek opportunities for informal interprofessional learning afforded by the workplace. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. System parameter identification information criteria and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Badong; Hu, Jinchun; Principe, Jose C

    2013-01-01

    Recently, criterion functions based on information theoretic measures (entropy, mutual information, information divergence) have attracted attention and become an emerging area of study in signal processing and system identification domain. This book presents a systematic framework for system identification and information processing, investigating system identification from an information theory point of view. The book is divided into six chapters, which cover the information needed to understand the theory and application of system parameter identification. The authors' research pr

  14. Measuring Practicing Clinicians' Information Literacy. An Exploratory Analysis in the Context of Panel Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E; Bennett, Katelyn J; Sherman, Scott E; Schwartz, Mark D

    2017-02-15

    As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans' Affairs (VA) medical center. Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach's α=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson's correlations. Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians' information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs.

  15. Clinicians, security and information technology support services in practice settings--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Juanita

    2010-01-01

    This case study of 9 information technology (IT) support staff in 3 Australian (Victoria) public hospitals juxtaposes their experiences at the user-level of eHealth security in the Natural Hospital Environment with that previously reported by 26 medical, nursing and allied healthcare clinicians. IT support responsibilities comprised the entire hospital, of which clinician eHealth security needs were only part. IT staff believed their support tasks were often fragmented while work responsibilities were hampered by resources shortages. They perceived clinicians as an ongoing security risk to private health information. By comparison clinicians believed IT staff would not adequately support the private and secure application of eHealth for patient care. Preliminary data analysis suggests the tension between these cohorts manifests as an eHealth environment where silos of clinical work are disconnected from silos of IT support work. The discipline-based silos hamper health privacy outcomes. Privacy and security policies, especially those influencing the audit process, will benefit by further research of this phenomenon.

  16. Watson will see you now: a supercomputer to help clinicians make informed treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lindrud, Susan

    2015-02-01

    IBM has collaborated with several cancer care providers to develop and train the IBM supercomputer Watson to help clinicians make informed treatment decisions. When a patient is seen in clinic, the oncologist can input all of the clinical information into the computer system. Watson will then review all of the data and recommend treatment options based on the latest evidence and guidelines. Once the oncologist makes the treatment decision, this information can be sent directly to the insurance company for approval. Watson has the ability to standardize care and accelerate the approval process, a benefit to the healthcare provider and the patient.

  17. Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians. The number of malaria cases reported in the United States in 2011 was the largest since 1971, representing a 14 percent increase from 2010 and a 48 percent increase from 2008. A CDC subject matter expert describes malaria prevention strategies aimed at reducing the risk of malaria in travelers, discusses the diagnosis of malaria in patients with suspect malaria, and explains the treatment options for confirmed malaria cases.  Created: 2/26/2014 by Center for Global Health (CGH); Malaria Branch; Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  18. How do practising clinicians and students apply newly learned causal information about mental disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kwaadsteniet, Leontien; Kim, Nancy S; Yopchick, Jennelle E

    2013-02-01

    New causal theories explaining the aetiology of psychiatric disorders continuously appear in the literature. How might such new information directly impact clinical practice, to the degree that clinicians are aware of it and accept it? We investigated whether expert clinical psychologists and students use new causal information about psychiatric disorders according to rationalist norms in their diagnostic reasoning. Specifically, philosophical and Bayesian analyses suggest that it is rational to draw stronger inferences about the presence of a disorder when a client's presenting symptoms are from disparate locations in a causal theory of the disorder than when they are from proximal locations. In a controlled experiment, we presented experienced clinical psychologists and students with recently published causal theories for different disorders; specifically, these theories proposed how the symptoms of each disorder stem from a root cause. Participants viewed hypothetical clients with presenting proximal or diverse symptoms, and indicated either the likelihood that the client has the disorder, or what additional information they would seek out to help inform a diagnostic decision. Clinicians and students alike showed a strong preference for diverse evidence, over proximal evidence, in making diagnostic judgments and in seeking additional information. They did not show this preference in the control condition, in which they gave their own opinions prior to learning the causal information. These findings suggest that experienced clinical psychologists and students are likely to use newly learned causal knowledge in a normative, rational way in diagnostic reasoning. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Structured cues or modafinil for fatigue amelioration in clinicians? A double-blind, randomized controlled trial of critical clinical information recall in fatigued clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flindall, Ian; Leff, Daniel Richard; Goodship, Jonathan; Sugden, Colin; Darzi, Ara

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of modafinil on "free" and "cued" recall of clinical information in fatigued but nonsleep-deprived clinicians. Despite attempts to minimize sleep deprivation through redesign of the roster of residents and staff surgeons, evidence suggests that fatigue remains prevalent. The wake-promoting agent modafinil improves cognition in the sleep-deprived fatigued state and may improve information recall in fatigued nonsleep-deprived clinicians. Twenty-four medical undergraduates participated in a double-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial (modafinil-200 mg:placebo). Medication was allocated 2 hours before a 90-minute fatigue-inducing, continuous performance task (dual 2-back task). A case history memorization task was then performed. Clinical information recall was assessed as "free"(no cognitive aids) and "cued"(using aid memoirs). Open and closed cues represent information of increasing specificity to aid the recall of clinical information. Fatigue was measured objectively using the psychomotor vigilance task at induction, before and after the dual 2-back task. Modafinil decreased false starts and lapses (modafinil = 0.50, placebo = 9.83, P recall (modafinil = 137.8, placebo = 106.0, P recalled with open (modafinil = 62.3, placebo = 52.8, P = .1) and closed cues (modafinil = 80.1, placebo = 75.9, P = .3). Modafinil attenuated fatigue and improved free recall of clinical information without improving cue-based recall under the design of our experimental conditions. Memory cues to aid retrieval of clinical information are convenient interventions that could decrease fatigue-related error without adverse effects of the neuropharmacology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Italian physician's needs for medical information. Retrospective analysis of the medical information service provided by Novartis Pharma to clinicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroni, Elisabetta; Poggi, Susanna; Vinaccia, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    The physician's need for medical information updates has been studied extensively in recent years but the point of view of the pharmaceutical industry on this need has rarely been considered. This paper reports the results of a retrospective analysis of the medical information service provided to Italian physicians by an important pharmaceutical company, Novartis Pharma, from 2004 to 2012. The results confirm clinicians' appreciation of a service that gives them access to tailored scientific documentation and the number of requests made to the network of medical representatives has been rising steadily, peaking whenever new drugs become available to physicians. The analysis confirms what -other international studies have ascertained, that most queries are about how to use the drugs and what their properties are. The results highlight some differences between different medical specialties: for example, proportionally, neurologists seem to be the most curious. This, as well as other interesting snippets, is worth further exploration. Despite its limits in terms of representativeness, what comes out of the study is the existence of an real unmet need for information by healthcare institutions and that the support offered by the pharmaceutical industry could be invaluable; its role could go well beyond that of a mere supplier to National Healthcare Systems, to that of being recognised as an active partner the process of ensuring balanced and evidence-based information. At the same time, closer appraisal of clinicians' needs could help the pharma industries to improve their communication and educational strategies in presenting their latest clinical research and their own products.

  1. A Multisite Survey Study of EMR Review Habits, Information Needs, and Display Preferences among Medical ICU Clinicians Evaluating New Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Matthew E; Cartin-Ceba, Rodrigo; Moreno-Franco, Pablo; Pickering, Brian; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2017-10-01

    The electronic chart review habits of intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians admitting new patients are largely unknown but necessary to inform the design of existing and future critical care information systems. We conducted a survey study to assess the electronic chart review practices, information needs, workflow, and data display preferences among medical ICU clinicians admitting new patients. We surveyed rotating residents, critical care fellows, advanced practice providers, and attending physicians at three Mayo Clinic sites (Minnesota, Florida, and Arizona) via email with a single follow-up reminder message. Of 234 clinicians invited, 156 completed the full survey (67% response rate). Ninety-two percent of medical ICU clinicians performed electronic chart review for the majority of new patients. Clinicians estimated spending a median (interquartile range (IQR)) of 15 (10-20) minutes for a typical case, and 25 (15-40) minutes for complex cases, with no difference across training levels. Chart review spans 3 or more years for two-thirds of clinicians, with the most relevant categories being imaging, laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, microbiology reports, and clinical notes, although most time is spent reviewing notes. Most clinicians (77%) worry about overlooking important information due to the volume of data (74%) and inadequate display/organization (63%). Potential solutions are chronologic ordering of disparate data types, color coding, and explicit data filtering techniques. The ability to dynamically customize information display for different users and varying clinical scenarios is paramount. Electronic chart review of historical data is an important, prevalent, and potentially time-consuming activity among medical ICU clinicians who would benefit from improved information display systems. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  2. Parent and Adolescent Interest in Receiving Adolescent Health Communication Information From Primary Care Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Carol A; Cheek, Courtney; Culhane, Jennifer; Fishman, Jessica; Mathew, Leny; Salek, Elyse C; Webb, David; Jaccard, James

    2016-08-01

    Patient-centered health care recognizes that adolescents and parents are stakeholders in adolescent health. We investigate adolescent and parent interest in receiving information about health topics and parent-teen communication from clinicians. Ninety-one parent-adolescent dyads in one practice completed individual interviews. Items assessed levels of interest in receiving health and health communication information from the adolescent's doctor about 18 topics, including routine, mental health, sexual health, substance use, and injury prevention issues. Analyses tested differences between parents and adolescents, within-dyad correlations, and associations with adolescent gender and age. Most parents were female (84%). Adolescents were evenly divided by gender; 36 were aged 12-13 years, 35 were aged 14-15 years, and 20 were aged 16-17 years. Adolescent race reflected the practice population (60% black; 35% white). The vast majority of parents and adolescents reported moderate or high levels of interest in receiving information about all 18 health issues and information to increase parent-teen communication about these topics. Parents' interest in receiving information varied by adolescent age when the expected salience of topics varied by age (e.g., acne, driving safety), whereas adolescents reported similar interest regardless of age. Adolescent gender influenced parent and adolescent interest. Level of interest in receiving information from doctors within adolescent-parent pairs was not significantly correlated for one-half of topics. Parents and adolescents want health care professionals to help them learn and talk about a wide range of adolescent health topics. Feasible primary care interventions that effectively improve parent-teen health communication, and specific adolescent health outcomes are needed. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reducing Negative Outcomes of Online Consumer Health Information: Qualitative Interpretive Study with Clinicians, Librarians, and Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluye, Pierre; Thoër, Christine; Rodriguez, Charo

    2018-01-01

    Background There has been an exponential increase in the general population’s usage of the internet and of information accessibility; the current demand for online consumer health information (OCHI) is unprecedented. There are multiple studies on internet access and usage, quality of information, and information needs. However, few studies explored negative outcomes of OCHI in detail or from different perspectives, and none examined how these negative outcomes could be reduced. Objective The aim of this study was to describe negative outcomes associated with OCHI use in primary care and identify potential preventive strategies from consumers’, health practitioners’, and health librarians’ perspectives. Methods This included a two-stage interpretive qualitative study. In the first stage, we recruited through a social media survey, a purposeful sample of 19 OCHI users who had experienced negative outcomes associated with OCHI. We conducted semistructured interviews and performed a deductive-inductive thematic analysis. The results also informed the creation of vignettes that were used in the next stage. In the second stage, we interviewed a convenient sample of 10 key informants: 7 health practitioners (3 family physicians, 2 nurses, and 2 pharmacists) and 3 health librarians. With the support of the vignettes, we asked participants to elaborate on (1) their experience with patients who have used OCHI and experienced negative outcomes and (2) what strategies they suggest to reduce these outcomes. We performed a deductive-inductive thematic analysis. Results We found that negative outcomes of OCHI may occur at three levels: internal (such as increased worrying), interpersonal (such as a tension in the patient-clinician relationship), and service-related (such as postponing a clinical encounter). Participants also proposed three types of strategies to reduce the occurrence of these negative outcomes, namely, providing consumers with reliable OCHI, educating

  4. System identification with information theoretic criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Stoorvogel; J.H. van Schuppen (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAttention is focused in this paper on the approximation problem of system identification with information theoretic criteria. For a class of problems it is shown that the criterion of mutual information rate is identical to the criterion of exponential-of-quadratic cost and to

  5. Understanding Clinician Information Demands and Synthesis of Clinical Documents in Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farri, Oladimeji Feyisetan

    2012-01-01

    Large quantities of redundant clinical data are usually transferred from one clinical document to another, making the review of such documents cognitively burdensome and potentially error-prone. Inadequate designs of electronic health record (EHR) clinical document user interfaces probably contribute to the difficulties clinicians experience while…

  6. A snapshot of health information exchange across five nations: an investigation of frontline clinician experiences in emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapman, Seth; Sher, Emily; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Ensuring the ability to exchange patient information among disparate electronic health records systems is a top priority and a domain of substantial public investment across countries. However, we know little about the extent to which current capabilities meet the needs of frontline clinicians. We conducted in-person, semistructured interviews with emergency care physicians and nurses in select hospitals in Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, and the USA. We characterized the state of health information exchange (HIE) by country and used thematic analysis to identify the perceived benefits of access to complete past medical history (PMH), the conditions under which PMH is sought, and the challenges to accessing and using HIE capabilities. HIE approaches, and the information electronically accessible to clinicians, differed by country. Benefits of access to PMH included safer care, reduced patient length of stay, and fewer lab and imaging orders. Conditions under which PMH was sought included moderate-acuity patients, patients with chronic conditions, and instances where accessing PMH was convenient. Challenges to HIE access and use included difficulty knowing where information is located, delay in receiving information, and difficulty finding information within documents. Even with different HIE approaches across countries, all clinicians reported shortcomings in their country's approach. Notably, challenges were similar and shaped the conditions under which PMH was sought. As countries continue to pursue broad-based HIE, they appear to be facing similar challenges in realizing HIE value and therefore have an opportunity to learn from one another.

  7. Core information sets for informed consent to surgical interventions: baseline information of importance to patients and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Barry G; McNair, Angus G K; Huxtable, Richard; Donovan, Jenny L; Thomas, Steven J; Kinnersley, Paul; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-04-26

    Consent remains a crucial, yet challenging, cornerstone of clinical practice. The ethical, legal and professional understandings of this construct have evolved away from a doctor-centred act to a patient-centred process that encompasses the patient's values, beliefs and goals. This alignment of consent with the philosophy of shared decision-making was affirmed in a recent high-profile Supreme Court ruling in England. The communication of information is central to this model of health care delivery but it can be difficult for doctors to gauge the information needs of the individual patient. The aim of this paper is to describe 'core information sets' which are defined as a minimum set of consensus-derived information about a given procedure to be discussed with all patients. Importantly, they are intended to catalyse discussion of subjective importance to individuals. The model described in this paper applies health services research and Delphi consensus-building methods to an idea orginally proposed 30 years ago. The hypothesis is that, first, large amounts of potentially-important information are distilled down to discrete information domains. These are then, secondly, rated by key stakeholders in multiple iterations, so that core information of agreed importance can be defined. We argue that this scientific approach is key to identifying information important to all stakeholders, which may otherwise be communicated poorly or omitted from discussions entirely. Our methods apply systematic review, qualitative, survey and consensus-building techniques to define this 'core information'. We propose that such information addresses the 'reasonable patient' standard for information disclosure but, more importantly, can serve as a spring board for high-value discussion of importance to the individual patient. The application of established research methods can define information of core importance to informed consent. Further work will establish how best to incorporate

  8. Does the Internet provide patients or clinicians with useful information regarding faecal incontinence? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, C A; Murphy, J; Hodgkinson, J D; Vaizey, C J; Maeda, Y

    2018-01-01

    The Internet has become an important platform for information communication. This study aim to investigate the utility of social media and search engines to disseminate faecal incontinence information. We looked into Social media platforms and search engines. There was not a direct patient recruitment and any available information from patients was already on public domain at the time of search. A quantitative analysis of types and volumes of information regarding faecal incontinence was made. Twelve valid pages were identified on Facebook: 5 (41%) pages were advertising commercial incontinence products, 4 (33%) pages were dedicated to patients support groups and 3 (25%) pages provided healthcare information. Also we found 192 Facebook posts. On Twitter, 2890 tweets were found of which 51% tweets provided healthcare information; 675 (45%) were sent by healthcare professionals to patients, 530 tweets (35.3%) were between healthcare professionals, 201 tweets (13.4%) were from medical journals or scientific books and 103 tweets (7%) were from hospitals or clinics with information about events and meetings. The second commonest type of tweets was advertising commercial incontinence products 27%. Patients tweeted to exchange information and advice between themselves (20.5%). In contrast, search engines as Google/Yahoo/Bing had a higher proportion of healthcare information (over 70%). Internet appears to have potential to be a useful platform for patients to learn about faecal incontinence and share information; however, given one lack of focus of available data, patients may struggle to identify valid and useful information.

  9. The role of the national general medical journal: surveys of which journals UK clinicians read to inform their clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Teresa H; Hanney, Stephen; Buxton, Martin J

    2008-12-01

    For biomedical research findings to contribute toward health gains they must reach clinicians. Academic journals have historically been considered important information sources. Birken and Parkin found seven journals to most consistently contain the best pediatric evidence and, of these seven, four were general medical journals. We surveyed clinicians in three UK medical specialties (psychiatry, surgery and pediatrics), asking which journals they read and which they considered important to inform their clinical practice. The readership of general medical journals, in comparison to specialty and sub-specialty journals, is widespread across the three UK medical specialties, although the importance of general medical journals varies widely. The BMJ is the most prominent general medical journal in terms of readership and importance but a dominant specialty or sub-specialty journal was usually more important for most groups. The Lancet is less widely read and less important, although more academics than non-academics consider it important. Overall, key general medical journals play an important role. Journal availability and cost, particularly in relation to membership for UK clinicians, and the position of academics and non-academics have to be considered in any analysis. Three of the four general medical journals containing the best pediatric evidence were found to be widely read by UK pediatricians and two UK-based general medical journals, the BMJ and The Lancet, were also considered important in our survey. Further investigation of the reasons for the importance of a journal and studies that would allow international comparisons would provide greater input to the discussion.

  10. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J; Koziol, Deloris E

    2013-01-01

    The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (Pinformation-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources.

  11. What information on measurement uncertainty should be communicated to clinicians, and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario; Sciacovelli, Laura; Bernardi, Daniela; Aita, Ada; Antonelli, Giorgia; Padoan, Andrea

    2018-02-02

    The communication of laboratory results to physicians and the quality of reports represent fundamental requirements of the post-analytical phase in order to assure the right interpretation and utilization of laboratory information. Accordingly, the International Standard for clinical laboratories accreditation (ISO 15189) requires that "laboratory reports shall include the information necessary for the interpretation of the examination results". Measurement uncertainty (MU) is an inherent property of any quantitative measurement result which express the lack of knowledge of the true value and quantify the uncertainty of a result, incorporating the factors known to influence it. Even if the MU is not included in the report attributes of ISO 15189 and cannot be considered a post-analytical requirement, it is suggested as an information which should facilitate an appropriate interpretation of quantitative results (quantity values). Therefore, MU has two intended uses: for laboratory professionals, it gives information about the quality of measurements, providing evidence of the compliance with analytical performance characteristics; for physicians (and patients) it may help in interpretation of measurement results, especially when values are compared with reference intervals or clinical decision limits, providing objective information. Here we describe the way that MU should be added to laboratory reports in order to facilitate the interpretation of laboratory results and connecting efforts performed within laboratory to provide more accurate and reliable results with a more objective tool for their interpretation by physicians. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The discrepancy between patients and informants on clinician-rated measures in major depressive disorder: implications for clinical trials and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselow, Eric D; Karamians, Reneh; Lord, Marie; Tobia, Gabriel; IsHak, Waguih William

    2014-03-01

    Clinician-rated measures are used in clinical trials and measurement-based clinical care settings to assess baseline symptoms and treatment outcomes of major depressive disorder (MDD), with a widely held dictum that they are sufficient in assessing the patient's clinical status. In this study, we examined clinician-rated measures of depressive and global symptom severity, obtained by interviewing patients as well as informants in an attempt to examine the potential difference or similarity between these two sources of information. The sample consisted of 89 treatment seeking, DSM-IV diagnosed MDD outpatients treated between 1995 and 2004. The clinician-rated measures used included the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) for Severity. The scores of the clinician-rated measures collected from patients' interviews were compared with those collected from informants' interviews. Clinician-rated scores, collected by interviewing patients, were significantly higher and indicative of greater symptom severity when compared with those collected by interviewing informants. This was true for both the MADRS before (Ppractical in MDD clinical trials or everyday clinical care. The discrepancies observed between the clinician-rated scores obtained from patients and informants emphasize the importance of incorporating collateral information during the assessment and rating of depressive symptom severity in both clinical trials as well as in clinical practice.

  13. Approaches to ascertaining comorbidity information: validation of routine hospital episode data with clinician-based case note review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Martin; Robertson, Lynn M; Ali, Tariq; Clark, Laura E; Fluck, Nicholas; Johnston, Marjorie; Marks, Angharad; Prescott, Gordon J; Smith, William Cairns S; Black, Corri

    2014-04-21

    In clinical practice, research, and increasingly health surveillance, planning and costing, there is a need for high quality information to determine comorbidity information about patients. Electronic, routinely collected healthcare data is capturing increasing amounts of clinical information as part of routine care. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of routine hospital administrative data to determine comorbidity, as compared with clinician-based case note review, in a large cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. A validation study using record linkage. Routine hospital administrative data were compared with clinician-based case note review comorbidity data in a cohort of 3219 patients with chronic kidney disease. To assess agreement, we calculated prevalence, kappa statistic, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Subgroup analyses were also performed. Median age at index date was 76.3 years, 44% were male, 67% had stage 3 chronic kidney disease and 31% had at least three comorbidities. For most comorbidities, we found a higher prevalence recorded from case notes compared with administrative data. The best agreement was found for cerebrovascular disease (κ = 0.80) ischaemic heart disease (κ = 0.63) and diabetes (κ = 0.65). Hypertension, peripheral vascular disease and dementia showed only fair agreement (κ = 0.28, 0.39, 0.38 respectively) and smoking status was found to be poorly recorded in administrative data. The patterns of prevalence across subgroups were as expected and for most comorbidities, agreement between case note and administrative data was similar. Agreement was less, however, in older ages and for those with three or more comorbidities for some conditions. This study demonstrates that hospital administrative comorbidity data compared moderately well with case note review data for cerebrovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, however there was

  14. Capturing sexual assault data: An information system designed by forensic clinicians and healthcare researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S Aqif; Smith, Debbie A; Phillips, Maureen A; Kelly, Maire C; Zilkens, Renate R; Semmens, James B

    2018-01-01

    The Sexual Assault Resource Center (SARC) in Perth, Western Australia provides free 24-hour medical, forensic, and counseling services to persons aged over 13 years following sexual assault. The aim of this research was to design a data management system that maintains accurate quality information on all sexual assault cases referred to SARC, facilitating audit and peer-reviewed research. The work to develop SARC Medical Services Clinical Information System (SARC-MSCIS) took place during 2007-2009 as a collaboration between SARC and Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. Patient demographics, assault details, including injury documentation, and counseling sessions were identified as core data sections. A user authentication system was set up for data security. Data quality checks were incorporated to ensure high-quality data. An SARC-MSCIS was developed containing three core data sections having 427 data elements to capture patient's data. Development of the SARC-MSCIS has resulted in comprehensive capacity to support sexual assault research. Four additional projects are underway to explore both the public health and criminal justice considerations in responding to sexual violence. The data showed that 1,933 sexual assault episodes had occurred among 1881 patients between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2015. Sexual assault patients knew the assailant as a friend, carer, acquaintance, relative, partner, or ex-partner in 70% of cases, with 16% assailants being a stranger to the patient. This project has resulted in the development of a high-quality data management system to maintain information for medical and forensic services offered by SARC. This system has also proven to be a reliable resource enabling research in the area of sexual violence.

  15. Perspectives of patients with haematological cancer on how clinicians meet their information needs: "Managing" information versus "giving" it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Kirsten; Young, Bridget; Kalakonda, Nagesh; Salmon, Peter

    2018-03-23

    Practitioners treating patients with haematological cancers have extensive clinical information available to give to patients, and patients need to be informed. However, many patients want to be protected from having information that is too detailed or threatening. To illuminate how practitioners can address this dilemma and help patients feel appropriately informed, we explored patients' experience of feeling informed or uninformed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 patients who had been diagnosed with haematological cancer and had recently received results from clinical investigations or from evaluations of treatment response. Inductive and interpretive analysis of the transcribed audio-recorded interviews drew on constant comparison. Patients described the need for practitioners carefully to manage the information that they provided, and many felt alarmed by information that they did not experience as having been managed for them. A few patients who had difficulty trusting practitioners were not content with the information provided. These findings can be understood using attachment theory, whereby practitioners' careful management of information demonstrates their care for patients, and patients' trust in the practitioner enables them to feel informed. It follows that, when patients do not feel informed, the solution will not necessarily be more information but might be to help patients feel more secure in a caring clinical relationship. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Identification and Management of Statin-Associated Symptoms in Clinical Practice: Extension of a Clinician Survey to 12 Further Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenson, Robert S; Gandra, Shravanthi R; McKendrick, Jan; Dent, Ricardo; Wieffer, Heather; Cheng, Lung-I; Catapano, Alberico L; Oh, Paul; Kees Hovingh, G; Stroes, Erik S

    2017-04-01

    Statins are the first-choice pharmacological treatment for patients with hypercholesterolemia and at risk for cardiovascular disease; however, a minority of patients experience statin-associated symptoms (SAS) and are considered to have reduced statin tolerance. The objective of this study was to establish how patients with SAS are identified and managed in clinical practice in Austria, Belgium, Colombia, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Portugal, Switzerland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. A cross-sectional survey was conducted (2015-2016) among clinicians (n = 60 per country; Croatia: n = 30) who are specialized/experienced in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Participants were asked about their experience of patients presenting with potential SAS and how such patients were identified and treated. Muscle-related symptoms were the most common presentation of potential SAS (average: 51%; range across countries [RAC] 17-74%); other signs/symptoms included persistent elevation in transaminases. To establish whether symptoms are due to statins, clinicians required rechallenge after discontinuation of statin treatment (average: 77%; RAC 40-90%); other requirements included trying at least one alternative statin. Clinicians reported that half of high-risk patients with confirmed SAS receive a lower-dose statin (average: 53%; RAC 43-72%), and that most receive another non-statin lipid-lowering therapy with or without a concomitant statin (average: 65%; RAC 52-83%). The specialists and GPs surveyed use stringent criteria to establish causality between statin use and signs or symptoms, and persevere with statin treatment where possible.

  17. Substance Identification Information from EPA's Substance Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Substance Registry Services (SRS) is the authoritative resource for basic information about substances of interest to the U.S. EPA and its state and tribal...

  18. Geometrical identification of quantum and information theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caianiello, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The interrelation of quantum and information theories is investigation on the base of the conception of cross-entropy. It is assumed that ''complex information geometry'' may serve as a tool for ''technological transfer'' from one research field to the other which is not connected directly with the first one. It is pointed out that the ''infinitesimal distance'' ds 2 and ''infinitesimal cross-entropy'' dHsub(c) coincide

  19. 15 CFR 718.2 - Identification of confidential business information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... business information. 718.2 Section 718.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS INFORMATION 718.2 Identification of confidential business...

  20. Effects of clinical communication interventions in hospitals: a systematic review of information and communication technology adoptions for improved communication between clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert C; Tran, Kim; Lo, Vivian; O'Leary, Kevin J; Morra, Dante; Quan, Sherman D; Perrier, Laure

    2012-11-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify, describe and assess interventions of information and communication technology on the processes of communication and associated patient outcomes within hospital settings. Studies published from the years 1996 to 2010 were considered and were selected if they described an evaluation of information and communication technology interventions to improve clinical communication within hospitals. Two authors abstracted data from full text articles, and the quality of individual articles were appraised. Results of interventions were summarized by their effect. There were 18 identified studies that evaluated the use of interventions that included alphanumeric paging, hands-free communication devices, mobile phones, smartphones, task management systems and a display based paging system. Most quantitative studies used a before and after study design and were of lower quality. Of all the studies, there was only one prospective randomized study, but this study used only simulated communication events. Quantitative studies identified improved perceptions of communication and some improvement in communication metrics. Qualitative studies described improvements in efficiency of communication but also issues of loss of control and reliability. Despite the rapid advancement in information and communications technology over the last decade, there is limited evidence suggesting improvements in the ability of health professionals to communicate effectively. Given the critical nature of communication, we advocate further evaluation of information and communication technology designed to improve communication between clinicians. Outcome measures should include measures of patient-oriented outcomes and efficiency for clinicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Customized lifting multiwavelet packet information entropy for equipment condition identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jinglong; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia; Chen, Xuefeng; Zuo, Ming J; Yuan, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Condition identification of mechanical equipment from vibration measurement data is significant to avoid economic loss caused by unscheduled breakdowns and catastrophic accidents. However, this task still faces challenges due to the complexity of equipment and the harsh environment. This paper provides a possibility for equipment condition identification by proposing a method called customized lifting multiwavelet packet information entropy. Benefiting from the properties of multi-resolution analysis and multiple wavelet basis functions, the multiwavelet method has advantages in characterizing non-stationary vibration signals. In order to realize the accurate detection and identification of the condition features, a customized lifting multiwavelet packet is constructed via a multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then the vibration signal from the mechanical equipment is processed by the customized lifting multiwavelet packet transform. The relative energy in each frequency band of the multiwavelet packet transform coefficients that equals a percentage of the whole signal energy is taken as the probability. The normalized information entropy is obtained based on the relative energy to describe the condition of a mechanical system. The proposed method is applied to the condition identification of a rolling mill and a demountable disk–drum aero-engine. The results support the feasibility of the proposed method in equipment condition identification. (paper)

  2. Evaluating common de-identification heuristics for personal health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Emam, Khaled; Jabbouri, Sam; Sams, Scott; Drouet, Youenn; Power, Michael

    2006-11-21

    With the growing adoption of electronic medical records, there are increasing demands for the use of this electronic clinical data in observational research. A frequent ethics board requirement for such secondary use of personal health information in observational research is that the data be de-identified. De-identification heuristics are provided in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Privacy Rule, funding agency and professional association privacy guidelines, and common practice. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the re-identification risks due to record linkage are sufficiently low when following common de-identification heuristics and whether the risk is stable across sample sizes and data sets. Two methods were followed to construct identification data sets. Re-identification attacks were simulated on these. For each data set we varied the sample size down to 30 individuals, and for each sample size evaluated the risk of re-identification for all combinations of quasi-identifiers. The combinations of quasi-identifiers that were low risk more than 50% of the time were considered stable. The identification data sets we were able to construct were the list of all physicians and the list of all lawyers registered in Ontario, using 1% sampling fractions. The quasi-identifiers of region, gender, and year of birth were found to be low risk more than 50% of the time across both data sets. The combination of gender and region was also found to be low risk more than 50% of the time. We were not able to create an identification data set for the whole population. Existing Canadian federal and provincial privacy laws help explain why it is difficult to create an identification data set for the whole population. That such examples of high re-identification risk exist for mainstream professions makes a strong case for not disclosing the high-risk variables and their combinations identified here. For professional subpopulations with published

  3. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... patient identification and health information. 880.6300 Section 880.6300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device...

  4. The power of clinicians' affective communication: how reassurance about non-abandonment can reduce patients' physiological arousal and increase information recall in bad news consultations. An experimental study using analogue patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sep, Milou S. C.; van Osch, Mara; van Vliet, Liesbeth M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of incurable cancer may evoke physiological arousal in patients. Physiological arousal can negatively impact patients' recall of information provided in the medical consultation. We aim to investigate whether clinicians' affective communication during a bad news consultation will

  5. A Delphi study among internal medicine clinicians to determine which therapeutic information is essential to record in a medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Unen, Robert J; Tichelaar, Jelle; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B; van Agtmael, Michiel A; Richir, Milan C; de Vries, Theo P G M

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that using a template for recording general and diagnostic information in the medical record (MR) improves the completeness of MR documentation, communication between doctors, and performance of doctors. However, little is known about how therapeutic information should be structured in the MR. The aim of this study was to investigate which specific therapeutic information registrars and consultants in internal medicine consider essential to record in the MR. Therefore, we carried out a 2-round Internet Delphi study. Fifty-nine items were assessed on a 5-point scale; an item was considered important if ≥ 80% of the respondents awarded it a score of 4 or 5. In total, 26 registrars and 30 consultants in internal medicine completed both rounds of the study. Overall, they considered it essential to include information about 11 items in the MR. Subgroup analyses revealed that the registrars considered 8 additional items essential, whereas the consultants considered 1 additional item essential to record. Study findings can be used as a starting point to develop a structured section of the MR for therapeutic information for both paper and electronic MRs. This section should contain at least 11 items considered essential by registrars and clinical consultants in internal medicine. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Human Identification at a Distance Using Body Shape Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, N K A M; Yahya, M F; Shafie, A A

    2013-01-01

    Shape of human body is unique from one person to another. This paper presents an intelligent system approach for human identification at a distance using human body shape information. The body features used are the head, shoulder, and trunk. Image processing techniques for detection of these body features were developed in this work. Then, the features are recognized using fuzzy logic approach and used as inputs to a recognition system based on a multilayer neural network. The developed system is only applicable for recognizing a person from its frontal view and specifically constrained to male gender to simplify the algorithm. In this research, the accuracy for human identification using the proposed method is 77.5%. Thus, it is proved that human can be identified at a distance using body shape information

  7. Ubiquitous Adoption of Innovative and Supportive Information and Communications Technology Across Health and Social Care Needs Education for Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Paula M

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the development, use and evaluation of an on-line undergraduate module delivering an academic-led programme of eHealth learning within nursing, midwifery, allied health professional and social work courses. The health information technology competency frameworks are explored along with an overview of the resulting module. The need for an academically led module will be made along with a description of the management required to maintain validity of content materials. A review of student evaluations will be presented. In conclusion the positive change in attitude and understanding of academic staff members towards health information technology through the inclusion of the module across all of the undergraduate courses will be explored.

  8. Identification of the operating crew's information needs for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Solberg, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    While it would be very difficult to predetermine all of the actions required to mitigate the consequences of every potential severe accident for a nuclear power plant, development of additional guidance and training could improve the likelihood that the operating crew would implement effective sever-accident management measures. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe-accident research results to enhance the capability of the plant operating crew to effectively manage severe accidents. One element of this program includes identification of the information needed by the operating crew in severe-accident situations. This paper discusses a method developed for identifying these information needs and its application. The methodology has been applied to a generic reactor design representing a PWR with a large dry containment. The information needs were identified by systematically determining what information is needed to assess the health of the critical functions, identify the presence of challenges, select strategies, and assess the effectiveness of these strategies. This method allows the systematic identification of information needs for a broad range of severe-accident scenarios and can be validated by exercising the functional models for any specific event sequence

  9. Model of critical diagnostic reasoning: achieving expert clinician performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjai, Prashant Kumar; Tiwari, Ruby

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic reasoning refers to the analytical processes used to determine patient health problems. While the education curriculum and health care system focus on training nurse clinicians to accurately recognize and rescue clinical situations, assessments of non-expert nurses have yielded less than satisfactory data on diagnostic competency. The contrast between the expert and non-expert nurse clinician raises the important question of how differences in thinking may contribute to a large divergence in accurate diagnostic reasoning. This article recognizes superior organization of one's knowledge base, using prototypes, and quick retrieval of pertinent information, using similarity recognition as two reasons for the expert's superior diagnostic performance. A model of critical diagnostic reasoning, using prototypes and similarity recognition, is proposed and elucidated using case studies. This model serves as a starting point toward bridging the gap between clinical data and accurate problem identification, verification, and management while providing a structure for a knowledge exchange between expert and non-expert clinicians.

  10. Examination of Routine Practice Patterns in the Hospital Information Data Warehouse: Use of OLAP and Rough Set Analysis with Clinician Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andrew; Grant, Gwyneth; Gagné, Jean; Blanchette, Carl; Comeau, Émilie; Brodeur, Guillaume; Dionne, Jonathon; Ayite, Alphonse; Synak, Piotr; Wroblewski, Jakub; Apanowitz, Cas

    2001-01-01

    The patient centred electronic patient record enables retrospective analysis of practice patterns as one means to assist clinicians adjust and improve their practice. An interrogation of the data-warehouse linking test use to Diagnostic Related Group (DRG) of one years data of the Sherbrooke University Hospital showed that one-third of patients used two-thirds of these diagnostic tests. Using RoughSets analysis, zones of repeated tests were demonstrated where results remained within stable limits. It was concluded that 30% of fluid and electrolyte testing was probably unnecessary. These findings led to an endorsement of changing the test request formats in the hospital information system from profiles to individual tests requiring justification.

  11. The electronic identification, signature and security of information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horovèák Pavel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the actual methods and technologies of information and communication systems security. It introduces the overview of electronic identification elements such as static password, dynamic password and single sign-on. Into this category belong also biometric and dynamic characteristics of verified person. Widespread is authentication based on identification elements ownership, such as various cards and authentication calculators. In the next part is specified a definition and characterization of electronic signature, its basic functions and certificate categories. Practical utilization of electronic signature consists of electronic signature acquirement, signature of outgoing email message, receiving of electronic signature and verification of electronic signature. The use of electronic signature is continuously growing and in connection with legislation development it exercises in all resorts.

  12. Clinicians' perceptions of organizational readiness for change in the context of clinical information system projects: insights from two cross-sectional surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Balouzakis, George

    2011-02-28

    The adoption and diffusion of clinical information systems has become one of the critical benchmarks for achieving several healthcare organizational reform priorities, including home care, primary care, and integrated care networks. However, these systems are often strongly resisted by the same community that is expected to benefit from their use. Prior research has found that early perceptions and beliefs play a central role in shaping future attitudes and behaviors such as negative rumors, lack of involvement, and resistance to change. In this line of research, this paper builds on the change management and information systems literature and identifies variables associated with clinicians' early perceptions of organizational readiness for change in the specific context of clinical information system projects. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted to test our research model. First, a questionnaire was pretested and then distributed to the future users of a mobile computing technology in 11 home care organizations. The second study took place in a large teaching hospital that had approved a budget for the acquisition of an electronic medical records system. Data analysis was performed using partial least squares. Scale items used in this study showed adequate psychometric properties. In Study 1, four of the hypothesized links in the research model were supported, with change appropriateness, organizational flexibility, vision clarity, and change efficacy explaining 75% of the variance in organizational readiness. In Study 2, four hypotheses were also supported, two of which differed from those supported in Study 1: the presence of an effective project champion and collective self-efficacy. In addition to these variables, vision clarity and change appropriateness also helped explain 75% of the variance in the dependent variable. Explanations for the similarities and differences observed in the two surveys are provided. Organizational readiness is arguably a key

  13. Letter-case information and the identification of brand names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Manuel; Jiménez, María; Talero, Fernanda; López-Cañada, Soraya

    2015-02-01

    A central tenet of most current models of visual-word recognition is that lexical units are activated on the basis of case-invariant abstract letter representations. Here, we examined this assumption by using a unique type of words: brand names. The rationale of the experiments is that brand names are archetypically printed either in lowercase (e.g., adidas) or uppercase (e.g., IKEA). This allows us to present the brand names in their standard or non-standard case configuration (e.g., adidas, IKEA vs. ADIDAS, ikea, respectively). We conducted two experiments with a brand-decision task ('is it a brand name?'): a single-presentation experiment and a masked priming experiment. Results in the single-presentation experiment revealed faster identification times of brand names in their standard case configuration than in their non-standard case configuration (i.e., adidas faster than ADIDAS; IKEA faster than ikea). In the masked priming experiment, we found faster identification times of brand names when they were preceded by an identity prime that matched its standard case configuration than when it did not (i.e., faster response times to adidas-adidas than to ADIDAS-adidas). Taken together, the present findings strongly suggest that letter-case information forms part of a brand name's graphemic information, thus posing some limits to current models of visual-word recognition. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Identification of Chemical Toxicity Using Ontology Information of Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanpeng Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of the combinatorial chemistry, a large number of synthetic compounds have surged. However, we have limited knowledge about them. On the other hand, the speed of designing new drugs is very slow. One of the key causes is the unacceptable toxicities of chemicals. If one can correctly identify the toxicity of chemicals, the unsuitable chemicals can be discarded in early stage, thereby accelerating the study of new drugs and reducing the R&D costs. In this study, a new prediction method was built for identification of chemical toxicities, which was based on ontology information of chemicals. By comparing to a previous method, our method is quite effective. We hope that the proposed method may give new insights to study chemical toxicity and other attributes of chemicals.

  15. Engaging clinicians in health informatics projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Muñoz, Erika; Hullin Lucay Cossio, Carola M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The importance of the engagement of clinicians within a health informatics project * Strategies required for an effective involvement of clinicians throughout a change management process within a clinical context for the implementation of a health informatics project * The critical aspects for a successful implementation of a health informatics project that involves clinicians as end users * Key factors during the administration of changes during the implementation of an informatics project for an information system in clinical practice.

  16. Chapter 08: Comments on, and additional information for, wood identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    This manual has described the theory of identification (Chapter 1), the botanical basis of wood structure (Chapter 2), the use of a hand lens (Chapter 3), how to use cutting tools to prepare wood for observation with a lens (Chapter 4), and the characters used in hand lens wood identification (Chapter 5) before leading you through an identification key (Chapter 6) and...

  17. Objective identification of informative wavelength regions in galaxy spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alexander S.; Budavári, Tamás; Wyse, Rosemary F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mahoney, Michael W. [Department of Mathematics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Csabai, István; Dobos, Laszlo, E-mail: cwyip@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: szalay@jhu.edu, E-mail: mmahoney@cs.stanford.edu [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Eötvös Loránd University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the diversity in spectra is the key to determining the physical parameters of galaxies. The optical spectra of galaxies are highly convoluted with continuum and lines that are potentially sensitive to different physical parameters. Defining the wavelength regions of interest is therefore an important question. In this work, we identify informative wavelength regions in a single-burst stellar population model using the CUR Matrix Decomposition. Simulating the Lick/IDS spectrograph configuration, we recover the widely used D {sub n}(4000), Hβ, and Hδ {sub A} to be most informative. Simulating the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrograph configuration with a wavelength range 3450-8350 Å and a model-limited spectral resolution of 3 Å, the most informative regions are: first region—the 4000 Å break and the Hδ line; second region—the Fe-like indices; third region—the Hβ line; and fourth region—the G band and the Hγ line. A principal component analysis on the first region shows that the first eigenspectrum tells primarily the stellar age, the second eigenspectrum is related to the age-metallicity degeneracy, and the third eigenspectrum shows an anti-correlation between the strengths of the Balmer and the Ca K and H absorptions. The regions can be used to determine the stellar age and metallicity in early-type galaxies that have solar abundance ratios, no dust, and a single-burst star formation history. The region identification method can be applied to any set of spectra of the user's interest, so that we eliminate the need for a common, fixed-resolution index system. We discuss future directions in extending the current analysis to late-type galaxies. ASCII formatted tables of the regional eigenspectra are available.

  18. The role of technology in clinician-to-clinician communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Lisa M; Ladner, Daniela P; Holl, Jane L

    2013-12-01

    Incomplete, fragmented and poorly organised communications contribute to more than half the errors that lead to adverse and sentinel events. Meanwhile, communication software and devices with expanding capabilities are rapidly proliferating and being introduced into the healthcare setting. Clinicians face a large communication burden, which has been exacerbated by the additional challenge of selecting a mode of communication. In addition to specific communication devices, some hospitals have implemented advanced technological systems to assist with communication. However, few studies have provided empirical evidence of the specific advantages and disadvantages of the different devices used for communication. Given the increasing quantities of information transmitted to and by clinicians, evaluations of how communication methods and devices can improve the quality, safety and outcomes of healthcare are needed.

  19. Primary caregivers' satisfaction with clinicians' response to them as informal carers of young people with first-episode psychosis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Terence V; Lubman, Dan I; Clark, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    To explore first-time primary caregivers' experience of the way mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians respond to them as carers of young people with first-episode psychosis. Caregivers have a key role in supporting family members/relatives with mental illness, but their contribution is undervalued frequently by mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians. Design.  Qualitative interpretative phenomenological analysis. A qualitative interpretative design was undertaken, using semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews. Twenty primary caregivers were recruited through Orygen Youth Health, a first-episode psychosis centre in Melbourne. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to identify themes in the data. Two competing themes were identified in the data, highlighting caregivers' contrasting experience with mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians. First, most clinical staff were approachable and supportive. Second, several carers felt their contribution was undervalued by some clinical staff. This was as a consequence of being excluded from clinical deliberations because of clinical staffs' concerns and young people's requests about maintaining confidentiality regarding treatment, as well as carers feeling their role was not taken seriously by clinical staff. First-time primary carers have positive and negative experiences with first-episode psychosis mental health nurses and other clinicians, and these competing events are interrelated. Experiences are affected directly by the manner they are treated by clinical staff and this may, in turn, affect carers' commitment to caring, the way they engage with clinical staff on subsequent occasions and towards the first-episode psychosis service generally. Greater appreciation is needed of the contribution, experience and difficulties caregivers encounter in their role and in engaging with mental health nurses and other clinicians. Additional training is required for

  20. 33 CFR 181.27 - Information displayed near hull identification number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information displayed near hull... displayed near hull identification number. With the exception of the characters “US-”, which constitute the... the 12-character hull identification number (HIN), that information must be separated from the HIN by...

  1. The power of clinicians' affective communication: how reassurance about non-abandonment can reduce patients' physiological arousal and increase information recall in bad news consultations. An experimental study using analogue patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sep, Milou S C; van Osch, Mara; van Vliet, Liesbeth M; Smets, Ellen M A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2014-04-01

    The diagnosis of incurable cancer may evoke physiological arousal in patients. Physiological arousal can negatively impact patients' recall of information provided in the medical consultation. We aim to investigate whether clinicians' affective communication during a bad news consultation will decrease patients' physiological arousal and will improve recall. Healthy women (N=50), acting as analogue patients, were randomly assigned to watch one out of the two versions of a scripted video-vignette of a bad news consultation in which clinician's communication differed: standard vs. affective communication. Participants' skin conductance levels were obtained during video-watching, and afterwards their recall was assessed. While the diagnosis increased skin conductance levels in all analogue patients, skin conductance levels during the remainder of the consultation decreased more in the affective communication condition than in the standard condition. Analogue patients' recall was significantly higher in the affective condition. Breaking bad news evokes physiological arousal. Affective communication can decrease this evoked physiological arousal and might be partly responsible for analogue patients' enhanced information recall. Although our findings need to be translated to clinical patients, they suggest that clinicians need to deal with patients' emotions before providing additional medical information. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Information-theoretical analysis of private content identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voloshynovskiy, S.; Koval, O.; Beekhof, F.; Farhadzadeh, F.; Holotyak, T.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, content identification based on digital fingerprinting attracts a lot of attention in different emerging applications. At the same time, the theoretical analysis of digital fingerprinting systems for finite length case remains an open issue. Additionally, privacy leaks caused by

  3. Informational dissimilarity and organizational citizenship behavior : The role of intrateam interdependence and team identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, GS; Van de Vliert, E; Oosterhof, A

    2003-01-01

    A questionnaire study of 129 members of 20 multidisciplinary project teams examined the relationship between informational dissimilarity and both team identification and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) for individuals working under different interdependence configurations. Results revealed

  4. How can clinician-educator training programs be optimized to match clinician motivations and concerns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Brendan; Marton, Gregory E; Ramnanan, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Several medical schools have implemented programs aimed at supporting clinician-educators with formal mentoring, training, and experience in undergraduate medical teaching. However, consensus program design has yet to be established, and the effectiveness of these programs in terms of producing quality clinician-educator teaching remains unclear. The goal of this study was to review the literature to identify motivations and perceived barriers to clinician-educators, which in turn will improve clinician-educator training programs to better align with clinician-educator needs and concerns. Review of medical education literature using the terms "attitudes", "motivations", "physicians", "teaching", and "undergraduate medical education" resulted in identification of key themes revealing the primary motivations and barriers involved in physicians teaching undergraduate medical students. A synthesis of articles revealed that physicians are primarily motivated to teach undergraduate students for intrinsic reasons. To a lesser extent, physicians are motivated to teach for extrinsic reasons, such as rewards or recognition. The key barriers deterring physicians from teaching medical students included: decreased productivity, lack of compensation, increased length of the working day, patient concerns/ethical issues, and lack of confidence in their own ability. Our findings suggest that optimization of clinician-educator training programs should address, amongst other factors, time management concerns, appropriate academic recognition for teaching service, and confidence in teaching ability. Addressing these issues may increase the retention of clinicians who are active and proficient in medical education.

  5. The Problem of Informational Object Identification in Case of the Considerable Quantity of Identifying Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Kulik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The modification of the algorithm of identification of the informational object, used for identification of the hand-written texts performer in an automated workplace of the forensic expert, is presented. As modification, it is offered to use a method of association rules discovery for definition of statistically dependent sets of feature of hand-written capital letters of the Russian language. The algorithm is approved on set of 691 samples of hand-written documents for which about 2000 identifying feature are defined. The modification of the identification algorithm allows to lower level of errors and to raise quality of accepted decisions for information security.

  6. Transthoracic Ultrasonography for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morné Johan Vorster

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Transthoracic ultrasonography (US has become an essential tool for respiratory, emergency, and critical care physicians. It can be performed with basic equipment and by personnel with minimum training as a modality for the evaluation of a wide range of thoracic pathologies. Its advantages include immediate application at the point of care, low cost, and lack of radiation. The main indications for transthoracic US are the qualitative and quantitative assessment of pleural effusions, pleural thickening, diaphragmatic pathology, as well as chest wall and pleural tumors. Transthoracic US is also useful in visualizing pulmonary pathologies that abut the pleura, such as pneumonic consolidation and interstitial syndromes, including pulmonary edema. Transthoracic US is more sensitive than the traditional chest radiograph in the detection of pneumothoraces, and it is useful in diagnosing skeletal abnormalities such as rib fractures. It is the ideal tool to guide transthoracic procedures, including thoracocentesis and pleural biopsy. Moreover, transthoracic US-guided procedures can be performed by a single clinician with no sedation and minimal monitoring. Transthoracic US-guided fine needle aspiration and/or cutting needle biopsy of extrathoracic lymph nodes and lesions arising from the chest wall, pleura, peripheral lung, and mediastinum are safe to perform and have a high yield in the of hands of experienced clinicians. Transthoracic US can also potentially guide the aspiration and biopsy of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates, consolidations, and lung abscesses. Moreover, transthoracic US may be used in the detection of pulmonary embolism

  7. Disseminating effective clinician communication techniques: Engaging clinicians to want to learn how to engage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Kathryn I; Back, Anthony L; Tulsky, James A

    2017-10-01

    Patient-clinician communication that promotes patient engagement enhances health care quality. Yet, disseminating effective communication interventions to practicing clinicians remains challenging. Current methods do not have large and sustainable effects. In this paper, we argue that both top-down approaches (mandated by institutions) should be coupled with bottom-up approaches that address clinician motivation, confidence, and barriers. We need to engage clinicians in the same way we ask them to engage patients - strategically and with empathy. We discuss potentially innovative strategies to integrate top-down and bottom-up approaches in ways that fit clinicians' busy schedules and can inform policy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. 'Learning Organizations': a clinician's primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nick; Kotze, Beth

    2008-06-01

    Most clinicians are poorly informed in relation to the key concepts of organizational learning. Yet the paradigm may offer clinicians a powerful method for using their knowledge and skills to respond to the demands of a changing environment through experimentation and learning. The concept is critically examined. Organizational learning principles are presented, including a conceptual framework for assessing health services as Learning Organizations. Barriers to organizational learning and strategies to overcome these are discussed. The seminal works of Argyris and Senge are reviewed and a framework for assessing organizational learning in health services is proposed. Current area health service actions are evaluated against the 'diagnostic' framework for a Learning Organization. Although critical examination reveals a poor empirical basis for the concept, the metaphor of the Learning Organization provides a useful conceptual framework and tools for individuals and organizations to apply in developing knowledge and effecting change. The Clinical Practice Improvement and Root Cause Analysis programs being conducted across NSW area health services meet the criteria for effective organizational learning. Key concepts from organizational learning theory provide a diagnostic framework for evaluating area health services as Learning Organizations and support two current strategies for overcoming barriers to organizational learning.

  9. Identification of risk factors of computer information technologies in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrebniak M.P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic direction of development of secondary school and vocational training is computer training of schoolchildren and students, including distance forms of education and widespread usage of world information systems. The purpose of the work is to determine risk factors for schoolchildren and students, when using modern information and computer technologies. Results of researches allowed to establish dynamics of formation of skills using computer information technologies in education and characteristics of mental ability among schoolchildren and students during training in high school. Common risk factors, while operating CIT, are: intensification and formalization of intellectual activity, adverse ergonomic parameters, unfavorable working posture, excess of hygiene standards by chemical and physical characteristics. The priority preventive directions in applying computer information technology in education are: improvement of optimal visual parameters of activity, rationalization of ergonomic parameters, minimizing of adverse effects of chemical and physical conditions, rationalization of work and rest activity.

  10. Boosting healthy heart employer-sponsored health dissemination efforts: identification and information-sharing intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Keri K; Pastorek, Angie; Crook, Brittani; Mackert, Michael; Donovan, Erin E; Shalev, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Health information dissemination options have expanded to include workplaces and employer-sponsored efforts. This study focuses on a core relational concept found in workplaces, organizational identification-the feeling of belongingness-and the impact of partnering with employers and health clinics in health information dissemination. We use social-identity theory and multiple identification to test our predictions from a sample of working adults representing more than 100 different employers. We found that when people strongly identify with their employer, they have increased health behavioral intentions and they intend to talk about the health information with coworkers. The significant models explain more than 50% and 30% of the variance in these two outcomes. The experimental results examining single and multiple organizational sources revealed no differences on any outcomes. These findings offer a contribution to health information dissemination research by articulating how identification with an employer functions to affect behavioral intentions.

  11. Turning attention to clinician engagement in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Christine; Hudson, Robyn; Wallace, Euan

    2017-11-16

    The engagement of clinicians with employing organisations and with the broader health system results in better safer care for patients. Concerns about the adequacy of clinician engagement in the state of Victoria led the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services to commission a scoping study. During this investigation more than 100 clinicians were spoken with and 1800 responded to surveys. The result was creation of a clear picture of what engagement and disengagement looked like at all levels - from the clinical microsystem to state health policy making. Multiple interventions are possible to enhance clinician engagement and thus the care of future patients. A framework was developed to guide future Victorian work with four elements: setting the agenda, informing, involving and empowering clinicians. Concepts of work or employee engagement that are used in other industries don't directly translate to healthcare and thus the definition of engagement chosen for use centred on involvement. This was designed to encourage system managers to ensure clinicians are full participants in design, planning and evaluation and in all decisions that affect them and their patients.

  12. Trust Your Boss or Listen to the Union? Information, Social Identification, Trust, and Strike Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Marieke J.; Akkerman, Agnes; Torenvlied, René

    2013-01-01

    We investigate two questions regarding the effect of information on participation in labor strikes: First, how are social identification and trust used as filters for information? Second, we investigate how cross-pressures affect willingness to participate. Using a dataset of 468 union members, we

  13. Identification of Functional Information Subgraphs in Complex Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Luis M. A.; Gintautas, Vadas; Ham, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    We present a general information theoretic approach for identifying functional subgraphs in complex networks. We show that the uncertainty in a variable can be written as a sum of information quantities, where each term is generated by successively conditioning mutual informations on new measured variables in a way analogous to a discrete differential calculus. The analogy to a Taylor series suggests efficient optimization algorithms for determining the state of a target variable in terms of functional groups of other nodes. We apply this methodology to electrophysiological recordings of cortical neuronal networks grown in vitro. Each cell's firing is generally explained by the activity of a few neurons. We identify these neuronal subgraphs in terms of their redundant or synergetic character and reconstruct neuronal circuits that account for the state of target cells

  14. Information Integration in Risky Choice: Identification and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Neil

    2011-01-01

    How is information integrated across the\\ud attributes of an option when making risky\\ud choices? In most descriptive models of\\ud decision under risk, information about\\ud risk, and reward is combined multiplicatively\\ud (e.g., expected value; expected utility\\ud theory, Bernouli, 1738/1954; subjective\\ud expected utility theory, Savage, 1954;\\ud Edwards, 1955; prospect theory, Kahneman\\ud and Tversky, 1979; rank-dependent utility,\\ud Quiggin, 1993; decision field theory,\\ud Busemeyer and To...

  15. A Practical Approach for Parameter Identification with Limited Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Yang, Guangya; Tarnowski, Germán Claudio

    2014-01-01

    A practical parameter estimation procedure for a real excitation system is reported in this paper. The core algorithm is based on genetic algorithm (GA) which estimates the parameters of a real AC brushless excitation system with limited information about the system. Practical considerations are ...... parameters. The whole methodology is described and the estimation strategy is presented in this paper....

  16. Context-sensitive Information security Risk identification and evaluation techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionita, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of my research is to improve and support the process of Information security Risk Assessment by designing a scalable Risk argumentation framework for socio-digital-technical Risk. Due to the various types of IT systems, diversity of architectures and dynamic nature of Risk, there is no

  17. Identification of appropriate tools of information and communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to sufficient and desirable food is one of the principles of any developing and healthy society. One of the important means for attainment of food security is information and communication technologies (ICT). The purpose of the research was to identify appropriate tools of ICT in improving food security of Iran's rural ...

  18. How can clinician-educator training programs be optimized to match clinician motivations and concerns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullough B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brendan McCullough, Gregory E Marton, Christopher J Ramnanan Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Background: Several medical schools have implemented programs aimed at supporting clinician-educators with formal mentoring, training, and experience in undergraduate medical teaching. However, consensus program design has yet to be established, and the effectiveness of these programs in terms of producing quality clinician-educator teaching remains unclear. The goal of this study was to review the literature to identify motivations and perceived barriers to clinician-educators, which in turn will improve clinician-educator training programs to better align with clinician-educator needs and concerns. Methods: Review of medical education literature using the terms “attitudes”, “motivations”, “physicians”, “teaching”, and “undergraduate medical education” resulted in identification of key themes revealing the primary motivations and barriers involved in physicians teaching undergraduate medical students. Results: A synthesis of articles revealed that physicians are primarily motivated to teach undergraduate students for intrinsic reasons. To a lesser extent, physicians are motivated to teach for extrinsic reasons, such as rewards or recognition. The key barriers deterring physicians from teaching medical students included: decreased productivity, lack of compensation, increased length of the working day, patient concerns/ethical issues, and lack of confidence in their own ability. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that optimization of clinician-educator training programs should address, amongst other factors, time management concerns, appropriate academic recognition for teaching service, and confidence in teaching ability. Addressing these issues may increase the retention of clinicians who are active and proficient in medical education. Keywords: clinician-educators, teaching, undergraduate medical

  19. Information identification, evaluation and utilisation for decision-making by managers in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotola Osunrinde

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Managers’ organisational decisions and subsequent actions flow from their understanding of the business environment in which they operate. This study sought to understand how managers in various organisations identify, evaluate and use information for effective current and future decision-making. Objectives: The study focused on the types of information needed by managers for decision-making, the methods used to identify and acquire the information and the sources of information consulted, their satisfaction with the information used and their decision-making behaviours. Methods: The study employed descriptive study design. Simple random sampling was used. A pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information from 219 managers, randomly selected from the registers of the Ibadan, Abeokuta and Lagos chapters of Nigerian Institute of Management. Results: Results indicated that the types of information considered very important for decision-making included industry information followed by government policies and economic development/forecasts. Conclusion: Investigation revealed the extent of information identification, information evaluation and information utilisation individually predict the perceived effectiveness of decision-making by the managers. Nevertheless, information evaluation was found to have greater predictive relationship with perceived effectiveness of decision-making than information use and information identification.

  20. A Student Information Management System Based on Fingerprint Identification and Data Security Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengtao Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of student information management system is designed to implement student information identification and management based on fingerprint identification. In order to ensure the security of data transmission, this paper proposes a data encryption method based on an improved AES algorithm. A new S-box is cleverly designed, which can significantly reduce the encryption time by improving ByteSub, ShiftRow, and MixColumn in the round transformation of the traditional AES algorithm with the process of look-up table. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly improve the encryption time compared with the traditional AES algorithm.

  1. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  2. Personalized Information Service for Clinicians: Users Like It. A Review of: Jerome, Rebecca N., Nunzia Bettinsoli Giuse, S. Trent Rosenbloom, and Patrick G. Arbogast. “Exploring Clinician Adoption of a Novel Evidence Request Feature in an Electronic Medical Record System.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 96.1 (Jan. 2008: 34-41, with online appendices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale G. Hannigan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine physician use of an Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM literature request service available to clinicians through the institution’s electronic medical record system (EMR. Specifically, the authors posed the following questions: 1 Did newly implemented marketing and communication strategies increase physicians’ use of the service? 2 How did clinicians rate the relevance of the information provided? 3 How was the information provided used and shared? Design – Ten-month, prospective, observational study employing a questionnaire, statistics, a focus group, and a “before and after marketing intervention” analysis.Setting – Adult primary care outpatient clinic in an academic medical centre.Subjects – Forty-eight attending and 89 resident physicians.Methods – In 2003, a new service was introduced that allowed physicians in the Adult Primary Care Center clinic to request evidence summaries from the library regarding complex clinical questions. Contact with the library was through the secure messaging feature of the institution’s electronic medical record (EMR. From March through July 2005, the librarian employed “standard” publicity methods (email, flyers, posters, demonstrations to promote the service. A focus group in July 2005 provided feedback about the service as well as recommendations about communicating its availability and utility. New communication methods were implemented, including a monthly electronic “current awareness” newsletter, more frequent visits by the librarian during resident clinic hours, and collaborations between the librarian and residents preparing for morning report presentations. At the end of the study period, a 25-item Web-based questionnaire was sent to the 137 physicians with access to the service. Main Results – During the 10-month study period, 23 unique users submitted a total of 45 questions to the EBM Literature RequestService. More questions were from attending

  3. Clinicians and journalists responding to disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Elana; Shapiro, Bruce

    2014-02-01

    Mass casualty events pose dilemmas for community clinicians, often challenging their existing clinical toolkits. However, few clinicians were trained to be experts in explaining the unfolding events to the community, creating resources, and interacting with journalists. The objective of this article is to explain knowledge, skills, and attitudes that mental health professionals need to consider when working with journalists, especially those covering children affected by disaster. In service of these objectives, this article reviews controversies, evidence, and best practices to facilitate effective collaborations and consultations with journalists. Advice includes information on how to be a good source to journalists. Clinicians can ethically and effectively help journalists tell accurate and compelling stories about the psychological effects of disasters when they understand and respect the aims, culture, and ethics of journalism.

  4. Memory for stereotype (in)consistent information : The role of in-group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doosje, Bertjan; Spears, Russell; de Redelijkheid, Hans; van Onna, Joost

    Effects of identification with one's group on memory of stereotype consistent and inconsistent information about one's group were examined in two studies. In the first study, we focused on supporters of a low status soccer team, and observed that diehard fans were more likely to remember

  5. Identifying Non-Volatile Data Storage Areas: Unique Notebook Identification Information as Digital Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikica Budimir

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The research reported in this paper introduces new techniques to aid in the identification of recovered notebook computers so they may be returned to the rightful owner. We identify non-volatile data storage areas as a means of facilitating the safe storing of computer identification information. A forensic proof of concept tool has been designed to test the feasibility of several storage locations identified within this work to hold the data needed to uniquely identify a computer. The tool was used to perform the creation and extraction of created information in order to allow the analysis of the non-volatile storage locations as valid storage areas capable of holding and preserving the data created within them.  While the format of the information used to identify the machine itself is important, this research only discusses the insertion, storage and ability to retain such information.

  6. Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled 'Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification' that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included

  7. Eyewitness identification: Bayesian information gain, base-rate effect equivalency curves, and reasonable suspicion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary L; Yang, Yueran; Smalarz, Laura

    2015-04-01

    We provide a novel Bayesian treatment of the eyewitness identification problem as it relates to various system variables, such as instruction effects, lineup presentation format, lineup-filler similarity, lineup administrator influence, and show-ups versus lineups. We describe why eyewitness identification is a natural Bayesian problem and how numerous important observations require careful consideration of base rates. Moreover, we argue that the base rate in eyewitness identification should be construed as a system variable (under the control of the justice system). We then use prior-by-posterior curves and information-gain curves to examine data obtained from a large number of published experiments. Next, we show how information-gain curves are moderated by system variables and by witness confidence and we note how information-gain curves reveal that lineups are consistently more proficient at incriminating the guilty than they are at exonerating the innocent. We then introduce a new type of analysis that we developed called base rate effect-equivalency (BREE) curves. BREE curves display how much change in the base rate is required to match the impact of any given system variable. The results indicate that even relatively modest changes to the base rate can have more impact on the reliability of eyewitness identification evidence than do the traditional system variables that have received so much attention in the literature. We note how this Bayesian analysis of eyewitness identification has implications for the question of whether there ought to be a reasonable-suspicion criterion for placing a person into the jeopardy of an identification procedure. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The effect of texture on face identification and configural information processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzschaschel Eva Alica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape and texture are an integral part of face identity. In the present study, the importance of face texture for face identification and detection of configural manipulation (i.e., spatial relation among facial features was examined by comparing grayscale face photographs (i.e., real faces and line drawings of the same faces. Whereas real faces provide information about texture and shape of faces, line drawings are lacking texture cues. A change-detection task and a forced-choice identification task were used with both stimuli categories. Within the change detection task, participants had to decide whether the size of the eyes of two sequentially presented faces had changed or not. After having made this decision, three faces were shown to the subjects and they had to identify the previously shown face among them. Furthermore, context (full vs. cropped faces and orientation (upright vs. inverted were manipulated. The results obtained in the change detection task suggest that configural information was used in processing real faces, while part-based and featural information was used in processing line-drawings. Additionally, real faces were identified more accurately than line drawings, and identification was less context but more orientation sensitive than identification of line drawings. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new evidence stressing the importance of face texture for identity encoding and configural face processing.

  9. Clinicians' Knowledge and Perception of Telemedicine Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Sarabi, Fatemeh Zahra Pourfard; Langarizadeh, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Telemedicine is an application of information and communication technology in the healthcare environment. This study aimed to compare knowledge and perceptions of telemedicine technology among different groups of clinicians. This survey study was conducted in 2013. The potential participants included 532 clinicians who worked in two hospitals and three clinics in a northern province of Iran. Data were collected using a five-point Likert-scale questionnaire. The content validity of the questionnaire was checked, and the reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α = 0.73). The results showed that most of the clinicians (96.1 percent) had little knowledge about telemedicine. They perceived the advantages of telemedicine at a moderate level and its disadvantages at a low level. The knowledge of dentists about this technology was less than that of other groups, and as a result they were less positive about the advantages of telemedicine compared to nurses, general physicians, and specialists. The limited knowledge of clinicians about telemedicine seems to have influenced their perceptions of the technology. Therefore, providing healthcare professionals with more information about new technologies in healthcare, such as telemedicine, can help to gain a more realistic picture of their perceptions.

  10. Language identification of information blocks based on lexico-grammatic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Kalegin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a continuation of the author's series of publications on the subjects of language identification of texts. In the article is being considered the creation of a technological basis for language identification systems of unstructured information blocks based on lexico-grammatical markers, in which are used the forms of verbs, verbal formations or functionally analogous constructions, are described method and algorithm for its software implementation. These developments will significantly reduce the resource intensity and improve the quality of such systems, which will give a significant economic effect and the possibility of creating fundamentally new technologies for determining the linguistic affiliation of information in a multilingual environment. Consequently, the study is of interest for computer linguists and developers of automatic word processing systems, such as: global monitoring systems, multilingual knowledge bases, automatic translation systems, information retrieval systems, document summarizing systems, literature catalogers, etc.

  11. Identification of energy information needs and existing information sources for Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisch, A.; Kunzier, J.; Limaye, D.; Orlando, J.

    1976-01-01

    Through use of a comprehensive interviewing schedule designed to elicit information needs from state policymakers, this study has shown a statewide need for a workable energy information network. As a counterpoint to this needs survey, it was also demonstrated that many of the components of such an information base already are available at the state and Federal levels. In order to assure that Pennsylvania's decision makers have access to this required information in a current and useful format at a minimal cost, this study has suggested a three-pronged action program: (1) In order to construct a workable energy information network for use by the Commonwealth, a liaison should be established with the Governor's Energy Council and the various national and regional energy information sources as cited in this report. (2) An information directory on State, Federal and private sources should be maintained and distributed on a continuing basis. An assessment of each source should be included with information on ease of access and relevance of the source to Pennsylvania. (3) After an information need is unable to be met through use of (1) the state energy information network and/or (2) the state energy information directory, effort should be initiated to satisfy that specific requirement.

  12. Producing patient-avatar identification in animation video information on spinal anesthesia by different narrative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Vesterby, Martin; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2016-06-01

    Visual approaches to health information reduce complexity and may bridge challenges in health literacy. But the mechanisms and meanings of using animated video in communication with patients undergoing surgery are not well described. By comparing two versions of a two-dimensional animated video on spinal anesthesia, this study tested the patient-avatar identification within two different narrative models. To explore the perspectives of total hip arthroplasty, we employed qualitative methods of interviews and ethnographic observation. The animated presentation of the spinal anesthesia procedure was immediately recognized by all participants as reflecting their experience of the procedure independent of the narrative form. The avatar gender did not affect this identification. We found no preference for either narrative form. This study supports the potential of animation video in health informatics as a didactic model for qualifying patient behavior. Animation video creates a high degree of identification that may work to reduce pre-surgical anxiety. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. 40 CFR 91.113 - Requirement of certification-emission control information label and engine identification number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control information label and engine identification number. 91.113 Section 91.113 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM... certification—emission control information label and engine identification number. (a) The engine manufacturer...

  14. Clinicians completion rate of radiology request card in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of adequately completing the radiology request card by the clinicians, in management of patient cannot be overemphasized. Omission of information on the request card may lead to reporting error. This study investigated the compliance rate of filling the radiology request card by clinicians received in a ...

  15. Dimensions of personality: clinicians' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullins-Sweatt, S.N.; Smit, V.; Verheul, R.; Oldham, J.; Widiger, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To obtain the opinions and preferences of practising clinicians about the clinical utility of personality scales included within 8 alternative dimensional models of personality disorder for inclusion within an official diagnostic nomenclature. Method: Psychiatrists (n = 226) and

  16. A Web-based patient information system--identification of patients' information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassling, Linda; Babic, Ankica; Lönn, Urban; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik

    2003-06-01

    Research described here was carried out to explore possibilities of creating a web-based patient information system within the areas of thoracic surgery. Data were collected to distinguish and assess the actual information needs of patients (1) prior to surgical treatment, (2) before discharge, and (3) 8 months after the hospitalization using a follow-up questionnaire. Interviews were performed with patients undergoing heart surgery. The study included material of 19 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (12) and valve replacement (7), age 35-74, 13 males and 6 females with nonacademic background. Patient satisfaction with given information was high. Analysis of the interviews held at the hospital resulted in seven different categories describing and giving a picture of the patients' information needs and apprehension of received care. The results found in this study can be used as guidance for developers in their design and development process of a health information system.

  17. Unfamiliar voice identification: Effect of post-event information on accuracy and voice ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Mary Jessica Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI on voice ratings, identification accuracy, and confidence, as well as the link between verbal recall and accuracy. Participants listened to a dialogue between male and female targets, then read misleading information about voice pitch. Participants engaged in verbal recall, rated voices on a feature checklist, and made a lineup decision. Accuracy rates were low, especially on target-absent lineups. Confidence and accuracy were unrelated, but the number of facts recalled about the voice predicted later lineup accuracy. There was a main effect of misinformation on ratings of target voice pitch, but there was no effect on identification accuracy or confidence ratings. As voice lineup evidence from earwitnesses is used in courts, the findings have potential applied relevance.

  18. Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural eGamma Identification with ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Da Fonseca Pinto, Joao Victor; The ATLAS collaboration; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Seixas, Jose

    2016-01-01

    \\title{Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural e/$\\gamma$ Identification with ATLAS Detector} After the successful operation of the Large Hadron Collider resulting with the discovery of the Higgs boson, a new data-taking period (Run 2) has started. For the first time, collisions are produced with energies of 13 TeV in the centre of mass. It is foreseen the luminosity increase, reaching values as high as $10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ yet in 2015. These changes in experimental conditions bring a proper environment for possible new physics key-findings. ATLAS is the largest LHC detector and was designed for general-purpose physics studies. Many potential physics channels have electrons or photons in their final states. For efficient studies on these channels precise measurement and identification of such particles is necessary. The identification task consists of disentangling those particles (signal) from collimated hadronic jets (background). Reported work concerns the identification process based on the cal...

  19. Enhanced statistical damage identification using frequency-shift information with tunable piezoelectric transducer circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J; Tang, J; Wang, K W

    2008-01-01

    The frequency-shift-based damage detection method entertains advantages such as global detection capability and easy implementation, but also suffers from drawbacks that include low detection accuracy and sensitivity and the difficulty in identifying damage using a small number of measurable frequencies. Moreover, the damage detection/identification performance is inevitably affected by the uncertainty/variations in the baseline model. In this research, we investigate an enhanced statistical damage identification method using the tunable piezoelectric transducer circuitry. The tunable piezoelectric transducer circuitry can lead to much enriched information on frequency shift (before and after damage occurrence). The circuitry elements, meanwhile, can be directly and accurately measured and thus can be considered uncertainty-free. A statistical damage identification algorithm is formulated which can identify both the mean and variance of the elemental property change. Our analysis indicates that the integration of the tunable piezoelectric transducer circuitry can significantly enhance the robustness of the frequency-shift-based damage identification approach under uncertainty and noise

  20. Identification of the operating crew's information needs for accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.; Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Solberg, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    While it would be very difficult to predetermine all of the actions required to mitigate the consequences of every potential severe accident for a nuclear power plant, development of additional guidance and training could improve the likelihood that the operating crew would implement effective sever-accident management measures. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe-accident research results to enhance the capability of the plant operating crew to effectively manage severe accidents. One element of this program includes identification of the information needed by the operating crew in severe-accident situations. This paper discusses a method developed for identifying these information needs and its application. The methodology has been applied to a generic reactor design representing a PWR with a large dry containment. The information needs were identified by systematically determining what information is needed to assess the health of the critical functions, identify the presence of challenges, select strategies, and assess the effectiveness of these strategies. This method allows the systematic identification of information needs for a broad range of severe-accident scenarios and can be validated by exercising the functional models for any specific event sequence.

  1. A New Method of Reliability Evaluation Based on Wavelet Information Entropy for Equipment Condition Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Z J; Zhang, X L; Chen, X F

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at reliability evaluation of condition identification of mechanical equipment, it is necessary to analyze condition monitoring information. A new method of reliability evaluation based on wavelet information entropy extracted from vibration signals of mechanical equipment is proposed. The method is quite different from traditional reliability evaluation models that are dependent on probability statistics analysis of large number sample data. The vibration signals of mechanical equipment were analyzed by means of second generation wavelet package (SGWP). We take relative energy in each frequency band of decomposed signal that equals a percentage of the whole signal energy as probability. Normalized information entropy (IE) is obtained based on the relative energy to describe uncertainty of a system instead of probability. The reliability degree is transformed by the normalized wavelet information entropy. A successful application has been achieved to evaluate the assembled quality reliability for a kind of dismountable disk-drum aero-engine. The reliability degree indicates the assembled quality satisfactorily.

  2. Identification and Characterization of Inter-Organizational Information Flows in the Portuguese National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, António Carvalho; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo João

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives To understand and build a collective vision of all existing institutions in the Portuguese National Health Service as well as to perceive how and how far the interaction between those multiple institutions is supported by Information Systems (IS). Methods Upon identification of the institutions involved in the healthcare process, a set of interviews with experienced people from those institutions was conducted, which produced about five hours of tape. The research was focused exclusively on processes involving two different organizations and any internal processes were altogether excluded from it. Results The study allowed the identification of about 50 recurrent interaction processes, which were classified into four different varieties in accordance with the nature of the information flow: administrative, clinical, identificational and statistical. In addition, these processes were divided in accordance with the way how that integration is achieved, from completely automated to email or telephone-based. Conclusions Funds/Money related processes are technologically more rigid and standardized, whereas auditing and inspection ones are less supported by automatic systems. There emerged an interesting level of sharing and integration in clinical processes, although the integration is mostly made at the interface level. The authors identified 5 particularly relevant and dominant actors (2 classes of individuals and 3 institutions) with which there is a need for coordination and cooperation. The authors consider that, in future works, an effort should be made to provide the various institutions with guidelines/interfaces and prompt such institutions to elaborate upon these. PMID:27999840

  3. Data Science Meets the Clinician: Challenges and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charitos, Efstratios I; Wilbring, Manuel; Treede, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    In the last three decades a profound transformation of the medical profession has taken place. The modern clinician is required to consume vast amounts of information from clinical studies, critically reviewing evidence that may or may not lead to changes in clinical practice. The present article presents some challenges that this era of information poses to clinicians and patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Comparisons of client and clinician views of the importance of factors in client-clinician interaction in hearing aid purchase decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poost-Foroosh, Laya; Jennings, Mary Beth; Cheesman, Margaret F

    2015-03-01

    Despite clinical recognition of the adverse effects of acquired hearing loss, only a small proportion of adults who could benefit use hearing aids. Hearing aid adoption has been studied in relationship to client-related and hearing aid technology-related factors. The influence of the client-clinician interaction in the decision to purchase hearing aids has not been explored in any depth. Importance ratings of a sample of adults having a recent hearing aid recommendation (clients) and hearing healthcare professionals (clinicians) from across Canada were compared on factors in client-clinician interactions that influence hearing aid purchase decisions. A cross-sectional approach was used to obtain online and paper-based concept ratings. Participants were 43 adults (age range, 45-85 yr) who had received a first hearing aid recommendation in the 3 mo before participation. A total of 54 audiologists and 20 hearing instrument practitioners from a variety of clinical settings who prescribed or dispensed hearing aids completed the concept-rating task. The task consisted of 122 items that had been generated via concept mapping in a previous study and which resulted in the identification of eight concepts that may influence hearing aid purchase decisions. Participants rated "the importance of each of the statements in a person's decision to purchase a hearing aid" on a 5-point Likert scale, from 1 = minimally important to 5 = extremely important. For the initial data analysis, the ratings for each of the items included in each concept were averaged for each participant to provide an estimate of the overall importance rating of each concept. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare the mean importance ratings of the clients to the clinicians. Ratings of individual statements were also compared in order to investigate the directionality of the importance ratings within concepts. There was a significant difference in the mean ratings for clients and clinicians for

  5. Once a clinician, always a clinician: a systematic review to develop a typology of clinician-researcher dual-role experiences in health research with patient-participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jean C. Hay-Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health researchers are clinicians. Dual-role experiences are common for clinician-researchers in research involving patient-participants, even if not their own patients. To extend the existing body of literature on why dual-role is experienced, we aimed to develop a typology of common catalysts for dual-role experiences to help clinician-researchers plan and implement methodologically and ethically sound research. Methods Systematic searching of Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase and Scopus (inception to 28.07.2014 for primary studies or first-person reflexive reports of clinician-researchers’ dual-role experiences, supplemented by reference list checking and Google Scholar scoping searches. Included articles were loaded in NVivo for analysis. The coding was focused on how dual-role was evidenced for the clinician-researchers in research involving patients. Procedures were completed by one researcher (MB and independently cross-checked by another (JHS. All authors contributed to extensive discussions to resolve all disagreements about initial coding and verify the final themes. Results Database searching located 7135 records, resulting in 29 included studies, with the addition of 7 studies through reference checks and scoping searches. Two overarching themes described the most common catalysts for dual-role experiences – ways a research role can involve patterns of behaviour typical of a clinical role, and the developing connection that starts to resemble a clinician-patient relationship. Five subthemes encapsulated the clinical patterns commonly repeated in research settings (clinical queries, perceived agenda, helping hands, uninvited clinical expert, and research or therapy and five subthemes described concerns about the researcher-participant relationship (clinical assumptions, suspicion and holding back, revelations, over-identification, and manipulation. Clinician-researchers use their clinical skills in health

  6. Comparison of alphabetical versus categorical display format for medication order entry in a simulated touch screen anesthesia information management system: an experiment in clinician-computer interaction in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Anil A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthesia information management system (AIMS records should be designed and configured to facilitate the accurate and prompt recording of multiple drugs administered coincidentally or in rapid succession. Methods We proposed two touch-screen display formats for use with our department’s new EPIC touch-screen AIMS. In one format, medication “buttons” were arranged in alphabetical order (i.e. A-C, D-H etc.. In the other, buttons were arranged in categories (Common, Fluids, Cardiovascular, Coagulation etc.. Both formats were modeled on an iPad screen to resemble the AIMS interface. Anesthesia residents, anesthesiologists, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (n = 60 were then asked to find and touch the correct buttons for a series of medications whose names were displayed to the side of the entry screen. The number of entries made within 2 minutes was recorded. This was done 3 times for each format, with the 1st format chosen randomly. Data were analyzed from the third trials with each format to minimize differences in learning. Results The categorical format had a mean of 5.6 more drugs entered using the categorical method in two minutes than the alphabetical format (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.5 to 6.8, P  Conclusions The use of touch-screen user interfaces in healthcare is increasingly common. Arrangement of drugs names in a categorical display format in the medication order-entry touch screen of an AIMS can result in faster data entry compared to an alphabetical arrangement of drugs. Results of this quality improvement project were used in our department’s design of our final intraoperative electronic anesthesia record. This testing approach using cognitive and usability engineering methods can be used to objectively design and evaluate many aspects of the clinician-computer interaction in electronic health records.

  7. Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural EGamma Identification with ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)762100; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the identification process of electrons based only on calorimeter information. It is proposed the usage of ring-shaped description for a region of interest of the calorimeter which explores the shower shape propagation throughout the ATLAS calorimeters. This information is fed into a multivariate discriminator, currently an artificial neural network, responsible for hypothesis testing. The concept is evaluated for online selection (trigger), used for reducing storage rate into viable levels while preserving collision events containing desired signals. Preliminary results from Monte Carlo data point out that the background rejection can be reduced by as much as 50 % over the current method used in the High-Level Trigger, allowing for high-latency reconstruction algorithms such as tracking to run over at a later stage of the trigger.

  8. Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural Egamma Identification with ATLAS Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor da Fonseca Pinto, João

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the identification process of electrons based only on calorimeter information. It is based on the usage of ring-shaped description for a region of interest of the calorimeter which explores the shower shape propagation throughout the ATLAS calorimeters. This information is fed into a multivariate discriminator, currently an artificial neural network, responsible for hypothesis testing. The concept is evaluated for online selection (trigger), used for reducing storage rate into viable levels while preserving collision events containing desired signals. Preliminary results from Monte Carlo simulation data indicate that the background rejection can be reduced by as much as 50 % over the current method used in the High-Level Trigger, allowing for high-latency reconstruction algorithms such as tracking to run at a later stage of the trigger. (paper)

  9. Mentoring for clinician-educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Susan E; Digioia, Natalie M; Broderick, Kerry B; Coates, Wendy C

    2004-12-01

    Mentorship has been shown to have a positive impact on academic faculty members in terms of career advancement. The guidance of a mentor has been shown to increase academic outcome measures such as peer-reviewed publications and grant support for junior academic faculty. In addition, career satisfaction of mentored faculty is greater than those with no mentorship. There is little research on the effects of mentorship on the careers of clinician-educators. This group has also been reported to have a lower scholarly productivity rate than the typical research-based faculty. This article addresses the current state of mentorship as it applies specifically to clinician-educators, offers advice on how a potential protégé might seek out a potential mentor, and finally, suggests a possible mentoring system for academic emergency physicians who are focusing on careers in medical education.

  10. A Time-Space Domain Information Fusion Method for Specific Emitter Identification Based on Dempster-Shafer Evidence Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Cao, Ying; Yang, Lin; He, Zichang

    2017-08-28

    Specific emitter identification plays an important role in contemporary military affairs. However, most of the existing specific emitter identification methods haven't taken into account the processing of uncertain information. Therefore, this paper proposes a time-space domain information fusion method based on Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, which has the ability to deal with uncertain information in the process of specific emitter identification. In this paper, radars will generate a group of evidence respectively based on the information they obtained, and our main task is to fuse the multiple groups of evidence to get a reasonable result. Within the framework of recursive centralized fusion model, the proposed method incorporates a correlation coefficient, which measures the relevance between evidence and a quantum mechanical approach, which is based on the parameters of radar itself. The simulation results of an illustrative example demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively deal with uncertain information and get a reasonable recognition result.

  11. Clinician search behaviors may be influenced by search engine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Annie Y S; Coiera, Enrico; Zrimec, Tatjana; Compton, Paul

    2010-06-30

    Searching the Web for documents using information retrieval systems plays an important part in clinicians' practice of evidence-based medicine. While much research focuses on the design of methods to retrieve documents, there has been little examination of the way different search engine capabilities influence clinician search behaviors. Previous studies have shown that use of task-based search engines allows for faster searches with no loss of decision accuracy compared with resource-based engines. We hypothesized that changes in search behaviors may explain these differences. In all, 75 clinicians (44 doctors and 31 clinical nurse consultants) were randomized to use either a resource-based or a task-based version of a clinical information retrieval system to answer questions about 8 clinical scenarios in a controlled setting in a university computer laboratory. Clinicians using the resource-based system could select 1 of 6 resources, such as PubMed; clinicians using the task-based system could select 1 of 6 clinical tasks, such as diagnosis. Clinicians in both systems could reformulate search queries. System logs unobtrusively capturing clinicians' interactions with the systems were coded and analyzed for clinicians' search actions and query reformulation strategies. The most frequent search action of clinicians using the resource-based system was to explore a new resource with the same query, that is, these clinicians exhibited a "breadth-first" search behaviour. Of 1398 search actions, clinicians using the resource-based system conducted 401 (28.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 26.37-31.11) in this way. In contrast, the majority of clinicians using the task-based system exhibited a "depth-first" search behavior in which they reformulated query keywords while keeping to the same task profiles. Of 585 search actions conducted by clinicians using the task-based system, 379 (64.8%, 95% CI 60.83-68.55) were conducted in this way. This study provides evidence that

  12. Multimedia reviews: multimedia convergence for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taintor, Zebulon

    2003-12-01

    Introduction by the column editor: In this final column of the year, Dr. Taintor provides an overview of exciting technological developments via his report on the 2003 annual meeting of the American Association for Technology in Psychiatry (AATP). Advances-and convergences-in technology are providing clinicians with increasingly useful tools to enhance the effectiveness of their treatments, increase access to care, reduce errors, and save time. As Dr. Taintor notes, AATP's meeting is traditionally held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA). I hope that his report will encourage APA's members to attend some of next year's informative sessions.

  13. Brand crisis management: the use of information for prevention, identification and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Borba Salvador

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To understand, from the management perspective, the use of information on brand crisis management in moments involving prevention, identification and management. Design/methodology/approach – This article is the result of an exploratory, qualitative study. Primary data was collected through interviews with marketing executives and crisis management specialists. Findings – We concluded that managers use information in very different ways, and, taking possession of information and decisionmaking attitudes into account, four groups of crisis managers were found. Originality/value – In order to contribute to the expansion of academic knowledge in the field of marketing administration and brand crisis management, this study presented the crossing of three different fields (information systems, brand crisis management and organizational development to structure knowledge concerning brand crisis management. From the managerial perspective, certain crises could be avoided by monitoring internal and external information, and by identifying problems in their early stages. From the social perspective, reducing brand crisis cases positively affects society as a whole (organizations and individuals.

  14. Text de-identification for privacy protection: a study of its impact on clinical text information content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Ferrández, Óscar; Friedlin, F Jeffrey; South, Brett R; Shen, Shuying; Samore, Matthew H

    2014-08-01

    As more and more electronic clinical information is becoming easier to access for secondary uses such as clinical research, approaches that enable faster and more collaborative research while protecting patient privacy and confidentiality are becoming more important. Clinical text de-identification offers such advantages but is typically a tedious manual process. Automated Natural Language Processing (NLP) methods can alleviate this process, but their impact on subsequent uses of the automatically de-identified clinical narratives has only barely been investigated. In the context of a larger project to develop and investigate automated text de-identification for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinical notes, we studied the impact of automated text de-identification on clinical information in a stepwise manner. Our approach started with a high-level assessment of clinical notes informativeness and formatting, and ended with a detailed study of the overlap of select clinical information types and Protected Health Information (PHI). To investigate the informativeness (i.e., document type information, select clinical data types, and interpretation or conclusion) of VHA clinical notes, we used five different existing text de-identification systems. The informativeness was only minimally altered by these systems while formatting was only modified by one system. To examine the impact of de-identification on clinical information extraction, we compared counts of SNOMED-CT concepts found by an open source information extraction application in the original (i.e., not de-identified) version of a corpus of VHA clinical notes, and in the same corpus after de-identification. Only about 1.2-3% less SNOMED-CT concepts were found in de-identified versions of our corpus, and many of these concepts were PHI that was erroneously identified as clinical information. To study this impact in more details and assess how generalizable our findings were, we examined the overlap between

  15. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Schubotz

    Full Text Available Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz. CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  16. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, Wiebke; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-01-01

    Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz). CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz) and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  17. Comparison of alphabetical versus categorical display format for medication order entry in a simulated touch screen anesthesia information management system: an experiment in clinician-computer interaction in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Anil A; Dexter, Franklin; Tucker, Peter; Todd, Michael M

    2012-05-29

    Anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records should be designed and configured to facilitate the accurate and prompt recording of multiple drugs administered coincidentally or in rapid succession. We proposed two touch-screen display formats for use with our department's new EPIC touch-screen AIMS. In one format, medication "buttons" were arranged in alphabetical order (i.e. A-C, D-H etc.). In the other, buttons were arranged in categories (Common, Fluids, Cardiovascular, Coagulation etc.). Both formats were modeled on an iPad screen to resemble the AIMS interface. Anesthesia residents, anesthesiologists, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (n = 60) were then asked to find and touch the correct buttons for a series of medications whose names were displayed to the side of the entry screen. The number of entries made within 2 minutes was recorded. This was done 3 times for each format, with the 1st format chosen randomly. Data were analyzed from the third trials with each format to minimize differences in learning. The categorical format had a mean of 5.6 more drugs entered using the categorical method in two minutes than the alphabetical format (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.5 to 6.8, P < 0.0001). The findings were the same regardless of the order of testing (i.e. alphabetical-categorical vs. categorical - alphabetical) and participants' years of clinical experience. Most anesthesia providers made no (0) errors for most trials (N = 96/120 trials, lower 95% limit 73%, P < 0.0001). There was no difference in error rates between the two formats (P = 0.53). The use of touch-screen user interfaces in healthcare is increasingly common. Arrangement of drugs names in a categorical display format in the medication order-entry touch screen of an AIMS can result in faster data entry compared to an alphabetical arrangement of drugs. Results of this quality improvement project were used in our department's design of our final intraoperative electronic

  18. Mapping of information and identification of construction waste at project life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Mochamad Agung; Handayani, Naniek Utami; Nurdiana, Asri; Sholeh, Moh Nur; Pamungkas, Gita Silvia

    2018-03-01

    The development of construction project towards green construction is needed in order to improve the efficiency of construction projects. One that needs to be minimized is construction waste. Construction waste is waste generated from construction project activities, both solid waste and non solid waste. More specifically, the waste happens at every phase of the project life cycle. Project life cycle are the stage of idea, design, construction, and operation/maintenance. Each phase is managed by different stakeholders. Therefore it requires special handling from the involved stakeholders. The objective of the study is to map the information and identify the waste at each phase of the project life cycle. The purpose of mapping is to figure out the process of information and product flow and with its timeline. This mapping used Value Stream Mapping (VSM). Identification of waste was done by distributing questionnaire to respondents to know the waste according to owner, consultant planner, contractor, and supervisory consultant. The result of the study is the mapping of information flow and product flow at the phases of idea, design, construction, and operation/ maintenance.

  19. Comparison of Accuracy and Speed of Information Identification by Nonpathologists in Synoptic Reports With Different Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Gould, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    - The College of American Pathologists requires synoptic reports for specific types of pathology reports. - To compare the accuracy and speed of information retrieval in synoptic reports of different formats. - We assessed the performance of 28 nonpathologists from 4 different types of users (cancer registrars, MDs, medical non-MDs, and nonmedical) at identifying specific information in various formatted synoptic reports, using a computerized quiz that measured both accuracy and speed. - There was no significant difference in the accuracy of data identification for any user group or in any format. While there were significant differences in raw time between users, these were eliminated when normalized times were used. Compared with the standard format of a required data element (RDE) and response on 1 line, both a list of responses without an RDE (21%, P RDE header on one line, response indented on the second line) (12%, P RDE response pairs in a random order were significantly slower (16%, P < .001). - There are significant differences in ease of use by nonpathologists between different synoptic report formats. Such information may be useful in deciding between different format options.

  20. Mathematical model of statistical identification of information support of road transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kozlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper based on the statistical identification method using the theory of self-organizing systems, built multifactor model the relationship of road transport and training system. Background information for the model represented by a number of parameters of average annual road transport operations and information provision, including training complex system parameters (inputs, road management and output parameters. Ask two criteria: stability criterion model and test correlation. The program determines their minimum, and is the only model of optimal complexity. The predetermined number of parameters established mathematical relationship of each output parameter with the others. To improve the accuracy and regularity of the forecast of the interpolation nodes allocated in the test data sequence. Other data form the training sequence. Decision model based on the principle of selection. Running it with the gradual complication of the mathematical description and exhaustive search of all possible variants of the models on the specified criteria. Advantages of the proposed model: adequately reflects the actual process, allows you to enter any additional input parameters and determine their impact on the individual output parameters of the road transport, allows in turn change the values of key parameters in a certain ratio and to determine the appropriate changes the output parameters of the road transport, allows to predict the output parameters road transport operations.

  1. Study of identification of geometrically shaped solids using colour and range information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebihara, Kenichi

    1997-05-01

    This report is the revision of the Technical Report (MECSE 1996-7) of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia which has been distributed to the Department Library in this University. The main work which is described in this report was carried out at Intelligent Robotics Research Center (IRRC) in the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering of Monash University from March in 1995 to March in 1996 and was be supported by a grant from Research Development Corporation of Japan (JRDC). This report describes the study of identification of geometrically shaped solids with unique colour using colour and range information. This study aims at recognition of equipment in nuclear plants. For this purpose, it is hypothesized that equipment in nuclear plants can be represented by combination of geometrically shaped solids with unique colour, such as a sphere, an ellipsoid, a cone, a cylinder, a rectangular solid and a pyramid. In this report, the colour image of geometrically shaped solids could be segmented comparatively easily and effectively into regions of each solid by using colour and range information. The range data of each solid was extracted using the segmented colour image. Thus the extracted range data could be classified into a plane surface or a curved surface by checking its spatial distribution. (author)

  2. Study on Karst Information Identification of Qiandongnan Prefecture Based on RS and GIS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, M.; Zhou, G.; Wang, W.; Wu, Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, X.

    2018-04-01

    Karst area is a pure natural resource base, at the same time, due to the special geological environment; there are droughts and floods alternating with frequent karst collapse, rocky desertification and other resource and environment problems, which seriously restrict the sustainable economic and social development in karst areas. Therefore, this paper identifies and studies the karst, and clarifies the distribution of karst. Provide basic data for the rational development of resources in the karst region and the governance of desertification. Due to the uniqueness of the karst landscape, it can't be directly recognized and extracted by computer in remote sensing images. Therefore, this paper uses the idea of "RS + DEM" to solve the above problems. this article is based on Landsat-5 TM imagery in 2010 and DEM data, proposes the methods to identify karst information research what is use of slope vector diagram, vegetation distribution map, distribution map of karst rocky desertification and other auxiliary data in combination with the signs for human-computer interaction interpretation, identification and extraction of peak forest, peaks cluster and isolated peaks, and further extraction of karst depression. Experiments show that this method achieves the "RS + DEM" mode through the reasonable combination of remote sensing images and DEM data. It not only effectively extracts karst areas covered with vegetation, but also quickly and accurately locks down the karst area and greatly improves the efficiency and precision of visual interpretation. The accurate interpretation rate of karst information in study area in this paper is 86.73 %.

  3. Identification of hidden relationships from the coupling of hydrophobic cluster analysis and domain architecture information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Guilhem; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2013-07-15

    Describing domain architecture is a critical step in the functional characterization of proteins. However, some orphan domains do not match any profile stored in dedicated domain databases and are thereby difficult to analyze. We present here an original novel approach, called TREMOLO-HCA, for the analysis of orphan domain sequences and inspired from our experience in the use of Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA). Hidden relationships between protein sequences can be more easily identified from the PSI-BLAST results, using information on domain architecture, HCA plots and the conservation degree of amino acids that may participate in the protein core. This can lead to reveal remote relationships with known families of domains, as illustrated here with the identification of a hidden Tudor tandem in the human BAHCC1 protein and a hidden ET domain in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Taf14p and human AF9 proteins. The results obtained in such a way are consistent with those provided by HHPRED, based on pairwise comparisons of HHMs. Our approach can, however, be applied even in absence of domain profiles or known 3D structures for the identification of novel families of domains. It can also be used in a reverse way for refining domain profiles, by starting from known protein domain families and identifying highly divergent members, hitherto considered as orphan. We provide a possible integration of this approach in an open TREMOLO-HCA package, which is fully implemented in python v2.7 and is available on request. Instructions are available at http://www.impmc.upmc.fr/∼callebau/tremolohca.html. isabelle.callebaut@impmc.upmc.fr Supplementary Data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Oral Cancer Knowledge Assessment: Newly Graduated versus Senior Dental Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado de Souza, Ricardo; Gallego Arias Pecorari, Vanessa; Lauria Dib, Luciano

    2018-01-01

    The present study assessed the level of dentists' knowledge regarding oral cancer in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A questionnaire was used to compare the level of knowledge among newly graduated and senior clinicians. A total of 20,154 e-mails were correctly delivered to the dentists registered in the database of the Regional Dentistry Council of São Paulo, and 477 (2.36%) responses were received. This sample consisted of 84 newly graduated clinicians and 105 senior clinicians. For the statistical analysis, the chi-square test and the logistic regression analysis were performed with α = 0.05, and the results were described herein. According to their knowledge level, the results were statistically different between the groups, since 19% of the newly graduated clinicians were evaluated with knowledge grade A (excellent) in comparison to 6.7% of the senior clinicians. In spite of the results indicated that newly graduated clinicians' knowledge regarding oral cancer was 2.1 times higher, 34.5% of the professionals in this group had regular or poor knowledge on the subject, and several questions relating to clinical characteristics and risk factors indicated that there still exist some knowledge gaps, demonstrating that there is a need for further studies and information activities addressing oral cancer. PMID:29666649

  5. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the clinician,s perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: 3D radiation treatment planning has enabled dose distributions to be related to the volume of normal tissues irradiated. The dose volume histograms thus derived have been utilized to set NTCP dose constraints to facilitate optimization of treatment planning. However, it is not widely appreciated that a number of important variables other than DYH's which determine NTCP in the individual patient. These variables will be discussed under the headings of patient and treatment related as well as tumour related factors. Patient related factors include age, co-morbidities such as connective tissue disease and diabetes mellitus, previous tissue/organ damage, tissue architectural organization (parallel or serial), regional tissue/organ and individual tissue/organ radiosensitivities as well as the development of severe acute toxicity. Treatment related variables which need to be considered include dose per fraction (if not the conventional 1.8012.00 Gy/fraction, particularly for IMRT), number of fractions and total dose, dose rate (particularly if combined with brachytherapy) and concurrent chemotherapy or other biological dose modifiers. Tumour related factors which impact on NTCP include infiltration of normal tissue/organ usually at presentation leading to compromised function but also with recurrent disease after radiation therapy as well as variable tumour radiosensitivities between and within tumour types. Whilst evaluation of DYH data is a useful guide in the choice of treatment plan, the current state of knowledge requires the clinician to make an educated judgement based on a consideration of the other factors.

  6. Methods for automated identification of informative behaviors in natural bioptic driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Peli, Eli

    2012-06-01

    Visually impaired people may legally drive if wearing bioptic telescopes in some developed countries. To address the controversial safety issue of the practice, we have developed a low-cost in-car recording system that can be installed in study participants' own vehicles to record their daily driving activities. We also developed a set of automated identification techniques of informative behaviors to facilitate efficient manual review of important segments submerged in the vast amount of uncontrolled data. Here, we present the methods and quantitative results of the detection performance for six types of driving maneuvers and behaviors that are important for bioptic driving: bioptic telescope use, turns, curves, intersections, weaving, and rapid stops. The testing data were collected from one normally sighted and two visually impaired subjects across multiple days. The detection rates ranged from 82% up to 100%, and the false discovery rates ranged from 0% to 13%. In addition, two human observers were able to interpret about 80% of targets viewed through the telescope. These results indicate that with appropriate data processing the low-cost system is able to provide reliable data for natural bioptic driving studies.

  7. The clinician and the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A. (Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-09-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.).

  8. The clinician and the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.)

  9. STUDY ON KARST INFORMATION IDENTIFICATION OF QIANDONGNAN PREFECTURE BASED ON RS AND GIS TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Karst area is a pure natural resource base, at the same time, due to the special geological environment; there are droughts and floods alternating with frequent karst collapse, rocky desertification and other resource and environment problems, which seriously restrict the sustainable economic and social development in karst areas. Therefore, this paper identifies and studies the karst, and clarifies the distribution of karst. Provide basic data for the rational development of resources in the karst region and the governance of desertification. Due to the uniqueness of the karst landscape, it can’t be directly recognized and extracted by computer in remote sensing images. Therefore, this paper uses the idea of “RS + DEM” to solve the above problems. this article is based on Landsat-5 TM imagery in 2010 and DEM data, proposes the methods to identify karst information research what is use of slope vector diagram, vegetation distribution map, distribution map of karst rocky desertification and other auxiliary data in combination with the signs for human-computer interaction interpretation, identification and extraction of peak forest, peaks cluster and isolated peaks, and further extraction of karst depression. Experiments show that this method achieves the “RS + DEM” mode through the reasonable combination of remote sensing images and DEM data. It not only effectively extracts karst areas covered with vegetation, but also quickly and accurately locks down the karst area and greatly improves the efficiency and precision of visual interpretation. The accurate interpretation rate of karst information in study area in this paper is 86.73 %.

  10. [Study on Application of NIR Spectral Information Screening in Identification of Maca Origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-zhong; Zhao, Yan-li; Zhang, Ji; Jin, Hang

    2016-02-01

    Medicinal and edible plant Maca is rich in various nutrients and owns great medicinal value. Based on near infrared diffuse reflectance spectra, 139 Maca samples collected from Peru and Yunnan were used to identify their geographical origins. Multiplication signal correction (MSC) coupled with second derivative (SD) and Norris derivative filter (ND) was employed in spectral pretreatment. Spectrum range (7,500-4,061 cm⁻¹) was chosen by spectrum standard deviation. Combined with principal component analysis-mahalanobis distance (PCA-MD), the appropriate number of principal components was selected as 5. Based on the spectrum range and the number of principal components selected, two abnormal samples were eliminated by modular group iterative singular sample diagnosis method. Then, four methods were used to filter spectral variable information, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), monte carlo-uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE), genetic algorithm (GA) and subwindow permutation analysis (SPA). The spectral variable information filtered was evaluated by model population analysis (MPA). The results showed that RMSECV(SPA) > RMSECV(CARS) > RMSECV(MC-UVE) > RMSECV(GA), were 2. 14, 2. 05, 2. 02, and 1. 98, and the spectral variables were 250, 240, 250 and 70, respectively. According to the spectral variable filtered, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to build the model, with random selection of 97 samples as training set, and the other 40 samples as validation set. The results showed that, R²: GA > MC-UVE > CARS > SPA, RMSEC and RMSEP: GA Maca. The method was aimed to lay the foundation for traditional Chinese medicine identification and quality evaluation.

  11. Patients' Contexts and Their Effects on Clinicians' Impressions of Conduct Disorder Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Marsh, Jessecae K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether contextual information about patients' clinical presentations affected clinicians' judgments of conduct disorder symptoms. Forty-five clinicians read vignettes describing hypothetical patients who displayed one conduct disorder symptom alongside information about the patients' home, school, and peer…

  12. Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Lynn; Joseph, Sundari

    Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians' attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful.

  13. Binomial probability distribution model-based protein identification algorithm for tandem mass spectrometry utilizing peak intensity information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chuan-Le; Chen, Xiao-Zhou; Du, Yang-Li; Sun, Xuesong; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu

    2013-01-04

    Mass spectrometry has become one of the most important technologies in proteomic analysis. Tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a major tool for the analysis of peptide mixtures from protein samples. The key step of MS data processing is the identification of peptides from experimental spectra by searching public sequence databases. Although a number of algorithms to identify peptides from MS/MS data have been already proposed, e.g. Sequest, OMSSA, X!Tandem, Mascot, etc., they are mainly based on statistical models considering only peak-matches between experimental and theoretical spectra, but not peak intensity information. Moreover, different algorithms gave different results from the same MS data, implying their probable incompleteness and questionable reproducibility. We developed a novel peptide identification algorithm, ProVerB, based on a binomial probability distribution model of protein tandem mass spectrometry combined with a new scoring function, making full use of peak intensity information and, thus, enhancing the ability of identification. Compared with Mascot, Sequest, and SQID, ProVerB identified significantly more peptides from LC-MS/MS data sets than the current algorithms at 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) and provided more confident peptide identifications. ProVerB is also compatible with various platforms and experimental data sets, showing its robustness and versatility. The open-source program ProVerB is available at http://bioinformatics.jnu.edu.cn/software/proverb/ .

  14. Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and Practices on Assessment and Measurement at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. ... A standardized questionnaire was administered to 236 hospital – based clinicians including medical doctors, nurses and clinical officers. The questionnaire consisted of ...

  15. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  16. To act or not to act: responses to electronic health record prompts by family medicine clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazove, Philip; McKee, Michael; Schleicher, Lauren; Green, Lee; Kileny, Paul; Rapai, Mary; Mulhem, Elie

    2017-03-01

    A major focus of health care today is a strong emphasis on improving the health and quality of care for entire patient populations. One common approach utilizes electronic clinical alerts to prompt clinicians when certain interventions are due for individual patients being seen. However, these alerts have not been consistently effective, particularly for less visible (though important) conditions such as hearing loss (HL) screening. We conducted hour-long cognitive task analysis interviews to explore how family medicine clinicians view, perceive, and use electronic clinical alerts, and to utilize this information to design a more effective alert using HL identification and referral as a model diagnosis. Four key direct barriers were identified that impeded alert use: poor standardization and formatting, time pressures in primary care, clinic workflow variations, and mental models of the condition being prompted (in this case, HL). One indirect barrier was identified: electronic health record and institution/government regulations. We identified that clinicians' mental model of the condition being prompted was probably the major barrier, though this was often expressed as time pressure. We discuss solutions to each of the 5 identified barriers, such as addressing physicians' mental models, by focusing on physicians' expertise rather than knowledge to improve their comfort when caring for patients with the conditions being prompted. To unleash the potential of electronic clinical alerts, electronic health record and health care institutions need to address some key barriers. We outline these barriers and propose solutions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Bed occupancy monitoring: data processing and clinician user interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Melanie; Joshi, Vilas; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Unobtrusive and continuous monitoring of patients, especially at their place of residence, is becoming a significant part of the healthcare model. A variety of sensors are being used to monitor different patient conditions. Bed occupancy monitoring provides clinicians a quantitative measure of bed entry/exit patterns and may provide information relating to sleep quality. This paper presents a bed occupancy monitoring system using a bed pressure mat sensor. A clinical trial was performed involving 8 patients to collect bed occupancy data. The trial period for each patient ranged from 5-10 weeks. This data was analyzed using a participatory design methodology incorporating clinician feedback to obtain bed occupancy parameters. The parameters extracted include the number of bed exits per night, the bed exit weekly average (including minimum and maximum), the time of day of a particular exit, and the amount of uninterrupted bed occupancy per night. The design of a clinical user interface plays a significant role in the acceptance of such patient monitoring systems by clinicians. The clinician user interface proposed in this paper was designed to be intuitive, easy to navigate and not cause information overload. An iterative design methodology was used for the interface design. The interface design is extendible to incorporate data from multiple sensors. This allows the interface to be part of a comprehensive remote patient monitoring system.

  18. The power grid AGC frequency bias coefficient online identification method based on wide area information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zian; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper propose online identification method of regional frequency deviation coefficient based on the analysis of interconnected grid AGC adjustment response mechanism of regional frequency deviation coefficient and the generator online real-time operation state by measured data through PMU, analyze the optimization method of regional frequency deviation coefficient in case of the actual operation state of the power system and achieve a more accurate and efficient automatic generation control in power system. Verify the validity of the online identification method of regional frequency deviation coefficient by establishing the long-term frequency control simulation model of two-regional interconnected power system.

  19. Improving clinicians' access to cost data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenagy, John; Shah, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Bringing clinical and financial data together is critical to effectively running and operating service lines. Helping clinicians use cost data to make decisions requires a shared vision and a partnership between finance leaders and physicians. Hosting a "jam session" of technical, financial, and clinical experts can accelerate an organization's business intelligence strategy. Labor and supply costs represent the most actionable cost data for clinicians. Clinician buy-in hinges on education and support. It is important to focus on easy wins at the beginning of the project.

  20. Communicating prognosis with parents of critically ill infants: direct observation of clinician behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R D; Lemmon, M E; Arnold, R M; Donohue, P K

    2017-11-01

    Delivering prognostic information to families requires clinicians to forecast an infant's illness course and future. We lack robust empirical data about how prognosis is shared and how that affects clinician-family concordance regarding infant outcomes. Prospective audiorecording of neonatal intensive care unit family conferences, immediately followed by parent/clinician surveys. Existing qualitative analysis frameworks were applied. We analyzed 19 conferences. Most prognostic discussion targeted predicted infant functional needs, for example, medications or feeding. There was little discussion of how infant prognosis would affect infant/family quality of life. Prognostic framing was typically optimistic. Most parents left the conference believing their infant's prognosis to be more optimistic than did clinicians. Clinician approach to prognostic disclosure in these audiotaped family conferences tended to be broad and optimistic, without detail regarding implications of infant health for infant/family quality of life. Families and clinicians left these conversations with little consensus about infant prognosis.

  1. 78 FR 14084 - Request for Information To Gather Technical Expertise Pertaining to the Identification and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Native American students, as English learners. For these reasons this RFI seeks solutions; advice... Expertise Pertaining to the Identification and Placement of Native American Students Who Are English... students in grades K-12 as English learners and to appropriately place these students in language...

  2. 77 FR 16209 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Permitting, Vessel Identification, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... the stocks, assess the effectiveness of management measures, evaluate the benefits and costs of...: Individuals; Business or other for-profit organizations. Estimated Number of Respondents: 30. Estimated Time... identification, 45 minutes. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 265 hours. Estimated Total Annual Cost to Public...

  3. 75 FR 55301 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Gear Identification Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ...., buoys, radar reflectors, or other methods identified in the regulations). The number of gear in the case... be responsible for marking several strings of a given type of gear, or may use multiple different gear types that require marking for identification and visibility. The display of the identifying...

  4. Impact of a radio-frequency identification system and information interchange on clearance processes for cargo at border posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Bhero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improved operational efficiency is important to role players in cross-border logistics and trade corridors. Cargo owners and cargo forwarders have been particularly concerned about long delays in the processing and clearing of cargo at border posts. Field studies suggest that these delays are due to a combination of factors, such as a lack of optimum system configurations and non-optimised human-dependent operations, which make the operations prone to corruption and other malpractices. Objectives: This article presents possible strategies for improving some of the operations in this sector. The research hinges on two key questions: (1 what is the impact of information interchange between stakeholders on the cargo transit time and (2 how will cargo transit time be impacted upon by automatic identification of cargo and the status of cargo seals on arriving vehicles at the border? Method: The use of information communication systems enabled by automatic identification systems (incorporating radio-frequency identification technology is suggested. Results: Results obtained by the described simulation model indicate that improvements of up to 82% with regard to transit time are possible using these techniques. Conclusion: The findings therefore demonstrate how operations at border posts can be improved through the use of appropriate technology and configuration of the operations.

  5. Clinicians' management strategies for patients with dyspepsia: a qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlsson Bodil

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms from the upper gastrointestinal tract are frequently encountered in clinical practice and may be of either organic or functional origin. For some of these conditions, according to the literature, certain management strategies can be recommended. For other conditions, the evidence is more ambiguous. The hypothesis that guided our study design was twofold: Management strategies and treatments suggested by different clinicians vary considerably, even when optimal treatment is clear-cut, as documented by evidence in the literature. Clinicians believe that the management strategies of their colleagues are similar to their own. Methods Simulated case histories of four patients with symptoms from the upper gastrointestinal tract were presented to 27 Swedish clinicians who were specialists in medical gastroenterology, surgery, and general practice and worked at three hospitals in the southern part of Sweden. The patients' histories contained information on the patient's sex and age and the localisation of the symptoms, but descriptions of subjective symptoms and findings from examinations differed from history to history. Interviews containing open-ended questions were conducted. Results For the same patient, the management strategies and treatments suggested by the clinicians varied widely, as did the strategies suggested by clinicians in the same speciality. Variation was more pronounced if the case history noted symptoms but no organic findings than if the case history noted unambiguous findings and symptoms. However, even in cases with a consensus in the scientific literature on treatment, the variations in clinicians' opinion on management were pronounced. Conclusion Despite these variations, the clinicians believed that the decisions made by their colleagues would be similar to their own. The overall results of this study indicate that we as researchers must make scientific evidence comprehensible and communicate

  6. Self vs. other: neural correlates underlying agent identification based on unimodal auditory information as revealed by electrotomography (sLORETA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justen, C; Herbert, C; Werner, K; Raab, M

    2014-02-14

    Recent neuroscientific studies have identified activity changes in an extensive cerebral network consisting of medial prefrontal cortex, precuneus, temporo-parietal junction, and temporal pole during the perception and identification of self- and other-generated stimuli. Because this network is supposed to be engaged in tasks which require agent identification, it has been labeled the evaluation network (e-network). The present study used self- versus other-generated movement sounds (long jumps) and electroencephalography (EEG) in order to unravel the neural dynamics of agent identification for complex auditory information. Participants (N=14) performed an auditory self-other identification task with EEG. Data was then subjected to a subsequent standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analysis (source localization analysis). Differences between conditions were assessed using t-statistics (corrected for multiple testing) on the normalized and log-transformed current density values of the sLORETA images. Three-dimensional sLORETA source localization analysis revealed cortical activations in brain regions mostly associated with the e-network, especially in the medial prefrontal cortex (bilaterally in the alpha-1-band and right-lateralized in the gamma-band) and the temporo-parietal junction (right hemisphere in the alpha-1-band). Taken together, the findings are partly consistent with previous functional neuroimaging studies investigating unimodal visual or multimodal agent identification tasks (cf. e-network) and extent them to the auditory domain. Cortical activations in brain regions of the e-network seem to have functional relevance, especially the significantly higher cortical activation in the right medial prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Essential laboratory knowledge for the clinician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As clinicians place huge emphasis on the numerical values obtained from the clinical ... where clinical management is based on medical decision limits that ... One area of laboratory medicine in which standardisation has been difficult to ...

  8. Models of information markets: Analysis of markets, identification of services, and design models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Internet reduces much of the costs of information sharing, but it does not solve information receivers’ reading and interpretation limitations. Search engines ease information retrieval but do not solve the problems of specifying information needs and evaluating retrieval results. This article

  9. Contraction of information and its inverse problem in reactor system identification and stochastic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, K.

    1996-01-01

    Research concerning power reactor noise analysis makes rapid progress in the areas of the system identification, prediction and diagnosis. Keywords in these studies are artificial intelligence, neural network, fuzzy, and chaos. Nonlinear, nonstationary, or non-Gaussian processes as well as linear and steady processes are also studied in fluctuation analysis. However, we have not enough time to study a fundamental theory, since we are urged to obtain results or applications in power reactor fluctuations. Furthermore, we have no systematic approach to handle observed time series data in the linear process, since power reactor noise phenomena are complicated. Hence, it is important to study it from the fundamental viewpoint. It is a main aim of the present review paper to describe a unified formalism for reactor system identification and stochastic diagnosis

  10. The Federal University of Minas Gerais into context of open access to scientific information: identification of their information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ráisa Mendes Fernandes de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The obstacles faced by the scientific community in the dissemination and access to their own productions, contextualized in need of open access to scientific information, boosted the creation of Institutional Repositories. These are technologies adopted by educational institutions and research that aim to manage and provide scientific production site. Objective: to characterize Federal University of Minas Gerais’ information systems, analyzing the perception of the actors responsible for their existence / maintenance within the context of open access to scientific information. Methodology: This is a descriptive and qualitative research, which is engaged in the information systems developed within the university to support the teaching, research and extension, which contain the records of productions or productions, scientific or not, the local academic community. Results: we found some awareness of the actors interviewed in relation to the existence of other systems, although such awareness is not ideal. Generally, UFMG has Managers and depositors competent enough to manage a repository greater, as is the case of an RI. Conclusion: It is necessary an information policy that is born of consolidated scientific sectors hierarchically superior and inferior sectors to be transferred to, well, be possible to articulate the entire university community in support of a common cause. The study emphasizes the community of UFMG and optimization of open access to publications of the University as the scope for possible future studies.

  11. Clinician user involvement in the real world: Designing an electronic tool to improve interprofessional communication and collaboration in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Terence; Lim, Morgan E; Mansfield, Elizabeth; McLachlan, Alexander; Quan, Sherman D

    2018-02-01

    User involvement is vital to the success of health information technology implementation. However, involving clinician users effectively and meaningfully in complex healthcare organizations remains challenging. The objective of this paper is to share our real-world experience of applying a variety of user involvement methods in the design and implementation of a clinical communication and collaboration platform aimed at facilitating care of complex hospitalized patients by an interprofessional team of clinicians. We designed and implemented an electronic clinical communication and collaboration platform in a large community teaching hospital. The design team consisted of both technical and healthcare professionals. Agile software development methodology was used to facilitate rapid iterative design and user input. We involved clinician users at all stages of the development lifecycle using a variety of user-centered, user co-design, and participatory design methods. Thirty-six software releases were delivered over 24 months. User involvement has resulted in improvement in user interface design, identification of software defects, creation of new modules that facilitated workflow, and identification of necessary changes to the scope of the project early on. A variety of user involvement methods were complementary and benefited the design and implementation of a complex health IT solution. Combining these methods with agile software development methodology can turn designs into functioning clinical system to support iterative improvement. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Classified Information in Unclassified DoD Systems During the Audit of Internal Controls and Data Reliability in the Deployable Disbursing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-17

    Identification of Classified Information in Unclassified DoD Systems During the Audit of Internal Controls and Data Reliability in the Deployable...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Classified Information in Unclassified DoD Systems During the Audit of Internal Controls and Data Reliability...Systems During the Audit ofInternal Controls and Data Reliability in the Deployable Disbursing System (Report No. D-2009-054) Weare providing this

  13. Lncident: A Tool for Rapid Identification of Long Noncoding RNAs Utilizing Sequence Intrinsic Composition and Open Reading Frame Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More and more studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs play critical roles in diversity of biological process and are also associated with various types of disease. How to rapidly identify lncRNAs and messenger RNA is the fundamental step to uncover the function of lncRNAs identification. Here, we present a novel method for rapid identification of lncRNAs utilizing sequence intrinsic composition features and open reading frame information based on support vector machine model, named as Lncident (LncRNAs identification. The 10-fold cross-validation and ROC curve are used to evaluate the performance of Lncident. The main advantage of Lncident is high speed without the loss of accuracy. Compared with the exiting popular tools, Lncident outperforms Coding-Potential Calculator, Coding-Potential Assessment Tool, Coding-Noncoding Index, and PLEK. Lncident is also much faster than Coding-Potential Calculator and Coding-Noncoding Index. Lncident presents an outstanding performance on microorganism, which offers a great application prospect to the analysis of microorganism. In addition, Lncident can be trained by users’ own collected data. Furthermore, R package and web server are simultaneously developed in order to maximize the convenience for the users. The R package “Lncident” can be easily installed on multiple operating system platforms, as long as R is supported.

  14. The clinician's dilemma: two dimensions of ethical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Grant; Chamberlain, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    There is a continuing intense medico-ethico-legal debate around legalized euthanasia and physician assisted suicide such that ethically informed clinicians often agree with the arguments but feel hesitant about the conclusion, especially when it may bring about a change in law. We argue that this confusion results from the convergence of two continua that underpin the conduct of a clinician and are especially prominent in psychiatry. The two continua concern the duty of care and the importance of patient autonomy and they do not quite map into traditional divides in debates about sanctity of life, paternalism, and autonomy. As ethical dimensions, they come into sharp focus in the psychological complexities of end-of-life care and they form two key factors in most ethical and legal or disciplinary deliberations about a clinician's actions. Whereas both dimensions are important when a clinician reflects on what s/he has done or should do, they need careful balancing in a request for euthanasia or physician assisted suicide where the patient wants to take a decisive role in his or her own end-of-life care. However, end-of-life is also a situation where clinicians often encounter 'cries for help' so that both continua are importantly in play. Balancing these two continua without using blunt legal instruments is often required in psychiatric care in such a way as to problematize the idea that patient decisions should dominate the care options available. A simplistic approach to that issue arguably plays into what has been called an 'impoverished construction of life and death' and, some would say, devalues the basic commitments fundamental to medical care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinicians' experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2012-11-22

    There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals' decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians' journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. We found that there were three phases in clinicians' journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants' experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management "on the fly". Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians' decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary support functions are available locally, especially

  16. Inclusion probability for DNA mixtures is a subjective one-sided match statistic unrelated to identification information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Mark William

    2015-01-01

    DNA mixtures of two or more people are a common type of forensic crime scene evidence. A match statistic that connects the evidence to a criminal defendant is usually needed for court. Jurors rely on this strength of match to help decide guilt or innocence. However, the reliability of unsophisticated match statistics for DNA mixtures has been questioned. The most prevalent match statistic for DNA mixtures is the combined probability of inclusion (CPI), used by crime labs for over 15 years. When testing 13 short tandem repeat (STR) genetic loci, the CPI(-1) value is typically around a million, regardless of DNA mixture composition. However, actual identification information, as measured by a likelihood ratio (LR), spans a much broader range. This study examined probability of inclusion (PI) mixture statistics for 517 locus experiments drawn from 16 reported cases and compared them with LR locus information calculated independently on the same data. The log(PI(-1)) values were examined and compared with corresponding log(LR) values. The LR and CPI methods were compared in case examples of false inclusion, false exclusion, a homicide, and criminal justice outcomes. Statistical analysis of crime laboratory STR data shows that inclusion match statistics exhibit a truncated normal distribution having zero center, with little correlation to actual identification information. By the law of large numbers (LLN), CPI(-1) increases with the number of tested genetic loci, regardless of DNA mixture composition or match information. These statistical findings explain why CPI is relatively constant, with implications for DNA policy, criminal justice, cost of crime, and crime prevention. Forensic crime laboratories have generated CPI statistics on hundreds of thousands of DNA mixture evidence items. However, this commonly used match statistic behaves like a random generator of inclusionary values, following the LLN rather than measuring identification information. A quantitative

  17. Inclusion probability for DNA mixtures is a subjective one-sided match statistic unrelated to identification information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark William Perlin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA mixtures of two or more people are a common type of forensic crime scene evidence. A match statistic that connects the evidence to a criminal defendant is usually needed for court. Jurors rely on this strength of match to help decide guilt or innocence. However, the reliability of unsophisticated match statistics for DNA mixtures has been questioned. Materials and Methods: The most prevalent match statistic for DNA mixtures is the combined probability of inclusion (CPI, used by crime labs for over 15 years. When testing 13 short tandem repeat (STR genetic loci, the CPI -1 value is typically around a million, regardless of DNA mixture composition. However, actual identification information, as measured by a likelihood ratio (LR, spans a much broader range. This study examined probability of inclusion (PI mixture statistics for 517 locus experiments drawn from 16 reported cases and compared them with LR locus information calculated independently on the same data. The log(PI -1 values were examined and compared with corresponding log(LR values. Results: The LR and CPI methods were compared in case examples of false inclusion, false exclusion, a homicide, and criminal justice outcomes. Statistical analysis of crime laboratory STR data shows that inclusion match statistics exhibit a truncated normal distribution having zero center, with little correlation to actual identification information. By the law of large numbers (LLN, CPI -1 increases with the number of tested genetic loci, regardless of DNA mixture composition or match information. These statistical findings explain why CPI is relatively constant, with implications for DNA policy, criminal justice, cost of crime, and crime prevention. Conclusions: Forensic crime laboratories have generated CPI statistics on hundreds of thousands of DNA mixture evidence items. However, this commonly used match statistic behaves like a random generator of inclusionary values, following the LLN

  18. Pubertal changes in emotional information processing: pupillary, behavioral, and subjective evidence during emotional word identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jennifer S; Siegle, Greg J; Whalen, Diana J; Ostapenko, Laura J; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Dahl, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated pupillary and behavioral responses to an emotional word valence identification paradigm among 32 pre-/early pubertal and 34 mid-/late pubertal typically developing children and adolescents. Participants were asked to identify the valence of positive, negative, and neutral words while pupil dilation was assessed using an eyetracker. Mid-/late pubertal children showed greater peak pupillary reactivity to words presented during the emotional word identification task than pre-/early pubertal children, regardless of word valence. Mid-/late pubertal children also showed smaller sustained pupil dilation than pre-/early pubertal children after the word was no longer on screen. These findings were replicated controlling for participants' age. In addition, mid-/late pubertal children had faster reaction times to all words, and rated themselves as more emotional during their laboratory visit compared to pre-/early pubertal children. Greater recall of emotional words following the task was associated with mid-/late pubertal status, and greater recall of emotional words was also associated with higher peak pupil dilation. These results provide physiological, behavioral, and subjective evidence consistent with a model of puberty-specific changes in neurobehavioral systems underpinning emotional reactivity.

  19. Identification and Analysis of Multi-tasking Product Information Search Sessions with Query Logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This research aims to identify product search tasks in online shopping and analyze the characteristics of consumer multi-tasking search sessions. Design/methodology/approach: The experimental dataset contains 8,949 queries of 582 users from 3,483 search sessions. A sequential comparison of the Jaccard similarity coefficient between two adjacent search queries and hierarchical clustering of queries is used to identify search tasks. Findings: (1 Users issued a similar number of queries (1.43 to 1.47 with similar lengths (7.3-7.6 characters per task in mono-tasking and multi-tasking sessions, and (2 Users spent more time on average in sessions with more tasks, but spent less time for each task when the number of tasks increased in a session. Research limitations: The task identification method that relies only on query terms does not completely reflect the complex nature of consumer shopping behavior. Practical implications: These results provide an exploratory understanding of the relationships among multiple shopping tasks, and can be useful for product recommendation and shopping task prediction. Originality/value: The originality of this research is its use of query clustering with online shopping task identification and analysis, and the analysis of product search session characteristics.

  20. Robust identification of noncoding RNA from transcriptomes requires phylogenetically-informed sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stinus Lindgreen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding RNAs are integral to a wide range of biological processes, including translation, gene regulation, host-pathogen interactions and environmental sensing. While genomics is now a mature field, our capacity to identify noncoding RNA elements in bacterial and archaeal genomes is hampered by the difficulty of de novo identification. The emergence of new technologies for characterizing transcriptome outputs, notably RNA-seq, are improving noncoding RNA identification and expression quantification. However, a major challenge is to robustly distinguish functional outputs from transcriptional noise. To establish whether annotation of existing transcriptome data has effectively captured all functional outputs, we analysed over 400 publicly available RNA-seq datasets spanning 37 different Archaea and Bacteria. Using comparative tools, we identify close to a thousand highly-expressed candidate noncoding RNAs. However, our analyses reveal that capacity to identify noncoding RNA outputs is strongly dependent on phylogenetic sampling. Surprisingly, and in stark contrast to protein-coding genes, the phylogenetic window for effective use of comparative methods is perversely narrow: aggregating public datasets only produced one phylogenetic cluster where these tools could be used to robustly separate unannotated noncoding RNAs from a null hypothesis of transcriptional noise. Our results show that for the full potential of transcriptomics data to be realized, a change in experimental design is paramount: effective transcriptomics requires phylogeny-aware sampling.

  1. AphasiaBank: a resource for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Margaret M; Fromm, Davida; Macwhinney, Brian

    2012-08-01

    AphasiaBank is a shared, multimedia database containing videos and transcriptions of ~180 aphasic individuals and 140 nonaphasic controls performing a uniform set of discourse tasks. The language in the videos is transcribed in Codes for the Human Analysis of Transcripts (CHAT) format and coded for analysis with Computerized Language ANalysis (CLAN) programs, which can perform a wide variety of language analyses. The database and the CLAN programs are freely available to aphasia researchers and clinicians for educational, clinical, and scholarly uses. This article describes the database, suggests some ways in which clinicians and clinician researchers might find these materials useful, and introduces a new language analysis program, EVAL, designed to streamline the transcription and coding processes, while still producing an extensive and useful language profile. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. 78 FR 68817 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Gear Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... gear type being used to help prevent gear conflicts. II. Method of Collection No information is... certain types of fishing gear mark the gear with specified information. The gear marking requirements... for marking several strings of a given gear type, or may use multiple different gear types that...

  3. 76 FR 59660 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Permitting, Vessel Identification, and Vessel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ...., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the Internet at [email protected] ). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for... satellite- based vessel monitoring system (VMS). This collection of information is needed for permit... transmission of paper forms. VMS data are collected electronically and automatically. III. Data OMB Control...

  4. Fisher information and asymptotic normality in system identification for quantum Markov chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guta, Madalin

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of estimating the coupling constant θ of a mixing quantum Markov chain. For a repeated measurement on the chain's output we show that the outcomes' time average has an asymptotically normal (Gaussian) distribution, and we give the explicit expressions of its mean and variance. In particular, we obtain a simple estimator of θ whose classical Fisher information can be optimized over different choices of measured observables. We then show that the quantum state of the output together with the system is itself asymptotically Gaussian and compute its quantum Fisher information, which sets an absolute bound to the estimation error. The classical and quantum Fisher information are compared in a simple example. In the vicinity of θ=0 we find that the quantum Fisher information has a quadratic rather than linear scaling in output size, and asymptotically the Fisher information is localized in the system, while the output is independent of the parameter.

  5. A systematic identification of species-specific protein succinylation sites using joint element features information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan MM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Md Mehedi Hasan,1 Mst Shamima Khatun,2 Md Nurul Haque Mollah,2 Cao Yong,3 Dianjing Guo1 1School of Life Sciences and the State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territory, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory of Bioinformatics, Department of Statistics, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lysine succinylation, an important type of protein posttranslational modification, plays significant roles in many cellular processes. Accurate identification of succinylation sites can facilitate our understanding about the molecular mechanism and potential roles of lysine succinylation. However, even in well-studied systems, a majority of the succinylation sites remain undetected because the traditional experimental approaches to succinylation site identification are often costly, time-consuming, and laborious. In silico approach, on the other hand, is potentially an alternative strategy to predict succinylation substrates. In this paper, a novel computational predictor SuccinSite2.0 was developed for predicting generic and species-specific protein succinylation sites. This predictor takes the composition of profile-based amino acid and orthogonal binary features, which were used to train a random forest classifier. We demonstrated that the proposed SuccinSite2.0 predictor outperformed other currently existing implementations on a complementarily independent dataset. Furthermore, the important features that make visible contributions to species-specific and cross-species-specific prediction of protein succinylation site were analyzed. The proposed predictor is anticipated to be a useful computational resource for lysine succinylation site prediction. The integrated species-specific online tool of SuccinSite2.0 is publicly

  6. The interplay between teamwork, clinicians' emotional exhaustion, and clinician-rated patient safety: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Annalena; Meier, Laurenz L; Manser, Tanja

    2016-04-19

    Effectively managing patient safety and clinicians' emotional exhaustion are important goals of healthcare organizations. Previous cross-sectional studies showed that teamwork is associated with both. However, causal relationships between all three constructs have not yet been investigated. Moreover, the role of different dimensions of teamwork in relation to emotional exhaustion and patient safety is unclear. The current study focused on the long-term development of teamwork, emotional exhaustion, and patient safety in interprofessional intensive care teams by exploring causal relationships between these constructs. A secondary objective was to disentangle the effects of interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork. We employed a longitudinal study design. Participants were 2100 nurses and physicians working in 55 intensive care units. They answered an online questionnaire on interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral aspects of teamwork, emotional exhaustion, and patient safety at three time points with a 3-month lag. Data were analyzed with cross-lagged structural equation modeling. We controlled for professional role. Analyses showed that emotional exhaustion had a lagged effect on interpersonal teamwork. Furthermore, interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork mutually influenced each other. Finally, cognitive-behavioral teamwork predicted clinician-rated patient safety. The current study shows that the interrelations between teamwork, clinician burnout, and clinician-rated patient safety unfold over time. Interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork play specific roles in a process leading from clinician emotional exhaustion to decreased clinician-rated patient safety. Emotionally exhausted clinicians are less able to engage in positive interpersonal teamwork, which might set in motion a vicious cycle: negative interpersonal team interactions negatively affect cognitive-behavioral teamwork and vice versa. Ultimately, ineffective cognitive

  7. Electronic medical records and communication with patients and other clinicians: are we talking less?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Cohen, Genna R; Grossman, Joy M

    2010-04-01

    Commercial electronic medical records (EMRs) both help and hinder physician interpersonal communication--real-time, face-to-face or phone conversations--with patients and other clinicians, according to a new Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) study based on in-depth interviews with clinicians in 26 physician practices. EMRs assist real-time communication with patients during office visits, primarily through immediate access to patient information, allowing clinicians to talk with patients rather than search for information from paper records. For some clinicians, however, aspects of EMRs pose a distraction during visits. Moreover, some indicated that clinicians may rely on EMRs for information gathering and transfer at the expense of real-time communication with patients and other clinicians. Given time pressures already present in many physician practices, EMR and office-work flow modifications could help ensure that EMRs advance care without compromising interpersonal communication. In particular, policies promoting EMR adoption should consider incorporating communication-skills training for medical trainees and clinicians using EMRs.

  8. 76 FR 16609 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Identification of Human Cell Lines Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... differentiate among cell lines, as described in Designation: ASN-0002 Authentication of Human Cell Lines... NIST (contact information above). III. Data OMB Control Number: None. Form Number: None. Type of Review...

  9. 75 FR 9158 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Identification of Northeast Regional Ocean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information... Social Network Analysis AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent...

  10. Elder Abuse: What's a Clinician To Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Bruce E.

    Incidence rates are critically examined in light of varying definitions of what constitutes elder abuse. It is suggested that the clinician's position of mandatory reporting is an unrealistic response in many cases of elder abuse due to the lack of adequate support services for either the abuser or the elder. Outcome studies are used to support…

  11. Staff Clinician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Neuro-Oncology Branch (NOB), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) is seeking staff clinicians to provide high-quality patient care for individuals with primary central nervous system (CNS) malignancies.  The NOB is comprised of a multidisciplinary team of physicians, healthcare providers, and scientists who

  12. A Reliable Measure of Information Security Awareness and the Identification of Bias in Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata McCormac

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Human Aspects of Information Security Questionnaire (HAIS-Q is designed to measure Information Security Awareness. More specifically, the tool measures an individual’s knowledge, attitude, and self-reported behaviour relating to information security in the workplace. This paper reports on the reliability of the HAIS-Q, including test-retest reliability and internal consistency. The paper also assesses the reliability of three preliminary over-claiming items, designed specifically to complement the HAIS-Q, and identify those individuals who provide socially desirable responses. A total of 197 working Australians completed two iterations of the HAIS-Q and the over-claiming items, approximately 4 weeks apart. Results of the analysis showed that the HAIS-Q was externally reliable and internally consistent. Therefore, the HAIS-Q can be used to reliably measure information security awareness. Reliability testing on the preliminary over-claiming items was not as robust and further development is required and recommended. The implications of these findings mean that organisations can confidently use the HAIS-Q to not only measure the current state of employee information security awareness within their organisation, but they can also measure the effectiveness and impacts of training interventions, information security awareness programs and campaigns. The influence of cultural changes and the effect of security incidents can also be assessed.

  13. Knowledge management strategies: Enhancing knowledge transfer to clinicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Lorrie K; Rocha, Roberto A; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Bradshaw, Richard L; Hanna, Timothy P; Hulse, Nathan C

    2006-01-01

    At Intermountain Healthcare (Intermountain), executive clinical content experts are responsible for disseminating consistent evidence-based clinical content throughout the enterprise at the point-of-care. With a paper-based system it was difficult to ensure that current information was received and was being used in practice. With electronic information systems multiple applications were supplying similar, but different, vendor-licensed and locally-developed content. These issues influenced the consistency of clinical practice within the enterprise, jeopardized patient and clinician safety, and exposed the enterprise and its employees to potential financial penalties. In response to these issues Intermountain is developing a knowledge management infrastructure providing tools and services to support clinical content development, deployment, maintenance, and communication. The Intermountain knowledge management philosophy includes strategies guiding clinicians and consumers of health information to relevant best practice information with the intention of changing behaviors. This paper presents three case studies describing different information management problems identified within Intermountain, methods used to solve the problems, implementation challenges, and the current status of each project.

  14. The nature of excellent clinicians at an academic health science center: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahant, Sanjay; Jovcevska, Vesna; Wadhwa, Anupma

    2012-12-01

    To understand the nature of excellent clinicians at an academic health science center by exploring how and why excellent clinicians achieve high performance. From 2008 to 2010, the authors conducted a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Members of the Clinical Advisory Committee in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Toronto nominated peers whom they saw as excellent clinicians. The authors then conducted in-depth interviews with the most frequently nominated clinicians. They audio-recorded and transcribed the interviews and coded the transcripts to identify emergent themes. From interviews with 13 peer-nominated, excellent clinicians, a model emerged. Dominant themes fell into three categories: (1) core philosophy, (2) deliberate activities, and (3) everyday practice. Excellent clinicians are driven by a core philosophy defined by high intrinsic motivation and passion for patient care and humility. They refine their clinical skills through two deliberate activities-reflective clinical practice and scholarship. Their high performance in everyday practice is characterized by clinical skills and cognitive ability, people skills, engagement, and adaptability. A rich theory emerged explaining how excellent clinicians, driven by a core philosophy and engaged in deliberate activities, achieve high performance in everyday practice. This theory of the nature of excellent clinicians provides a holistic perspective of individual performance, informs medical education, supports faculty career development, and promotes clinical excellence in the culture of academic medicine.

  15. Hydrocarbon Reservoir Identification in Volcanic Zone by using Magnetotelluric and Geochemistry Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firda, S. I.; Permadi, A. N.; Supriyanto; Suwardi, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    The resistivity of Magnetotelluric (MT) data show the resistivity mapping in the volcanic reservoir zone and the geochemistry information for confirm the reservoir and source rock formation. In this research, we used 132 data points divided with two line at exploration area. We used several steps to make the resistivity mapping. There are time series correction, crosspower correction, then inversion of Magnetotelluric (MT) data. Line-2 and line-3 show anomaly geological condition with Gabon fault. The geology structure from the resistivity mapping show the fault and the geological formation with the geological rock data mapping distribution. The geochemistry information show the maturity of source rock formation. According to core sample analysis information, we get the visual porosity for reservoir rock formation in several geological structure. Based on that, we make the geological modelling where the potential reservoir and the source rock around our interest area.

  16. Demographic and health surveillance of mobile pastoralists in Chad: integration of biometric fingerprint identification into a geographical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Daniel; Schelling, Esther; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Utzinger, Jürg; Hattendorf, Jan; Abdoulaye, Mahamat; Madjiade, Toguina; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2008-11-01

    There is a pressing need for baseline demographic and health-related data to plan, implement and evaluate health interventions in developing countries, and to monitor progress towards international development goals. However, mobile pastoralists, i.e. people who depend on a livestock production system and follow their herds as they move, remain marginalized from rural development plans and interventions. The fact that mobile people are hard to reach and stay in contact with is a plausible reason why they are underrepresented in national censuses and/or alternative sequential sample survey systems. We present a proof-of-concept of monitoring highly mobile, pastoral people by recording demographic and health-related data from 933 women and 2020 children and establishing a biometric identification system (BIS) based on the registration and identification of digital fingerprints. Although only 22 women, representing 2.4% of the total registered women, were encountered twice in the four survey rounds, the approach implemented is shown to be feasible. The BIS described here is linked to a geographical information system to facilitate the creation of the first health and demographic surveillance system in a mobile, pastoralist setting. Our ultimate goal is to implement and monitor interventions with the "one health" concept, thus integrating and improving human, animal and ecosystem health.

  17. Demographic and health surveillance of mobile pastoralists in Chad: integration of biometric fingerprint identification into a geographical information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Weibel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for baseline demographic and health-related data to plan, implement and evaluate health interventions in developing countries, and to monitor progress towards international development goals. However, mobile pastoralists, i.e. people who depend on a livestock production system and follow their herds as they move, remain marginalized from rural development plans and interventions. The fact that mobile people are hard to reach and stay in contact with is a plausible reason why they are underrepresented in national censuses and/or alternative sequential sample survey systems. We present a proof-of-concept of monitoring highly mobile, pastoral people by recording demographic and health-related data from 933 women and 2020 children and establishing a biometric identification system (BIS based on the registration and identification of digital fingerprints. Although only 22 women, representing 2.4% of the total registered women, were encountered twice in the four survey rounds, the approach implemented is shown to be feasible. The BIS described here is linked to a geographical information system to facilitate the creation of the first health and demographic surveillance system in a mobile, pastoralist setting. Our ultimate goal is to implement and monitor interventions with the “one health” concept, thus integrating and improving human, animal and ecosystem health.

  18. Informed consent in contrast-enhanced CT. Understanding of risks and identification of possible prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrl, S.; Dendl, L.M.; Scharf, G.; Stroszczynski, C.; Schreyer, A.G.; Zeman, F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of our study was to assess understanding of risks associated with intravascular application of contrast media in patients undergoing CT examination. We wanted to evaluate epidemiologic and socio-economic prognostic factors for a higher understanding of risks. Additionally, we evaluated a possible correlation between an extensive, outcome-oriented oral informed consent and better understanding of risks. 120 patients distributed in 2 study arms participated in this prospective study. In study arm I, the treating physician was not informed that his patients participated in a study whereas the physician in study arm II knew about the survey. After the informed consent we performed a standardized, semi-structured interview to enquire the 3 most frequent risks of intravascular application of contrast agents (anaphylactoid reactions, nephropathy and thyrotoxic crisis) and epidemiologic data. The understanding of the risks was evaluated using a 6 point scale. Patients scored 3.73 points in study arm I and 4.93 points in arm II on average. The statistical difference between both study arms was highly significant (p < 0.001). In a combined logistic regression analysis, only ''higher education'' (p = 0.001) and participation in study arm II (p =0.001) showed a significant connection to a better understanding of risks. Patients profit from an outcome-oriented and individualized informed consent. Due to the significant correlation between educational level and understanding of risks, informed consent should be adjusted to the educational status of the individual patient, e.g. by using didactic aids or individualized information sheets.

  19. Burns education for non-burn specialist clinicians in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Tania; Hendricks, Joyce; Twigg, Di; Wood, Fiona

    2015-03-01

    Burn patients often receive their initial care by non-burn specialist clinicians, with increasingly collaborative burn models of care. The provision of relevant and accessible education for these clinicians is therefore vital for optimal patient care. A two phase design was used. A state-wide survey of multidisciplinary non-burn specialist clinicians throughout Western Australia identified learning needs related to paediatric burn care. A targeted education programme was developed and delivered live via videoconference. Pre-post-test analysis evaluated changes in knowledge as a result of attendance at each education session. Non-burn specialist clinicians identified numerous areas of burn care relevant to their practice. Statistically significant differences between perceived relevance of care and confidence in care provision were reported for aspects of acute burn care. Following attendance at the education sessions, statistically significant increases in knowledge were noted for most areas of acute burn care. Identification of learning needs facilitated the development of a targeted education programme for non-burn specialist clinicians. Increased non-burn specialist clinician knowledge following attendance at most education sessions supports the use of videoconferencing as an acceptable and effective method of delivering burns education in Western Australia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. An overview of meta-analysis for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho

    2018-03-01

    The number of medical studies being published is increasing exponentially, and clinicians must routinely process large amounts of new information. Moreover, the results of individual studies are often insufficient to provide confident answers, as their results are not consistently reproducible. A meta-analysis is a statistical method for combining the results of different studies on the same topic and it may resolve conflicts among studies. Meta-analysis is being used increasingly and plays an important role in medical research. This review introduces the basic concepts, steps, advantages, and caveats of meta-analysis, to help clinicians understand it in clinical practice and research. A major advantage of a meta-analysis is that it produces a precise estimate of the effect size, with considerably increased statistical power, which is important when the power of the primary study is limited because of a small sample size. A meta-analysis may yield conclusive results when individual studies are inconclusive. Furthermore, meta-analyses investigate the source of variation and different effects among subgroups. In summary, a meta-analysis is an objective, quantitative method that provides less biased estimates on a specific topic. Understanding how to conduct a meta-analysis aids clinicians in the process of making clinical decisions.

  1. An overview of meta-analysis for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho

    2018-01-01

    The number of medical studies being published is increasing exponentially, and clinicians must routinely process large amounts of new information. Moreover, the results of individual studies are often insufficient to provide confident answers, as their results are not consistently reproducible. A meta-analysis is a statistical method for combining the results of different studies on the same topic and it may resolve conflicts among studies. Meta-analysis is being used increasingly and plays an important role in medical research. This review introduces the basic concepts, steps, advantages, and caveats of meta-analysis, to help clinicians understand it in clinical practice and research. A major advantage of a meta-analysis is that it produces a precise estimate of the effect size, with considerably increased statistical power, which is important when the power of the primary study is limited because of a small sample size. A meta-analysis may yield conclusive results when individual studies are inconclusive. Furthermore, meta-analyses investigate the source of variation and different effects among subgroups. In summary, a meta-analysis is an objective, quantitative method that provides less biased estimates on a specific topic. Understanding how to conduct a meta-analysis aids clinicians in the process of making clinical decisions. PMID:29277096

  2. Identification of informative features for predicting proinflammatory potentials of engine exhausts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chi; Lin, Ying-Chi; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Jhang, Syu-Ruei; Tung, Chun-Wei

    2017-08-18

    The immunotoxicity of engine exhausts is of high concern to human health due to the increasing prevalence of immune-related diseases. However, the evaluation of immunotoxicity of engine exhausts is currently based on expensive and time-consuming experiments. It is desirable to develop efficient methods for immunotoxicity assessment. To accelerate the development of safe alternative fuels, this study proposed a computational method for identifying informative features for predicting proinflammatory potentials of engine exhausts. A principal component regression (PCR) algorithm was applied to develop prediction models. The informative features were identified by a sequential backward feature elimination (SBFE) algorithm. A total of 19 informative chemical and biological features were successfully identified by SBFE algorithm. The informative features were utilized to develop a computational method named FS-CBM for predicting proinflammatory potentials of engine exhausts. FS-CBM model achieved a high performance with correlation coefficient values of 0.997 and 0.943 obtained from training and independent test sets, respectively. The FS-CBM model was developed for predicting proinflammatory potentials of engine exhausts with a large improvement on prediction performance compared with our previous CBM model. The proposed method could be further applied to construct models for bioactivities of mixtures.

  3. Economic Regime identification and prediction in TAC SCM using sales and procurement information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenboom, F.P.; Ketter, W.; Dalen, van Jan; Kaymak, U.; Collins, J.; Gupta, Alok

    2009-01-01

    Our research is focused on the effects of the additionof procurement information (offer prices) to a sales-based economic regime model. This model is used for strategic, tactical, and operational decision making in dynamic supply chains. We evaluate the performance of the regime model through

  4. A Manual of Cherokee Herbal Remedies: History, Information, Identification, Medicinal Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Patricia D.

    This thesis reports on the research of 25 plants, used as herbal remedies since the 1800s by the author's Native American ancestors (the Day family) and the Cherokee tribe. The plants were identified in four state parks in southwestern Indiana. Information sources included the research literature, articles on Cherokee herbal remedies, and…

  5. Genome-wide identification of breed-informative single-nucleotide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is because the SNPs on BovineSNP50 and GGP-80K assays were ascertained as being common in European taurine breeds. Lower MAF and SNP informativeness observed in this study limits the application of these assays in breed assignment, and could have other implications for genome-wide studies in South ...

  6. 78 FR 23332 - Supplemental Identification Information for Two (2) Individuals Designated Pursuant to Executive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... two (2) individuals in this notice, pursuant is effective on April 11, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... determined by the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of..., in consultation with the Departments of State, Homeland [[Page 23333

  7. Burden of informal caregiving for stroke patients: Identification of caregivers at risk of adverse health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exel, N.J.A. van; Koopmanschap, M.A.; Berg, B. van den; Brouwer, W.B.F.; Bos, G.A.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    Background: We assessed the objective and subjective burden of caregiving for stroke patients and investigated which characteristics of the patient, the informal caregiver and the objective burden contribute most to subjective burden and to the condition of feeling substantially burdened. Methods:

  8. COBACORE Community Based Comprehensive Recovery : D2.1: Data identification - WP2: Information framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anoniem

    2013-01-01

    The collation, effective management and timely transfer of robust and credible data impact all activities and transcend all phases of the disaster cycle. All actors involved in recovery and reconstruction are dependent upon specific datasets in order to inform decision making, prioritise and

  9. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree Information of Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Mulder, H.A.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype

  10. Semantic Technology Application for Collective Knowledge and Information Management: Prospective Consumer Needs Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilma Pranciulytė-Bagdziunienė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the global flow of information forms qualitatively new complex information processing and filing requirements. The flow of information, data and knowledge manages the various activities of the original search for technological solutions. Very abundant and rapidly growing technology solutions groups are based on semantic technologies. Therefore, this article aims to provide user access needs for producing perspective survey methodology and the empirical study is based on the prospective development of innovative product lines. This article is formed based on the recommendations of the semantics of the applicability of technology development to business end users, public administration, organization of information flows the value of the generation of knowledge—based on environment and development issues. At a practical level, based on empirical evidence substantiates the semantics it is based on technology solutions for organizations in the integration of business processes, which can become the modern aspect of the success factors of the value of domestic and global market and facilitate the diffusion of innovation. The field of qualitative research has revealed the final consumer habits and problems of information search, organization, grouping aspects. Secondly, the study determined the idea of the necessity of technology in business processes, innovation generation and diffusion of knowledge issues aspects. Third, the authors submit proposals based on the semantics of the applicability of technology development opportunities in the business. Finally—users, public administrations and their mutual interaction activities. ST applicability of these segments may occur based on ST integration of IT systems in organizations, the general structure of existing products or used as a service by buying them from outside suppliers. It is important to emphasize that the ST innovative methods to ensure successful use of advanced, modern

  11. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  12. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino Buslje, Cristina; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas; Delfino, José María; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-11-04

    Identification of catalytic residues (CR) is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI), and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  13. On a learning curve for shared decision making: Interviews with clinicians using the knee osteoarthritis Option Grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Rasmussen, Julie; Kinsey, Katharine; Firth, Jill; Marrin, Katy; Edwards, Adrian; Wood, Fiona

    2018-02-01

    Tools used in clinical encounters to illustrate to patients the risks and benefits of treatment options have been shown to increase shared decision making. However, we do not have good information about how these tools are viewed by clinicians and how clinicians think patients would react to their use. Our aim was to examine clinicians' views about the possible and actual use of tools designed to support patients and clinicians to collaborate and deliberate about treatment options, namely, Option Grid decision aids. We conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews embedded in the intervention phase of a trial of an Option Grid decision aid for osteoarthritis of the knee. Interviews were conducted with 6 participating clinicians before they used the tool and again after clinicians had used the tool with 6 patients. In the first interview, clinicians voiced concerns that the tool would lead to an increase in encounter duration, patient resistance regarding involvement in decision making, and potential information overload. At the second interview, after minimal training, the clinicians reported that the tool had changed their usual way of communicating, and it was generally acceptable and helpful to integrate it into practice. After experiencing the use of Option Grids, clinicians became more willing to use the tools in their clinical encounters with patients. How best to introduce Option Grids to clinicians and adopt their use into practice will need careful consideration of context, workflow, and clinical pathways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Affect as Information in Persuasion: A Model of Affect Identification and Discounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Dolores; Kumkale, G. Tarcan

    2016-01-01

    Three studies examined the implications of a model of affect as information in persuasion. According to this model, extraneous affect may have an influence when message recipients exert moderate amounts of thought, because they identify their affective reactions as potential criteria but fail to discount them as irrelevant. However, message recipients may not use affect as information when they deem affect irrelevant or when they do not identify their affective reactions at all. Consistent with this curvilinear prediction, recipients of a message that either favored or opposed comprehensive exams used affect as a basis for attitudes in situations that elicited moderate thought. Affect, however, had no influence on attitudes in conditions that elicited either large or small amounts of thought. PMID:12635909

  15. Information flow between interacting human brains: Identification, validation, and relationship to social expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Edda; Ruf, Matthias; Schäfer, Axel; Akdeniz, Ceren; Calhoun, Vince D; Schmahl, Christian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-04-21

    Social interactions are fundamental for human behavior, but the quantification of their neural underpinnings remains challenging. Here, we used hyperscanning functional MRI (fMRI) to study information flow between brains of human dyads during real-time social interaction in a joint attention paradigm. In a hardware setup enabling immersive audiovisual interaction of subjects in linked fMRI scanners, we characterize cross-brain connectivity components that are unique to interacting individuals, identifying information flow between the sender's and receiver's temporoparietal junction. We replicate these findings in an independent sample and validate our methods by demonstrating that cross-brain connectivity relates to a key real-world measure of social behavior. Together, our findings support a central role of human-specific cortical areas in the brain dynamics of dyadic interactions and provide an approach for the noninvasive examination of the neural basis of healthy and disturbed human social behavior with minimal a priori assumptions.

  16. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  17. Inter-Rater Agreement of Auscultation, Palpable Fremitus, and Ventilator Waveform Sawtooth Patterns Between Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Marc P; Martí, Joan-Daniel; Ntoumenopoulos, George

    2016-10-01

    Clinicians often use numerous bedside assessments for secretion retention in participants who are receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. This study aimed to evaluate inter-rater agreement between clinicians when using standard clinical assessments of secretion retention and whether differences in clinician experience influenced inter-rater agreement. Seventy-one mechanically ventilated participants were assessed by a research clinician and by one of 13 ICU clinicians. Each clinician conducted a standardized assessment of lung auscultation, palpation for chest-wall (rhonchal) fremitus, and ventilator inspiratory/expiratory flow-time waveforms for the sawtooth pattern. On the presence of breath sounds, agreement ranged from absolute to moderate in the upper zones and the lower zones, respectively. Kappa values for abnormal and adventitious lung sounds achieved moderate agreement in the upper zones, less than chance agreement to substantial agreement in the middle zones, and moderate agreement to almost perfect agreement in the lower zones. Moderate to almost perfect agreement was established for palpable fremitus in the upper zones, moderate to substantial agreement in the middle zones, and less than chance to moderate agreement in the lower zones. Inter-rater agreement on the presence of expiratory sawtooth pattern identification showed moderate agreement. The level of percentage agreement between the research and ICU clinicians for each respiratory assessment studied did not relate directly to level of clinical experience. Inter-rater agreement for all assessments showed variability between lung regions but maintained reasonable percentage agreement in mechanically ventilated participants. The level of percentage agreement achieved between clinicians did not directly relate to clinical experience for all respiratory assessments. Therefore, these respiratory assessments should not necessarily be viewed in isolation but interpreted within the context of a full

  18. Enhancing shared decision making through assessment of patient-clinician concordance on decision quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Selby, Warwick; Salkeld, Glenn

    to quantify, document, and suggest how future dyadic decisions can be enhanced by criterion prioritisation. Associations between patient’s MDQ-W before, and MDQ-R after consultation with their clinician were analysed along with patient scores from the Satisfaction With Decision (SWD) instrument. Results...... and clinician using the dually-personalised decomposable MyDecisionQuality (MDQ) instrument. This has the potential to guide future work on optimising dyad-specific patient-clinician communication for shared decision making and informed consent....

  19. Identification of Breast Cancer Using Integrated Information from MRI and Mammography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Neng Yang

    Full Text Available Integration of information from corresponding regions between the breast MRI and an X-ray mammogram could benefit the detection of breast cancer in clinical diagnosis. We aimed to provide a framework of registration from breast MRI to mammography and to evaluate the diagnosis using the combined information.43 patients with 46 lesions underwent both MRI and mammography scans, and the interval between the two examinations was around one month. The distribution of malignant to benign lesions was 31/46 based on histological results. Maximum intensity projection and thin-plate spline methods were applied for image registration for MRI to mammography. The diagnosis using integrated information was evaluated using results of histology as the reference. The assessment of annotations and statistical analysis were performed by the two radiologists.For the cranio-caudal view, the mean post-registration error between MRI and mammography was 2.2±1.9 mm. For the medio-lateral oblique view, the proposed approach performed even better with a mean error of 3.0±2.4 mm. In the diagnosis using MRI assessment with information of mammography, the sensitivity was 91.9±2.3% (29/31, 28/31, specificity 70.0±4.7% (11/15, 10/15, accuracy 84.8±3.1% (40/46, 38/46, positive predictive value 86.4±2.1% (29/33, 28/33 and negative predictive value 80.8±5.4% (11/13, 10/13.MRI with the aid of mammography shows potential improvements of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV in clinical breast cancer diagnosis compared to the use of MRI alone.

  20. Determination of the Relationship between Information Capacity and Identification by Simulated Aerial Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-27

    experiment by Frank Scott, Peter Hollanda , and Albert Harabedian 7 7Scott, F., Hollanda , P. A., and Harabedian, A., Phot. Sci. Eng., 14 1 pp 21-27...photographs of models of military tanks and trucks. The information capacity of these photos was varied by defocussing the taking camera and the simulated...photographic reconnaissance mission. This was done by photographing models of military targets, I processing and duplicating the resulting images, and

  1. Percussion use and training: a survey of music therapy clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Stephanie; Matney, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Percussion instruments are commonly used in music therapy practice; however, the body of published literature regarding music therapy-related percussion training and practice is limited. The purpose of our survey study was to describe: (a) clinician perspectives of their academic percussion training; (b) use of percussion testing during academic training; (c) clinician perspectives on relevance, adequacy, and importance of academic percussion training; (d) clinician perspectives of their nonacademic percussion training; and (e) current use of percussion in clinical practice. Through comparisons of these parameters, we sought to provide information that may inform future percussion use and training. Participants were selected using an email list from the Certification Board for Music Therapists. Board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) were provided with a researcher-created survey about academic percussion training, nonacademic percussion training, and use of percussion in clinical practice. Survey response rate was 14.4% (611/4234). We used demographic data to address potential nonresponse error and ensure population representation for region of residence and region of academic training. Results revealed concerns about perceived adequacy of percussion training received during music therapy education (14.6% reported receiving no academic percussion training; 40.6% reported training was not adequate), and absence of percussion-specific proficiency exams. Of the training received, 62.8% indicated that training was relevant; however, a majority (76.5%) recommended current music therapy students receive more percussion training on instruments and skills most relevant to clinical practice. Comparisons between academic training, perceived needs in academic training, and clinical usage may inform future training and clinical competency. We provide suggestions for developing future training, as well as for furthering clinical implementation and research. © the American

  2. Reviewing social media use by clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Muhlen, Marcio; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Adoption studies of social media use by clinicians were systematically reviewed, up to July 26th, 2011, to determine the extent of adoption and highlight trends in institutional responses. This search led to 370 articles, of which 50 were selected for review, including 15 adoption surveys. The definition of social media is evolving rapidly; the authors define it broadly to include social networks and group-curated reference sites such as Wikipedia. Facebook accounts are very common among health science students (64-96%) and less so for professional clinicians (13-47%). Adoption rates have increased sharply in the past 4 years. Wikipedia is widely used as a reference tool. Attempts at incorporating social media into clinical training have met with mixed success. Posting of unprofessional content and breaches of patient confidentiality, especially by students, are not uncommon and have prompted calls for social media guidelines.

  3. Use of SERVQUAL to assess clinicians' satisfaction with the blood transfusion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspollini, E; Pappalettera, M; Riccardi, D; Parravicini, A; Sestili, S; Rebulla, P; Sirchia, G

    1997-01-01

    Limited information is available on the level of satisfaction of clinicians with services delivered by blood banks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of clinicians with our blood transfusion service. We prepared a questionnaire based on SERVQUAL, a method used to measure customers' appreciation of quality of service, by assessing the gap between perceived and expected quality. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items grouped according to five dimensions of quality of service: assurance, empathy, responsiveness, reliability, tangibles. Clinicians were asked to give two scores on a scale from 1 to 7 for each item, score (e) representing what they expected from an 'excellent' service, score (r) how they graded the service received. We considered wide differences in scores of service expectation and receipt for a question to be indicative of either service above expected levels (r > e) or service below expectation (r SERVQUAL was useful to gather information on the level of clinicians' satisfaction with our transfusion service.

  4. Assessment of mood: guides for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toshi A

    2010-06-01

    This article is one of the series of review articles aiming to present a convenient guideline for practicing clinicians in their selection of scales for clinical and research purposes. This article focuses on assessment scales for mood (depression, mania). After reviewing the basic principles of clinical psychometrics, we present a selective review of representative scales measuring depressed or manic mood. We reviewed and reported on reliability, validity, interpretability, and feasibility of the following rating scales: Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), K6, Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR) as self-report scales for depressed mood; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) as clinician-administered measure for depression; and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) as a clinician-administered instrument for mania. Although the rating scales for mood represent a well-trodden terrain, this brief review of the most frequently used scales in the literature revealed there is still some room for improvement and for further research, especially with regard to their clinical interpretability. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Canary: An NLP Platform for Clinicians and Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmasi, Shervin; Sandor, Nicolae L; Hosomura, Naoshi; Goldberg, Matt; Skentzos, Stephen; Turchin, Alexander

    2017-05-03

    Information Extraction methods can help discover critical knowledge buried in the vast repositories of unstructured clinical data. However, these methods are underutilized in clinical research, potentially due to the absence of free software geared towards clinicians with little technical expertise. The skills required for developing/using such software constitute a major barrier for medical researchers wishing to employ these methods. To address this, we have developed Canary, a free and open-source solution designed for users without natural language processing (NLP) or software engineering experience. It was designed to be fast and work out of the box via a user-friendly graphical interface.

  6. A Vision-Based System for Object Identification and Information Retrieval in a Smart Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Raphael; Monekosso, Dorothy; de Jager, Deon; Remagnino, Paolo

    This paper describes a hand held device developed to assist people to locate and retrieve information about objects in a home. The system developed is a standalone device to assist persons with memory impairments such as people suffering from Alzheimer's disease. A second application is object detection and localization for a mobile robot operating in an ambient assisted living environment. The device relies on computer vision techniques to locate a tagged object situated in the environment. The tag is a 2D color printed pattern with a detection range and a field of view such that the user may point from a distance of over 1 meter.

  7. Identification of calculation hierarchy and information flow for postclosure performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avci, H.I.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brandstetter, A.

    1990-01-01

    A management tool consisting of calculation hierarchy and information flow diagrams is being prepared to address the resolution of major postclosure performance issues for a geologic high-level radioactive waste repository in the U.S.A. The diagrams will indicate the types of calculations and data needed to assess the postclosure performance of the repository. Separate diagrams will be generated for different scenario classes and conceptual models. The methodology used in developing these diagrams and their contents are illustrated for a single scenario and conceptual model. 5 refs., 5 figs

  8. Complexities of emergency communication: clinicians' perceptions of communication challenges in a trilingual emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Jack Kh; Chan, Engle Angela; Murray, Kristen A; Slade, Diana; Matthiessen, Christian Mim

    2017-11-01

    To understand the challenges that clinicians face in communicating with patients and other clinicians within a Hong Kong trilingual emergency department. Effective communication has long been recognised as fundamental to the delivery of quality health care, especially in high-risk and time-constrained environments such as emergency departments. The issue of effective communication is particularly relevant in Hong Kong emergency departments, due to the high volume of patients and the linguistic complexity of this healthcare context. In Hong Kong, emergency department clinicians are native speakers of Chinese, but have received their medical training in English. The clinicians read and record virtually all of their medical documentation in English, yet they communicate verbally with patients in Cantonese and Mandarin. In addition, communication between clinicians occurs in spoken Cantonese, mixed with medical English. Thus, medical information is translated numerous times within one patient journey. This complex linguistic environment creates the potential for miscommunication. A mixed-methods design consisting of a quantitative survey with a sequential qualitative interview. Data were collected in a survey from a purposive sample of 58 clinicians and analysed through descriptive statistics. Eighteen of the clinicians were then invited to take part in semi-structured interviews, the data from which were then subjected to a manifest content analysis. Nearly half of the clinicians surveyed believed that medical information may be omitted or altered through repeated translation in a trilingual emergency department. Eighty-three per cent of clinicians stated that there are communication problems at triage. Over 40% said that they have difficulties in documenting medical information. Around 50% believed that long work hours reduced their ability to communicate effectively with patients. In addition, 34% admitted that they rarely or never listen to patients during a

  9. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calus Mario PL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF. Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT. The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL. All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL identified 18 (22 additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error, were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error, were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions

  10. Two-dimensional hidden semantic information model for target saliency detection and eyetracking identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weibing; Yuan, Lingfeng; Zhao, Qunfei; Fang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Saliency detection has been applied to the target acquisition case. This paper proposes a two-dimensional hidden Markov model (2D-HMM) that exploits the hidden semantic information of an image to detect its salient regions. A spatial pyramid histogram of oriented gradient descriptors is used to extract features. After encoding the image by a learned dictionary, the 2D-Viterbi algorithm is applied to infer the saliency map. This model can predict fixation of the targets and further creates robust and effective depictions of the targets' change in posture and viewpoint. To validate the model with a human visual search mechanism, two eyetrack experiments are employed to train our model directly from eye movement data. The results show that our model achieves better performance than visual attention. Moreover, it indicates the plausibility of utilizing visual track data to identify targets.

  11. Teen, Parent, and Clinician Expectations About Obesity and Related Conditions During the Annual Well-Child Visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Bossick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to examine family (patient, parent/guardian and clinician preferences for identification and management of obesity and obesity-related conditions during the well-child visit. Methods: Four focus groups with teen patients (n = 16, four focus groups with parents (n = 15 and one focus group with providers (n = 12 were conducted using a structured moderator guide tailored to each population. Eligible patients had a well-child visit during the past 12 months and a diagnosis of overweight, obesity, hyperlipidemia or elevated blood pressure. Parents who attended their child’s well-child visit and whose child met the diagnostic criteria were eligible. Teen focus groups were divided by gender (male/female and age (14–15/16–17 years. Focus group transcripts were coded for concepts and themes using qualitative data and thematic analysis. Analysis was performed across groups to determine common themes and domains of intersect. Results: Teens and parents expect weight to be discussed at well-child visits and prefer discussions to come from a trusted clinician who uses serious, consistent language. Teens did not recognize the health implications from excess weight, and both parents and teens express the need for more information on strategies to change behavior. Providers recognize several challenges and barriers to discussing weight management in the well-child visit. Conclusions: A clinician-teen-family relationship built on trust, longevity, teamwork, support and encouragement can create a positive atmosphere and may improve understanding for weight-related messages for teens and families during a well-child visit.

  12. Challenges of the information age: the impact of false discovery on pathway identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog, Colin J; Chekuri, Srinivasa C; Edgerton, Mary E

    2012-11-21

    Pathways with members that have known relevance to a disease are used to support hypotheses generated from analyses of gene expression and proteomic studies. Using cancer as an example, the pitfalls of searching pathways databases as support for genes and proteins that could represent false discoveries are explored. The frequency with which networks could be generated from 100 instances each of randomly selected five and ten genes sets as input to MetaCore, a commercial pathways database, was measured. A PubMed search enumerated cancer-related literature published for any gene in the networks. Using three, two, and one maximum intervening step between input genes to populate the network, networks were generated with frequencies of 97%, 77%, and 7% using ten gene sets and 73%, 27%, and 1% using five gene sets. PubMed reported an average of 4225 cancer-related articles per network gene. This can be attributed to the richly populated pathways databases and the interest in the molecular basis of cancer. As information sources become enriched, they are more likely to generate plausible mechanisms for false discoveries.

  13. Forensic Evidence Identification and Modeling for Attacks against a Simulated Online Business Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghui Tu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Forensic readiness can support future forensics investigation or auditing on external/internal attacks, internal sabotage and espionage, and business frauds. To establish forensics readiness, it is essential for an organization to identify what evidences are relevant and where they can be found, to determine whether they are logged in a forensic sound way and whether all the needed evidences are available to reconstruct the events successfully.  Our goal of this research is to ensure evidence availability. First, both external and internal attacks are molded as augmented attack trees/graphs based on the system vulnerabilities. Second, modeled attacks are conducted against a honeynet simulating an online business information system, and each honeypot's hard drive is forensic sound imaged for each individual attack. Third, an evidence tree/graph will be built after forensics examination on the disk images for each attack. The evidence trees/graphs are expected to be used for automatic crime scene reconstruction and automatic attack/fraud detection in the future.

  14. Identification and classification of inland wetlands in Tamaulipas through remote sensing and geographic information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilver Enrique Salinas Castillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify and classify artificial and natural inland wetlands in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, important for migratory aquatic birds. Historically, efforts nave been focused on natural coastal wetlands or specific water bodies located in highlands; however, these surveys have not reflected the dramatic changes in landscape due to farming development in northem Mexico in the Iatest decades. Agricultural fieids and dams associated to them provide food, water and shelterto many migratory birds and other species, a fact not well documented. Factors that may influence the use of wetlands were analyzed, including surface area, associated vegetation and proximity to agricultural fieids. The inventory of inland wetlands was based on the analysis of seven 2000 Landsat ETM satellite imagery and field data gathered from 261 sites surveyed in 2001. Baseline maps were created and GIS analyses were undertaken to classify these water bodies. More than 23 000 inland wetlands were identified, and the information derived from this study will be assist in the development of programs to manage and protect wetlands of importance for migratory aquatic birds in Tamaulipas.

  15. Identification of Evacuation Routes in Tacloban City using Geographic Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Jerico; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    The Philippines is the second most at risk to natural hazards according to the 2014 World Risk Report. On 8 November 2013, category 5 Typhoon Haiyan crossed the central region of the Philippines with maximum sustained wind reaching 315 kph. Considered as one of the strongest typhoons that made landfall in recorded history, Typhoon Haiyan caused USD 8 billion damage to properties, 6,293 deaths, 28,689 injured and 1,061 missing persons. Tacloban City, located in the north-eastern part of the island of Leyte in Eastern Visayas region, is one of the area most devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. The city is susceptible to other natural hazards given its geography, topography and geology. This condition emphasizes the need for preventive measures to avoid further loss of lives and destruction to properties. Evacuation is a mitigating strategy which involves the process of moving people from dangerous places to safer locations. Using Geographic Information System (GIS), a multi-hazard map of Tacloban City was created to determine safe areas for evacuation centers. The optimal route for evacuation was identified using ArcGIS Network Analyst's routing solver based on Dijkstra's algorithm. The medium of transportation used in the analysis is by foot with an average speed of 5.0 kph. Furthermore, the study assumes that all roads are passable and fully functional during the travel period and that there are no structures, trees and other debris that may act as road blockage. The study can be used as a reference in hazard assessment for disaster risk management and evacuation planning. This can be further improved by incorporating behaviour of the affected population and other socio-economic factors, different modes of transportation and detailed analysis of topography.

  16. Clinicians' Choices in Selecting Orthodontic Archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Izabella Pop

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the choices made by clinicians in selecting archwires during the initial, intermediate and final stages of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Methods: We carried out a questionnaire-based study at the Orthodontics and Pedodontics Clinic Târgu Mureș, between March 2012 and September 2012. The questionnaires consisted of two parts: the first included questions related to the dimension, alloy used in fabrication, section (round or rectangular and manufacturer of the archwires used by the orthodontists in their orthodontic practice, the second part was concerned with their personal opinion about the physical properties and disadvantages of the archwires. Results: From a total number of 90 distributed questionnaires, 62 were returned. The majority of clinicians are using stainless steel (SS and nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi wires in their fixed orthodontic treatments, very few are using beta-titanium (Beta Ti, copper nickel-titanium (Co- NiTi and esthetic archwires. The preferred dimension seem to be 0.022 inches in the appliance system. Regarding the wire dimensions, 0.014, 0.016 inch wires are mostly used from the round section group and 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.017 × 0.025 inch from the rectangular ones. Conclusions: There is a general lack of agreement between the clinicians surveyed regarding the properties of an ideal archwire and the disadvantages of the used wires. The most frequently used alloys seemed to be the SS and NiTi

  17. CHEST: Home of the Clinician-Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William F; Niven, Alexander S

    2018-03-01

    Many hands can build a house; it takes trust to make that house a home. Trust has two main components: credibility (worthiness based on preparation and past performance) and empathy (the ability to understand and share another person's values). CHEST has maintained its credibility and empathy as the global leader in clinical pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medical education. It follows that the leader in chest clinical education would also be the home of the clinician-educator. You are that educator. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. US Health Care Clinicians' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; Shepard, Allie; Kahn, Jessica A

    2018-03-01

    Clinicians' recommendation for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine appears to be an important driver of parental decisions about vaccination. Our aim was to synthesize the best available evidence exploring the perceptions and experiences regarding HPV vaccination, from the perspective of the US clinician. We conducted a comprehensive literature search of Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus, Communication & Mass Media Complete, Consumer Health Complete (EBSCOhost), ERIC, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, MEDLINE with full text, and PsycINFO databases. We identified 60 eligible articles: 48 quantitative and 12 qualitative. We extracted the following information: study purpose, use of theory, location, inclusion criteria, and health care provider classification. Results were organized into 5 categories: 1) clinicians' knowledge and beliefs about HPV and the HPV vaccine, 2) clinicians' attitudes and beliefs about recommending HPV vaccines, 3) clinicians' intention to recommend HPV vaccines, 4) clinicians' professional practices regarding HPV vaccination, and 5) patient HPV vaccination rates. Although clinicians were generally supportive of HPV vaccination, there was a discrepancy between clinicians' intentions, recommendation practices, and patient vaccination rates. Studies reported that clinicians tended not to provide strong, consistent recommendations, and were more likely to recommend HPV vaccines to girls versus boys and to older versus younger adolescents. Analyses revealed a number of facilitating factors and barriers to HPV vaccination at the clinician, parent/patient, and systems levels, including clinician knowledge, clinician beliefs, and office procedures that promote vaccination. This review provides an evidence base for multilevel interventions to improve clinician HPV vaccine recommendations and vaccination rates. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gamification as a strategy to engage and motivate clinicians to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Shari; Krause, Christina; Shergill, Meher; Siu, Andrew; Sweet, David

    2016-03-01

    Approaching change through seeking commitment rather than requiring compliance is an effective way to promote desired behaviours in healthcare. Gamification was explored as a technique to engage clinicians in the adoption of sepsis identification and management tools. Positive extrinsic (eg, feedback and rewards) and intrinsic (eg, mastery, autonomy, relatedness, and purpose) motivators were integrated into a campaign to save lives, leading to a significant reduction in severe sepsis mortality and improvement in processes of care. © 2016 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  20. Stigma in the mental health workplace: perceptions of peer employees and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromwall, Layne K; Holley, Lynn C; Bashor, Kathy E

    2011-08-01

    Informed by a structural theory of workplace discrimination, mental health system employees' perceptions of mental health workplace stigma and discrimination against service recipients and peer employees were investigated. Fifty-one peer employees and 52 licensed behavioral health clinicians participated in an online survey. Independent variables were employee status (peer or clinician), gender, ethnicity, years of mental health employment, age, and workplace social inclusion of peer employees. Analysis of covariance on workplace discrimination against service recipients revealed that peer employees perceived more discrimination than clinicians and whites perceived more discrimination than employees of color (corrected model F = 9.743 [16, 87], P = .000, partial ŋ (2) = .644). Analysis of covariance on workplace discrimination against peer employees revealed that peer employees perceived more discrimination than clinicians (F = 4.593, [6, 97], P = .000, partial ŋ (2) = .223).

  1. Clinician's gaze behaviour in simulated paediatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughten, Ben; Hart, Caroline; Gallagher, Stephen; Junk, Carol; Coulter, Patricia; Thompson, Andrew; Bourke, Thomas

    2018-03-07

    Differences in the gaze behaviour of experts and novices are described in aviation and surgery. This study sought to describe the gaze behaviour of clinicians from different training backgrounds during a simulated paediatric emergency. Clinicians from four clinical areas undertook a simulated emergency. Participants wore SMI (SensoMotoric Instruments) eye tracking glasses. We measured the fixation count and dwell time on predefined areas of interest and the time taken to key clinical interventions. Paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) consultants performed best and focused longer on the chest and airway. Paediatric consultants and trainees spent longer looking at the defibrillator and algorithm (51 180 ms and 50 551 ms, respectively) than the PICU and paediatric emergency medicine consultants. This study is the first to describe differences in the gaze behaviour between experts and novices in a resuscitation. They mirror those described in aviation and surgery. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential use of eye tracking as an educational tool. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Understanding clinicians' attitudes toward a mobile health strategy to childhood asthma management: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cushing, Anna; Melvin, Emilie; McGowan, Bryanna; Cloutier, Michelle M; Manice, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Mobile technology for childhood asthma can provide real-time data to enhance care. What real-time adherence information clinicians want, how they may use it, and if the data meet their clinical needs have not been fully explored. Our goal was to determine whether pediatric primary care and pulmonary clinicians believe if a sensor-based mobile intervention is useful in caring for patients with asthma. We recruited participants from 3 urban, primary care and 1 pulmonary practice from July to September 2015 in Hartford, CT. Forty-one participated in four focus groups, which included a demonstration of the technology. Participants were probed with open-ended questions on the type, frequency, and format of inter-visit patient information they found useful. 41 participants (mean age 49 (±13.7) years) were board-certified clinicians (41% MDs and 20% mid-level practitioners), practiced medicine on an average of 19 (±14) years, were primarily white (59%) and women (78%). Clinicians wanted 1) adherence to prescribed inhaler therapy and 2) data on inhaler technique. Clinicians wanted it at the time of a scheduled clinic visit but also wanted inter-visit alerts for excessive use of rescue therapy. Pulmonologists liked the mobile spirometer's provision of inter-visit lung function data; pediatricians did not share this view. Concerns with data accuracy were raised due to families who shared inhalers, access to smartphones, and protection of health information. Overall, clinicians view an asthma mobile health technology as enhancing the patient-centered medical home. Pediatric primary care clinicians and pulmonologists want different information from a mobile app.

  3. Clinician preferences and the estimation of causal treatment differences

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Edward L.; Baumrind, Sheldon

    1998-01-01

    Clinician treatment preferences affect the ability to perform randomized clinical trials and the ability to analyze observational data for treatment effects. In clinical trials, clinician preferences that are based on a subjective analysis of the patient can make it difficult to define eligibility criteria for which clinicians would agree to randomize all patients who satisfy the criteria. In addition, since each clinician typically has some preference for the choice of treatment for a given ...

  4. The effect of core clinician interpersonal behaviours on depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnicot, K; Wampold, B; Priebe, S

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that core clinician interpersonal behaviours are important when treating depression, but few studies have evaluated whether outcome is determined by clinicians׳ general behaviour rather than by the perception of the individual being treated. In the NIMH TDCRP, 157 patients rated their clinician׳s genuineness, positive regard, empathy and unconditional regard during cognitive behavioural therapy, interpersonal therapy or clinical management with placebo. The association between averaged ratings for each of 27 clinicians and their patients׳ self- and observer-rated depression outcomes was evaluated, adjusting for the deviation of individual patient ratings from the average for their clinician and other potential confounders. Clinicians in the clinical management condition were rated on average as less genuine and less empathic than those in the psychotherapy conditions. Clinicians׳ average genuineness, positive regard and empathy were significantly associated with lower depression severity during treatment, but not with recovery from depression, after adjusting for the deviation of the individual patient׳s rating of their clinician from the average for that clinician, treatment condition and baseline depression severity. Clinician unconditional regard was not significantly associated with outcome. Using averaged ratings of clinician behaviour likely reduced statistical power. Clinicians׳ ability to demonstrate genuineness, positive regard and empathy may represent a stable personal characteristic that influences the treatment of depression beyond the individual clinician-patient relationship or an individual patient׳s perception of their clinician. However, clinicians׳ ability to demonstrate these behaviours may be poorer when delivering an intervention without a specific rationale or treatment techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Experiences of parenting and clinical intervention for mothers affected by personality disorder: a pilot qualitative study combining parent and clinician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ruth; Weaver, Tim; Michelson, Daniel; Day, Crispin

    2018-05-25

    Evidence-based parenting programmes are recommended for the treatment of child mental health difficulties. Families with complex psychosocial needs show poorer retention and outcomes when participating in standard parenting programmes. The Helping Families Programme (HFP) is a 16-week community-based parenting intervention designed to meet the needs of these families, including families with parental personality disorder. This study aimed to explore the help seeking and participatory experiences of parents with a diagnosis of personality disorder. It further aimed to examine the acceptability of referral and intervention processes for the HFP from the perspectives of (i) clinicians referring into the programme; and (ii) referred parents. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents recruited to receive HFP (n = 5) as part of a research case series and the referring NHS child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) clinicians (n = 5). Transcripts were analysed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Four themes were identified for parents: (i) the experience of parenthood, (ii) being a parent affected by personality disorder, (iii) experience of the intervention, and (iv) qualities of helping. Three themes emerged for clinicians: (i) challenges of addressing parental need, (ii) experience of engaging parents with personality disorders and (iii) limited involvement during HFP. Comparison of parent and clinician themes led to the identification of two key interlinked themes: (i) concerns prior to receiving the intervention, and (ii) the challenges of working together without a mutual understanding. This pilot study identifies potentially significant challenges of working with parents affected by personality disorder and engaging them in HFP and other similar interventions. Results have important wider clinical implications by highlighting potential barriers to engagement and participation and providing insights on how these barriers might be

  6. [Leadership and management courses for clinicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelhaus, Daniel; Fischer, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the benefit of Leadership and Management Courses for clinicians, specifically which leadership and management contents are beneficial to their daily clinical work and whether these contents support their individual career. E-mail invitations to participate in the study were sent to all 543 medical doctors of the University Hospital Hanover, Germany, who had taken part in one of the leadership and management courses offered between June 2005 and June 2015. The enquiry was carried out between June 1 and June 30, 2015. 84 e-mail addresses were no longer active; and so, N=459 clinicians actually received the invitation. Of these, 104 participated (22.7%). The study included 59 items. Six were free text items, twelve items were closed questions which could be answered by choosing from a drop down menu, and 41 were answered on a Likert scale from 0 (not fitting at all) to 10 (perfect fit). Based on the items answered on a Likert scale, the following scales and mean values were deduced: Job Satisfaction (M=7.44); Leadership (M=7.77); Trust (M=7.22); Striving for Power (M=7,45); negative Affect (M=4,91); Target Achievement Motivation (M=8.19); Communication (M=8.30) and Management (M=6.48). Regression analysis showed that Job- and Team Satisfaction can predict to what extent the participants regard themselves as good leaders. The study participants defined the following topics as very important: leadership and management style, managerial functions, team management, human resources development and project management. Further topics included rhetoric skills, presentation techniques, as well as basic economics such as understanding balance sheets, profit & loss statements and contribution margin calculation. 55% of the course contents were described as being directly applicable to their daily working environment. In the clinicians' view, the ideal leader acts as a role model (passing on values like respect, appreciation, honesty

  7. The making of expert clinicians: reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, J M; Szyld, D; Del Moral, I; Ortiz, G; Rudolph, J W

    2014-05-01

    Debriefing is a rigorous reflection process which helps trainees recognize and resolve clinical and behavioral dilemmas raised by a clinical case. This approach emphasizes eliciting trainees'assumptions about the situation and their reasons for performing as they did (mental models). It analyses their impact on actions, to understand if it is necessary to maintain them or construct new ones that may lead to better performance in the future. It blends evidence and theory from education research, the social and cognitive sciences, and experience drawn from conducting and teaching debriefing to clinicians worldwide, on how to improve professional effectiveness through "reflective practice". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a clinician's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Edwin J; Olson, Gary S; Weiner, Scott J; Paddock, Christopher D

    2003-04-14

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is still the most lethal tick-vectored illness in the United States. We examine the dilemmas facing the clinician who is evaluating the patient with possible Rocky Mountain spotted fever, with particular attention to the following 8 pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment: (1) waiting for a petechial rash to develop before diagnosis; (2) misdiagnosing as gastroenteritis; (3) discounting a diagnosis when there is no history of a tick bite; (4) using an inappropriate geographic exclusion; (5) using an inappropriate seasonal exclusion; (6) failing to treat on clinical suspicion; (7) failing to elicit an appropriate history; and (8) failing to treat with doxycycline. Early diagnosis and proper treatment save lives.

  9. Testing a potential alternative to traditional identification procedures: Reaction time-based concealed information test does not work for lineups with cooperative witnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Melanie; Wolfs, Andrea C F; Crans, Samantha; Verschuere, Bruno

    2017-11-27

    Direct eyewitness identification is widely used, but prone to error. We tested the validity of indirect eyewitness identification decisions using the reaction time-based concealed information test (CIT) for assessing cooperative eyewitnesses' face memory as an alternative to traditional lineup procedures. In a series of five experiments, a total of 401 mock eyewitnesses watched one of 11 different stimulus events that depicted a breach of law. Eyewitness identifications in the CIT were derived from longer reaction times as compared to well-matched foil faces not encountered before. Across the five experiments, the weighted mean effect size d was 0.14 (95% CI 0.08-0.19). The reaction time-based CIT seems unsuited for testing cooperative eyewitnesses' memory for faces. The careful matching of the faces required for a fair lineup or the lack of intent to deceive may have hampered the diagnosticity of the reaction time-based CIT.

  10. Addressing Burnout in Oncology: Why Cancer Care Clinicians Are At Risk, What Individuals Can Do, and How Organizations Can Respond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubocky, Fay J; Back, Anthony L; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2016-01-01

    Despite their benevolent care of others, today, more than ever, the cancer care professional who experiences overwhelming feelings of exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy is in grave jeopardy of developing burnout. Clinicians are repeatedly physically and emotionally exposed to exceedingly long hours in direct care with seriously ill patients/families, limited autonomy over daily responsibilities, endless electronic documentation, and a shifting medical landscape. The physical and emotional well-being of the cancer care clinician is critical to the impact on quality care, patient satisfaction, and overall success of their organizations. The prevention of burnout as well as targeting established burnout need to be proactively addressed at the individual level and organizational level. In fact, confronting burnout and promoting wellness are the shared responsibility of both oncology clinicians and their organizations. From an individual perspective, oncology clinicians must be empowered to play a crucial role in enhancing their own wellness by identification of burnout symptoms in both themselves and their colleagues, learning resilience strategies (e.g., mindful self-compassion), and cultivating positive relationships with fellow clinician colleagues. At the organizational level, leadership must recognize the importance of oncology clinician well-being; engage leaders and physicians in collaborative action planning, improve overall practice environment, and provide institutional wellness resources to physicians. These effective individual and organizational interventions are crucial for the prevention and improvement of overall clinician wellness and must be widely and systematically integrated into oncology care.

  11. Online Mental Health Resources in Rural Australia: Clinician Perceptions of Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kristi; Riley, Geoffrey; Auret, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background Online mental health resources have been proposed as an innovative means of overcoming barriers to accessing rural mental health services. However, clinicians tend to express lower satisfaction with online mental health resources than do clients. Objective To understand rural clinicians’ attitudes towards the acceptability of online mental health resources as a treatment option in the rural context. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 rural clinicians (general practitioners, psychologists, psychiatrists, and clinical social workers). Interviews were supplemented with rural-specific vignettes, which described clinical scenarios in which referral to online mental health resources might be considered. Symbolic interactionism was used as the theoretical framework for the study, and interview transcripts were thematically analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Clinicians were optimistic about the use of online mental health resources into the future, showing a preference for integration alongside existing services, and use as an adjunct rather than an alternative to traditional approaches. Key themes identified included perceptions of resources, clinician factors, client factors, and the rural and remote context. Clinicians favored resources that were user-friendly and could be integrated into their clinical practice. Barriers to use included a lack of time to explore resources, difficulty accessing training in the rural environment, and concerns about the lack of feedback from clients. Social pressure exerted within professional clinical networks contributed to a cautious approach to referring clients to online resources. Conclusions Successful implementation of online mental health resources in the rural context requires attention to clinician perceptions of acceptability. Promotion of online mental health resources to rural clinicians should include information about resource effectiveness, enable integration with existing

  12. A clinician-driven home care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, D A; Faubion, W C; Ryan, M L; Haggerty, R H; Wesley, J R

    1993-12-01

    The financial, entrepreneurial, administrative, and legal forces acting within the home care arena make it difficult for clinicians to develop and operate home care initiatives within an academic setting. HomeMed is a clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery system wholly owned by the University of Michigan. The advantages of a clinician-directed system include: Assurance that clinical and patient-based factors are the primary determinants of strategic and procedural decisions; Responsiveness of the system to clinician needs; Maintenance of an important role for the referring physician in home care; Economical clinical research by facilitation of protocol therapy in ambulatory and home settings; Reduction of lengths of hospital stays through clinician initiatives; Incorporation of outcome analysis and other research programs into the mission of the system; Clinician commitment to success of the system; and Clinician input on revenue use. Potential disadvantages of a clinician-based system include: Entrepreneurial, financial, and legal naivete; Disconnection from institutional administrative and data management resources; and Inadequate clinician interest and commitment. The University of Michigan HomeMed experience demonstrates a model of clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery that has been innovative, profitable, and clinically excellent, has engendered broad physician, nurse, pharmacist, and social worker enthusiasm, and has supported individual investigator clinical protocols as well as broad outcomes research initiatives. It is concluded that a clinician-initiated and -directed home care program is feasible and effective, and in some settings may be optimal.

  13. Impact of patient questionnaires on completeness of clinical information and identification of causes of pain during outpatient abdominopelvic CT interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Ankur M; Huang, Chenchan; Ginocchio, Luke; Shanbhogue, Krishna; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of questionnaires completed by patients at the time of abdominopelvic CT performed for abdominal pain on the completeness of clinical information and the identification of potential causes of pain, compared with order requisitions alone. 100 outpatient CT examinations performed for the evaluation of abdominal pain were retrospectively reviewed. The specificity of the location of pain was compared between the order requisition and patient questionnaire. An abdominal imaging fellow (Reader 1) and abdominal radiologist (Reader 2) reviewed the examinations independently in two sessions 6 weeks apart (one with only the order requisition and one also with the questionnaire). Readers recorded identified causes of pain and rated their confidence in interpretation (1-5 scale; least to greatest confidence). In 30% of patients, the questionnaire provided a more specific location for pain. Among these, the pain was localized to a specific quadrant in 40%. With having access to the questionnaire, both readers identified additional causes for pain not identified in session 1 (Reader 1, 8.6% [7/81]; Reader 2 5.3% [4/75]). Additional identified causes of pain included diverticulitis, cystitis, peritoneal implants, epiploic appendagitis, osseous metastatic disease, umbilical hernia, gastritis, and SMA syndrome. Confidence in interpretation was significantly greater using the questionnaire for both readers (Reader 1: 4.8 ± 0.6 vs. 4.0 ± 0.5; Reader 2: 4.9 ± 0.3 vs. 4.7 ± 0.5, p questionnaires provide additional relevant clinical history, increased diagnostic yield, and improve radiologists' confidence. Radiology practices are encouraged to implement questionnaires and make these readily available to radiologists at the time of interpretation.

  14. A stakeholder-informed approach to the identification of criteria for the prioritization of zoonoses in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Ng

    Full Text Available Zoonotic diseases account for over 60% of all communicable diseases causing illness in humans and 75% of recently emerging infectious diseases. As limited resources are available for the control and prevention of zoonotic diseases, it is necessary to prioritize diseases in order to direct resources into those with the greatest needs. The selection of criteria for prioritization has traditionally been on the basis of expert opinion; however, details of the methods used to identify criteria from expert opinion often are not published and a full range of criteria may not be captured by expert opinion.This study used six focus groups to identify criteria for the prioritization of zoonotic diseases in Canada. Focus groups included people from the public, animal health professionals and human health professionals. A total of 59 criteria were identified for prioritizing zoonotic diseases. Human-related criteria accounted for the highest proportion of criteria identified (55%, followed by animal-related criteria (26% then pathogen/disease-related criteria (19%. Similarities and differences were observed in the identification and scoring of criteria for disease prioritization between groups; the public groups were strongly influenced by the individual-level of disease burden, the responsibility of the scientific community in disease prioritization and the experiences of recent events while the professional groups were influenced by the societal- and population-level of disease burden and political and public pressure.This was the first study to describe a mixed semi-quantitative and qualitative approach to deriving criteria for disease prioritization. This was also the first study to involve the opinion of the general public regarding disease prioritization. The number of criteria identified highlights the difficulty in prioritizing zoonotic diseases. The method presented in this paper has formulated a comprehensive list of criteria that can be used to

  15. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY FOR RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID ADOPTION BY SMEs IN THE TAIWANESE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology represents a common standard for data storage and retrieval that could improve collaboration and data sharing between non-competing organisations. With the advent of RFID, organisations have the opportunity to rethink how their organisation will operate and integrate in the supply chain. Especially for Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs, that they have limited resources adopting such an innovative technology (i.e. RFID the adoption decision can be daunting. Literature indicates that SMEs that decide to go on with implementation have so far only a few guidelines from either private companies or public authorities regarding awareness on specific opportunities and risks. This research is therefore trying to explore in detail the factors that affect SMEs' RFID adoption in the Taiwan Information Technology (IT manufacturing industry. We are employing Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA techniques and utilising a questionnaire survey in order to collect and analyse our data. After classifying the responding SMEs into three different adopters categories named ready adopter, initiator adopter and unprepared adopter using EFA technique our results show that each category has some specific adoption factors related to their unique situation. These are for ready adopters: cost and management, for initiator adopters: competitiveness and process efficiency and unprepared adopters: IT management difficulties, IT implementation difficulties and cost of implementation. A SMEs RFID adoption model is then proposed. It is anticipated that the findings of this research will not only enhance the research in RFID adoption in SMEs, but can also act as a reference for practitioners in the industry and researchers in the academic field.

  16. A qualitative study examining methods of accessing and identifying research relevant to clinical practice among rehabilitation clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Drasti; Koehmstedt, Christine; Jones, Rebecca; Coffey, Nathan T; Cai, Xinsheng; Garfinkel, Steven; Shaewitz, Dahlia M; Weinstein, Ali A

    2017-01-01

    Research examining the utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP) specifically among rehabilitation clinicians is limited. The objective of this study was to examine how various rehabilitative clinicians including physical therapists, occupational therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physiatrists are gaining access to literature and whether they are able to implement the available research into practice. A total of 21 total clinicians were interviewed via telephone. Using NVivo, a qualitative analysis of the responses was performed. There were similarities found with respect to the information-seeking behaviors and translation of research across the different clinician types. Lack of time was reported to be a barrier for both access to literature and implementation of research across all clinician types. The majority of clinicians who reported having difficulty with utilizing the published literature indicated that the literature was not applicable to their practice, the research was not specific enough to be put into practice, or the research found was too outdated to be relevant. In addition, having a supportive work environment aided in the search and utilization of research through providing resources central to assisting clinicians in gaining access to health information. Our study identified several barriers that affect EBP for rehabilitation clinicians. The findings suggest the need for researchers to ensure that their work is applicable and specific to clinical practice for implementation to occur.

  17. 36 CFR 1254.8 - What information do I need to provide when applying for a researcher identification card?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other identification is not current. Students who consider the home of their parents as their permanent address, but who do not live there during the academic session, must provide their current student address...

  18. Interactions between non-physician clinicians and industry: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Grundy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With increasing restrictions placed on physician-industry interactions, industry marketing may target other health professionals. Recent health policy developments confer even greater importance on the decision making of non-physician clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the types and implications of non-physician clinician-industry interactions in clinical practice. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched MEDLINE and Web of Science from January 1, 1946, through June 24, 2013, according to PRISMA guidelines. Non-physician clinicians eligible for inclusion were: Registered Nurses, nurse prescribers, Physician Assistants, pharmacists, dieticians, and physical or occupational therapists; trainee samples were excluded. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria. Data were synthesized qualitatively into eight outcome domains: nature and frequency of industry interactions; attitudes toward industry; perceived ethical acceptability of interactions; perceived marketing influence; perceived reliability of industry information; preparation for industry interactions; reactions to industry relations policy; and management of industry interactions. Non-physician clinicians reported interacting with the pharmaceutical and infant formula industries. Clinicians across disciplines met with pharmaceutical representatives regularly and relied on them for practice information. Clinicians frequently received industry "information," attended sponsored "education," and acted as distributors for similar materials targeted at patients. Clinicians generally regarded this as an ethical use of industry resources, and felt they could detect "promotion" while benefiting from industry "information." Free samples were among the most approved and common ways that clinicians interacted with industry. Included studies were observational and of varying methodological rigor; thus, these findings may not be generalizable. This review is, however, the

  19. Interactions between non-physician clinicians and industry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Quinn; Bero, Lisa; Malone, Ruth

    2013-11-01

    With increasing restrictions placed on physician-industry interactions, industry marketing may target other health professionals. Recent health policy developments confer even greater importance on the decision making of non-physician clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the types and implications of non-physician clinician-industry interactions in clinical practice. We searched MEDLINE and Web of Science from January 1, 1946, through June 24, 2013, according to PRISMA guidelines. Non-physician clinicians eligible for inclusion were: Registered Nurses, nurse prescribers, Physician Assistants, pharmacists, dieticians, and physical or occupational therapists; trainee samples were excluded. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria. Data were synthesized qualitatively into eight outcome domains: nature and frequency of industry interactions; attitudes toward industry; perceived ethical acceptability of interactions; perceived marketing influence; perceived reliability of industry information; preparation for industry interactions; reactions to industry relations policy; and management of industry interactions. Non-physician clinicians reported interacting with the pharmaceutical and infant formula industries. Clinicians across disciplines met with pharmaceutical representatives regularly and relied on them for practice information. Clinicians frequently received industry "information," attended sponsored "education," and acted as distributors for similar materials targeted at patients. Clinicians generally regarded this as an ethical use of industry resources, and felt they could detect "promotion" while benefiting from industry "information." Free samples were among the most approved and common ways that clinicians interacted with industry. Included studies were observational and of varying methodological rigor; thus, these findings may not be generalizable. This review is, however, the first to our knowledge to provide a descriptive analysis

  20. [Quo vadis pathologia? An elderly clinicians meditations about autopsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iványi, J

    1998-02-08

    Relying on his own experience and the relevant literature of the past 15 years, the author analyzes the causes of the decrease in the number of autopsies. He disagrees with those who, referring to the application of state-of-the art examination methods, dismiss "the ultimate audit" as unnecessary and only suggest selection. Careful autopsies can still be rendered an authentic and reliable picture of treatment of the deceased on the one hand, and provide information about diagnostic difficulties as well as the possible mistakes and errors on the other. This is especially true of the elderly deceased usually with multimorbidity. As well as several aspects of the cooperation between the pathologist and the clinician there is the didactic importance of autopsies that should also be emphasized.

  1. A clinician's artificial organ? Instant messaging applications in medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazegul, Gokhan; Bozoglan, Humeyra; Ogut, Tahir S; Balcı, Mustafa K

    2017-09-15

    After the development of the first phone at the end of 19th century, communication technologies took a great leap forward in the 20th century. With the birth of the "smartphone" in the 21st century, communication technologies exponentially evolved and became an important part of our daily routine. Effective communications between clinicians is critical in medical care and miscommunications are a source of errors. Although telecommunication technologies have proliferated dramatically in the last decade, there is scarce evidence-based information on the use of this technology in medical care. For the purposes of medical communication, we can now consult each other about patients individually and within a group via instant messaging applications by using text messages, photos, audio messages and even videos. In this review, we examine the uses and drawbacks of instant messaging applications in medical communications.

  2. Examination of the relationship between management and clinician perception of patient safety climate and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, Olena; Richter, Jason; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Ford, Eric

    2017-04-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between managers and clinicians' agreement on deeming the patient safety climate as high or low and the patients' satisfaction with those organizations. We used two secondary data sets: the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (2012) and the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (2012). We used ordinary least squares regressions to analyze the relationship between the extent of agreement between managers and clinicians' perceptions of safety climate in relationship to patient satisfaction. The dependent variables were four Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems patient satisfaction scores: communication with nurses, communication with doctors, communication about medicines, and discharge information. The main independent variables were four groups that were formed based on the extent of managers and clinicians' agreement on four patient safety climate domains: communication openness, feedback and communication about errors, teamwork within units, and teamwork across units. After controlling for hospital and market-level characteristics, we found that patient satisfaction was significantly higher if managers and clinicians reported that patient safety climate is high or if only clinicians perceived the climate as high. Specifically, manager and clinician agreement on high levels of communication openness (β = 2.25, p = .01; β = 2.46, p = .05), feedback and communication about errors (β = 3.0, p = .001; β = 2.89, p = .01), and teamwork across units (β = 2.91, p = .001; β = 3.34, p = .01) was positively and significantly associated with patient satisfaction with discharge information and communication about medication. In addition, more favorable perceptions about patient safety climate by clinicians only yielded similar findings. Organizations should measure and examine patient safety climate from multiple perspectives and be aware that individuals

  3. Prediction of mandibular rotation: an empirical test of clinician performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; West, E E

    1984-11-01

    An experiment was conducted in an attempt to determine empirically how effective a number of expert clinicians were at differentiating "backward rotators" from "forward rotators" on the basis of head-film information which might reasonably have been available to them prior to instituting treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusion. As a result of a previously reported ongoing study, pre- and posttreatment head films were available for 188 patients treated in the mixed dentition for the correction of Class II malocclusion and for 50 untreated Class II subjects. These subjects were divided into 14 groups (average size of group, 17; range, 6 to 23) solely on the basis of type of treatment and the clinician from whose clinic the records had originated. From within each group, we selected the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme backward rotation and the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme forward rotation of the mandible during the interval between films. The sole criterion for classification was magnitude of change in the mandibular plane angle of Downs between the pre- and posttreatment films of each patient. The resulting sample contained 32 backward-rotator subjects and 32 forward-rotator subjects. Five expert judges (mean clinical experience, 28 years) were asked to identify the backward-rotator subjects by examination of the pretreatment films. The findings may be summarized as follows: (1) No judge performed significantly better than chance. (2) There was strong evidence that the judges used a shared, though relatively ineffective, set of rules in making their discriminations between forward and backward rotators. (3) Statistical analysis of the predictive power of a set of standard cephalometric measurements which had previously been made for this set of subjects indicated that the numerical data also failed to identify potential backward rotators at a rate significantly better than chance. We infer from these

  4. A qualitative analysis of oncology clinicians' perceptions and barriers for physical activity counseling in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Angela J; Faulkner, Guy; Jones, Jennifer M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2018-03-24

    Few breast cancer survivors (BCS) engage in sufficient physical activity (PA) to gain physical and mental health benefits. This may be due to a lack of appropriate PA information and support. While key messengers of PA information could be oncology clinicians, many do not consistently counsel their patients on PA. To examine factors affecting PA counseling in clinicians and inform future strategies. Focus groups were conducted with clinicians (N = 27) at four cancer hospitals to better understand factors that affect PA counseling. Focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Clinicians perceived a lack of training and knowledge related to PA and BCS. Clinicians also discussed being unsure of when to integrate PA counseling into different phases of survivorship. Similarly, clinicians experienced barriers from hospital administration to maintain patient flow in-clinic, which decreased opportunities for PA counseling. Additionally, lack of awareness of community-based programs within large areas served by hospitals also decreased clinicians' self-efficacy for counseling. In order to facilitate PA counseling, clinicians wanted resources that promote patient-managed PA, available on multiple platforms (e.g., printed and online). Continued education, highlighting recent research and effective implementation of PA, was noted as an important facilitator. Researchers are encouraged to develop research agendas and test educational strategies that are integrated into current practice, empirically test barriers that developed from this study with a larger, representative sample to determine salient barriers and develop PA counseling strategies that are clinician-initiated but not dependent on clinicians.

  5. Gatekeepers or intermediaries? The role of clinicians in commercial genomic testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L McGowan

    Full Text Available Many commentators on "direct-to-consumer" genetic risk information have raised concerns that giving results to individuals with insufficient knowledge and training in genomics may harm consumers, the health care system, and society. In response, several commercial laboratories offering genomic risk profiling have shifted to more traditional "direct-to-provider" (DTP marketing strategies, repositioning clinicians as the intended recipients of advertising of laboratory services and as gatekeepers to personal genomic information. Increasing popularity of next generation sequencing puts a premium on ensuring that those who are charged with interpreting, translating, communicating and managing commercial genomic risk information are appropriately equipped for the job. To shed light on their gatekeeping role, we conducted a study to assess how and why early clinical users of genomic risk assessment incorporate these tools in their clinical practices and how they interpret genomic information for their patients.We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 18 clinicians providing genomic risk assessment services to their patients in partnership with DNA Direct and Navigenics. Our findings suggest that clinicians learned most of what they knew about genomics directly from the commercial laboratories. Clinicians rely on the expertise of the commercial laboratories without the ability to critically evaluate the knowledge or assess risks.DTP service delivery model cannot guarantee that providers will have adequate expertise or sound clinical judgment. Even if clinicians want greater genomic knowledge, the current market structure is unlikely to build the independent substantive expertise of clinicians, but rather promote its continued outsourcing. Because commercial laboratories have the most "skin in the game" financially, genetics professionals and policymakers should scrutinize the scientific validity and clinical soundness of the process by which

  6. Gatekeepers or intermediaries? The role of clinicians in commercial genomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Michelle L; Fishman, Jennifer R; Settersten, Richard A; Lambrix, Marcie A; Juengst, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Many commentators on "direct-to-consumer" genetic risk information have raised concerns that giving results to individuals with insufficient knowledge and training in genomics may harm consumers, the health care system, and society. In response, several commercial laboratories offering genomic risk profiling have shifted to more traditional "direct-to-provider" (DTP) marketing strategies, repositioning clinicians as the intended recipients of advertising of laboratory services and as gatekeepers to personal genomic information. Increasing popularity of next generation sequencing puts a premium on ensuring that those who are charged with interpreting, translating, communicating and managing commercial genomic risk information are appropriately equipped for the job. To shed light on their gatekeeping role, we conducted a study to assess how and why early clinical users of genomic risk assessment incorporate these tools in their clinical practices and how they interpret genomic information for their patients. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 18 clinicians providing genomic risk assessment services to their patients in partnership with DNA Direct and Navigenics. Our findings suggest that clinicians learned most of what they knew about genomics directly from the commercial laboratories. Clinicians rely on the expertise of the commercial laboratories without the ability to critically evaluate the knowledge or assess risks. DTP service delivery model cannot guarantee that providers will have adequate expertise or sound clinical judgment. Even if clinicians want greater genomic knowledge, the current market structure is unlikely to build the independent substantive expertise of clinicians, but rather promote its continued outsourcing. Because commercial laboratories have the most "skin in the game" financially, genetics professionals and policymakers should scrutinize the scientific validity and clinical soundness of the process by which these laboratories

  7. Systematic Heuristic Evaluation of Computerized Consultation Order Templates: Clinicians' and Human Factors Engineers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, April; Patel, Himalaya; Flanagan, Mindy E; Weiner, Michael; Russ, Alissa L

    2017-08-01

    We assessed the usability of consultation order templates and identified problems to prioritize in design efforts for improving referral communication. With a sample of 26 consultation order templates, three evaluators performed a usability heuristic evaluation. The evaluation used 14 domain-independent heuristics and the following three supplemental references: 1 new domain-specific heuristic, 6 usability goals, and coded clinicians' statements regarding ease of use for 10 sampled templates. Evaluators found 201 violations, a mean of 7.7 violations per template. Minor violations outnumbered major violations almost twofold, 115 (57%) to 62 (31%). Approximately 68% of violations were linked to 5 heuristics: aesthetic and minimalist design (17%), error prevention (16%), consistency and standards (14%), recognition rather than recall (11%), and meet referrers' information needs (10%). Severe violations were attributed mostly to meet referrers' information needs and recognition rather than recall. Recorded violations yielded potential negative consequences for efficiency, effectiveness, safety, learnability, and utility. Evaluators and clinicians demonstrated 80% agreement in usability assessment. Based on frequency and severity of usability heuristic violations, the consultation order templates reviewed may impede clinical efficiency and risk patient safety. Results support the following design considerations: communicate consultants' requirements, facilitate information seeking, and support communication. While the most frequent heuristic violations involved interaction design and presentation, the most severe violations lacked information desired by referring clinicians. Violations related to templates' inability to support referring clinicians' information needs had the greatest potential negative impact on efficiency and safety usability goals. Heuristics should be prioritized in future design efforts.

  8. Use of laboratory test results in patient management by clinicians in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Kundai; Porter, Carol; Chilima, Ben; Mwenda, Reuben; Kabue, Mark; Zungu, Lutho; Sarr, Abdoulaye

    2015-11-18

    Malawi has a high burden of infectious disease. The expansion of programmes targeting these diseases requires a strong laboratory infrastructure to support both diagnosis and treatment. To assess the use of laboratory test results in patient management and to determine the requirements for improving laboratory services. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 to survey practising clinicians. Two hospitals were purposively selected for observations of clinicians ordering laboratory tests. Twelve management-level key informants were interviewed. Descriptive statistics were conducted. A total of 242 clinicians were identified and 216 (89%) were interviewed. Of these, 189 (87%) reported doubting laboratory test results at some point. Clinicians most often doubted the quality of haematology (67%), followed by malaria (53%) and CD4 (22%) test results. A total of 151 (70%) clinicians reported using laboratory tests results in patient management. Use of laboratory test results at all times in patient management varied by the type of health facility ( P management. Key informants reported that the quality of laboratory services was good and useful, but that services were often unavailable. Gaps in the public laboratory system were evident. Key recommendations to enhance the use of laboratory test results in patient management were to strengthen the supply chain, reduce turn-around times, improve the test menu and improve the laboratory infrastructure.

  9. Bioethics for clinicians: 27. Catholic bioethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwell, Hazel J.; Brown, Barry F.

    2001-01-01

    THERE IS A LONG TRADITION OF BIOETHICAL REASONING within the Roman Catholic faith, a tradition expressed in scripture, the writings of the Doctors of the Church, papal encyclical documents and reflections by contemporary Catholic theologians. Catholic bioethics is concerned with a broad range of issues, including social justice and the right to health care, the duty to preserve life and the limits of that duty, the ethics of human reproduction and end-of-life decisions. Fundamental to Catholic bioethics is a belief in the sanctity of life and a metaphysical conception of the person as a composite of body and soul. Although there is considerable consensus among Catholic thinkers, differences in philosophical approach have given rise to some diversity of opinion with respect to specific issues. Given the influential history of Catholic reflection on ethical matters, the number of people in Canada who profess to be Catholic, and the continuing presence of Catholic health care institutions, it is helpful for clinicians to be familiar with the central tenets of this tradition while respecting the differing perspectives of patients who identify themselves as Catholic. PMID:11501460

  10. Childhood agricultural injuries: an update for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Suzanne; Marlenga, Barbara; Lee, Barbara C

    2013-02-01

    Every three days a child dies in an agriculture-related incident, and every day 45 children are injured in the United States. These tragedies should not be regarded as "accidents," as they often follow predictable and preventable patterns. Prevention is not only possible, but vital, since many of these injuries are almost immediately fatal. Major sources of fatal injuries are machinery, motor vehicles, and drowning. Tractor injuries alone account for one-third of all deaths. The leading sources of nonfatal injuries are structures and surfaces, animals (primarily horses), and vehicles (primarily all-terrain vehicles [ATVs]). Children living on farms are at a higher risk than hired workers, and are unprotected by child labor laws. Preschool children and older male youth are at the highest risk for fatal injury, while nonfatal injury was most common among boys aged 10-15 years. Multiple prevention strategies have been developed, yet economic and cultural barriers often impede their implementation. Educational campaigns alone are often ineffective, and must be coupled with re-engineering of machines and safety devices to reduce fatalities. Legislation has the potential to improve child safety, yet political and economic pressures often prohibit changes in child labor laws and mandated safety requirements. Clinicians play a pivotal role in injury prevention, and should actively address common rural risk-taking behaviors as part of the routine office visit in order to help prevent these tragedies. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Going Tobacco-Free: Predictors of Clinician Reactions and Outcomes of the NY State OASAS Tobacco-Free Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner; George, Kerrin; Brown, B. Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to reduce patient tobacco dependence and create healthier work environments, New York State (NYS) mandated 100% tobacco-free addiction treatment programs for state funded or certified facilities in 2008. We present the results of a longitudinal study examining how local implementation features shape clinician reactions to the regulation and influence post-regulation clinician behavior and strain. A cohort of 147 clinicians associated with 13 treatment organizations throughout NYS completed a survey prior to the passage of the regulation and again approximately 1 year post-regulation. Findings reveal that local implementation features of clinician participation in the planning for change, the provision of change-related information, and perceived organizational support predicted perceptions of change management fairness, which in turn predicted clinical practice behaviors to support smoking cessation, as well as psychological and behavioral strain. In contrast, self-efficacy for change was neither related to local implementation or clinician outcomes. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:22959978

  12. Selling health data: de-identification, privacy, and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Bonnie

    2015-07-01

    Two court cases that involve selling prescription data for pharmaceutical marketing affect biomedical informatics, patient and clinician privacy, and regulation. Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc. et al. in the United States and R v. Department of Health, Ex Parte Source Informatics Ltd. in the United Kingdom concern privacy and health data protection, data de-identification and reidentification, drug detailing (marketing), commercial benefit from the required disclosure of personal information, clinician privacy and the duty of confidentiality, beneficial and unsavory uses of health data, regulating health technologies, and considering data as speech. Individuals should, at the very least, be aware of how data about them are collected and used. Taking account of how those data are used is needed so societal norms and law evolve ethically as new technologies affect health data privacy and protection.

  13. Identification of specific requirements for a NASA aerospace law information system and identification of the acquisition requirements for an aerospace law collection for the NASA law library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morenoff, J.; Roth, D. L.; Singleton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The study to develop, implement, and maintain a space law library and information system is summarized. The survey plan; major interviews with individuals representative of potential sources, users and producers of information related to aerospace law; and system trade-off analyses are discussed along with the NASA/RECON system capability. The NASA publications of STAR and IAA are described, and the NASA legal micro-thesaurus is included.

  14. Bioethics for clinicians: 25. Teaching bioethics in the clinical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKneally, Martin F.; Singer, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    BIOETHICS IS NOW TAUGHT IN EVERY CANADIAN MEDICAL SCHOOL. Canada needs a cadre of teachers who can help clinicians learn bioethics. Our purpose is to encourage clinician teachers to accept this important responsibility and to provide practical advice about teaching bioethics to clinicians as an integral part of good clinical medicine. We use 5 questions to focus the discussion: Why should I teach? What should I teach? How should I teach? How should I evaluate? How should I learn? PMID:11338804

  15. Patient-Clinician Communication About Pain: A Conceptual Model and Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G; Matthias, Marianne S

    2018-02-01

    Productive patient-clinician communication is an important component of effective pain management, but we know little about how patients and clinicians actually talk about pain in clinical settings and how it might be improved to produce better patient outcomes. The objective of this review was to create a conceptual model of patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain, review and synthesize empirical research in this area, and identify priorities for future research. A conceptual model was developed that drew on existing pain and health communication research. CINAHL, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched to find studies reporting empirical data on patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain; results were supplemented with manual searches. Studies were categorized and analyzed to identify crosscutting themes and inform model development. The conceptual model comprised the following components: contextual factors, clinical interaction, attitudes and beliefs, and outcomes. Thirty-nine studies met inclusion criteria and were analyzed based on model components. Studies varied widely in quality, methodology, and sample size. Two provisional conclusions were identified: contrary to what is often reported in the literature, discussions about analgesics are most frequently characterized by patient-clinician agreement, and self-presentation during patient-clinician interactions plays an important role in communication about pain and opioids. Published studies on patient-clinician communication about noncancer pain are few and diverse. The conceptual model presented here can help to identify knowledge gaps and guide future research on communication about pain. Investigating the links between communication and pain-related outcomes is an important priority for future research. © 2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Oncology clinicians' defenses and adherence to communication skills training with simulated patients: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Mathieu; de Roten, Yves; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to assess the impact of clinicians' defense mechanisms-defined as self-protective psychological mechanisms triggered by the affective load of the encounter with the patient-on adherence to a communication skills training (CST). The population consisted of oncology clinicians (N=31) who participated in a CST. An interview with simulated cancer patients was recorded prior and 6 months after CST. Defenses were measured before and after CST and correlated with a prototype of an ideally conducted interview based on the criteria of CST-teachers. Clinicians who used more adaptive defense mechanisms showed better adherence to communication skills after CST than clinicians with less adaptive defenses (F(1, 29) =5.26, p=0.03, d=0.42). Improvement in communication skills after CST seems to depend on the initial levels of defenses of the clinician prior to CST. Implications for practice and training are discussed. Communication has been recognized as a central element of cancer care [1]. Ineffective communication may contribute to patients' confusion, uncertainty, and increased difficulty in asking questions, expressing feelings, and understanding information [2, 3], and may also contribute to clinicians' lack of job satisfaction and emotional burnout [4]. Therefore, communication skills trainings (CST) for oncology clinicians have been widely developed over the last decade. These trainings should increase the skills of clinicians to respond to the patient's needs, and enhance an adequate encounter with the patient with efficient exchange of information [5]. While CSTs show a great diversity with regard to their pedagogic approaches [6, 7], the main elements of CST consist of (1) role play between participants, (2) analysis of videotaped interviews with simulated patients, and (3) interactive case discussion provided by participants. As recently stated in a consensus paper [8], CSTs need to be taught in small groups (up to 10

  17. Barriers and enablers in primary care clinicians' management of osteoarthritis: protocol for a systematic review and qualitative evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton, T; Diamond, L; Buchbinder, R; Bennell, K; Slade, S C

    2016-05-27

    Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent and disabling condition. Primary care management of osteoarthritis is generally suboptimal despite evidence for several modestly effective interventions and the availability of high-quality clinical practice guidelines. This report describes a planned study to synthesise the views of primary care clinicians on the barriers and enablers to following recommended management of osteoarthritis, with the aim of providing new interpretations that may facilitate the uptake of recommended treatments, and in turn improve patient care. A systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. 5 databases will be searched using key search terms for qualitative research, evidence-based practice, clinical practice guidelines, osteoarthritis, beliefs, perceptions, barriers, enablers and adherence. A priori inclusion/exclusion criteria include availability of data from primary care clinicians, reports on views regarding management of osteoarthritis, and studies using qualitative methods for both data collection and analysis. At least 2 independent reviewers will identify eligible reports, conduct a critical appraisal of study conduct, extract data and synthesise reported findings and interpretations. Synthesis will follow thematic analysis within a grounded theory framework of inductive coding and iterative theme identification. The reviewers plus co-authors will contribute to the meta-synthesis to find new themes and theories. The Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research (CERQual) approach will be used to determine a confidence profile of each finding from the meta-synthesis. The protocol has been registered on PROSPERO and is reported using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Ethical approval is not required. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The results will help to inform policy and practice and assist in the

  18. Identification of Information Needs of the American Indian Community That Can Be Met by Library Services. Final Report, June 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles T.

    As the final report on the National Indian Education Association's (NIEA) Library Project, this document presents the following: (1) an introduction (describes the general condition of American Indian library service, the involvement of NIEA, and the project's objectives and time line); (2) the methodology of Phase I: identification of…

  19. Genome-Independent Identification of RNA Editing by Mutual Information (GIREMI) | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of single-nucleotide variants in RNA-seq data. Current version focuses on detection of RNA editing sites without requiring genome sequence data. New version is under development to separately identify RNA editing sites and genetic variants using RNA-seq data alone.

  20. How do intake clinicians use patient characteristics to select treatment for patients with personality disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Janine; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Visbach, Geny; Ziegler, Uli; Gerritsen, Ad; Van Rossum, Bert; Rijnierse, Piet; Timman, Reinier; Verheul, Roel

    2008-11-01

    Treatment selection in clinical practice is a poorly understood, often largely implicit decision process, perhaps especially for patients with personality disorders. This study, therefore, investigated how intake clinicians use information about patient characteristics to select psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with personality disorder. A structured interview with a forced-choice format was administered to 27 experienced intake clinicians working in five specialist mental health care institutes in the Netherlands. Substantial consensus was evident among intake clinicians. The results revealed that none of the presented patient characteristics were deemed relevant for the selection of the suitable treatment setting. The appropriate duration and intensity are selected using severity or personal strength variables. The theoretical orientation is selected using personal strength variables.

  1. Clinician researcher career pathway for registered nurses and midwives: A proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheree; Gullick, Janice; Ballard, Jacqueline; Perry, Lin

    2018-06-01

    To consider clinician researcher career frameworks and propose a new pathway, integrating university and health service components to support research career progression within nursing and midwifery practice. Hospitals with research-active clinicians report fewer adverse events and better patient outcomes. Nursing clinician researcher career development is therefore an international priority, yet positions and expectations associated with this are not always well articulated, with nurses and midwives challenged to accommodate research and clinical careers. This discussion paper describes nurse/midwife clinician researcher career frameworks and a new pathway that aligns academic and nursing role descriptions. The new framework was informed by a brief literature search for international framework documents, three Australian state-based Nurses and Midwives Awards: the Australian Qualifications Framework, publically available University Academic (Research) Award schedules and academic staff descriptions, and state health department and health services publications. The implementation of research-based practice is a key element of nursing and midwifery roles and "advanced practice" position descriptions have well-defined research expectations. This paper considers structures to support their achievement. This paper provides a blueprint for clinician researcher career development. It elevates the research domain as an equal alongside clinical, managerial and educational clinical career development. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Increasing consumer demand for tobacco treatments: Ten design recommendations for clinicians and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan Swartz; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Health professionals play an important role in addressing patient tobacco use in clinical settings. While there is clear evidence that identifying tobacco use and assisting smokers in quitting affects outcomes, challenges to improve routine, clinician-delivered tobacco intervention persist. The Consumer Demand Initiative has identified simple design principles to increase consumers' use of proven tobacco treatments. Applying these design strategies to activities across the healthcare system, we articulate ten recommendations that can be implemented in the context of most clinical systems where most clinicians work. The recommendations are: (1) reframe the definition of success, (2) portray proven treatments as the best care, (3) redesign the 5A's of tobacco intervention, (4) be ready to deliver the right treatment at the right time, (5) move tobacco from the social history to the problem list, (6) use words as therapy and language that makes sense, (7) fit tobacco treatment into clinical team workflows, (8) embed tobacco treatment into health information technology, (9) make every encounter an opportunity to intervene, and (10) end social disparities for tobacco users. Clinical systems need to change to improve tobacco treatment implementation. The consumer- and clinician-centered recommendations provide a roadmap that focuses on increasing clinician performance through greater understanding of the clinician's role in helping tobacco users, highlighting the value of evidence-based tobacco treatments, employing shared decision-making skills, and integrating routine tobacco treatment into clinical system routines. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Usability testing of two e-learning resources: methods to maximize potential for clinician use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anita; Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Chignell, Mark; Straus, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    Rigorous usability testing of e-learn-ing resources is an important prerequisite to their wide-spread use among clinicians. This study demonstrates the application of an evidence-based approach to usability testing of two stroke-related e-learning resources (StrokEngine). 14 stroke rehabilitation clinicians (occupational therapists and physiotherapists) from Ontario, Canada participated in a 1.5 h in-person testing session. Clinicians navigated StrokEngine in search of information to answer questions on stroke assessment/intervention. Their search patterns were observed and clinicians provided verbal/written feedback about StrokEngine. Content analysis was used to generate themes and categorize them under two broad categories: facilitators and barriers to use. Five key facilitators and three key barriers to Strok-Engine use were identified and related to screen format, layout/organization, ease of navigation, quality of content, likelihood of using StrokEngine in the future, and system dysfunctions. All 14 clinicians were very or extremely satisfied with the layout/organization, quality and clinical relevance of the content, stating that they were likely to use StrokEngine in the future. All identified barriers from this study were addressed with website modifications in order to maximize the usability and navigability of StrokEngine. This rigorous methodology for usability testing can be applied during the design process of any e-learning resource.

  4. Rehabilitation goal setting with community dwelling adults with acquired brain injury: a theoretical framework derived from clinicians' reflections on practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Sarah; Fleming, Jennifer; Doig, Emmah

    2017-06-11

    The aim of this study was to explore clinicians' experiences of implementing goal setting with community dwelling clients with acquired brain injury, to develop a goal setting practice framework. Grounded theory methodology was employed. Clinicians, representing six disciplines across seven services, were recruited and interviewed until theoretical saturation was achieved. A total of 22 clinicians were interviewed. A theoretical framework was developed to explain how clinicians support clients to actively engage in goal setting in routine practice. The framework incorporates three phases: a needs identification phase, a goal operationalisation phase, and an intervention phase. Contextual factors, including personal and environmental influences, also affect how clinicians and clients engage in this process. Clinicians use additional strategies to support clients with impaired self-awareness. These include structured communication and metacognitive strategies to operationalise goals. For clients with emotional distress, clinicians provide additional time and intervention directed at new identity development. The goal setting practice framework may guide clinician's understanding of how to engage in client-centred goal setting in brain injury rehabilitation. There is a predilection towards a client-centred goal setting approach in the community setting, however, contextual factors can inhibit implementation of this approach. Implications for Rehabilitation The theoretical framework describes processes used to develop achievable client-centred goals with people with brain injury. Building rapport is a core strategy to engage clients with brain injury in goal setting. Clients with self-awareness impairment benefit from additional metacognitive strategies to participate in goal setting. Clients with emotional distress may need additional time for new identity development.

  5. What patient characteristics make clinicians recommend brief treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, B. A.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Wouters, L.; Emmelkamp, P. M. G.; Schene, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Assessing self-rated items that might have an impact on clinicians recommending brief treatment (BT) over unlimited or long-term treatment (ULT). Method: On the basis of patient self-report data we compared patients referred by clinicians to BT (n =71) with those referred to ULT (n =145).

  6. The clinician-educator track: training internal medicine residents as clinician-educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C Christopher; McCormick, Ian; Huang, Grace C

    2014-06-01

    Although resident-as-teacher programs bring postgraduate trainees' teaching skills to a minimum threshold, intensive, longitudinal training is lacking for residents who wish to pursue careers in medical education. The authors describe the development, implementation, and preliminary assessment of the novel track for future clinician-educators that they introduced in the internal medicine residency program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in 2010. Categorical medical interns with a career interest in medical education apply to participate in the clinician-educator track (CET) at the midpoint of their first postgraduate year. CET residents complete a 2.5-year curriculum in which they review foundations of medical education, design and assess new curricula, and evaluate learners and programs. They apply these skills in a variety of clinical settings and receive frequent feedback from faculty and peers. All CET residents design and implement at least one medical education research project. A comprehensive evaluation plan to assess the impact of the CET on resident teaching skills, scholarly productivity, career selection, and advancement is under way. A preliminary evaluation demonstrates high satisfaction with the track among the first cohort of CET residents, who graduated in 2012. Compared with residents in the traditional resident-as-teacher program, CET residents reported higher gains in their confidence in core medical education skills. Although these preliminary data are promising, data will be collected over the next several years to explore whether the additional curricular time, faculty time, and costs and potential expansion to other institutions are justified.

  7. PubMed searches: overview and strategies for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Wesley T; Olin, Bernie R

    2013-04-01

    PubMed is a biomedical and life sciences database maintained by a division of the National Library of Medicine known as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). It is a large resource with more than 5600 journals indexed and greater than 22 million total citations. Searches conducted in PubMed provide references that are more specific for the intended topic compared with other popular search engines. Effective PubMed searches allow the clinician to remain current on the latest clinical trials, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines. PubMed continues to evolve by allowing users to create a customized experience through the My NCBI portal, new arrangements and options in search filters, and supporting scholarly projects through exportation of citations to reference managing software. Prepackaged search options available in the Clinical Queries feature also allow users to efficiently search for clinical literature. PubMed also provides information regarding the source journals themselves through the Journals in NCBI Databases link. This article provides an overview of the PubMed database's structure and features as well as strategies for conducting an effective search.

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Primer for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hao Wang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS use high-throughput genotyping technology to relate hundreds of thousands of genetic markers (genotypes to clinical conditions and measurable traits (phenotypes. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to GWAS for clinicians, to allow them to better appreciate the value and limitations of GWAS for genotype-disease association studies. The input of clinicians is vital for GWAS, since disease heterogeneity is frequently a confounding factor that can only really be solved by clinicians. For diseases that are difficult to diagnose, clinicians should ensure that the cases do indeed have the disease; for common diseases, clinicians should ensure that the controls are truly disease-free.

  9. Automated identification of wound information in clinical notes of patients with heart diseases: Developing and validating a natural language processing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Maxim; Lai, Kenneth; Dowding, Dawn; Lei, Victor J; Zisberg, Anna; Bowles, Kathryn H; Zhou, Li

    2016-12-01

    Electronic health records are being increasingly used by nurses with up to 80% of the health data recorded as free text. However, only a few studies have developed nursing-relevant tools that help busy clinicians to identify information they need at the point of care. This study developed and validated one of the first automated natural language processing applications to extract wound information (wound type, pressure ulcer stage, wound size, anatomic location, and wound treatment) from free text clinical notes. First, two human annotators manually reviewed a purposeful training sample (n=360) and random test sample (n=1100) of clinical notes (including 50% discharge summaries and 50% outpatient notes), identified wound cases, and created a gold standard dataset. We then trained and tested our natural language processing system (known as MTERMS) to process the wound information. Finally, we assessed our automated approach by comparing system-generated findings against the gold standard. We also compared the prevalence of wound cases identified from free-text data with coded diagnoses in the structured data. The testing dataset included 101 notes (9.2%) with wound information. The overall system performance was good (F-measure is a compiled measure of system's accuracy=92.7%), with best results for wound treatment (F-measure=95.7%) and poorest results for wound size (F-measure=81.9%). Only 46.5% of wound notes had a structured code for a wound diagnosis. The natural language processing system achieved good performance on a subset of randomly selected discharge summaries and outpatient notes. In more than half of the wound notes, there were no coded wound diagnoses, which highlight the significance of using natural language processing to enrich clinical decision making. Our future steps will include expansion of the application's information coverage to other relevant wound factors and validation of the model with external data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Clinician Perspectives on an Electronic Portal to Improve Communication with Patients and Families in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sigall K; Roche, Stephanie D; Johansson, Anna C; O'Reilly, Kristin P; Lee, Barbara S; Sands, Kenneth E; Talmor, Daniel S; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-12-01

    Communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) often falls short of patient and family needs, putting them at risk for significant physical and emotional harm. As electronic patient portals rapidly evolve, one designed specifically for the ICU might potentially enhance communication among patients, family members, and clinicians; however, the views of frontline ICU staff on such technology are unknown. To identify clinician perspectives on the current state of communication among patients, families, and clinicians in the ICU, and assess their views on whether and how an electronic portal may address existing communication deficits and improve care. Three focus groups comprised altogether of 26 clinicians from 6 ICUs, representing several disciplines in an academic medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. Transcripts were analyzed inductively for major themes using grounded theory. We identified seven themes reflecting clinician perspectives on communication challenges and desired portal functionality: (1) comprehension and literacy; (2) results and updates; (3) patient and family preferences; (4) interclinician communication; (5) family informational needs; (6) the ICU as an unfamiliar environment; and (7) enhancing humanism through technology. Each theme included current gaps in practice, potential benefits and concerns related to an ICU communication portal, and participant recommendations. Benefits included enhanced education, patient/family engagement, and clinician workflow. Challenges included the stress and uncertainty of ICU care, fear of technology replacing human connection, existing interclinician communication failures, and the tension between informing families without overwhelming them. Overall, clinicians were cautiously supportive of an electronic portal to enhance communication in the ICU and made several specific recommendations for design and implementation. As new technologies expand opportunities for greater transparency and participation in

  11. Patient and Clinician Perspectives on Shared Decision-making in Early Adopting Lung Cancer Screening Programs: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Koppelman, Elisa; Bolton, Rendelle; Lasser, Karen E; Borrelli, Belinda; Au, David H; Slatore, Christopher G; Clark, Jack A; Kathuria, Hasmeena

    2018-02-21

    Guidelines recommend, and Medicare requires, shared decision-making between patients and clinicians before referring individuals at high risk of lung cancer for chest CT screening. However, little is known about the extent to which shared decision-making about lung cancer screening is achieved in real-world settings. To characterize patient and clinician impressions of early experiences with communication and decision-making about lung cancer screening and perceived barriers to achieving shared decision-making. Qualitative study entailing semi-structured interviews and focus groups. We enrolled 36 clinicians who refer patients for lung cancer screening and 49 patients who had undergone lung cancer screening in the prior year. Participants were recruited from lung cancer screening programs at four hospitals (three Veterans Health Administration, one urban safety net). Using content analysis, we analyzed transcripts to characterize communication and decision-making about lung cancer screening. Our analysis focused on the recommended components of shared decision-making (information sharing, deliberation, and decision aid use) and barriers to achieving shared decision-making. Clinicians varied in the information shared with patients, and did not consistently incorporate decision aids. Clinicians believed they explained the rationale and gave some (often purposely limited) information about the trade-offs of lung cancer screening. By contrast, some patients reported receiving little information about screening or its trade-offs and did not realize the CT was intended as a screening test for lung cancer. Clinicians and patients alike did not perceive that significant deliberation typically occurred. Clinicians perceived insufficient time, competing priorities, difficulty accessing decision aids, limited patient comprehension, and anticipated patient emotions as barriers to realizing shared decision-making. Due to multiple perceived barriers, patient-clinician

  12. A qualitative study examining methods of accessing and identifying research relevant to clinical practice among rehabilitation clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Drasti Patel,1 Christine Koehmstedt,1 Rebecca Jones,1 Nathan T Coffey,1 Xinsheng Cai,2 Steven Garfinkel,2 Dahlia M Shaewitz,2 Ali A Weinstein1 1Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 2American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC, USA Purpose: Research examining the utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP specifically among rehabilitation clinicians is limited. The objective of this study was to examine how various rehabilitative clinicians including physical therapists, occupational therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physiatrists are gaining access to literature and whether they are able to implement the available research into practice.Methods: A total of 21 total clinicians were interviewed via telephone. Using NVivo, a qualitative analysis of the responses was performed.Results: There were similarities found with respect to the information-seeking behaviors and translation of research across the different clinician types. Lack of time was reported to be a barrier for both access to literature and implementation of research across all clinician types. The majority of clinicians who reported having difficulty with utilizing the published literature indicated that the literature was not applicable to their practice, the research was not specific enough to be put into practice, or the research found was too outdated to be relevant. In addition, having a supportive work environment aided in the search and utilization of research through providing resources central to assisting clinicians in gaining access to health information.Conclusion: Our study identified several barriers that affect EBP for rehabilitation clinicians. The findings suggest the need for researchers to ensure that their work is applicable and specific to clinical practice for implementation to occur. Keywords: health information, information behavior, knowledge utilization

  13. Identification method of gas-liquid two-phase flow regime based on image wavelet packet information entropy and genetic neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yunlong; Chen Fei; Sun Bin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristic that wavelet packet transform image can be decomposed by different scales, a flow regime identification method based on image wavelet packet information entropy feature and genetic neural network was proposed. Gas-liquid two-phase flow images were captured by digital high speed video systems in horizontal pipe. The information entropy feature from transformation coefficients were extracted using image processing techniques and multi-resolution analysis. The genetic neural network was trained using those eigenvectors, which was reduced by the principal component analysis, as flow regime samples, and the flow regime intelligent identification was realized. The test result showed that image wavelet packet information entropy feature could excellently reflect the difference between seven typical flow regimes, and the genetic neural network with genetic algorithm and BP algorithm merits were with the characteristics of fast convergence for simulation and avoidance of local minimum. The recognition possibility of the network could reach up to about 100%, and a new and effective method was presented for on-line flow regime. (authors)

  14. Designing User-Centric Patient Portals: Clinician and Patients' Uses and Gratifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krist, Alex H.; Aycock, Rebecca A.; Kreps, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Legislation mandates that clinicians make patients' medical information available digitally. This has resulted in hurriedly installing patient portals that do not fully meet the needs of patients or clinicians. This study examined a specific portal, MyPreventiveCare (MPC), a patient-centered portal designed to promote preventive care to consumers, to elicit recommendations from patients and clinicians about how it could be more beneficial by uncovering their uses and gratifications (U&G). Materials and Methods: In-depth interviews with 31 patients and two clinician focus groups were conducted. Multiple methods were utilized, such as grounded theory coding to develop themes and content analysis to classify responses according to the U&G framework. Results: Four main categories emerged that users desire to be included in health portals: integration with technology (27%), coordination of care (27%), incorporation of lifestyle (26%), and increased control (20%). Additional analysis revealed that health portals are mainly utilized to fulfill cognitive and affective needs, with over 80% of recommendations related to the U&G categories of cognitive and affective needs. Cognitive (60%), affective (21%), social integrative (10%), personal integrative (9%), and tension release (0%). Conclusions: Portals will continue to evolve and become important health communication tools if they address the user's perspective and are inclusive of new technological advances. Specifically, portals must become more user centric and incorporate aspects of the patients' lifestyle and integrate health information technology. PMID:27333468

  15. Designing User-Centric Patient Portals: Clinician and Patients' Uses and Gratifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Jordan M; Krist, Alex H; Aycock, Rebecca A; Kreps, Gary L

    2017-03-01

    Legislation mandates that clinicians make patients' medical information available digitally. This has resulted in hurriedly installing patient portals that do not fully meet the needs of patients or clinicians. This study examined a specific portal, MyPreventiveCare (MPC), a patient-centered portal designed to promote preventive care to consumers, to elicit recommendations from patients and clinicians about how it could be more beneficial by uncovering their uses and gratifications (U&G). In-depth interviews with 31 patients and two clinician focus groups were conducted. Multiple methods were utilized, such as grounded theory coding to develop themes and content analysis to classify responses according to the U&G framework. Four main categories emerged that users desire to be included in health portals: integration with technology (27%), coordination of care (27%), incorporation of lifestyle (26%), and increased control (20%). Additional analysis revealed that health portals are mainly utilized to fulfill cognitive and affective needs, with over 80% of recommendations related to the U&G categories of cognitive and affective needs. Cognitive (60%), affective (21%), social integrative (10%), personal integrative (9%), and tension release (0%). Portals will continue to evolve and become important health communication tools if they address the user's perspective and are inclusive of new technological advances. Specifically, portals must become more user centric and incorporate aspects of the patients' lifestyle and integrate health information technology.

  16. Correction for phylogeny, small number of observations and data redundancy improves the identification of coevolving amino acid pairs using mutual information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, C.M.; Santos, J.; Delfino, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Mutual information (MI) theory is often applied to predict positional correlations in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) to make possible the analysis of those positions structurally or functionally important in a given fold or protein family. Accurate identification of coevolving......-weighting techniques to reduce sequence redundancy and low-count corrections to account for small number of observations in limited size sequence families, can significantly improve the predictability of MI. The evaluation is made on large sets of both in silico-generated alignments as well as on biological sequence...

  17. The meaning of co- production for clinicians: an exploratory case study of Practitioner Trainers in one Recovery College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Mark; Oates, Jennifer

    2018-05-15

    Co-production between service users and clinicians is a desirable element of recovery-oriented practice in mental health but the effect of co-production on clinicians has not been explored thoroughly. to explore the meaning of co-production for clinicians based on their experience of co-production in a Recovery College Method: Thematic analysis of eight semi-structured interviews with clinicians who have co-produced and co-delivered workshops with a Recovery College Peer Trainer. The 'meaning of co-production' had four themes: definitions, power dynamics, negotiating roles and influence on practice. Clinicians' experience of co-production meant a reassessment of their expert role and power. They said that this altered their clinical practice, particularly the language they used and the personal information they shared. Role negotiation between Practitioner and Peer Trainers is an iterative process, whereby clinicians may revise their perspectives on personal disclosure, professional identity and collegiate support. The Peer and Practitioner Trainer relationship is characterised by reciprocity and mutuality, and there is some evidence that Practitioner involvement in a co-produced activity has the potential to transform service user and provider relationships beyond the Recovery College setting. Engaging in co-produced educational workshops can alter clinicians' perspectives on roles, power and clinical expertise. Findings from this case study must be tested against research on other Recovery Colleges. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Can promoting patient decision making be exclusionary? Moral expectations and cultural difference in the narratives of UK maternity clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Myfanwy; Elwyn, Glyn; Papadopoulos, Irena; Fleming, Lon; Williams, Gareth

    2009-01-01

    Patient autonomy in health care decision making is increasingly advocated as a means of promoting patients' 'responsibilities' for treatments and costs. However, little is known with regard to clinicians' understanding of patients' potential responsibilities in decision making. We explore how clinicians may view decision making as a 'moral' obligation and examine how moral virtue is discursively constructed in this context and in the face of ethnic and social difference. Data reported are derived from an interview study that examined perceptions of maternity decision making among Arab Muslim women and clinicians. Results reported here are from the clinician sample which includes obstetricians, general practitioners (GPs) and midwives. Clinicians perceived that a key element of their role involved imparting relevant information to their clients and, increasingly, involving them in making autonomous decisions about their care. However, by analysing and assessing the attribution of specific cultural differences in clinicians' discussion of decision making processes with minority group women, we demonstrate how some clinicians justified their failure to promote autonomy through shared decision making with women from these groups. We will demonstrate these attributes to be those of passivity and non-rationality which entail some negative moral judgements and which have a complex relationship to gender and power

  19. Postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up: Perspectives of Australian hospital clinicians and general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Catherine; Bogossian, Fiona Elizabeth; Callaway, Leonie; Gallois, Cindy

    2018-05-04

    The reasons for low postnatal screening rates for women with gestational diabetes mellitus are not well understood. Multiple care providers, settings and changes to diagnostic criteria, may contribute to confusion over postnatal care. Quality of communication between clinicians may be an important influence for the completion of postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up. Describe and analyse communication processes between hospital clinicians (midwives, medical, allied staff) and general practitioners who provide postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus care. Purposive sampling and convergent interviews explored participants' communication experiences providing gestational diabetes mellitus postnatal follow-up. Data were analysed with Leximancer automated content analysis software; interpretation was undertaken using Communication Accommodation Theory. Clinicians who provided maternity care at a tertiary referral hospital (n=13) in Queensland, Australia, and general practitioners (n=16) who provided maternity shared care with that hospital between December 2012 and July 2013. Thematic analysis identified very different perspectives between the experiences of General Practitioners and hospital clinicians; six themes emerged. General practitioners were concerned about themes relating to discharge summaries and follow-up guidelines. In contrast, hospital clinicians were more concerned about themes relating to gestational diabetes mellitus antenatal care and specialist clinics. Two themes, gestational diabetes mellitus women and postnatal checks were shared. Gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up is characterised by communication where general practitioners appear to be information seekers whose communication needs are not met by hospital clinicians. Midwives are ideally placed to assist in improving communication and postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Clinicians and their cameras: policy, ethics and practice in an Australian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kara; Belton, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    Medical photography illustrates what people would prefer to keep private, is practiced when people are vulnerable, and has the power to freeze a moment in time. Given it is a sensitive area of health, lawful and ethical practice is paramount. This paper recognises and seeks to clarify the possibility of widespread clinician-taken medical photography in a tertiary hospital in northern Australia, examining the legal and ethical implications of this practice. A framework of Northern Territory law, state Department of Health policy and human rights theory were used to argue the thesis. Clinicians from 13 purposively chosen wards were asked to participate in an anonymous survey and confidential in-depth interviews. Questions were generated from the literature and local knowledge on the topics of 'occurrence', 'image use', 'quality of consent', 'cameras and technology', 'confidentiality', 'data storage and security', 'hospital policy and law' and 'cultural issues'. One hundred and seventy surveys and eights interviews were analysed using descriptive statistics and theme and content analysis, then triangulated for similarity, difference and unique responses. Forty-eight percent of clinicians surveyed take medical photographs, with the majority using hospital-owned cameras. However, one-fifth of clinicians reported photographing with personal mobile phones. Non-compliance with written consent requirements articulated in policy was endemic, with most clinicians surveyed obtaining only verbal consent. Labeling, storage, copyright and cultural issues were generally misunderstood, with a significant number of clinicians risking the security of patient information by storing images on personal devices. If this tertiary hospital does not develop a clinical photography action plan to address staff lack of knowledge, and noncompliance with policy and mobile phone use, patients' data is at risk of being distributed into the public domain where unauthorised publication may cause

  1. Development of a wheelchair maintenance training programme and questionnaire for clinicians and wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Maria Luisa; Bird, Emily; Oyster, Michelle; Worobey, Lynn; Lain, Michael; Bucior, Samuel; Cooper, Rory A; Pearlman, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Purpose of state: The aims of this study were to develop a Wheelchair Maintenance Training Programme (WMTP) as a tool for clinicians to teach wheelchair users (and caregivers when applicable) in a group setting to perform basic maintenance at home in the USA and to develop a Wheelchair Maintenance Training Questionnaire (WMT-Q) to evaluate wheelchair maintenance knowledge in clinicians, manual and power wheelchair users. The WMTP and WMT-Q were developed through an iterative process. A convenience sample of clinicians (n = 17), manual wheelchair (n ∞ 5), power wheelchair users (n = 4) and caregivers (n = 4) provided feedback on the training programme. A convenience sample of clinicians (n = 38), manual wheelchair (n = 25), and power wheelchair users (n = 30) answered the WMT-Q throughout different phases of development. The subscores of the WMT-Q achieved a reliability that ranged between ICC(3,1) = 0.48 to ICC(3,1) = 0.89. The WMTP and WMT-Q were implemented with 15 clinicians who received in-person training in the USA using the materials developed and showed a significant increase in all except one of the WMT-Q subscores after the WMTP (p users. This training complements the World Health Organization basic wheelchair service curriculum, which only includes training of the clinicians, but does not include detailed information to train wheelchair users and caregivers. This training program offers a time efficient method for providing education to end users in a group setting that may mitigate adverse consequences resulting from wheelchair breakdown. This training program has significant potential for impact among wheelchair users in areas where access to repair services is limited.

  2. Allied health clinicians using translational research in action to develop a reliable stroke audit tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abery, Philip; Kuys, Suzanne; Lynch, Mary; Low Choy, Nancy

    2018-05-23

    To design and establish reliability of a local stroke audit tool by engaging allied health clinicians within a privately funded hospital. Design: Two-stage study involving a modified Delphi process to inform stroke audit tool development and inter-tester reliability. Allied health clinicians. A modified Delphi process to select stroke guideline recommendations for inclusion in the audit tool. Reliability study: 1 allied health representative from each discipline audited 10 clinical records with sequential admissions to acute and rehabilitation services. Recommendations were admitted to the audit tool when 70% agreement was reached, with 50% set as the reserve agreement. Inter-tester reliability was determined using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) across 10 clinical records. Twenty-two participants (92% female, 50% physiotherapists, 17% occupational therapists) completed the modified Delphi process. Across 6 voting rounds, 8 recommendations reached 70% agreement and 2 reached 50% agreement. Two recommendations (nutrition/hydration; goal setting) were added to ensure representation for all disciplines. Substantial consistency across raters was established for the audit tool applied in acute stroke (ICC .71; range .48 to .90) and rehabilitation (ICC.78; range .60 to .93) services. Allied health clinicians within a privately funded hospital generally agreed in an audit process to develop a reliable stroke audit tool. Allied health clinicians agreed on stroke guideline recommendations to inform a stroke audit tool. The stroke audit tool demonstrated substantial consistency supporting future use for service development. This process, which engages local clinicians, could be adopted by other facilities to design reliable audit tools to identify local service gaps to inform changes to clinical practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. PERCC Tools: Public Health Preparedness for Clinicians

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-29

    CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response funds Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs) to examine components of the public health system. This podcast is an overview of mental and behavioral health tools developed by the Johns Hopkins PERRC.  Created: 8/29/2011 by Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 8/30/2011.

  4. Compilation of a panel of informative single nucleotide polymorphisms for bovine identification in the Northern Irish cattle population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartshorne David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal identification is pivotal in governmental agricultural policy, enabling the management of subsidy payments, movement of livestock, test scheduling and control of disease. Advances in bovine genomics have made it possible to utilise inherent genetic variability to uniquely identify individual animals by DNA profiling, much as has been achieved with humans over the past 20 years. A DNA profiling test based on bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers would offer considerable advantages over current short tandem repeat (STR based industry standard tests, in that it would be easier to analyse and interpret. In this study, a panel of 51 genome-wide SNPs were genotyped across panels of semen DNA from 6 common breeds for the purposes of ascertaining allelic frequency. For SNPs on the same chromosome, the extent of linkage disequilbrium was determined from genotype data by Expectation Maximization (EM algorithm. Minimum probabilities of unique identification were determined for each breed panel. The usefulness of this SNP panel was ascertained by comparison to the current bovine STR Stockmarks II assay. A statistically representative random sampling of bovine animals from across Northern Ireland was assembled for the purposes of determining the population allele frequency for these STR loci and subsequently, the minimal probability of unique identification they conferred in sampled bovine animals from Northern Ireland. Results 6 SNPs exhibiting a minor allele frequency of less than 0.2 in more than 3 of the breed panels were excluded. 2 Further SNPs were found to reside in coding areas of the cattle genome and were excluded from the final panel. The remaining 43 SNPs exhibited genotype frequencies which were in Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium. SNPs on the same chromosome were observed to have no significant linkage disequilibrium/allelic association. Minimal probabilities of uniquely identifying individual animals from

  5. Clinician Survey to Determine Knowledge of Dengue and Clinical Management Practices, Texas, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jessica K; Abeyta, Roman; Smith, Brian; Gaul, Linda; Thomas, Dana L; Han, George; Sharp, Tyler M; Waterman, Stephen H; Tomashek, Kay M

    2017-03-01

    AbstractDengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is increasingly being identified as a cause of outbreaks in the United States. During July-December 2013, a total of three south Texas counties reported 53 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases; 26 were locally acquired, constituting the largest outbreak in Texas since 2005. Because dengue outbreaks are expected to continue in south Texas and early case identification and timely treatment can reduce mortality, we sought to determine clinicians' knowledge of dengue and its clinical management. A survey was sent to 2,375 south Texas clinicians; 217 (9%) completed the survey. Approximately half of participants demonstrated knowledge needed to identify dengue cases, including symptoms (56%), early indicators of shock (54%), or timing of thrombocytopenia (48%). Fewer than 20% correctly identified all prevention messages, severe dengue warning signs, or circumstances in which a dengue patient should return for care. Knowledge of clinical management was limited; few participants correctly identified scenarios when plasma leakage occurred (10%) or a crystalloid solution was indicated (7%); however, 45% correctly identified when a blood transfusion was indicated. Because of the ongoing threat of dengue, we recommend clinicians in south Texas receive dengue clinical management training.

  6. Clinician Survey to Determine Knowledge of Dengue and Clinical Management Practices, Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jessica K.; Abeyta, Roman; Smith, Brian; Gaul, Linda; Thomas, Dana L.; Han, George; Sharp, Tyler M.; Waterman, Stephen H.; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is increasingly being identified as a cause of outbreaks in the United States. During July–December 2013, a total of three south Texas counties reported 53 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases; 26 were locally acquired, constituting the largest outbreak in Texas since 2005. Because dengue outbreaks are expected to continue in south Texas and early case identification and timely treatment can reduce mortality, we sought to determine clinicians' knowledge of dengue and its clinical management. A survey was sent to 2,375 south Texas clinicians; 217 (9%) completed the survey. Approximately half of participants demonstrated knowledge needed to identify dengue cases, including symptoms (56%), early indicators of shock (54%), or timing of thrombocytopenia (48%). Fewer than 20% correctly identified all prevention messages, severe dengue warning signs, or circumstances in which a dengue patient should return for care. Knowledge of clinical management was limited; few participants correctly identified scenarios when plasma leakage occurred (10%) or a crystalloid solution was indicated (7%); however, 45% correctly identified when a blood transfusion was indicated. Because of the ongoing threat of dengue, we recommend clinicians in south Texas receive dengue clinical management training. PMID:28138048

  7. Randomised clinical trials with clinician-preferred treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, E L; Baumrind, S

    1991-01-19

    The standard design for randomised clinical trials may be inappropriate when the clinician believes that one of the treatments being tested is superior for the patient, or when the clinician has a preference for one of the treatments. For such instances the suggestion is that the patient is randomly allocated to treatment only when there is clinical disagreement about treatment of choice for that patient, and then the patient is assigned to a clinician who had thought that the regimen allocated is the one most appropriate for that patient.

  8. Mental health/illness and prisons as place: frontline clinicians׳ perspectives of mental health work in a penal setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicola; Jordan, Melanie; Kane, Eddie

    2014-09-01

    This article takes mental health and prisons as its two foci. It explores the links between social and structural aspects of the penal setting, the provision of mental healthcare in prisons, and mental health work in this environment. This analysis utilises qualitative interview data from prison-based fieldwork undertaken in Her Majesty׳s Prison Service, England. Two themes are discussed: (1) the desire and practicalities of doing mental health work and (2) prison staff as mental health work allies. Concepts covered include equivalence, training, ownership, informal communication, mental health knowledge, service gatekeepers, case identification, and unmet need. Implications for practice are (1) the mental health knowledge and understanding of prison wing staff could be appraised and developed to improve mental healthcare and address unmet need. Their role as observers and gatekeepers could be considered. (2) The realities of frontline mental health work for clinicians in the penal environment should be embraced and used to produce and implement improved policy and practice guidance, which is in better accord with the actuality of the context - both socially and structurally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human babesiosis in Europe: what clinicians need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A; Gray, J S; Hunfeld, K-P

    2013-12-01

    Although best known as an animal disease, human babesiosis is attracting increasing attention as a worldwide emerging zoonosis. Humans are commonly infected by the bite of ixodid ticks. Rare ways of transmission are transplacental, perinatal and transfusion-associated. Infection of the human host can cause a very severe host-mediated pathology including fever, and hemolysis leading to anemia, hyperbilirubinuria, hemoglobinuria and possible organ failure. In recent years, apparently owing to increased medical awareness and better diagnostic methods, the number of reported cases in humans is rising steadily worldwide. Hitherto unknown zoonotic Babesia spp. are now being reported from geographic areas where babesiosis was not previously known to occur and the growing numbers of travelers and immunocompromised individuals suggest that the frequency of cases in Europe will also continue to rise. Our review is intended to provide clinicians with practical information on the clinical management of this rare, but potentially life-threatening zoonotic disease. It covers epidemiology, phylogeny, diagnostics and treatment of human babesiosis and the potential risk of transfusion-transmitted disease with a special focus on the European situation.

  10. Integrating virtual reality video games into practice: clinicians' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle E; Miller, Patricia A

    2013-10-01

    The Nintendo Wii is a popular virtual reality (VR) video gaming system in rehabilitation practice and research. As evidence emerges related to its effectiveness as a physical therapy training method, clinicians require information about the pragmatics of its use in practice. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore observations and insights from a sample of physical therapists (PTs) working with children with acquired brain injury regarding practical implications of using the Wii as a physical therapy intervention. Six PTs employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Two themes summarize the practical implications of Wii use: 1) technology meets clinical practice; and 2) onus is on the therapist. Therapists described both beneficial and challenging implications arising from the intersection of technology and practice, and reported the personal commitment required to orient oneself to the gaming system and capably implement this intervention. Findings include issues that may be relevant to professional development in a broader rehabilitation context, including suggestions for the content of educational initiatives and the need for institutional support from managers in the form of physical resources for VR implementation.

  11. Factors influencing rural and urban emergency clinicians' participation in an online knowledge exchange intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet A; Murphy, Andrea L; Sinclair, Douglas; McGrath, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Rural emergency departments (EDs) generally have limited access to continuing education and are typically staffed by clinicians without pediatric emergency specialty training. Emergency care of children is complex and the majority of children receive emergency care in non-pediatric tertiary care centers. In recent decades, there has been a call to action to improve quality and safety in the emergency care of children. Of the one million ED visits by children in Ontario in 2005-2006, one in three visited more than once in a year and one in 15 returned to the ED within 72 hours of the index visit. This study explored factors influencing rural and urban ED clinicians' participation in a Web-based knowledge exchange intervention that focused on best practice knowledge about pediatric emergency care. The following questions guided the study: (i) What are the individual, context of practice or knowledge factors which impact a clinician's decision to participate in a Web-based knowledge exchange intervention?; (ii) What are clinicians' perceptions of organizational expectations regarding knowledge and information sources to be used in practice?; and (iii) What are the preferred knowledge sources of rural and urban emergency clinicians? A Web-based knowledge exchange intervention, the Pediatric Emergency Care Web Based Knowledge Exchange Project, for rural and urban ED clinicians was developed. The website contained 12 pediatric emergency practice learning modules with linked asynchronous discussion forums. The topics for the modules were determined through a needs assessment and the module content was developed by known experts in the field. A follow-up survey was sent to a convenience sample of 187 clinicians from nine rural and two urban Canadian EDs participating in the pediatric emergency Web-based knowledge exchange intervention study. The survey response rate was 56% (105/187). Participation in the knowledge exchange intervention was related to individual

  12. Effectiveness of teaching quality improvement to clinicians: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyasai, Romsai T; Windish, Donna M; Chakraborti, Chayan; Feldman, Leonard S; Rubin, Haya R; Bass, Eric B

    2007-09-05

    Accreditation requirements mandate teaching quality improvement (QI) concepts to medical trainees, yet little is known about the effectiveness of teaching QI. To perform a systematic review of the effectiveness of published QI curricula for clinicians and to determine whether teaching methods influence the effectiveness of such curricula. The electronic literature databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ERIC were searched for English-language articles published between January 1, 1980, and April 30, 2007. Experts in the field of QI were queried about relevant studies. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion if the curriculum taught QI principles to clinicians and the evaluation used a comparative study design. Information about the features of each curriculum, its use of 9 principles of adult learning, and the type of educational and clinical outcomes were extracted. The relationship between the outcomes and the number of educational principles used was assessed. Of 39 studies that met eligibility criteria, 31 described team-based projects; 37 combined didactic instruction with experiential learning. The median number of adult learning principles used was 7 (range, 2-8). Evaluations included 22 controlled trials (8 randomized and 14 nonrandomized) and 17 pre/post or time series studies. Fourteen studies described educational outcomes (attitudes, knowledge, or skills or behaviors) and 28 studies described clinical process or patient outcomes. Nine of the 10 studies that evaluated knowledge reported only positive effects but only 2 of these described a validated assessment tool. The 6 assessments of attitudes found mixed results. Four of the 6 studies on skill or behavior outcomes reported only positive effects. Eight of the 28 studies of clinical outcomes reported only beneficial effects. Controlled studies were more likely than other studies to report mixed or null effects. Only 4 studies evaluated both educational and clinical outcomes

  13. Primary care clinicians' experiences prescribing HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis at a specialized community health centre in Boston: lessons from early adopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakower, Douglas S; Maloney, Kevin M; Grasso, Chris; Melbourne, Katherine; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 1.2 million Americans have indications for using antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV acquisition. For many of these at-risk individuals, the best opportunity to learn about and receive PrEP will be during routine visits to their generalist primary care clinicians. However, few generalist clinicians have prescribed PrEP, primarily because of practical concerns about providing PrEP in primary care settings. The experiences of specialized primary care clinicians who have prescribed PrEP can inform the feasibility of PrEP provision by generalists. During January to February 2015, 35 primary care clinicians at a community health centre in Boston that specializes in the care of sexual and gender minorities completed anonymous surveys about their experiences and practices with PrEP provision. Responses were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Thirty-two clinicians (response rate=91%) completed the surveys. Nearly all clinicians (97%) had prescribed PrEP (median 20 patients, interquartile range 11-33). Most clinicians reported testing and risk-reduction counselling practices concordant with U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for PrEP. Clinicians indicated that patients using PrEP experienced medication toxicities infrequently and generally reported high adherence. However, some clinicians' practices differed from guideline recommendations, and some clinicians observed patients with increased risk behaviours. Most clinicians (79%) rated PrEP provision as easy to accomplish, and 97% considered themselves likely to prescribe PrEP in the future. In a primary care clinic with specialized expertise in HIV prevention, clinicians perceived that PrEP provision to large numbers of patients was safe, feasible and potentially effective. Efforts to engage generalist primary care clinicians in PrEP provision could facilitate scale-up of this efficacious intervention.

  14. Does use of the recognition of stroke in the emergency room stroke assessment tool enhance stroke recognition by ambulance clinicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Rachael T; Williams, Julia; Edwards, Melanie J; Russell, Ian T; Gompertz, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    U.K ambulance services assess patients with suspected stroke using the Face Arm Speech Test (FAST). The Recognition Of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER) tool has been shown superior to the FAST in identifying strokes in emergency departments but has not previously been tested in the ambulance setting. We investigated whether ROSIER use by ambulance clinicians can improve stroke recognition. Ambulance clinicians used the ROSIER in place of the FAST to assess patients with suspected stroke. As the ROSIER includes all FAST elements, we calculated a FAST score from the ROSIER to enable comparisons between the two tools. Ambulance clinicians' provisional stroke diagnoses using the ROSIER and calculated FAST were compared with stroke consultants' diagnosis. We used stepwise logistic regression to compare the contribution of individual ROSIER and FAST items and patient demographics to the prediction of consultants' diagnoses. Sixty-four percent of strokes and 78% of nonstrokes identified by ambulance clinicians using the ROSIER were subsequently confirmed by a stroke consultant. There was no difference in the proportion of strokes correctly detected by the ROSIER or FAST with both displaying excellent levels of sensitivity. The ROSIER detected marginally more nonstroke cases than the FAST, but both demonstrated poor specificity. Facial weakness, arm weakness, seizure activity, age, and sex predicted consultants' diagnosis of stroke. The ROSIER was not better than the FAST for prehospital recognition of stroke. A revised version of the FAST incorporating assessment of seizure activity may improve stroke identification and decision making by ambulance clinicians.

  15. Development of a clinician reputation metric to identify appropriate problem-medication pairs in a crowdsourced knowledge base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Rogith, Deevakar; Fathiamini, Safa; Ottenbacher, Allison J; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-04-01

    Correlation of data within electronic health records is necessary for implementation of various clinical decision support functions, including patient summarization. A key type of correlation is linking medications to clinical problems; while some databases of problem-medication links are available, they are not robust and depend on problems and medications being encoded in particular terminologies. Crowdsourcing represents one approach to generating robust knowledge bases across a variety of terminologies, but more sophisticated approaches are necessary to improve accuracy and reduce manual data review requirements. We sought to develop and evaluate a clinician reputation metric to facilitate the identification of appropriate problem-medication pairs through crowdsourcing without requiring extensive manual review. We retrieved medications from our clinical data warehouse that had been prescribed and manually linked to one or more problems by clinicians during e-prescribing between June 1, 2010 and May 31, 2011. We identified measures likely to be associated with the percentage of accurate problem-medication links made by clinicians. Using logistic regression, we created a metric for identifying clinicians who had made greater than or equal to 95% appropriate links. We evaluated the accuracy of the approach by comparing links made by those physicians identified as having appropriate links to a previously manually validated subset of problem-medication pairs. Of 867 clinicians who asserted a total of 237,748 problem-medication links during the study period, 125 had a reputation metric that predicted the percentage of appropriate links greater than or equal to 95%. These clinicians asserted a total of 2464 linked problem-medication pairs (983 distinct pairs). Compared to a previously validated set of problem-medication pairs, the reputation metric achieved a specificity of 99.5% and marginally improved the sensitivity of previously described knowledge bases. A

  16. SNPs selected by information content outperform randomly selected microsatellite loci for delineating genetic identification and introgression in the endangered dark European honeybee (Apis mellifera mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Irene; Henriques, Dora; Jara, Laura; Johnston, J Spencer; Chávez-Galarza, Julio; De La Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2017-07-01

    The honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been threatened by multiple factors including pests and pathogens, pesticides and loss of locally adapted gene complexes due to replacement and introgression. In western Europe, the genetic integrity of the native A. m. mellifera (M-lineage) is endangered due to trading and intensive queen breeding with commercial subspecies of eastern European ancestry (C-lineage). Effective conservation actions require reliable molecular tools to identify pure-bred A. m. mellifera colonies. Microsatellites have been preferred for identification of A. m. mellifera stocks across conservation centres. However, owing to high throughput, easy transferability between laboratories and low genotyping error, SNPs promise to become popular. Here, we compared the resolving power of a widely utilized microsatellite set to detect structure and introgression with that of different sets that combine a variable number of SNPs selected for their information content and genomic proximity to the microsatellite loci. Contrary to every SNP data set, microsatellites did not discriminate between the two lineages in the PCA space. Mean introgression proportions were identical across the two marker types, although at the individual level, microsatellites' performance was relatively poor at the upper range of Q-values, a result reflected by their lower precision. Our results suggest that SNPs are more accurate and powerful than microsatellites for identification of A. m. mellifera colonies, especially when they are selected by information content. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinician and cancer patient views on patient participation in treatment decision-making: a quantitative and qualitative exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, A H; Baas-Thijssen, M C M; Marijnen, C A M; Stiggelbout, A M

    2008-01-01

    Patient participation in treatment decision-making is being increasingly advocated, although cancer treatments are often guideline-driven. Trade-offs between benefits and side effects underlying guidelines are made by clinicians. Evidence suggests that clinicians are inaccurate at predicting patient values. The aim was to assess what role oncologists and cancer patients prefer in deciding about treatment, and how they view patient participation in treatment decision-making. Seventy disease-free cancer patients and 60 oncologists (surgical, radiation, and medical) were interviewed about their role preferences using the Control Preferences Scale (CPS) and about their views on patient participation using closed- and open-ended questions. Almost all participants preferred treatment decisions to be the outcome of a shared process. Clinicians viewed participation more often as reaching an agreement, whereas 23% of patients defined participation exclusively as being informed. Of the participants, ⩾81% thought not all patients are able to participate and ⩾74% thought clinicians are not always able to weigh the pros and cons of treatment for patients, especially not quality as compared with length of life. Clinicians seemed reluctant to share probability information on the likely impact of adjuvant treatment. Clinicians should acknowledge the legitimacy of patients' values in treatment decisions. Guidelines should recommend elicitation of patient values at specific decision points. PMID:18781148

  18. Take the money and run? Redemption of a gift card incentive in a clinician survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane S. Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinician surveys provide critical information about many facets of health care, but are often challenging to implement. Our objective was to assess use by participants and non-participants of a prepaid gift card incentive that could be later reclaimed by the researchers if unused. Methods Clinicians were recruited to participate in a mailed or online survey as part of a study to characterize women’s primary health care provider attitudes towards breast and cervical cancer screening guidelines and practices (n = 177. An up-front incentive of a $50 gift card to a popular online retailer was included with the study invitation. Clinicians were informed that the gift card would expire if it went unused after 4 months. Outcome measures included use of gift cards by participants and non-participants and comparison of hypothetical costs of different incentive strategies. Results 63.5 % of clinicians who responded to the survey used the gift card, and only one provider who didn’t participate used the gift card (1.6 %. Many of those who participated did not redeem their gift cards (36.5 % of respondents. The price of the incentives actually claimed totaled $3700, which was less than half of the initial outlay. Since some of the respondents did not redeem their gift cards, the cost of incentives was less than it might have been if we had provided a conditional incentive of $50 to responders after they had completed the survey. Conclusions Redeemable online gift card codes may provide an effective way to motivate clinicians to participate in surveys.

  19. Take the money and run? Redemption of a gift card incentive in a clinician survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jane S; Sprague, Brian L; Klabunde, Carrie N; Tosteson, Anna N A; Bitton, Asaf; Onega, Tracy; MacLean, Charles D; Harris, Kimberly; Schapira, Marilyn M; Haas, Jennifer S

    2016-02-24

    Clinician surveys provide critical information about many facets of health care, but are often challenging to implement. Our objective was to assess use by participants and non-participants of a prepaid gift card incentive that could be later reclaimed by the researchers if unused. Clinicians were recruited to participate in a mailed or online survey as part of a study to characterize women's primary health care provider attitudes towards breast and cervical cancer screening guidelines and practices (n = 177). An up-front incentive of a $50 gift card to a popular online retailer was included with the study invitation. Clinicians were informed that the gift card would expire if it went unused after 4 months. Outcome measures included use of gift cards by participants and non-participants and comparison of hypothetical costs of different incentive strategies. 63.5% of clinicians who responded to the survey used the gift card, and only one provider who didn't participate used the gift card (1.6%). Many of those who participated did not redeem their gift cards (36.5% of respondents). The price of the incentives actually claimed totaled $3700, which was less than half of the initial outlay. Since some of the respondents did not redeem their gift cards, the cost of incentives was less than it might have been if we had provided a conditional incentive of $50 to responders after they had completed the survey. Redeemable online gift card codes may provide an effective way to motivate clinicians to participate in surveys.

  20. Bioethics for clinicians: 21. Islamic bioethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, Abdallah S.; Khitamy, A.

    2001-01-01

    ISLAMIC BIOETHICS DERIVES FROM A COMBINATION OF PRINCIPLES, duties and rights, and, to a certain extent, a call to virtue. In Islam, bioethical decision-making is carried out within a framework of values derived from revelation and tradition. It is intimately linked to the broad ethical teachings of the Qur'an and the tradition of the Prophet Muhammad, and thus to the interpretation of Islamic law. In this way, Islam has the flexibility to respond to new biomedical technologies. Islamic bioethics emphasizes prevention and teaches that the patient must be treated with respect and compassion and that the physical, mental and spiritual dimensions of the illness experience be taken into account. Because Islam shares many foundational values with Judaism and Christianity, the informed Canadian physician will find Islamic bioethics quite familiar. Canadian Muslims come from varied backgrounds and have varying degrees of religious observance. Physicians need to recognize this diversity and avoid a stereotypical approach to Muslim patients. PMID:11202669

  1. Media literacy for clinicians and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, V Susan; Olson, Cheryl K; Jellinek, Michael S

    2005-07-01

    Families and children are in the midst of a media revolution. Television, Internet access, instant messaging, cell phones, and interactive video games are delivering more information for more hours than ever in history. Exposure is occurring at younger and younger ages, often without parental oversight or interpretation. The impact on children is just beginning to be studied. Does media exposure prepare children for the world in which they live or deprive them of critical developmental opportunities? Does the steady display of violence contribute to violent behavior? This article presents a developmental context, discusses the research conducted to date, reviews the recommendations of major organizations, and tries to take a balanced perspective in the midst of a rising tide of media, technology, commercialism, and controversy.

  2. Child Health Disparities: What Can a Clinician Do?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Tina L.; Emmanuel, Mickey; Levy, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Renee R.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric primary and specialty practice has changed with more to do, more regulation and more family needs. Similarly, the needs of patients have changed with more demographic diversity, family stress and continued health disparities by race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. How can clinicians continue their dedicated service to children and ensure health equity in the face of these changes? This paper outlines specific, practical, actionable and evidence-based activities for clinicians t...

  3. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O

    2011-01-01

    for improvements, 21 key issues were defined and validated through a questionnaire in an independent group of breast cancer patient advocates. Clear messages, emotionally neutral expressions, careful descriptions of side effects, clear comparisons between different treatment alternatives and information about......Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used...... the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials....

  4. Acquiring and preprocessing leaf images for automated plant identification: understanding the tradeoff between effort and information gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rzanny

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated species identification is a long term research subject. Contrary to flowers and fruits, leaves are available throughout most of the year. Offering margin and texture to characterize a species, they are the most studied organ for automated identification. Substantially matured machine learning techniques generate the need for more training data (aka leaf images. Researchers as well as enthusiasts miss guidance on how to acquire suitable training images in an efficient way. Methods In this paper, we systematically study nine image types and three preprocessing strategies. Image types vary in terms of in-situ image recording conditions: perspective, illumination, and background, while the preprocessing strategies compare non-preprocessed, cropped, and segmented images to each other. Per image type-preprocessing combination, we also quantify the manual effort required for their implementation. We extract image features using a convolutional neural network, classify species using the resulting feature vectors and discuss classification accuracy in relation to the required effort per combination. Results The most effective, non-destructive way to record herbaceous leaves is to take an image of the leaf’s top side. We yield the highest classification accuracy using destructive back light images, i.e., holding the plucked leaf against the sky for image acquisition. Cropping the image to the leaf’s boundary substantially improves accuracy, while precise segmentation yields similar accuracy at a substantially higher effort. The permanent use or disuse of a flash light has negligible effects. Imaging the typically stronger textured backside of a leaf does not result in higher accuracy, but notably increases the acquisition cost. Conclusions In conclusion, the way in which leaf images are acquired and preprocessed does have a substantial effect on the accuracy of the classifier trained on them. For the first time, this

  5. Clinician perspectives of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Edna M; Worrall, Linda E; Cherney, Leora R

    2013-01-01

    Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) have increased in number in recent years in the United States and abroad. To describe the experiences of clinicians working in an ICAP. A phenomenological approach was taken. Seven clinicians from 3 ICAPs were interviewed in person or on the phone. Their interviews were transcribed and coded for themes relating to their experiences. Clinicians described 3 major themes. The first theme related to the intensity component of the ICAP that allowed clinicians to provide in-depth treatment and gave them a different perspective with regard to providing treatment and the potential impact on the person with aphasia. The second theme of rewards for the clinicians included learning and support, seeing progress, and developing relationships with their clients and family members. Third, challenges were noted, including the time involved in learning new therapy techniques, patient characteristics such as chronicity of the aphasia, and the difficulty of returning to work in typical clinical settings after having experienced an ICAP. Although there is a potential for bias with the small sample size, this pilot study gives insight into the clinician perspective of what makes working in an ICAP both worthwhile and challenging.

  6. Equity of access to elective surgery: reflections from NZ clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Deborah; Dew, Kevin; Morgan, Sonya; Dowell, Anthony; Cumming, Jackie; Cormack, Donna; McKinlay, Eileen; Love, Tom

    2004-10-01

    To explore factors potentially influencing equitable access to elective surgery in New Zealand by describing clinicians' perceptions of equity and the factors they consider when prioritising patients for elective surgery. A qualitative study in selected New Zealand localities. A purposive sample of 49 general practitioners, specialists and registrars were interviewed. Data were analysed thematically. General practitioners described unequal opportunities for patients to access primary and secondary care and, in particular, private sector elective surgery. They felt that socio-economically disadvantaged patients were less able to advocate for themselves and were more vulnerable to being lost to the elective surgical booking system as well as being less able to access private care. Both GPs and secondary care clinicians described situations where they would personally advocate for individual patients to improve their access. Advocacy was related to clinicians' perceptions of the 'value' that patients would receive from the surgery and patients' needs for public sector funding. The structure of the health system contributes to inequities in access to elective care in New Zealand. Subjective decision making by clinicians has the potential to advantage or disadvantage patients through the weighting clinicians place on socio-demographic factors when making rationing decisions. Review of the potential structural barriers to equitable access, further public debate and guidance for clinicians on the relative importance of socio-demographic factors in deciding access to rationed services are required for allocation of services to be fair.

  7. Clinicians' perception of the preventability of inpatient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert; Srinivasan, Ramya; Kenway, Bruno; Quinn, James

    2018-03-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess whether clinicians have an accurate perception of the preventability of their patients' mortality. Case note review estimates that approximately 5 percent of inpatient deaths are preventable. Design/methodology/approach The design involved in the study is a prospective audit of inpatient mortality in a single NHS hospital trust. The case study includes 979 inpatient mortalities. A number of outcome measures were recorded, including a Likert scale of the preventability of death- and NCEPOD-based grading of care quality. Findings Clinicians assessed only 1.4 percent of deaths as likely to be preventable. This is significantly lower than previously published values ( p<0.0001). Clinicians were also more likely to rate the quality of care as "good," and less likely to identify areas of substandard clinical or organizational management. Research limitations/implications The implications of objective assessment of the preventability of mortality are essential to drive quality improvement in this area. Practical implications There is a wide disparity between independent case note review and clinicians assessing the care of their own patients. This may be due to a "knowledge gap" between reviewers and treating clinicians, or an "objectivity gap" meaning clinicians may not recognize preventability of death of patients under their care. Social implications This study gives some insight into deficiencies in clinical governance processes. Originality/value No similar study has been performed. This has significant implications for the idea of the preventability of mortality.

  8. Towards reinforcing telemedicine adoption amongst clinicians in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenuga, Kayode I; Iahad, Noorminshah A; Miskon, Suraya

    2017-08-01

    Telemedicine systems have been considered as a necessary measure to alleviate the shortfall in skilled medical specialists in developing countries. However, the obvious challenge is whether clinicians are willing to use this technological innovation, which has aided medical practice globally. One factor which has received little academic attention is the provision of suitable encouragement for clinicians to adopt telemedicine, in the form of rewards, motivation or incentives. A further consideration for telemedicine usage in developing countries, especially sub-Saharan Africa and Nigeria in particular, are to the severe shortage of available practising clinicians. The researchers therefore explore the need to positively reinforce the adoption of telemedicine amongst clinicians in Nigeria, and also offer a rationale for this using the UTAUT model. Data were collected using a structured paper-based questionnaire, with 252 physicians and nurses from six government hospitals in Ondo state, Nigeria. The study applied SmartPLS 2.0 for analysis to determine the relationship between six variables. Demographic moderating variables, age, gender and profession, were included. The results indicate that performance expectancy (ptelemedicine systems, as predicted using the extended UTAUT model. Our results showed that the use of telemedicine by clinicians in the Nigerian context is perceived as a dual responsibility which requires suitable reinforcement. In addition, performance expectancy, effort expectancy, facilitating condition and reinforcement determinants are influential factors in the use of telemedicine services for remote-patient clinical diagnosis and management by the Nigerian clinicians. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Investigating the need for clinicians to use tablet computers with a newly envisioned electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Jason J; Savoy, April; Etherton, Gale; Herout, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has deployed a large number of tablet computers in the last several years. However, little is known about how clinicians may use these devices with a newly planned Web-based electronic health record (EHR), as well as other clinical tools. The objective of this study was to understand the types of use that can be expected of tablet computers versus desktops. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 clinicians at a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Center. An inductive qualitative analysis resulted in findings organized around recurrent themes of: (1) Barriers, (2) Facilitators, (3) Current Use, (4) Anticipated Use, (5) Patient Interaction, and (6) Connection. Our study generated several recommendations for the use of tablet computers with new health information technology tools being developed. Continuous connectivity for the mobile device is essential to avoid interruptions and clinician frustration. Also, making a physical keyboard available as an option for the tablet was a clear desire from the clinicians. Larger tablets (e.g., regular size iPad as compared to an iPad mini) were preferred. Being able to use secure messaging tools with the tablet computer was another consistent finding. Finally, more simplicity is needed for accessing patient data on mobile devices, while balancing the important need for adequate security. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Clinician-Reported Barriers to Implementing Breast Cancer Chemoprevention in the UK: A Qualitative Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel G; Side, Lucy; Meisel, Susanne F; Horne, Rob; Cuzick, Jack; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The use of tamoxifen and raloxifene as preventive therapy for women at increased risk of breast cancer was approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in 2013. We undertook a qualitative investigation to investigate the factors affecting the implementation of preventive therapy within the UK. We recruited general practitioners (GPs) (n = 10) and clinicians working in family history or clinical genetics settings (FHCG clinicians) (n = 15) to participate in semi-structured interviews. Data were coded thematically within the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. FHCG clinicians focussed on the perceived lack of benefit of preventive therapy and difficulties interpreting the NICE guidelines. FHCG clinicians felt poorly informed about preventive therapy, and this discouraged patient discussions on the topic. GPs were unfamiliar with the concept of preventive therapy, and were not aware that they may be asked to prescribe it for high-risk women. GPs were reluctant to initiate therapy because it is not licensed, but were willing to continue a prescription if it had been started in secondary or tertiary care. Barriers to implementing preventive therapy within routine clinical practice are common and could be addressed by engaging all stakeholders during the development of policy documents. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Loyalty in the trenches: practical teleology for office clinicians responding to terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Griffin

    2004-08-01

    Were terrorists ever to effectively deploy weapons of mass destruction, medical practice would be quickly transformed. Many ordinary clinicians would be asked or required to treat unfamiliar yet serious medical conditions in a setting of overwhelming urgency and impossible odds. Clinical focus would shift from doing good things for a succession of individual patients to considering many patients at once, a change that could beget loss of trust and rapport with patients. Clinicians might also experience restrictions in personal liberties and appropriation of their property. The purpose of this essay is to develop a teleological framework for undertaking this transformation. In ordinary clinical medicine, the elusiveness of the individual telos (i.e.,the good for the individual) is acknowledged in procedures (such as social history taking,informed consent and outpatient scheduling) designed to protect patients' (and clinicians')prerogatives to interpret the telos for themselves. In mass casualty scenarios, on the other hand, the telos is standardized and regarded as an Immediate Object (usually as a state of affairs in which survival is maximized and permanent disability is minimized). Clinicians who provide mass casualty care will face a number of ethical challenges that can be negotiated by appealing to the political and ethical rationale, and limits, pertaining to the pursuit of aggregate survival as an Immediate Object.

  12. Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users\\' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.

  13. Knowledge transfer to clinicians and consumers by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Nancy; Maxwell, Lara; Tugwell, Peter S; Wells, George A; O'connor, Annette M; Judd, Maria; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2006-11-01

    The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG) is one of 50 groups of the Cochrane Collaboration that prepares, maintains, and disseminates systematic reviews of treatments for musculoskeletal diseases. Once systematic reviews are completed, the next challenge is presenting the results in useful formats to be integrated into the healthcare decisions of clinicians and consumers. The CMSG recommends 3 methods to aid knowledge translation and exchange between clinicians and patients: produce clinical relevance tables, create graphical displays using face figures, and write consumer summaries and patient decision aids. Accordingly, CMSG has developed specific guidelines to help researchers and authors convert the pooled estimates of metaanalyses in the systematic reviews to user-friendly numbers. First, clinical relevance tables are developed that include absolute and relative benefits or harms and the numbers needed to treat. Next, the numbers from the clinical relevance tables are presented graphically using faces. The faces represent a group of 100 people and are shaded according to how many people out of 100 benefited or were harmed by the interventions. The user-friendly numbers are also included in short summaries and decision aids written for patients. The different levels of detail in the summaries and decision aids provide patients with tools to prepare them to discuss treatment options with their clinicians. Methods to improve the effects and usability of systematic reviews by providing results in more clinically relevant formats are essential. Both clinicians and consumers can use these products to use evidence-based information in individual and shared decision-making.

  14. Process of smoking cessation. Implications for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, J O; Goldstein, M G

    1991-12-01

    The process of smoking cessation involves progression through five stages of change: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance. Most patients are not prepared to take action on their smoking, yet most smoking cessation programs are designed for smokers who are so prepared. Small percentages of smokers register for action-oriented cessation programs. How much progress patients make after an intervention is directly related to what stage they are in prior to intervention. The stages of change can be quickly assessed with four questions. Physicians can then be more effective with a broader range of patients by matching their interventions to the patients' stage of change. Helping patients progress just one stage can double their chances of not smoking 6 months later. Providing personalized information about the cons of smoking, asking affect-arousing questions, and encouraging patients to re-evaluate themselves as smokers are interventions physicians can use to help patients who are not prepared to quit smoking. Behavioral interventions, such as providing substitutes like nicotine gum and removing or altering cues for smoking, are most helpful for patients who are ready to take action. The use of a stage-matched, patient-centered counseling intervention can help physicians to feel less frustrated and more effective in their efforts to help a broad range of their patients.

  15. Medication errors: an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Burkle, Christopher M; Lanier, William L

    2014-08-01

    Medication error is an important cause of patient morbidity and mortality, yet it can be a confusing and underappreciated concept. This article provides a review for practicing physicians that focuses on medication error (1) terminology and definitions, (2) incidence, (3) risk factors, (4) avoidance strategies, and (5) disclosure and legal consequences. A medication error is any error that occurs at any point in the medication use process. It has been estimated by the Institute of Medicine that medication errors cause 1 of 131 outpatient and 1 of 854 inpatient deaths. Medication factors (eg, similar sounding names, low therapeutic index), patient factors (eg, poor renal or hepatic function, impaired cognition, polypharmacy), and health care professional factors (eg, use of abbreviations in prescriptions and other communications, cognitive biases) can precipitate medication errors. Consequences faced by physicians after medication errors can include loss of patient trust, civil actions, criminal charges, and medical board discipline. Methods to prevent medication errors from occurring (eg, use of information technology, better drug labeling, and medication reconciliation) have been used with varying success. When an error is discovered, patients expect disclosure that is timely, given in person, and accompanied with an apology and communication of efforts to prevent future errors. Learning more about medication errors may enhance health care professionals' ability to provide safe care to their patients. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adolescent autonomy revisited: clinicians need clearer guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Joe; Larcher, Victor

    2016-08-01

    In 1996, Brazier and Bridge raised the question 'is adolescent autonomy truly dead and buried' following judicial decisions which had seemed to reverse the Gillick-inspired trend for greater child autonomy in healthcare. Subsequent decisions by the courts have reinforced the view that those below 18 years in England and Wales remain children with limited rights to refuse treatment compared with adults. This is at variance with the daily experience of those working with young people who increasingly seek to actively involve them in making freely informed decisions about their healthcare, in accordance with the principles enunciated in the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child and the UK Children Acts. We review the derivation of the law in England and Wales in this area, in the light of another recent family court judgement enforcing treatment on a 'competent' child without his or her consent and ask: 'How can the Common Law and the ethical practice of those caring for young people have diverged so far?' Either young people can decide whether to have a recommended treatment, or they cannot. Given Ian McEwan's book, the Children Act, has stimulated wider social debate in this area might this be an opportune moment to seek public policy resolution with regards to healthcare decision making by young people? We argue that events since the Gillick case have underlined the need for a comprehensive review of legal policy and practice in this area. While absolute autonomy and freedom of choice are arguably inconsistent with the protection rights that society has agreed are owed to children, healthcare practitioners need clarity over the circumstances in which society expects that autonomous choices of adolescents can be overridden. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Herpes: a dilemma for client and clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, B J; Poteet, G W

    1987-01-01

    In the last 10 years genital herpes simplex has reached epidemic proportions, affecting 5 million Americans, with 500,000 new cases yearly. The incidence is highest among middle and upper socioeconomic groups and among whites. There are 2 antigenically distinct strains of the herpes simplex virus, and type II is the cause of 85% of the genital infections. The virus has an affinity for tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm -- skin, mucous membranes, eye, and central nervous system. Transmission is by personal contact with an infected area. The clinical course of the disease involves 4 stages. In the primary stage the typical lesions are vesicles, which rupture, leaving painful shallow ulcerations. The primary stage lasts from 2 to 4 weeks with approximately 10 days of viral shedding. In the latent stage the virus lies dormant in the sacral ganglion and is noninfectious. In the shedding stage the virus replicates and sheds in genital secretions. The recurrent stage is characterized by prodromal itching or tingling sensations prior to the eruption of the vesicles and by neuralgia. Recurrence occurs as often as 4 to 7 times a year and lasts from 7 to 10 days, with viral shedding for 4 or 5 days. Definitive diagnosis can be made from viral tissue culture or the Tzanck and Papanicolaou smears. There is no cure for herpes although acyclovir has been found to shorten the duration of the episodes. Except for pregnancy complications, the most serious complications of recurrent genital herpes are psychological. The disease is socially stigmatizing and inhibits sexual activity. The nurse should provide supportive care, information about the transmission and symptoms of the disease, and counseling as to precautions to take, such as condom and spermicide use, avoidance of oral sex, abstention when lesions are present, and limiting sex to one partner.

  18. Information service on new and emerging health technologies: identification and prioritization processes for a European union-wide newsletter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Claudia; Simpson, Sue; Douw, Karla; Geiger-Gritsch, Sabine; Mathis, Stefan; Langer, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    EUnetHTA WP 7 (Strand B) aimed to promote sharing information on new and emerging technologies. The task was to develop a prototype of a newsletter and pilot the processes of production. The EuroScan database served as information source on pertinent technologies. To prioritize, a set of criteria for scoring the potential impact and for selecting the technologies for articles was applied and a pilot newsletter was produced. Being objective and transparent about the content of a newsletter required a method for prioritizing health technologies. Using significance criteria, members of the prioritization panel selected twelve technologies for articles of different length and depth. Potential recipients, surveyed on relevance, content, timeliness, and readability responded mostly positive, but requested more information on cost effectiveness and criticized timeliness. Dissemination of an EU-wide newsletter would be feasible, but time-consuming. Although a newsletter appears to fulfill a need for information on emerging and new health technologies, it is not considered the right tool to avoid duplication of effort in the present international constellation of horizon scanning for new health technologies. Other options will be pursued as part of future collaborative actions, for example, a core set of early awareness information, or an on-demand electronic information system.

  19. Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyard, Pierre.

    1981-01-01

    The fear for nuclear energy and more particularly for radioactive wastes is analyzed in the sociological context. Everybody agree on the information need, information is available but there is a problem for their diffusion. Reactions of the public are analyzed and journalists, scientists and teachers have a role to play [fr

  20. Moore's Law, disruptive technologies, and the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburgh, Kirby G; Newbower, Ronald S

    2002-01-01

    The advancement of technical power described by Moore's Law offers great potential for enabling more cost-effective medical devices and systems. However, progress has been slow. Many factors for this failure have been cited, including the anti-rational economic structure of healthcare and the complexity and long time scale of medical development. Christensen et al. suggest that "disruptive technologies" may circumvent some of these difficulties. "Disruptive Technologies" are defined as those that are established in one market, but then penetrate and overwhelm another market. These incursions are accelerated by economic factors, and capitalize on functionality, reliability, and advancements supported by the original market. Christensen has cited many examples from industrial and service businesses, but few examples can be found yet in healthcare. We argue that positive technology impacts in medicine occur most readily when innovators augment the skills of and collaborate with caregivers, rather than seeking to displace them. In the short term, a new approach may improve efficiency or quality. In the longer term, such approaches may obviate human tasks at lower-skill levels, and even permit task automation. One successful example has been the introduction of flexible monitoring for physiologic information. Systems for computer-aided diagnosis, which have failed to impact complex decision making, have succeeded in simpler specialty areas such as the interpretation of EKG's and mammograms, and may do the same with analysis of some pathology images. The next frontier may the operating room, and the adoption of such systemic technologies by caregivers in emergency medicine and general care may then have an even wider "disruptive" effect. Responding to time and cost pressures, and the desire to move care to the patient, other workers, such as radiologists, will drive the trend away from isolated, complex, large-scale devices, and toward integrated, modular, and simpler

  1. Clinicians' interpretations of point of care urine culture versus laboratory culture results: analysis from the four-country POETIC trial of diagnosis of uncomplicated urinary tract infection in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullegie, Saskia; Wootton, Mandy; Verheij, Theo J M; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Bates, Janine; Hood, Kerenza; Gal, Micaela; Francis, Nick A; Little, Paul; Moore, Michael; Llor, Carl; Pickles, Timothy; Gillespie, David; Kirby, Nigel; Brugman, Curt; Butler, Christopher C

    2017-08-01

    Urine culture at the point of care minimises delay between obtaining the sample and agar inoculation in a microbiology laboratory, and quantification and sensitivity results can be available more rapidly in primary care. To identify the degree to which clinicians' interpretations of a point-of-care-test (POCT) urine culture (Flexicult™ SSI-Urinary Kit) agrees with laboratory culture in women presenting to primary care with symptoms of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Primary care clinicians used the Flexicult™-POCT, recorded their findings and took a photograph of the result, which was interpreted by microbiology laboratory technicians. Urine samples were additionally processed in routine care laboratories. Cross tabulations were used to identify important differences in organism identification, quantification and antibiotic susceptibility between these three sources of data. The influence of various laboratory definitions for UTI on culture were assessed. Primary care clinicians identified 202/289 urine samples (69.9%) as positive for UTI using the Flexicult™-POCT, whereas laboratory culture identified 94-190 (32.5-65.7%) as positive, depending on definition thresholds. 82.9% of samples identified positive for E. coli on laboratory culture were also considered positive for E. coli using the Flexicult™ -POCT, and susceptibilities were reasonably concordant. There were major discrepancies between laboratory staff interpretation of Flexicult™ photographs, clinicians' interpretation of the Flexicult™ test, and laboratory culture results. Flexicult™-POCT overestimated the positivity rate of urine samples for UTI when laboratory culture was used as the reference standard. However, it is unclear whether point-of-care or laboratory based urine culture provides the most valid diagnostic information. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. 'So you want to be a clinician-educator...': designing a clinician-educator curriculum for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Mitchell T; Pinheiro, Sandro; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; McNeill, Diana

    2009-06-01

    Despite a growing demand for skilled teachers and administrators in graduate medical education, clinician-educator tracks for residents are rare and though some institutions offer 'resident-as-teacher' programs to assist residents in developing teaching skills, the need exists to expand training opportunities in this area. The authors conducted a workshop at a national meeting to develop a description of essential components of a training pathway for internal medicine residents. Through open discussion and small group work, participants defined the various roles of clinician-educators and described goals, training opportunities, assessment and resource needs for such a program. Workshop participants posited that the clinician-educator has several roles to fulfill beyond that of clinician, including those of teacher, curriculum developer, administrator and scholar. A pathway for residents aspiring to become clinician educators must offer structured training in each of these four areas to empower residents to effectively practice clinical education. In addition, the creation of such a track requires securing time and resources to support resident learning experiences and formal faculty development programs to support institutional mentors and leaders. This article provides a framework by which leaders in medical education can begin to prepare current trainees interested in careers as clinician-educators.

  3. USER FRUSTRATION IN HIT INTERFACES: EXPLORING PAST HCI RESEARCH FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CLINICIANS' EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Boateng, Gloria A

    2015-01-01

    User frustration research has been one way of looking into clinicians' experience with health information technology use and interaction. In order to understand how clinician frustration with Health Information Technology (HIT) use occurs, there is the need to explore Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) literature that addresses both frustration and HIT use. In the past three decades, HCI frustration research has increased and expanded. Researchers have done a lot of work to understand emotions, end-user frustration and affect. This paper uses a historical literature review approach to review the origins of emotion and frustration research and explore the research question; Does HCI research on frustration provide insights on clinicians' frustration with HIT interfaces? From the literature review HCI research on emotion and frustration provides additional insights that can indeed help explain user frustration in HIT. Different approaches and HCI perspectives also help frame HIT user frustration research as well as inform HIT system design. The paper concludes with a suggested directions on how future design and research may take.

  4. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, A.S.; Worthy, S.; Keir, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  5. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O; Malmström, P; Carlsson, C

    2011-07-01

    Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used in three clinical trials for breast cancer. Primary data collection was done in focus group interviews with breast cancer patient advocates. Content analysis identified three major themes: comprehensibility, emotions and associations, and decision making. Based on the advocates' suggestions for improvements, 21 key issues were defined and validated through a questionnaire in an independent group of breast cancer patient advocates. Clear messages, emotionally neutral expressions, careful descriptions of side effects, clear comparisons between different treatment alternatives and information about the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Identification of Preferred Sources of Information for Undertaking Studies in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wyrwicka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010 a survey has been conducted among first-year students about sources of information which influence the decision of undertaking field studies in Safety Engineering, Management Engineering and Logistics in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology. The goal of these analyses is both to assess the effectiveness of promotion and also show trends in the use of diverse channels of information transfer of studies. The results of the investigation show that internet promotion via university and faculty website plays the dominant role but also direct promotion, such as opinion of older friends, is crucial. Furthermore, from year to year the analyses indicate the significant increase of official media and reveal that the prospective students rely on a few sources of information simultaneously.

  7. A model for the design of computer integrated manufacturing systems: Identification of information requirements of decision makers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1990-01-01

    A predominant interest in recent design research has been the development of a general model of the design process to formulate a framework within which support systems based on modern information technology can be developed. Similarly, for manufacturing systems, advanced information systems...... and compatibility of data bases. It is, however, a question whether traditional models of work process or task procedures are suited for design of advanced information systems such as integrated manufacturing systems. Modern technology and the rapid succession of designs, materials and processes require flexible...... are developed to support production planning and control processes as they are found in the present organizations. In this case, the result has been the evolution of "islands of automation" and in the CIM literature, integration is widely discussed in terms of standardization of communication protocols...

  8. Techniques of uranium mineralization alteration remote sensing information identification and its application in Taoshan area, Jiangxi province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuan Yanxiu; Zhang Jielin

    2010-01-01

    Based on the spectrum characteristics analysis of uranium mineralization alteration rocks and minerals, and using satellite multi-spectral remote sensing image data as the main information sources, multiple remote sensing data processing techniques and methods such as color compound, band ratio, principal component analysis and image color segmentation, are synthetically applied to extract uranium mineralization and alteration information from the remote sensing image. The results of this study provided basic data for analysis of uranium ore-formation conditions in the area. (authors)

  9. The decision to extract: part II. Analysis of clinicians' stated reasons for extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L; Maxwell, R

    1996-04-01

    In a recently reported study, the pretreatment records of each subject in a randomized clinical trial of 148 patients with Class I and Class II malocclusions presenting for orthodontic treatment were evaluated independently by five experienced clinicians (drawn from a panel of 14). The clinicians displayed a higher incidence of agreement with each other than had been expected with respect to the decision as to whether extraction was indicated in each specific case. To improve our understanding of how clinicians made their decisions on whether to extract or not, the records of a subset of 72 subjects randomly selected from the full sample of 148, have now been examined in greater detail. In 21 of these cases, all five clinicians decided to treat without extraction. Among the remaining 51 cases, there were 202 decisions to extract (31 unanimous decision cases and 20 split decision cases). The clinicians cited a total of 469 reasons to support these decisions. Crowding was cited as the first reason in 49% of decisions to extract, followed by incisor protrusion (14%), need for profile correction (8%), Class II severity (5%), and achievement of a stable result (5%). When all the reasons for extraction in each clinician's decision were considered as a group, crowding was cited in 73% of decisions, incisor protrusion in 35%, need for profile correction in 27%, Class II severity in 15% and posttreatment stability in 9%. Tooth size anomalies, midline deviations, reduced growth potential, severity of overjet, maintenance of existing profile, desire to close the bite, periodontal problems, and anticipation of poor cooperation accounted collectively for 12% of the first reasons and were mentioned in 54% of the decisions, implying that these considerations play a consequential, if secondary, role in the decision-making process. All other reasons taken together were mentioned in fewer than 20% of cases. In this sample at least, clinicians focused heavily on appearance

  10. Competing priorities in treatment decision-making: a US national survey of individuals with depression and clinicians who treat depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Paul J; Forcino, Rachel C; Mishra, Manish; Blitzer, Rachel; Elwyn, Glyn

    2016-01-08

    To identify information priorities for consumers and clinicians making depression treatment decisions and assess shared decision-making (SDM) in routine depression care. 20 questions related to common features of depression treatments were provided. Participants were initially asked to select which features were important, and in a second stage they were asked to rank their top 5 'important features' in order of importance. Clinicians were asked to provide rankings according to both consumer and clinician perspectives. Consumers completed CollaboRATE, a measure of SDM. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified consumer characteristics associated with CollaboRATE scores. Online cross-sectional surveys fielded in September to December 2014. We administered surveys to convenience samples of US adults with depression and clinicians who treat depression. Consumer sampling was targeted to reflect age, gender and educational attainment of adults with depression in the USA. Information priority rankings; CollaboRATE, a 3-item consumer-reported measure of SDM. 972 consumers and 244 clinicians completed the surveys. The highest ranked question for both consumers and clinicians was 'Will the treatment work?' Clinicians were aware of consumers' priorities, yet did not always prioritise that information themselves, particularly insurance coverage and cost of treatment. Only 18% of consumers reported high levels of SDM. Working with a psychiatrist (OR 1.87; 95% CI 1.07 to 3.26) and female gender (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.25 to 3.34) were associated with top CollaboRATE scores. While clinicians know what information is important to consumers making depression treatment decisions, they do not always address these concerns. This mismatch, coupled with low SDM, adversely affects the quality of depression care. Development of a decision support intervention based on our findings can improve levels of SDM and provide clinicians and consumers with a tool to address the existing

  11. Identification of Information Needs of the American Indian Community That Can Be Met by Library Services. Phase IV. Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles T.

    Under a grant from the Bureau of Libraries and Learning Resources of the United States Office of Education, the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) implemented a Library Project to identify library and information needs of Indian people and to establish, operate, and evaluate three demonstration sites. During this reporting period,…

  12. The Identification of Reasons, Solutions, and Techniques Informing a Theory-Based Intervention Targeting Recreational Sports Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Quinton, Tom; Brunton, Julie A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study is the 3rd piece of formative research utilizing the theory of planned behavior to inform the development of a behavior change intervention. Focus groups were used to identify reasons for and solutions to previously identified key beliefs in addition to potentially effective behavior change techniques. Method: A purposive…

  13. The development of novel smart packaging labels and mobile application for protection, information and identification of product shelf life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Đurđević

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Use of mobile devices for the purpose of reading information from the packaging has already been present for some time. Today present applications that replace bar or QR code readers with a mobile camera interact with the database server successfully and transmit information about the product. This paper shows the conceptual solution for reading not only product information but also the condition of the product in terms of freshness, shelf-life and protection. The paper gives an overview of existing solutions of special inks that could be used in order to create smart labels, the algorithm for data reading through the camera of the mobile devices and mobile application. The aim is to set up a concept for the development of smart labels, from the standpoint of the materials and existing QR codes, but also to define the basis for the development of mobile application that can provide information on the state of the product in interaction with special inks.

  14. Clinicians' recognition and management of emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elliott B; Mazzola, Natalia M; Brandano, Jessica; Luff, Donna; Zurakowski, David; Meyer, Elaine C

    2015-10-01

    To examine the most commonly reported emotions encountered among healthcare practitioners when holding difficult conversations, including frequency and impact on care delivery. Interprofessional learners from a range of experience levels and specialties completed self-report questionnaires prior to simulation-based communication workshops. Clinicians were asked to describe up to three emotions they experienced when having difficult healthcare conversations; subsequent questions used Likert-scales to measure frequency of each emotion, and whether care was affected. 152 participants completed questionnaires, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial professionals. Most commonly reported emotions were anxiety, sadness, empathy, frustration, and insecurity. There were significant differences in how clinicians perceived these different emotions affecting care. Empathy and anxiety were emotions perceived to influence care more than sadness, frustration, and insecurity. Most clinicians, regardless of clinical experience and discipline, find their emotional state influences the quality of their care delivery. Most clinicians rate themselves as somewhat to quite capable of recognizing and managing their emotions, acknowledging significant room to grow. Further education designed to increase clinicians' recognition of, reflection on, and management of emotion would likely prove helpful in improving their ability to navigate difficult healthcare conversations. Interventions aimed at anxiety management are particularly needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. From leader to leadership: clinician managers and where to next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, Liz; Day, Gary E

    2010-08-01

    Individual clinician leadership is at the forefront of health reforms in Australia as well as overseas with many programs run by health departments (and hospitals) generally focus on the development of individual leaders. This paper argues, along with others, that leadership in the clinician management context cannot be understood from an individualistic approach alone. Clinician managers, especially in the ranks of doctors, are usually described as 'hybrid-professional managers' as well as reluctant leaders for whom most leadership theories do not easily apply. Their experiences of leadership development programs run by health departments both in Australia and internationally are likely to be based on an individual leader-focussed approach that is driving health care reforms. These approaches work from three key assumptions: (1) study and fix the person; (2) give them a position or title; and (3) make them responsible for results. Some would argue that the combination of these three approaches equates to heroic and transformational leadership. Several alternative approaches to leadership development are presented to illustrate how reforms in healthcare, and notably in hospitals, must incorporate alternative approaches, such as those based on collective and relational forms of leadership. This does not mean eschewing individual approaches to leadership but rather, thinking of them differently and making them more relevant to the daily experiences of clinician managers. We conclude by highlighting several significant challenges facing leadership development for clinician managers that arise from these considerations.

  16. Application of Barcoding to Reduce Error of Patient Identification and to Increase Patient's Information Confidentiality of Test Tube Labelling in a Psychiatric Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Chu; Li, Hsing; Chang, Hsin-Fei; Lu, Mei-Rou; Chen, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Learning from the experience of another medical center in Taiwan, Kaohsiung Municipal Kai-Suan Psychiatric Hospital has changed the nursing informatics system step by step in the past year and a half . We considered ethics in the original idea of implementing barcodes on the test tube labels to process the identification of the psychiatric patients. The main aims of this project are to maintain the confidential information and to transport the sample effectively. The primary nurses had been using different work sheets for this project to ensure the acceptance of the new barcode system. In the past two years the errors in the blood testing process were as high as 11,000 in 14,000 events per year, resulting in wastage of resources. The actions taken by the nurses and the new barcode system implementation can improve the clinical nursing care quality, safety of the patients, and efficiency, while decreasing the cost due to the human error.

  17. The use of traditional Chinese medicine among breast cancer patients: implications for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kar Yong; Tan, Ern Yu; Chen, Juliana J C; Teo, Christine; Chan, Patrick M Y

    2014-02-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine or Traditional Complementary Medicine (TCM) is commonly used in our culture. There are several concerns regarding its use in patients undergoing conventional treatments for breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and pattern of TCM use among our breast cancer patients, and to identify patients who were most likely to choose TCM. A total of 300 patients on active follow-up with Breast Service at Tan Tock Seng Hospital were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. A total of 35% (104 of 296) of patients reported using TCM. The majority of the patients were introduced to TCM by family and friends following the diagnosis of breast cancer. All except 3 patients continued with recommended conventional therapy although most did not inform their clinicians of TCM use. None of the patients reported any serious adverse events and 75% of them perceived a benefit from TCM use. Younger patients and those of Chinese ethnicity were more likely to use TCM (P 0.05). TCM use is common among our breast cancer patients, particularly the younger women. However, most patients do not inform their clinicians of TCM use while on recommended conventional therapies. It is therefore important for clinicians to initiate discussions regarding TCM use in order to be aware of potential unwanted drug interactions.

  18. Exploring dialectical behaviour therapy clinicians' experiences of team consultation meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Cian; Ryan, Patrick; Flynn, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a detailed idiographic analysis of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) clinicians' experiences of team consultation meetings. DBT is an evidence-based psychological intervention with a demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Team consultation meetings encompass one of the primary components involved in this treatment model; where DBT clinicians regularly meet to discuss client work and enhance further learning. The present study's aim was to assess what are DBT clinicians' experiences of the consultation meeting component and whether it is useful or not. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 11 DBT clinicians (nine females, two males) from three different consultation teams. The research project utilised an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) framework. Audio-recorded interview data was analysed using this framework. Four superordinate themes emerged from the interview data, which included ten subordinate themes. The superordinate themes focused on: (1) the acquisition of DBT technical knowledge and other MDT related expertise (2) participants' emotional experiences of DBT and consultation meetings, and how this can evolve over time (3) the underlying processes that occur in the consultation team including the development of a team bond and the impact of membership changes and (4) the largely consistent and reliable nature of consultation meetings and how they help maintain clinician motivation. Team consultation meetings were found to be supportive; playing an important role in maintaining clinician motivation through the availability of team support, opportunities to reflect and learn, and assistance in regulating emotions. Challenges arose in relation to team membership changes and acclimatisation to the type of feedback utilised in team consultation. The study's implications for practise are considered.

  19. Do clinicians assess patients' religiousness? An audit of an aged psychiatry community team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payman, Vahid; Lim, Zheng Jie

    2018-03-01

    To determine the frequency and quality of religious history taking of patients by clinicians working in an old age psychiatry service. A retrospective audit of 80 randomised patient files from the Koropiko Mental Health Services for Older People (MHSOP) in Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 66 clinical records were available for analysis. A religious history was taken in 33/66 (50%) patients. However, when such histories were evaluated using the FICA assessment tool, only 10/33 (30.3%) histories contained detailed information regarding the patient's religiousness. The infrequency and low quality of religious histories discovered in this audit suggest that clinicians need more training in taking a religious history from patients.

  20. Big-Data Based Decision-Support Systems to Improve Clinicians' Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosan, Don; Samore, Matthew; Jones, Makoto; Livnat, Yarden; Clutter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Complex clinical decision-making could be facilitated by using population health data to inform clinicians. In two previous studies, we interviewed 16 infectious disease experts to understand complex clinical reasoning. For this study, we focused on answers from the experts on how clinical reasoning can be supported by population-based Big-Data. We found cognitive strategies such as trajectory tracking, perspective taking, and metacognition has the potential to improve clinicians' cognition to deal with complex problems. These cognitive strategies could be supported by population health data, and all have important implications for the design of Big-Data based decision-support tools that could be embedded in electronic health records. Our findings provide directions for task allocation and design of decision-support applications for health care industry development of Big data based decision-support systems.

  1. An organizational assessment of disruptive clinician behavior: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrath, Jo M; Dang, Deborah; Nyberg, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated registered nurses' (RNs) and physicians' (MD) experiences with disruptive behavior, triggers, responses, and impacts on clinicians, patients, and the organization. Using the Disruptive Clinician Behavior Survey for Hospital Settings, it was found that RNs experienced a significantly higher frequency of disruptive behaviors and triggers than MDs; MDs (45% of 295) and RNs (37% of 689) reported that their peer's disruptive behavior affected them most negatively. The most frequently occurring trigger was pressure from high census, volume, and patient flow; 189 incidences of harm to patients as a result of disruptive behavior were reported. Findings provide organizational leaders with evidence to customize interventions to strengthen the culture of safety.

  2. Informe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egon Lichetenberger

    1950-10-01

    Full Text Available Informe del doctor Egon Lichetenberger ante el Consejo Directivo de la Facultad, sobre el  curso de especialización en Anatomía Patológica patrocinado por la Kellogg Foundation (Departamento de Patología

  3. Whale Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    R:BASE for DOS, a computer program developed under NASA contract, has been adapted by the National Marine Mammal Laboratory and the College of the Atlantic to provide and advanced computerized photo matching technique for identification of humpback whales. The program compares photos with stored digitized descriptions, enabling researchers to track and determine distribution and migration patterns. R:BASE is a spinoff of RIM (Relational Information Manager), which was used to store data for analyzing heat shielding tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. It is now the world's second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software.

  4. Feedback mechanisms of change: How problem alerts reported by youth clients and their caregivers impact clinician-reported session content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Susan R.; Jonghyuk, Bae; de Andrade, Ana Regina Vides; Tomlinson, M. Michele; Hargraves, Ryan Pamela; Bickman, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study explored how clinician-reported content addressed in treatment sessions was predicted by clinician feedback group and multi-informant cumulative problem alerts that appeared in computerized feedback reports for 299 clients aged 11 to 18 years receiving home-based community mental health treatment. Method Measures included a clinician-report of content addressed in sessions and additional measures of treatment progress and process (e.g., therapeutic alliance) completed by clinicians, clients, and their caregivers. Item responses in the top 25th percentile in severity from these measures appeared as ‘problem alerts’ on corresponding computerized feedback reports. Clinicians randomized to the feedback group received feedback weekly while the control group did not. Analyses were conducted using the Cox proportional hazards regression for recurrent events. Results For all content domains, the results of the survival analyses indicated a robust effect of the feedback group on addressing specific content in sessions, with feedback associated with shorter duration to first occurrence and increased likelihood of addressing or focusing on a topic compared to the non-feedback group. Conclusion There appears to be an important relationship between feedback and cumulative problem alerts reported by multiple informants as they influence session content. PMID:26337327

  5. Attitudes toward antipsychotic treatment among patients with bipolar disorders and their clinicians: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Faith DiBiasi,2 Susan N Legacy3 1Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2US Medical Affairs, Neuroscience, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 3US Medical Affairs, Neuroscience, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Princeton, NJ, USA Introduction: Antipsychotics are recommended as first-line therapy for acute mania and maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder; however, published literature suggests their real-world use remains limited. Understanding attitudes toward these medications may help identify barriers and inform personalized therapy. This literature review evaluated patient and clinician attitudes toward the use of antipsychotics for treating bipolar disorder. Materials and methods: A systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and BIOSIS Previews identified English language articles published between January 1, 2000, and June 15, 2016, that reported attitudinal data from patients, health care professionals, or caregivers; treatment decision-making; or patient characteristics that predicted antipsychotic use for bipolar disorder. Results were analyzed descriptively. Results: Of the 209 references identified, 11 met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. These articles provided attitudinal information from 1,418 patients with bipolar disorder and 1,282 treating clinicians. Patients’ attitudes toward antipsychotics were generally positive. Longer duration of clinical stability was associated with positive attitudes. Implementation of psychoeducational and adherence enhancement strategies could improve patient attitudes. Limited data suggest clinicians’ perceptions of antipsychotic efficacy and tolerability may have the greatest impact on their prescribing patterns. Because the current real-world evidence base is inadequate, clinician attitudes

  6. Identification of retinal ganglion cells and their projections involved in central transmission of information about upward and downward image motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Yonehara

    Full Text Available The direction of image motion is coded by direction-selective (DS ganglion cells in the retina. Particularly, the ON DS ganglion cells project their axons specifically to terminal nuclei of the accessory optic system (AOS responsible for optokinetic reflex (OKR. We recently generated a knock-in mouse in which SPIG1 (SPARC-related protein containing immunoglobulin domains 1-expressing cells are visualized with GFP, and found that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the medial terminal nucleus (MTN, the principal nucleus of the AOS, are comprised of SPIG1+ and SPIG1(- ganglion cells distributed in distinct mosaic patterns in the retina. Here we examined light responses of these two subtypes of MTN-projecting cells by targeted electrophysiological recordings. SPIG1+ and SPIG1(- ganglion cells respond preferentially to upward motion and downward motion, respectively, in the visual field. The direction selectivity of SPIG1+ ganglion cells develops normally in dark-reared mice. The MTN neurons are activated by optokinetic stimuli only of the vertical motion as shown by Fos expression analysis. Combination of genetic labeling and conventional retrograde labeling revealed that axons of SPIG1+ and SPIG1(- ganglion cells project to the MTN via different pathways. The axon terminals of the two subtypes are organized into discrete clusters in the MTN. These results suggest that information about upward and downward image motion transmitted by distinct ON DS cells is separately processed in the MTN, if not independently. Our findings provide insights into the neural mechanisms of OKR, how information about the direction of image motion is deciphered by the AOS.

  7. Knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of clinicians at a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... patients and recognising cardiac arrest, to assess clinicians' ... programmes that are accessible, innovative and inexpensive. .... well as, and sometimes better than, traditional CPR.16 In ... resuscitation training programme resulted in a noticeable ... 31 physicians in Canada whose resuscitation skills were.

  8. Magnesium 1993 Maternal-Fetal Toxicology. A Clinician's Guide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I S I G I 0 I M I. Maternal-Fetal Toxicology. A Clinician's. Guide. 2nd edition. Ed. by Gideon Koren. Pp. 824 ... analysis is presented, and survival curve ideas for effects over time. Final chapters ... SPSS-PC+, SAS and Nanostat. Several important.

  9. Attitude and Perceptions of Clinicians in Lagos to Autopsy Practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using pretested questionnaire instrument, a cross sectional survey of clinicians working in the Lagos University Teaching Hospital to obtain their attitudes and perception towards autopsy practice. 230 questionnaires were administered and the response rate was 80.7% . 41.5% of respondents often requested for autopsy.

  10. Dysarthria of Motor Neuron Disease: Clinician Judgments of Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikel, J. Anthony; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the temporal-acoustic parameters of the speech of 15 adults with motor neuron disease. Differences in predictions of the progression of the disease and clinician judgments of dysarthria severity were found to relate to the linguistic systems of both speaker and judge. (Author/JDD)

  11. Antiretroviral drug resistance: A guide for the southern African clinician

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both private and public sector see a bewildering clinical array of patients taking failing antiretroviral (ARV) regimens. We intend this article to provide a practical guide to help clinicians understand and manage ARV drug resistance in an African context. ARV resistance is a rapidly evolving field, requiring expertise in dealing ...

  12. Clinician or Witness? The Intervener's Relationship with Traumatized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, William

    2008-01-01

    To heal the hurt child, one begins not as a clinician but as a person trying to witness how the child experiences trauma. This requires more than just talking since the child's terrifying memories are stored in the brain's senses and visual imagery, not in rational thoughts and words. The goal is to change these frightening sensory experiences…

  13. Feminist Family Therapy: Ethical Considerations for the Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luann; Sorenson, Jody

    1993-01-01

    Notes the traditional minimization of gender and power issues in the cultural context by systemic family therapists. Presents five questions that can serve as guidelines in examining ethical and personal issues and provides ethical considerations for the clinician. (Author/NB)

  14. Capitalising on leadership fellowships for clinicians in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Edward D

    2011-04-01

    Clinical leadership has become a primary focus of the NHS with many leadership programmes, particularly those aimed at junior clinicians, being developed. This article illustrates the potential of these programmes but also urges caution when assessing the success of these schemes both from an individual and organisational perspective.

  15. Remote clinical decision-making: a clinician's definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mike; Northstone, Kate

    2017-05-12

    Aims Remote clinical decision-making (RCDM), commonly known as 'telephone triage' or 'hear and treat', describes clinicians' non-face-to-face involvement with patient care, and is an established strategy in UK ambulance services for managing increasing demand. However, there is no suitable definition of RCDM that fully explains the roles undertaken by clinicians in 999 hubs, or for its use as an ambulance quality indicator (AQI). The aim of this study, which is part of a larger evaluation of a new RCDM module in higher education, is to determine how clinicians define RCDM. Methods Three participants were asked, during semi-structured interviews, to define RCDM. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Clinicians do not focus on outcomes when defining RCDM, but on the efficacy of the process and the appropriateness of the determined outcome. Conclusion There is no precise description of the role of healthcare professionals in 999 clinical hubs, but there is a need for role clarity, for employees and organisations. The study questions the suitability of the definition of hear and treat as an AQI, as it does not appear to represent fully the various duties undertaken by 999 clinical hub healthcare professionals. More research is needed to consider the definition of RCDM in all its forms.

  16. A framework for understanding moral distress among palliative care clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda H; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Halifax, Joan S

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care clinicians confront suffering as they care for people living with life-limiting conditions. When the degree of suffering becomes unjustified, moral distress can ensue. Promising work from neuroscience and social psychology has yet to be applied to clinical practice. Our objective was to expand a social psychology model focusing on empathy and compassion in response to suffering to include an ethical dimension and to examine how the interrelationships of its proposed components can assist clinicians in understanding their responses to morally distressing situations. In the clinical context, responses to distressing events are thought to include four dimensions: empathy (emotional attunement), perspective taking (cognitive attunement), memory (personal experience), and moral sensitivity (ethical attunement). These dynamically intertwined dimensions create the preconditions for how clinicians respond to a triggering event instigated by an ethical conflict or dilemma. We postulate that if the four dimensions are highly aligned, the intensity and valence of emotional arousal will influence ethical appraisal and discernment by engaging a robust view of the ethical issues, conflicts, and possible solutions and cultivating compassionate action and resilience. In contrast, if they are not, ethical appraisal and discernment will be deficient, creating emotional disregulation and potentially leading to personal and moral distress, self-focused behaviors, unregulated moral outrage, burnout, and secondary stress. The adaptation and expansion of a conceptual framework offers a promising approach to designing interventions that help clinicians mitigate the detrimental consequences of unregulated moral distress and to build the resilience necessary to sustain themselves in clinical service.

  17. Identification of {sup 192}Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, William F; Chaney, Edward L; Coggins, James M

    1995-07-01

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual {sup 192}Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone to error. The objective of this investigation is to develop computer-based methods that analyze digitized localization images, improve dosimetric efficiency, and reduce labeling errors. Materials and Methods: {sup 192}Ir localization films were digitized with a scanned-laser system and analyzed using Multiscale, Geometric, Statistical Pattern Recognition (MGSPR), a technique that recognizes and classifies pixels in gray-scale images based on their surrounding, neighborhood geometry. To 'teach' MGSPR how to recognize specific objects, a Gaussian-based mathematical filter set is applied to training images containing user-labeled examples of the desired objects. The filters capture a broad range of descriptive geometric information at multiple spatial scales. Principled mathematical analysis is used to determine the linear combination of filters from a large base set that yields the best discrimination between object types. Thus the sensitivity of the filters can be 'tuned' to detect specific objects such as{sup 192} Ir seeds. For a given pixel, the output of the filter is a multi-component feature vector that uniquely describes the pixel's geometric characteristics. Pixels with similar geometric attributes have feature vectors that naturally 'cluster', or group, in the multidimensional space called 'feature space'. After statistically quantifying the training-set clusters in feature space, pixels found in new images are automatically labeled by correlation with the nearest cluster, e.g., the cluster representing {sup 192}Ir seeds. One of the greatest challenges in statistical pattern recognition is to determine which filters result in the best labeling. Good discrimination is achieved when clusters are compact and well isolated from one another in feature space. The filters used in

  18. Identification of 192Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, William F.; Chaney, Edward L.; Coggins, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual 192 Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone to error. The objective of this investigation is to develop computer-based methods that analyze digitized localization images, improve dosimetric efficiency, and reduce labeling errors. Materials and Methods: 192 Ir localization films were digitized with a scanned-laser system and analyzed using Multiscale, Geometric, Statistical Pattern Recognition (MGSPR), a technique that recognizes and classifies pixels in gray-scale images based on their surrounding, neighborhood geometry. To 'teach' MGSPR how to recognize specific objects, a Gaussian-based mathematical filter set is applied to training images containing user-labeled examples of the desired objects. The filters capture a broad range of descriptive geometric information at multiple spatial scales. Principled mathematical analysis is used to determine the linear combination of filters from a large base set that yields the best discrimination between object types. Thus the sensitivity of the filters can be 'tuned' to detect specific objects such as 192 Ir seeds. For a given pixel, the output of the filter is a multi-component feature vector that uniquely describes the pixel's geometric characteristics. Pixels with similar geometric attributes have feature vectors that naturally 'cluster', or group, in the multidimensional space called 'feature space'. After statistically quantifying the training-set clusters in feature space, pixels found in new images are automatically labeled by correlation with the nearest cluster, e.g., the cluster representing 192 Ir seeds. One of the greatest challenges in statistical pattern recognition is to determine which filters result in the best labeling. Good discrimination is achieved when clusters are compact and well isolated from one another in feature space. The filters used in this study are

  19. How Do Clinicians Learn About Knowledge Translation? An Investigation of Current Web-Based Learning Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarell, Raechel A; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2017-07-13

    Clinicians are important stakeholders in the translation of well-designed research evidence into clinical practice for optimal patient care. However, the application of knowledge translation (KT) theories and processes may present conceptual and practical challenges for clinicians. Online learning platforms are an effective means of delivering KT education, providing an interactive, time-efficient, and affordable alternative to face-to-face education programs. This study investigates the availability and accessibility of online KT learning opportunities for health professionals. It also provides an analysis of the types of resources and associated disciplines retrieved by a range of KT synonyms. We searched a range of bibliographic databases and the Internet (Google advanced option) using 9 KT terms to identify online KT learning resources. To be eligible, resources had to be free, aimed at clinicians, educational in intent, and interactive in design. Each term was searched using two different search engines. The details of the first 100 websites captured per browser (ie, n=200 results per term) were entered into EndNote. Each site was subsequently visited to determine its status as a learning resource. Eligible websites were appraised for quality using the AACODS (Authority, Accuracy, Coverage, Objectivity, Date, Significance) tool. We identified 971 unique websites via our multiple search strategies. Of these, 43 were health-related and educational in intent. Once these sites were evaluated for interactivity, a single website matched our inclusion criteria (Dementia Knowledge Translation Learning Centre). KT is an important but complex system of processes. These processes overlap with knowledge, practice, and improvement processes that go by a range of different names. For clinicians to be informed and competent in KT, they require better access to free learning opportunities. These resources should be designed from the viewpoint of the clinician, presenting KT

  20. Online Health Searches and their Perceived Effects on Patients and Patient-Clinician Relationships: A Systematic Review,,✯✯✯.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jane; Ashvetiya, Tamara; Quaye, Emmanuel; Parakh, Kapil; Martin, Seth S

    2018-05-03

    Online health searches are common and may be impacting patients and their relationships with their clinicians in ways that are not fully understood. We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Reviews, Cochrane Trials, Scopus, and CINAHL from 1 January 1990 to 29 January 2016 for studies in which patients searched online for any aspect of healthcare and then visited their clinician. We extracted data pertaining to either patients' or clinicians' perceptions of the effects of these online searches on patients and the patient-clinician relationship. Searches seemed to induce patient anxiety but more often led to patient reassurance, clinical understanding, and empowerment. Patients tended to perceive that online health searches had a positive effect on the patient-clinician relationship, though the nature of the effect could depend on the clinician's response to patient queries regarding the information. Clinicians generally perceived neutral effects on patients and the patient-clinician relationship, and commonly raised concerns about accuracy of online content. Significant methodological heterogeneity prevented quantitative synthesis. Accuracy of online health search content was not assessed, and randomized controlled trials were notably lacking. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A Qualitative Case Study of Smartphone-Connected Hearing Aids: Influences on Patients, Clinicians, and Patient-Clinician Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella L; Phelan, Shanon; Leonard, MaryAnn; Galster, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Innovations in hearing aid technology influence clinicians and individuals who use hearing aids. Little research, to date, explains the innovation adoption experiences and perspectives of clinicians and patients, which matter to a field like audiology, wherein technology innovation is constant. By understanding clinician and patient experiences with such innovations, the field of audiology may develop technologies and ways of practicing in a manner more responsive to patients' needs, and attentive to society's influence. The authors aimed to understand how new innovations influence clinician and patient experiences, through a study focusing on connected hearing aids. "Connected" refers to the wireless functional connection of hearing aids with everyday technologies like mobile phones and tablets. The authors used a qualitative collective case study methodology, borrowing from constructivist grounded theory for data collection and analysis methods. Specifically, the authors designed a collective case study of a connected hearing aid and smartphone application, composed of two cases of experience with the innovation: the case of clinician experiences, and the case of patient experiences. The qualitative sampling methods employed were case sampling, purposive within-case sampling, and theoretical sampling, and culminated in a total collective case n = 19 (clinician case n = 8; patient case n = 11). These data were triangulated with a supplementary sample of ten documents: relevant news and popular media collected during the study time frame. The authors conducted interviews with the patients and clinicians, and analyzed the interview and document data using the constant comparative method. The authors compared their two cases by looking at trends within, between, and across cases. The clinician case highlighted clinicians' heuristic-based candidacy judgments in response to the adoption of the connected hearing aids into their practice. The patient case revealed

  2. What motivates senior clinicians to teach medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Cathy

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to assess the motivations of senior medical clinicians to teach medical students. This understanding could improve the recruitment and retention of important clinical teachers. Methods The study group was 101 senior medical clinicians registered on a teaching list for a medical school teaching hospital (The Canberra Hospital, ACT, Australia. Their motivations to teach medical students were assessed applying Q methodology. Results Of the 75 participants, 18 (24% were female and 57 (76% were male. The age distribution was as follows: 30–40 years = 16 participants (21.3%, 41–55 years = 46 participants (61.3% and >55 years = 13 participants (17.3%. Most participants (n = 48, 64% were staff specialists and 27 (36% were visiting medical officers. Half of the participants were internists (n = 39, 52%, 12 (16% were surgeons, and 24 (32% were other sub-specialists. Of the 26 senior clinicians that did not participate, two were women; 15 were visiting medical officers and 11 were staff specialists; 16 were internists, 9 were surgeons and there was one other sub-specialist. The majority of these non-participating clinicians fell in the 41–55 year age group. The participating clinicians were moderately homogenous in their responses. Factor analysis produced 4 factors: one summarising positive motivations for teaching and three capturing impediments for teaching. The main factors influencing motivation to teach medical students were intrinsic issues such as altruism, intellectual satisfaction, personal skills and truth seeking. The reasons for not teaching included no strong involvement in course design, a heavy clinical load or feeling it was a waste of time. Conclusion This study provides some insights into factors that may be utilised in the design of teaching programs that meet teacher motivations and ultimately enhance the effectiveness of the medical teaching workforce.

  3. Leadership, clinician managers and a thing called "hybridity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, Liz

    2012-01-01

    In many countries leadership theories and leadership development programs in healthcare have been dominated by individualistic and heroic approaches that focus on developing the skills and competencies of health professionals. Alternative approaches have been proffered but mainly in the form of post-heroic and distributed forms of leadership. The notion of "hybridity" has emerged to challenge the assumptions of distributed leadership. The paper seeks to explore how the concept of hybridity can be used to re-theorize leadership in healthcare as it relates to clinician managers (or hybrid-professional managers). The theoretical developments are explored and empirical material is presented from research in Australian public hospitals to support the case for the existence of hybridized forms of leadership in healthcare. The paper discusses whether hybridity needs re-theorizing to adequately account for clinician leadership. It contributes to debates surrounding the role of clinician leadership in healthcare reform particularly in relation to those doctors who occupy management positions at the division or unit levels as distinct to CEOs. The study uses qualitative research, i.e. interactive interviews to present accounts of how healthcare professionals describe leadership. It undertakes both deductive and inductive theme analysis of the interview material. There is support for hybridized configurations of leadership in interview materials of healthcare professionals but other aspects were also noted that cannot be explained by this approach alone. The paper is the first to examine the concept of hybridity in the context of clinician leadership. Many approaches to leadership in healthcare fail to address the complexity of leadership within the ranks of clinician managers and thus are unable to deal adequately with the role of leadership in healthcare reform and change.

  4. Smallpox vaccination and adverse reactions. Guidance for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cono, Joanne; Casey, Christine G; Bell, David M

    2003-02-21

    , vaccination during pregnancy should not ordinarily be a reason to consider termination of pregnancy. No known indication exists for routine, prophylactic use of VIG in an unintentionally vaccinated pregnant woman; however, VIG should not be withheld if a pregnant woman develops a condition where VIG is needed. Other less-common adverse events after smallpox vaccination have been reported to occur in temporal association with smallpox vaccination, but causality has not been established. Prophylactic treatment with VIG is not recommended for persons or close contacts with contraindications to smallpox vaccination who are inadvertently inoculated or exposed. These persons should be followed closely for early recognition of adverse reactions that might develop, and clinicians are encouraged to enroll these persons in the CDC registry by calling the Clinician Information Line at 877-554-4625. To request clinical consultation and IND therapies for vaccinia-related adverse reactions for civilians, contact your state health department or CDC's Clinician Information Line (877-554-4625). Clinical evaluation tools are available at http.//www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/smallpox/vaccination/clineval. Clinical specimen-collection guidance is available at http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/smallpox/vaccination/vaccinia-specimen-collection.asp. Physicians at military medical facilities can request VIG or cidofovir by calling the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) at 301-619-2257 or 888-USA-RIID.

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF THE FREQUENCY AND THE INTENSITY OF THE THREATS IN THE FUNCTION OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Hutinski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the process of development of the security system of the information system, the risk assessment is the foundation for selection of the security measures. The reduction of the level of risk and the amount of costs depend upon the adequate selection of the security measures. The quality of the risk assessment depends upon the adequate assessment of the form and the intensity of the threats. If the forms of threats are not monitored in the business system, it should make its own threat assessment, or use experience of others. The best, but also the most time-consuming solution is to develop own security system, while the fastest way is to use experience of others. However, there is the problem of migration of some other solution to our own system. Depending upon the question whether we are adopting the experiences of domestic or foreign business systems, the question of the applicability to the system from the different business environment becomes relevant. This happens because of the significant differences in the form and intensity of threats in certain local environments or different branches of industry.

  6. Identification and Authentication Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimble, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    .... We will accomplish the audit objective in two phases. In this phase, we reviewed current DoD Component policies on the use of identification and authentication controls to access information systems...

  7. On-line ethics education for occupational therapy clinician-educators: a single-group pre-/post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderKaay, Sandra; Letts, Lori; Jung, Bonny; Moll, Sandra E

    2018-05-20

    Ethics education is a critical component of training rehabilitation practitioners. There is a need for capacity-building among ethics educators regarding facilitating ethical decision-making among students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of an on-line ethics education module for occupational therapy clinician-educators (problem-based learning tutors/clinical placement preceptors/evidence-based practice facilitators). The Knowledge-to-Action Process informed development and evaluation of the module. Clinician-educators (n = 33) viewed the module and reported on its impact on knowledge and facilitation practices via pre, post, and follow-up questionnaires. Pre- and post-test data indicated improvement in self-reported ethics knowledge (t = 8.275, p ethics education module for clinician-educators. Future recommendations include broader consideration of context, adding supplemental knowledge translation components, and further research exploring outcomes with larger samples, longer follow-up and randomized trial methodology. Implications for Rehabilitation The on-line ethics module has potential to improve rehabilitation practice by addressing the noted gap in knowledge among clinician-educators. Viewing an on-line module regarding approaches to ethics education may not be sufficient to change clinician-educators' teaching practices. More time and opportunities to discuss ethics with student occupational therapists may be required to effect practice change among clinician-educators. Developing ethics education tools for clinician-educators requires ongoing and iterative input from knowledge users to optimize translation of ideas to practice.

  8. Pitfalls in urinary stone identification using CT attenuation values: Are we getting the same information on different scanner models?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosjean, Romain, E-mail: r.grosjean@chu-nancy.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Daudon, Michel, E-mail: michel.daudon@tnn.aphp.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Chammas, Mario F., E-mail: mariochammas@usp.br [University of Sao Paulo – Division of Urology, Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 255, 7" o Andar – s. 7123, São Paulo (Brazil); Claudon, Michel, E-mail: m.claudon@chu-nancy.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Eschwege, Pascal, E-mail: peschwege@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, Brabois Hospital, University Hospital of Nancy, Allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Felblinger, Jacques, E-mail: j.felblinger@chu-nancy.fr [IADI Laboratory, INSERM-U947, Nancy-University, Allée du Morvan, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Hubert, Jacques, E-mail: j.hubert@chu-nancy.fr [Department of Urology, Brabois Hospital, University Hospital of Nancy, Allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-08-15

    Introduction: Evaluate the capability of different Computed Tomography scanners to determine urinary stone compositions based on CT attenuation values and to evaluate potential differences between each model. Methods: 241 human urinary stones were obtained and their biochemical composition determined. Four different CT scanners (Siemens, Philips, GEMS and Toshiba) were evaluated. Mean CT-attenuation values and the standard deviation were recorded separately and compared with a t-paired test. Results: For all tested CT scanners, when the classification of the various types of stones was arranged according to the mean CT-attenuation values and to the confidence interval, large overlappings between stone types were highlighted. The t-paired test showed that most stone types could not be identified. Some types of stones presented mean CT attenuation values significantly different from one CT scanner to another. At 80 kV, the mean CT attenuation values obtained with the Toshiba Aquilion were significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens Sensation. On the other hand, mean values obtained with the Philips Brilliance were all significantly equal to those obtained with the Siemens Sensation and with the Toshiba Aquilion. At 120 kV mean CT attenuation values of uric acid, cystine and struvite stones obtained with the Philips model are significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens and the Toshiba but equal to those obtained with the GE 64. Conclusions: According to our study, there is a great variability when different brands and models of scanners are compared directly. Furthermore, the CT scan analysis and HU evaluation appears to gather insufficient information in order to characterize and identify the composition of renal stones.

  9. Pitfalls in urinary stone identification using CT attenuation values: Are we getting the same information on different scanner models?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, Romain; Daudon, Michel; o Andar – s. 7123, São Paulo (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (University of Sao Paulo – Division of Urology, Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 255, 7o Andar – s. 7123, São Paulo (Brazil))" >Chammas, Mario F.; Claudon, Michel; Eschwege, Pascal; Felblinger, Jacques; Hubert, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluate the capability of different Computed Tomography scanners to determine urinary stone compositions based on CT attenuation values and to evaluate potential differences between each model. Methods: 241 human urinary stones were obtained and their biochemical composition determined. Four different CT scanners (Siemens, Philips, GEMS and Toshiba) were evaluated. Mean CT-attenuation values and the standard deviation were recorded separately and compared with a t-paired test. Results: For all tested CT scanners, when the classification of the various types of stones was arranged according to the mean CT-attenuation values and to the confidence interval, large overlappings between stone types were highlighted. The t-paired test showed that most stone types could not be identified. Some types of stones presented mean CT attenuation values significantly different from one CT scanner to another. At 80 kV, the mean CT attenuation values obtained with the Toshiba Aquilion were significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens Sensation. On the other hand, mean values obtained with the Philips Brilliance were all significantly equal to those obtained with the Siemens Sensation and with the Toshiba Aquilion. At 120 kV mean CT attenuation values of uric acid, cystine and struvite stones obtained with the Philips model are significantly different from those obtained with the Siemens and the Toshiba but equal to those obtained with the GE 64. Conclusions: According to our study, there is a great variability when different brands and models of scanners are compared directly. Furthermore, the CT scan analysis and HU evaluation appears to gather insufficient information in order to characterize and identify the composition of renal stones

  10. Ethics of fertility preservation for prepubertal children: should clinicians offer procedures where efficacy is largely unproven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Rosalind J; Gillam, Lynn; Delany, Clare; Jayasinghe, Yasmin

    2018-01-01

    Young children with cancer are treated with interventions that can have a high risk of compromising their reproductive potential. ‘Fertility preservation’ for children who have not yet reached puberty involves surgically removing and cryopreserving reproductive tissue prior to treatment in the expectation that strategies for the use of this tissue will be developed in the future. Fertility preservation for prepubertal children is ethically complex because the techniques largely lack proven efficacy for this age group. There is professional difference of opinion about whether it is ethical to offer such ‘experimental’ procedures. The question addressed in this paper is: when, if ever, is it ethically justifiable to offer fertility preservation surgery to prepubertal children? We present the ethical concerns about prepubertal fertility preservation, drawing both on existing literature and our experience discussing this issue with clinicians in clinical ethics case consultations. We argue that offering the procedure is ethically justifiable in certain circumstances. For many children, the balance of benefits and burdens is such that the procedure is ethically permissible but not ethically required; when the procedure is medically safe, it is the parents’ decision to make, with appropriate information and guidance from the treating clinicians. We suggest that clinical ethics support processes are necessary to assist clinicians to engage with the ethical complexity of prepubertal fertility preservation and describe the framework that has been integrated into the pathway of care for patients and families attending the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. PMID:29084865

  11. Extended regimen combined oral contraception: A review of evolving concepts and acceptance by women and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Bitzer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of extended regimen combined oral contraceptives (COCs) is increasingly being recognised. Our objective was to understand the attitudes of women and clinicians about the use of these regimens. We present the rationale for extended regimen COCs from a historical perspective, and trace their evolution and growing popularity in light of their clinical benefits. We conclude by offering potential strategies for counselling women about extended regimen COC options. We conducted a MEDLINE search to identify and summarise studies of extended regimen COCs, focusing on attitudes of women and clinicians regarding efficacy, safety/tolerability and fewer scheduled bleeding episodes and other potential benefits. The body of contemporary literature on extended regimen COCs suggests that their contraceptive efficacy is comparable to that of conventional 28-day (i.e., 21/7) regimens. For women seeking contraception that allows infrequent scheduled bleeding episodes, particularly those who suffer from hormone withdrawal symptoms and cyclical symptoms (e.g., headache, mood changes, dysmenorrhoea, heavy menstrual bleeding), extended regimen COCs are an effective and safe option. Although satisfaction with extended regimen COCs in clinical trials is high, misperceptions about continuous hormone use may still limit the widespread acceptance of this approach. Despite the widespread acceptance among clinicians of extended regimen COCs as an effective and safe contraceptive option, these regimens are underused, likely due to a lack of awareness about their availability and utility among women. Improved patient education and counselling regarding the safety and benefits of extended regimen COCs may help women make more informed contraceptive choices.

  12. Clinician and Parent Perspectives on Educational Needs for Increasing Adolescent HPV Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widman, Christy A; Rodriguez, Elisa M; Saad-Harfouche, Frances; Twarozek, Annamaria Masucci; Erwin, Deborah O; Mahoney, Martin C

    2018-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related morbidity and mortality remain a significant public health burden despite the availability of HPV vaccines for cancer prevention. We engaged clinicians and parents to identify barriers and opportunities related to adolescent HPV vaccination within a focused geographic region. This mixed-method study design used an interviewer-administered semi-structured interview with clinicians (n = 52) and a written self-administered survey with similar items completed by parents (n = 54). Items focused on experiences, opinions, and ideas about HPV vaccine utilization in the clinical setting, family, and patient perceptions about HPV vaccination and potential future efforts to increase vaccine utilization. Quantitative items were analyzed using descriptive statistics, while qualitative content was analyzed thematically. Suggested solutions for achieving higher rates of HPV vaccination noted by clinicians included public health education, the removal of stigma associated with vaccines, media endorsements, and targeting parents as the primary focus of educational messages. Parents expressed the need for more information about HPV-related disease, HPV vaccines, vaccine safety, sexual concerns, and countering misinformation on social media. Results from this mixed-method study affirm that educational campaigns targeting both health care professionals and parents represent a key facilitator for promoting HPV vaccination; disease burden and cancer prevention emerged as key themes for this messaging.

  13. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of aetiological agents of sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Degl’Innocenti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The MALDI-TOF has recently become part of the methods of microbiological investigation in many laboratories of bacteriology with advantages both practical and economical.The use of this technique for the rapid identification of the causative agents of sepsis is of strategic importance to the ability to provide the clinician with useful information for a prompt and rapid establishment of an empirical antimicrobial “targeted” therapy. Methods: It was tested a total of 343 positive blood culture bottles from 211 patients. The samples after collection were incubated in the BACTEC FX (Becton Dickinson, USA. From these bottles were taken a few milliliters of broth culture and transferred into a vacutainer tube containing gel. This was centrifuged, the supernatant was decanted, and finally recovered the bacterial suspension on the gel. With micro-organisms recovered in this way, after several washes with distilled water, was prepared a slide for microscopic examination with Gram stain, and a plate for mass spectrometry (MS-Vitek, bioMérieux, France.Then, the same samples were inoculated on solid agar media according to the protocol in use in our laboratory.The next day was checked the possible bacterial growth on solid media; we then proceeded to the identification of the colonies by Vitek MS and / or with the system Vitek2 (bioMérieux, France. Results: 258 (75.2% positive vials show concordant results between direct identification and identification after growth on agar. For 83 (24.2% positive bottles there has been full compliance with the microscopic examination but not with culture. In particular, two bottles (0.6% have given complete discordance between the direct identification and that after growth. Conclusions: The protocol we use for the direct identification of organisms responsible for sepsis, directly on positive bottles, seems to be a quick and inexpensive procedure, which in less than 60 minutes can give valuable

  14. Identification of novel risk factors for community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection using spatial statistics and geographic information system analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deverick J Anderson

    Full Text Available The rate of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI is increasing. While receipt of antibiotics remains an important risk factor for CDI, studies related to acquisition of C. difficile outside of hospitals are lacking. As a result, risk factors for exposure to C. difficile in community settings have been inadequately studied.To identify novel environmental risk factors for CA-CDI.We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study of patients with CA-CDI from 1/1/2007 through 12/31/2014 in a 10-county area in central North Carolina. 360 Census Tracts in these 10 counties were used as the demographic Geographic Information System (GIS base-map. Longitude and latitude (X, Y coordinates were generated from patient home addresses and overlaid to Census Tracts polygons using ArcGIS; ArcView was used to assess "hot-spots" or clusters of CA-CDI. We then constructed a mixed hierarchical model to identify environmental variables independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI.A total of 1,895 unique patients met our criteria for CA-CDI. The mean patient age was 54.5 years; 62% were female and 70% were Caucasian. 402 (21% patient addresses were located in "hot spots" or clusters of CA-CDI (p<0.001. "Hot spot" census tracts were scattered throughout the 10 counties. After adjusting for clustering and population density, age ≥ 60 years (p = 0.03, race (<0.001, proximity to a livestock farm (0.01, proximity to farming raw materials services (0.02, and proximity to a nursing home (0.04 were independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI.Our study is the first to use spatial statistics and mixed models to identify important environmental risk factors for acquisition of C. difficile and adds to the growing evidence that farm practices may put patients at risk for important drug-resistant infections.

  15. Comparison of Trained Clinician Ratings with Expert Ratings of Aspiration on Videofluoroscopic Images from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gensler, Gary; Brandt, Diane K.; Miller Gardner, Patricia J.; Blumenthal, Loreen; Gramigna, Gary D.; Kosek, Steven; Lundy, Donna; McGarvey-Toler, Susan; Rockafellow, Susan; Sullivan, Paula A.; Villa, Marybell; Gill, Gary D.; Lindblad, Anne S.; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2009-01-01

    Accurate detection and classification of aspiration is a critical component of videofluoroscopic swallowing evaluation, the most commonly utilized instrumental method for dysphagia diagnosis and treatment. Currently published literature indicates that inter-judge reliability for the identification of aspiration ranges from poor to fairly good depending on the amount of training provided to clinicians. The majority of extant studies compared judgments among clinicians. No studies included judgments made during the use of a postural compensatory strategy. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of judgments made by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practicing in hospitals compared with unblinded expert judges when identifying aspiration and using the 8-point Penetration/Aspiration Scale. Clinicians received extensive training for the detection of aspiration and minimal training on use of the Penetration/Aspiration Scale. Videofluoroscopic data were collected from 669 patients as part of a large, randomized clinical trial and include judgments of 10,200 swallows made by 76 clinicians from 44 hospitals in 11 states. Judgments were made on swallows during use of dysphagia compensatory strategies: chin down posture with thin-liquids and thickened liquids (nectar-thick and honey-thick consistencies) in a head neutral posture. The subject population included patients with Parkinson’s disease and/or dementia. Kappa statistics indicate high accuracy for all interventions by SLPs for identification of aspiration (all К > .86) and variable accuracy (range 69%–76%) using the Penetration/Aspiration Scale when compared to expert judges. It is concluded that while the accuracy of identifying the presence of aspiration by SLPs is excellent, more extensive training and/or image enhancement is recommended for precise use of the Penetration/Aspiration Scale. PMID:18953607

  16. UK medical students' perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Maral J; Burleigh, Eleanor J; Hobbis, Chloe; Dunford, Charlotte; Osman, Nadir I; Gan, Christine; Gibbons, Norma B; Ahmed, Hashim U; Miah, Saiful

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to determine UK medical students' perceptions and attitudes and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the academic year 2015-2016. An online questionnaire was distributed to 2,349 final-year students from 10 UK medical schools. Participants were asked to complete a 5-point Likert scale on their current perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers. They were also asked to self-rate their leadership competences set by the Medical Leadership Competency Framework and to rate the quality of management and leadership training they received from their medical school. In total, we received 114 complete responses. Only 7.9% of respondents were in agreement (strongly agree or agree) when asked whether they felt they were well informed about what a managerial position in medicine entails. When asked whether clinicians should influence managerial decisions within a clinical setting, 94.7% of respondents were in agreement with the statement. About 85% of respondents were in agreement that it is important for clinicians to have managerial or leadership responsibilities, with 63.2% of students in agreement that they would have liked more management or leadership training during medical school. Over half the respondents rated their management and leadership training they received during medical school as "very poor" or "poor" (54.4%). Our study suggests that UK medical students have an appetite for management and leadership training and appreciate its importance but feel that the training they are receiving is poor. This suggests that there is a gap between the demand for management and leadership training and the quality of training supplied by UK medical schools.

  17. Perspective: Entering uncharted waters: navigating the transition from trainee to career for the nonphysician clinician-scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Sharpe, Heather M; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Larsen, Bodil; MacKay, Lyndsay

    2013-01-01

    The transition from trainee to career clinician-scientist can be a stressful and challenging time, particularly for those entering the less established role of nonphysician clinician-scientist. These individuals are typically PhD-prepared clinicians in the allied health professions, who have either a formal or informal joint appointment between a clinical institution and an academic or research institution. The often poorly defined boundaries and expectations of these developing roles can pose additional challenges for the trainee-to-career transition.It is important for these trainees to consider what they want and need in a position in order to be successful, productive, and fulfilled in both their professional and personal lives. It is also critical for potential employers, whether academic or clinical (or a combination of both), to be fully aware of the supports and tools necessary to recruit and retain new nonphysician clinician-scientists. Issues of relevance to the trainee and the employer include finding and negotiating a position; the importance of mentorship; the value of effective time management, particularly managing clinical and academic time commitments; and achieving work-life balance. Attention to these issues, by both the trainee and those in a position to hire them, will facilitate a smooth transition to the nonphysician clinician-scientist role and ultimately contribute to individual and organizational success.

  18. Importance ratings on patient-reported outcome items for survivorship care: comparison between pediatric cancer survivors, parents, and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Conor M; Baker, Justin N; Keesey, Rachel M; Eliason, Ruth J; Lanctot, Jennifer Q; Clegg, Jennifer L; Mandrell, Belinda N; Ness, Kirsten K; Krull, Kevin R; Srivastava, Deokumar; Forrest, Christopher B; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Huang, I-Chan

    2018-04-18

    To compare importance ratings of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) items from the viewpoints of childhood cancer survivors, parents, and clinicians for further developing short-forms to use in survivorship care. 101 cancer survivors, 101 their parents, and 36 clinicians were recruited from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Participants were asked to select eight items that they deemed useful for clinical decision making from each of the four Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Pediatric item banks. These item banks were pain interference (20 items), fatigue (23 items), psychological stress (19 items), and positive affect (37 items). Compared to survivors, clinicians rated more items across four domains that were statistically different than did parents (23 vs. 13 items). Clinicians rated five items in pain interference domain (ORs 2.33-6.01; p's important but rated three items in psychological stress domain (ORs 0.14-0.42; p's important than did survivors. In contrast, parents rated seven items in positive affect domain (ORs 0.25-0.47; p's important than did survivors. Survivors, parents, and clinicians viewed importance of PRO items for survivorship care differently. These perspectives should be used to assist the development of PROs tools.

  19. The patient perspective: arthritis care provided by Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care program-trained clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmington K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kelly Warmington,1 Carol A Kennedy,2 Katie Lundon,3 Leslie J Soever,4 Sydney C Brooks,5 Laura A Passalent,6 Rachel Shupak,7 Rayfel Schneider,8 1Learning Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, 2Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St Michael’s Hospital, 3Continuing Professional Development, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 4University Health Network, 5Ontario Division, Arthritis Society, 6Toronto Western Hospital, 7Division of Rheumatology, St Michael's Hospital, 8Division of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: To assess patient satisfaction with the arthritis care services provided by graduates of the Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC program. Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional evaluation using a self-report questionnaire for data collection. Participants completed the Patient–Doctor Interaction Scale, modified to capture patient–practitioner interactions. Participants completed selected items from the Group Health Association of America's Consumer Satisfaction Survey, and items capturing quality of care, appropriateness of wait times, and a comparison of extended-role practitioner (ERP services with previously received arthritis care. Results: A total of 325 patients seen by 27 ERPs from 15 institutions completed the questionnaire. Respondents were primarily adults (85%, female (72%, and living in urban areas (79%. The mean age of participants was 54 years (range 3–92 years, and 51% were not working. Patients with inflammatory (51% and noninflammatory conditions (31% were represented. Mean (standard deviation Patient–Practitioner Interaction Scale subscale scores ranged from 4.50 (0.60 to 4.63 (0.48 (1 to 5 [greater satisfaction]. Overall satisfaction with the quality of care was high (4.39 [0.77], as was satisfaction with wait times (referral to appointment, 4.27 [0.86]; in clinic, 4.24 [0.91]. Ninety-eight percent of

  20. Financial capacity in older adults: a growing concern for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paul A; Byrne, Gerard J; Mitchell, Leander K; Pachana, Nancy A

    2015-02-02

    Older people with cognitive impairment and/or dementia may be particularly vulnerable to diminished financial decision-making capacity. Financial capacity refers to the ability to satisfactorily manage one's financial affairs in a manner consistent with personal self-interest and values. Impairment of financial capacity makes the older individual vulnerable to financial exploitation, may negatively affect their family's financial situation and places strain on relationships within the family. Clinicians are often on the front line of responding to queries regarding decision-making capacity, and clinical evaluation options are often not well understood. Assessment of financial capacity should include formal objective assessment in addition to a clinical interview and gathering contextual data. Development of a flexible, empirically supported and clinically relevant assessment approach that spans all dimensions of financial capacity yet is simple enough to be used by non-specialist clinicians is needed.

  1. The cultural divide: exploring communication barriers between scientists and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restifo, Linda L; Phelan, Gerald R

    2011-07-01

    Despite remarkable advances in basic biomedical science that have led to improved patient care, there is a wide and persistent gap in the abilities of researchers and clinicians to understand and appreciate each other. In this Editorial, the authors, a scientist and a clinician, discuss the rift between practitioners of laboratory research and clinical medicine. Using their first-hand experience and numerous interviews throughout the United States, they explore the causes of this 'cultural divide'. Members of both professions use advanced problem-solving skills and typically embark on their career paths with a deeply felt sense of purpose. Nonetheless, differences in classroom education, professional training environments, reward mechanisms and sources of drive contribute to obstacles that inhibit communication, mutual respect and productive collaboration. More than a sociological curiosity, the cultural divide is a significant barrier to the bench-to-bedside goals of translational medicine. Understanding its roots is the first step towards bridging the gap.

  2. The cultural divide: exploring communication barriers between scientists and clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L. Restifo

    2011-07-01

    Despite remarkable advances in basic biomedical science that have led to improved patient care, there is a wide and persistent gap in the abilities of researchers and clinicians to understand and appreciate each other. In this Editorial, the authors, a scientist and a clinician, discuss the rift between practitioners of laboratory research and clinical medicine. Using their first-hand experience and numerous interviews throughout the United States, they explore the causes of this ‘cultural divide’. Members of both professions use advanced problem-solving skills and typically embark on their career paths with a deeply felt sense of purpose. Nonetheless, differences in classroom education, professional training environments, reward mechanisms and sources of drive contribute to obstacles that inhibit communication, mutual respect and productive collaboration. More than a sociological curiosity, the cultural divide is a significant barrier to the bench-to-bedside goals of translational medicine. Understanding its roots is the first step towards bridging the gap.

  3. [Choice of informative laboratory biomarkers for the early identification of changes in neurohumoral regulation and carbohydrate exchange in workers of the mining and mechanical engineering industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapko, I V; Kiryakov, V A; Pavlovskaya, N A; Oshkoderov, O A; Klimkina, K V

    The diagnostic significance of hormones and integral indices of pituitary-adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system and carbohydrate metabolism (ACTH (corticotropin), aldosterone, cortisol, TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), total and free testosterone, insulin, integral pituitary-adrenal index (IPAI), the pituitary-thyroid index (PTI), indices of carbohydrate metabolism (Caro and HOMA-IR) was studied for the early diagnostics of disorders of neurohumoral regulation in workers of mining and mechanical engineering industries. The most informative indices, permitting to identify disorders of carbohydrate metabolism are established to be indices of insulin resistance (index Caro and index NOMA-IR) and the determination of insulin in serum. For the identification of changes in pituitary adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system in patients with vibration disease, sensory-neural hearing loss, comorbidity indexes IGNI, ITI, concentrations of LH and total testosterone are of the most diagnostically significance.

  4. Identification of environmental parameters and risk mapping of visceral leishmaniasis in Ethiopia by using geographical information systems and a statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Tsegaw

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, a vector-borne disease strongly influenced by environmental factors, has (re-emerged in Ethiopia during the last two decades and is currently of increasing public health concern. Based on VL incidence in each locality (kebele documented from federal or regional health bureaus and/or hospital records in the country, geographical information systems (GIS, coupled with binary and multivariate logistic regression methods, were employed to develop a risk map for Ethiopia with respect to VL based on soil type, altitude, rainfall, slope and temperature. The risk model was subsequently validated in selected sites. This environmental VL risk model provided an overall prediction accuracy of 86% with mean land surface temperature and soil type found to be the best predictors of VL. The total population at risk was estimated at 3.2 million according to the national population census in 2007. The approach presented here should facilitate the identification of priority areas for intervention and the monitoring of trends as well as providing input for further epidemiological and applied research with regard to this disease in Ethiopia.

  5. Communication skills in healthcare: academic, clinician and patient perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    CHARLOTTE ABYNA INDERMAUR DENNISTON

    2018-01-01

    This PhD explores healthcare communication skills from the perspectives of academics, clinicians and patients. We know that communication is key to effective healthcare and this research has revealed new approaches for teaching and learning these skills. Findings indicate that we need to consider multiple stakeholders in the design of communication education, we need to develop healthcare professionals’ skills at assessing their own communication and asking for feedback, and workplace teachin...

  6. Child Health Disparities: What Can a Clinician Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tina L; Emmanuel, Mickey A; Levy, Daniel J; Jenkins, Renee R

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric primary and specialty practice has changed, with more to do, more regulation, and more family needs than in the past. Similarly, the needs of patients have changed, with more demographic diversity, family stress, and continued health disparities by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. How can clinicians continue their dedicated service to children and ensure health equity in the face of these changes? This article outlines specific, practical, actionable, and evidence-based activities to help clinicians assess and address health disparities in practice. These tools may also support patient-centered medical home recognition, national and state cultural and linguistic competency standards, and quality benchmarks that are increasingly tied to payment. Clinicians can play a critical role in (1) diagnosing disparities in one's community and practice, (2) innovating new models to address social determinants of health, (3) addressing health literacy of families, (4) ensuring cultural competence and a culture of workplace equity, and (5) advocating for issues that address the root causes of health disparities. Culturally competent care that is sensitive to the needs, health literacy, and health beliefs of families can increase satisfaction, improve quality of care, and increase patient safety. Clinical care approaches to address social determinants of health and interrupting the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage include (1) screening for new health "vital signs" and connecting families to resources, (2) enhancing the comprehensiveness of services, (3) addressing family health in pediatric encounters, and (4) moving care outside the office into the community. Health system investment is required to support clinicians and practice innovation to ensure equity. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Digitizing the Facebow: A Clinician/Technician Communication Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Les; Chrapka, Julia; Joseph, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the clinician and the technician has been an ongoing problem in dentistry. To improve the issue, a dental software application has been developed--the Virtual Facebow App. It is an alternative to the traditional analog facebow, used to orient the maxillary cast in mounting. Comparison data of the two methods indicated that the digitized virtual facebow provided increased efficiency in mounting, increased accuracy in occlusion, and lower cost. Occlusal accuracy, lab time, and total time were statistically significant (Ptechnician communication.

  8. Relationships between radiologists and clinicians: Results from three surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, L.; Stacul, F.; Meduri, S.; Geitung, J. Te.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To analyse reasons for and the nature of clinico-radiological contacts and their clinical impact. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three different surveys were performed. (1) Data concerning contacts between staff radiologists (n = 20) and clinicians during 10 consecutive working days were collected; (2) staff clinicians (n = 174) filled in a questionnaire asking for their opinions about relationships with radiologists; (3) staff radiologists collected data about contacts with clinicians related to more urgent/complicated cases. Radiologists assessed the clinical impact of the radiological procedure and of the consultation. RESULTS: (1) During 220 working days 20 radiologists had a mean of 3.95 contacts per day (48.2% personal contacts, 51.8% telephone contacts), amounting to a personal total of 21.65 min per day. These contacts amounted to a total of 7.08 h per day, roughly one whole-time equivalent radiologist. (2) These consultations helped to refine the diagnostic strategy often (12.6%) or sometimes (71.4%) and to alter therapeutic decisions often (10.4%) or sometimes (56.6%). (3) The initial clinical diagnosis was changed in 50% of cases and the therapy was substantially changed on the basis of further radiological investigations and clinical-radiological discussion in 60% of cases. CONCLUSION: Clinical-radiological consultations are time consuming but have a beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic impact. Dalla Palma, L. (2000)

  9. Reiki Reduces Burnout Among Community Mental Health Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosada, Renee M; Rubik, Beverly; Mainguy, Barbara; Plummer, Julie; Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians working in community mental health clinics are at high risk for burnout. Burnout is a problem involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Reiki is a holistic biofield energy therapy beneficial for reducing stress. The purpose of this study was to determine if 30 minutes of healing touch could reduce burnout in community mental health clinicians. We utilized a crossover design to explore the efficacy of Reiki versus sham Reiki, a pseudo treatment designed to mimic true Reiki, as a means to reduce symptoms of burnout. Subjects were randomized to whether they started with Reiki or sham. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile Version 2 (MYMOP-2) were used as outcome measures. Multilevel modeling was used to represent the relations among variables. Reiki was statistically significantly better than sham Reiki in reducing burnout among community mental health clinicians (p=0.011). Reiki was significant in reducing depersonalization (pReiki reduced the primary symptom on the MYMOP also only among single people (p=0.03). The effects of Reiki were differentiated from sham Reiki. Reiki could be helpful in community mental health settings for the mental health of the practitioners.

  10. Understanding academic clinicians' intent to treat pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankfurter, Claudia; Cunningham, Charles; Morrison, Katherine M; Rimas, Heather; Bailey, Karen

    2017-02-08

    To examine the extent to which the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicts academic clinicians' intent to treat pediatric obesity. A multi-disciplinary panel iteratively devised a Likert scale survey based on the constructs of the TPB applied to a set of pediatric obesity themes. A cross-sectional electronic survey was then administered to academic clinicians at tertiary care centers across Canada from January to April 2012. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic and item agreement data. A hierarchical linear regression analysis controlling for demographic variables was conducted to examine the extent to which the TPB subscales predicted intent to treat pediatric obesity. A total of 198 physicians, surgeons, and allied health professionals across Canada (British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec) completed the survey. On step 1, demographic factors accounted for 7.4% of the variance in intent scores. Together in step 2, demographic variables and TPB subscales predicted 56.9% of the variance in a measure of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Perceived behavioral control, that is, confidence in one's ability to manage pediatric obesity, and subjective norms, congruent with one's context of practice, were the most significant predictors of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Attitudes and barriers did not predict the intent to treat pediatric obesity in this context. Enhancing self-confidence in the ability to treat pediatric obesity and the existence of supportive treatment environments are important to increase clinician's intent to treat pediatric obesity.

  11. Factors that influence clinicians' assessment and management of family violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, V P; Schmidt, T A; Limandri, B J; Chiodo, G T; Garland, M J; Loveless, P A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. High rates of family violence and low rates of detection, report, and therapeutic intervention by health professionals are well documented. This study was undertaken to determine what factors influence clinicians' decision making about identifying abuse and intervening with victims. METHODS. Survey data about clinicians' experiences with and attitudes toward family violence were gathered by mailed questionnaire from a random sample of practicing clinicians in six disciplines (n = 1521). RESULTS. Data showed similarities within and wide differences among three groups of subjects: dentists/dental hygienists, nurses/physicians, and psychologists/social workers. Overall, a third of subjects reported having received no educational content on child, spouse, or elder abuse in their professional training programs. Subjects with education on the topic more commonly suspected abuse in their patients than those without; among all subjects, spouse abuse was suspected more often than child abuse while elder abuse was suspected infrequently. Significant numbers of subjects did not view themselves as responsible for dealing with problems of family violence. Subjects indicated low confidence in and low compliance with mandatory reporting laws. CONCLUSIONS. There is a need for educators to expand curricula on family violence and for legislators to reexamine mandatory reporting laws. PMID:8154568

  12. Nature & prevalence of stalking among New Zealand mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Frances A; Thom, Katey; Dixon, Robyn

    2007-04-01

    Stalking involves recurrent and persistent unwanted communication or contact that generates fear for safety in the victims. This pilot study evaluated the nature and prevalence of stalking among New Zealand nurses and physicians working in mental health services. An anonymous questionnaire asking respondents to describe their experiences with 12 stalking behaviors was distributed to 895 clinicians. Results indicated that regardless of discipline, women were more likely than men to have experienced one or more stalking behaviors, including receiving unwanted telephone calls, letters, and approaches; receiving personal threats: and being followed, spied on, or subject to surveillance. Women also reported higher levels of fearfulness as a consequence of stalking behaviors. Nearly half of the stalkers were clients; the remaining were former partners, colleagues, or acquaintances. In client-related cases, the majority of respondents told their colleagues and supervisors first, and the majority found them to be the most helpful resource. The results of this pilot study indicate a need for further research focused on the stalking of mental health clinicians in New Zealand and for development of workplace policies for adequate response to the stalking of mental health clinicians.

  13. Effect of Physical Therapy Students' Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivko, Susan E; Abbruzzese, Laurel D; Duttaroy, Pragati; Hansen, Ruth L; Ryans, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Physical therapy clinical education experiences (CEEs) are difficult to secure, particularly first-level CEEs. Our purpose was to determine 1) what impact student full-time CEEs have on PT clinician productivity and 2) whether there is a productivity difference between first vs final CEEs. Productivity logs, including possible factors impacting productivity, were distributed to clinician-student pairings on first and final CEEs. Two-week baseline data (without a student) were compared to weeks 1 and 6 (with a student) for 31 logs using a 2x4 repeated-measures ANOVA. In a subset of 17 logs for CEEs 8 weeks or longer, a 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. There was a significant increase in the number of patients seen and CPT units billed by both levels of CEEs comparing weeks 1 and 6. In the subset of CEEs, 8 weeks or longer, there was a significant increase in the number of patients treated per hour at week 6 and a trend toward a change at week 8 when compared to baseline week A. The factors selected as impacting productivity were census (59%) and staffing (32%). Physical therapy clinician-student pairings showed an overall increase in productivity during both full-time first and final level CEEs.

  14. Conflicts in the ICU: perspectives of administrators and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjoux Meth, Nathalie; Lawless, Bernard; Hawryluck, Laura

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand conflicts in the ICU setting as experienced by clinicians and administrators and explore methods currently used to resolve such conflicts when there may be discordance between clinicians and families, caregivers or administration. Qualitative case study methodology using semi-structured interviews was used. The sample included community and academic health science centres in 16 hospitals from across the province of Ontario, Canada. A total of 42 participants including hospital administrators and ICU clinicians were interviewed. Participants were sampled purposively to ensure representation. The most common source of conflict in the ICU is a result of disagreement about the goals of treatment. Such conflicts arise between the ICU and referring teams (inter-team), among members of the ICU team (intra-team), and between the ICU team and patients' family/substitute decision-maker (SDM). Inter- and intra-team conflicts often contribute to conflicts between the ICU team and families. Various themes were identified as contributing factors that may influence conflict resolution practices as well as the various consequences and challenges of conflict situations. Limitations of current conflict resolution policies were revealed as well as suggested strategies to improve practice. There is considerable variability in dealing with conflicts in the ICU. Greater attention is needed at a systems level to support a culture aimed at prevention and resolution of conflicts to avoid increased sources of anxiety, stress and burnout.

  15. UK medical students’ perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhani MJ

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Maral J Rouhani,1 Eleanor J Burleigh,2 Chloe Hobbis,2 Charlotte Dunford,1 Nadir I Osman,3 Christine Gan,1 Norma B Gibbons,1 Hashim U Ahmed,1,4 Saiful Miah1,5 1Department of Urology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK; 2Medical School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; 3Department of Urology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK; 4Division of Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK; 5Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK Background: We aimed to determine UK medical students’ perceptions and attitudes and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during the academic year 2015–2016. An online questionnaire was distributed to 2,349 final-year students from 10 UK medical schools. Participants were asked to complete a 5-point Likert scale on their current perceptions, attitudes, and interest toward medical leadership and clinician managers. They were also asked to self-rate their leadership competences set by the Medical Leadership Competency Framework and to rate the quality of management and leadership training they received from their medical school. Results: In total, we received 114 complete responses. Only 7.9% of respondents were in agreement (strongly agree or agree when asked whether they felt they were well informed about what a managerial position in medicine entails. When asked whether clinicians should influence managerial decisions within a clinical setting, 94.7% of respondents were in agreement with the statement. About 85% of respondents were in agreement that it is important for clinicians to have managerial or leadership responsibilities, with 63.2% of students in agreement that they would have liked more management or leadership training during medical school. Over half the respondents rated their management and leadership

  16. Ebola Virus Disease: Essential Public Health Principles for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L. Koenig

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD has become a public health emergency of international concern. The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed guidance to educate and inform healthcare workers and travelers worldwide. Symptoms of EVD include abrupt onset of fever, myalgias, and headache in the early phase, followed by vomiting, diarrhea and possible progression to hemorrhagic rash, life-threatening bleeding, and multi-organ failure in the later phase. The disease is not transmitted via airborne spread like influenza, but rather from person-to-person, or animal to person, via direct contact with bodily fluids or blood. It is crucial that emergency physicians be educated on disease presentation and how to generate a timely and accurate differential diagnosis that includes exotic diseases in the appropriate patient population. A patient should be evaluated for EVD when both suggestive symptoms, including unexplained hemorrhage, AND risk factors within 3 weeks prior, such as travel to an endemic area, direct handling of animals from outbreak areas, or ingestion of fruit or other uncooked foods contaminated with bat feces containing the virus are present. There are experimental therapies for treatment of EVD virus; however the mainstay of therapy is supportive care. Emergency department personnel on the frontlines must be prepared to rapidly identify and isolate febrile travelers if indicated. All healthcare workers involved in care of EVD patients should wear personal protective equipment. Despite the intense media focus on EVD rather than other threats, emergency physicians must master and follow essential public health principles for management of all infectious diseases. This includes not only identification and treatment of individuals, but also protection of healthcare workers and prevention of spread, keeping in mind the possibility of other more common disease processes. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  17. Improved Palmprint Identification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshala C. Salave

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Generally private information is provided by using passwords or Personal Identification Numbers which is easy to implement but it is very easily stolen or forgotten or hack. In Biometrics for individuals identification uses human physiological which are constant throughout life like palm face DNA iris etc. or behavioral characteristicswhich is not constant in life like voice signature keystroke etc.. But mostly gain more attention to palmprint identification and is becoming more popular technique using for identification and promising alternatives to the traditional password or PIN based authentication techniques. In this paper propose palmprint identification using veins on the palm and fingers. Here use fusion of techniques such as Discrete Wavelet transformDWT Canny Edge Detector Gaussian Filter Principle Component AnalysisPCA.

  18. Barriers to Translation of Physical Activity into the Lung Cancer Model of Care. A Qualitative Study of Clinicians' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Catherine L; Denehy, Linda; Remedios, Louisa; Retica, Sarah; Phongpagdi, Pimsiri; Hart, Nicholas; Parry, Selina M

    2016-12-01

    both clinician- and healthcare system-related factors. A combined approach to target a number of these factors should be used to inform research, improve clinical services, and develop policies aiming to increase physical activity and improve survivorship outcomes for patients with lung cancer.

  19. Real-time feedback on nonverbal clinical communication. Theoretical framework and clinician acceptance of ambient visual design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A L; Patel, R A; Czerwinski, M; Pratt, W; Roseway, A; Chandrasekaran, N; Back, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the focus theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Pervasive Intelligent Technologies for Health". Effective nonverbal communication between patients and clinicians fosters both the delivery of empathic patient-centered care and positive patient outcomes. Although nonverbal skill training is a recognized need, few efforts to enhance patient-clinician communication provide visual feedback on nonverbal aspects of the clinical encounter. We describe a novel approach that uses social signal processing technology (SSP) to capture nonverbal cues in real time and to display ambient visual feedback on control and affiliation--two primary, yet distinct dimensions of interpersonal nonverbal communication. To examine the design and clinician acceptance of ambient visual feedback on nonverbal communication, we 1) formulated a model of relational communication to ground SSP and 2) conducted a formative user study using mixed methods to explore the design of visual feedback. Based on a model of relational communication, we reviewed interpersonal communication research to map nonverbal cues to signals of affiliation and control evidenced in patient-clinician interaction. Corresponding with our formulation of this theoretical framework, we designed ambient real-time visualizations that reflect variations of affiliation and control. To explore clinicians' acceptance of this visual feedback, we conducted a lab study using the Wizard-of-Oz technique to simulate system use with 16 healthcare professionals. We followed up with seven of those participants through interviews to iterate on the design with a revised visualization that addressed emergent design considerations. Ambient visual feedback on non- verbal communication provides a theoretically grounded and acceptable way to provide clinicians with awareness of their nonverbal communication style. We provide implications for the design of such visual feedback that encourages empathic patient

  20. The clinician factor: Personality characteristics of clinicians and their impact upon clinical outcomes in the management of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Fergus J; Russell, Ellyn; McCombe, Julia; O'Connell, Michele A; Skinner, Timothy

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate clinician qualities that influence metabolic outcomes in youth with type 1 diabetes. Data were gathered over two 3 month periods in a large tertiary diabetes center (1500 patients, 8 clinicians) from patients with type 1 diabetes who received continuous care from each clinician. Data included sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen, body mass index (BMI), insulin dose and episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Clinician data included target blood glucose levels, target glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), Diabetes Attitude Scale and Big 5 Personality Inventory Scale. Mean HbA1c per clinician was the primary outcome variable. The 8 clinicians saw a total of 464 patients during the first time period, and 603 in the second time period. Lowest to highest mean HbA1c per clinician varied by 0.7%. There were small but statistically significant differences between clinicians with their patients' age at diagnosis, duration of diabetes, age, gender, treatment type and BMI SD score. After controlling for these differences, the clinician characteristics that were associated with lower mean HbA1c were having no lower limit in target HbA1c and being self-reportedly "less agreeable." The impact of these clinician attitudinal traits was equivalent to the combined effects of patient characteristics and treatment type. There was a significant variation in metabolic outcomes between treating clinicians. After controlling for patient clinical differences, clinician mean HbA1c was associated with lower limit in target HbA1c and being "less agreeable." Clinicians who were more demanding and dogmatic appeared to have better outcomes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clinicians' views and experiences of offering two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhoa, Celine Y; Sawyer, Alexandra; Ayers, Susan; Pushpa-Rajah, Angela; Duley, Lelia

    2017-04-26

    The Cord Pilot Trial compared alternative policies for timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth at eight UK hospitals. Preterm birth can be rapid and unexpected, allowing little time for the usual consent process. Therefore, in addition to the usual procedure for written consent, a two-stage pathway for consent for use when birth was imminent was developed. The aims of this study were to explore clinicians' views and experiences of offering two consent pathways for recruitment to a randomised trial of timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth. This was a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Clinicians from eight hospitals in the UK who had been involved in offering consent to the Cord Pilot Trial were invited to take part in an interview. Clinicians were interviewed in person or by telephone. Interviews were analysed using inductive systematic thematic analysis. Seventeen clinicians who had either offered usual written consent only (n = 6) or both the two-stage pathway (with oral assent before the birth and written consent after the birth) and usual written consent (n = 11) were interviewed. Six themes were identified: (1) team approach to offering participation; (2) consent form as a record; (3) consent and participation as a continual process; (4) different consent pathways for different trials; (5) balance between time, information, and understanding; and (6) validity of consent. Overall, clinicians were supportive of the two-stage consent pathway. Some clinicians felt that in time-critical situations oral assent presented an advantage over the usual written consent as they provided information on a "need to know" basis. However, there was some concern about how much information should be given for oral assent, and how this is understood by women when birth is imminent. The two-stage pathway for consent developed for use in the Cord Pilot Trial when birth was imminent was acceptable to clinicians for comparable low-risk studies

  2. Collaboration in a competitive healthcare system: negotiation 101 for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay-Williams, Robyn; Johnson, Andrew; Lane, Paul; Li, Zhicheng; Camilleri, Lauren; Winata, Teresa; Klug, Michael

    2018-04-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of negotiation training delivered to senior clinicians, managers and executives, by exploring whether staff members implemented negotiation skills in their workplace following the training, and if so, how and when. Design/methodology/approach This is a qualitative study involving face-to-face interviews with 18 senior clinicians, managers and executives who completed a two-day intensive negotiation skills training course. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and inductive interpretive analysis techniques were used to identify common themes. Research setting was a large tertiary care hospital and health service in regional Australia. Findings Participants generally reported positive affective and utility reactions to the training, and attempted to implement at least some of the skills in the workplace. The main enabler was provision of a Negotiation Toolkit to assist in preparing and conducting negotiations. The main barrier was lack of time to reflect on the principles and prepare for upcoming negotiations. Participants reported that ongoing skill development and retention were not adequately addressed; suggestions for improving sustainability included provision of refresher training and mentoring. Research limitations/implications Limitations include self-reported data, and interview questions positively elicited examples of training translation. Practical implications The training was well matched to participant needs, with negotiation a common and daily activity for most healthcare professionals. Implementation of the skills showed potential for improving collaboration and problem solving in the workplace. Practical examples of how the skills were used in the workplace are provided. Originality/value To the authors' knowledge, this is the first international study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of an integrative bargaining negotiation training program targeting executives, senior

  3. Comparison of methods of alert acknowledgement by critical care clinicians in the ICU setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Harrison

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Electronic Health Record (EHR-based sepsis alert systems have failed to demonstrate improvements in clinically meaningful endpoints. However, the effect of implementation barriers on the success of new sepsis alert systems is rarely explored. Objective To test the hypothesis time to severe sepsis alert acknowledgement by critical care clinicians in the ICU setting would be reduced using an EHR-based alert acknowledgement system compared to a text paging-based system. Study Design In one arm of this simulation study, real alerts for patients in the medical ICU were delivered to critical care clinicians through the EHR. In the other arm, simulated alerts were delivered through text paging. The primary outcome was time to alert acknowledgement. The secondary outcomes were a structured, mixed quantitative/qualitative survey and informal group interview. Results The alert acknowledgement rate from the severe sepsis alert system was 3% (N = 148 and 51% (N = 156 from simulated severe sepsis alerts through traditional text paging. Time to alert acknowledgement from the severe sepsis alert system was median 274 min (N = 5 and median 2 min (N = 80 from text paging. The response rate from the EHR-based alert system was insufficient to compare primary measures. However, secondary measures revealed important barriers. Conclusion Alert fatigue, interruption, human error, and information overload are barriers to alert and simulation studies in the ICU setting.

  4. Inter-rater Agreement of Clinicians' Treatment Recommendations Based on Modified Barium Swallow Study Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovarp, Laurie; Danielson, Jennifer; Liss, Julie

    2018-06-07

    The modified barium swallow study (MBSS) is a commonly used radiographic procedure for diagnosis and treatment of swallowing disorders. Despite attempts by dysphagia specialists to standardize the MBSS, most institutions have not adopted such standardized procedures. High variability of assessment patterns arguably contribute to variability of treatment recommendations made from diagnostic information derived from the MBSS report. An online survey was distributed to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) participating in American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA) listservs. Sixty-three SLPs who treat swallowing disorders participated. Participating SLPs reviewed two MBSS reports and chose physiologic treatment targets (e.g., tongue base retraction) based on each report. One report primarily contained symptomatology (e.g., aspiration, pharyngeal residue) with minimal information on impaired physiology (e.g., laryngeal incompetence, reduced hyolaryngeal elevation/excursion). In contrast, the second report contained a clear description of impaired physiology to explain the dysphagia symptoms. Fleiss kappa coefficients were used to analyze inter-rater agreement across the high and low physiology report types. Results revealed significantly higher inter-rater agreement across clinicians when reviewing reports with clear explanation(s) of physiologic impairment relative to reports that primarily focused on symptomatology. Clinicians also reported significantly greater satisfaction and treatment confidence following review of reports with clear description(s) of impaired physiology.

  5. Are Clinicians Better Than Lay Judges at Recalling Case Details? An Evaluation of Expert Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher A; Keeley, Jared W; Eakin, Deborah K

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the role of expertise in clinicians' memory for case details. Clinicians' diagnostic formulations may afford mechanisms for retaining and retrieving information. Experts (N = 41; 47.6% males, 23.8% females; 28.6% did not report gender; age: mean [M] = 54.69) were members of the American Board of Professional Psychologists. Lay judges (N = 156; 25.4% males, 74.1% females; age: M = 18.85) were undergraduates enrolled in general psychology. Three vignettes were presented to each group, creating a 2 (group: expert, lay judge) x 3 (vignettes: simple, complex-coherent, complex-incoherent) mixed factorial design. Recall accuracy for vignette details was the dependent variable. Data analyses used multivariate analyses of variance to detect group differences among multiple continuous variables. Experts recalled more information than lay judges, overall. However, experts also exhibited more false memories for the complex-incoherent case because of their schema-based knowledge. This study supported clinical expertise as beneficial. Nonetheless, negative influences from experts' schema-based knowledge, as exhibited, could adversely affect clinical practices. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The clinician's guide to composing effective business plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Alan B; Blondell, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In today's challenging healthcare environment, clinicians need to understand the fundamentals of financial analysis, which are the underpinnings of their clinical programs, especially when seeking administrative support for new initiatives. The business plan for new clinical program initiatives is composed of diverse elements such as the mission statement, market and competitive analyses, operations plan, and financial analysis. Armed with a basic knowledge of financial analysis of clinical programs, as well as forward-looking analysis of an initiative's added value, the healthcare provider can work much more effectively with administration in developing or creating new healthcare program initiatives.

  7. Supporting clinician educators to achieve “work-work balance”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry M Maniate

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinician Educators (CE have numerous responsibilities in different professional domains, including clinical, education, research, and administration. Many CEs face tensions trying to manage these often competing professional responsibilities and achieve “work-work balance.” Rich discussions of techniques for work-work balance amongst CEs at a medical education conference inspired the authors to gather, analyze, and summarize these techniques to share with others. In this paper we present the CE’s “Four Ps”; these are practice points that support both the aspiring and established CE to help improve their performance and productivity as CEs, and allow them to approach work-work balance.

  8. Clinician-patient E-mail communication: challenges for reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, Eugenie M

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians are rapidly gaining experience with online clinician-patient consultation, and more tools are becoming available to support these efforts. In addition, we now have evidence that using electronic communication is cost-effective to payers and appealing to patients and providers. At present, there appear to be few barriers to the adoption of these solutions for practices that use other online services. Security concerns can easily be overcome by using programs described in this commentary. Larger and longer studies that evaluate the benefits and cost savings in more detail may help convince other payers and providers of the utility of the Web-based programs. More studies are needed to understand the effect of dinician-patient electronic communication on the costs of caring for chronic illness. When these solutions also include support tools, such as electronic prescribing, which could improve patient safety and quality of care, they should be encouraged. In their article entitled, "Electrons in Flight-Email between Doctors and Patients," Delbanco and Sands postulate that the future of e-communication in medicine will be integrated with a patient-controlled health record and will include secure synchronous and asynchronous communication, video conferencing and messaging, instant transcription into the written record, full-patient access to the record, translation into different languages, connectivity to multiple data sources, incorporation of multi-media educational materials. It-will also allow data from home-based diagnostic technology to be sent to clinicians. "Electronic communication will move medicine inexorably toward such transparency, enabling doctors and patients to share knowledge, responsibility, and decision-making more equally. We need to explore rapidly how this change will affect the quality of care for patients and the quality of life for doctors." The widespread dependence on Internet-based electronic communication to support a variety of

  9. November 8, 2016: The day I became a White clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Susan

    2018-05-01

    When Donald Trump became president of the United States, I discovered that my clients who identified as Black saw me as a White clinician. With that came a host of nefarious attributions. To preserve therapeutic efficacy, and the genuine relationships with people about whom I cared, I had to distinguish myself from the president; thus, I learned not only how it feels to be seen through the bias of skin color but what I needed to do to identify as a person rather than a White person. "Welcome to my world," said one African American client. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Provisional materials: advances lead to extensive options for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisi, John C

    2015-01-01

    The progression of provisional materials to bis-acrylics has lead to such improvements as easier handling, improved compressive and tensile strength, less water sorption, and less shrinkage. The end-result is more options for clinicians for high-quality chairside provisional restorations. Newer provisional materials are easy to manipulate and bring increased comfort to the patient. This review of current products affirms that the choices of provisional materials available for the dental professional today are quite extensive and have advanced the quality of interim restorations.

  11. Evidence summaries (decision boxes) to prepare clinicians for shared decision-making with patients: a mixed methods implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Anik M C; Labrecque, Michel; Haynes, R Brian; Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Légaré, France; Cauchon, Michel; Greenway, Matthew; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues

    2014-10-05

    Decision boxes (Dboxes) provide clinicians with research evidence about management options for medical questions that have no single best answer. Dboxes fulfil a need for rapid clinical training tools to prepare clinicians for clinician-patient communication and shared decision-making. We studied the barriers and facilitators to using the Dbox information in clinical practice. We used a mixed methods study with sequential explanatory design. We recruited family physicians, residents, and nurses from six primary health-care clinics. Participants received eight Dboxes covering various questions by email (one per week). For each Dbox, they completed a web questionnaire to rate clinical relevance and cognitive impact and to assess the determinants of their intention to use what they learned from the Dbox to explain to their patients the advantages and disadvantages of the options, based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Following the 8-week delivery period, we conducted focus groups with clinicians and interviews with clinic administrators to explore contextual factors influencing the use of the Dbox information. One hundred clinicians completed the web surveys. In 54% of the 496 questionnaires completed, they reported that their practice would be improved after having read the Dboxes, and in 40%, they stated that they would use this information for their patients. Of those who would use the information for their patients, 89% expected it would benefit their patients, especially in that it would allow the patient to make a decision more in keeping with his/her personal circumstances, values, and preferences. They intended to use the Dboxes in practice (mean 5.6±1.2, scale 1-7, with 7 being "high"), and their intention was significantly related to social norm, perceived behavioural control, and attitude according to the TPB (Pdecision aids and training in shared decision-making would facilitate the use of the Dbox information. Some participants would have liked

  12. Maternity care for trafficked women: Survivor experiences and clinicians' perspectives in the United Kingdom's National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Debra; Howard, Louise M; Oram, Sian; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Although trafficked women and adolescents are at risk of unprotected or forced sex, there is little research on maternity care among trafficking survivors. We explored health care needs, service use and challenges among women who became pregnant while in the trafficking situation in the United Kingdom (UK) and clinicians' perspectives of maternity care for trafficked persons. Cross-sectional survey and qualitative interviews with trafficking survivors recruited from statutory and voluntary sector organisations in England and qualitative interviews with maternity clinicians and family doctors undertaken to offer further insight into experiences reported by these women. Twenty-eight (29%) of 98 women who took part in a large study of trafficking survivors reported one or more pregnancies while trafficked, whose data are reported here. Twelve (42.8%) of these women reported at least one termination of pregnancy while in the trafficking situation and 25 (89.3%) experienced some form of mental health disorder. Nineteen (67.9%) women experienced pre-trafficking physical abuse and 9 (32.%) sexual abuse. A quarter of women were trafficked for sexual exploitation, six for domestic servitude and two for manual labour. Survivors and clinicians described service challenges, including restrictions placed on women's movements by traffickers, poor knowledge on how to access maternity care, poor understanding of healthcare entitlements and concerns about confidentiality. Maternity care clinicians recognised potential indicators of trafficking, but considered training would help them identify and respond to victims. Main limitations include that findings reflect women who had exited the trafficking situation, however as some had only recently exited the trafficking situation, difficulties with recall were likely to be low. More than one in four women became pregnant while trafficked, indicating that maternity services offer an important contact point for identification and care

  13. Optimal utilization of a breast care advanced practice clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Katie W; Mone, Mary C; Serpico, Victoria J; Ward, Cori; Lynch, Joanna; Neumayer, Leigh A; Nelson, Edward W

    2014-12-01

    Incorporation of "lean" business philosophy within health care has the goal of adding value by reducing cost and improving quality. Applying these principles to the role of Advance Practice Clinicians (APCs) is relevant because they have become essential members of the healthcare team. An independent surgical breast care clinic directed by an APC was created with measurements of success to include the following: time to obtain an appointment, financial viability, and patient/APC/MD satisfaction. During the study period, there was a trend toward a decreased median time to obtain an appointment. Monthly APC charges increased from $388 to $30,800. The mean provider satisfaction score by Press Ganey was 96% for the APC and 95.8% for the surgeon. Both clinicians expressed significant satisfaction with clinic development. Overall, initiation of an APC breast clinic met the proposed goals of success. The use of lean philosophy demonstrates that implementation of change can result in added value in patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder. A guide for the treating clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hal

    2002-01-01

    Up to 75% of women report some premenstrual symptoms, but less than 10% have symptoms severe enough to qualify for a diagnosis of PMDD. A key to diagnosis is establishing a pattern of typical PMDD symptoms that recur during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and remit after menses. Underlying psychiatric and medical disorders that might mimic PMDD should be ruled out or addressed. The clinician should recognize that severe PMS and PMDD are most likely caused by sensitivity to hormonal cycling rather than an abnormality of hormone levels. Current treatment is based on the hypothesis that serotonin depletion is responsible for the premenstrual irritability, dysphoria, and poor impulse control in PMDD. There is some evidence that GABA, endogenous opiates, allopregenolone, and various vitamins and minerals might play roles in severe PMS and PMDD. Treatment with oral contraceptives or supplementary progesterone or estrogen has not been effective. For the treating clinician, a reasonable approach to the patient with severe PMS or PMDD is shown in Table 2.

  15. Patient satisfaction with clinicians in colorectal 2-week wait clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Karen; Kent, Bridie

    2017-03-23

    To determine if patient satisfaction is affected by the clinician (nurse or doctor), conducting the colorectal 2-week wait (2ww) clinics. A prospective non-randomised comparative cohort study of 339 consecutive patients (divided by blind allocation into nurse-led (n=216) and doctor-led (n=123) cohorts) conducted over a 3-month period. Patient satisfaction in both cohorts was assessed by an adapted version of the Grogan et al validated patient satisfaction questionnaire. The questionnaire was piloted first and was found to have high internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.91). The study had a response rate of 78% (n=258/331) and overall satisfaction scores showed 85% (n=149/175) of patients in the nurse-led cohort and 65% (n=54/83) of patients in the doctor-led cohort strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the care they received. Mean overall satisfaction scores in the two cohorts revealed that the nurse-led cohort achieved significantly more 'strongly agree' responses than the doctor-led cohort (ppatient satisfaction was affected by the clinician conducting the 2ww clinic, in that the nurse-led cohort displayed significantly higher patient satisfaction. However, there are areas that merit further research.

  16. Eye dosimetry and protective eye wear for interventional clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.J.; Magee, J.S.; Sandblom; Almen, A.; Lundh, C.

    2015-01-01

    Doses to the eyes of interventional clinicians can exceed 20 mSv. Various protective devices can afford protection to the eyes with the final barrier being protective eye wear. The protection provided by lead glasses is difficult to quantify, and the majority of dosimeters are not designed to be worn under lead glasses. This study has measured dose reduction factors (DRFs) equal to the ratio of the dose with no protection, divided by that when lead glasses are worn. Glasses have been tested in X-ray fields using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate the patient and clinician. DRFs for X-rays incident from the front vary from 5.2 to 7.6, while values for orientations reminiscent of clinical practice are between 1.4 and 5.2. Results suggest that a DRF of two is a conservative factor that could be applied to personal dosimeter measurements to account for the dose reduction provided by most types of lead glasses. (authors)

  17. Strategies for research engagement of clinicians in allied health (STRETCH): a mixed methods research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickan, Sharon; Wenke, Rachel; Weir, Kelly; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Noble, Christy

    2017-09-11

    Allied health professionals (AHPs) report positive attitudes to using research evidence in clinical practice, yet often lack time, confidence and skills to use, participate in and conduct research. A range of multifaceted strategies including education, mentoring and guidance have been implemented to increase AHPs' use of and participation in research. Emerging evidence suggests that knowledge brokering activities have the potential to support research engagement, but it is not clear which knowledge brokering strategies are most effective and in what contexts they work best to support and maintain clinicians' research engagement. This protocol describes an exploratory concurrent mixed methods study that is designed to understand how allied health research fellows use knowledge brokering strategies within tailored evidence-based interventions, to facilitate research engagement by allied health clinicians. Simultaneously, a realist approach will guide a systematic process evaluation of the research fellows' pattern of use of knowledge brokering strategies within each case study to build a programme theory explaining which knowledge brokering strategies work best, in what contexts and why. Learning and behavioural theories will inform this critical explanation. An explanation of how locally tailored evidence-based interventions improve AHPs use of, participation in and leadership of research projects will be summarised and shared with all participating clinicians and within each case study. It is expected that local recommendations will be developed and shared with medical and nursing professionals in and beyond the health service, to facilitate building research capacity in a systematic and effective way. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Evidence gaps in advanced cancer care: community-based clinicians' perspectives and priorities for CER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Sarah J; Loggers, Elizabeth T; Bowles, Erin J A; Wagner, Edward H

    2012-05-01

    Although much effort has focused on identifying national comparative effectiveness research (CER) priorities, little is known about the CER priorities of community-based practitioners treating patients with advanced cancer. CER priorities of managed care-based clinicians may be valuable as reflections of both payer and provider research interests. We conducted mixed methods interviews with 10 clinicians (5 oncologists and 5 pharmacists) at 5 health plans within the Health Maintenance Organization Cancer Research Network. We asked, "What evidence do you most wish you had when treating patients with advanced cancer" and questioned participants on their impressions and knowledge of CER and pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs). We conducted qualitative analyses to identify themes across interviews. Ninety percent of participants had heard of CER, 20% had heard of PCTs, and all rated CER/PCTs as highly relevant to patient and health plan decision making. Each participant offered between 3 and 10 research priorities. Half (49%) involved head-to-head treatment comparisons; another 20% involved comparing different schedules or dosing regimens of the same treatment. The majority included alternative outcomes to survival (eg, toxicity, quality of life, noninferiority). Participants cited several limitations to existing evidence, including lack of generalizability, funding biases, and rapid development of new treatments. Head-to-head treatment comparisons remain a major evidence need among community- based oncology clinicians, and CER/PCTs are highly valued methods to address the limitations of traditional randomized trials, answer questions of cost-effectiveness or noninferiority, and inform data-driven dialogue and decision making by all stakeholders.

  19. Managing diabetic foot infections: a survey of Australasian infectious diseases clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commons, Robert J; Raby, Edward; Athan, Eugene; Bhally, Hasan; Chen, Sharon; Guy, Stephen; Ingram, Paul R; Lai, Katy; Lemoh, Chris; Lim, Lyn-Li; Manning, Laurens; Miyakis, Spiros; O'Reilly, Mary; Roberts, Adam; Sehu, Marjoree; Torda, Adrienne; Vicaretti, Mauro; Lazzarini, Peter A

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic foot infections (DFI) present a major morbidity, mortality and economic challenge for the tertiary health sector. However, lack of high quality evidence for specific treatment regimens for patients with DFIs may result in inconsistent management. This study aimed to identify DFI caseload proportion and patterns of clinical practice of Infectious Diseases (ID) Physicians and Trainees within Australia and New Zealand. A cross-sectional online survey of Australian and New Zealand ID Physicians and Trainees was undertaken, to estimate the overall ID caseload devoted to patients with DFIs and assess clinicians' management practices of patients with DFIs. Approximately 28% (142/499) of ID Physicians and Trainees from Australia and New Zealand responded to the survey. DFI made up 19.2% of all ID consultations. Involvement in multidisciplinary teams (MDT) was common as 77.5% (93/120) of those responding indicated their patients had access to an inpatient or outpatient MDT. Significant heterogeneity of antimicrobial treatments was reported, with 82 unique treatment regimens used by 102 respondents in one scenario and 76 unique treatment regimens used by 101 respondents in the second scenario. The duration of therapy and the choice of antibiotics for microorganisms isolated from superficial swabs also varied widely. Patients with DFIs represent a significant proportion of an ID clinician's caseload. This should be reflected in the ID training program. Large heterogeneity in practice between clinicians reflects a lack of evidence from well-designed clinical trials for patients with DFI and highlights the need for management guidelines informed by future trials.

  20. Ethics of fertility preservation for prepubertal children: should clinicians offer procedures where efficacy is largely unproven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Rosalind J; Gillam, Lynn; Delany, Clare; Jayasinghe, Yasmin

    2018-01-01

    Young children with cancer are treated with interventions that can have a high risk of compromising their reproductive potential. 'Fertility preservation' for children who have not yet reached puberty involves surgically removing and cryopreserving reproductive tissue prior to treatment in the expectation that strategies for the use of this tissue will be developed in the future. Fertility preservation for prepubertal children is ethically complex because the techniques largely lack proven efficacy for this age group. There is professional difference of opinion about whether it is ethical to offer such 'experimental' procedures. The question addressed in this paper is: when, if ever, is it ethically justifiable to offer fertility preservation surgery to prepubertal children? We present the ethical concerns about prepubertal fertility preservation, drawing both on existing literature and our experience discussing this issue with clinicians in clinical ethics case consultations. We argue that offering the procedure is ethically justifiable in certain circumstances. For many children, the balance of benefits and burdens is such that the procedure is ethically permissible but not ethically required; when the procedure is medically safe, it is the parents' decision to make, with appropriate information and guidance from the treating clinicians. We suggest that clinical ethics support processes are necessary to assist clinicians to engage with the ethical complexity of prepubertal fertility preservation and describe the framework that has been integrated into the pathway of care for patients and families attending the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children's Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians With and Without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J; Jenkins, Melissa M; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F

    2015-02-01

    Mental health professionals' decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments on clinicians' assessment and treatment formulations using case vignettes. Specifically, study aims included using the Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM) cognitive theory to 1) examine potential associations between EBT training and decision-making processes (novice versus expert type), and 2) explore how client and family contextual information affects clinical decision-making. Forty-eight clinicians across two groups (EBT trained=14, Not EBT trained=34) participated. Clinicians were comparable on professional experience, demographics, and discipline. The quasi-experimental design used an analog "think aloud" method where clinicians read case vignettes about a child with disruptive behavior problems and verbalized case conceptualization and treatment planning out-loud. Responses were coded according to NDM theory. MANOVA results were significant for EBT training status such that EBT trained clinicians' displayed cognitive processes more closely aligned with "expert" decision-makers and non-EBT trained clinicians' decision processes were more similar to "novice" decision-makers, following NDM theory. Non-EBT trained clinicians assigned significantly more diagnoses, provided less detailed treatment plans and discussed fewer EBTs. Parent/family contextual information also appeared to influence decision-making. This study offers a preliminary investigation of the possible broader impacts of EBT training and potential associations with development of expert decision-making skills. Targeting clinicians' decision-making may be an important avenue to pursue within dissemination-implementation efforts in mental health practice.

  2. Discharge planning for a patient with a new ostomy: best practice for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Anita; Colwell, Janice C; Cross, Heidi H; Mantel, Janet; Perkins, Jacqueline; Walker, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive discharge plan for a patient with a new stoma is needed to ensure the individual receives the necessary ostomy education prior to discharge. The plan should include teaching basic skills and providing information about how to manage the ostomy (ie, emptying and changing the pouch, how to order supplies, available manufacturers, dietary/fluid guidelines, potential complications, medications, and managing gas and odor), assisting with transitions in care, and providing information about resources for support and assistance. The purpose of this best practice guideline is to provide clinicians with a brief overview of the essential elements that should be included in the discharge plan to facilitate patient education and the transition of care from hospital to home.

  3. Prison Clinicians' Perceptions of Antisocial Personality Disorder as a Formal Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gail Flint

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed and interviewed 53 clinicians who work with prison inmates. Results indicated that clinicians used diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder liberally among inmates and felt majority of inmates could be so diagnosed. Large minority of clinicians went beyond Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria and reported…

  4. Outcomes achieved by and police and clinician perspectives on a joint police officer and mental health clinician mobile response unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart J; Thomas, Phillipa; Doulis, Chantelle; Bowles, Doug; Henderson, Kathryn; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Perez, Eva; Stafrace, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Despite their limited mental health expertise, police are often first to respond to people experiencing a mental health crisis. Often the person in crisis is then transported to hospital for care, instead of receiving more immediate assessment and treatment in the community. The current study conducted an evaluation of an Australian joint police-mental health mobile response unit that aimed to improve the delivery of a community-based crisis response. Activity data were audited to demonstrate utilization and outcomes for referred people. Police officers and mental health clinicians in the catchment area were also surveyed to measure the unit's perceived impact. During the 6-month pilot, 296 contacts involving the unit occurred. Threatened suicide (33%), welfare concerns (22%) and psychotic episodes (18%) were the most common reasons for referral. The responses comprised direct admission to a psychiatric unit for 11% of contacts, transportation to a hospital emergency department for 32% of contacts, and community management for the remainder (57%). Police officers were highly supportive of the model and reported having observed benefits of the unit for consumers and police and improved collaboration between services. The joint police-mental health clinician unit enabled rapid delivery of a multi-skilled crisis response in the community. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Training clinicians in how to use patient-reported outcome measures in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria J; Haverman, Lotte; Absolom, Kate; Takeuchi, Elena; Feeny, David; Grootenhuis, Martha; Velikova, Galina

    2015-07-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) were originally developed for comparing groups of people in clinical trials and population studies, and the results were used to support treatment recommendations or inform health policy, but there was not direct benefit for the participants providing PROs data. However, as the experience in using those measures increased, it became obvious the clinical value in using individual patient PROs profiles in daily practice to identify/monitor symptoms, evaluate treatment outcomes and support shared decision-making. A key issue limiting successful implementation is clinicians' lack of knowledge on how to effectively utilize PROs data in their clinical encounters. Using a change management theoretical framework, this paper describes the development and implementation of three programs for training clinicians to effectively use PRO data in routine practice. The training programs are in three diverse clinical areas (adult oncology, lung transplant and paediatrics), in three countries with different healthcare systems, thus providing a rare opportunity to pull out common approaches whilst recognizing specific settings. For each program, we describe the clinical and organizational setting, the program planning and development, the content of the training session with supporting material, subsequent monitoring of PROs use and evidence of adoption. The common successful components and practical steps are identified, leading to discussion and future recommendations. The results of the three training programs are described as the implementation. In the oncology program, PRO data have been developed and are currently evaluated; in the lung transplant program, PRO data are used in daily practice and the integration with electronic patient records is under development; and in the paediatric program, PRO data are fully implemented with around 7,600 consultations since the start of the implementation. Adult learning programs teaching clinicians

  6. Ten clinician-driven strategies for maximising value of Australian health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ian

    2014-05-01

    To articulate the concept of high-value care (i.e. clinically relevant, patient-important benefit at lowest possible cost) and suggest strategies by which clinicians can promote such care in rendering the Australian healthcare system more affordable and sustainable. Strategies were developed by the author based on personal experience in clinical practice, evidence-based medicine and quality improvement. Relevant literature was reviewed in retrieving studies supporting each strategy. Ten strategies were developed: (1) minimise errors in diagnosis; (2) discontinue low- or no-value practices that provide little benefit or cause harm; (3) defer the use of unproven interventions; (4) select care options according to comparative cost-effectiveness; (5) target clinical interventions to those who derive greatest benefit; (6) adopt a more conservative approach nearing the end of life; (7) actively involve patients in shared decision making and self-management; (8) minimise day-to-day operational waste; (9) convert healthcare institutions into rapidly learning organisations; and (10) advocate for integrated patient care across all clinical settings. Clinicians and their professional organisations, in partnership with managers, can implement strategies capable of maximising value and sustainability of health care in Australia. What is known about this topic? Value-based care has emerged as a unitary concept that integrates quality and cost, and is being increasingly used to inform healthcare policy making and reform. What does this paper add? There is scant literature that translates the concept of high value care into actionable enhancement strategies for clinicians in everyday practice settings. This article provides 10 strategies with supporting studies in an attempt to fill this gap. What are the implications for practitioners? If all practitioners, in partnership with healthcare managers, attempted to enact all 10 strategies in their workplaces, a significant quantum of

  7. Clinician support and psychosocial risk factors associated with breastfeeding discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveras, Elsie M; Capra, Angela M; Braveman, Paula A; Jensvold, Nancy G; Escobar, Gabriel J; Lieu, Tracy A

    2003-07-01

    Breastfeeding rates fall short of goals set in Healthy People 2010 and other national recommendations. The current, national breastfeeding continuation rate of 29% at 6 months lags behind the Healthy People 2010 goal of 50%. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between breastfeeding discontinuation at 2 and 12 weeks postpartum and clinician support, maternal physical and mental health status, workplace issues, and other factors amenable to intervention. A prospective cohort study was conducted of low-risk mothers and infants who were in a health maintenance organization and enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial of home visits. Mothers were interviewed in person at 1 to 2 days postpartum and by telephone at 2 and 12 weeks. Logistic regression modeling was performed to assess the independent effects of the predictors of interest, adjusting for sociodemographic and other confounding variables. Of the 1163 mother-newborn pairs in the cohort, 1007 (87%) initiated breastfeeding, 872 (75%) were breastfeeding at the 2-week interview, and 646 (55%) were breastfeeding at the 12-week interview. In the final multivariate models, breastfeeding discontinuation at 2 weeks was associated with lack of confidence in ability to breastfeed at the 1- to 2-day interview (odds ratio [OR]: 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-7.6), early breastfeeding problems (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-1.97), Asian race/ethnicity (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.1-5.7), and lower maternal education (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.2-1.9). Mothers were much less likely to discontinue breastfeeding at 12 weeks postpartum if they reported (during the 12-week interview) having received encouragement from their clinician to breastfeed (OR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.8). Breastfeeding discontinuation at 12 weeks was also associated with demographic factors and maternal depressive symptoms (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.01-1.37) and returning to work or school by 12 weeks postpartum (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.8-3.3). Our results indicate

  8. Barriers and strategies for improving communication between inpatient and outpatient mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Susan E; Sherin, Jonathan E; Chan, Jeffrey A; Hermann, Richard C

    2011-11-01

    To explore hospital leaders' perceptions of organisational factors as barriers and/or facilitators in improving inpatient-outpatient (IP-OP) communication. Semistructured in-person interviews. Constant comparative method of qualitative data. Inpatient psychiatry units in 33 general medical/surgical and specialty psychiatric hospitals in California and Massachusetts (USA). Psychiatry chair/chief, service director or medical director. Importance to leadership, resources, organisational structure and culture. A majority of hospital leaders rated the IP-OP communication objective as highly or moderately important. Hospitals with good IP-OP communication had structures in place to support communication or had changed/implemented new procedures to enhance communication, and anticipated clinicians would 'buy in' to the goal of improved communication. Hospitals reporting no improvement efforts were less likely to have structures supporting IP-OP communication, anticipated resistance among clinicians and reported a need for technological resources such as electronic health records, integrated IT and secure online communication. Most leaders reported a need for additional staff time and information, knowledge or data. For many hospitals, successfully improving communication will require overcoming organisational barriers such as cultures not conducive to change and lack of resources and infrastructure. Creating a culture that values communication at discharge may help improve outcomes following hospitalisation, but changes in healthcare delivery in the past few decades may necessitate new strategies or changes at the systems level to address barriers to effective communication.

  9. Controlling liver cancer internationally: A qualitative study of clinicians' perceptions of current public policy needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, John Fp; Gallego, Gisselle; Blauvelt, Barri M

    2011-07-28

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh for women. Usually because of late diagnosis, the prognosis for liver cancer remains poor, resulting in liver cancer being the third most common cause of death from cancer. While some countries have treatment guidelines, little is known or understood about the strategies needed for liver cancer control internationally. To explore leading liver cancer clinician's perceptions of the current public policy needs to control liver cancer internationally. Key informant interviews were conducted with a range of liver cancer clinicians involved in policy in eleven countries. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated (where necessary), de-identified and analyzed by two researchers using a constant comparative method. Twenty in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in: Australia, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey and the United States. Nine themes were identified and cluster into three groups: 1) Promoting prevention via early risk assessment, focusing on viral hepatitis and other lifestyle factors; 2) Increasing political, public and medical community awareness; and 3) Improving funding for screening, liver cancer surveillance and treatment. This study is an important step towards developing an evidence-based approach to assessing preparedness for implementing comprehensive liver cancer control strategies. Evaluation mechanisms to assess countries' performance on the needs described are needed. Future research will concentrate of understanding how these needs vary across countries and the optimal strategies to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with liver cancer internationally.

  10. Engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in outcome measurement - the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Williams, Heather; Sephton, Keith; Rose, Hilary; Harris, Sarah; Thu, Aung

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the rationale for choosing the instruments included within the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative (UKROC) data set. Using one specialist neuro-rehabilitation unit as an exemplar service, it describes an approach to engaging the hearts and minds of clinicians in recording the data. Measures included within a national data set for rehabilitation should be psychometrically robust and feasible to use in routine clinical practice; they should also support clinical decision-making so that clinicians actually want to use them. Learning from other international casemix models and benchmarking data sets, the UKROC team has developed a cluster of measures to inform the development of effective and cost-efficient rehabilitation services. These include measures of (1) "needs" for rehabilitation (complexity), (2) inputs provided to meet those needs (nursing and therapy intervention), and (3) outcome, including the attainment of personal goals as well as gains in functional independence. By integrating the use of the data set measures in everyday clinical practice, we have achieved a very high rate of compliance with data collection. However, staff training and ongoing commitment from senior staff and managers are critical to the maintenance of effort required to provide assurance of data quality in the longer term.

  11. Introduction to health economics and decision-making: Is economics relevant for the frontline clinician?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeree, Ron; Diaby, Vakaramoko

    2013-12-01

    In a climate of escalating demands for new health care services and significant constraints on new resources, the disciplines of health economics and health technology assessment (HTA) have increasingly been turned to as explicit evidence-based frameworks to help make tough health care access and reimbursement decisions. Health economics is the discipline of economics concerned with the efficient allocation of health care resources, essentially trying to maximize health benefits to society contingent upon available resources. HTA is a broader field drawing upon several disciplines, but which relies heavily upon the tools of health economics and economic evaluation. Traditionally, health economics and economic evaluation have been widely used at the political (macro) and local (meso) decision-making levels, and have progressively had an important role even at informing individual clinical decisions (micro level). The aim of this paper is to introduce readers to health economics and discuss its relevance to frontline clinicians. Particularly, the content of the paper will facilitate clinicians' understanding of the link between economics and their medical practice, and how clinical decision-making reflects on health care resource allocation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Using clinician text notes in electronic medical record data to validate transgender-related diagnosis codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R; Cashy, John; Gordon, Adam J; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Fine, Michael J

    2018-04-04

    Transgender individuals are vulnerable to negative health risks and outcomes, but research remains limited because data sources, such as electronic medical records (EMRs), lack standardized collection of gender identity information. Most EMR do not include the gold standard of self-identified gender identity, but International Classification of Diseases (ICDs) includes diagnostic codes indicating transgender-related clinical services. However, it is unclear if these codes can indicate transgender status. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which patients' clinician notes in EMR contained transgender-related terms that could corroborate ICD-coded transgender identity. Data are from the US Department of Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse. Transgender patients were defined by the presence of ICD9 and ICD10 codes associated with transgender-related clinical services, and a 3:1 comparison group of nontransgender patients was drawn. Patients' clinician text notes were extracted and searched for transgender-related words and phrases. Among 7560 patients defined as transgender based on ICD codes, the search algorithm identified 6753 (89.3%) with transgender-related terms. Among 22 072 patients defined as nontransgender without ICD codes, 246 (1.1%) had transgender-related terms; after review, 11 patients were identified as transgender, suggesting a 0.05% false negative rate. Using ICD-defined transgender status can facilitate health services research when self-identified gender identity data are not available in EMR.

  13. Clinician Perceptions of the Importance of Hospital Discharge Components for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Kevin; Rogers, Jayne; OʼNeill, Margaret R; McBride, Sarah; Faerber, Jennifer; Feudtner, Chris; Berry, Jay G

    Discharging hospitalized children involves several different components, but their relative value is unknown. We assessed which discharge components are perceived as most and least important by clinicians. March and June of 2014, we conducted an online discrete choice experiment (DCE) among national societies representing 704 nursing, physician, case management, and social work professionals from 46 states. The DCE consisted of 14 discharge care components randomly presented two at a time for a total of 28 choice tasks. Best-worst scaling of participants' choices generated mean relative importance (RI) scores for each component, which allowed for ranking from least to most important. Participants, regardless of field or practice setting, perceived "Discharge Education/Teach-Back" (RI 11.1 [95% confidence interval, CI: 11.0-11.3]) and "Involve the Child's Care Team" (RI 10.6 [95% CI: 10.4-10.8]) as the most important discharge components, and "Information Reconciliation" (RI 4.1 [95% CI: 3.9-4.4]) and "Assigning Roles/Responsibilities of Discharge Care" (RI 2.8 [95% CI: 2.6-3.0]) as least important. A diverse group of pediatric clinicians value certain components of the pediatric discharge care process much more than others. Efforts to optimize the quality of hospital discharge for children should consider these findings.

  14. Educational Strategies to Enhance Reflexivity Among Clinicians and Health Professional Students: A Scoping Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Landy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflexivity involves the ability to understand how one's social locations and experiences of advantage or disadvantage have shaped the way one understands the world. The capacity for reflexivity is crucial because it informs clinical decisions, which can lead to improvements in service delivery and patient outcomes. In this article, we present a scoping study that explored educational strategies designed to enhance reflexivity among clinicians and/or health profession students. We reviewed articles and grey literature that address the question: What is known about strategies for enhancing reflexivity among clinicians and students in health professional training programs? We searched multiple databases using keywords including: reflexivity, reflective, allied health professionals, pedagogy, learning, and education. The search strategy was iterative and involved three reviews. Each abstract was independently reviewed by two team members. Sixty-eight texts met the inclusion criteria. There was great diversity among the educational strategies and among health professions. Commonalities across strategies were identified related to reflective writing, experiential learning, classroom-based activities, continuing education, and online learning. We also summarize the 19 texts that evaluated educational strategies to enhance reflexivity. Further research and education is urgently needed for more equitable and socially-just health care. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1603140

  15. Action and resistance mechanisms of antibiotics: A guide for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Kapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections account for a major cause of death throughout the developing world. This is mainly due to the emergence of newer infectious agents and more specifically due to the appearance of antimicrobial resistance. With time, the bacteria have become smarter and along with it, massive imprudent usage of antibiotics in clinical practice has resulted in resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. The antimicrobial resistance is recognized as a major problem in the treatment of microbial infections. The biochemical resistance mechanisms used by bacteria include the following: antibiotic inactivation, target modification, altered permeability, and “bypass” of metabolic pathway. Determination of bacterial resistance to antibiotics of all classes (phenotypes and mutations that are responsible for bacterial resistance to antibiotics (genetic analysis are helpful. Better understanding of the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance will help clinicians regarding usage of antibiotics in different situations. This review discusses the mechanism of action and resistance development in commonly used antimicrobials.

  16. Creating safety by strengthening clinicians' capacity for reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This commentary explores the nature of creating safety in the here-and-now. Creating safety encompasses two dimensions: revisiting specific behaviours by focusing on substandard performance (reflection), and a more broad-ranging attention to everyday behaviours that are taken as given (reflexivity). The piece pays particular attention to this second dimension of creating safety. Two techniques that promote reflexivity are discussed: video-filming real-time, everyday clinical practice and inviting clinicians' feedback about their own footage, and reflecting on the knowledge and questions that patients and families have about their care, and about unexpected outcomes and clinical incidents. The piece concludes that feedback about everyday practice using these methods is critical to enhancing the safety of everyday activity. PMID:21450780

  17. Approach to Peripheral Neuropathy for the Primary Care Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher T; Seyedsadjadi, Reza

    2018-02-02

    Peripheral neuropathy is commonly encountered in the primary care setting and is associated with significant morbidity, including neuropathic pain, falls, and disability. The clinical presentation of neuropathy is diverse, with possible symptoms including weakness, sensory abnormalities, and autonomic dysfunction. Accordingly, the primary care clinician must be comfortable using the neurologic examination-including the assessment of motor function, multiple sensory modalities, and deep tendon reflexes-to recognize and characterize neuropathy. Although the causes of peripheral neuropathy are numerous and diverse, careful review of the medical and family history coupled with limited, select laboratory testing can often efficiently lead to an etiologic diagnosis. This review offers an approach for evaluating suspected neuropathy in the primary care setting. It will describe the most common causes, suggest an evidence-based workup to aid in diagnosis, and highlight recent evidence that allows for selection of symptomatic treatment of patients with neuropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Online Continuing Education for Expanding Clinicians' Roles in Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A; Colchamiro, Rachel; Tolan, Ellen; Browne, Susan; Foley, Mary; Jenkins, Lucia; Mainello, Kristen; Vallu, Rohith; Hanley, Lauren E; Boisvert, Mary Ellen; Forgit, Julie; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Nordstrom, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Lack of health professional support is an important variable affecting mothers' achievement of breastfeeding goals. Online continuing education is a recognized pathway for disseminating content for improving clinicians' knowledge and supporting efforts to change practices. At the time we developed our project, free, accredited continuing education for physicians related to breastfeeding management that could be easily accessed using portable devices (via tablets/smartphones) was not available. Such resources were in demand, especially for facilities pursuing designation through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. We assembled a government, academic, health care provider, and professional society partnership to create such a tutorial that would address the diverse content needed for supporting breastfeeding mothers postdischarge in the United States. Our 1.5-hour-long continuing medical and nursing education was completed by 1606 clinicians (1172 nurses [73%] and 434 physicians [27%]) within 1 year. More than 90% of nurses and over 98% of physicians said the tutorial achieved its 7 learning objectives related to breastfeeding physiology, broader factors in infant feeding decisions and practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement, and breastfeeding management/troubleshooting. Feedback received from the tutorial led to the creation of a second tutorial consisting of another 1.5 hours of continuing medical and nursing education related to breast examination and assessment prior to delivery, provision of anticipatory guidance to pregnant women interested in breastfeeding, maternity care practices that influence breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding preterm infants, breastfeeding's role in helping address disparities, and dispelling common myths. The tutorials contribute to achievement of 8 Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health objectives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Clinicians adopting evidence based guidelines: a case study with thromboprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous Thromboembolism (VTE is a cause of hospital mortality and managing its morbidity is associated with significant expenditure. Uptake of evidenced based guideline recommendations intended to prevent VTE in hospital settings is sub-optimal. This study was conducted to explore clinicians' attitudes and the clinical environment in which they work to understand their reluctance to adopt VTE prophylaxis guidelines. Methods Between February and November 2009, 40 hospital employed doctors from 2 Australian metropolitan hospitals were interviewed in depth. Qualitative data were analysed according to thematic methodology. Results Analysis of interviews revealed that barriers to evidence based practice include i the fragmented system of care delivery where multiple members of teams and multiple teams are responsible for each patient's care, and in the case of VTE, where everyone shares responsibility and no-one in particular is responsible; ii the culture of practice where team practice is tailored to that of the team head, and where medicine is considered an 'art' in which guidelines should be adapted to each patient rather than applied universally. Interviewees recommend clear allocation of responsibility and reminders to counteract VTE risk assessment being overlooked. Conclusions Senior clinicians are the key enablers for practice change. They will need to be convinced that guideline compliance adds value to their patient care. Then with the support of systems in the organisation designed to minimize the effects of care fragmentation, they will drive practice changes in their teams. We believe that evidence based practice is only possible with a coordinated program that addresses individual, cultural and organisational constraints.

  20. Paramedic literature search filters: optimised for clinicians and academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaussen, Alexander; Semple, William; Oteir, Alaa; Todd, Paula; Williams, Brett

    2017-10-11

    Search filters aid clinicians and academics to accurately locate literature. Despite this, there is no search filter or Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term pertaining to paramedics. Therefore, the aim of this study was to create two filters to meet to different needs of paramedic clinicians and academics. We created a gold standard from a reference set, which we measured against single terms and search filters. The words and phrases used stemmed from selective exclusion of terms from the previously published Prehospital Search Filter 2.0 as well as a Delphi session with an expert panel of paramedic researchers. Independent authors deemed articles paramedic-relevant or not following an agreed definition. We measured sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and number needed to read (NNR). We located 2102 articles of which 431 (20.5%) related to paramedics. The performance of single terms was on average of high specificity (97.1% (Standard Deviation 7.4%), but of poor sensitivity (12.0%, SD 18.7%). The NNR ranged from 1 to 8.6. The sensitivity-maximising search filter yielded 98.4% sensitivity, with a specificity of 74.3% and a NNR of 2. The specificity-maximising filter achieved 88.3% in specificity, which only lowered the sensitivity to 94.7%, and thus a NNR of 1.48. We have created the first two paramedic specific search filters, one optimised for sensitivity and one optimised for specificity. The sensitivity-maximising search filter yielded 98.4% sensitivity, and a NNR of 2. The specificity-maximising filter achieved 88.3% in specificity, which only lowered the sensitivity to 94.7%, and a NNR of 1.48. A paramedic MeSH term is needed.

  1. Clinician styles of care: transforming patient care at the intersection of leadership and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho P; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-11-01

    A key role of clinicians is to motivate their patients to initiate and maintain beneficial health behaviors. This article integrates research on transformational leadership, clinician-patient communication, and health behavior to introduce a novel approach to understanding and improving clinicians' effectiveness as motivators. We describe three dominant clinician styles or patterned approaches to patient care that derive from leadership theory (in order of least to most effective): laissez-faire, transactional, and transformational. Additionally, we suggest potential mediators and effects of the transformational style of care. Finally, we discuss future research directions for the study of clinician styles of care. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Successful recruitment to a study of first-episode psychosis by clinicians: a qualitative account of outcomes and influences on process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Sue; Duhig, Michael; Connell, Melissa; Scott, James

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Background: Strategies proposed to promote recruitment of representative samples to trials and mental health research have focused on researchers external to clinical services. How clinicians approach recruitment as researchers and particularities of recruiting people with first episode of psychosis warrant investigation. To describe recruitment, by clinicians, of people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and factors influencing process and enrolment. Observational study nested within longitudinal examination of trauma and outcomes for patients experiencing first psychotic episode. Data collected during 20 scheduled meetings of clinicians recruiting from services in Australia. Timely recruitment of 60 young people demonstrates that clinicians can successfully engage patients in research. Success depends on satisfaction of organisational preconditions and clinician motivation grounded in considering the study worthwhile. Pre-selection of participants was informed by judgments about health, insight and quality of the therapeutic alliance. Patients' decisions were influenced by family support, acceptance of diagnosis and altruism. Honoraria had variable effect. Clinicians are well placed to recruit when appropriately supported, and people with FEP are willing to engage in research that fits their personal circumstances. Research should examine the meaning of participation in such studies and ways participation could support recovery.

  3. Experiences of randomization: interviews with patients and clinicians in the SPCG-IV trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill-Axelson, Anna; Christensson, Anna; Carlsson, Marianne; Norlén, Bo Johan; Holmberg, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of both patients and clinicians to randomized trials is difficult. Low participation carries the risk of terminating studies early and making them invalid owing to insufficient statistical power. This study investigated patients' and clinicians' experiences of randomization with the aim of facilitating trial participation in the future. This was a qualitative study using content analysis. Patients offered to participate in a randomized trial and randomizing clinicians were interviewed. Five participants, four non-participants and five randomizing clinicians were interviewed, 2-8 years from randomization. Clinicians used strategies in interaction with the patients to facilitate decision making. Patients' attitudes differed and experiences of relatives or friends were often stated as reasons for treatment preferences. Patients described that letting chance decide treatment was a difficult barrier to overcome for randomization. The clinicians used a number of different strategies perceived to make randomization more acceptable to their patients. The clinicians' own motivation for randomizing patients for trials depended on the medical relevance of the study question and the clinicians' major obstacle was to maintain equipoise over time. Regular meetings with the study group helped to maintain equipoise and motivation. To establish a good platform for randomization the clinician needs to know about the patient's treatment preferences and the patient's attitude concerning the role of the clinician to facilitate decision making. The strategies used by the clinicians were perceived as helpful and could be tested in an intervention study.

  4. [Projective identification in human relations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göka, Erol; Yüksel, Fatih Volkan; Göral, F Sevinç

    2006-01-01

    Melanie Klein, one of the pioneers of Object Relations Theory, first defined "projective identification", which is regarded as one of the most efficacious psychoanalytic concepts after the discovery of the "unconscious". Examination of the literature on "projective identification" shows that there are various perspectives and theories suggesting different uses of this concept. Some clinicians argue that projective identification is a primitive defense mechanism observed in severe psychopathologies like psychotic disorder and borderline personality disorder, where the intra-psychic structure has been damaged severely. Others suggest it to be an indispensable part of the transference and counter-transference between the therapist and the patient during psychotherapy and it can be used as a treatment material in the therapy by a skillful therapist. The latter group expands the use of the concept through normal daily relationships by stating that projective identification is one type of communication and part of the main human relation mechanism operating in all close relationships. Therefore, they suggest that projective identification has benign forms experienced in human relations as well as malign forms seen in psychopathologies. Thus, discussions about the definition of the concept appear complex. In order to clarify and overcome the complexity of the concept, Melanie Klein's and other most important subsequent approaches are discussed in this review article. Thereby, the article aims to explain its important function in understanding the psychopathologies, psychotherapeutic relationships and different areas of normal human relations.

  5. Mental Status Documentation: Information Quality and Data Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Charlene; Gibson, Bryan; Taft, Teresa; Slager, Stacey; Lewis, Lacey; Staggers, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Delirium is a fluctuating disturbance of cognition and/or consciousness associated with poor outcomes. Caring for patients with delirium requires integration of disparate information across clinicians, settings and time. The goal of this project was to characterize the information processes involved in nurses' assessment, documentation, decisionmaking and communication regarding patients' mental status in the inpatient setting. VA nurse managers of medical wards (n=18) were systematically selected across the US. A semi-structured telephone interview focused on current assessment, documentation, and communication processes, as well as clinical and administrative decision-making was conducted, audio-recorded and transcribed. A thematic analytic approach was used. Five themes emerged: 1) Fuzzy Concepts, 2) Grey Data, 3) Process Variability 4) Context is Critical and 5) Goal Conflict. This project describes the vague and variable information processes related to delirium and mental status that undermine effective risk, prevention, identification, communication and mitigation of harm.

  6. Feelings of Clinician-Patient Similarity and Trust Influence Pain: Evidence From Simulated Clinical Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losin, Elizabeth A Reynolds; Anderson, Steven R; Wager, Tor D

    2017-07-01

    Pain is influenced by many factors other than external sources of tissue damage. Among these, the clinician-patient relationship is particularly important for pain diagnosis and treatment. However, the effects of the clinician-patient relationship on pain remain underexamined. We tested the hypothesis that patients who believe they share core beliefs and values with their clinician will report less pain than patients who do not. We also measured feelings of perceived clinician-patient similarity and trust to see if these interpersonal factors influenced pain. We did so by experimentally manipulating perceptions of similarity between participants playing the role of clinicians and participants playing the role of patients in simulated clinical interactions. Participants were placed in 2 groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire about their personal beliefs and values, and painful thermal stimulation was used as an analog of a painful medical procedure. We found that patients reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their clinician when they were paired with clinicians from their own group. In turn, patients' positive feelings of similarity and trust toward their clinicians-but not clinicians' feelings toward patients or whether the clinician and patient were from the same group-predicted lower pain ratings. Finally, the most anxious patients exhibited the strongest relationship between their feelings about their clinicians and their pain report. These findings increase our understanding of context-driven pain modulation and suggest that interventions aimed at increasing patients' feelings of similarity to and trust in health care providers may help reduce the pain experienced during medical care. We present novel evidence that the clinician-patient relationship can affect the pain experienced during medical care. We found that "patients" in simulated clinical interactions who reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their

  7. Parental And Clinician Views Of Consent In Neonatal Research

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Shea, N

    2018-03-01

    Informed consent is an obligatory requirement for research participation1. The process of informed consent states that certain measures must be followed to ensure a research participant has made an informed decision about their participation in a research study2,3. Consent for research should be voluntary, informed, and understood by the consenting individual who must also be competent to do so. In the case of neonatal research informed consent is acquired from parent(s)\\/guardian(s) of a patient.

  8. Microbiological contamination of mobile phones of clinicians in intensive care units and neonatal care units in public hospitals in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyba, Mohammed; Ismaiel, Mohammad; Alotaibi, Abdulrahman; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Baqer, Hussain; Safar, Ali; Al-Sweih, Noura; Al-Taiar, Abdullah

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of microbiological contamination of mobile phones that belong to clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs), pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), and neonatal care units (NCUs) in all public secondary care hospitals in Kuwait. The study also aimed to describe mobile phones disinfection practices as well as factors associated with mobile phone contamination. This is a cross-sectional study that included all clinicians with mobile phones in ICUs, PICUs, and NCUs in all secondary care hospitals in Kuwait. Samples for culture were collected from mobile phones and transported for microbiological identification using standard laboratory methods. Self-administered questionnaire was used to gather data on mobile phones disinfection practices. Out of 213 mobile phones, 157 (73.7 %, 95 % CI [67.2-79.5 %]) were colonized. Coagulase-negative staphylococci followed by Micrococcus were predominantly isolated from the mobile phones; 62.9 % and 28.6 % of all mobile phones, respectively. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Gram-negative bacteria were identified in 1.4 % and 7.0 % of the mobile phones, respectively. Sixty-eight clinicians (33.5 %) reported that they disinfected their mobile phones, with the majority disinfecting their mobile phones only when they get dirty. The only factor that was significantly associated with mobile phone contamination was whether a clinician has ever disinfected his/her mobile phone; adjusted odds ratio 2.42 (95 % CI [1.08-5.41], p-value = 0.031). The prevalence of mobile phone contamination is high in ICUs, PICUs, and NCUs in public secondary care hospitals in Kuwait. Although some of the isolated organisms can be considered non-pathogenic, various reports described their potential harm particularly among patients in ICU and NCU settings. Isolation of MRSA and Gram-negative bacteria from mobile phones of clinicians treating patients in high-risk healthcare

  9. An Automated Approach for Ranking Journals to Help in Clinician Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R.; Moosavinasab, Soheil; Nath, Chinmoy; Li, Dingcheng; Chute, Christopher G.; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    Point of care access to knowledge from full text journal articles supports decision-making and decreases medical errors. However, it is an overwhelming task to search through full text journal articles and find quality information needed by clinicians. We developed a method to rate journals for a given clinical topic, Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). Our method enables filtering of journals and ranking of journal articles based on source journal in relation to CHF. We also obtained a journal priority score, which automatically rates any journal based on its importance to CHF. Comparing our ranking with data gathered by surveying 169 cardiologists, who publish on CHF, our best Multiple Linear Regression model showed a correlation of 0.880, based on five-fold cross validation. Our ranking system can be extended to other clinical topics. PMID:25954382

  10. Effects of electronic emergency-department whiteboards on clinicians' time distribution and mental workload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Whiteboards are a central tool at emergency departments. We investigate how the substitution of electronic for dry-erase whiteboards affects emergency department clinicians’ mental workload and distribution of their time. With the electronic whiteboard, physicians and nurses spend more...... of their time in the work areas where other clinicians are present and whiteboard information is permanently displayed, and less in the patient rooms. Main reasons for these changes appear to be that the electronic whiteboard facilitates better timeouts and handovers. Physicians and nurses are, however......, in the patient rooms for longer periods at a time, suggesting a more focused patient contact. The physicians’ mental workload has increased during timeouts, whereas the nurses’ mental workload has decreased at the start of shifts when they form an overview of the emergency department. Finally, the secretaries...

  11. Quality of Web-Based Educational Interventions for Clinicians on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Content and Usability Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; Bishop, James M; McDonald, Skye L; Kahn, Jessica A; Kreps, Gary L

    2018-02-16

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates fall far short of Healthy People 2020 objectives. A leading reason is that clinicians do not recommend the vaccine consistently and strongly to girls and boys in the age group recommended for vaccination. Although Web-based HPV vaccine educational interventions for clinicians have been created to promote vaccination recommendations, rigorous evaluations of these interventions have not been conducted. Such evaluations are important to maximize the efficacy of educational interventions in promoting clinician recommendations for HPV vaccination. The objectives of our study were (1) to expand previous research by systematically identifying HPV vaccine Web-based educational interventions developed for clinicians and (2) to evaluate the quality of these Web-based educational interventions as defined by access, content, design, user evaluation, interactivity, and use of theory or models to create the interventions. Current HPV vaccine Web-based educational interventions were identified from general search engines (ie, Google), continuing medical education search engines, health department websites, and professional organization websites. Web-based educational interventions were included if they were created for clinicians (defined as individuals qualified to deliver health care services, such as physicians, clinical nurses, and school nurses, to patients aged 9 to 26 years), delivered information about the HPV vaccine and how to increase vaccination rates, and provided continuing education credits. The interventions' content and usability were analyzed using 6 key indicators: access, content, design, evaluation, interactivity, and use of theory or models. A total of 21 interventions were identified, out of which 7 (33%) were webinars, 7 (33%) were videos or lectures, and 7 (33%) were other (eg, text articles, website modules). Of the 21 interventions, 17 (81%) identified the purpose of the intervention, 12 (57%) provided the

  12. Experiencing mental health diagnosis: a systematic review of service user, clinician, and carer perspectives across clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Amorette; Ridler, Joseph; Browes, Daniel; Peryer, Guy; Notley, Caitlin; Hackmann, Corinna

    2018-04-18

    Receiving a mental health diagnosis can be pivotal for service users, and it has been described in both positive and negative terms. What influences service-user experience of the diagnostic process is unclear; consequently, clinicians report uncertainty regarding best practice. This Review aims to understand and inform diagnostic practice through a comprehensive synthesis of qualitative data on views and experiences from key stakeholders (service users, clinicians, carers, and family). We searched five databases and identified 78 papers for inclusion, originating from 13 countries and including 2228 participants. Eligible papers were assessed for quality, and data were coded and then developed into themes, which generated a model representing factors to consider for clinicians conveying, and individuals receiving, mental health diagnoses. Themes included disclosure, information provision, collaboration, timing, stigma, and functional value of diagnosis for recovery. Variations between different stakeholders and clinical contexts are explored. Findings support an individualised, collaborative, and holistic approach to mental health diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prospective analysis of clinician accuracy in the diagnosis of benign anorectal pathology: the value of clinical information Análisis prospectivo de la precisión diagnóstica en la patología anorrectal benigna: importancia de la información clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Jimeno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the prevalence of anorectal disorders in general population is high. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of clinical symptoms on diagnostic accuracy for benign anorectal pathology among different specialists and evaluate the relationship between diagnostic accuracy and years of professional experience. Methods: seven typical cases were selected. In a first interview, participants were shown images and asked to make a diagnosis. Afterwards, images with additional information (clinical symptoms were used. Two groups (group 1 = general surgeons and group 2 = medical specialists who attended emergency department completed both phases of the study to analyze the influence of clinical symptoms on the final diagnosis. Results: forty four specialists were interviewed. The percentage of participants making a correct diagnosis in groups 1 and 2, respectively, was as follows: case 1 (perianal abscess: 100 vs. 80.6%, (p = 0.157; case 2 (fissure: 92.3 vs. 51.6% (p = 0.015; case 3 (thrombosed hemorrhoid: 92.3 vs. 74.2% (p = 0.321; case 4 (anal condyloma: 100 vs. 87.1% (p = 0.302; case 5 (rectal prolapse: 100 vs. 83.9% (p = 0.301; case 6 (prolapsed hemorrhoid: 92.3 vs. 29% (p = 0.001, and case 7 (fistula: 100 vs. 67.7% (p = 0.021. There were significant differences in the number of correctly diagnosed cases between groups (p Objetivo: la prevalencia de los trastornos anorrectales benignos en la población general es alta. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar la influencia de los síntomas clínicos en la precisión diagnóstica de la patología benigna anorrectal entre los diferentes especialistas y evaluar la relación entre el diagnóstico de la enfermedad y los años de experiencia profesional entre los profesionales participantes. Pacientes y métodos: se seleccionaron 7 casos típicos. En una primera entrevista, se mostró a los participantes las imágenes clínicas de cada caso y se les pidió que formularan un diagn

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, John P

    2010-11-30

    There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. This is the first of two reviews that are intended to cover the essential aspects of CMR physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to this group. It begins by explaining the basic physical principles of MR, including a description of the main components of an MR imaging system and the three types of magnetic field that they generate. The origin and method of production of the MR signal in biological systems are explained, focusing in particular on the two tissue magnetisation relaxation properties (T1 and T2) that give rise to signal differences from tissues, showing how they can be exploited to generate image contrast for tissue characterisation. The method most commonly used to localise and encode MR signal echoes to form a cross sectional image is described, introducing the concept of k-space and showing how the MR signal data stored within it relates to properties within the reconstructed image. Before describing the CMR acquisition methods in detail, the basic spin echo and gradient pulse sequences are introduced, identifying the key parameters that influence image contrast, including appearances in the presence of flowing blood, resolution and image acquisition time. The main derivatives of these two pulse sequences used for cardiac imaging are then described in more detail. Two of the key requirements for CMR are the need for data acquisition first to be to be synchronised with the subject's ECG and to be fast enough for the subject

  15. Do self- reported intentions predict clinicians' behaviour: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickinson Heather O

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation research is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of clinical research findings into routine clinical practice. Several interventions have been shown to be effective in changing health care professionals' behaviour, but heterogeneity within interventions, targeted behaviours, and study settings make generalisation difficult. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the 'active ingredients' in professional behaviour change strategies. Theories of human behaviour that feature an individual's "intention" to do something as the most immediate predictor of their behaviour have proved to be useful in non-clinical populations. As clinical practice is a form of human behaviour such theories may offer a basis for developing a scientific rationale for the choice of intervention to use in the implementation of new practice. The aim of this review was to explore the relationship between intention and behaviour in clinicians and how this compares to the intention-behaviour relationship in studies of non-clinicians. Methods We searched: PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Science/Social science citation index, Current contents (social & behavioural med/clinical med, ISI conference proceedings, and Index to Theses. The reference lists of all included papers were checked manually. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they had: examined a clinical behaviour within a clinical context, included measures of both intention and behaviour, measured behaviour after intention, and explored this relationship quantitatively. All titles and abstracts retrieved by electronic searching were screened independently by two reviewers, with disagreements resolved by discussion. Discussion Ten studies were found that examined the relationship between intention and clinical behaviours in 1623 health professionals. The proportion of variance in behaviour explained by

  16. Concepts, Utility and Limitations of Cord Blood Banking: What Clinicians Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Dhanya Lakshmi; Phadke, Shubha R

    2018-03-20

    Stem cell transplantation and cord blood banking have received much popularity among general public and medical professionals in the recent past. But information about the scientific aspects, its utility and limitations is incomplete amongst laypersons as well as many medical practitioners. Stem cells differ from all other types of cells in the human body because of their ability to multiply in order to self perpetuate and differentiate into specialized cells. Stems cells could be totipotent, multipotent, pluripotent, oligopotent or unipotent depending on the type of cells that can arise or differentiate from them. Umbilical cord blood serves as a potent source of hematopoeitic stem cells and is being used to treat various disorders like blood cancers, hemoglobinopathies and immunodeficiency disorders for which hematological stem cell transplantation is the standard of care. Cord blood can be collected at ease, without any major complications and has a lower incidence of graft vs. host reaction compared to bone marrow cells or peripheral blood cells. Both public and private banks have been established for collection and storage of umbilical cord blood. However, false claims and misleading commercial advertisements about the use of umbilical cord blood stem cells for the treatment of a variety of conditions ranging from neuromuscular disorders to cosmetic benefits are widespread and create unrealistic expectations in laypersons and clinicians. Many clinicians and laypersons are unaware of the limitations of cord blood banking, as in treating a genetic disorder by autologous cord blood transplant. Knowledge and awareness about the scientific indications of cord blood stem cell transplantation and realistic expectations about the utility of cord blood among medical practitioners are essential for providing accurate information to laypersons before they decide to preserve umbilical cord blood in private banks and thus prevent malpractice.

  17. The role of the clinician in the multi-omics era: are you ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Wortmann, Saskia B; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Langeveld, Mirjam; Ferreira, Carlos R; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Hollak, Carla E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Waterham, Hans R; Wevers, Ron A; Haack, Tobias B; Wanders, Ronald J A; Boycott, Kym M

    2018-01-23

    Since Garrod's first description of alkaptonuria in 1902, and newborn screening for phenylketonuria introduced in the 1960s, P4 medicine (preventive, predictive, personalized, and participatory) has been a reality for the clinician serving patients with inherited metabolic diseases. The era of high-throughput technologies promises to accelerate its scale dramatically. Genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics offer an amazing opportunity for holistic investigation and contextual pathophysiologic understanding of inherited metabolic diseases for precise diagnosis and tailored treatment. While each of the -omics technologies is important to systems biology, some are more mature than others. Exome sequencing is emerging as a reimbursed test in clinics around the world, and untargeted metabolomics has the potential to serve as a single biochemical testing platform. The challenge lies in the integration and cautious interpretation of these big data, with translation into clinically meaningful information and/or action for our patients. A daunting but exciting task for the clinician; we provide clinical cases to illustrate the importance of his/her role as the connector between physicians, laboratory experts and researchers in the basic, computer, and clinical sciences. Open collaborations, data sharing, functional assays, and model organisms play a key role in the validation of -omics discoveries. Having all the right expertise at the table when discussing the diagnostic approach and individualized management plan according to the information yielded by -omics investigations (e.g., actionable mutations, novel therapeutic interventions), is the stepping stone of P4 medicine. Patient participation and the adjustment of the medical team's plan to his/her and the family's wishes most certainly is the capstone. Are you ready?

  18. Strengthening the working alliance through a clinician's familiarity with the 12-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cory B; Roland, Brian D; Loneck, Barry M

    2018-01-01

    The working alliance plays an important role in the substance use disorder treatment process. Many substance use disorder treatment providers incorporate the 12-Step approach to recovery into treatment. With the 12-Step approach known among many clients and clinicians, it may well factor into the therapeutic relationship. We investigated how, from the perspective of clients, a clinician's level of familiarity with and in-session time spent on the 12-Step approach might affect the working alliance between clients and clinicians, including possible differences based on a clinician's recovery status. We conducted a secondary study using data from 180 clients and 31 clinicians. Approximately 81% of client participants were male, and approximately 65% of clinician participants were female. We analyzed data with Stata using a population-averaged model. From the perspective of clients with a substance use disorder, clinicians' familiarity with the 12-Step approach has a positive relationship with the working alliance. The client-estimated amount of in-session time spent on the 12-Step approach did not have a statistically significant effect on ratings of the working alliance. A clinician's recovery status did not moderate the relationship between 12-Step familiarity and the working alliance. These results suggest that clinicians can influence, in part, how their clients perceive the working alliance by being familiar with the 12-Step approach. This might be particularly salient for clinicians who provide substance use disorder treatment at agencies that incorporate, on some level, the 12-Step approach to recovery.

  19. The Effectiveness of Clinician Education on the Adequate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    information to make their input in the patient's management.[1]. Some errors in ... to insufficient, and/or illegible clinical information provided ... Adequate Completion of Laboratory Test Request. Forms at a ..... the system prior to the posttest.

  20. Patient Decision-Making About Emergency and Planned Stoma Surgery for IBD: A Qualitative Exploration of Patient and Clinician Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibley, Lesley; Czuber-Dochan, Wladyslawa; Wade, Tiffany; Duncan, Julie; Burch, Jennie; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Norton, Christine; Artom, Micol; O'Sullivan, Liam; Verjee, Azmina; Cann, Denise

    2018-01-18

    Many inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients worry about stoma-forming surgery (SFS), sometimes enduring poor bowel-related quality of life to avoid it. Anticipation of SFS and whether expectations match experience is underreported. This qualitative study explored influences on patients' SFS decision-making and compared preoperative concerns with postoperative outcomes. We purposively recruited participants with IBD from UK hospital outpatient and community sources, and IBD clinicians from public hospitals. Four focus groups, 29 semistructured patient participant interviews, and 18 clinician interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Participants had a current temporary, recently-reversed, or permanent stoma, or were stoma naive. Four themes emerged: Preoperative concerns and expectations, Patient decision-making, Surgery and recovery, and Long-term outcomes. Participants and clinicians agreed about most preoperative concerns, that outcomes were often better than expected, and support from others with a stoma is beneficial. Patient decision-making involves multiple factors, including disease status. Some clinicians avoid discussing SFS, and the phrase 'last resort' can bias patient perceptions; others recommend early discussion, increasing dialogue when medical management becomes ineffective. The postoperative period is particularly challenging for patients. Stoma acceptance is influenced by personal perceptions and pre- and postoperative clinical and social support. Patients need balanced information on all treatment options, including surgery, from an early stage. Early multidisciplinary team dialogue about SFS, and contact with others living well with a stoma, could enable informed decision-making. Life with a stoma is often better than anticipated, improving quality of life and control. Ongoing specialist nursing support aids recovery and adjustment. © 2018 Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. Published by Oxford University

  1. Barriers and facilitators to sexual and reproductive health communication between pediatric oncology clinicians and adolescent and young adult patients: The clinician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Natasha N; Campbell, Kevin; Kenney, Lisa B; Moss, Kerry; Speckhart, Ashley; Bober, Sharon L

    2018-04-26

    Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is identified by adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer as an important but often neglected aspect of their comprehensive cancer care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of pediatric oncology clinicians towards discussing SRH with AYAs, and to understand perceived barriers to effective communication in current practice. Pediatric oncology clinicians (physicians, certified nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews investigating attitudes about SRH communication with AYAs and barriers to such conversations. Twenty-two clinicians participated from seven institutions in the Northeastern United States. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using a thematic analysis approach. Interviews with pediatric oncology clinicians revealed the following five primary themes: the role for pediatric oncology clinicians to discuss SRH, the focus of current SRH conversations on fertility, the meaning of "sexual health" as safe sex and contraception only, clinician-reported barriers to SRH conversations, and the need for education and support. Communication barriers included lack of knowledge/experience, lack of resources/referrals, low priority, parents/family, patient discomfort, clinician discomfort, time, and lack of rapport. Clinicians identified resource and support needs, including formal education and SRH education materials for patients and families. Although the study participants identified a role for pediatric oncology clinicians in SRH care for AYA patients with cancer, multiple barriers interfere with such discussions taking place on a regular basis. Future efforts must focus on resource development and provider education and training in SRH to optimize the care provided to this unique patient population. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. What is good medical ethics? A clinician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wing May

    2015-01-01

    Speaking from the perspective of a clinician and teacher, good medical ethics needs to make medicine better. Over the past 50 years medical ethics has helped shape the culture in medicine and medical practice for the better. However, recent healthcare scandals in the UK suggest more needs to be done to translate ethical reasoning into ethical practice. Focusing on clinical practice and individual patient care, I will argue that, to be good, medical ethics needs to become integral to the activities of health professionals and healthcare organisations. Ethics is like a language which brings a way of thinking and responding to the world. For ethics to become embedded in clinical practice, health professionals need to progress from classroom learners to fluent social speakers through ethical dialogue, ethical reflection and ethical actions. I will end by discussing three areas that need to be addressed to enable medical ethics to flourish and bring about change in everyday clinical care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. In utero fuel homeostasis: Lessons for a clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N Suman Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetus exists in a complex, dynamic, and yet intriguing symbiosis with its mother as far as fuel metabolism is concerned. Though the dependence on maternal fuel is nearly complete to cater for its high requirement, the fetus is capable of some metabolism of its own. The first half of gestation is a period of maternal anabolism and storage whereas the second half results in exponential fetal growth where maternal stores are mobilized. Glucose is the primary substrate for energy production in the fetus though capable of utilizing alternate sources like lactate, ketoacids, amino acids, fatty acids, and glycogen as fuel under special circumstances. Key transporters like glucose transporters (GLUT are responsible for preferential transfers, which are in turn regulated by complex interaction of maternal and fetal hormones. Amino acids are preferentially utilized for growth and essential fatty acids for development of brain and retina. Insulin, insulin like growth factors, glucagon, catecholamines, and letpin are the hormones implicated in this fascinating process. Hormonal regulation of metabolic substrate utilization and anabolism in the fetus is secondary to the supply of nutrient substrates. The knowledge of fuel homeostasis is crucial for a clinician caring for pregnant women and neonates to manage disorders of metabolism (diabetes, growth (intrauterine growth restriction, and transitional adaptation (hypoglycemia.

  4. The Clinician as Leader: Why, How, and When.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2017-11-01

    Clinicians are inveterate leaders. We lead patients through the difficult maze of illness, families through the travails of ill loved ones, and physicians-in-training through the gauntlet of learning medicine. Yet, in the context of a range of leadership styles that effective leaders must be able to deploy situationally, physician leaders have traditionally defaulted to a "command and control" style that fosters the concept of physicians as "Viking warriors" or "heroic lone healers." The perverse effects of "command and control" are that this style conspires against collaboration and tends to be perpetuated as aspiring leaders emulate their predecessors. Because healthcare faces challenges of cost, access, and quality and is in the throes of change, the current landscape requires effective leadership. Though still relatively uncommon among healthcare organizations, frontrunner organizations are offering leadership development programs. The design of such programs requires clarity about requisite leadership competencies and about how and when to best to deliver such curricula. As one example, the American Thoracic Society has launched its Emerging Leaders Program (ELP), which is currently offering a leadership development curriculum to 18 selected emerging leaders. The ATS ELP curriculum focuses on awareness of self and system and incorporates highly participatory sessions on emotional intelligence, teambuilding, change management, situational leadership, appreciative inquiry, process and quality improvement, strategic planning, and organizational culture. Short-term deliverables are the development and presentation of business plans for innovations proposed by the group. Hoped for longer-term outcomes include an enhanced leadership pipeline for global respiratory health.

  5. Martha Wollstein: A pioneer American female clinician-scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jeanne; Wright, James R

    2018-01-01

    Martha Wollstein was not only the first fully specialized pediatric perinatal pathologist practicing exclusively in a North America children's hospital, she also blazed another pathway as a very early pioneer female clinician-scientist. Wollstein provided patient care at Babies Hospital of New York City from 1891 until her retirement in 1935, and also simultaneously worked for many years as a basic scientist at the prestigious Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. Wollstein published over 65 papers, many frequently cited, during her career on a wide range of topics including pediatric and infectious diseases. Wollstein was a rare female in the field of pathology in an era when just a relatively small number of women became doctors in any medical specialty. Wollstein was born into an affluent Jewish American family in New York City in 1868 and graduated from the Women's Medical College in 1889. This paper explores her family support and ethnic and religious background, which helped facilitate her professional success. During her time, she was recognized internationally for her research and was respected for her medical and scientific skills; unfortunately today her important career has been largely forgotten.

  6. An integrated billing application to streamline clinician workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawdrey, David K; Walsh, Colin; Stetson, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, our academic medical center transitioned to electronic provider documentation using a commercial electronic health record system. For attending physicians, one of the most frustrating aspects of this experience was the system's failure to support their existing electronic billing workflow. Because of poor system integration, it was difficult to verify the supporting documentation for each bill and impractical to track whether billable notes had corresponding charges. We developed and deployed in 2011 an integrated billing application called "iCharge" that streamlines clinicians' documentation and billing workflow, and simultaneously populates the inpatient problem list using billing diagnosis codes. Each month, over 550 physicians use iCharge to submit approximately 23,000 professional service charges for over 4,200 patients. On average, about 2.5 new problems are added to each patient's problem list. This paper describes the challenges and benefits of workflow integration across disparate applications and presents an example of innovative software development within a commercial EHR framework.

  7. Front-line ordering clinicians: matching workforce to workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldston, Evan S; Zaoutis, Lisa B; Hicks, Patricia J; Kolb, Susan; Sladek, Erin; Geiger, Debra; Agosto, Paula M; Boswinkel, Jan P; Bell, Louis M

    2014-07-01

    Matching workforce to workload is particularly important in healthcare delivery, where an excess of workload for the available workforce may negatively impact processes and outcomes of patient care and resident learning. Hospitals currently lack a means to measure and match dynamic workload and workforce factors. This article describes our work to develop and obtain consensus for use of an objective tool to dynamically match the front-line ordering clinician (FLOC) workforce to clinical workload in a variety of inpatient settings. We undertook development of a tool to represent hospital workload and workforce based on literature reviews, discussions with clinical leadership, and repeated validation sessions. We met with physicians and nurses from every clinical care area of our large, urban children's hospital at least twice. We successfully created a tool in a matrix format that is objective and flexible and can be applied to a variety of settings. We presented the tool in 14 hospital divisions and received widespread acceptance among physician, nursing, and administrative leadership. The hospital uses the tool to identify gaps in FLOC coverage and guide staffing decisions. Hospitals can better match workload to workforce if they can define and measure these elements. The Care Model Matrix is a flexible, objective tool that quantifies the multidimensional aspects of workload and workforce. The tool, which uses multiple variables that are easily modifiable, can be adapted to a variety of settings. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire; Hørder, Kirsten; Bilenberg, Niels; Støving, René Klinkby

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross-sectional study compared data assessed by the clinician to patient-reported measures in patients with a history of EDs. We included data from a cohort of patients with EDs (n=544) referred to a specialized ED unit in Denmark. Patient-reported measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and clinical data included remission status and body mass index (BMI). We found a positive association between BMI and EDI-2 scores for anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), reflecting increasing ED symptomatology with increasing BMI. This association was not observed in bulimia nervosa (BN). We did not find a correlation between SF-36 scores and BMI in any of the diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic Delays in Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Call for Clinician Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Francis X; Hapner, Edie; Klein, Adam; Rosen, Ami; Jinnah, Hyder A; Johns, Michael M

    2015-09-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a rare but often debilitating disease. Due to lack of awareness among practitioners and lack of well-defined diagnostic criteria, it can be difficult for patients with SD to receive a diagnosis and subsequent treatment. There is currently no literature documenting the efficacy of the medical community in recognizing and diagnosing this disorder. We aimed to quantify the patients' experiences with obtaining a diagnosis of SD. One hundred seven consecutive patients with SD completed questionnaires about their experiences with SD. Patients were recruited either during outpatient laryngology visits or during participation in a National Institutes of Health funded study investigating SD. It took patients an average of 4.43 years (53.21 months) to be diagnosed with SD after first going to a physician with vocal symptoms. Patients had to see an average of 3.95 physicians to receive a diagnosis of SD. Patients (31.4%) had been prescribed medications other than botulinum toxin to treat their symptoms. Patients (30%) attempted alternative therapies for treatment of SD, such as chiropractor or dietary modification. Despite advances in diagnostic modalities in medicine, the diagnosis of SD still remains elusive. Objective criteria for the diagnosis of SD and increased clinician education are warranted to address this diagnostic delay. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bunch identification module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    This module provides bunch identification and timing signals for the PEP Interaction areas. Timing information is referenced to the PEP master oscillator, and adjusted in phase as a function of region. Identification signals are generated in a manner that allows observers in all interaction regions to agree on an unambiguous bunch identity. The module provides bunch identification signals via NIM level logic, upon CAMAC command, and through LED indicators. A front panel ''region select'' switch allows the same module to be used in all regions. The module has two modes of operation: a bunch identification mode and a calibration mode. In the identification mode, signals indicate which of the three bunches of electrons and positrons are interacting, and timing information about beam crossing is provided. The calibration mode is provided to assist experimenters making time of flight measurements. In the calibration mode, three distinct gating signals are referenced to a selected bunch, allowing three timing systems to be calibrated against a common standard. Physically, the bunch identifier is constructed as a single width CAMAC module. 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Point-of-Care Healthcare Databases Are an Overall Asset to Clinicians, but Different Databases May Vary in Usefulness Based on Personal Preferences. A Review of: Chan, R. & Stieda, V. (2011). Evaluation of three point-of-care healthcare databases: BMJ Point-of-Care, Clin-eguide and Nursing Reference Centre. Health and Information Libraries Journal, 28(1), 50-58. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-1842.2010.00920.x

    OpenAIRE

    Carol D. Howe

    2011-01-01

    Objective – To evaluate the usefulness of three point-of-care healthcare databases (BMJ Point-of-Care, Clin-eguide, and Nursing Reference Centre) in clinical practice.Design – A descriptive study analyzing questionnaire results.Setting – Hospitals within Alberta, Canada’s two largest health regions (at the time of this study), with a third health region submitting a small number of responses.Subjects – A total of 46 Alberta hospital personnel answered the questionnaire, including 19 clinician...

  12. Endoscopic Sex Identification in Chelonians and Birds (Psittacines, Passerines, and Raptors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the advent of DNA probes for sex identification of many avian and some reptile species, clinicians involved with zoos, conservation projects, or breeders may still be asked to perform "surgical sexing." This article describes the practical approach to performing endoscopic sex identification in psittacines and chelonians, including patient preparation, anesthesia, and endoscopic procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  14. System Identification with Quantized Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Le Yi; Zhang, Jifeng; Zhao, Yanlong

    2010-01-01

    This book presents recently developed methodologies that utilize quantized information in system identification and explores their potential in extending control capabilities for systems with limited sensor information or networked systems. The results of these methodologies can be applied to signal processing and control design of communication and computer networks, sensor networks, mobile agents, coordinated data fusion, remote sensing, telemedicine, and other fields in which noise-corrupted quantized data need to be processed. Providing a comprehensive coverage of quantized identification,

  15. [Biomedical research, the market, clinicians, safety and corporate social responsibility post-phase III: maintaining confidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Gámez, N; Kessel-Sardiñas, H; Cervantes-Bonet, B; López-Palmero, S; Antón-Molina, F; Martínez-García, L

    2010-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard in the western world for decision making, as much for the clinicians as for the agencies or managers for community policies. In this powerful deployment of investigative effort there are variable degrees of conflict of interests, and the clinicians, not foreign to this, are entering a sea of doubts on safety, a dimension that emerges like a diacritical, inalienable element. The aim of the study was to select and ctically evaluate editorials, clinical trials and/or meta-analyses published on physical support, or the more important internationally credited websites, which has patient safety as their primary objective. Evaluative study performed in the Torrecardenas Hospital, of the Andalucian Public Health Service (SSPA), in the context of an accredited training unit (Mejora_F), so called "transference of the biomedical knowledge from the bibliography" from 2008 to 2009. Analyzed articles: 170 (75 % in English, with predominance of N Eng J Med >50 %; followed by Journal Of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, British Medical Journal, Journal of American Geriatrics; Med Clin, Rev Clin Esp.; and Infectología). From 170 eligible articles we selected 5 key topoi due to their impact as the most representative owing to their citation frequency. They represented, in our judgment, "a red flag" of safety: long-acting beta-stimulators or LABS and increase in mortality in asthma; neuroleptics in the elderly and extension of the QT interval associated with sudden death; thiazolidinediones in type II diabetes and negative cardiovascular effects; promotion of statins-ezetimibe and the debatable association with major mortality for cancer, and intensive treatment in diabetes and probable increase in mortality. What really maters in biomedicine is that it leads to a given strategy in real patients, not the intermediate points. Clinicians should not support partial results of designs based on intermediate information

  16. 75 FR 10414 - Researcher Identification Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... capturing administrative information on the characteristics of our users. Other forms of identification are... use bar-codes on researcher identification cards in the Washington, DC, area. The plastic cards we... plastic researcher identification cards as part of their security systems, we issue a plastic card to...

  17. Next Steps After Your Diagnosis: Finding Information and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinicians & Providers Data & Measures Education & Training Health Information Technology ... Sources Available from AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Medical Expenditure Panel ...

  18. Transitioning Newborns from NICU to Home: Family Information Packet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinicians & Providers Data & Measures Education & Training Health Information Technology ... Sources Available from AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Medical Expenditure Panel ...

  19. Point-of-Care Healthcare Databases Are an Overall Asset to Clinicians, but Different Databases May Vary in Usefulness Based on Personal Preferences. A Review of: Chan, R. & Stieda, V. (2011. Evaluation of three point-of-care healthcare databases: BMJ Point-of-Care, Clin-eguide and Nursing Reference Centre. Health and Information Libraries Journal, 28(1, 50-58. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-1842.2010.00920.x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Howe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To evaluate the usefulness of three point-of-care healthcare databases (BMJ Point-of-Care, Clin-eguide, and Nursing Reference Centre in clinical practice.Design – A descriptive study analyzing questionnaire results.Setting – Hospitals within Alberta, Canada’s two largest health regions (at the time of this study, with a third health region submitting a small number of responses.Subjects – A total of 46 Alberta hospital personnel answered the questionnaire, including 19 clinicians, 7 administrators, 6 nurses, 1 librarian, 1 preceptor, and “some” project coordinators. Subjects were chosen using a non-probability sampling method.Methods – The researchers developed an online questionnaire consisting of 17 questions and posted it on the University of Calgary’s Health Sciences Library and the Health Knowledge Network websites. The questions, in general, asked respondents how easy the databases were to search and use, whether the database content answered their clinical questions, and whether they would recommend the databases for future purchase. Most questions required a response for each of the three databases. The researchers collected quantitative data by using a Likert scale from 1 to 5, with 5 being the most positive answer and 1 being the most negative. They collected qualitative data by asking open-ended questions.Main Results – With regard to ease of searching, BMJ Point-of-Care (BMJ received the greatest number of responses (71% at level 5. A smaller number of respondents (56% rated Nursing Reference Centre (NRC at level 5. Clin-eguide received 59% of the responses at level 5, but it also received the greatest number of responses at the next highest level (level 4. Respondents rated all three databases similarly with regard to levels 1 and 2.Regarding how easy the resources were to learn, most respondents rated all three databases as easy to learn (BMJ, 77%; Clin-eguide, 72%; and NRC, 68%. Very few respondents

  20. Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Directory contains selected information on physicians, doctors of Osteopathy, limited licensed practitioners and...

  1. Third molar surgery: the patient's and the clinician's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerjes Waseem

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this report, the problems of third molar surgery have been reviewed from the perspective of both patient and clinician; additionally an overall analysis of preoperative imaging investigations was carried out. Specifically, three main areas of interest were investigated: the prediction of surgical difficulty and potential complications; the assessment of stress and anxiety and finally the assessment of postoperative complications and the surgeon's experience. Findings In the first study, the prediction of surgical difficulty and potential injury to the inferior alveolar nerve w