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Sample records for clinically presymptomatic spinocerebellar

  1. Motor Decline in Clinically Presymptomatic Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Gene Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Perez, Luis; Díaz, Rosalinda; Pérez-González, Ruth; Canales, Nalia; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Medrano, Jacquelín; Sánchez, Gilberto; Almaguer-Mederos, Luis; Torres, Cira; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Background Motor deficits are a critical component of the clinical characteristics of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, there is no current information on the preclinical manifestation of those motor deficits in presymptomatic gene carriers. To further understand and characterize the onset of the clinical manifestation in this disease, we tested presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers, and volunteers, in a task that evaluates their motor performance and their motor learning capabilities. Methods and Findings 28 presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers and an equal number of control volunteers matched for age and gender participated in the study. Both groups were tested in a prism adaptation task known to be sensible to both motor performance and visuomotor learning deficits. Our results clearly show that although motor learning capabilities are intact, motor performance deficits are present even years before the clinical manifestation of the disease start. Conclusions The results show a clear deficit in motor performance that can be detected years before the clinical onset of the disease. This motor performance deficit appears before any motor learning or clinical manifestations of the disease. These observations identify the performance coefficient as an objective and quantitative physiological biomarker that could be useful to assess the efficiency of different therapeutic agents. PMID:19401771

  2. Clinical neurogenetics: autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Fogel, Brent L

    2013-11-01

    The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are a diverse and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by degeneration and dysfunction of the cerebellum and its associated pathways. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation can be challenging because of phenotypic overlap among causes, and a stratified and systematic approach is essential. Recent advances include the identification of additional genes causing dominant genetic ataxia, a better understanding of cellular pathogenesis in several disorders, the generation of new disease models that may stimulate development of new therapies, and the use of new DNA sequencing technologies, including whole-exome sequencing, to improve diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vascular Risk Factors and Clinical Progression in Spinocerebellar Ataxias

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    Raymond Y. Lo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The contributions of vascular risk factors to spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA are not known.Methods: We studied 319 participants with SCA 1, 2, 3, and 6 and repeatedly measured clinical severity using the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA for 2 years. Vascular risk factors were summarized by CHA2DS2-VASc scores as the vascular risk factor index. We employed regression models to study the effects of vascular risk factors on ataxia onset and progression after adjusting for age, sex, and pathological CAG repeats. Our secondary analyses took hyperlipidemia into account.Results: Nearly 60% of SCA participants were at low vascular risks with CHA2DS2-VASc = 0, and 31% scored 2 or greater. Higher CHA2DS2-VASc scores were not associated with either earlier onset or faster progression of ataxia. These findings were not altered after accounting for hyperlipidemia. Discussion: Vascular risks are not common in SCAs and are not associated with earlier onset or faster ataxia progression.

  4. Clinical and CT features in cases of spinocerebellar degeneration occurring at infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eda, Isematsu; Nakano, Chizuko; Kawahara, Hitoshi; Takeshita, Kenzo

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and CT findings were evaluated in 7 patients in whom symptoms compatible with spinocerebellar degeneration had occurred at infancy. CT findings included atrophy of the vermis, hemisphere and brain-stem, and dilation of the forth ventricle. These were in accordance with those reported in adult cases of spinocerebellar degeneration. There was some correlation between the severity of clinical symptoms and CT findings. Clinical lesions tended to coincide with CT findings. None of the patients had typical adult types such as delayed cerebello-cortical atrophy and olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy. There were great differences in clinical symptoms among the patients. Many of the patients had complications such as pigmentary degeneration of the retina, optic atrophy and cataract, which are rare in adult cases. It is therefore considered impossible to categorize these cases, except for two cases of familial convulsive paraplegia, as a given type. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and conducts a broad range of basic and clinical research on cerebellar and spinocerebellar degeneration, including work aimed at finding the cause(s) of ataxias and ways to ... Publications Definition Ataxia ...

  6. Speech in spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalling, Ellika; Hartelius, Lena

    2013-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias clinically characterized by progressive ataxia, dysarthria and a range of other concomitant neurological symptoms. Only a few studies include detailed characterization of speech symptoms in SCA. Speech symptoms in SCA resemble ataxic dysarthria but symptoms related to phonation may be more prominent. One study to date has shown an association between differences in speech and voice symptoms related to genotype. More studies of speech and voice phenotypes are motivated, to possibly aid in clinical diagnosis. In addition, instrumental speech analysis has been demonstrated to be a reliable measure that may be used to monitor disease progression or therapy outcomes in possible future pharmacological treatments. Intervention by speech and language pathologists should go beyond assessment. Clinical guidelines for management of speech, communication and swallowing need to be developed for individuals with progressive cerebellar ataxia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical features, neurogenetics and neuropathology of the polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias type 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, Udo; Schöls, Ludger; Paulson, Henry; Auburger, Georg; Kermer, Pawel; Jen, Joanna C; Seidel, Kay; Korf, Horst-Werner; Deller, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias type 1 (SCA1), 2 (SCA2), 3 (SCA3), 6 (SCA6) and 7 (SCA7) are genetically defined autosomal dominantly inherited progressive cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs). They belong to the group of CAG-repeat or polyglutamine diseases and share pathologically expanded and meiotically unstable glutamine-encoding CAG-repeats at distinct gene loci encoding elongated polyglutamine stretches in the disease proteins. In recent years, progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these currently incurable diseases: Identification of underlying genetic mechanisms made it possible to classify the different ADCAs and to define their clinical and pathological features. Furthermore, advances in molecular biology yielded new insights into the physiological and pathophysiological role of the gene products of SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 (i.e. ataxin-1, ataxin-2, ataxin-3, α-1A subunit of the P/Q type voltage-dependent calcium channel, ataxin-7). In the present review we summarize our current knowledge about the polyglutamine ataxias SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 and compare their clinical and electrophysiological features, genetic and molecular biological background, as well as their brain pathologies. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the structure, interactions and functions of the different disease proteins. On the basis of these comprehensive data, similarities, differences and possible disease mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cerebral blood flow in presymptomatic MAPT and GRN mutation carriers: A longitudinal arterial spin labeling study

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    Elise G.P. Dopper, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation: We demonstrated longitudinal alterations in CBF in presymptomatic FTD independent of grey matter atrophy, with the strongest decrease in individuals that developed symptoms during follow-up. Therefore, ASL could have the potential to serve as a sensitive biomarker of disease progression in the presymptomatic stage of FTD in future clinical trials.

  9. Presymptomatic ALS genetic counseling and testing: Experience and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatar, Michael; Stanislaw, Christine; Reyes, Eliana; Hussain, Sumaira; Cooley, Anne; Fernandez, Maria Catalina; Dauphin, Danielle D; Michon, Sara-Claude; Andersen, Peter M; Wuu, Joanne

    2016-06-14

    Remarkable advances in our understanding of the genetic contributions to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have sparked discussion and debate about whether clinical genetic testing should routinely be offered to patients with ALS. A related, but distinct, question is whether presymptomatic genetic testing should be offered to family members who may be at risk for developing ALS. Existing guidelines for presymptomatic counseling and testing are mostly based on small number of individuals, clinical judgment, and experience from other neurodegenerative disorders. Over the course of the last 8 years, we have provided testing and 317 genetic counseling sessions (including predecision, pretest, posttest, and ad hoc counseling) to 161 first-degree family members participating in the Pre-Symptomatic Familial ALS Study (Pre-fALS), as well as testing and 75 posttest counseling sessions to 63 individuals with familial ALS. Based on this experience, and the real-world challenges we have had to overcome in the process, we recommend an updated set of guidelines for providing presymptomatic genetic counseling and testing to people at high genetic risk for developing ALS. These recommendations are especially timely and relevant given the growing interest in studying presymptomatic ALS. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Spinocerebellar ataxias Ataxias espinocerebelares

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    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia in association with some or all of the following conditions: ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a clinical and genetic review of the main types of SCA. METHOD: The review was based on a search of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. RESULTS: Thirty types of SCAs are currently known, and 16 genes associated with the disease have been identified. The most common types are SCA type 3, or Machado-Joseph disease, SCA type 10 and SCA types 7, 2, 1 and 6. SCAs are genotypically and phenotypically very heterogeneous. A clinical algorithm can be used to distinguish between the different types of SCAs. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed clinical neurological examination of SCA patients can be of great help when assessing them, and the information thus gained can be used in an algorithm to screen patients before molecular tests to investigate the correct etiology of the disease are requested.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs compreendem um grupo heterogeneo de enfermidades neurodegenerativas, que se caracterizam pela presença de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, associada de forma variada com oftalmoplegia, sinais piramidais, distúrbios do movimento, retinopatia pigmentar, neuropatia periférica, disfunção cognitiva e demência. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão clínico-genética dos principais tipos de AECs. MÉTODO: A revisão foi realizada através da pesquisa pelo sistema do PUBMED e do OMIM. RESULTADOS: Na atualidade existem cerca de 30 tipos de AECs, com a descoberta de 16 genes. Os tipos mais comuns são a AEC tipo 3, ou doença de Machado-Joseph, a AEC tipo 10, e as AECs tipo 7, 2 1, e 6. As AECs apresentam grande heterogeneidade genotípica e fenotípica. Pode-se utilizar um algoritmo clínico para a

  11. Clinical and molecular characteristics of a Brazilian family with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 Características clínicas e moleculares de uma família Brasileira com ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 1

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    Iscia Lopes-Cendes

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of late onset neurodegenerative disorders. To date, seven different genes causing autosomal dominant SCA have been mapped: SCA1, SCA2, Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3, SCA4, SCA5, SCA7 and dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA. Expansions of an unstable trinucleotide CAG repeat cause three of these disorders: SCA1, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA. We studied one Brazilian family segregating an autosomal dominant type of SCA. A total of ten individuals were examined and tested for the presence of the SCA1, MJD and DRPLA mutations. Three individuals, one male and two females, were considered affected based on neurological examination; ages at onset were: 32, 36 and 41 years. The first complaint in all three patients was gait ataxia which progressed slowly over the years. Six individuals showed one allele containing an expanded CAG repeat in the SCA1 gene. The mean size of the expanded allele was 48.2 CAG units. Instability of the expanded CAG tract was seen in the two transmissions that were observed in this family. In both occasions there was a contraction of the CAG tract. Our study demonstrates that SCA1 occurs in the Brazilian population. In addition, our results stress the importance of molecular studies in the confirmation of diagnosis and for pre-symptomatic testing in SCAs.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs fazem parte de um grupo de doenças neurodegenerativas que apresentam grande heterogeneidade clínica e genética. Existem até o momento sete genes mapeados responsáveis pelas AECs de transmissão autossômica dominante: SCA1, SCA2, doença de Machado-Joseph (DA/7 ou SCA3, SCA4, SCA5, SCA7 e atrofia dentatorubropalidoluisiana (ADRPL. Uma expansão de um trínucletídeo CAG foi identificada como a mutação responsável na SCA], DMJ e ADRPL. Estudamos uma família brasileira com uma forma autossômica dominante de AEC. Dez indivíduos foram examinados e

  12. Six psychotropics for pre-symptomatic & early Alzheimer's (MCI, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease modification

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    Edward C Lauterbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for neuroprotective drugs to slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and Huntington's disease (HD, has been largely unrewarding. Preclinical evidence suggests that repurposing quetiapine, lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine for early and pre-symptomatic disease-modification in NDDs may be promising and can spare regulatory barriers. The literature of these psychotropics in early stage and pre-symptomatic AD, PD, and HD is reviewed and propitious findings follow. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI phase of AD: salutary human randomized controlled trial findings for low-dose lithium and, in selected patients, donepezil await replication. Pre-symptomatic AD: human epidemiological data indicate that lithium reduces AD risk. Animal model studies (AMS reveal encouraging results for quetiapine, lithium, donepezil, and memantine. Early PD: valproate AMS findings show promise. Pre-symptomatic PD: lithium and valproate AMS findings are encouraging. Early HD: uncontrolled clinical data indicate non-progression with lithium, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine. Pre-symptomatic HD: lithium and valproate are auspicious in AMS. Many other promising findings awaiting replication (valproate in MCI; lithium, valproate, fluoxetine in pre-symptomatic AD; lithium in early PD; lithium, valproate, fluoxetine in pre-symptomatic PD; donepezil in early HD; lithium, fluoxetine, memantine in pre-symptomatic HD are reviewed. Dose- and stage-dependent effects are considered. Suggestions for signal-enhancement in human trials are provided for each NDD stage.

  13. Divergent clinical outcomes of alpha-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy in two siblings with infantile-onset Pompe disease treated in the symptomatic or pre-symptomatic state.

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    Matsuoka, Takashi; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Makiko; Sawada, Madoka; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Soga, Takashi; Tomita, Hideshi; Uemura, Shigeru; Nishino, Ichizo; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki; Umeda, Yoh

    2016-12-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal glycogen storage disease caused by acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) is the most severe form and is characterized by cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly, and skeletal muscle weakness. Untreated, IOPD generally results in death within the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) has been shown to markedly improve the life expectancy of patients with IOPD. However, the efficacy of ERT in patients with IOPD is affected by the presence of symptoms and cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM) status. We have treated two siblings with IOPD with ERT at different ages: the first was symptomatic and the second was asymptomatic. The female proband (Patient 1) was diagnosed with IOPD and initiated ERT at 4 months of age. Her younger sister (Patient 2) was diagnosed with IOPD at 10 days of age and initiated ERT at Day 12. Patient 1, now 6 years old, is alive but bedridden, and requires 24-hour invasive ventilation due to gradually progressive muscle weakness. In Patient 2, typical symptoms of IOPD, including cardiac failure, respiratory distress, progressive muscle weakness, hepatomegaly and myopathic facial features were largely absent during the first 12 months of ERT. Her cardiac function and mobility were well-maintained for the first 3 years, and she had normal motor development. However, she developed progressive hearing impairment and muscle weakness after 3 years of ERT. Both siblings have had low anti-rhGAA immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers during ERT and have tolerated the treatment well. These results suggest that initiation of ERT during the pre-symptomatic period can prevent and/or attenuate the progression of IOPD, including cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, and muscle weakness for first several years of ERT. However, to improve the long-term efficacy of ERT for IOPD, new strategies

  14. Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease.

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    Jenner, P

    1993-01-01

    Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease is necessary if neuroprotective therapies are to be utilized in its treatment. Various methods (PET, electrophysiology, enzyme assays, olfactory function) may be applicable but none has been rigorously evaluated. Other possible approaches are now considered. Plasma HVA levels (pHVA) in the presence of debrisoquine may reflect cerebral dopamine function. However, there are no detectable differences in pHVA between newly diagnosed and untreated parkinsonian patients and control subjects. Compensatory increases in dopamine turnover may mask a decrease in pHVA in the early stages of the disease. So, at present this technique could not be used as a diagnostic tool. Post-mortem studies of brain in Parkinson's disease may provide clues to biochemical markers indicative of nigral pathology. Mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease and it was reported also to be markedly reduced in blood platelets. However, subsequent studies suggest that the difference in platelet complex I activity is too small to be diagnostic of Parkinson's disease. There are also selective reductions in brain glutathione levels in Parkinson's disease restricted to substantia nigra, which do not occur in other neurodegenerative disorders and are not due to drug treatment. Importantly, in incidental Lewy body disease (preclinical Parkinson's disease) nigral glutathione levels are reduced to the same degree as in advanced Parkinson's disease. So, some peripheral index of altered glutathione function may be valuable in the early detection of the disease process.

  15. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

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    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  16. Functional Compensation of Motor Function in Pre-Symptomatic Huntington's Disease

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    Kloppel, Stefan; Draganski, Bogdan; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Weiller, Cornelius; Frackowiak, Richard S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Involuntary choreiform movements are a clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease. Studies in clinically affected patients suggest a shift of motor activations to parietal cortices in response to progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we studied pre-symptomatic gene carriers to examine the compensatory mechanisms that underlie the phenomenon of…

  17. Phenotype variability and early onset ataxia symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: comparison and correlation with other spinocerebellar ataxias

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    Marcus Vinicius Cristino de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion and includes cerebellar signs associated with visual loss and ophthalmoplegia. Marked anticipation and dynamic mutation is observed in SCA7. Moreover, phenotype variability and very early onset of symptoms may occur. In this article, a large series of Brazilian patients with different SCA subtypes was evaluated, and we compared the age of onset of SCA7 with other SCA. From the 26 patients with SCA7, 4 manifested their symptoms before 10-year-old. Also, occasionally the parents may have the onset of symptoms after their children. In conclusion, our study highlights the genetic anticipation phenomenon that occurs in SCA7 families. Patients with very early onset ataxia in the context of a remarkable family history, must be considered and tested for SCA7.

  18. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported...

  19. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

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    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging evidence for presymptomatic change in thalamus and caudate in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Natalie S; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Lehmann, Manja; Crutch, Sebastian J; Malone, Ian B; Thornton, John S; Mancini, Laura; Hyare, Harpreet; Yousry, Tarek; Ridgway, Gerard R; Zhang, Hui; Modat, Marc; Alexander, Daniel C; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C

    2013-05-01

    Amyloid imaging studies of presymptomatic familial Alzheimer's disease have revealed the striatum and thalamus to be the earliest sites of amyloid deposition. This study aimed to investigate whether there are associated volume and diffusivity changes in these subcortical structures during the presymptomatic and symptomatic stages of familial Alzheimer's disease. As the thalamus and striatum are involved in neural networks subserving complex cognitive and behavioural functions, we also examined the diffusion characteristics in connecting white matter tracts. A cohort of 20 presenilin 1 mutation carriers underwent volumetric and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and clinical assessments; 10 were symptomatic, 10 were presymptomatic and on average 5.6 years younger than their expected age at onset; 20 healthy control subjects were also studied. We conducted region of interest analyses of volume and diffusivity changes in the thalamus, caudate, putamen and hippocampus and examined diffusion behaviour in the white matter tracts of interest (fornix, cingulum and corpus callosum). Voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics were also used to provide unbiased whole-brain analyses of group differences in volume and diffusion indices, respectively. We found that reduced volumes of the left thalamus and bilateral caudate were evident at a presymptomatic stage, together with increased fractional anisotropy of bilateral thalamus and left caudate. Although no significant hippocampal volume loss was evident presymptomatically, reduced mean diffusivity was observed in the right hippocampus and reduced mean and axial diffusivity in the right cingulum. In contrast, symptomatic mutation carriers showed increased mean, axial and in particular radial diffusivity, with reduced fractional anisotropy, in all of the white matter tracts of interest. The symptomatic group also showed atrophy and increased mean diffusivity in all of the subcortical

  1. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease) : severe destruction of the lateral reticular nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; de Vos, RAI; Schultz, C; Brunt, ER; Paulson, H; Braak, H

    The lateral reticular nucleus (LRT) of the medulla oblongata is a precerebellar nucleus involved in proprioception and somatomotor automatisms. We investigated this nucleus in five individuals with clinically diagnosed and genetically confirmed spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, Machado-Joseph

  2. [Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 associated to pigmentary retinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Caballero, Pedro Enrique; Serviá, Mónica

    2010-07-01

    Ocular disorders are useful in the characterisation of the different types of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA); pigmentary retinitis is an alteration that is specifically associated to SCA type 7 and is characterised by night blindness, sensitivity to glare and progressive narrowing of the visual field. A 34-year-old woman with clinical symptoms of progressive ataxia and visual impairment secondary to pigmentary retinitis. The patient had a personal history with an autosomal dominant pattern of a similar disorder in her father and paternal grandmother. In the genetic study she presented a triplet expansion in the SCA type 2 gene. CONCLUSIONS; Although pigmentary retinitis belongs to the SCA type 7 phenotype, our patient presented this retinal disorder, as in other cases of SCA type 2. A genetic study for SCA type 2 must therefore be conducted in patients with a degenerative ataxic clinical picture and who present evidence of pigmentary retinitis.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging evidence for presymptomatic change in thalamus and caudate in familial Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihaninejad, Shiva; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Lehmann, Manja; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Malone, Ian B.; Thornton, John S.; Mancini, Laura; Hyare, Harpreet; Yousry, Tarek; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Zhang, Hui; Modat, Marc; Alexander, Daniel C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid imaging studies of presymptomatic familial Alzheimer’s disease have revealed the striatum and thalamus to be the earliest sites of amyloid deposition. This study aimed to investigate whether there are associated volume and diffusivity changes in these subcortical structures during the presymptomatic and symptomatic stages of familial Alzheimer’s disease. As the thalamus and striatum are involved in neural networks subserving complex cognitive and behavioural functions, we also examined the diffusion characteristics in connecting white matter tracts. A cohort of 20 presenilin 1 mutation carriers underwent volumetric and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and clinical assessments; 10 were symptomatic, 10 were presymptomatic and on average 5.6 years younger than their expected age at onset; 20 healthy control subjects were also studied. We conducted region of interest analyses of volume and diffusivity changes in the thalamus, caudate, putamen and hippocampus and examined diffusion behaviour in the white matter tracts of interest (fornix, cingulum and corpus callosum). Voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics were also used to provide unbiased whole-brain analyses of group differences in volume and diffusion indices, respectively. We found that reduced volumes of the left thalamus and bilateral caudate were evident at a presymptomatic stage, together with increased fractional anisotropy of bilateral thalamus and left caudate. Although no significant hippocampal volume loss was evident presymptomatically, reduced mean diffusivity was observed in the right hippocampus and reduced mean and axial diffusivity in the right cingulum. In contrast, symptomatic mutation carriers showed increased mean, axial and in particular radial diffusivity, with reduced fractional anisotropy, in all of the white matter tracts of interest. The symptomatic group also showed atrophy and increased mean diffusivity in all of the

  4. Genetic testing for clinically suspected spinocerebellar ataxias ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sowmya Devatha Venkatesh

    2018-03-13

    Mar 13, 2018 ... 5 Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA ... 2000; Sinha et al. 2004). Most epidemiological studies on the preva- ... tion may be due to a very recent admixture event (Singh et al. 2010).

  5. Genetic testing for clinically suspected spinocerebellar ataxias ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh

    Research Article. Genetic ... Melbourne, Australia and Department of Animal Science, School of Life .... The patients were assessed according to the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating ..... The Indian Journal of Medical Research 126(5):.

  6. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

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    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  7. Postictal psychosis: presymptomatic risk factors and the need for further investigation of genetics and pharmacotherapy

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    Bromfield Edward B

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postictal psychosis (PIP, an episode of psychosis occurring after a cluster of seizures, is common and may be associated with profound morbidity, including chronic psychosis. Symptoms are often pleomorphic, involving a range of psychotic symptoms, including hallucinations and disorders of thought. PIP is treatable and may be averted if presymptomatic risk factors are considered in susceptible patients and treatment is initiated. Case presentation In this report, we present an illustrative case of PIP. The patient, Mr. R, presented to our emergency room with delusions and disordered thought process following a cluster of seizures. He recovered after admission, sedation and treatment with antipsychotic medication. Discussion A list of presymptomatic risk factors is established based on review of current literature. Identification of such risk factors may potentially help with prophylactic treatment; however, little empirical research exists in this area and treatment guidelines are thus far largely based on expert opinion. Further, while the neurobiology of schizophrenia is advancing at a rapid pace, largely due to advances in genetics, the pathophysiology of PIP remains largely unknown. Considering the progress in schizophrenia research in the context of the clinical features of PIP and existing studies, potential neurobiological mechanisms for PIP are herein proposed, and further genetic analyses, which may help identify those susceptible, are warranted. Conclusion While PIP is an important problem that may present first to general hospital psychiatrists, as in the case presented, this topic is under-represented in the medical psychiatry literature. As discussed in this article, further research is needed to develop presymptomatic screens and treatment pathways to help prevent morbidity.

  8. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 in eastern India: Some new observations

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    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are hereditary, autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorders showing clinical and genetic heterogeneity. They are usually manifested clinically in the third to fifth decade of life although there is a wide variability in the age of onset. More than 36 different types of SCAs have been reported so far and about half of them are caused by pathological expansion of the trinucleotide, Cytosine Alanine Guanine (CAG repeat. The global prevalence of SCA is 0.3-2 per 100,000 population, SCA3 being the commonest variety worldwide, accounting for 20-50 per cent of all cases, though SCA 2 is generally considered as the commonest one in India. However, SCA6 has not been addressed adequately from India though it is common in the eastern Asian countries like, Japan, Korea and Thailand. Objective: The present study was undertaken to identify the prevalence of SCA6 in the city of Kolkata and the eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: 83 consecutive patients were recruited for the study of possible SCAs and their clinical features and genotype were investigated. Results: 6 of the 83 subjects turned out positive for SCA6, constituting therefore, 13.33% of the patient pool. Discussion: SCA6 is prevalent in the eastern part of India, though not as frequent as the other common varieties. Conclusions: Further community based studies are required in order to understand the magnitude of SCA6 in the eastern part, as well as in other regions of India.

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 in eastern India: Some new observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Pulai, Debabrata; Guin, Deb Shankar; Ganguly, Goutam; Joardar, Anindita; Roy, Sarnava; Rai, Saurabh; Biswas, Atanu; Pandit, Alok; Roy, Arijit; Senapati, Asit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary, autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorders showing clinical and genetic heterogeneity. They are usually manifested clinically in the third to fifth decade of life although there is a wide variability in the age of onset. More than 36 different types of SCAs have been reported so far and about half of them are caused by pathological expansion of the trinucleotide, Cytosine Alanine Guanine (CAG) repeat. The global prevalence of SCA is 0.3-2 per 100,000 population, SCA3 being the commonest variety worldwide, accounting for 20-50 per cent of all cases, though SCA 2 is generally considered as the commonest one in India. However, SCA6 has not been addressed adequately from India though it is common in the eastern Asian countries like, Japan, Korea and Thailand. The present study was undertaken to identify the prevalence of SCA6 in the city of Kolkata and the eastern part of India. 83 consecutive patients were recruited for the study of possible SCAs and their clinical features and genotype were investigated. 6 of the 83 subjects turned out positive for SCA6, constituting therefore, 13.33% of the patient pool. SCA6 is prevalent in the eastern part of India, though not as frequent as the other common varieties. Further community based studies are required in order to understand the magnitude of SCA6 in the eastern part, as well as in other regions of India.

  10. Prevalence of spinocerebellar ataxia 36 in a US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Juliana M; Diaz, Tatyana; Petty, Lauren E; Quintáns, Beatriz; Yáñez, Zuleima; Boerwinkle, Eric; Muzny, Donna; Akhmedov, Dmitry; Berdeaux, Rebecca; Sobrido, Maria J; Gibbs, Richard; Lupski, James R; Geschwind, Daniel H; Perlman, Susan; Below, Jennifer E; Fogel, Brent L

    2017-08-01

    To assess the prevalence and clinical features of individuals affected by spinocerebellar ataxia 36 (SCA36) at a large tertiary referral center in the United States. A total of 577 patients with undiagnosed sporadic or familial cerebellar ataxia comprehensively evaluated at a tertiary referral ataxia center were molecularly evaluated for SCA36. Repeat primed PCR and fragment analysis were used to screen for the presence of a repeat expansion in the NOP56 gene. Fragment analysis of triplet repeat primed PCR products identified a GGCCTG hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of NOP56 in 4 index cases. These 4 SCA36-positive families comprised 2 distinct ethnic groups: white (European) (2) and Asian (Japanese [1] and Vietnamese [1]). Individuals affected by SCA36 exhibited typical clinical features with gait ataxia and age at onset ranging between 35 and 50 years. Patients also suffered from ataxic or spastic limbs, altered reflexes, abnormal ocular movement, and cognitive impairment. In a US population, SCA36 was observed to be a rare disorder, accounting for 0.7% (4/577 index cases) of disease in a large undiagnosed ataxia cohort.

  11. Molecular genetics of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia

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    Dan-dan WU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the genotype of the members of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA. Methods The peripheral blood samples of 6 patients and 40 asymptomatic people belonged to the family were collected. Referring to the clinical manifestations of the proband and second-generation sequencing results, the CAG trinucleotide repeats of the pathogenic gene ATXN2 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The repeated times of the trinucleotide in normally and abnormally amplified alleles were defined by agarose gel electrophoresis and PCR products sequencing. Results Autosomal dominant heredity was the cause of the SCA in this family. Six out of 46 in the fourth-generation were SCA2 patients, 7 were the carriers of pathogenic allele. The repeated times of CAG trinucleotide were within the normal range in one of the two alleles of ATXN2, but they were in abnormal range in the another one. The repeated times of CAG trinucleotide were 40-46 in abnormal alleles of patients. Conclusion Autosomal dominant heredity SCA2 has been diagnosed in this family caused by the dynamic nutation of CAG trinucleotide repeats, and 7 pathogenic allele carriers in this family were confirmed by genetic diagnosis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.07

  12. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease–-Spinocerebellar Ataxia–-Opportunities and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Satya Prakash; Meenakshi Malhotra

    2008-01-01

    Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Olig...

  13. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective ...... of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 October 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.231....

  14. Modifications of resting state networks in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, Sirio; Saccà, Francesco; Cervo, Amedeo; Marsili, Angela; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Giorgio, Sara Maria Delle Acque; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Brunetti, Arturo; Quarantelli, Mario

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the integrity of the Resting State Networks in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) and the correlations between the modification of these networks and clinical variables. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) data from 19 SCA2 patients and 29 healthy controls were analyzed using an independent component analysis and dual regression, controlling at voxel level for the effect of atrophy by co-varying for gray matter volume. Correlations between the resting state networks alterations and disease duration, age at onset, number of triplets, and clinical score were assessed by Spearman's coefficient, for each cluster which was significantly different in SCA2 patients compared with healthy controls. In SCA2 patients, disruption of the cerebellar components of all major resting state networks was present, with supratentorial involvement only for the default mode network. When controlling at voxel level for gray matter volume, the reduction in functional connectivity in supratentorial regions of the default mode network, and in cerebellar regions within the default mode, executive and right fronto-parietal networks, was still significant. No correlations with clinical variables were found for any of the investigated resting state networks. The SCA2 patients show significant alterations of the resting state networks, only partly explained by the atrophy. The default mode network is the only resting state network that shows also supratentorial changes, which appear unrelated to the cortical gray matter volume. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical significance of these changes. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Structural imaging in the presymptomatic stage of genetically determined parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reetz, Kathrin; Tadic, Vera; Kasten, Meike

    2010-01-01

    Several genes associated with monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been discovered, opening up new avenues for the investigation of presymptomatic stages of PD. Using voxel-based morphometry in 30 asymptomatic mutation carriers (MC) with mutations in four different genes for PD and 100....... The observed striatal GMV increase might be the common structural correlate of compensatory mechanisms due to the latent dopaminergic deficit, reflecting the different, but probably interrelated pathogenic pathways resulting in nigral cell death. Asymptomatic PINK1 and LRRK2 MC also revealed smaller GMV...

  16. Radiosensitivity in Huntington's disease: implications for pathogenesis and presymptomatic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshell, A.N.; Tarone, R.E.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited fatal disorder characterised by premature death of nerve cells. Cultured lymphocyte lines from four patients with HD were abnormally sensitive to the lethal effects of X rays, as were lines from two of five subjects at risk for HD. The hypersensitivity is specific for ionising radiation, since HD lines had normal survival after exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The hypersensitivity, which may reflect an inherited defect in DNA repair, provides the basis for a presymptomatic diagnostic test for the disease. (author)

  17. Presymptomatic genetic analysis during pregnancy for vascular type Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

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    Naing BT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Banyar Than Naing,1 Atsushi Watanabe,1,2 Shinji Tanigaki,3 Masae Ono,4 Mitsutoshi Iwashita,3 Takashi Shimada1,21Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Division of Clinical Genetics, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Pediatrics, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The vascular type of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS, EDS type IV (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [MIM] #130050 is characterized by thin, translucent skin, easy bruising, and arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility during pregnancy, which may lead to sudden death. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by type III procollagen gene (COL3A1: MIM #120180 mutations. Approximately 50% of the COL3A1 mutations are inherited from an affected parent, and 50% are de novo mutations. Each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation and developing the disorder. Pregnant women with vascular EDS are at an increased risk of uterine and arterial rupture during the peripartum period, with high maternal morbidity and mortality rates. We report the first case of an asymptomatic 35-year-old woman at a risk of complications of vascular EDS who underwent presymptomatic evaluation during pregnancy. The sequencing results of both her brother and mother had a one-base-pair deletion, resulting in Glutamate at position 730 changing to Lysine and causing a frame shift and premature termination codon at 61 amino acids from the mutation position (p. Glu730Lysfs*61 on exon 32 of COL3A1. This deletion caused frameshift, leading to a premature termination codon (TAG at 181 nucleotides downstream in exon 35, which could not be detected by previous total RNA (ribonucleic acid method. Thus, she was at risk of complications of vascular EDS, and diagnostic testing was employed

  18. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

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    Matthis Synofzik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”. The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability. Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease.

  19. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  20. Modeling Test and Treatment Strategies for Presymptomatic Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James F.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Hayward, Rodney A.; Albin, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we developed a model of presymptomatic treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) after a screening diagnostic evaluation and explored the circumstances required for an AD prevention treatment to produce aggregate net population benefit. Methods Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to estimate outcomes in a simulated population derived from data on AD incidence and mortality. A wide variety of treatment parameters were explored. Net population benefit was estimated in aggregated QALYs. Sensitivity analyses were performed by individually varying the primary parameters. Findings In the base-case scenario, treatment effects were uniformly positive, and net benefits increased with increasing age at screening. A highly efficacious treatment (i.e. relative risk 0.6) modeled in the base-case is estimated to save 20 QALYs per 1000 patients screened and 221 QALYs per 1000 patients treated. Conclusions Highly efficacious presymptomatic screen and treat strategies for AD are likely to produce substantial aggregate population benefits that are likely greater than the benefits of aspirin in primary prevention of moderate risk cardiovascular disease (28 QALYS per 1000 patients treated), even in the context of an imperfect treatment delivery environment. PMID:25474698

  1. Properties of bilateral spinocerebellar activation of cerebellar cortical neurons

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    Pontus eGeborek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to explore the cerebellar cortical inputs from two spinocerebellar pathways, the spinal border cell-component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (SBC-VSCT and the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT, respectively, in the sublobule C1 of the cerebellar posterior lobe. The two pathways were activated by electrical stimulation of the contralateral lateral funiculus (coLF and the ipsilateral LF (iLF at lower thoracic levels. Most granule cells in sublobule C1 did not respond at all but part of the granule cell population displayed high-intensity responses to either coLF or iLF stimulation. As a rule, Golgi cells and Purkinje cell simple spikes responded to input from both LFs, although Golgi cells could be more selective. In addition, a small population of granule cells responded to input from both the coLF and the iLF. However, in these cases, similarities in the temporal topography and magnitude of the responses suggested that the same axons were stimulated from the two LFs, i.e. that the axons of individual spinocerebellar neurons could be present in both funiculi. This was also confirmed for a population of spinal neurons located within known locations of SBC-VSCT neurons and dorsal horn DSCT neurons. We conclude that bilateral spinocerebellar responses can occur in cerebellar granule cells, but the VSCT and DSCT systems that provide the input can also be organized bilaterally. The implications for the traditional functional separation of VSCT and DSCT systems and the issue whether granule cells primarily integrate functionally similar information or not are discussed.

  2. Progression of Dysphagia in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Chiharu; Hirano, Makito; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant triplet repeat disease, predominantly affects the cerebellum with a late onset and generally good prognosis. Dysphagia is commonly associated with the outcomes of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCA6. Although the characteristics of dysphagia have been rarely reported in SCA6, our previous study indicated that dysphagia is generally milder in SCA6 than in SCA3, another inherited ataxia with multisystem involvement. However, abnormalities in the pharyngeal phase in SCA6 were indistinguishable from those in SCA3, with no explainable reason. To determine the reason, we repeatedly performed videofluoroscopic examinations (VF) in 14 patients with SCA6. The results showed that the gross progression of dysphagia was apparently slow, but four patients had progressive dysphagia at an early disease stage; dysphagia began within 10 years from the onset of ataxia and rapidly progressed. A common clinical feature of the four patients was a significantly older age at the onset of ataxia (74.0 vs. 60.3 years), associated with significantly shorter triplet repeats. This finding surprisingly indicated that patients who had shorter repeats and thereby later onset and potentially better prognoses were at risk for dysphagia-associated problems. Ischemic changes, homozygous mutation, and diabetes mellitus as well as aging might have contributed to the observed progressive dysphagia. We found that conventionally monitored somatosensory evoked potentials at least partly reflected progressive dysphagia. Despite the small study group, our findings suggest that clinicians should carefully monitor dysphagia in patients with SCA6 who are older at disease onset (>60 years).

  3. Neuronal vacuolation and spinocerebellar degeneration associated with altered neurotransmission

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    Aggeliki Giannakopoulou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inherited neurodegenerative disorders are debilitating diseases that occur across different species, such as the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris, and many are caused by mutations in the same genes as corresponding human conditions. In the present study, we report an inherited neurodegenerative condition, termed ‘neuronal vacuolation and spinocerebellar degeneration’ (NVSD which affects neonatal or young dogs, mainly Rottweilers, which recently has been linked with the homozygosity for the RAB3GAP1:c.743delC allele. Mutations in human RAB3GAP1 cause Warburg micro syndrome (WARBM, a severe developmental disorder characterized predominantly by abnormalities of the nervous system including axonal peripheral neuropathy. RAB3GAP1 encodes the catalytic subunit of a GTPase activator protein and guanine exchange factor for Rab3 and Rab18 proteins, respectively. Rab proteins are involved in membrane trafficking in the endoplasmic reticulum, autophagy, axonal transport and synaptic transmission. The present study attempts to carry out a detailed histopathological examination of NVSD disease, extending from peripheral nerves to lower brain structures focusing on the neurotransmitter alterations noted in the cerebellum, the major structure affected. NVSD dogs presented with progressive cerebellar ataxia and some clinical manifestations that recapitulate the WARBM phenotype. Neuropathological examination revealed dystrophic axons, neurodegeneration and intracellular vacuolization in specific nuclei. In the cerebellum, severe vacuolation of cerebellar nuclei neurons, atrophy of Purkinje cells, and diminishing of GABAergic and glutamatergic fibres constitute the most striking lesions. The balance of evidence suggests that the neuropathological lesions are a reaction to the altered neurotransmission. The canine phenotype could serve as a model to delineate the disease-causing pathological mechanisms in RAB3GAP1 mutation.

  4. Ethical issues in presymptomatic genetic testing for minors: a dilemma in Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, Brice; Brugières, Laurence; Caron, Olivier; Moutel, Grégoire

    2013-06-01

    In 2001, a French expert panel recommended that presymptomatic tests should not be carried out on minors in families affected by Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), flying in the face of possible parental demands for such testing. We decided to investigate the legitimacy of such a recommendation. We conducted a national multicenter survey using self-administered questionnaires mailed to French oncogeneticists in 33 regional centers in France. We aimed to (1) determine the extent to which these doctors were confronted with parental requests for TP53 testing, (2) study how they responded to these requests and the arguments used and (3) assess the attitude of oncogeneticists concerning the normative framework regulating the prescription of tests for minors. Twenty oncogeneticists stated that they had managed at least one LFS family. Eleven of these doctors had been confronted with parental requests for testing and three had prescribed such tests on at least one occasion. The oncogeneticists gave balanced medical, psychological and ethical arguments, highlighting the dilemma they face in the decision-making process. This dilemma is due to the lack of a consensus concerning this recommendation, which aims to protect the minor by limiting presymptomatic tests to cases in which a clear medical benefit can be demonstrated but which prevents the unique situation of particular families from being taken into account. In conclusion, the recommendation has a normative status but first, from a clinical stance, it is difficult to dissociate it from the evaluation of individual family situations, and second, the benefit of a specific medical follow-up for TP53 mutation carriers is currently being investigated.

  5. Mutation in the kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channel causing spinocerebellar ataxia 13 disrupts sound-localization mechanisms.

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    John C Middlebrooks

    Full Text Available Normal sound localization requires precise comparisons of sound timing and pressure levels between the two ears. The primary localization cues are interaural time differences, ITD, and interaural level differences, ILD. Voltage-gated potassium channels, including Kv3.3, are highly expressed in the auditory brainstem and are thought to underlie the exquisite temporal precision and rapid spike rates that characterize brainstem binaural pathways. An autosomal dominant mutation in the gene encoding Kv3.3 has been demonstrated in a large Filipino kindred manifesting as spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13. This kindred provides a rare opportunity to test in vivo the importance of a specific channel subunit for human hearing. Here, we demonstrate psychophysically that individuals with the mutant allele exhibit profound deficits in both ITD and ILD sensitivity, despite showing no obvious impairment in pure-tone sensitivity with either ear. Surprisingly, several individuals exhibited the auditory deficits even though they were pre-symptomatic for SCA13. We would expect that impairments of binaural processing as great as those observed in this family would result in prominent deficits in localization of sound sources and in loss of the "spatial release from masking" that aids in understanding speech in the presence of competing sounds.

  6. Radiation-induced brain structural and functional abnormalities in presymptomatic phase and outcome prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Han; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Xie, Fei; Liu, Lizhi; Qiu, Shijun; Li, Li; Shen, Dinggang

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy, a major method of treatment for brain cancer, may cause severe brain injuries after many years. We used a rare and unique cohort of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with normal-appearing brains to study possible early irradiation injury in its presymptomatic phase before severe, irreversible necrosis happens. The aim is to detect any structural or functional imaging biomarker that is sensitive to early irradiation injury, and to understand the recovery and progression of irradiation injury that can shed light on outcome prediction for early clinical intervention. We found an acute increase in local brain activity that is followed by extensive reductions in such activity in the temporal lobe and significant loss of functional connectivity in a distributed, large-scale, high-level cognitive function-related brain network. Intriguingly, these radiosensitive functional alterations were found to be fully or partially recoverable. In contrast, progressive late disruptions to the integrity of the related far-end white matter structure began to be significant after one year. Importantly, early increased local brain functional activity was predictive of severe later temporal lobe necrosis. Based on these findings, we proposed a dynamic, multifactorial model for radiation injury and another preventive model for timely clinical intervention. Hum Brain Mapp 39:407-427, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the α 1A voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca 2+ channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.)

  8. Presymptomatic generalized brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ahsan, R Laila; Isaacs, Adrian M

    2009-01-01

    mutation carriers with a control group of 7 mutation-negative family members. Volumetric MRI brain scans were performed on all subjects at two time points, and rates of volume change were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: We demonstrate that generalized atrophy occurs presymptomatically in CHMP2B...... gene mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: This finding suggests that mutations in CHMP2B have widespread effects throughout the brain, leading to a neuro-anatomical signature distinct from other diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum........ There are no detailed studies of brain imaging in CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. This study aimed to investigate whether there were early or presymptomatic changes in this group of patients. METHODS: Subjects comprised 16 members of a Danish family with CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. Nine subjects were presymptomatic...

  9. Ataxia espinocerebelosa 7: Investigación clínica y genética en una familia argentina Spinocerebellar ataxia 7: Clinical and genetic investigation in an Argentine family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I. Rojas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias espino cerebelosas (AEC, constituyen un grupo de trastornos hereditarios neurodegenerativos de herencia autosómica dominante. Se caracterizan principalmente por la presencia clínica de ataxia cerebelosa asociada a oftalmoplejía, disartria, signos piramidales o extrapiramidales y pérdida de la sensibilidad profunda. La AEC 7 pertenece al grupo de las ataxias espinocerebelosas en la cual el trastorno es consecuencia de la expansión del triplete CAG localizado en el cromosoma 3 p12-p21. La característica clínica de dicha ataxia es la pérdida de la agudeza visual y posterior ceguera. Presentamos tres individuos de una familia con ataxia cerebelosa, pérdida de la agudeza visual y otros signos neurológicos. El diagnóstico fue confirmado por medio del análisis genético en el cual se observó la anormalidad característica de la AEC 7. Este es el primer caso de AEC 7 en Argentina confirmado por estudio genético. En la revisión de la literatura (hasta enero 2006 se hallaron sólo dos familias notificadas en América Latina. El objetivo del trabajo es el de enfocar la atención en el diagnóstico de esta enfermedad degenerativa en pacientes que se presentan con ataxia cerebelosa progresiva asociada con disminución de la agudeza visual e historia familiar positiva.Spino cerebellar ataxia (SCA are a complex group of hereditary neurodegenerative disturbances of autosomal dominant pattern. They are largely characterized by the clinical presence of cerebellar ataxia related to ophtalmoplegia, dysarthria, pyramidal and extra-pyramidal signs and loss of deep sensitivity. SCA 7 belongs to the SCA group in which the disturbance is a result of the expansion of CAG triplet repetition located in the 3p12-p21 chromosome. The characteristic clinical feature of SCA7 is the loss of visual acuity and blindness. We present here three cases of ataxia, from the same family, with loss of visual acuity and other neurological disorders. The diagnosis

  10. Functional compensation of motor function in pre-symptomatic Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klöppel, Stefan; Draganski, Bogdan; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2009-01-01

    the compensatory mechanisms that underlie the phenomenon of retained motor function in the presence of degenerative change. Fifteen pre-symptomatic gene carriers and 12 matched controls performed button presses paced by a metronome at either 0.5 or 2 Hz with four fingers of the right hand whilst being scanned...... with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects pressed buttons either in the order of a previously learnt 10-item finger sequence, from left to right, or kept still. Error rates ranged from 2% to 7% in the pre-symptomatic gene carriers and from 0.5% to 4% in controls, depending on the condition...

  11. Early manifestations of type 1 Gaucher disease in presymptomatic children diagnosed after parental carrier screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Amy C; Bier, Louise; Overbey, Jessica R; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica; Desai, Khyati; Desnick, Robert J; Balwani, Manisha

    2017-06-01

    The overall published experience with pediatric type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) has been based on ascertainment through clinical presentation of the disease. We describe the longitudinal follow-up in a presymptomatic pediatric cohort. The cohort includes children diagnosed with GD1, either prenatally or postnatally by molecular genetic testing, and followed for clinical care at our center from 1998 to 2016. All patients' parents were GBA mutation carriers identified through carrier screening programs. Longitudinal clinical, laboratory, and imaging data were obtained through chart review. Thirty-eight patients aged 1-18 years (mean at last visit 6.9 ± 4.1 years) were followed, including 32 p.N409S homozygotes and 6 p.N409S/p.R535H compound heterozygotes. At the last evaluation, a minority had hematological (5%), bone (15%), or linear growth (19%) issues. Only 12% had splenomegaly and 74% had moderate hepatomegaly. Chitotriosidase activity varied widely (6-5,640 nmol/hour/ml) and generally increased with age. Pediatric Gaucher severity scores (GSS) remained stable and within the mild-disease range for most (95%). Treatment for progressive disease during this period was recommended for four children. Most children with the p.N409S/p.N409S and p.N409S/p.R535H GD1 genotypes have minimal disease manifestations and progression during childhood and can be monitored using limited assessments. Those with other mutations may require additional monitoring. These data are valuable for newborn screening and counseling.Genet Med advance online publication 13 October 2016.

  12. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: Report of an Indian family

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    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is a form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia which is associated with pigmentary retinal degeneration. It is known for its world-wide rarity except in the Scandinavian countries. It is very rarely reported from India and the neighbouring Asian countries . The present report describes the neurogenetic findings of a family of SCA7, from the northern part of Karnataka in South India. It documents the wide intrafamilial phenotypic variability, which could be correlated with the CAG repeat counts and phenomenon of anticipation. Genotype phenotype correlation highlighted certain disparities in comparison with the previous studies. The report highlights the need for multiethnic population studies and the role of genetic counseling and prenatal testing in SCA7 patients.

  13. Evidence of Neurobiological Changes in the Presymptomatic PINK1 Knockout Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Craig F; Morrison, Thomas R; Iriah, Sade; Malmberg, Samantha; Kulkarni, Praveen; Hartner, Jochen C; Trivedi, Malav

    2018-01-01

    Genetic models of Parkinson's disease (PD) coupled with advanced imaging techniques can elucidate neurobiological disease progression, and can help identify early biomarkers before clinical signs emerge. PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) helps protect neurons from mitochondrial dysfunction, and a mutation in the associated gene is a risk factor for recessive familial PD. The PINK1 knockout (KO) rat is a novel model for familial PD that has not been neuroradiologically characterized for alterations in brain structure/function, alongside behavior, prior to 4 months of age. To identify biomarkers of presymptomatic PD in the PINK1 -/- rat at 3 months using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. At postnatal weeks 12-13; one month earlier than previously reported signs of motor and cognitive dysfunction, this study combined imaging modalities, including assessment of quantitative anisotropy across 171 individual brain areas using an annotated MRI rat brain atlas to identify sites of gray matter alteration between wild-type and PINK1 -/- rats. The olfactory system, hypothalamus, thalamus, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellum showed differences in anisotropy between experimental groups. Molecular analyses revealed reduced levels of glutathione, ATP, and elevated oxidative stress in the substantia nigra, striatum and deep cerebellar nuclei. Mitochondrial genes encoding proteins in Complex IV, along with mRNA levels associated with mitochondrial function and genes involved in glutathione synthesis were reduced. Differences in brain structure did not align with any cognitive or motor impairment. These data reveal early markers, and highlight novel brain regions involved in the pathology of PD in the PINK1 -/- rat before behavioral dysfunction occurs.

  14. Presymptomatic and longitudinal neuroimaging in neurodegeneration--from snapshots to motion picture: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christina; Elamin, Marwa; Hardiman, Orla; Bede, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Recent quantitative neuroimaging studies have been successful in capturing phenotype and genotype-specific changes in dementia syndromes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. However, the majority of imaging studies are cross-sectional, despite the obvious superiority of longitudinal study designs in characterising disease trajectories, response to therapy, progression rates and evaluating the presymptomatic phase of neurodegenerative conditions. The aim of this work is to perform a systematic review of longitudinal imaging initiatives in neurodegeneration focusing on methodology, optimal statistical models, follow-up intervals, attrition rates, primary study outcomes and presymptomatic studies. Longitudinal imaging studies were identified from 'PubMed' and reviewed from 1990 to 2014. The search terms 'longitudinal', 'MRI', 'presymptomatic' and 'imaging' were utilised in combination with one of the following degenerative conditions; Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease, frontotemporal dementia, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, ataxia, HIV, alcohol abuse/dependence. A total of 423 longitudinal imaging papers and 103 genotype-based presymptomatic studies were identified and systematically reviewed. Imaging techniques, follow-up intervals and attrition rates showed significant variation depending on the primary diagnosis. Commonly used statistical models included analysis of annualised percentage change, mixed and random effect models, and non-linear cumulative models with acceleration-deceleration components. Although longitudinal imaging studies have the potential to provide crucial insights into the presymptomatic phase and natural trajectory of neurodegenerative processes a standardised design is required to enable meaningful data interpretation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under

  15. Origin, course, and laterality of spinocerebellar axons in the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, J R; Wang, X M; Martin, G F

    1998-08-01

    Spinocerebellar axons have been studied extensively in placental mammals, but there have been no full reports on their origin, laterality, or spinal course in any marsupial. We have used the North American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) to obtain such information and to ask whether any spinocerebellar neurons innervate both the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum through axonal collaterals. To identify spinal neurons that project to the cerebellum, we employed the retrograde transport of Fluoro-Gold (FG) from the anterior lobe, the main target of spinocerebellar axons. In some cases, cerebellar injections of FG were combined with hemisections of the rostral cervical or midthoracic spinal cord, so that laterality of spinocerebellar connections could be established. To determine whether single neurons project to both the anterior lobe and the posterior lobe, injections of Fast Blue (FB) into the anterior lobe were combined with injections of Diamidino yellow (DY) or rhodamine B dextran (RBD) into the posterior lobe, or vice versa. Following injections of FG into the anterior lobe, neurons were labeled throughout the length of the spinal cord, which differed in laminar distribution and laterality of their projections. Among other areas, neurons were labeled in the central cervical nucleus, the nucleus centrobasalis, Clarke's nucleus, the dorsal horn dorsal spinocerebellar tract area, the spinal border region, and Stilling's nucleus. When anterior lobe injections of FB were combined with injections of RBD or DY into the posterior lobe, or vice versa, some double-labeled neurons were present in all major spinocerebellar groups. Cerebellar injections of FG also retrogradely labeled spinocerebellar axons, allowing us to document their locations in the gray matter as well as within the periphery of the lateral and ventral funiculi at all spinal levels. A few spinocerebellar axons also were found in the dorsal funiculus (a dorsal column-spinocerebellar tract

  16. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: Clinicogenetic Aspects, Mechanistic Insights, and Management Approaches

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    Luis C. Velázquez-Pérez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia that occurs as a consequence of abnormal CAG expansions in the ATXN2 gene. Progressive clinical features result from the neurodegeneration of cerebellum and extra-cerebellar structures including the pons, the basal ganglia, and the cerebral cortex. Clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging approaches have been used to characterize the natural history of the disease, allowing its classification into four distinct stages, with special emphasis on the prodromal stage, which is characterized by a plethora of motor and non-motor features. Neuropathological investigations of brain tissue from SCA2 patients reveal a widespread involvement of multiple brain systems, mainly cerebellar and brainstem systems. Recent findings linking ataxin-2 intermediate expansions to other neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have provided insights into the ataxin-2-related toxicity mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases and have raised new ethical challenges to molecular predictive diagnosis of SCA2. No effective neuroprotective therapies are currently available for SCA2 patients, but some therapeutic options such as neurorehabilitation and some emerging neuroprotective drugs have shown palliative benefits.

  17. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Giannelli, Marco; Ginestroni, Andrea; Soricelli, Andrea; Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Tessa, Carlo; Galli, Lucia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Piacentini, Silvia; Salvatore, Elena; Toschi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  18. Two in one: report of a patient with spinocerebellar ataxia types 2 and 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Sachin S; Goldman, Jennifer G

    2012-09-01

    To report a rare case of the coexistence of 2 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) mutations in a single patient. Case report. University hospital, Movement Disorders Center. A 54-year-old man of Mexican, American Indian, and French descent with an 11-year history of gait and limb ataxia. Findings of clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and video electroencephalographic monitoring. Neurologic history revealed a gradually progressive gait and limb ataxia along with muscle cramps and sensory symptoms in his distal extremities; examination revealed executive dysfunction, dysarthria, ataxia, and sensory neuronopathy. Episodes of loss of awareness were reported, but electroencephalograms were negative. Brain imaging demonstrated severe cerebellar and brainstem atrophy. Genetic evaluation of the case revealed mutations in both the SCA2 and SCA10 genes. Our patient has a unique combination of genetic mutations for 2 different SCAs, types 2 and 10, which to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. His clinical phenotype is largely consistent with SCA2, but his possible seizures and Mexican heritage suggest influences of SCA10.

  19. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Mascalchi

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM and cortical gray matter (GM in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  20. Alteration of CBF and CMRO2 and TRH effects on CBF in spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyoshi, Toshihiko; Namura, Yasuhiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and to evaluate the cerebral circulation and metabolism in patients with SCD. We performed a positron emission tomography study on each of six SCD patients (mean age 47.7 ± 3.6 : 5 cases; OPCA of Dejerene-Thomas type, 1 case; OPCA of Menzel type) and twelve normal volunteers. In SCD patients there were marked reductions in CBF (p < 0.01) and CMRO2 (p < 0.01) in the cerebellum compared with normal volunteers, while in the cerebral cortices and the thalamus, SCD patients showed normal values. There were no significant changes in regional and global CBF after 2 mg TRH intravenous injection in the SCD patients. But comparing CBF before TRH administration with corrected CBF (CBF after TRH · mean global CBF before TRH/mean global CBF after TRH), it is only the CBF of the cerebellum that increased after TRH administration (paired t test, p < 0.02). This elevation of CBF in the cerebellum would be related to some clinical effects of TRH in SCD patients. (author)

  1. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease - Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Opportunities and Challenges

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    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  2. Evaluation of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy by computerized tomography in spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroko; Asano, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Takatoshi; Hirao, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yasushi; Sobue, Itsuro

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of various parameters of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy in computerized tomographs of 142 cases of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and 100 age and sex matched controls was carried out in order to investigate whether these parameters would correspond to the subtypes of this disease and differing grades of various clinical manifestations. One supra- and all infratentorial parameters of SCD showed statistically significant atrophy with a risk of P < 0.005. Among the subtypes, OPCA had a more severely atrophied pons than LCCA (P < 0.005), Menzel (P < 0.05) and SSP (P < 0.01). There was a correlation between the distribution of symptoms like gait, speech, ataxia of extremities and ocular movement disorders, and distribution and degree of infratentorial atrophy with statistical significance (P < 0.05 ∼ P < 0.005). The degree of atrophy of the pons and the width of the IV ventricle were directly proportional to the duration of the illness in cases of less than 10 years, but not to those of over 10 years. Follow-up CT scan was done for 24 patients, 12 within 3 years, 12 after the lapse of 3 years. The latter group showed statistically significant atrophy between the 1st and 2nd scans in several parameters, but there was no significance between those of the former group. (author)

  3. Evaluation of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy by computerized tomography in spinocerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hiroko; Asano, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Takatoshi; Hirao, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yasushi; Sobue, Itsuro

    1986-08-01

    Measurement of various parameters of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy in computerized tomographs of 142 cases of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and 100 age and sex matched controls was carried out in order to investigate whether these parameters would correspond to the subtypes of this disease and differing grades of various clinical manifestations. One supra- and all infratentorial parameters of SCD showed statistically significant atrophy with a risk of P < 0.005. Among the subtypes, OPCA had a more severely atrophied pons than LCCA (P < 0.005), Menzel (P < 0.05) and SSP (P < 0.01). There was a correlation between the distribution of symptoms like gait, speech, ataxia of extremities and ocular movement disorders, and distribution and degree of infratentorial atrophy with statistical significance (P < 0.05 -- P < 0.005). The degree of atrophy of the pons and the width of the IV ventricle were directly proportional to the duration of the illness in cases of less than 10 years, but not to those of over 10 years. Follow-up CT scan was done for 24 patients, 12 within 3 years, 12 after the lapse of 3 years. The latter group showed statistically significant atrophy between the 1st and 2nd scans in several parameters, but there was no significance between those of the former group.

  4. Alterations in CD200-CD200R1 System during EAE Already Manifest at Presymptomatic Stages

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    Tony Valente

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis, activated microglia/macrophages appear in active lesions and in normal appearing white matter. However, whether they play a beneficial or a detrimental role in the development of the pathology remains a controversial issue. The production of pro-inflammatory molecules by chronically activated microglial cells is suggested to contribute to the progression of neurodegenerative processes in neurological disease. In the healthy brain, neurons control glial activation through several inhibitory mechanisms, such as the CD200-CD200R1 interaction. Therefore, we studied whether alterations in the CD200-CD200R1 system might underlie the neuroinflammation in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis. We determined the time course of CD200 and CD200R1 expression in the brain and spinal cord of an EAE mouse model from presymptomatic to late symptomatic stages. We also assessed the correlation with associated glial activation, inflammatory response and EAE severity. Alterations in CD200 and CD200R1 expression were mainly observed in spinal cord regions in the EAE model, mostly a decrease in CD200 and an increase in CD200R1 expression. A decrease in the expression of the mRNA encoding a full CD200 protein was detected before the onset of clinical signs, and remained thereafter. A decrease in CD200 protein expression was observed from the onset of clinical signs. By contrast, CD200R1 expression increased at EAE onset, when a glial reaction associated with the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers occurred, and continued to be elevated during the pathology. Moreover, the magnitude of the alterations correlated with severity of the EAE mainly in spinal cord. These results suggest that neuronal-microglial communication through CD200-CD200R1 interaction is compromised in EAE. The early decreases in CD200 expression in EAE suggest that this downregulation might also

  5. Metabolic profiling of presymptomatic Huntington’s disease sheep reveals novel biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, Debra J.; Middleton, Benita; Fraser, Cara K.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Kuchel, Timothy R.; Rudiger, Skye R.; Bawden, C. Simon; Morton, A. Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The pronounced cachexia (unexplained wasting) seen in Huntington’s disease (HD) patients suggests that metabolic dysregulation plays a role in HD pathogenesis, although evidence of metabolic abnormalities in HD patients is inconsistent. We performed metabolic profiling of plasma from presymptomatic HD transgenic and control sheep. Metabolites were quantified in sequential plasma samples taken over a 25 h period using a targeted LC/MS metabolomics approach. Significant changes with respect to genotype were observed in 89/130 identified metabolites, including sphingolipids, biogenic amines, amino acids and urea. Citrulline and arginine increased significantly in HD compared to control sheep. Ten other amino acids decreased in presymptomatic HD sheep, including branched chain amino acids (isoleucine, leucine and valine) that have been identified previously as potential biomarkers of HD. Significant increases in urea, arginine, citrulline, asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine, alongside decreases in sphingolipids, indicate that both the urea cycle and nitric oxide pathways are dysregulated at early stages in HD. Logistic prediction modelling identified a set of 8 biomarkers that can identify 80% of the presymptomatic HD sheep as transgenic, with 90% confidence. This level of sensitivity, using minimally invasive methods, offers novel opportunities for monitoring disease progression in HD patients. PMID:28223686

  6. Increased susceptibility to structural acute kidney injury in a mouse model of presymptomatic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, LaTawnya; Ma, Qing; Devarajan, Mahima; Parameswaran, Priyanka; Drake, Keri; Siroky, Brian; Shay-Winkler, Kritton; Robbins, Jeffrey; Devarajan, Prasad

    2017-09-01

    The early events that signal renal dysfunction in presymptomatic heart failure are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that functional and mechanistic changes occur in the kidney that precede the development of symptomatic heart failure. We employed a transgenic mouse model with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of mutant α-B-crystallin that develops slowly progressive cardiomyopathy. Presymptomatic transgenic mice displayed an increase in serum creatinine (1.17 ± 0.34 vs. wild type 0.65 ± 0.16 mg/dl, P kidneys exhibited a twofold upregulation of the Ren1 gene, marked overexpression of renin protein in the tubules, and a worsened response to ischemia-reperfusion injury based on serum creatinine (2.77 ± 0.66 in transgenic mice vs. 2.01 ± 0.58 mg/dl in wild type, P kidney that occur in early presymptomatic heart failure, which increase the susceptibility to subsequent acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Partial Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training in Spinocerebellar Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Laura Alice Santos; Martins, Camilla Polonini; Horsczaruk, Carlos Henrique Ramos; da Silva, Débora Cristina Lima; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Meira Mainenti, Míriam Raquel; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho

    2018-01-01

    The motor impairments related to gait and balance have a huge impact on the life of individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Here, the aim was to assess the possibility of retraining gait, improving cardiopulmonary capacity, and challenging balance during gait in SCA using a partial body weight support (BWS) and a treadmill. Also, the effects of this training over functionality and quality of life were investigated. Eight SCA patients were engaged in the first stage of the study that focused on gait training and cardiovascular conditioning. From those, five took part in a second stage of the study centered on dynamic balance training during gait. The first and second stages lasted 8 and 10 weeks, respectively, both comprising sessions of 50 min (2 times per week). The results showed that gait training using partial BWS significantly increased gait performance, treadmill inclination, duration of exercise, and cardiopulmonary capacity in individuals with SCA. After the second stage, balance improvements were also found. Combining gait training and challenging tasks to the postural control system in SCA individuals is viable, well tolerated by patients with SCA, and resulted in changes in capacity for walking and balance.

  8. Before it is too late: Professional responsibilities in late-onset Alzheimer’s research and pre-symptomatic prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eSchicktanz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a wide array of molecular and neuroscientific biomarkers can provide the possibility to visualize the course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD at early stages. Many of these biomarkers are aimed at detecting not only a preclinical, but also a pre-symptomatic state. They are supposed to facilitate clinical trials aiming at treatments that attack the disease at its earliest stage or even prevent it. The increasing number of such biomarkers currently tested and now partly proposed for clinical implementation calls for critical reflection on their aims, social benefits and risks. This position paper summarizes major challenges and responsibilities. Its focus is on the ethical and social problems involved in the organization and application, of dementia research as well as in health care provision from a cross-national point of view. The paper is based on a discussion of leading dementia experts from various disciplines, such as neuroscience, neurology, social sciences, and bioethics. We intend to initiate a debate on the need for actions within the researchers’ national and international communities.

  9. Missense mutation in CAPN1 is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia in the Parson Russell Terrier dog breed.

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    Oliver P Forman

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA in the Parson Russell Terrier (PRT dog breed is a disease of progressive incoordination of gait and loss of balance. Clinical signs usually become notable between 6 and 12 months of age with affected dogs presenting with symmetric spinocerebellar ataxia particularly evident in the pelvic limbs. The degree of truncal ataxia, pelvic limb hypermetria and impaired balance is progressive, particularly during the initial months of disease. A certain degree of stabilisation as well as intermittent worsening may occur. At the later stages of the disease ambulation often becomes difficult, with owners often electing to euthanise affected dogs on welfare grounds. Using a GWAS approach and target-enriched massively-parallel sequencing, a strongly associated non-synonymous SNP in the CAPN1 gene, encoding the calcium dependent cysteine protease calpain1 (mu-calpain, was identified. The SNP is a missense mutation causing a cysteine to tyrosine substitution at residue 115 of the CAPN1 protein. Cysteine 115 is a highly conserved residue and forms a key part of a catalytic triad of amino acids that are crucial to the enzymatic activity of cysteine proteases. The CAPN1 gene shows high levels of expression in the brain and nervous system and roles for the protein in both neuronal necrosis and maintenance have been suggested. Given the functional implications and high level of conservation observed across species, the CAPN1 variant represents a provocative candidate for the cause of SCA in the PRT and a novel potential cause of ataxia in humans.

  10. Presymptomatic Treatment with Acetylcholinesterase Antisense Oligonucleotides Prolongs Survival in ALS (G93A-SOD1 Mice

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    Gotkine Marc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Previous research suggests that acetylcholinesterase (AChE may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. AChE enzyme inhibitors can upregulate AChE transcription which in certain contexts can have deleterious (noncatalytic effects, making them theoretically harmful in ALS, whilst AChE antisense-oligonucleotides (mEN101, which downregulate AChE may be beneficial. Our aim was to investigate whether downregulation of AChE using mEN101 is beneficial in an ALS mouse model. Methods. ALS (G93A-SOD1 mice received saline, mEN101, inverse-EN101, or neostigmine. Treatments were administered from 5 weeks. Disease-onset and survival were recorded. Additional mice were sacrificed for pathological analysis at 15 weeks of age. In a follow-up experiment treatment was started at the symptomatic stage at a higher dose. Results. mEN101 given at the presymptomatic (but not symptomatic stage prolonged survival and attenuated motor-neuron loss in ALS mice. In contrast, neostigmine exacerbated the clinical parameters. Conclusions. These results suggest that AChE may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. The accelerated disease course with neostigmine suggests that any beneficial effects of mEN101 occur through a non-catalytic rather than cholinergic mechanism.

  11. Presymptomatic identification of CDH1 germline mutation in a healthy korean individual with family history of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Ki, Chang-Seok; Suh, Soon-Pal; Kim, Jong-Won

    2014-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common cancers with high morbidity and mortality. Familial GC is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of familial GC cases arise owing to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). CDH1, which encodes the protein E-cadherin, is the only gene whose mutations are associated with HDGC. Screening for the familial GC-predisposing gene has been neglected in high-risk countries such as Korea, China, and Japan, where all the cases have been attributed to Helicobacter pylori or other carcinogens. Screening for the GC-causing CDH1 mutation may provide valuable information for genetic counseling, testing, and risk-reduction management for the as-yet unaffected family members. An asymptomatic 44-yr-old Korean male visited our genetic clinic for consultation owing to his family history of GC. Eventually, c.1018A>G in CDH1, a known disease-causing mutation, was found. As of the publication time, the individual is alive without the evidence of GC, and is on surveillance. To our knowledge, this is the first Korean case of presymptomatic detection of CDH1 mutation, and it highlights the importance of genetic screening for individuals with a family history of GC, especially in high-risk geographical areas.

  12. Direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways: shared ideas but different functions in motor control

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    Juan eJiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impressive precision of mammalian limb movements relies on internal feedback pathways that convey information about ongoing motor output to cerebellar circuits. The spino-cerebellar tracts (SCT in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord have long been considered canonical neural substrates for the conveyance of internal feedback signals. Here we consider the distinct features of an indirect spino-cerebellar route, via the brainstem lateral reticular nucleus (LRN, and the implications of this pre-cerebellar ‘detour’ for the execution and evolution of limb motor control. Both direct and indirect spino-cerebellar pathways signal spinal interneuronal activity to the cerebellum during movements, but evidence suggests that direct SCT neurons are mainly modulated by rhythmic activity, whereas the LRN also receives information from systems active during postural adjustment, reaching and grasping. Thus, while direct and indirect spino-cerebellar circuits can both be regarded as internal copy pathways, it seems likely that the direct system is principally dedicated to rhythmic motor acts like locomotion, while the indirect system also provides a means of pre-cerebellar integration relevant to the execution and coordination of de

  13. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Protein Aggregates Cause Deficits in Motor Learning and Cerebellar Plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, Melanie D; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cell - derived neurons for the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Stummann, Tina C.; Madsen, Helena Borland

    2016-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines were established from two SCA3 patients. Dermal fibroblasts were reprogrammed using an integration-free method...

  15. Early symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Globas, C.; Montcel, S.T. du; Baliko, L.; Boesch, S.; Depondt, C.; DiDonato, S.; Durr, A.; Filla, A.; Klockgether, T.; Mariotti, C.; Melegh, B.; Rakowicz, M.; Ribai, P.; Rola, R.; Schmitz-Hubsch, T.; Szymanski, S.; Timmann, D.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bauer, P.; Schols, L.

    2008-01-01

    Onset of genetically determined neurodegenerative diseases is difficult to specify because of their insidious and slowly progressive nature. This is especially true for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) because of varying affection of many parts of the nervous system and huge variability of symptoms. We

  16. Cellular protein quality control and the evolution of aggregates in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, K.; Meister, M.; Dugbartey, G. J.; Zijlstra, M. P.; Vinet, J.; Brunt, E. R. P.; van Leeuwen, F. W.; Rueb, U.; Kampinga, H. H.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.

    2012-01-01

    K. Seidel, M. Meister, G. J. Dugbartey, M. P. Zijlstra, J. Vinet, E. R. P. Brunt, F. W. van Leeuwen, U. Rub, H. H. Kampinga and W. F. A. den Dunnen (2012) Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology38, 548558 Cellular protein quality control and the evolution of aggregates in spinocerebellar ataxia type

  17. Evidence of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) patient fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Nanna; Wardman, Jonathan H; Hargreaves, Iain P

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-2 gene. We show increased oxidative stress, abnormalities in the antioxidant system, changes in complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and changes in mitochondrial mor...

  18. Peripheral Neuropathy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, Christoph; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Rakowicz, Maryla; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, Jose; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Pedersen, Karine; Depondt, Chantal; Rola, Rafal; Klockgether, Thomas; García, Antonio; Mutlu, Gurkan; Schöls, Ludger

    2016-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are characterized by autosomal dominantly inherited progressive ataxia but are clinically heterogeneous due to variable involvement of non-cerebellar parts of the nervous system. Non-cerebellar symptoms contribute significantly to the burden of SCAs, may guide the clinician to the underlying genetic subtype, and might be useful markers to monitor disease. Peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in SCA, but subtype-specific features and subclinical manifestations have rarely been evaluated. We performed a multicenter nerve conduction study with 162 patients with genetically confirmed SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6. The study proved peripheral nerves to be involved in the neurodegenerative process in 82 % of SCA1, 63 % of SCA2, 55 % of SCA3, and 22 % of SCA6 patients. Most patients of all subtypes revealed affection of both sensory and motor fibers. Neuropathy was most frequently of mixed type with axonal and demyelinating characteristics in all SCA subtypes. However, nerve conduction velocities of SCA1 patients were slower compared to other genotypes. SCA6 patients revealed less axonal damage than patients with other subtypes. No influence of CAG repeat length or biometric determinants on peripheral neuropathy could be identified in SCA1, SCA3, and SCA6. In SCA2, earlier onset and more severe ataxia were associated with peripheral neuropathy. We proved peripheral neuropathy to be a frequent site of the neurodegenerative process in all common SCA subtypes. Since damage to peripheral nerves is readily assessable by electrophysiological means, nerve conduction studies should be performed in a longitudinal approach to assess these parameters as potential progression markers.

  19. Organization of spinocerebellar projection map in three types of agranular cerebellum: Purkinje cells vs. granule cells as organizer element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenio Nunes, M.L.; Sotelo, C.; Wehrle, R.

    1988-01-01

    The organization of the spinocerebellar projection was analysed by the anterograde axonal WGA-HRP (horseradish peroxidase-wheat germ agglutinin conjugate) tracing method in three different types of agranular cerebellar cortex either induced experimentally by X-irradiation or occurring spontaneously in weaver (wv/wv) and staggerer (sg/sg) mutant mice. The results of this study show that in the X-irradiated rat and weaver mouse, in both of which the granule cells are directly affected and die early in development, the spinal axons reproduce, with few differences, the normal spinocerebellar pattern. Conversely, in staggerer mouse, in which the Purkinje cells are intrinsically affected and granule neurons do not seem to be primarily perturbed by the staggerer gene action, the spinocerebellar organization is severely modified. These findings appear somewhat paradoxical because if granule cells, the synaptic targets of mossy spinocerebellar fibers, were necessary for the organization of spinocerebellar projection, the staggerer cerebellum would exhibit a much more normal projectional map than the weaver and the X-irradiated cerebella. It is, therefore, obvious that granule cells, and even specific synaptogenesis, are not essential for the establishment of the normal spinocerebellar topography. On the other hand, the fact that the Purkinje cells are primarily affected in the unique agranular cortex in which the spinocerebellar organization is severely modified suggests that these neurons could be the main element in the organization of the spinocerebellar projection map. This hypothesis is discussed in correlation with already-reported findings on the zonation of the cerebellar cortex by biochemically different clusters of Purkinje cells

  20. Noninvasive presymptomatic detection of Cercospora beticola infection and identification of early metabolic responses in sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Mock

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cercospora beticola is an economically significant fungal pathogen of sugar beet, and is the causative pathogen of Cercospora leaf spot. Selected host genotypes with contrasting degree of susceptibility to the disease have been exploited to characterize the patterns of metabolite responses to fungal infection, and to devise a pre-symptomatic, non-invasive method of detecting the presence of the pathogen. Sugar beet genotypes were analyzed for metabolite profiles and hyperspectral signatures. Correlation of data matrices from both approaches facilitated identification of candidates for metabolic markers. Hyperspectral imaging was highly predictive with a classification accuracy of 98.5-99.9 % in detecting C. beticola. Metabolite analysis revealed metabolites altered by the host as part of a successful defence response: these were L-DOPA, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-β-D-glucoside, pantothenic acid and 5-O-feruloylquinic acid. The accumulation of glucosylvitexin in the resistant cultivar suggests it acts as a constitutively-produced protectant. The study establishes a proof-of-concept for an unbiased, presymptomatic and non-invasive detection system for the presence of C. beticola. The test needs to be validated with a larger set of genotypes, to be scalable to the level of a crop improvement program, aiming to speed up the selection for resistant cultivars of sugar beet. Untargeted metabolic profiling is a valuable tool to identify metabolites which correlate with hyperspectral data.

  1. Identification of beta cell dysfunction at the pre-symptomatic stage of diabetes mellitus by novel analytical system: liquid biopsy measurements in femtograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfenbauer, Kurt

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is produced and progresses as a consequence of complex and gradual processes, in which a variety of alterations of the endocrine pancreas, are involved and which mainly result in beta cell failure. Those molecular alterations can be found in the bloodstream, which suggests that we could quantify specific biomarkers in plasma or serum by very sensitive methods before the onset diabetes mellitus is diagnosed. However, classical methods of protein analysis such as electrophoresis, Western blot, ELISA, and liquid chromatography are generally time-consuming, lab-intensive, and not sensitive enough to detect such alteration in a pre-symptomatic state of the disease. A very sensitive and novel analytical detection conjugate system by using the combination of polyfluorophor technology with protein microchip method was developed. This innovative system facilitates the use of a very sensitive microchip assays that measure selected biomarkers in a small sample volume (10 μL) with a much higher sensitivity (92%) compare to common immune assay systems. Further advances of the application of this technology combine the power of miniaturization and faster quantification (around 10 min). The power of this technology offers great promise for point-of-care clinical testing and monitoring of specific biomarkers for diabetes in femtogram level in serum or plasma. In conclusion, the results indicate that the technical performance of this new technology is valid and that the assay is able to quantified PPY-specific antigens in plasma at femtogram levels which can be used for identification of beta cell dysfunction at the pre-symptomatic stage of diabetes mellitus.

  2. Understanding the Pathophysiology of Spinocerebellar Ataxias through genetics, neurophysiology, structural and functional neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Pal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years a large cohort of 656 index patients with clinically suspected degenerative ataxias were clinically evaluated under various research projects. Of these, 625 index patients underwent genetic tests for the clinically suspected most probable diagnosis. A diagnosis could be achieved in 218 patients (34.9%. Among these 218 index patients, 82 each were SCA1 and SCA2, 32 were SCA3, 4 were SCA12, and 18 were Friedreich's Ataxia. Thus among the Autosomal Dominant Ataxias (SCAs there was equal prevalence of SCA1 and SCA2 (41% each followed by SCA3 (16% and SCA12 (2%. This high prevalence of SCA1 is in contrast to the available National and International literature. The rate of clinical disease progression, especially in SCA2, was dependent on the CAG repeat size, and may commence linearly from birth.Apart from cerebellar involvement, a comprehensive evaluation of the neuroaxis in various subsets of this genetically proved cohort showedsubclinicalinvolvement of the cerebral cortex, central motor and sensory pathways, peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system. Important findings include: (aAmixedsensorimotor and pure sensory neuropathy was seen in all the three subtypes of SCAs, while pure motor neuropathy was uncommon; (b There was reduced cortical excitability and prolonged central motor conduction time, most evident in SCA1 and least in SCA2; (c Cardiac autonomic dysfunction, predominantly parasympathetic, was seen in SCA, and the severity correlated with the duration of illness in SCA1; (d In SCA1 there was a global impairment of balance, with greater instability in anterior–posterior than medio–lateral directions; (e In all the three SCAs there was a significant loss of gray matter in both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Vermian atrophy was more pronounced in SCA3, while SCA1 and SCA2 had significant white matter atrophy. Pontine white matter atrophy was more pronounced in SCA2; (f Cerebellar activity was

  3. Presymptomatic diagnosis using a deletion of a single codon in families with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S.; Katballe, Niels; Wikman, Friedrik P.

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is often confirmed by a mutation in one of several mismatch-repair genes, in particular MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Presymptomatic diagnosis requires the identification of a mutation causing the disease. Three different deletions...

  4. MRI of the spinocerebellar degeneration (multiple system atrophy, Holmes type, and Menzel-Joseph type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki.

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed MRI in 33 patients with several forms of spinocerebellar degeneration; 17 with multiple system atrophy, 10 with Holmes type, and 6 with Menzel-Joseph type. The MRIs were obtained using a 1.5-T GEMR System. Patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated: atrophy of the brain stem, particularly basis pontis; decreased signal intensity of the white matter of pons; atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum; atrophy and decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions; and atrophy of the cerebrum. Patients with Holmes type showed: atrophy of the cerebellum; atrophy of the vermis more than hemispheres; and nuclei of the cerebellum with no decreased intensity on T 2 -weighted sequences. Patients with Menzel-Joseph type demonstrated moderate atrophy of the brain stem and mild atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum. MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in the management of the spinocerebellar degeneration. (author)

  5. Defence in depth in nuclear safety learning from 'pre-symptomatic diseases'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine argued 'pre-symptomatic diseases', which encouraged for a physician to treat before the ailment occurred. This article described such prophylactic concept was compared to that of defense in depth in nuclear safety, which suggested encouragement of daily activities with safety awareness, preventive maintenance and appropriate treatment for incidents of aged plants would reduce or mitigate their effects. Area of safety culture was also included. Importance of human resources development for safety culture and need of establishment of database concerning new knowledge and experiences were highly recommended. In reality various slight events, whose level of the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) were less than 2, occurred before a large accident happened to occur. Efforts to reduce events whose level of INES was less than 2 or precursor of accidents would prevent level 3 serious accidents as maximum accident of defense in depth or mitigate the extension to a larger accident. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Pre-symptomatic increase in urine-orosomucoid excretion in pre-eclamptic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Camilla Skovhus; Allen, Jim; Vittinghus, Erik

    2007-01-01

    , 32 women developed pre-eclampsia, and 5 controls for every case of pre-eclampsia were found. Blood samples were collected 4 times and urine samples 6 times from the 18/19th week and throughout pregnancy. Orosomucoid and albumin in plasma were analysed by standard methods, and in urine by sandwich...... in orosomucoid. In the plasma samples, orosomucoid was significantly higher late in pre-eclamptic pregnancies (>or=36th week, p=0.0275). CONCLUSIONS: Pre-eclampsia is associated with a pre-symptomatic increase in the urine excretion of orosomucoid, and orosomucoid excretion precedes that of albumin. Orosomucoid...... excretion can probably be used as a prognostic tool in combination with other screening methods, and seems to be a more sensitive marker for evolving pre-eclampsia than albumin. Plasma orosomucoid is significantly increased late in pre-eclampsia. Thus, the increased excretion of orosomucoid must primarily...

  7. Proteomic Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Presymptomatic and Affected Persons Carrying Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M.; Schulman, Howard; Becker, Chris; Jones, Ted; Bai, Yuchen; Immermann, Fred; Cole, Gregory; Sokolow, Sophie; Gylys, Karen; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Wan, Hong I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein changes in persons who will develop familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) due to PSEN1 and APP mutations, using unbiased proteomics. Design We compared proteomic profiles of CSF from individuals with FAD who were mutation carriers (MCs) and related noncarriers (NCs). Abundant proteins were depleted and samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography– electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry on a high-resolution time-of-flight instrument. Tryptic peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Proteins differing in concentration between the MCs and NCs were identified. Setting A tertiary dementia referral center and a proteomic biomarker discovery laboratory. Participants Fourteen FAD MCs (mean age, 34.2 years; 10 are asymptomatic, 12 have presenilin-1 [PSEN1] gene mutations, and 2 have amyloid precursor protein [APP] gene mutations) and 5 related NCs (mean age, 37.6 years). Results Fifty-six proteins were identified, represented by multiple tryptic peptides showing significant differences between MCs and NCs (46 upregulated and 10 downregulated); 40 of these proteins differed when the analysis was restricted to asymptomatic individuals. Fourteen proteins have been reported in prior proteomic studies in late-onset AD, including amyloid precursor protein, transferrin, α1β-glycoprotein, complement components, afamin precursor, spondin 1, plasminogen, hemopexin, and neuronal pentraxin receptor. Many other proteins were unique to our study, including calsyntenin 3, AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) 4 glutamate receptor, CD99 antigen, di-N-acetyl-chitobiase, and secreted phosphoprotein 1. Conclusions We found much overlap in CSF protein changes between individuals with presymptomatic and symptomatic FAD and those with late-onset AD. Our results are consistent with inflammation and synaptic loss early in FAD and suggest new presymptomatic biomarkers of potential usefulness in drug

  8. Considerations in using linkage analysis as a presymptomatic test for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, L A; Myers, R H; Cupples, L A; Conneally, P M

    1988-09-01

    The polymorphic locus D4S10 that is genetically linked to the locus for Huntington's disease (HD) has made possible a presymptomatic test for those at risk. Because the symptoms of this progressively debilitating and fatal illness are not usually manifest until adulthood, the outcome of the test will influence major decisions about career, marriage, and procreation. Several differential diagnoses must be considered before using the test if HD is not confirmed in at least one family member. Review of a large number of pedigrees has shown that 40% of persons at risk do not have appropriate family structure for a linkage test. Furthermore, uncooperative or inaccessible relatives may make this test infeasible for many others who wish to be tested. Linkage phase, which must be known in the affected parent for an informative test, can be determined using one or more of 12 probe-enzyme combinations for D4S10. Although the polymorphism information content (PIC) value for any one RFLP is less than 40%, the PIC value for the haplotype of the two G8 HindIII, pK083 EcoRI, and R7 BglII RFLPs is greater than 88%. We have developed a scheme to incorporate linkage data and age at onset information adjusted for censored observations, sex of affected parent, and familial correlation for age at onset, using the computer program MLINK for calculation of risk of having HD. Simulated experiments showed that proper age at onset adjustment is crucial to the calculation of the probability of risk. A formal presymptomatic testing protocol, including pre- and post-test counselling, psychological testing, and paternity testing is recommended. Many of these considerations are illustrated in several actual test cases.

  9. A novel missense mutation in CCDC88C activates the JNK pathway and causes a dominant form of spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Ho; Yu, Allen C S; Chen, Zhefan S; Ng, Nelson K N; Chan, Anne Y Y; Yuen, Liz Y P; Abrigo, Jill M; Tsang, Suk Ying; Tsui, Stephen K W; Tong, Tony M F; Lo, Ivan F M; Lam, Stephen T S; Mok, Vincent C T; Wong, Lawrence K S; Ngo, Jacky C K; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Ting-Fung; Chan, H Y Edwin

    2014-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a group of clinically and genetically diverse and autosomal-dominant disorders characterised by neurological deficits in the cerebellum. At present, there is no cure for SCAs. Of the different distinct subtypes of autosomal-dominant SCAs identified to date, causative genes for only a fraction of them are currently known. In this study, we investigated the cause of an autosomal-dominant SCA phenotype in a family that exhibits cerebellar ataxia and pontocerebellar atrophy along with a global reduction in brain volume. Whole-exome analysis revealed a missense mutation c.G1391A (p.R464H) in the coding region of the coiled-coil domain containing 88C (CCDC88C) gene in all affected individuals. Functional studies showed that the mutant form of CCDC88C activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, induces caspase 3 cleavage and triggers apoptosis. This study expands our understanding of the cause of autosomal-dominant SCAs, a group of heterogeneous congenital neurological conditions in humans, and unveils a link between the JNK stress pathway and cerebellar atrophy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease–-Spinocerebellar Ataxia–-Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 due to mutations in ITPR1: a case series and review of this emerging congenital ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, Jessica L; Bellomo, Allison; Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Everman, David B; Frazer, Lee M; Geraghty, Michael T; Harper, Amy D; Jones, Julie R; Kamien, Benjamin; Kernohan, Kristin; Koenig, Mary Kay; Lines, Matthew; Palmer, Elizabeth Emma; Richardson, Randal; Segel, Reeval; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Vanstone, Jason R; Gibbons, Melissa; Collins, Abigail; Fogel, Brent L; Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Boycott, Kym M

    2017-06-28

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 (SCA29) is an autosomal dominant, non-progressive cerebellar ataxia characterized by infantile-onset hypotonia, gross motor delay and cognitive impairment. Affected individuals exhibit cerebellar dysfunction and often have cerebellar atrophy on neuroimaging. Recently, missense mutations in ITPR1 were determined to be responsible. Clinical information on 21 individuals from 15 unrelated families with ITPR1 mutations was retrospectively collected using standardized questionnaires, including 11 previously unreported singletons and 2 new patients from a previously reported family. We describe the genetic, clinical and neuroimaging features of these patients to further characterize the clinical features of this rare condition and assess for any genotype-phenotype correlation for this disorder. Our cohort consisted of 9 males and 12 females, with ages ranging from 28 months to 49 years. Disease course was non-progressive with infantile-onset hypotonia and delays in motor and speech development. Gait ataxia was present in all individuals and 10 (48%) were not ambulating independently between the ages of 3-12 years of age. Mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment was present in 17 individuals (85%). Cerebellar atrophy developed after initial symptom presentation in 13 individuals (72%) and was not associated with disease progression or worsening functional impairment. We identified 12 different mutations including 6 novel mutations; 10 mutations were missense (with 4 present in >1 individual), 1 a splice site mutation leading to an in-frame insertion and 1 an in-frame deletion. No specific genotype-phenotype correlations were observed within our cohort. Our findings document significant clinical heterogeneity between individuals with SCA29 in a large cohort of molecularly confirmed cases. Based on the retrospective observed clinical features and disease course, we provide recommendations for management. Further research into the natural

  12. Pre-symptomatic transcriptome changes during cold storage of chilling sensitive and resistant peach cultivars to elucidate chilling injury mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, Clara Pons; Dagar, Anurag; Marti Ibanez, Cristina; Singh, Vikram; Crisosto, Carlos H; Friedman, Haya; Lurie, Susan; Granell, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cold storage induces chilling injury (CI) disorders in peach fruit (woolliness/mealiness, flesh browning and reddening/bleeding) manifested when ripened at shelf life. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying CI, we analyzed the transcriptome of 'Oded' (high tolerant) and 'Hermoza' (relatively tolerant to woolliness, but sensitive to browning and bleeding) peach cultivars at pre-symptomatic stages. The expression profiles were compared and validated with two previously analy...

  13. Urinary excretion of radiocopper in presymptomatic and symptomatic Wilson's disease, heterozygotes and controls: its significance in diagnosis and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, K; Hanka, R; Walshe, J M [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Clinical School

    1978-07-01

    Radiocopper (/sup 64/Cu, /sup 67/Cu), given intravenously, has been used to study the pattern of excretion of copper in patients with presymptomatic, symptomatic and treated Wilson's disease, together with heterozygotes for the Wilson's disease gene and a control group of patients with a variety of neurological lesions mimicking wilson's disease. The most important radiochemical findings were as follows. Heterozygotes excreted less of the injected copper than controls both under basal conditions and after penicillamine. Presymptomatic patients excreted less radiocopper than heterozygotes after penicillamine although the excretion during the basal 24 hour period was very much greater. Patients with symptomatic Wilson's disease had by far the highest excretion of radiocopper in all three time periods which fell after treatment, pro rata with time, as had been found for stable copper. These results were subjected to computer analysis. There was no overlap between the various groups with the exception of a single control subject who had combined pyramidal and extrapyramidal system degeneration of obscure aetiology. This patient was classified by the computer as 'heterozygote'. These findings lend further support to the hypothesis that the loss of a single gene for copper balance can be detected with a high degree of accuracy and also that presymptomatic patients can be selected from a sibship for prophylactic treatment without the risk of subjecting healthy heterozygotes to unnecessary and potentially hazardous longterm therapy.

  14. Network degeneration and dysfunction in presymptomatic C9ORF72 expansion carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzee E. Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 are the most common known genetic cause of familial and sporadic frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous work has shown that patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to C9ORF72 show salience and sensorimotor network disruptions comparable to those seen in sporadic behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, but it remains unknown how early in the lifespan these and other changes in brain structure and function arise. To gain insights into this question, we compared 15 presymptomatic carriers (age 43.7 ± 10.2 years, nine females to matched healthy controls. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess gray matter, diffusion tensor imaging to interrogate white matter tracts, and task-free functional MRI to probe the salience, sensorimotor, default mode, and medial pulvinar thalamus-seeded networks. We further used a retrospective chart review to ascertain psychiatric histories in carriers and their non-carrier family members. Carriers showed normal cognition and behavior despite gray matter volume and brain connectivity deficits that were apparent as early as the fourth decade of life. Gray matter volume deficits were topographically similar though less severe than those in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to C9ORF72, with major foci in cingulate, insula, thalamus, and striatum. Reduced white matter integrity was found in the corpus callosum, cingulum bundles, corticospinal tracts, uncinate fasciculi and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. Intrinsic connectivity deficits were detected in all four networks but most prominent in salience and medial pulvinar thalamus-seeded networks. Carrier and control groups showed comparable relationships between imaging metrics and age, suggesting that deficits emerge during early adulthood. Carriers and non-carrier family members had comparable lifetime histories of psychiatric symptoms. Taken

  15. Reversible Pharmacological Induction of Motor Symptoms in MPTP-Treated Mice at the Presymptomatic Stage of Parkinsonism: Potential Use for Early Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimova, Gulnara R; Kozina, Elena A; Kucheryanu, Valerian G; Ugrumov, Michael V

    2017-07-01

    A crucial event in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is the death of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal system, which are responsible for the regulation of motor function. Motor symptoms first appear in patients 20-30 years after the onset of the neurodegeneration, when there has been a loss of an essential number of neurons and depletion of compensatory reserves of the brain, which explains the low efficiency of treatment. Therefore, the development of a technology for the diagnosing of Parkinson's disease at the preclinical stage is of a high priority in neurology. In this study, we have developed at an experimental model a fundamentally novel for neurology approach for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease at the preclinical stage. This methodology, widely used for the diagnosis of chronic diseases in the internal medicine, is based on the application of a challenge test that temporarily increases the latent failure of a specific functional system, thereby inducing the short-term appearance of clinical symptoms. The provocation test was developed by a systemic administration of α-methyl-p-tyrosine (αMpT), a reversible inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase to MPTP-treated mice at the presymptomatic stage of parkinsonism. For this, we first selected a minimum dose of αMpT, which caused a decrease of the dopamine level in the striatum of normal mice below the threshold at which motor dysfunctions appear. Then, we found the maximum dose of αMpT at which a loss of dopamine in the striatum of normal mice did not reach the threshold level, and motor behavior was not impaired. We showed that αMpT at this dose induced a decrease of the dopamine concentration in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice at the presymptomatic stage of parkinsonism below a threshold level that results in the impairment of motor behavior. Finally, we proved that αMpT exerts a temporal and reversible influence on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of MPTP-treated mice with no long

  16. Rhythmic activity of feline dorsal and ventral spinocerebellar tract neurons during fictive motor actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedirchuk, Brent; Stecina, Katinka; Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl

    2013-01-01

    (without phasic afferent feedback). In this study, we compared the activity of DSCT and VSCT neurons during fictive rhythmic motor behaviors. We used decerebrate cat preparations in which fictive motor tasks can be evoked while the animal is paralyzed and there is no rhythmic sensory input from hindlimb......Neurons of the dorsal spinocerebellar tracts (DSCT) have been described to be rhythmically active during walking on a treadmill in decerebrate cats, but this activity ceased following deafferentation of the hindlimb. This observation supported the hypothesis that DSCT neurons primarily relay...

  17. Multifunctional liposomes delay phenotype progression and prevent memory impairment in a presymptomatic stage mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Simona; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Tolomeo, Daniele; Forloni, Gianluigi; Masserini, Massimo; Re, Francesca

    2017-07-28

    The failure of clinical trials largely focused on mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease has suggested to the scientific community that the effectiveness of Amyloid-β (Aβ)-centered treatments should be evaluated starting as early as possible, well before irreversible brain damage has occurred. Accordingly, also the preclinical development of new therapies should be carried out taking into account this suggestion. In the present investigation we evaluated the efficacy of a treatment with liposomes multifunctionalized for crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting Aβ, carried out on young APP/PS1 Tg mice, taken as a model of pre-symptomatic disease stage. Liposomes were administered once a week to Tg mice for 7months, starting at the age of 5months and up to the age of 12 when they display AD-like cognitive and brain biochemical/anatomical features. The treatment prevented the onset of the long-term memory impairment and slowed down the deposition of brain Aβ; at anatomical level, prevented both ventricle enlargement and entorhinal cortex thickness reduction, otherwise occurring in untreated mice. Strikingly, these effects were maintained 3months after treatment discontinuation. An increase of Aβ levels in the liver was detected at the end of the treatment, then followed also by reduction of brain Amyloid Precursor Protein and increase of Aβ-degrading enzymes. These results suggest that the treatment promotes brain Aβ clearance by a peripheral 'sink' effect and ultimately affects Aβ turnover in the brain. Worth of note, the treatment was apparently not toxic for all the organs analyzed, in particular for brain, as suggested by the lower brain TNF-α and MDA levels, and by higher level of SOD activity in treated mice. Together, these findings promote a very early treatment with multi-functional liposomes as a well-tolerated nanomedicine-based approach, potentially suitable for a disease-modifying therapy of AD, able to delay or prevent relevant

  18. Cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic patients undergoing haemodialysis: in vivo proton MR spectroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Ming-Lun; Chiang, I. Chan; Li, Chun-Wei; Chang, Jer-Ming; Ko, Chih-Hung; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Sheu, Reu-Sheng; Lee, Chen-Chang; Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively investigate and detect early cerebral metabolic changes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). We enrolled 32 patients with ESRD and 32 healthy controls between the ages of 26 and 50 years. Short echo time single-voxel proton MRS was acquired from volumes of interest (VOIs) located in the frontal grey and white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia. The choline/phospatidylcholine (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) peaks were measured and the metabolic ratios with respect to tCr were calculated. In the ESRD group, significant elevations of the Cho/tCr and mI/tCr ratios were observed for the frontal grey matter, frontal white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia as compared with controls. There was no significant difference in the NAA/tCr ratios at all VOIs between the ESRD patients and the healthy controls. Proton MRS is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool for the detection of early cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic ESRD patients. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic patients undergoing haemodialysis: in vivo proton MR spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Ming-Lun; Chiang, I. Chan [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Li, Chun-Wei [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Health Science (China); Chang, Jer-Ming [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Hsiao-Kang Municipal Hospital (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Nephrology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Ko, Chih-Hung [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry (China); Chuang, Hung-Yi [Kaohsiung Medical University, Faculty of Public Health, College of Health Science (China); Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (China); Sheu, Reu-Sheng [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Lee, Chen-Chang [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Health Science (China); Kaohsiung Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (China); Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China)

    2010-06-15

    To prospectively investigate and detect early cerebral metabolic changes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). We enrolled 32 patients with ESRD and 32 healthy controls between the ages of 26 and 50 years. Short echo time single-voxel proton MRS was acquired from volumes of interest (VOIs) located in the frontal grey and white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia. The choline/phospatidylcholine (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) peaks were measured and the metabolic ratios with respect to tCr were calculated. In the ESRD group, significant elevations of the Cho/tCr and mI/tCr ratios were observed for the frontal grey matter, frontal white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia as compared with controls. There was no significant difference in the NAA/tCr ratios at all VOIs between the ESRD patients and the healthy controls. Proton MRS is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool for the detection of early cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic ESRD patients. (orig.)

  20. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.A11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG-repeat expanding mutation in ATXN3. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a SCA3 patient by electroporation of dermal fibroblasts with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28...

  1. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.B11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of the CAG-repeat in ATXN3. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from SCA3 patient dermal fibroblasts by electroporation with episomal plasmids encoding L...

  2. Simulating spinal border cells and cerebellar granule cells under locomotion--a case study of spinocerebellar information processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Spanne

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar systems are essential for the brain in the performance of coordinated movements, but our knowledge about the spinocerebellar interactions is very limited. Recently, several crucial pieces of information have been acquired for the spinal border cell (SBC component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT, as well as the effects of SBC mossy fiber activation in granule cells of the cerebellar cortex. SBCs receive monosynaptic input from the reticulospinal tract (RST, which is an important driving system under locomotion, and disynaptic inhibition from Ib muscle afferents. The patterns of activity of RST neurons and Ib afferents under locomotion are known. The activity of VSCT neurons under fictive locomotion, i.e. without sensory feedback, is also known, but there is little information on how these neurons behave under actual locomotion and for cerebellar granule cells receiving SBC input this is completely unknown. But the available information makes it possible to simulate the interactions between the spinal and cerebellar neuronal circuitries with a relatively large set of biological constraints. Using a model of the various neuronal elements and the network they compose, we simulated the modulation of the SBCs and their target granule cells under locomotion and hence generated testable predictions of their general pattern of modulation under this condition. This particular system offers a unique opportunity to simulate these interactions with a limited number of assumptions, which helps making the model biologically plausible. Similar principles of information processing may be expected to apply to all spinocerebellar systems.

  3. The natural history of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3, and 6: a 2-year follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, H.; Bauer, P.; Giunti, P.; Labrum, R.; Sweeney, M.G.; Charles, P.; Durr, A.; Marelli, C.; Globas, C.; Linnemann, C.; Schols, L.; Rakowicz, M.; Rola, R.; Zdzienicka, E.; Schmitz-Hubsch, T.; Fancellu, R.; Mariotti, C.; Tomasello, C.; Baliko, L.; Melegh, B.; Filla, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Szymanski, S.; Berciano, J.; Infante, J.; Timmann, D.; Boesch, S.; Hering, S.; Depondt, C.; Pandolfo, M.; Kang, J.S.; Ratzka, S.; Schulz, J.; Tezenas du Montcel, S.; Klockgether, T.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain quantitative data on the progression of the most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and identify factors that influence their progression, we initiated the EUROSCA natural history study, a multicentric longitudinal cohort study of 526 patients with SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, or SCA6.

  4. Operation of a P300-based brain-computer interface by patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Okahara

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the efficacy of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, which is often accompanied by cerebellar impairment. Methods: Eight patients with SCA and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls were instructed to input Japanese hiragana characters using the P300-based BCI with green/blue flicker. All patients depended on some assistance in their daily lives (modified Rankin scale: mean 3.5. The chief symptom was cerebellar ataxia; no cognitive deterioration was present. A region-based, two-step P300-based BCI was used. During the P300 task, eight-channel EEG data were recorded, and a linear discriminant analysis distinguished the target from other nontarget regions of the matrix. Results: The mean online accuracy in BCI operation was 82.9% for patients with SCA and 83.2% for controls; no significant difference was detected. Conclusion: The P300-based BCI was operated successfully not only by healthy controls but also by individuals with SCA. Significance: These results suggest that the P300-based BCI may be applicable for patients with SCA. Keywords: BCI, BMI, P300, Visual stimuli, Spinocerebellar ataxia

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging for nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem and spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Tsuguo

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can create an image of the anisotropic nature of diffusion and express it quantitatively. Nerve fibers have a large anisotropic diffusion, and it is possible to obtain images of the nerve fiber bundle. The purpose of this study is to observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI and study its potential for diagnosing the type of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and 3D-tractography images were obtained for 41 subjects with no brain stem abnormalities. We created an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map and an FA map using DTI for 16 subjects in the disease group (11 with hereditary SCD and 5 with non-hereditary SCD) and 25 in the control group. The diffusion value of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was measured using ADC, and the degree of anisotropic diffusion was measured using FA. The pyramidal tract, superior cerebellar peduncle, and inferior cerebellar peduncle were clearly demonstrated for all cases. ADC for the middle cerebellar peduncle in spinocerebellar ataxin (SCA)1 was significantly higher, similar to that for the pons in dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). In MSA-C, ADC for both the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was significantly elevated and FA was significantly decreased. There were no significant changes in SCA3. We could observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI. FA and ADC measurements with DTI can aid in diagnosing the type of SCD. (author)

  6. Double-blind crossover trial of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, T; Mattern, R; Berger, K; Szymanski, S; Klotz, P; Kraus, P H; Przuntek, H; Schöls, L

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD). Placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial in 22 patients with genetically confirmed SCA3/MJD. Study phases of 6 months were separated by a washout period of 4 weeks. Dosages were a combination of trimethoprim, 160 mg, and sulfamethoxazole, 800 mg, twice daily for 2 weeks, followed by a combination of trimethoprim, 80 mg, and sulfamethoxazole, 400 mg, twice daily for 5.5 months. Outpatient department of the Neurological Clinic, Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany. Ataxia ranking scale, self-assessment score, static posturography, and results of motor performance testing. Effects on the visual system were studied using the achromatic Vision Contrast Test System and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test for color discrimination. Physical and mental health were documented using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Subgroup analyses assessed the influence of age, sex, age at onset, duration of the disease, phenotype, and CAG repeat length on test performance. Twenty of 22 patients completed the study. Dropouts were due to a rash (placebo phase) and an attempted suicide in a family conflict. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy had no significant effect in SCA3/MJD patients in the short-term analysis (2 weeks) or in the long-term interval (6 months). In contrast to previous reports that studied smaller groups of patients, treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole did not improve the diverse and complex movement disorders caused by SCA3/MJD. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole had no effect on the visual system and cannot be recommended as a continuous treatment for SCA3/MJD patients.

  7. Impact of presymptomatic genetic testing for hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corrine O; Lipe, Hillary P; Bird, Thomas D

    2004-06-01

    With the exception of Huntington disease, the psychological and psychosocial impact of DNA testing for neurogenetic disorders has not been well studied. To evaluate the psychosocial impact of genetic testing for autosomal dominant forms of hereditary ataxia and neuromuscular disorders. Patients Fifty subjects at risk for autosomal dominant forms of spinocerebellar ataxia (n = 11), muscular dystrophy (n = 28), and hereditary neuropathy (n = 12). A prospective, descriptive, observational study in a university setting of individuals who underwent genetic counseling and DNA testing. Participants completed 3 questionnaires before testing and at regular intervals after testing. The questionnaire set included the Revised Impact of Event Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, demographic information, and an assessment of attitudes and feelings about genetic testing. Thirty-nine subjects (78%) completed 6 months to 5 years of posttest follow-up. Common reasons for pursuing genetic testing were to provide an explanation for symptoms, emotional relief, and information for future planning. Thirty-four (68%) had positive and 16 (32%) had negative genetic results. In those with a positive result, 26 (76%) had nonspecific signs or symptoms of the relevant disorder. Forty-two participants (84%) felt genetic testing was beneficial. Groups with positive and negative test results coped well with results. However, 13 subjects (10 with positive and 3 with negative results) reported elevated anxiety levels, and 3 (1 with positive and 2 with negative results) expressed feelings of depression during the follow-up period. The test result was not predictive of anxiety or depression. Most individuals find neurogenetic testing to be beneficial, regardless of the result. Anxiety or depression may persist in some persons with positive or negative test results. Testing can have a demonstrable impact on family planning and interpersonal relationships. Further studies are needed to

  8. Early presymptomatic cholinergic dysfunction in a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Mancuso, Renzo; Osta, Rosario; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic and familiar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases presented lower cholinergic activity than in healthy individuals in their still preserved spinal motoneurons (MNs) suggesting that cholinergic reduction might occur before MN death. To unravel how and when cholinergic function is compromised, we have analyzed the spatiotemporal expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) from early presymptomatic stages of the SOD1G93A ALS mouse model by confocal immunohistochemistry. The analysis showed an early reduction in ChAT content in soma and presynaptic boutons apposed onto MNs (to 76%) as well as in cholinergic interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of the 30-day-old SOD1G93A mice. Cholinergic synaptic stripping occurred simultaneously to the presence of abundant surrounding major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II)-positive microglia and the accumulation of nuclear Tdp-43 and the appearance of mild oxidative stress within MNs. Besides, there was a loss of neuronal MHC-I expression, which is necessary for balanced synaptic stripping after axotomy. These events occurred before the selective raise of markers of denervation such as ATF3. By the same time, alterations in postsynaptic cholinergic-related structures were also revealed with a loss of the presence of sigma-1 receptor, a Ca2+ buffering chaperone in the postsynaptic cisternae. By 2 months of age, ChAT seemed to accumulate in the soma of MNs, and thus efferences toward Renshaw interneurons were drastically diminished. In conclusion, cholinergic dysfunction in the local circuitry of the spinal cord may be one of the earliest events in ALS etiopathogenesis. PMID:23531559

  9. Presymptomatic cerebral blood flow changes in CHMP2B mutation carriers of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD-3), measured with MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Line Andersen; Mouridsen, Kim; Rodell, Anders

    2012-01-01

    1 images. Perfusion data were then extracted from seven regions-of-interest, normalised to white matter and statistically compared between carriers and non-carriers. RESULTS: For SE, contrasts between carriers and non-carriers showed significant differences in temporal, occipital and parietal lobes...... and in hippocampus. There was no evidence of changes from baseline to follow-up. For GRE, there were no significant differences between carriers and non-carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly decreased CBF was found in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers in occipital-and parietal lobes. Comparing SE with GRE, data...

  10. [Spinocerebellar ataxia type 8: the case of a Spanish family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Cabrero, D; Sánchez-Migallón, M; Cantarero, S; García-Ruiz Espiga, P J; Giménez-Pardo, A; Trujillo-Tiebas, M; Ayuso-García, C

    Dominant autosomic ataxias include a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the abnormal expansion of triplets. Male aged 33, with expansion of the SCA 8 gene (100 repetitions), who presented a clinical picture compatible with a pancerebellar syndrome. The patient had been diagnosed 11 years earlier as suffering from previously of histiocytosis X. A clinico genetic study was conducted on the patient and several members of his family (parents and two sisters). Both sisters and the father were found to be carriers of the expansion (110 and 150 repetitions, respectively), and are currently asymptomatic. There is no relation between the number of repetitions and the age of onset of the disease. The normal interval in our population oscillates between 16 37 repetitions, and the pathological interval has not been well determined. There may be a relation between the SCA 8 form and histiocytosis X.

  11. Normal Levels of Plasma Free Carnitine and Acylcarnitines in Follow-Up Samples From a Presymptomatic Case of Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1 (CPT1) Deficiency Detected Through Newborn Screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Luise; Lund, Allan; Wibrand, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    of presymptomatic CPT1A deficiency detected through newborn screening in Denmark with diagnostic levels of carnitine and acylcarnitines in the initial dried blood spot. Levels of plasma-free carnitine and acylcarnitines in follow-up samples were normal, but reverted to diagnostic levels when the patient developed...... clinical symptoms at the age of 8 months. At that time, a diagnosis of CPT1A deficiency was confirmed by sequence analysis of the CPT1A gene revealing homozygosity for a novel c.167C>T variation in exon 3. Enzyme activity measurements showed a relatively mild enzyme defect with a decreased residual enzyme...... activity of 17–25%. We conclude that CPT1A gene testing and/or enzyme assay is mandatory to confirm an abnormal newborn screen suggesting CPT1A deficiency to avoid delayed diagnoses....

  12. Cellular protein quality control and the evolution of aggregates in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, K; Meister, M; Dugbartey, G J; Zijlstra, M P; Vinet, J; Brunt, E R P; van Leeuwen, F W; Rüb, U; Kampinga, H H; den Dunnen, W F A

    2012-10-01

    A characteristic of polyglutamine diseases is the increased propensity of disease proteins to aggregate, which is thought to be a major contributing factor to the underlying neurodegeneration. Healthy cells contain mechanisms for handling protein damage, the protein quality control, which must be impaired or inefficient to permit proteotoxicity under pathological conditions. We used a quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of the pons of eight patients with the polyglutamine disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. We employed the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2, antibodies against p62 that is involved in delivering ubiquitinated protein aggregates to autophagosomes, antibodies against the chaperones HSPA1A and DNAJB1 and the proteasomal stress marker UBB⁺¹. The 1C2 antibody stained neuronal nuclear inclusions (NNIs), diffuse nuclear staining (DNS), granular cytoplasmic staining (GCS) and combinations, with reproducible distribution. P62 always co-localized with 1C2 in NNI. DNS and GCS co-stained with a lower frequency. UBB⁺¹ was present in a subset of neurones with NNI. A subset of UBB⁺¹-containing neurones displayed increased levels of HSPA1A, while DNAJB1 was sequestered into the NNI. Based on our results, we propose a model for the aggregation-associated pathology of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3: GCS and DNS aggregation likely represents early stages of pathology, which progresses towards formation of p62-positive NNI. A fraction of NNI exhibits UBB⁺¹ staining, implying proteasomal overload at a later stage. Subsequently, the stress-inducible HSPA1A is elevated while DNAJB1 is recruited into NNIs. This indicates that the stress response is only induced late when all endogenous protein quality control systems have failed. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  13. Detection of pre-symptomatic rose powdery-mildew and gray-mold diseases based on thermal vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, M.; Minaei, S.; Safaie, N.

    2017-09-01

    Roses are the most important plants in ornamental horticulture. Roses are susceptible to a number of phytopathogenic diseases. Among the most serious diseases of rose, powdery mildew (Podosphaera pannosa var. rosae) and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) are widespread which require considerable attention. In this study, the potential of implementing thermal imaging to detect the pre-symptomatic appearance of these fungal diseases was investigated. Effects of powdery mildew and gray mold diseases on rose plants (Rosa hybrida L.) were examined by two experiments conducted in a growth chamber. To classify the healthy and infected plants, feature selection was carried out and the best extracted thermal features with the largest linguistic hedge values were chosen. Two neuro-fuzzy classifiers were trained to distinguish between the healthy and infected plants. Best estimation rates of 92.55% and 92.3% were achieved in training and testing the classifier with 8 clusters in order to identify the leaves infected with powdery mildew. In addition, the best estimation rates of 97.5% and 92.59% were achieved in training and testing the classifier with 4 clusters to identify the gray mold disease on flowers. Performance of the designed neuro-fuzzy classifiers were evaluated with the thermal images captured using an automatic imaging setup. Best correct estimation rates of 69% and 80% were achieved (on the second day post-inoculation) for pre-symptomatic appearance detection of powdery mildew and gray mold diseases, respectively.

  14. Excitatory inputs to four types of spinocerebellar tract neurons in the cat and the rat thoraco-lumbar spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sony Shakya; Bannatyne, B Anne; Jankowska, Elzbieta; Hammar, Ingela; Nilsson, Elin; Maxwell, David J

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum receives information from the hindlimbs through several populations of spinocerebellar tract neurons. Although the role of these neurons has been established in electrophysiological experiments, the relative contribution of afferent fibres and central neurons to their excitatory input has only been estimated approximately so far. Taking advantage of differences in the immunohistochemistry of glutamatergic terminals of peripheral afferents and of central neurons (with vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 or VGLUT2, respectively), we compared sources of excitatory input to four populations of spinocerebellar neurons in the thoraco-lumbar spinal cord: dorsal spinocerebellar tract neurons located in Clarke's column (ccDSCT) and in the dorsal horn (dhDSCT) and ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT) neurons including spinal border (SB) neurons. This was done on 22 electrophysiologically identified intracellularly labelled neurons in cats and on 80 neurons labelled by retrograde transport of cholera toxin b subunit injected into the cerebellum of rats. In both species distribution of antibodies against VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 on SB neurons (which have dominating inhibitory input from limb muscles), revealed very few VGLUT1 contacts and remarkably high numbers of VGLUT2 contacts. In VSCT neurons with excitatory afferent input, the number of VGLUT1 contacts was relatively high although VGLUT2 contacts likewise dominated, while the proportions of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 immunoreactive terminals were the reverse on the two populations of DSCT neurons. These findings provide morphological evidence that SB neurons principally receive excitatory inputs from central neurons and provide the cerebellum with information regarding central neuronal activity. PMID:22371473

  15. [Voluntary postural control learning with a use of visual bio-feedback in patients with spinocerebellar degenerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinova, K I; Ioffe, M E; Chernikova, L A; Kulikov, M A; Illarioshkin, S N; Markova, E D

    2004-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluation of possibility and features of voluntary postural control learning using biofeedback from a force platform in patients with spinocerebellar ataxias. Thirty-seven patients with different forms of spinocerebellar degenerations and 13 age-matched healthy subjects were trained to shift the center of pressure (CP) during several stabilographic computer games which tested an ability to learn 2 different types of voluntary postural control: general strategy and precise coordination of CP shifting. Despite the disturbances of static posture and ability for voluntary control of CP position, patients with spinocerebellar degenerations can learn to control a vertical posture using biofeedback on stabilogram. In contrast to healthy subjects, improvement of coordination in the training process does not exert a significant influence on the static posture characteristics, in particular on lateral CP oscillations. The results obtained suggest involvement of the cerebellum in both types of postural control that distinguishes them from pathology caused by motor cortex and nigro-striatal system involved only in one type of postural control.

  16. Presymptomatic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2: how distressing are the pre-test weeks? Rotterdam/Leiden Genetics Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N. Lodder; P. Devilee (Peter); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus); C.J. Cornelisse (Cees); P.G. Frets; R.W. Trijsburg (Wim); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); A. Tibben (Arend); A. Wagner (Anja); C.A. van der Meer

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPresymptomatic DNA testing for autosomal dominant hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) became an option after the identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 1994-1995. Healthy female mutation carriers have a high lifetime risk for breast cancer

  17. Presymptomatic diagnosis using a deletion of a single codon in families with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, R S; Katballe, N; Wikman, F P

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is often confirmed by a mutation in one of several mismatch-repair genes, in particular MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Presymptomatic diagnosis requires the identification of a mutation causing the disease. Three different deletions......, identified after mutation screening of MSH2 and MLH1. All patients in the families were haplotyped using markers flanking the MSH2 gene. The haplotypes revealed that the five families with high probability descended from only two founders. The N596del segregated with the HNPCC phenotype with lod scores of 3.......2 and 2.0 at the recombination fraction of 0.0 in the two founder families. Sequencing of MSH2 and MLH1 did not reveal other pathogenic mutations, and N596del was not identified in 50 healthy controls. The mutation has previously been found expressed in mRNA, and is located in a conserved domain...

  18. CT scanning of the brain and lumber CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei

    1984-01-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorder s (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrpphy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups. (J.P.N.)

  19. Misclassification of Patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia as having Psychogenic Postural Instability based on Computerized Dynamic Posturography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Herdman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific criteria have been developed based on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP to assist clinicians in identifying patients with psychogenic balance problems1-4. Patients with known Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA meet several of the criteria for psychogenic balance problem and risk being misclassified as having imbalance of psychogenic origin. However, our research shows that patients with SCA may be distinguished from patients with psychogenic balance problems in several ways. We compared test performance on CDP and the observation of specific behaviors that are associated with psychogenic balance problems in patients with SCA (n = 43 and patients with known psychogenic balance problems (n = 40. Chi square analysis was used to determine if there were significant differences between the groups for the frequency of each criterion for psychogenic CDP and Observed Behaviors. Level of significance was Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratios were calculated for each criterion. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to examine whether the two patient groups demonstrated similar groupings of criteria. Comparison of the results of these analyses identified two criteria that were significantly more frequent in the Psychogenic group than in the SCA group: Regular Periodicity of sway and Circular Sway. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratios identified two additional criteria, Inconsistent Motor Responses and Large lateral Sway that also seem to suggest a psychogenic component to a person’s imbalance. Prospective studies are needed to validate the usefulness of these findings.

  20. [123I]-IMP SPECT findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Nakabayashi, Haruo; Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Nakajima, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    To study the dynamics of metabolic function in the cerebellar hemispheres, vermis and brain stem of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), we used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine (IMP) to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in six Japanese patients with SCA6 and nine normal control subjects. All patients with SCA6 were found to have expanded CAG repeats (from 22 to 24 repeats). The SPECT data were also analyzed semiquantitatively. The rCBF in the cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem was not significantly lower in patients with SCA6 than in normal controls. However, the ratio of the cerebellar hemisphere to occipital lobe (C/O ratio) was significantly lower in patients. The ratio of the vermis and brain stem to occipital lobe (V/O, P/O ratio) were not significantly lower in patients. The C/O, V/O and P/O ratio were especially sensitive indexes for regional cerebral function in patients with SCA6. Results of this study suggest that the functional decrease in SCA6 may begin in the cerebellar hemispheres. IMP SPECT was useful for evaluating rCBF in patients with SCA6. (author)

  1. Cerebello-cerebral functional relationship in spinocerebellar degeneration using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Sakayori, Osamu; Komaba, Yuichi; Terashi, Akiro

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the laterality of cerebellar ataxia and its influence for the cerebral cortex in spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in 10 patients with sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy (sOPCA), 7 patients with hereditary SCD (hSCD), and 10 age matched control subjects. The laterality of cerebellar ataxia was evaluated by the total score of the difference between left and right limbs of three limb-coordination tests. The lateralities of rCBF were calculated by asymmetry indices (AIs) of each region of interest in the cerebellum, thalamus, caudate, putamen, cerebral cortices. The laterality of cerebellar ataxia was significantly correlated with AI in the cerebellum in patients with sOPCA. Furthermore, significant negative correlations were observed between AI in the cerebellum and each AI in the thalamus, frontal cortex in patients with sOPCA. However, no correlations were observed between AI in the cerebellum and the other AIs in controls and patients with h SCD. Duration of illness in patients with sOPCA with laterality is shorter than that in patients without laterality. These results suggest that the existence of crossed cerebello-cerebral diaschisis (CCCD) resulting from transneuronal deactivation through cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway in patients with the early stage of sOPCA with laterality. (author)

  2. Cerebello-cerebral functional relationship in spinocerebellar degeneration using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Sakayori, Osamu; Komaba, Yuichi; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    In order to investigate the laterality of cerebellar ataxia and its influence for the cerebral cortex in spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in 10 patients with sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy (sOPCA), 7 patients with hereditary SCD (hSCD), and 10 age matched control subjects. The laterality of cerebellar ataxia was evaluated by the total score of the difference between left and right limbs of three limb-coordination tests. The lateralities of rCBF were calculated by asymmetry indices (AIs) of each region of interest in the cerebellum, thalamus, caudate, putamen, cerebral cortices. The laterality of cerebellar ataxia was significantly correlated with AI in the cerebellum in patients with sOPCA. Furthermore, significant negative correlations were observed between AI in the cerebellum and each AI in the thalamus, frontal cortex in patients with sOPCA. However, no correlations were observed between AI in the cerebellum and the other AIs in controls and patients with h SCD. Duration of illness in patients with sOPCA with laterality is shorter than that in patients without laterality. These results suggest that the existence of crossed cerebello-cerebral diaschisis (CCCD) resulting from transneuronal deactivation through cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway in patients with the early stage of sOPCA with laterality. (author).

  3. Spinocerebellar ataxias in Venezuela: genetic epidemiology and their most likely ethnic descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Irene; Ikonomu, Vassiliki; Arias, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Dominantly inherited ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias, SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurologic diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar and spinal tract degeneration with ataxia and other signs, common to all known subtypes. Several types are relatively frequent worldwide, but in several countries, one specific SCA may show a higher prevalence owing to founder phenomena. In Venezuela, genetic epidemiological features of SCAs have been assessed during the last 30 years; mutations in ATXN1 (SCA1), ATXN2 (SCA2), ATXN3 (SCA3), CACNA1A (SCA6), ATXN7 (SCA7), ATXN8 (SCA8), ATXN10 (SCA10), TBP (SCA17) and ATN1 (dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy, DRPLA) loci were searched among 115 independent families. SCA7 was the most frequent subtype (26.6%), followed by SCA3 (25.0%), SCA2 (21.9%), SCA1 (17.2%), SCA10 (4.7%) and DRPLA (3.1%); in 43% of the families, the subtype remained unidentified. SCA7 mutations displayed strong geographic aggregation in two independent founder foci, and SCA1 showed a very remote founder effect for a subset of families. SCA10 families were scattered across the country, but all had an identical in-phase haplotype carried also by Mexican, Brazilian and Sioux patients, supporting a very old common Amerindian origin. Prevalence for dominant SCAs in Venezuela was estimated as 1:25 000 nuclear families, provenances of which are either Caucasoid, African or Amerindian.

  4. CT scanning of the brain and lumbar CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei [Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1984-08-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorders (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrophy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups.

  5. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen N.; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A. G.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed “ATCCT interruptions,” experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confers a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling. PMID:24318420

  6. From mild ataxia to huntington disease phenocopy: the multiple faces of spinocerebellar ataxia 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Panas, Marios; Paraskevas, George P; Bougea, Anastasia M; Kladi, Athina; Karadima, Georgia; Kapaki, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA 17) is a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) caused by a CAG/CAA expansion in the TBP gene, reported from a limited number of countries. It is a very heterogeneous ADCA characterized by ataxia, cognitive decline, psychiatric symptoms, and involuntary movements, with some patients presenting with Huntington disease (HD) phenocopies. The SCA 17 expansion is stable during parent-child transmission and intrafamilial phenotypic homogeneity has been reported. However, significant phenotypic variability within families has also been observed. Report of the Family. We presently report a Greek family with a pathological expansion of 54 repeats at the SCA 17 locus that displayed remarkable phenotypic variability. Among 3 affected members, one presented with HD phenocopy; one with progressive ataxia, dementia, chorea, dystonia, and seizures, and one with mild slowly progressive ataxia with minor cognitive and affective symptoms. Conclusions. This is the first family with SCA 17 identified in Greece and highlights the multiple faces of this rare disorder, even within the same family.

  7. From Mild Ataxia to Huntington Disease Phenocopy: The Multiple Faces of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Koutsis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA 17 is a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA caused by a CAG/CAA expansion in the TBP gene, reported from a limited number of countries. It is a very heterogeneous ADCA characterized by ataxia, cognitive decline, psychiatric symptoms, and involuntary movements, with some patients presenting with Huntington disease (HD phenocopies. The SCA 17 expansion is stable during parent-child transmission and intrafamilial phenotypic homogeneity has been reported. However, significant phenotypic variability within families has also been observed. Report of the Family. We presently report a Greek family with a pathological expansion of 54 repeats at the SCA 17 locus that displayed remarkable phenotypic variability. Among 3 affected members, one presented with HD phenocopy; one with progressive ataxia, dementia, chorea, dystonia, and seizures, and one with mild slowly progressive ataxia with minor cognitive and affective symptoms. Conclusions. This is the first family with SCA 17 identified in Greece and highlights the multiple faces of this rare disorder, even within the same family.

  8. The effect of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwugo, Chika C; Lin, Hong; Duan, Yongping; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2013-04-11

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on the physiological and molecular

  9. Dysregulated expression of death, stress and mitochondrion related genes in the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic SOD1G93A mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystian Junqueira Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells are the main source of paracrine support to motor neurons. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been correlated to motor neuron death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. Despite the involvement of Schwann cells in early neuromuscular disruption in ALS, detailed molecular events of a dying-back triggering are unknown. Sciatic nerves of presymptomatic (60-day-old SOD1G93A mice were submitted to a high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis. DAVID demonstrated the deregulated genes related to death, stress and mitochondrion, which allowed the identification of Cell cycle, ErbB signaling, Tryptophan metabolism and Rig-I-like receptor signaling as the most representative KEGG pathways. The protein-protein interaction networks based upon deregulated genes have identified the top hubs (TRAF2, H2AFX, E2F1, FOXO3, MSH2, NGFR, TGFBR1 and bottlenecks (TRAF2, E2F1, CDKN1B, TWIST1, FOXO3. Schwann cells were enriched from the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic mice using flow cytometry cell sorting. qPCR showed the up regulated (Ngfr, Cdnkn1b, E2f1, Traf2 and Erbb3, H2afx, Cdkn1a, Hspa1, Prdx, Mapk10 and down-regulated (Foxo3, Mtor genes in the enriched Schwann cells. In conclusion, molecular analyses in the presymptomatic sciatic nerve demonstrated the involvement of death, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial pathways in the Schwann cell non-autonomous mechanisms in the early stages of ALS.

  10. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  11. The human dorsal spinocerebellar tract: myelinated fiber spectrum and fiber density in controls, autosomal dominant spinocerebellar atrophy, Huntington's chorea, radiation myelopathy, and diseases with peripheral sensory nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringelstein, E.B.; Schroeder, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The human dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT) was evaluated morphometrically in 14 control cases of different age and sex using semithin sections of epon-embedded cross sections from the C3, T5, and T10 segments of the spinal cord. A bimodal fiber spectrum was revealed with one peak at 2-3 microns, and a second, broader peak at about 6-8 microns. Fiber density at C3 was 11,188 fibers/mm2 and at T5, 11,156 fibers/mm2. Regression analysis relating fiber density to age disclosed a highly significant loss of myelinated fibers at T5 amounting to about 2.5% per decade. A severe reduction of fiber density and a distinct change in the fiber spectrum with predominant loss of large myelinated fibers were noted in a case of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar atrophy with late onset, and, to a lesser degree, in a case of Huntington's chorea. A subtotal loss of fibers with a persistent normal distribution of fiber sizes was observed rostral to a focus of severe radiation myelopathy, indicating Wallerian degeneration of large numbers of fibers, and a reduction of fiber diameters caudal to the lesion, suggesting retrograde fiber change. By contrast, no primary or transneural changes in the DSCT were detected in six cases of long-term alcoholism, carcinomatous sensory neuropathy, and neurofibromatosis in spite of the involvement of numerous nerve roots.

  12. Caffeine alleviates progressive motor deficits in a transgenic mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Nélio; Simões, Ana T; Prediger, Rui D; Hirai, Hirokazu; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2017-03-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a neurodegenerative spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) associated with an expanded polyglutamine tract within ataxin-3 for which there is currently no available therapy. We previously showed that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, delays the appearance of striatal damage resulting from expression of full-length mutant ataxin-3. Here we investigated the ability of caffeine to alleviate behavioral deficits and cerebellar neuropathology in transgenic mice with a severe ataxia resulting from expression of a truncated fragment of polyglutamine-expanded ataxin-3 in Purkinje cells. Control and transgenic c57Bl6 mice expressing in the mouse cerebella a truncated form of human ataxin-3 with 69 glutamine repeats were allowed to freely drink water or caffeinated water (1g/L). Treatments began at 7 weeks of age, when motor and ataxic phenotype emerges in MJD mice, and lasted up to 20 weeks. Mice were tested in a panel of locomotor behavioral paradigms, namely rotarod, beam balance and walking, pole, and water maze cued-platform version tests, and then sacrificed for cerebellar histology. Caffeine consumption attenuated the progressive loss of general and fine-tuned motor function, balance, and grip strength, in parallel with preservation of cerebellar morphology through decreasing the loss of Purkinje neurons and the thinning of the molecular layer in different folia. Caffeine also rescued the putative striatal-dependent executive and cognitive deficiencies in MJD mice. Our findings provide the first in vivo demonstration that caffeine intake alleviates behavioral disabilities in a severely impaired animal model of SCA. Ann Neurol 2017;81:407-418. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  13. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang improves the aversive memory in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Maurmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA-2 is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder without specific therapy identified, and it is related to the loss of function in the cerebellum, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neurotoxic processes. Scientific evidence indicates that Mangifera indica L. aqueous extract (MiE and its major constituent (mangiferin display antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. Aims: To investigate the MiE and mangiferin effects on behavioral outcomes of neurological function in SCA-2 transgenic mice. Methods: The SCA-2 transgenic mice were daily and orally administered during 12 months with MiE (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, mangiferin (10 mg/kg or vehicle. It was evaluated locomotion (open-field, aversive memory (inhibitory avoidance and declarative memory (object recognition. To explore possible cellular mechanisms underlying the in vivo effects was also evaluated their effects on nerve grow factor (NGF and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α levels in the human glioblastoma cell line U138-MG supernatant. Results: MiE administration did not affect the object recognition memory, but mangiferin did. The natural extract improved selectively the aversive memory in SCA-2 mice, indicating that MiE can affect behavioral parameters regarding fear-related memory. MiE also induced a significant increase in supernatant levels of NGF and TNF-α in vitro in human U138-MG glioblastoma cells. Conclusions: The results suggest that MiE enhances the aversive memory through a mechanism that might involve an increase in neurotrophin and cytokine levels. These findings constitute the basis for the use of the natural extract in the prevention/treatment of memory deficits in SCA-2.

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia: a critical review of cognitive and socio-cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocondo, Flora; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    The primary aim of this contribution is to provide a critical discussion on cognitive and sociocognitive implications of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) subtypes. The term SCA refers to a group of neurodegenerative disorders that have been increasingly investigated in the last years, sharing the characteristic of progressive ataxia resulting from degeneration of cerebellum and its connections. In past decades only involvement of cerebellum in behaviour and timing has been investigated, bringing to the belief about its central role in timing of movement and sensation, particularly for short intervals of time. Only very recently the cerebellum has been considered as a potentially important centre for cognitive processing and related spheres of social cognition, so that several studies with SCA patients have been carried out on these topics: as a consequence a section of this review will be dedicated to this important aspect. After a brief discussion on most commonly used methods to assess cognitive and socio-cognitive abilities in SCAs, cognitive and socio-cognitive profiles of principal SCA subtypes have been thoroughly reviewed and critically discussed. Due to the very poor literature in this field the most common SCA variants have been fully included (i.e. SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7). A comparative summary of the main characteristics of cognitive and social cognition deficit in SCA subtypes has been proposed together with a research agenda for future investigation in this field principally aimed at using measures of cognition and/or social cognition as potential predictors of the extent and progression of disease.

  15. Social and cultural elements associated with neurocognitive dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 patients

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    Roberto Emmanuele Mercadillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2 is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain related alterations. Here we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the

  16. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H266

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Tubsuwan, Alisa; Schmid, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. We have successfully generated bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell...

  17. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H271

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. We have successfully generated bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell...

  18. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected control cell line of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patient-derived iPSC line H196

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schmid, Benjamin; Tubsuwan, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting the cerebellum. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and, to date, no cure or treatment is available. We have successfully generated bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell...

  19. Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing in detection of dynamic mutations of spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan CHEN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To estimate the accuracy and stability of capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing in detecting dynamic mutations of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA. Methods Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis and clone sequencing were used in detecting trinucleotide repeated sequence of 14 SCA patients (3 cases of SCA2, 2 cases of SCA7, 7 cases of SCA8 and 2 cases of SCA17. Results Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis of 3 SCA2 cases showed the expanded cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeats were 31, 30 and 32, and the copy numbers of 3 clone sequencing for 3 colonies in each case were 37/40/40, 37/38/39 and 38/39/40 respectively. Capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis of 2 SCA7 cases showed the expanded CAG repeats were 57 and 34, and the copy numbers of repeats were 69, 74, 75 in 3 colonies of one case, and was 45 in the other case. For the 7 SCA8 cases with the expanded cytosine-thymine-adenine (CTA/cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG repeats of 99, 111, 104, 92, 89, 104 and 75, the results of clone sequencing were 97, 116, 104, 90, 90, 102 and 76 respectively. For 2 SCA17 cases with the short/expanded CAG repeats of 37/50 and 36/45, the results of clone sequencing were 51/50/52 and 45/44 for 3 and 2 colonies. Conclusions Although the higher mobility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR products containing dynamic mutation in the capillary electrophoresis fragment analysis might cause the deviation for analysis of copy numbers, the deviation was predictable and the results were repeatable. The clone sequencing results showed obvious instability, especially for SCA2 and SCA7 genes, which might owing to their simple CAG repeats. Consequently, clone sequencing is not suited for detection of dynamic mutation, not to mention the quantitative criteria of dynamic mutation sequencing. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.008

  20. Targeting the CACNA1A IRES as a Treatment for Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Parviz Daniel Hejazi; Du, Xiaofei; Fazal, Sarah; Davies, Andre N; Gomez, Christopher M

    2018-02-01

    We have discovered that the P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel (VGCC) gene, CACNA1A, encodes both the α1A (Cav2.1) subunit and a newly recognized transcription factor, α1ACT, by means of a novel internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) within the α1A C-terminal coding region. α1ACT, when mutated with an expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the C-terminus, gives rise to spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Because silencing of the entire CACNA1A gene would result in the loss of the essential Cav2.1 channel, the IRES controlling α1ACT expression is an excellent target for selective silencing of α1ACT as a therapeutic intervention for SCA6. We performed a high-throughput screen of FDA-approved small molecules using a dual luciferase reporter system and identified ten hits able to selectively inhibit the IRES. We identified four main candidates that showed selective suppression of α1ACT relative to α1A in HEK cells expressing a native CACNA1A vector. We previously pursued another avenue of molecular intervention through miRNA silencing. We studied three human miRNAs (miRNA-711, -3191-5p, -4786) that would potentially bind to sequences within the CACNA1A IRES region, based on an miRNA prediction program. Only miRNA-3191-5p was found to selectively inhibit the translation of α1ACT in cells. We developed a hyperacute model of SCA6 in mice by injecting a pathogenic form of the IRES-mediated α1ACT (AAV9-α1ACTQ33). Finally, we tested the effectiveness of the miRNA therapy by co-expressing either control miRNA or miRNA-3191-5p and found that miRNA-3191-5p decreased the levels of α1ACTQ33 and prevented the hyperacute disease in mice. These studies provide the proof of principle that a therapy directed at selectively preventing α1ACT expression could be used to treat SCA6.

  1. Gene screening and prevention of hereditary breast cancer: a clinical view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, J. G. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, the major tasks of the increasing number of family cancer clinics are to provide general information about cancer, to perform risk assessment, to offer (presymptomatic) DNA-testing, to advise on lifestyle, to take steps for early detection and prevention of cancer, for psychological

  2. Informing family members about a hereditary predisposition to cancer: attitudes and practices among clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, Y.; Menko, F.H.; Westerman, M.J.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    If a hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer or breast cancer is diagnosed, most guidelines state that clinical geneticists should request index patients to inform their at-risk relatives about the existence of this condition in their family, thus enabling them to consider presymptomatic

  3. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling : patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V.; van Langen, Irene M.

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large

  4. Pre-symptomatic activation of antioxidant responses and alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C1-deficient murine brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused in most cases by mutations in the NPC1 gene. NPC1-deficiency is characterized by late endosomal accumulation of cholesterol, impaired cholesterol homeostasis, and a broad range of other cellular abnormalities. Although neuronal abnormalities and glial activation are observed in nearly all areas of the brain, the most severe consequence of NPC1-deficiency is a near complete loss of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. The link between cholesterol trafficking and NPC pathogenesis is not yet clear; however, increased oxidative stress in symptomatic NPC disease, increases in mitochondrial cholesterol, and alterations in autophagy/mitophagy suggest that mitochondria play a role in NPC disease pathology. Alterations in mitochondrial function affect energy and neurotransmitter metabolism, and are particularly harmful to the central nervous system. To investigate early metabolic alterations that could affect NPC disease progression, we performed metabolomics analyses of different brain regions from age-matched wildtype and Npc1 (-/- mice at pre-symptomatic, early symptomatic and late stage disease by (1H-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolic profiling revealed markedly increased lactate and decreased acetate/acetyl-CoA levels in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum and cerebral cortex at all ages. Protein and gene expression analyses indicated a pre-symptomatic deficiency in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, and an upregulation of glycolytic gene expression at the early symptomatic stage. We also observed a pre-symptomatic increase in several indicators of oxidative stress and antioxidant response systems in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum. Our findings suggest that energy metabolism and oxidative stress may present additional therapeutic targets in NPC disease, especially if intervention can be started at an early stage of the disease.

  5. Automated home cage assessment shows behavioral changes in a transgenic mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Esteban; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2013-08-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is an autosomal dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease characterized by ataxia, involuntary movements, and dementia. A novel SCA17 mouse model having a 71 polyglutamine repeat expansion in the TATA-binding protein (TBP) has shown age related motor deficit using a classic motor test, yet concomitant weight increase might be a confounding factor for this measurement. In this study we used an automated home cage system to test several motor readouts for this same model to confirm pathological behavior results and evaluate benefits of automated home cage in behavior phenotyping. Our results confirm motor deficits in the Tbp/Q71 mice and present previously unrecognized behavioral characteristics obtained from the automated home cage, indicating its use for high-throughput screening and testing, e.g. of therapeutic compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Depression as the Primary Cause of Insomnia and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in a Family with Multiple Cases of Spinocerebellar Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Yen-Lin; Pei, Dee; Yu, Shu-Man; Liu, I-Chao

    2016-07-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a hereditary disease characterized by central nervous system-related motor dysfunctions. Sleep disorders and frequent non-motor manifestations are commonly comorbid with SCA. To elucidate this relationship, we present three cases in a family that included multiple SCA type 2 patients with various sleep disorders. Complete physical examination, and genetic and imaging studies were performed. Anti-parkinsonism medications were prescribed after neurological examination. Clonazepam and/or quetiapine were administered for sleep disorders but failed to resolve insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Based on DSM-5 criteria, all cases were diagnosed with depression. After treatment with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, symptoms of insomnia and EDS, which are strongly associated with depression in SCA type 2 patients, improved significantly. It is crucial to recognize insomnia and EDS in neurodegenerative diseases, not only for earlier diagnosis, but also to improve quality of life. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  7. A Novel TTBK2 De Novo Mutation in a Danish Family with Early-Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Suzanne Granhøj; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Dali, Christine I.

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11 (SCA11) is rare and has previously been described in four families worldwide. We report a Danish family with onset of symptoms in early childhood and affected family members in two generations. The proband, a Danish female born in 1968, and family members were...... examined. Exome sequencing was performed and a “movement disorders” gene panel consisting of approximately 200 genes was used for filtering, while Sanger sequencing was used for subsequent testing for the mutation in the family. Onset of symptoms in affected family members was in early childhood. A novel...... delineates the phenotypic spectrum of the rare SCA11 disease. In contrast to previously reported cases, onset of symptoms was in early childhood and the mutation was de novo in the proband....

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell line, CSSi004-A (2962, from a patient diagnosed with Huntington's disease at the presymptomatic stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eris Bidollari

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an incurable, autosomal dominant, hereditary neurodegenerative disorder that typically manifests itself in midlife. This pathology is linked to the deregulation of multiple, as yet unknown, cellular processes starting before HD onset. A human iPS cell line was generated from skin fibroblasts of a subject at the presymptomatic life stage, carrying a polyglutamine expansion in HTT gene codifying Huntingtin protein. The iPSC line contained the expected CAG expansion, expressed the expected pluripotency markers, displayed in vivo differentiation potential to the three germ layers and had a normal karyotype.

  9. Presymptomatic Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Predisposed Children: The Role of Gene Expression Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatola, Martina; Cielo, Donatella; Panico, Camilla; Stellato, Pio; Malamisura, Basilio; Carbone, Lorenzo; Gianfrani, Carmen; Troncone, Riccardo; Greco, Luigi; Auricchio, Renata

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) has increased significantly in recent years, and risk prediction and early diagnosis have become imperative especially in at-risk families. In a previous study, we identified individuals with CD based on the expression profile of a set of candidate genes in peripheral blood monocytes. Here we evaluated the expression of a panel of CD candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from at-risk infants long time before any symptom or production of antibodies. We analyzed the gene expression of a set of 9 candidate genes, associated with CD, in 22 human leukocyte antigen predisposed children from at-risk families for CD, studied from birth to 6 years of age. Nine of them developed CD (patients) and 13 did not (controls). We analyzed gene expression at 3 different time points (age matched in the 2 groups): 4-19 months before diagnosis, at the time of CD diagnosis, and after at least 1 year of a gluten-free diet. At similar age points, controls were also evaluated. Three genes (KIAA, TAGAP [T-cell Activation GTPase Activating Protein], and SH2B3 [SH2B Adaptor Protein 3]) were overexpressed in patients, compared with controls, at least 9 months before CD diagnosis. At a stepwise discriminant analysis, 4 genes (RGS1 [Regulator of G-protein signaling 1], TAGAP, TNFSF14 [Tumor Necrosis Factor (Ligand) Superfamily member 14], and SH2B3) differentiate patients from controls before serum antibodies production and clinical symptoms. Multivariate equation correctly classified CD from non-CD children in 95.5% of patients. The expression of a small set of candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells can predict CD at least 9 months before the appearance of any clinical and serological signs of the disease.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of semantic memory as a presymptomatic biomarker of Alzheimer's disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Michael A; Woodard, John L; Nielson, Kristy A; Seidenberg, Michael; Smith, J Carson; Durgerian, Sally; Rao, Stephen M

    2012-03-01

    Extensive research efforts have been directed toward strategies for predicting risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) prior to the appearance of observable symptoms. Existing approaches for early detection of AD vary in terms of their efficacy, invasiveness, and ease of implementation. Several non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging strategies have been developed for predicting decline in cognitively healthy older adults. This review will survey a number of studies, beginning with the development of a famous name discrimination task used to identify neural regions that participate in semantic memory retrieval and to test predictions of several key theories of the role of the hippocampus in memory. This task has revealed medial temporal and neocortical contributions to recent and remote memory retrieval, and it has been used to demonstrate compensatory neural recruitment in older adults, apolipoprotein E ε4 carriers, and amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients. Recently, we have also found that the famous name discrimination task provides predictive value for forecasting episodic memory decline among asymptomatic older adults. Other studies investigating the predictive value of semantic memory tasks will also be presented. We suggest several advantages associated with the use of semantic processing tasks, particularly those based on person identification, in comparison to episodic memory tasks to study AD risk. Future directions for research and potential clinical uses of semantic memory paradigms are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Imaging Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extensive vascular remodeling in the spinal cord of pre-symptomatic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice; increased vessel expression of fibronectin and the α5β1 integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Welser-Alves, Jennifer V.; Milner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in vascular structure and function are a central component of demyelinating disease. In addition to blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, which occurs early in the course of disease, recent studies have described angiogenic remodeling, both in multiple sclerosis tissue and in the mouse demyelinating model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). As the precise timing of vascular remodeling in demyelinating disease has yet to be fully defined, the purpose of the current study was to define the time-course of these events in the MOG35-55 EAE model. Quantification of endothelial cell proliferation and vessel density revealed that a large part of angiogenic remodeling in cervical spinal cord white matter occurs during the pre-symptomatic phase of EAE. At the height of vascular remodeling, blood vessels in the cervical spinal cord showed strong transient upregulation of fibronectin and the α5β1 integrin. In vitro experiments revealed that α5 integrin inhibition reduced brain endothelial cell proliferation under inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, loss of vascular integrity was evident in all vessels during the first 4–7 days post-immunization, but after 14 days, was localized predominantly to venules. Taken together, our data demonstrate that extensive vascular remodeling occurs during the pre-symptomatic phase of EAE and point to a potential role for the fibronectin-α5β1 integrin interaction in promoting vascular remodeling during demyelinating disease. PMID:24056042

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from af pre-symptomatic carrier of a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) causing frontotemporal dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 28-year-old pre-symptomatic woman carrying a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), known to cause frontotemporal dementia. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4...

  13. Testing the Children: Do Non-Genetic Health-Care Providers Differ in Their Decision to Advise Genetic Presymptomatic Testing on Minors? A Cross-Sectional Study in Five Countries in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass, Anne Marie C.; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Cornel, Martina C.; Julian-Reynier, Claire; Nippert, Irmgard; Harris, Hillary; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Schmidtke, Jörg; Anionwu, Elizabeth N.; Benjamin, Caroline; Challen, Kirsty; Harris, Rodney; ten Kate, Leo P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Within Europe many guidelines exist regarding the genetic testing of minors. Predictive and presymptomatic genetic testing of minors is recommended for disorders for which medical intervention/preventive measures exist, and for which early detection improves future medical health. Aim:

  14. Testing the children: do non-genetic health-care providers differ in their decision to advise genetic presymptomatic testing on minors? A cross-sectional study in five countries in the European Union.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass, A.M.C.; Baars, M.J.H.; Cornel, M.C.; Julian-Reynier, C.; Nippert, I.; Harris, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Schmidtke, J.; Anionwu, E.N.; Benjamin, C.; Challen, K.; Harris, R.; Kate, L.P. ten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within Europe many guidelines exist regarding the genetic testing of minors. Predictive and presymptomatic genetic testing of minors is recommended for disorders for which medical intervention/preventive measures exist, and for which early detection improves future medical health. AIM:

  15. Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Holm, I.E.; Schwartz, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic an......We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre...

  16. Population genetics and new insight into range of CAG repeats of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 in the Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Rui Gan

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is one of the most common SCAs worldwide and caused by a CAG repeat expansion located in ATXN3 gene. Based on the CAG repeat numbers, alleles of ATXN3 can be divided into normal alleles (ANs, intermediate alleles (AIs and expanded alleles (AEs. It was controversial whether the frequency of large normal alleles (large ANs is related to the prevalence of SCA3 or not. And there were huge chaos in the comprehension of the specific numbers of the range of CAG repeats which is fundamental for genetic analysis of SCA3. To illustrate these issues, we made a novel CAG repeat ladder to detect CAG repeats of ATXN3 in 1003 unrelated Chinese normal individuals and studied haplotypes defined by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs closed to ATXN3. We found that the number of CAG repeats ranged from 13 to 49, among them, 14 was the most common number. Positive skew, the highest frequency of large ANs and 4 AIs which had never been reported before were found. Also, AEs and large ANs shared the same haplotypes defined by the SNPs. Based on these data and other related studies, we presumed that de novo mutations of ATXN3 emerging from large ANs are at least one survival mechanisms of mutational ATXN3 and we can redefine the range of CAG repeats as: ANs≤44, 45 ≤AIs ≤49 and AEs≥50.

  17. PET Study in a Patient with Spinocerebellar Degeneration before and after Long-Term Administration of Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tanji

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the chronic effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH in a patient with spinocerebellar degeneration by measuring cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRG1c using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG and positron emission tomography (PET. A 56-year-old female, who had suffered from progressive ataxia for 2 years, was treated by intravenous administration of 2 mg TRH for 3 weeks, and CMRG1c of the brain was measured before and after treatment. CMRG1c was markedly decreased in the cerebellum and there was no significant difference before and after the treatment, i.e. mean CMRG1c values were 4.92 and 4.90 mg/100 g/min, and the ratios of the cerebellum versus the frontal cortex were 0.50 and 0.51, respectively. The degree of disequilibrium of her body examined with stabilography became better by the 19th day and further improved by the 26th day after the start of TRH treatment. Based on the present study we conclude that long-term administration of TRH did not improve CMRG1c in the cerebellum, but evidently improved the sway of gravity center by stabilography. We speculate that the chronic effect of TRH was not necessarily due to an improvement of cerebellar function, because TRH receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system.

  18. Aqueous Extract of Paeonia lactiflora and Paeoniflorin as Aggregation Reducers Targeting Chaperones in Cell Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 17 as well as Huntington’s disease are a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by expanded CAG repeats encoding a long polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the respective proteins. Evidence has shown that the accumulation of intranuclear and cytoplasmic misfolded polyQ proteins leads to apoptosis and cell death. Thus suppression of aggregate formation is expected to inhibit a wide range of downstream pathogenic events in polyQ diseases. In this study, we established a high-throughput aggregation screening system using 293 ATXN3/Q75-GFP cells and applied this system to test the aqueous extract of Paeonia lactiflora (P. lactiflora and its constituents. We found that the aggregation can be significantly prohibited by P. lactiflora and its active compound paeoniflorin. Meanwhile, P. lactiflora and paeoniflorin upregulated HSF1 and HSP70 chaperones in the same cell models. Both of them further reduced the aggregation in neuronal differentiated SH-SY5Y ATXN3/Q75-GFP cells. Our results demonstrate how P. lactiflora and paeoniflorin are likely to work on polyQ-aggregation reduction and provide insight into the possible working mechanism of P. lactiflora in SCA3. We anticipate our paper to be a starting point for screening more potential herbs for the treatment of SCA3 and other polyQ diseases.

  19. Increased protein kinase C gamma activity induces Purkinje cell pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jingmin; Hassler, Melanie L; Shimobayashi, Etsuko; Paka, Nagendher; Streit, Raphael; Kapfhammer, Josef P

    2014-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary diseases leading to Purkinje cell degeneration and cerebellar dysfunction. Most forms of SCA are caused by expansion of CAG repeats similar to other polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease. In contrast, in the autosomal dominant SCA-14 the disease is caused by mutations in the protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) gene which is a well characterized signaling molecule in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The study of SCA-14, therefore, offers the unique opportunity to reveal the molecular and pathological mechanism eventually leading to Purkinje cell dysfunction and degeneration. We have created a mouse model of SCA-14 in which PKCγ protein with a mutation found in SCA-14 is specifically expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. We find that in mice expressing the mutated PKCγ protein the morphology of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures is drastically altered and mimics closely the morphology seen after pharmacological PKC activation. Similar morphological abnormalities were seen in localized areas of the cerebellum of juvenile transgenic mice in vivo. In adult transgenic mice there is evidence for some localized loss of Purkinje cells but there is no overall cerebellar atrophy. Transgenic mice show a mild cerebellar ataxia revealed by testing on the rotarod and on the walking beam. Our findings provide evidence for both an increased PKCγ activity in Purkinje cells in vivo and for pathological changes typical for cerebellar disease thus linking the increased and dysregulated activity of PKCγ tightly to the development of cerebellar disease in SCA-14 and possibly also in other forms of SCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) : widespread brain damage in an adult-onset patient with progressive visual impairments in comparison with an adult-onset patient without visual impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Brunt, E. R.; Seidel, K.; Gierga, K.; Mooy, C. M.; Kettner, M.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Bechmann, I.; La Spada, A. R.; Schoels, L.; den Dunnen, W.; de Vos, R. A. I.; Deller, T.

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) represents a rare and severe autosomal dominantly inherited ataxic disorder and is among the known CAG-repeat, or polyglutamine, diseases. In contrast to other currently known autosomal dominantly inherited ataxic disorders, SCA7 may manifest itself with

  1. Incidentalome in Neurogenetics: Pathogenic Variant of NSD1 in a Patient With Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Harvy; Ramírez-Montaño, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Genetic studies of late-onset sporadic ataxias (>40 years of age) are not routinely indicated. For unresolved cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS) tools, such as whole-exome sequencing (WES), are available for a definitive diagnosis. Case presentation: Our patient is a woman with a usual facial phenotype and anthropometry, who developed ataxia at 45 years of age, with no relevant family history and an initial clinical approach that ruled out common aetiologies. WES was performed when the patient was 54 years old. The results identified the heterozygous pathogenic variant c.248delA (p.N83MfsX4) in the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 1 ( NSD1 ; MIM 606681) gene (related to Sotos syndrome), which was not associated with ataxia and is not related to the patient's phenotype. Sanger sequencing of NSD1 in two different laboratories confirmed the variant. Conclusions: NGS findings generally offer valuable information that can be used for clinical decision-making. However, an incidental finding that leads to defining new clinical and bioethical actions is also possible. Consequently, the biological importance of this type of genetic "incidentalome" must be determined.

  2. Incidentalome in Neurogenetics: Pathogenic Variant of NSD1 in a Patient With Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvy Velasco

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genetic studies of late-onset sporadic ataxias (>40 years of age are not routinely indicated. For unresolved cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS tools, such as whole-exome sequencing (WES, are available for a definitive diagnosis.Case presentation: Our patient is a woman with a usual facial phenotype and anthropometry, who developed ataxia at 45 years of age, with no relevant family history and an initial clinical approach that ruled out common aetiologies. WES was performed when the patient was 54 years old. The results identified the heterozygous pathogenic variant c.248delA (p.N83MfsX4 in the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 1 (NSD1; MIM 606681 gene (related to Sotos syndrome, which was not associated with ataxia and is not related to the patient's phenotype. Sanger sequencing of NSD1 in two different laboratories confirmed the variant.Conclusions: NGS findings generally offer valuable information that can be used for clinical decision-making. However, an incidental finding that leads to defining new clinical and bioethical actions is also possible. Consequently, the biological importance of this type of genetic “incidentalome” must be determined.

  3. Divergent clinical outcomes of alpha-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy in two siblings with infantile-onset Pompe disease treated in the symptomatic or pre-symptomatic state

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Takashi; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Makiko; Sawada, Madoka; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Soga, Takashi; Tomita, Hideshi; Uemura, Shigeru; Nishino, Ichizo; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki; Umeda, Yoh

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal glycogen storage disease caused by acid ?-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) is the most severe form and is characterized by cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly, and skeletal muscle weakness. Untreated, IOPD generally results in death within the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) has been shown to markedly improve the life expectan...

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Semantic Memory as a Presymptomatic Biomarker of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Michael A.; Woodard, John L.; Nielson, Kristy A.; Seidenberg, Michael; Smith, J. Carson; Durgerian, Sally; Rao, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been directed toward strategies for predicting risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) prior to the appearance of observable symptoms. Existing approaches for early detection of AD vary in terms of their efficacy, invasiveness, and ease of implementation. Several non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging strategies have been developed for predicting decline in cognitively healthy older adults. This review will survey a number of studies, beginning with the development of a famous name discrimination task used to identify neural regions that participate in semantic memory retrieval and to test predictions of several key theories of the role of the hippocampus in memory. This task has revealed medial temporal and neocortical contributions to recent and remote memory retrieval, and it has been used to demonstrate compensatory neural recruitment in older adults, apolipoprotein E ε4 carriers, and amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients. Recently, we have also found that the famous name discrimination task provides predictive value for forecasting episodic memory decline among asymptomatic older adults. Other studies investigating the predictive value of semantic memory tasks will also be presented. We suggest several advantages associated with the use of semantic processing tasks, particularly those based on person identification, in comparison to episodic memory tasks to study AD risk. Future directions for research and potential clinical uses of semantic memory paradigms are also discussed. PMID:21996618

  5. Clinical neurogenetics: behavioral management of inherited neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Psychiatric symptoms often manifest years before overt neurologic signs in patients with inherited neurodegenerative disease. The most frequently cited example of this phenomenon is the early onset of personality changes in "presymptomatic" Huntington patients. In some cases the changes in mood and cognition are even more debilitating than their neurologic symptoms. The goal of this article is to provide the neurologist with a concise primer that can be applied in a busy clinic or private practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset. Clinical symptoms and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko (Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)); Yamada, Kazuhiko

    1989-07-01

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author).

  7. Challenges in sleep stage R scoring in patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1, SCA2 and SCA3) and oculomotor abnormalities: a whole night polysomnographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshagiri, Doniparthi Venkata; Sasidharan, Arun; Kumar, Gulshan; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Kutty, Bindu M; Yadav, Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive cerebellar features with additional neuro-axis involvement. Oculomotor abnormality is one of the most frequent manifestations. This study was done to assess the polysomnographic abnormalities in patients with Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2 and SCA3) and also to evaluate whether oculomotor abnormalities interfere with sleep stage R scoring. The study was carried out using 36 genetically positive SCA patients. All patients underwent neurological examination with special focus on oculomotor function (optokinetic nystagmus-OKN and extraocular movement restriction-EOM). The sleep quality was measured with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Disease severity was assessed with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). All the patients underwent over-night video-polysomnography (VPSG). Out of 36 patients studied, the data of 34 patients [SCA1 (n = 12), SCA2 (n = 13), SCA3 (n = 9)] were used for final analysis. Patients from SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3 category did not show significant differences in age and diseases severity (ICARS). All patients had vertical OKN impairment. Oculomotor impairment was higher in SCA2 patients. Sleep macro-architecture analysis showed absent stage R sleep, predominantly in SCA2 (69%) followed by SCA3 (44%) and SCA1 (8%). Patients showed a strong negative correlation of stage R sleep percentage with disease severity and oculomotor dysfunction. Voluntary saccadic eye movement velocity and rapid eye movements (REMs) in sleep are strongly correlated. The more severe the saccadic velocity impairment, the less likely was it to generate REMs (rapid eye movements) during stage R. Accordingly 69% of SCA2 patients with severe occulomotor impairments showed absent stage R as per the AASM sleep scoring. We presume that the impaired REMs generation in sleep could be due to oculomotor abnormality and has

  8. Presymptomatic diagnosis of Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Lav Madsen, Per; Bundgaard, Henning

    2016-01-01

    differential diagnoses in patients presenting with cardiac hypertrophy. In boys, onset has been reported in early childhood with complaints initially comprising neuropathic pain, reduced sweat production, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Later the cardiac, renal, and central nervous systems may become affected...... inheritable cardiomyopathies. The specific - precise - diagnosis may be crucial for the patient as well as the relatives....

  9. Promoter Variation and Expression Levels of Inflammatory Genes IL1A, IL1B, IL6 and TNF in Blood of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 (SCA3) Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Mafalda; Bettencourt, Conceição; Ramos, Amanda; Kazachkova, Nadiya; Vasconcelos, João; Kay, Teresa; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Lima, Manuela

    2017-03-01

    Age at onset in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD) is incompletely explained by the size of the CAG tract at the ATXN3 gene, implying the existence of genetic modifiers. A role of inflammation in SCA3 has been postulated, involving altered cytokines levels; promoter variants leading to alterations in cytokines expression could influence onset. Using blood from 86 SCA3 patients and 106 controls, this work aimed to analyse promoter variation of four cytokines (IL1A, IL1B, IL6 and TNF) and to investigate the association between variants detected and their transcript levels, evaluated by quantitative PCR. Moreover, the effect of APOE isoforms, known to modulate cytokines, was investigated. Correlations between cytokine variants and onset were tested; the cumulative modifier effects of cytokines and APOE were analysed. Patients carrying the IL6*C allele had a significant earlier onset (4 years in average) than patients carrying the G allele, in agreement with lower mRNA levels produced by IL6*C carriers. The presence of APOE*ɛ2 allele seems to anticipate onset in average 10 years in patients carrying the IL6*C allele; a larger number of patients will be needed to confirm this result. These results highlight the pertinence of conducting further research on the role of cytokines as SCA3 modulators, pointing to the presence of shared mechanisms involving IL6 and APOE.

  10. The SCA1 (Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and MJD (Machado-Joseph disease CAG repeats in normal individuals: segregation analysis and allele frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Emília Vieira Wiezel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3 are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the SCA1 and MJD genes. These expanded sequences are unstable upon transmission, leading to an intergeneration increase in the number of repeats (dynamic mutation. The transmission of the CAG repeat was studied in normal mother-father-child trios, referred for paternity testing (SCA1, n = 367; MJD, n = 879. No segregation distortion was detected. The CAG allele frequencies were determined in 330 unrelated individuals (fathers from couples tested for paternity. The allele frequency distributions did not differ from those previously reported for European populations. The estimated values for the statistic parameters indicating diversity at the SCA1 locus did not differ much from those reported previously for other STRs in the Brazilian population, while those for the MJD locus were close to or higher than the maximum values of previous reports. This shows that SCA1 and MJD are highly informative loci for applications in genetic and population studies and for forensic analysis.

  11. A novel nuclear DnaJ protein, DNAJC8, can suppress the formation of spinocerebellar ataxia 3 polyglutamine aggregation in a J-domain independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Norie [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Department of Neurology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Kamiguchi, Kenjiro; Nakanishi, Katsuya; Sokolovskya, Alice; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yasuaki; Murai, Aiko; Yamamoto, Eri; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Kochin, Vitaly [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Chiba, Susumu [Department of Neurology, Clinical Brain Research Laboratory, Toyokura Memorial Hall, Sapporo Yamano-ue Hospital (Japan); Shimohama, Shun [Department of Neurology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Sato, Noriyuki [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Torigoe, Toshihiko, E-mail: torigoe@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1, West-17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)

    2016-06-10

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases comprise neurodegenerative disorders caused by expression of expanded polyQ-containing proteins. The cytotoxicity of the expanded polyQ-containing proteins is closely associated with aggregate formation. In this study, we report that a novel J-protein, DNAJ (HSP40) Homolog, Subfamily C, Member 8 (DNAJC8), suppresses the aggregation of polyQ-containing protein in a cellular model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), which is also known as Machado-Joseph disease. Overexpression of DNAJC8 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells significantly reduced the polyQ aggregation and apoptosis, and DNAJC8 was co-localized with the polyQ aggregation in the cell nucleus. Deletion mutants of DNAJC8 revealed that the C-terminal domain of DNAJC8 was essential for the suppression of polyQ aggregation, whereas the J-domain was dispensable. Furthermore, 22-mer oligopeptide derived from C-termilal domain could suppress the polyQ aggregation. These results indicate that DNAJC8 can suppress the polyQ aggregation via a distinct mechanism independent of HSP70-based chaperone machinery and have a unique protective role against the aggregation of expanded polyQ-containing proteins such as pathogenic ataxin-3 proteins.

  12. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-07-29

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy.

  13. Generation of an isogenic, gene-corrected iPSC line from a pre-symptomatic 28-year-old woman with an R406W mutation in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimsanor, Natakarn; Poulsen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Mikkel A.

    2016-01-01

    pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise to model FTDP-17 as such cells can be differentiated in vitro to the required cell type. Furthermore, gene-editing approaches allow generating isogenic gene-corrected controls that can be used as a very specific control. Here, we report the generation......Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17q21.2 (FTDP-17) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations in the MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau) gene can cause FTDP-17, but the underlying pathomechanisms of the disease are still unknown. Induced...... of genetically corrected iPSCs from a pre-symptomatic carrier of the R406W mutation in the MAPT-gene....

  14. Deregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in response to phorbol ester by the mutant protein kinase C gamma that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro eYamamoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. γPKC is a neuron-specific member of the classical PKCs and is activated and translocated to subcellular regions as a result of various stimuli, including diacylglycerol synthesis, increased intracellular Ca2+ and phorbol esters. We investigated whether SCA14 mutations affect the γPKC-related functions by stimulating HeLa cells with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylpholbol 13-acetate, a type of phorbol ester. Wild-type (WT γPKC-GFP was translocated to the plasma membrane within 10 min of TPA stimulation, followed by its perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage, in a PKC kinase activity- and microtubule-dependent manner. On the other hand, although SCA14 mutant γPKC-GFP exhibited a similar translocation to the plasma membrane, the subsequent perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage were significantly impaired in response to TPA. Translocated WT γPKC colocalized with F-actin and formed large vesicular structures in the perinuclear region. The uptake of FITC-dextran, a marker of macropinocytosis, was promoted by TPA stimulation in cells expressing WT γPKC, and FITC-dextran was surrounded by γPKC-positive vesicles. Moreover, TPA induced the phosphorylation of MARCKS, which is a membrane-substrate of PKC, resulting in the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS to the perinuclear region, suggesting that TPA induces macropinocytosis via γPKC activation. However, TPA failed to activate macropinocytosis and trigger the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS in cells expressing the SCA14 mutant γPKC. These findings suggest that γPKC is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in HeLa cells, while SCA14 mutant γPKC fails to regulate these processes due to its reduced kinase activity at the plasma membrane. This property might be involved in

  15. Reduced cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a comparative study with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rosa, Anna; De Leva, Maria Fulvia; Maddaluno, Gennaro; Filla, Alessandro; De Michele, Giuseppe [University Federico II, Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatologic Sciences, Naples (Italy); Pappata, Sabina; Pellegrino, Teresa [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Fiumara, Giovanni [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Carotenuto, Raffaella; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is often present. This study evaluated the cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2 using {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in comparison with patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects. Nine patients with SCA2, nine patients with PD, and nine control subjects underwent {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging studies from which early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rates were calculated. Early (F = 12.3, p < 0.0001) and late (F = 16.8, p < 0.0001) H/M ratios were significantly different among groups. In controls, early and late H/M ratios (2.2 {+-} 0.12 and 2.1 {+-} 0.20) were significantly higher than in patients with SCA2 (1.9 {+-} 0.23 and 1.8 {+-} 0.20, both p < 0.05) and with patients with PD (1.7 {+-} 0.29 and 1.4 {+-} 0.35, both p < 0.001). There was also a significant difference in washout rates among groups (F = 11.7, p < 0.0001). In controls the washout rate (19.9 {+-} 9.6 %) was significantly lower (p < 0.005) than in patients with PD (51.0 {+-} 23.7 %), but not different from that in SCA2 patients (19.5 {+-} 9.4 %). In SCA2 patients, in a multivariable linear regression analysis only the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score was independently associated with early H/M ratio ({beta} = -0.12, p < 0.05). {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy demonstrated an impairment of cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2, which was less marked than in PD patients. These results suggest that {sup 123}I-MIBG cardiac imaging could become a useful tool for analysing the pathophysiology of SCA2. (orig.)

  16. Individualized exergame training improves postural control in advanced degenerative spinocerebellar ataxia: A rater-blinded, intra-individually controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatton, Cornelia; Synofzik, Matthis; Fleszar, Zofia; Giese, Martin A; Schöls, Ludger; Ilg, Winfried

    2017-06-01

    Treatment options are rare in degenerative ataxias, especially in advanced, multisystemic disease. Exergame training might offer a novel treatment strategy, but its effectiveness has not been investigated in advanced stages. We examined the effectiveness of a 12-week home-based training with body-controlled videogames in 10 young subjects with advanced degenerative ataxia unable or barely able to stand. Training was structured in two 6-weeks phases, allowing to adapt the training according to individual training progress. Rater-blinded clinical assessment (Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia; SARA), individual goal-attainment scoring (GAS), and quantitative movement analysis were performed two weeks before training, immediately prior to training, and after training phases 1 and 2 (intra-individual control design). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02874911). After intervention, ataxia symptoms were reduced (SARA -2.5 points, p training (p = 0.04). Goal attainment during daily living was higher than expected (GAS: 0.45). Movement analysis revealed reduced body sway while sitting (p training-induced improvements in posture control mechanisms. This study provides first evidence that, even in advanced stages, subjects with degenerative ataxia may benefit from individualized training, with effects translating into daily living and improving underlying control mechanisms. The proposed training strategy can be performed at home, is motivating and facilitates patient self-empowerment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The history of spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 in Brazil: travels of a gene A história da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 no Brasil: as viagens de um gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the history of spinocerebellar ataxia 10 (SCA10, since its first report in a large Portuguese-ancestry Family with autosomal dominant pure cerebellar ataxia, till the final identification of further families without Mexican ancestry. These families present a quite different phenotype from those SCA10 families described in Mexico.Os autores apresentam a história da descoberta da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 (AEC10 no Brasil, desde o primeiro relato em uma família com ancestrais portugueses com ataxia cerebelar pura, autossômica dominante, até a identificação de famílias sem ancestrais mexicanos. Essas famílias apresentam um fenótipo de AEC10, com ataxia cerebelar "pura", distinta daquele descrito nas famílias no México.

  18. A host transcriptional signature for presymptomatic detection of infection in humans exposed to influenza H1N1 or H3N2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Woods

    Full Text Available There is great potential for host-based gene expression analysis to impact the early diagnosis of infectious diseases. In particular, the influenza pandemic of 2009 highlighted the challenges and limitations of traditional pathogen-based testing for suspected upper respiratory viral infection. We inoculated human volunteers with either influenza A (A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1 or A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2, and assayed the peripheral blood transcriptome every 8 hours for 7 days. Of 41 inoculated volunteers, 18 (44% developed symptomatic infection. Using unbiased sparse latent factor regression analysis, we generated a gene signature (or factor for symptomatic influenza capable of detecting 94% of infected cases. This gene signature is detectable as early as 29 hours post-exposure and achieves maximal accuracy on average 43 hours (p = 0.003, H1N1 and 38 hours (p-value = 0.005, H3N2 before peak clinical symptoms. In order to test the relevance of these findings in naturally acquired disease, a composite influenza A signature built from these challenge studies was applied to Emergency Department patients where it discriminates between swine-origin influenza A/H1N1 (2009 infected and non-infected individuals with 92% accuracy. The host genomic response to Influenza infection is robust and may provide the means for detection before typical clinical symptoms are apparent.

  19. Cognitive Changes in Presymptomatic Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heilman, Kenneth M

    2006-01-01

    .... Thus, the goal of this project has been to study the semantic organization of verbal information in PD patients and matched controls, and determine the influence of dopamine on these cognitive processes...

  20. Cognitive Changes in Presymptomatic Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heilman, Kenneth M

    2005-01-01

    .... Thus the goal of this project has been to study the semantic organization of verbal information in PD patients and matched controls and determine the influence of dopamine on these cognitive processes...

  1. Imaging of cystic fibrosis lung disease and clinical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielpuetz, M.O.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Biederer, J. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Gross-Gerau Community Hospital (Germany). Radiologie Darmstadt; Wege, S. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology and Respiratory Medicine; Stahl, M.; Sommerburg, O. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Mall, M.A. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Translational Pulmonology; Puderbach, M. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Hufeland Hospital, Bad Langensalza (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-09-15

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable.

  2. Clinical neurogenetics: huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Yvette M

    2013-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of abnormal movements (typically chorea), cognitive impairment, and psychiatric problems. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the gene encoding the protein huntingtin on chromosome 4 and causes progressive atrophy of the striatum as well as cortical and other extrastriatal structures. Genetic testing has been available since 1993 to confirm diagnosis in affected adults and for presymptomatic testing in at-risk individuals. This review covers HD signs, symptoms, and pathophysiology; current genetic testing issues; and current and future treatment strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The benefits of a Neurogenetics clinic in an adult Academic Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Diana A; McVeigh, Terri; Fallon, Emer M; Pastores, Gregory M; Lynch, Tim

    2018-03-09

    Genetics is the backbone of Neurology, where a number of disorders have a genetic aetiology and are complex, requiring a dedicated Neurogenetics clinic. Genetics in the Republic of Ireland is under-resourced, with the lowest number of consultants per million of population in Europe. In November 2014, we established the monthly adult Neurogenetics clinic in Ireland, staffed by 2 consultants and 2 registrars from each speciality. We see patients with complex rare neurological conditions that may potentially have an underlying genetic basis, in the presence or absence of a family history. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis, reviewing symptoms and work-up data. Twenty-seven patients attended a pilot clinic over 12 months. Conditions encountered included Parkin-related PD, leucodystrophy, ataxia, fronto-temporal lobar degeneration, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and ataxia-telangiectasia. Identification of pathogenic mutations directed screening, treatment and facilitated onward genetic counselling (n = 10, 33%). A number of novel mutations were identified in MAPT gene ("missing tau mutation" McCarthy et al., Brain, 2015), SLCA1 gene and GRN (progranulin). Phenotypic features not previously reported were seen; e.g. writer's cramp in SCA6; paroxysmal myoclonus in the glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficiency. Breast cancer screening for ATM mutations carriers and referral to international experts in two undiagnosed patients were arranged. The establishment of a Neurogenetics clinic has addressed a gap in service and allowed identification of rare and atypical diagnoses.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time, individuals with SCA3 may develop loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy), muscle cramps, muscle twitches (fasciculations), and swallowing difficulties. Individuals with SCA3 may have problems with memory, planning, and problem solving. Signs and symptoms of ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CaV2.1 channels play an essential role in communication between neurons in the brain. The CACNA1A gene mutations that ... calcium channels in the cell membrane impairs cell communication between neurons in the brain. Diminished cell communication leads to ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an earlier onset of signs and symptoms. This phenomenon is called anticipation. Anticipation tends to be more ... As the gene is passed from parent to child, the size of the CAG trinucleotide repeat may ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Almira YR, Zaldivar YG, Almarales DC, Góngora EM, Herrera MP, Batallán KE, Armiñán RR, Manresa MV, Cruz ... Falcón NS, Góngora EM, Almarales DC, Pérez LV, Herrera MP. Age-dependent risks in genetic counseling for ...

  8. A clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsube, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro; Shimada, Yasuo.

    1987-01-01

    Dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) has been described as an atypical type of spino-cerebellar degeneration by J.K. Smith (1958). Choreo-athetoid movement characterizes the DRPLA. We here report a case of DRPLA that was suspected from clinical symptoms and CT brain examinations. Case report: A 36-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of involuntary movements of the extremities in July, 1978. He had epileptic seizures since the age of 25. Since then, his intelligence had gradually been getting worse. At the same time, dysarthria (slow and slurred speech) also appeared. The neurological examination on admission revealed choreo-athetoid movements, with ataxia of the extremities, trancal ataxia, ataxic speech, moderate dementia, and a disturbance of the smooth-pursuit eye movements. He could not maintain his eye position in a steady gaze, but nystagmus was absent. A brain CT scan revealed a marked atrophy of the upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle. The cerebral atrophy was mild, and caudate nuclei were spared. The electroencephalograph showed a slow, diffuse, high-voltage wave, with an associated spike and waves. The cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. An electrophysiological examination revealed no myoclonus in the extremities. These clinical findings suggested that this case is a pseudo-Huntington form of DRPLA. (author)

  9. Clinical utility of FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Orini, Stefania; Gandolfo, Federica; Boccardi, Marina; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Nobili, Flavio; Walker, Zuzana; Pagani, Marco

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of FDG-PET over clinical tests in: (i) diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); (ii) picking early signs of neurodegeneration in patients with a genetic risk of Huntington's disease (HD); and detecting metabolic changes related to cognitive impairment in (iii) ALS and (iv) HD patients. Four comprehensive literature searches were conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted using the Delphi method on these four diagnostic scenarios. The availability of evidence was good for FDG-PET utility to support the diagnosis of ALS, poor for identifying presymptomatic subjects carrying HD mutation who will convert to HD, and lacking for identifying cognitive-related metabolic changes in both ALS and HD. After the Delphi consensual procedure, the panel did not support the clinical use of FDG-PET for any of the four scenarios. Relative to other neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical use of FDG-PET in ALS and HD is still in its infancy. Once validated by disease-control studies, FDG-PET might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. FDG-PET is presently not justified as a routine investigation to predict conversion to HD, nor to detect evidence of brain dysfunction justifying cognitive decline in ALS and HD.

  10. Frequency of the different mutations causing spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA in a large group of Brazilian patients Freqüência das mutações que causam ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 e DRPLA em um grupo numeroso de pacientes Brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iscia Lopes-Cendesi

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 and Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (MJD/SCA3 are three distinctive forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA caused by expansions of an unstable CAG repeat localized in the coding region of the causative genes. Another related disease, dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA is also caused by an unstable triplet repeat and can present as SCA in late onset patients. We investigated the frequency of the SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA mutations in 328 Brazilian patients with SCA, belonging to 90 unrelated families with various patterns of inheritance and originating in different geographic regions of Brazil. We found mutations in 35 families (39%, 32 of them with a clear autosomal dominant inheritance. The frequency of the SCA1 mutation was 3% of all patients; and 6 % in the dominantly inherited SCAs. We identified the SCA2 mutation in 6% of all families and in 9% of the families with autosomal dominant inheritance. The MJD/SCA3 mutation was detected in 30 % of all patients; and in the 44% of the dominantly inherited cases. We found no DRPLA mutation. In addition, we observed variability in the frequency of the different mutations according to geographic origin of the patients, which is probably related to the distinct colonization of different parts of Brazil. These results suggest that SCA may be occasionally caused by the SCA1 and SCA2 mutations in the Brazilian population, and that the MJD/SCA3 mutation is the most common cause of dominantly inherited SCA in Brazil.Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 1 (SCA1, ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 2 (SCA2 e doença de Machado-Joseph ou ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 3 (MJD/SCA3 são três formas de ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA que apresentam herança genética autossômica dominante. Nessas três doenças foi encontrada uma expansão instável de trinucleotídeo CAG localizada na região codificadora dos

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... questions and clinical trials. Optimizing our Clinical Trials Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical ... multi-pronged approach to Optimize our Clinical Trials Enterprise that will make our clinical trials enterprise even ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance ...

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ...

  14. Structural and functional brain connectivity in presymptomatic familial frontotemporal dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopper, E.G.P.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Jiskoot, L.C.; den Heijer, T.; de Graaf, J.R.A.; de Koning, I.; Hammerschlag, A.R.; Seelaar, H.; Seeley, W.W.; Veer, I.M.; van Buchem, M.A.; Rizzu, P.; van Swieten, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether cognitive deficits and structural and functional connectivity changes can be detected before symptom onset in a large cohort of carriers of microtubuleassociated protein tau and progranulin mutations. Methods: In this case-control study, 75 healthy

  15. Structural and functional brain connectivity in presymptomatic familial frontotemporal dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); L.C. Jiskoot (Lize); T. den Heijer (Tom); J.R.A. de Graaf (Joke); I. de Koning (Inge); M.R. Hammerschlag; H. Seelaar (Harro); W. Seeley (William); I.M. Veer (Ilya); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); P. Rizzu (Patrizia); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We aimed to investigate whether cognitive deficits and structural and functional connectivity changes can be detected before symptom onset in a large cohort of carriers of MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau) or GRN (progranulin) mutations. Methods: In this case-control

  16. Structural and functional brain connectivity in presymptomatic familial frontotemporal dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); L.C. Jiskoot (Lize); T. den Heijer (Tom); J.R.A. de Graaf (J. Roos); I. de Koning (Inge); M.R. Hammerschlag; H. Seelaar (Harro); W. Seeley (William); I.M. Veer (Ilya); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); P. Rizzu (Patrizia); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We aimed to investigate whether cognitive deficits and structural and functional connectivity changes can be detected before symptom onset in a large cohort of carriers of microtubuleassociated protein tau and progranulin mutations. Methods: In this case-control study, 75

  17. Connectivity features for identifying cognitive impairment in presymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jen Lin

    Full Text Available Severe asymptomatic stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA leads to increased incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI likely through silent embolic infarcts and/or chronic hypoperfusion, but the brain dysfunction is poorly understood and difficult to diagnose. Thirty cognitively intact subjects with asymptomatic, severe (≥ 70%, unilateral stenosis of the ICA were compared with 30 healthy controls, matched for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors and education level, on a battery of neuropsychiatric tests, voxel-based morphometry of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and brain-wise, seed-based analysis of resting-state functional MRI. Multivariate regression models and multivariate pattern classification (support vector machines were computed to assess the relationship between connectivity measures and neurocognitive performance. The patients had worse dizziness scores and poorer verbal memory, executive function and complex visuo-spatial performance than controls. Twelve out of the 30 patients (40% were considered to have MCI. Nonetheless, the leukoaraiosis Sheltens scores, hippocampal and brain volumes were not different between groups. Their whole-brain mean fractional anisotropy (FA was significantly reduced and regional functional connectivity (Fc was significantly impaired in the dorsal attention network (DAN, frontoparietal network, sensorimotor network and default mode network. In particular, the Fc strength at the insula of the DAN and the mean FA were linearly related with attention performance and dizziness severity, respectively. The multivariate pattern classification gave over 90% predictive accuracy of individuals with MCI or severe dizziness. Cognitive decline in stroke-free individuals with severe carotid stenosis may arise from nonselective widespread disconnections of long-range, predominantly interhemispheric non-hippocampal pathways. Connectivity measures may serve as both predictors for cases at risk and therapeutic targets for mitigating vascular cognitive impairment.

  18. Cognitive Changes in Presymptomatic Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Society, 8(2), 203) Hillier, A, Beversdorf, D.Q., Raymer , A., Williamson, D.J.G., & Heilman, K.M. Abnormal emotional word ratings in parkinson’s...disease. (submitted). Raymer A, Beversdorf D, Mitchell A, Williamson D, Heilman KM. Emotion word ratings in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease...Rhodes, Robert ; Mielke, Jeannine B. ; Riestra, Alonso ; Womack, Kyle ; Okun, Michael S. ; Reeves, Dennis L. ; Crosson, Bruce ; 1, 2 1, 2 1 1 1 3 1

  19. Clinical and muscle biopsy findings in Norwegian paediatric patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Magnhild; Scheie, David; Breivik, Noralv; Mork, Marit; Lindal, Sigurd

    2014-05-01

    To describe patients diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) in our paediatric departments between 2004 and 2012. The hospital charts of 17 patients presenting for evaluation at a mean age of 7.8 years (range 1-13 years) were retrospectively reviewed. With one exception, all patients were homozygous for the common mutation c.826C>A in the FKRP gene. Three patients experienced transient pronounced weakness as toddlers. Fatigue and muscle pain were most prominent, weakness less so, in children presenting at an older age. The degree of severity varied substantially. In certain cases, increased creatine kinase was an incidental finding. All walked independently by 18 months. When last evaluated at a mean age of 14.3 years (range 3.5-18 years), five patients were part-time wheelchair users. One patient was then treated for a cardiomyopathy. Creatine kinase was consistently increased, except presymptomatic in one patient. Muscle biopsies showed focal acute and chronic myopathic changes and pathological expression of α-dystroglycan. No consistent relationship between clinical function and the degree of morphological pathology was found. LGMD2I is a relevant differential diagnosis when creatine kinase is increased in children presenting with fatigue, muscle pain and sometimes weakness. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often had to ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a ... will be done during the clinical trial and why. Each medical center that does the study uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often ... participants. Children and Clinical Studies Learn about the importance of children in clinical studies and get answers ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ...

  4. Clinical phenotype and genetic mutation of one case with head tremor and cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-ming XIE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To make the diagnosis for a patient presented with head tremor and cerebellar atrophy by integrating clinical features and accessory examination with genetic testing and to explore the interpretation of genetic testing results.  Methods A 30-year-old male patient's medical information, clinical pheontype, family history and accessory examinations were collected. The next?generation sequencing (NGS of exons in 3994 causative genes of Mendelian inheritance diseases and the family tree verification were carried out. China Human Phenotype Ontology (CHPO, Phenomizer, Ensembl and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database were used to interpret the genetic test results.  Results The patient carried heterozygous mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 19 (SCA19 related KCND3 gene c.1057A > G (p. Ser353Gly, but his parents did not carry this mutation. The patient also carried heterozygous mutation of parkinsonism type 20 (PARK20 related SYNJ1 gene c.4436C > T (p.Thr1479Ile which was also seen in his mother. Phenotypic similarity analysis showed the patient's phenotype was correspond with the phenotype of SCA19, and the variation locus of KCND3 gene c.1057A > G was highly conservative with homologous gene in different species.  Conclusions By means of the integration of clinical phenotype with the result of genetic test, KCND3 gene c.1057A > G (p.Ser353Gly carried in the patient is the pathogenic mutation. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.07.007

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

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    Full Text Available ... or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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    Full Text Available ... you to explore NIH Clinical Center for patient recruitment and clinical trial information. For more information, please email the NIH Clinical Center Office of Patient Recruitment at cc-prpl@cc.nih.gov or call ...

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    Full Text Available ... take part in a clinical trial. When researchers think that a trial's potential risks are greater than ... care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find ...

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    Full Text Available ... the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ... based on what is known to work in adults. To improve clinical care of children, more studies ...

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    Full Text Available ... comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This method helps ensure that any differences observed during a ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are ... earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ...

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    Full Text Available ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ... All types of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical ...

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    Full Text Available ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies ... parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, ...

  16. Clinical penetrance in hereditary hemochromatosis: estimates of the cumulative incidence of severe liver disease among HFE C282Y homozygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Scott D; Gurrin, Lyle C; Bertalli, Nadine A; Allen, Katrina J

    2018-04-01

    Iron overload (hemochromatosis) can cause serious, symptomatic disease that is preventable if detected early and managed appropriately. The leading cause of hemochromatosis in populations of predominantly European ancestry is homozygosity of the C282Y variant in the HFE gene. Screening of adults for iron overload or associated genotypes is controversial, largely because of a belief that severe phenotypes are uncommon, although cascade testing of first-degree relatives of patients is widely endorsed. We contend that severe liver disease (cirrhosis or hepatocellular cancer) is not at all uncommon among older males with hereditary hemochromatosis. Our review of the published data from a variety of empirical sources indicates that roughly 1 in 10 male HFE C282Y homozygotes is likely to develop severe liver disease during his lifetime unless iron overload is detected early and treated. New evidence from a randomized controlled trial of treatment allows for evidence-based management of presymptomatic patients. Although population screening for HFE C282Y homozygosity faces multiple barriers, a potentially effective strategy for increasing the early detection and prevention of clinical iron overload and severe disease is to include HFE C282Y homozygosity in lists of medically actionable gene variants when reporting the results of genome or exome sequencing.

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... resources to the strategies and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking part in a clinical trial is different ...

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    Full Text Available ... need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in ... Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place in medical centers and ... trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new treatments before ...

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics / About Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, ... tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. Clinical research is done only if doctors don't know ...

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    Full Text Available ... about your health or fill out forms about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key ... Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

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    Full Text Available ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children have the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

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    Full Text Available ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the ... more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about ... clinical trials. NIH Clinical Research Studies ...

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    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results ...

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    Full Text Available ... protocol affect the trial's results. Comparison Groups In most clinical trials, researchers use comparison groups. This means ... study before you agree to take part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. ...

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    Full Text Available ... Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ...

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    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, ... and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually ...

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    Full Text Available ... decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ... otherwise. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ...

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and ...

  10. Clinical Pharmacopsychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fava, Giovanni A.; Tomba, Elena; Bech, Per

    2017-01-01

    of its most representative expressions and reference to current challenges of clinical research, with particular reference to clinimetrics. The domains of clinical pharmacopsychology encompass the clinical benefits of psychotropic drugs, the characteristics that predict responsiveness to treatment...... effects, (b) treatment-induced unwanted side effects, and (c) the patient's own personal experience of a change in terms of well-being and/or quality of life. Clinical pharmacopsychology offers a unifying framework for the understanding of clinical phenomena in medical and psychiatric settings. Research......The aim of this critical review was to outline emerging trends and perspectives of clinical pharmacopsychology, an area of clinical psychology that is concerned with the psychological effects of medications. The historical development of clinical pharmacopsychology is outlined, with discussion...

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    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. These studies also may show which ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

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    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human ... of people. Clinical trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ...

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    Full Text Available ... needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ... phase I clinical trials test new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. ...

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    Full Text Available ... to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal ... for the clinical trial. The protocol outlines what will be done during the clinical trial and why. ...

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    Full Text Available ... more information about eligibility criteria, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Work?" Some trials enroll people who ... for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" For more information about ...

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    Full Text Available ... risks that outweigh any possible benefits. Clinical Trial Phases Clinical trials of new medicines or medical devices are done in phases. These phases have different purposes and help researchers ...

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    Full Text Available ... go to the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about ... Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees ...

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    Full Text Available ... at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ... in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about ...

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    Full Text Available ... and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial ... volunteer because they want to help others. Possible Risks Clinical trials do have risks and some downsides, ...

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    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to ... as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

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    Full Text Available ... give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Find a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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  10. Clinical, pathological and functional characterization of riboflavin-responsive neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Andreea; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Hargreaves, Iain; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Bello, Oscar D; Pope, Simon; Pandraud, Amelie; Horga, Alejandro; Scalco, Renata S; Li, Abi; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Lourenço, Charles M; Heales, Simon; Horvath, Rita; Chinnery, Patrick F; Toro, Camilo; Singleton, Andrew B; Jacques, Thomas S; Abramov, Andrey Y; Muntoni, Francesco; Hanna, Michael G; Reilly, Mary M; Revesz, Tamas; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Jepson, James E C; Houlden, Henry

    2017-11-01

    Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome represents a phenotypic spectrum of motor, sensory, and cranial nerve neuropathy, often with ataxia, optic atrophy and respiratory problems leading to ventilator-dependence. Loss-of-function mutations in two riboflavin transporter genes, SLC52A2 and SLC52A3, have recently been linked to Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome. However, the genetic frequency, neuropathology and downstream consequences of riboflavin transporter mutations are unclear. By screening a large cohort of 132 patients with early-onset severe sensory, motor and cranial nerve neuropathy we confirmed the strong genetic link between riboflavin transporter mutations and Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, identifying 22 pathogenic mutations in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3, 14 of which were novel. Brain and spinal cord neuropathological examination of two cases with SLC52A3 mutations showed classical symmetrical brainstem lesions resembling pathology seen in mitochondrial disease, including severe neuronal loss in the lower cranial nerve nuclei, anterior horns and corresponding nerves, atrophy of the spinothalamic and spinocerebellar tracts and posterior column-medial lemniscus pathways. Mitochondrial dysfunction has previously been implicated in an array of neurodegenerative disorders. Since riboflavin metabolites are critical components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, we hypothesized that reduced riboflavin transport would result in impaired mitochondrial activity, and confirmed this using in vitro and in vivo models. Electron transport chain complex I and complex II activity were decreased in SLC52A2 patient fibroblasts, while global knockdown of the single Drosophila melanogaster riboflavin transporter homologue revealed reduced levels of riboflavin, downstream metabolites, and electron transport chain complex I activity. This in turn led to abnormal mitochondrial membrane potential, respiratory chain activity and morphology. Riboflavin transporter knockdown in

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. This involves assigning patients to different comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This ...

  12. Clinical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Kristian; Skakkebæk, Anne; Høst, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Recently, new clinically important information regarding Klinefelter syndrome (KS) has been published. We review aspects of epidemiology, endocrinology, metabolism, body composition, and neuropsychology with reference to recent genetic discoveries.......Recently, new clinically important information regarding Klinefelter syndrome (KS) has been published. We review aspects of epidemiology, endocrinology, metabolism, body composition, and neuropsychology with reference to recent genetic discoveries....

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the clinical trial you take part in, the information gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get ... legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people ... participants, it may not work for you. A new treatment may have side ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... phase II clinical trials. The risk of side effects might be even greater for ... treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't always ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn more about ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... more screening tests to see which test produces the best results. Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the ... and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ... cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT ... Clinical Trials Work If you take ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  1. Clinical Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla

    universities and practicing dentists restore millions of teeth throughout the World with composite resin materials. Do we know enough about the clinical performance of these restorations over time? Numerous in vitro studies are being published on resin materials and adhesion, some of them attempting to imitate...... in vivo conditions. But real life is different and in vitro studies cannot include all variables. Only clinical studies can provide valid information on the clinical performance of restorations over time. What do we know about longevity of posterior resin restorations? What are the reasons for replacement...... and results from own up to 30-year prospective clinical university studies and practice based studies from Public Dental Health Service on the clinical performance of posterior composite resin restorations....

  2. Clinical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about the logic of problem solving and the production of scientific knowledge through the utilisation of clinical research perspective. Ramp-up effectiveness, productivity, efficiency and organizational excellence are topics that continue to engage research and will continue doing so...... for years to come. This paper seeks to provide insights into ramp-up management studies through providing an agenda for conducting collaborative clinical research and extend this area by proposing how clinical research could be designed and executed in the Ramp- up management setting....

  3. Studies on Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Line Vildbrad

    . Even though a range of mechanisms contributing to polyQ diseases have been uncovered, there is still no treatment available. One of the more common polyQ diseases is SCA3, which is caused by a polyQ expansion in the ataxin-3 protein that normally functions as a deubiquitinating enzyme involved...... in protein quality control. In SCA3 patients polyQ expanded ataxin-3 forms intranuclear inclusions in various brain areas, but why the polyQ expansion of ataxin-3 leads to neuronal dysfunction is still not well understood. This thesis describes molecular biological investigations of ataxin-3 biology, aimed...... at furthering our understanding of SCA3 disease mechanisms. In manuscript I, we investigated if post-translational modifications of ataxin-3 were changed by the polyQ expansion. The ubiquitin chain topology and ubiquitination pattern of ataxin-3 were unaltered by the polyQ expansion. In contrast...

  4. Genotyping and prenatal diagnosis of a large spinocerebellar ataxia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... range of eye movements with horizontal nystagmus, dysdi- adochokinesia, and ... individuals; open symbols indicate normal individuals; grey sym- bols indicate .... prenatal diagnosis of a fetus at risk of MJD. In conclusion, we ...

  5. Mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome mimicking dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palin, Eino J H; Hakonen, Anna H; Korpela, Mari; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2012-04-15

    We studied the genetic background of a family with SCA, showing dominant inheritance and anticipation. Muscle histology, POLG1 gene sequence, neuropathology and mitochondrial DNA analyses in a mother and a son showed typical findings for a mitochondrial disorder, and both were shown to be homozygous for a recessive POLG1 mutation, underlying mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome, MIRAS. The healthy father was a heterozygous carrier for the same mutation. Recessively inherited MIRAS mutations should be tested in dominantly inherited SCAs cases of unknown cause, as the high carrier frequency of MIRAS may result in two independent introductions of the mutant allele in the family and thereby mimic dominant inheritance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... strict scientific standards. These standards protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one ... are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding The National ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments ... sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the benefits of ...

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    Full Text Available ... patients to find out whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, ... device improves patient outcomes; offers no benefit; or causes unexpected harm All of these results are important ...

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    Full Text Available ... Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including ... our campus or trials NIH has sponsored at universities, medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a ...

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    Full Text Available ... and compare new treatments with other available treatments. Steps To Avoid Bias The researchers doing clinical trials take steps to avoid bias. "Bias" means that human choices ...

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    Full Text Available ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because they want to help others. ...

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    Full Text Available ... materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of Health ( ... III clinical trial is required to have a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). This board consists ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Personal Stories Peers Celebrating Art Peers Celebrating Music Be Vocal Support Locator DBSA In-Person Support ... by participating in a clinical trial is to science first and to the patient second. More About ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be ... the new approach. You also will have the support of a team of health care providers, who ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists ... part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

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    Full Text Available ... as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. The DSMB also reviews research results ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... identified earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ... supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medical centers and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling the clinical trial participants which treatment they're getting. Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and ... how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees all research ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trial. IRB members are doctors, statisticians, and community members. The IRB's purpose is to ensure that ... lung, and blood disorders. By engaging the research community and a broad group of stakeholders and advisory ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, ... gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are ...

  5. Clinical proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Frederiksen, Hanne; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2018-01-01

    Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS)-platforms...... standards and calibrants. The present challenge is to examine if targeted proteomics of IGF-I can truly measure up to the routine performance that must be expected from a clinical testing platform.......Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS......)-platforms already implemented in many clinical laboratories for routine quantitation of small molecules (i.e. uHPLC coupled to triple-quadrupole MS). Progress in targeted proteomics of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) have provided valuable insights about tryptic peptides, transitions, internal...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about specific trials you're ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... studies. View funding information for clinical trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the past, clinical trial participants often were White men. Researchers assumed that trial results were valid for ... different ethnic groups sometimes respond differently than White men to the same medical approach. As a result, ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The ... a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether the patient has had ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood ... of estrogen and progestin, the risk of breast cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... issues arise. Participation and Eligibility Each clinical trial defines who is eligible to take part in the ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ...

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical care of children, more studies are needed focusing on children's health with the goal to develop ... study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Clinical trials produce the best data available for ... or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; ... age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... or strategies work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Some clinical trials show a positive result. For example, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) sponsored a trial of two different ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about the new approach's risks and benefits. ... explore whether surgery or other medical treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... any clinical trial before you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about specific trials you're interested in. For a list of questions to ask your doctor and the ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical trials at all phases, including ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... healthy people to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants ... DSMBs for large trials comparing alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH requires DSMBs ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... study explored whether the benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that are ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding The National Heart, Lung, and ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ... in Bethesda, Maryland. The physicians, nurses, scientists and staff of the NHLBI encourage you to explore NIH ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and useful results, which in turn will improve public health. We offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well ... confirm how well treatments work, further examine side effects, and compare new treatments with other available treatments. ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and devices specific to children. Resources for a Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical trials at all phases, including ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... records can quickly show this information if safety issues arise. Participation and Eligibility Each clinical trial defines ... and materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ... often differ for children. For example, children may need lower doses of certain medicines or smaller medical ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ... taking part in a clinical trial. Your treatment team also may ask you to do other tasks. ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored ... risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether surgery ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight ... of research studies at the NIH Clinical Center, America's research hospital, located on the NIH campus in ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well treatments work and further review these treatments for safety. Phase ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense ... FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes ... for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... combination of estrogen and progestin, the risk of breast cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food ... to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants often were ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. ( ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ... minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  10. Clinical epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S W; Bonnett, B

    1987-06-01

    Rational clinical practice requires deductive particularization of diagnostic findings, prognoses, and therapeutic responses from groups of animals (herds) to the individual animal (herd) under consideration This process utilizes concepts, skills, and methods of epidemiology, as they relate to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in populations, and casts them in a clinical perspective.We briefly outline diagnostic strategies and introduce a measure of agreement, called kappa, between clinical diagnoses. This statistic is useful not only as a measure of diagnostic accuracy, but also as a means of quantifying and understanding disagreement between diagnosticians. It is disconcerting to many, clinicians included, that given a general deficit of data on sensitivity and specificity, the level of agreement between many clinical diagnoses is only moderate at best with kappa values of 0.3 to 0.6.Sensitivity, specificity, pretest odds, and posttest probability of disease are defined and related to the interpretation of clinical findings and ancillary diagnostic test results. An understanding of these features and how they relate to ruling-in or ruling-out a diagnosis, or minimizzing diagnostic errors will greatly enhance the diagnostic accuracy of the practitioner, and reduce the frequency of clinical disagreement. The approach of running multiple tests on every patient is not only wasteful and expensive, it is unlikely to improve the ability of the clinician to establish the correct diagnosis.We conclude with a discussion of how to decide on the best therapy, a discussion which centers on, and outlines the key features of, the well designed clinical trial. Like a diagnosis, the results from a clinical trial may not always be definitive, nonetheless it is the best available method of gleaning information about treatment efficacy.

  11. Correlation of clinical course with MRI findings in olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy and late-cortical cerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Morishita, Shinji; Konagaya, Yoko; Takayanagi, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Satoru

    1989-01-01

    We quantitatively analyzed 1.5 T MRI in 36 cases of sporadic spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and 30 control cases without intracranial lesions, using graphic analyzer. SCD consisted of 21 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and 15 late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA). There was negative correlation between vermian size and the duration of illness both in OPCA (r=0.8960, p<0.001) and LCCA (r=0.7756, p<0.01), but the progression rate in OPCA was three times greater than that in LCCA. LCCA was suggested the preclinical vermian atrophy by the statistical regression study. In OPCA, the duration of illness also revealed significant correlations with atrophy of ventral pons (r=0.8308, p<0.001) and also cerebellar hemisphere (medial hemiphere; r=0.7278, p<0.001. lateral hemisphere; r=0.6039, p<0.01). OPCA showed diffuse atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere, whereas LCCA showed medial dominant atrophy. OPCA demonstrated significant correlation between the fourth ventricle dilatation and the duration of illness (r=0.6005, p<0.01). A discriminant study significantly separated OPCA, LCCA and control each other by sizes of ventral pons and cerebellar vermis (p<0.001). In T2 weighted MRI, 10 cases out of 14 LCCA did not show hypointensity in dentate nucleus in spite of normal appearance in the other portions usually decreased intensity. The dentate nucleus of OPCA showed a significant atrophy. The insidence of putaminal hypointensity in OPCA was significantly greater than that of control group (ki-quare=6.476, p<0.05). There were no atrophies in red nucleus and tegmentum of midbrain, which indicated minimum involvement in cerebellar efferent system both in OPCA and LCCA. We concluded that the quantitative and qualitative analysis of high field MRI is useful in clinical discrimination between OPCA and LCCA. (author)

  12. Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome: The Expanding Clinical Picture, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, and Update on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Hall

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a progressive degenerative movement disorder characterized by kinetic tremor, cerebellar gait ataxia, parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. This disorder occurs in both males and females, frequently in families with children who have fragile X syndrome. The clinical features of this disorder, both classic and newly described, are summarized in this paper. In screening studies, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene premutation (55–200 CGG expansions are most frequently seen in men with ataxia who have tested negative for spinocerebellar ataxias. Since the original description, the classic FXTAS phenotype has now been reported in females and in carriers of smaller (45–54 CGG and larger (>200 CGG expansions in FMR1. Premutation carriers may present with a Parkinson disease phenotype or hypotension, rather than with tremor and/or ataxia. Parkinsonism and gait ataxia may also be seen in individuals with gray zone (41–54 CGG expansions. Studies regarding medication to treat the symptoms in FXTAS are few in number and suggest that medications targeted to specific symptoms, such as kinetic tremor or gait ataxia, may be most beneficial. Great progress has been made in regards to FXTAS research, likely given the readily available gene test and the screening of multiple family members, including parents and grandparents, of fragile X syndrome children. Expansion of genotypes and phenotypes in the disorder may suggest that a broader disease definition might be necessary in the future.

  13. Clinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, J.

    1973-01-01

    The main point of this paper on clinical dosimetry which is to be understood here as application of physical dosimetry on accelerators in medical practice, is based on dosimetric methodics. Following an explanation of the dose parameters and description of the dose distribution important for clinical practice as well as geometric irradiation parameters, the significance of a series of physical parameters such as accelerator energy, surface energy of average stopping power etc. is dealt with in detail. Following a section on field homogenization with bremsstrahlung and electron radiation, details on dosimetry in clinical practice are given. Finally, a few problems of dosemeter or monitor calibration on accelerators are described. The explanations are supplemented by a series of diagrams and tables. (ORU/LH) [de

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... seems promising, the next step may involve animal testing. This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment team. ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; look at the best age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests to see which test ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of ...

  18. clinical: dementia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have impairment on multiple cognitive domains, including attention, concentration, memory, executive function, motor functioning and speed of information processing, and sensory perceptual/motor skills deficits. The milder forms of HAND are easily missed. Diagnosis can be made on clinical grounds in the most severe ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trial found that one of the combinations worked much better than the other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... patient has had certain treatments or has other health problems. Eligibility criteria ensure that new approaches are tested ... public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other expenses (for example, travel and child care)? Who will be in charge of my care? What will happen after the trial? Taking part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems ... Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and ...

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part ... about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT to prevent heart disease. When HT is used for menopausal symptoms, it should be taken only at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ...

  9. Clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servente, L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about clinical cases and the contribution of the PET - CT Fag application in the diagnosis and treatment of different types of cancer. The cases presented were: neck diseases, epidermoid carcinoma, liver damage and metastasize, lymphoma, thrombosis, colonic cancer and lung disease

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ...

  11. Clinical biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  12. Clinical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-30

    conducted at WBAV’S is categorized as t basic experimental medicine or trials and testing of clinical medicine pro- cedures using the indigenous population...Unit No. 77/20 (FY77, 0) An Analysis of Ameloblastic Fibro-odontoma ....................... 27 Department of Medicine Nork Unit No, 69/338 (FY69, T...Unit No. 71/38 (FY71, T) Injected Marihuana : Effects of Cannabinol ....................... 71 Department of Pediatrics Wfork Unit No. 74/23 (FY74, T

  13. Clinical arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram

  14. Clinical Characteristics and Etiology of Bilateral Vestibular Loss in a Cohort from Central Illinois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C. Kattah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPrevious series of bilateral vestibular loss (BVL identified numerous etiologies, but surprisingly, a cause in a significant number of cases remains unknown. In an effort to understand possible etiology and management strategies, a global effort is currently in progress. Here, I contribute my 10-year experience with both acute and chronic BVL during the 2007–2017 decade.MethodsThis is a retrospective review of the charts and EMR of patients diagnosed with BVL in the last 10 years. Following Institutional IRB approval, we identified 57 patients with a diagnosis of BVL and utilized the current diagnostic criteria listed by the Barany society (1. The inclusion criteria included patients with BVL of any cause, within an age span older than 18 and a neuro-otologic examination supporting the clinical impression of BVL.ResultsDuring the current decade 2007–2017, I identified two broad categories of BVL (acute and chronic in 57 patients; only 41 of them had records available. The etiology includes: idiopathic: n = 9, Wernicke’s encephalopathy n = 11, superficial siderosis n = 3, paraneoplastic syndrome: n = 3, bilateral vestibular neuritis (recurrent AVS lasting days without cochlear symptoms n = 3, simultaneous ototoxicity of aminoglycoside and chemotherapy toxicity n = 2, MELAS n = 2, Meniere’s disease treated with intra-tympanic streptomycin in one ear n = 1, acute phenytoin intoxication: n = 1, combined chronic unilateral tumor-related vestibulopathy and new contralateral vestibular neuritis (this patient presented with Betcherew’s phenomenon n = 1, bilateral AICA stroke n = 1, mixed spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, n = 2 and CANVAS n = 2.ConclusionThis cohort included a 28% overall incidence of acute and subacute BVL; among them, 65% improved with intervention. In the thiamine deficiency group, specifically, the vestibular function improved in 80% of the patients. Even though

  15. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    ... in the pharmaceutical industry, Clinical trial methodology emphasizes the importance of statistical thinking in clinical research and presents the methodology as a key component of clinical research...

  16. Textbook of clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Simon; Machin, David; Green, Sylvan B

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 The Development of Clinical Trials Simon...

  17. Hypothyroidism in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Qari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points.

  18. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  19. Understanding Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watch these videos to learn about some basic aspects of cancer clinical trials such as the different phases of clinical trials, methods used to protect patient safety, and how the costs of clinical trials are covered.

  20. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Defects ART and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Additional Information About ART in the United States. Fertility Clinic Tables Introduction to Fertility Clinic Tables [PDF - ...

  1. Future requirements. Clinical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.

    2002-01-01

    Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics......Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics...

  2. Biomarker development for presymptomatic molecular diagnosis of preeclampsia: feasible, useful or even unnecessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe; Lapaire, Olav; Than, Nandor Gabor

    2015-05-01

    The past decade saw the advent of a number of promising biomarkers to detect pregnancies at risk for preeclampsia (PE), the foremost being those associated with an imbalance of angiogenic factors. In late pregnancy, these are useful for the detection of imminent cases of PE, while earlier they were more predictive for early- than late-onset PE. This suggests that there may be fundamental differences between the underlying pathology of these two PE forms. Therefore, it is possible that such a biological premise may limit the development of biomarkers that will permit the efficacious detection of both early- and late-onset PE via an analysis of first-trimester maternal blood samples. Consequently, a significant increase in our understanding of the underlying pathology of PE, using a variety of approaches ranging from systems biology to animal models, will be necessary in order to overcome this obstacle.

  3. Medulla oblongata transcriptome changes during presymptomatic natural scrapie and their associaition with prion-related lesions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filali, H.; Martin-Burriel, I.; Harders, F.; Varona, L.; Serrano, C.; Acín, C.; Badiola, J.J.; Bossers, A.; Bolea, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases is still poorly understood. Determining the variations in the transcriptome in the early phases of the disease might clarify some of the molecular mechanisms of the prion-induced pathology and allow for the development of new

  4. Medulla oblongata transcriptome changes during presymptomatic natural scrapie and their association with prion-related lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filali, Hicham; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Serrano, Carmen; Acín, Cristina; Badiola, Juan J; Bossers, Alex; Bolea, Rosa

    2012-08-16

    The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases is still poorly understood. Determining the variations in the transcriptome in the early phases of the disease might clarify some of the molecular mechanisms of the prion-induced pathology and allow for the development of new biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy. This study is the first to focus on the identification of genes regulated during the preclinical phases of natural scrapie in the ovine medulla oblongata (MO) and the association of these genes with prion deposition, astrocytosis and spongiosis. A custom microarray platform revealed that 86 significant probes had expression changes greater than 2-fold. From these probes, we identified 32 genes with known function; the highest number of regulated genes was included in the phosphoprotein-encoding group. Genes encoding extracellular marker proteins and those involved in the immune response and apoptosis were also differentially expressed. In addition, we investigated the relationship between the gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-associated brain lesions. Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to validate the expression of some of the regulated genes, thus showing the reliability of the microarray hybridization technology. Genes involved in protein and metal binding and oxidoreductase activity were associated with prion deposition. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was associated with changes in the expression of genes encoding proteins with oxidoreductase and phosphatase activity, and the expression of spongiosis was related to genes encoding extracellular matrix components or transmembrane transporters. This is the first genome-wide expression study performed in naturally infected sheep with preclinical scrapie. As in previous studies, our findings confirm the close relationship between scrapie and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. CSF neurofilament light concentration is increased in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Roos, Peter; Portelius, Erik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a mutation in the CHMP2B gene on chromosome 3 (FTD-3), described in a Danish family. Here we examine whether CSF biomarkers change in the preclinical phase of the disease. METHODS: In this cross-sectional explorative study, we...... analyzed CSF samples from 16 mutation carriers and 14 noncarriers from the Danish FTD-3 family. CSF biomarkers included total tau (t-tau) and neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a marker for neurodegeneration, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) as a marker for tau pathology, β-amyloid (Aβ) 38, 40, and 42 (Aβ38, Aβ......40, and Aβ42) to monitor Aβ metabolism, and YKL-40 as a marker of neuroinflammation. Aβ isoform concentrations were measured using a multiplexed immunoassay; t-tau, p-tau, NfL, and YKL-40 concentrations were measured using sandwich ELISAs. RESULTS: CSF NfL concentration was significantly increased...

  6. Successful Object Encoding Induces Increased Directed Connectivity in Presymptomatic Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, John Fredy; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Duque, Jon Edinson; Tobón, Carlos Andrés; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Lopera, Francisco; Hernández, Alher Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies report increases in neural activity in brain regions critical to episodic memory at preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although electroencephalography (EEG) is widely used in AD studies, given its non-invasiveness and low cost, there is a need to translate the findings in other neuroimaging methods to EEG. Objective: To examine how the previous findings using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at preclinical stage in presenilin-1 E280A mutation carriers could be assessed and extended, using EEG and a connectivity approach. Methods: EEG signals were acquired during resting and encoding in 30 normal cognitive young subjects, from an autosomal dominant early-onset AD kindred from Antioquia, Colombia. Regions of the brain previously reported as hyperactive were used for connectivity analysis. Results: Mutation carriers exhibited increasing connectivity at analyzed regions. Among them, the right precuneus exhibited the highest changes in connectivity. Conclusion: Increased connectivity in hyperactive cerebral regions is seen in individuals, genetically-determined to develop AD, at preclinical stage. The use of a connectivity approach and a widely available neuroimaging technique opens the possibility to increase the use of EEG in early detection of preclinical AD. PMID:27792014

  7. Treatment of clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Jerry R

    2012-07-01

    In summary, culture-based therapy and severity levels are key to management of clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy should be strongly considered for gram-positive clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy is not necessary for mild-to-moderate gram-negative clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy is warranted for practically all severe clinical mastitis as well as fluids and anti-inflammatory drugs. Clinical mastitis cases due to yeast and fungal pathogens or no growth isolates do not warrant antibiotic therapy.

  8. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  9. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  10. Radioimmunoassay in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ametov, A S

    1982-01-01

    A wide application of radioimmunoassay in clinical practice is shown. The main theoretical aspects of radioimmunoassay and the fields of application in clinical practice - endocrinology, oncology, allergology, cardiology, pharmacology, pediatrics, hematology, obstetrics and gynecology, are presented.

  11. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    "Now viewed as its own scientific discipline, clinical trial methodology encompasses the methods required for the protection of participants in a clinical trial and the methods necessary to provide...

  12. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  13. HISTIOCYTOSIS X: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical cases of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis X have been analyzed demonstrating lung and other inner organ pathology, common clinical and X-ray features but different life prognosis.

  14. Learning clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Ralph; Welch, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Errors in clinical reasoning continue to account for significant morbidity and mortality, despite evidence-based guidelines and improved technology. Experts in clinical reasoning often use unconscious cognitive processes that they are not aware of unless they explain how they are thinking. Understanding the intuitive and analytical thinking processes provides a guide for instruction. How knowledge is stored is critical to expertise in clinical reasoning. Curricula should be designed so that trainees store knowledge in a way that is clinically relevant. Competence in clinical reasoning is acquired by supervised practice with effective feedback. Clinicians must recognise the common errors in clinical reasoning and how to avoid them. Trainees can learn clinical reasoning effectively in everyday practice if teachers provide guidance on the cognitive processes involved in making diagnostic decisions. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Decision analysis. Clinical art or Clinical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    having helped some clients. Over the past half century, psychotherapy has faced a series of crises concerned with its transformation from an art to a...clinical science . These include validation of the effectiveness of various forms of therapy, validating elements of treatment programs and

  16. Clinical reasoning: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a report of a concept analysis of clinical reasoning in nursing. Clinical reasoning is an ambiguous term that is often used synonymously with decision-making and clinical judgment. Clinical reasoning has not been clearly defined in the literature. Healthcare settings are increasingly filled with uncertainty, risk and complexity due to increased patient acuity, multiple comorbidities, and enhanced use of technology, all of which require clinical reasoning. Data sources. Literature for this concept analysis was retrieved from several databases, including CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and OvidMEDLINE, for the years 1980 to 2008. Rodgers's evolutionary method of concept analysis was used because of its applicability to concepts that are still evolving. Multiple terms have been used synonymously to describe the thinking skills that nurses use. Research in the past 20 years has elucidated differences among these terms and identified the cognitive processes that precede judgment and decision-making. Our concept analysis defines one of these terms, 'clinical reasoning,' as a complex process that uses cognition, metacognition, and discipline-specific knowledge to gather and analyse patient information, evaluate its significance, and weigh alternative actions. This concept analysis provides a middle-range descriptive theory of clinical reasoning in nursing that helps clarify meaning and gives direction for future research. Appropriate instruments to operationalize the concept need to be developed. Research is needed to identify additional variables that have an impact on clinical reasoning and what are the consequences of clinical reasoning in specific situations.

  17. Introduction to clinical nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sardesai, Vishwanath M

    2012-01-01

    .... Introduction to Clinical Nutrition, Third edition discusses the physiologic and metabolic interrelationships of all nutrients and their roles in health maintenance and the prevention of various...

  18. Clinical research informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Richesson, Rachel L

    2012-01-01

    This book provides foundational coverage of key areas, concepts, constructs, and approaches of medical informatics as it applies to clinical research activities, in both current settings and in light of emerging policies. The field of clinical research is fully characterized (in terms of study design and overarching business processes), and there is emphasis on information management aspects and informatics implications (including needed activities) within various clinical research environments. The purpose of the book is to provide an overview of clinical research (types), activities, and are

  19. Clinical review: Riedel's thyroiditis: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, James V

    2011-10-01

    Riedel's thyroiditis is a rare inflammatory process involving the thyroid and surrounding cervical tissues and is associated with various forms of systemic fibrosis. Riedel's presentation is complex, including a thyroid mass associated with local symptoms, characteristic biochemical abnormalities such as hypocalcemia and hypothyroidism, as well as the involvement of a wide range of other organ systems. Diagnosis of Riedel's thyroiditis requires histopathological confirmation, but due to high complication rates, the role of surgical intervention is limited to airway decompression and diagnostic tissue retrieval. Unique among processes of the thyroid, Riedel's is commonly treated with long-term antiinflammatory medications to arrest progression and maintain a symptom-free course. Due to its rarity, Riedel's may not be immediately diagnosed, so clinicians benefit from recognizing the constellation of findings that should make prompt diagnosis possible. A review of print and electronic reviews was conducted. Source references were identified, and available literature was reviewed. A search of the PubMed database using the search term "Riedel's thyroiditis" was cross-referenced with associated clinical findings, systemic fibrosis diagnoses, and therapeutic search terms. Because most of the literature consisted of case reports and very small series, inclusion of identified articles was based on clinical descriptions of the subjects included and the criteria for diagnosis reported. More weight was attributed to series, using contemporary criteria for diagnosis. Case reports were included if the diagnosis was clear and clinical presentation was unique to illustrate the spectrum of disease. Because the majority of therapeutic intervention data were based upon case reports and very small series, an evidence-based approach was problematic, but information is presented as objectively and with as much balance as the limited quality of the data allows. Clinical awareness of the

  20. Clinical Case. Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Bogadelnikov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a clinical case of visceral leishmaniasis in 9-month-old girl. There is described in detail the change of clinical symptoms, as well as laboratory and instrumental diagnostic technique in this child. Attention was paid to epidemiological history, which made it possible to make a definitive diagnosis (posthumously.

  1. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF DIURETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Soldatenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pharmacology of diuretics in the international system of ATC (anatomic-therapeutic-chemical is presented. Classification of this group by the action mechanism and caused effects is provided. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics features, indications and principles of diuretics usage in clinics are considered. Contraindications, side effects and interaction with other drugs of this group are discussed in detail.

  2. ACCP Clinical Pharmacist Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saseen, Joseph J; Ripley, Toni L; Bondi, Deborah; Burke, John M; Cohen, Lawrence J; McBane, Sarah; McConnell, Karen J; Sackey, Bryan; Sanoski, Cynthia; Simonyan, Anahit; Taylor, Jodi; Vande Griend, Joseph P

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) is to advance human health by extending the frontiers of clinical pharmacy. Consistent with this mission and its core values, ACCP is committed to ensuring that clinical pharmacists possess the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to deliver comprehensive medication management (CMM) in team-based, direct patient care environments. These components form the basis for the core competencies of a clinical pharmacist and reflect the competencies of other direct patient care providers. This paper is an update to a previous ACCP document and includes the expectation that clinical pharmacists be competent in six essential domains: direct patient care, pharmacotherapy knowledge, systems-based care and population health, communication, professionalism, and continuing professional development. Although these domains align with the competencies of physician providers, they are specifically designed to better reflect the clinical pharmacy expertise required to provide CMM in patient-centered, team-based settings. Clinical pharmacists must be prepared to complete the education and training needed to achieve these competencies and must commit to ongoing efforts to maintain competence through ongoing professional development. Collaboration among stakeholders will be needed to ensure that these competencies guide clinical pharmacists' professional development and evaluation by educational institutions, postgraduate training programs, professional societies, and employers. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  3. Clinical diagnostic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, E.; Morley, P.

    1986-01-01

    This textbook on diagnostic ultrasound covers the main systems, with emphasis being placed on the clinical application of diagnostic ultrasound in everyday practice. It provides not only a textbook for postgraduates (particularly FRCR candidates), but also a reference work for practitioners of clinical ultrasound and clinicians generally

  4. Developing Clinical Competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.F. Wimmers (Paul)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe development of clinical competence is the main purpose of medical education. The long road to become clinically competent starts on the first day of medical school, and every institution strives to select the best students. The responsibility of medical schools is to train

  5. Clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Xandra; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Herrero, María José; McLeod, Howard; López-Fernández, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, pharmacogenetic research has been performed in different fields. However, the application of pharmacogenetic findings to clinical practice has not been as fast as desirable. The current situation of clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics is discussed. This review focuses on the advances of pharmacogenomics to individualize cancer treatments, the relationship between pharmacogenetics and pharmacodynamics in the clinical course of transplant patients receiving a combination of immunosuppressive therapy, the needs and barriers facing pharmacogenetic clinical application, and the situation of pharmacogenetic testing in Spain. It is based on lectures presented by speakers of the Clinical Implementation of Pharmacogenetics Symposium at the VII Conference of the Spanish Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Society, held in April 20, 2015.

  6. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find the answer to your question IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY Hs-cTnI as a Gatekeeper for Further Cardiac ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  7. Clinical microbiology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-10-01

    The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Learning for clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Michael J; Leathard, Helen L

    2004-11-01

    Clinical leadership has been acclaimed widely as a major factor influencing the quality of patient care but research has revealed a paucity of preparation for this significant role. Leadership literature has rarely addressed clinical leadership specifically or referred to the difficulties in characterizing effective clinical leaders. The research informing this paper focused on clinical leadership and identified five attributes of effective clinical leaders: creativity, highlighting, influencing, respecting, and supporting. Effective clinical leaders adopted a transformational leadership style and improved care, through others, by including transformational (soft) knowledge as an integral part of their effective practice repertoire. Phronesis is introduced as practical wisdom that is gained through immersion in relevant experience, and as an essential element of preparation for clinical nursing leadership practice. It is argued, that learning to transform care requires opportunities to work within an environment that engenders and supports aspiring leaders. The paper describes the research process, elucidates the attributes through illustrative examples from the research data, and discusses an emergent educational strategy for the development of these attributes by clinicians in their practice environments. The paper also describes the application of this research through an interdisciplinary programme for staff leading teams in both health and social services sectors.

  9. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Varieties of clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Jonathan W

    2015-06-01

    Clinical reasoning comprises a variety of different modes of inference. The modes that are practiced will be influenced by the sociological characteristics of the clinical settings and the tasks to be performed by the clinician. This article presents C.S. Peirce's typology of modes of inference: deduction, induction and abduction. It describes their differences and their roles as stages in scientific argument. The article applies the typology to reasoning in clinical settings. The article describes their differences, and their roles as stages in scientific argument. It then applies the typology to reasoning in typical clinical settings. Abduction is less commonly taught or discussed than induction and deduction. However, it is a common mode of inference in clinical settings, especially when the clinician must try to make sense of a surprising phenomenon. Whether abduction is followed up with deductive and inductive verification is strongly influenced by situational constraints and the cognitive and psychological stamina of the clinician. Recognizing the inevitability of abduction in clinical practice and its value to discovery is important to an accurate understanding of clinical reasoning. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Clinical physiology grand rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jeremy; Schwartzstein, Richard; Irish, Julie; Almeida, Jacqueline; Roberts, David

    2013-04-01

    Clinical Physiology Grand Rounds (CPGR) is an interactive, case-based conference for medical students designed to: (1) integrate preclinical and clinical learning; (2) promote inductive clinical reasoning; and (3) emphasise students as peer teachers. CPGR specifically encourages mixed learning level student interactions and emphasises the use of concept mapping. We describe the theoretical basis and logistical considerations for an interactive, integrative, mixed-learner environment such as CPGR. In addition, we report qualitative data regarding students' attitudes towards and perceptions of CPGR. Medical students from first to fourth year participate in a monthly, interactive conference. The CPGR was designed to bridge gaps and reinforce linkages between basic science and clinical concepts, and to incorporate interactive vertical integration between preclinical and clinical students. Medical education and content experts use Socratic, interactive teaching methods to develop real-time concept maps to emphasise the presence and importance of linkages across curricula. Student focus groups were held to assess attitudes towards and perceptions of the mixed-learner environment and concept maps in CPGR. Qualitative analyses of focus group transcripts were performed to develop themes and codes describing the students' impressions of CPGR. CPGR is a case-based, interactive conference designed to help students gain an increased appreciation of linkages between basic science and clinical medicine concepts, and an increased awareness of clinical reasoning thought processes. Success is dependent upon explicit attention being given to goals for students' integrated learning. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  12. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  13. Clinical Case Registries (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Clinical Case Registries (CCR) replaced the former Immunology Case Registry and the Hepatitis C Case Registry with local and national databases. The CCR:HIV and...

  14. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  15. Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Independent Rural Health Clinic and Freestanding Federally Qualified Health Center (HCLINIC).This data...

  16. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  17. Clinical approach to dyslipidaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    ment and management right can pro- foundly influence ... Depending on the clinical context, a lipid value that .... tree, to which as much information as possible is .... Further useful laboratory investiga- tions at the ... on the system. If triglyceride ...

  18. Fidelity in clinical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne; Nøhr, Christian; Rasmussen, Stine Loft

    2013-01-01

    Clinical simulation may be used to identify user needs for context sensitive functionalities in e-Health. The objective with this paper is to describe how user requirements and use cases in a large EHR-platform procurement may be validated by clinical simulation using a very low-fidelity prototype...... without any existing test data. Instead of using test scenarios and use cases, the healthcare professionals who are participating in the clinical simulation are generating both scenario and patient data themselves. We found that this approach allows for an imaginative discussion, not restricted by known...... functionalities and limitations, of the ideal EHR-platform. Subsequently, we discuss benefits and challenges of using an extremely low fidelity environment and discuss the degree of fidelity necessary for conducting clinical simulation....

  19. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  20. CliniCal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... tion choices, available data from clinical studies and expert paediatric pharmacology ... large volumes required or palatability, solid dosage formulations are ... crushed and added to food or liquid, it is important that the entire ...

  1. Cancer clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurlen, A.; Kay, R.; Baum, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on Cancer clinical trials: A critical appraisal. Topics covered include: Scientific fundamentals; Heterogeneous treatment effects; On combining information: Historical controls, overviews, and comprehensive cohort studies; and assessment of quality of life

  2. Clinical leadership project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Vera G

    2010-11-01

    Nurse educators seek innovative strategies to maximize student learning in the classroom and clinical settings. Students enrolled in a nursing leadership and management course often find they spend more clinical time observing leaders than practicing the necessary skills to lead others in the provision of nursing care. In addition, opportunities to explore the nurse educator role often do not exist in baccalaureate nursing education, despite the shortage of nurse educators. An experience was developed in a baccalaureate nursing program to give senior students, under supervision of faculty, the opportunity to lead and evaluate lower-level students providing patient care in the clinical setting and to experience the role of nursing faculty. Feedback from senior students was positive, and students noted increased proficiency in leadership ability and critical thinking. Student interest in the nurse educator role was also enhanced. Program expansion and evaluation with faculty, clinical staff, and patients are planned. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The clinical nanomedicine handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Designed to foster a stronger awareness and exploration of the subject by practicing clinicians, medical researchers and scientists, The Clinical Nanomedicine Handbook discusses the integration of nanotechnology, biology, and medicine from a clinical point of view. The book highlights relevant research and applications by specialty; it examines nanotechnology in depth, and the potential to solve medical problems. It also increases literacy in nanotechnology, and allows for more effective communication and collaboration between disciplines. Details worldwide developments in nanomedicine Provide

  4. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  5. Beninese vaccination clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Sun

    2017-01-01

    This photo was taken in the village of Ladji, which is on the outskirts of Cotonou, the capital of Benin. At the time, I was a second year medical student volunteering at a local medical clinic. On every Wednesday morning, many Beninese babies, like this one, cry out of discomfort while receiving their monthly vaccinations. The photo shows a local clinic nurse administering the vaccination.

  6. Beninese vaccination clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Sun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This photo was taken in the village of Ladji, which is on the outskirts of Cotonou, the capital of Benin. At the time, I was a second year medical student volunteering at a local medical clinic. On every Wednesday morning, many Beninese babies, like this one, cry out of discomfort while receiving their monthly vaccinations. The photo shows a local clinic nurse administering the vaccination.

  7. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  8. [Outlook for clinical hemorheology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, J F

    1996-01-01

    Harvey may be considered to be the precursor of modern hemorheology, but it was not until the pioneering work of Loewenhoeck, Poiseuille, Fahraeus and Copley that the essential role of the hemorheological properties of blood and its cellular components was recognized. Before the advent of modern hemorheology in the 70s, studies were mainly focussed on microcirculation and validation of global hemorheological equations applied to blood circulation. Parallel studies on the microrheological properties (erythrocyte deformability and aggregation) explained analytically the non-Newtonian behavior of blood, and the essential contribution of these parameters to the understanding hyperviscosity syndromes. The development of clinical hemorheology in fact started at the international conferences held in Reykjavik (1966) and Heidelberg (1969), and with the initiation of the periodical European Microcirculation (since Nancy in 1960) and Clinical Hemorheology (since Nancy in 1979) Conferences. The current main avenues of research involve flow modelling, studies of cell-cell interaction mechanisms (aggregation and adhesion), in relation to the associated pathophysiological phenomena, such as cellular activation (platelets and leukocytes in particular), gene expression linked to blood flow (e.g. endothelial cells)... Clinically and therapeutically, it is crucial that pathophysiological studies be undertaken on the relationship existing between rheological parameters and objective clinical data (local flow rates, ischemic markers, hemostatic parameters, tissue oxygen, clinical symptoms,...). The main clinical application fields are cardiovascular diseases, thrombosis, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia... Also, studies on new therapeutics or on biomaterials should also be given priority.

  9. Clinical dosimetry using mosfets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, Ramaseshan; Russell, Stephen; O'Brien, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The use of metal oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) as clinical dosimeters is demonstrated for a number of patients with targets at different clinical sites. Methods and Materials: Commercially available MOSFETs were characterized for energy response, angular dependency of response, and effect of accumulated dose on sensitivity and some inherent properties of MOSFETs. The doses determined both by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) and MOSFETs in clinical situation were evaluated and compared to expected doses determined by calculation. Results: It was observed that a standard calibration of 0.01 Gy/mV gave MOSFET determined doses which agreed with expected doses to within 5% at the 95% confidence limit for photon beams from 6 to 25 MV and electron beams from 5 to 14 MeV. An energy-dependent variation in response of up to 28% was observed between two orientations of a MOSFET. The MOSFET doses compared very well with the doses estimated by TLDs, and the patients tolerated MOSFETs very well. A standard deviation of 3.9% between expected dose and MOSFET determined dose was observed, while for TLDs the standard deviation was 5.1%. The advantages and disadvantages of using MOSFETs for clinical dosimetry are discussed in detail. Conclusion: It was concluded that MOSFETs can be used as clinical dosimeters and can be a good alternative to TLDs. However, they have limitations under certain clinical situations

  10. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    OpenAIRE

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30?years but no research has captured nurses? clinicians? views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses? understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-struct...

  11. Clinical simulation practise framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein

    2015-02-01

    Historically, simulation has mainly been used to teach students hands-on skills in a relatively safe environment. With changes in the patient population, professional regulations and clinical environments, clinical simulation practise (CSP) must assist students to integrate and apply their theoretical knowledge and skills with their critical thinking, clinical judgement, prioritisation, problem solving, decision making, and teamwork skills to provide holistic care and treatment to their patients. CSP holds great potential to derive a positive transformation in students' transition into the workplace, by associating and consolidating learning from classrooms to clinical settings, and creating bridges between theory and practice. For CSP to be successful in filling the gap, the design and management of the simulation is crucial. In this article a new framework called 'Clinical simulation practise framework: A knowledge to action strategy in health professional education' is being introduced that aims to assist educators and curriculum developers in designing and managing their simulations. This CSP framework theorises that simulation as an experiential educational tool could improve students' competence, confidence and collaboration in performing professional practice in real settings if the CSP provides the following three dimensions: (1) a safe, positive, reflective and fun simulated learning environment; (2) challenging, but realistic, and integrated simulated scenarios; and (3) interactive, inclusive, interprofessional patient-centred simulated practise. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Jeffrey B; Ommen, Steve R; Gersh, Bernard J

    2018-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heritable cardiomyopathy, manifesting as left ventricular hypertrophy in the absence of a secondary cause. The genetic underpinnings of HCM arise largely from mutations of sarcomeric proteins; however, the specific underlying mutation often remains undetermined. Patient presentation is phenotypically diverse, ranging from asymptomatic to heart failure or sudden cardiac death. Left ventricular hypertrophy and abnormal ventricular configuration result in dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction in most patients. The goal of therapeutic interventions is largely to reduce dynamic obstruction, with treatment modalities spanning lifestyle modifications, pharmacotherapies, and septal reduction therapies. A small subset of patients with HCM will experience sudden cardiac death, and risk stratification remains a clinical challenge. This paper presents a clinical update for diagnosis, family screening, clinical imaging, risk stratification, and management of symptoms in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinics of ocular tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishali; Shoughy, Samir S; Mahajan, Sarakshi; Khairallah, Moncef; Rosenbaum, James T; Curi, Andre; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2015-02-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is an extrapulmonary tuberculous condition and has variable manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of ocular tuberculosis affecting the anterior and posterior segments of the eye in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Review of literature using Pubmed database. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may lead to formation of conjunctival granuloma, nodular scleritis, and interstitial keratitis. Lacrimal gland and orbital caseating granulomas are rare but may occur. The intraocular structures are also a target of insult by M. tuberculosis and may cause anterior granulomatous uveitis, anterior and posterior synechiae, secondary glaucoma, and cataract. The bacillus may involve the ciliary body, resulting in the formation of a localized caseating granuloma. Posterior segment manifestations include vitritis, retinal vasculitis, optic neuritis, serpiginous-like choroiditis, choroidal tubercules, subretinal neovascularization, and, rarely, endophthalmitis. The recognition of clinical signs of ocular tuberculosis is of utmost importance as it can provide clinical pathway toward tailored investigations and decision making for initiating anti-tuberculosis therapy.

  14. Ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, S F

    1996-05-01

    The modern clinical trial is a form of human experimentation. There is a long history of disregard for individual rights of the patient in this context, and special attention must be paid to ethical guidelines for these studies. Clinical trials differ in basic ways from clinical practice. Foremost is the introduction of outside interests, beyond those of the patient's health, into the doctor-patient therapeutic alliance. Steps must be taken to protect the interests of the patient when such outside influence exists. Kantian moral theory and the Hippocratic oath dictate that the physician must respect the individual patient's rights and hold such interests paramount. These principles are the basis for informed consent. Randomization of patients is justified when a condition of equipoise exists. The changing nature of health care delivery in the United States introduces new outside interests into the doctor-patient relationship.

  15. Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A M James; Pokrywczynska, Marta; Ricordi, Camillo

    2017-05-01

    Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation can be considered one of the safest and least invasive transplant procedures. Remarkable progress has occurred in both the technical aspects of islet cell processing and the outcomes of clinical islet transplantation. With >1,500 patients treated since 2000, this therapeutic strategy has moved from a curiosity to a realistic treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (that is, those with hypoglycaemia unawareness, severe hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic lability). This Review outlines the techniques required for human islet isolation, in vitro culture before the transplant and clinical islet transplantation, and discusses indications, optimization of recipient immunosuppression and management of adjunctive immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory strategies. The potential risks, long-term outcomes and advances in treatment after the transplant are also discussed to further move this treatment towards becoming a more widely available option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and eventually a potential cure.

  16. Increased sexual arousal in patients with movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P

    2016-04-01

    Increased of sexual arousal (ISA) has been described in different neurological diseases. The purpose of this study was present a case series of ISA in patients with movement disorders. Fifteen patients with different forms of movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3), were evaluated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. Among Parkinson's disease patients there were seven cases with different forms of ISA due to dopaminergic agonist use, levodopa abuse, and deep brain stimulation (DBS). In the group with hyperkinetic disorders, two patients with Huntington's disease, two with Tourette's syndrome, and four with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presented with ISA. ISA in this group of patients had different etiologies, predominantly related to dopaminergic treatment or DBS in Parkinson's disease, part of the background clinical picture in Huntington's disease and Tourette's syndrome, and probably associated with cultural aspects in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

  17. Consolidated clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter, Robert L; Thomson, Richard B

    2015-05-01

    The manner in which medical care is reimbursed in the United States has resulted in significant consolidation in the U.S. health care system. One of the consequences of this has been the development of centralized clinical microbiology laboratories that provide services to patients receiving care in multiple off-site, often remote, locations. Microbiology specimens are unique among clinical specimens in that optimal analysis may require the maintenance of viable organisms. Centralized laboratories may be located hours from patient care settings, and transport conditions need to be such that organism viability can be maintained under a variety of transport conditions. Further, since the provision of rapid results has been shown to enhance patient care, effective and timely means for generating and then reporting the results of clinical microbiology analyses must be in place. In addition, today, increasing numbers of patients are found to have infection caused by pathogens that were either very uncommon in the past or even completely unrecognized. As a result, infectious disease specialists, in particular, are more dependent than ever on access to high-quality diagnostic information from clinical microbiology laboratories. In this point-counterpoint discussion, Robert Sautter, who directs a Charlotte, NC, clinical microbiology laboratory that provides services for a 40-hospital system spread over 3 states in the southeastern United States explains how an integrated clinical microbiology laboratory service has been established in a multihospital system. Richard (Tom) Thomson of the NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, IL, discusses some of the problems and pitfalls associated with large-scale laboratory consolidation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Clinical dictionary of MRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herborn, C.U.; Zink, C.

    2007-01-01

    MRT is the method of choice in many clinical problems. It is also one of the most complex imaging procedures, requiring much technical and physical knowledge and also detailed knowledge of the signal response of physiological and pathological tissues in the many variants of contrast enhancement, image reconstruction and image processing. In 2006, the pocket dictionary of MRT was published by the same publisher. It met with much positive response, which induced the publication of this new dictionary. With more than 3000 terms and definitions elaborated in cooperation with an excellent practician, the clinical applications of MRT are illustrated by typical findings and examples. (orig.)

  19. Mycobacteria of clinical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is based upon a symposium on mycobacteria of clinical interest. Due to the multidisciplinary participation of, among others, microbiologists, clinicians, immunologists and epidemiologists, a very wide and thorough presentation of the present state of clinical research in this field is ensured. Topics of particular interest included in this volume were the new antimicrobial agents active against mycobacteria; new therapeutic possibilities; a system of rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and mycobacteriosis; mycobacteriosis in AIDS; progress in immunopathology of tuberculosis and leprosy; progress in bacteriology and vaccination in leprosy; progress in immunological diagnosis and new epidemiological biovars of M. tuberculosis. (Auth.)

  20. Managing clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation.

  1. Pursuing Improvement in Clinical Reasoning: The Integrated Clinical Education Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Mary Ann

    2018-01-01

    The link between clinical education and development of clinical reasoning is not well supported by one theoretical perspective. Learning to reason during clinical education may be best achieved in a supportive sociocultural context of nursing practice that maximizes reasoning opportunities and facilitates discourse and meaningful feedback. Prelicensure clinical education seldom incorporates these critical components and thus may fail to directly promote clinical reasoning skill. Theoretical frameworks supporting the development of clinical reasoning during clinical education were evaluated. Analysis of strengths and gaps in each framework's support of clinical reasoning development was conducted. Commensurability of philosophical underpinnings was confirmed, and complex relationships among key concepts were elucidated. Six key concepts and three tenets comprise an explanatory predictive theory-the integrated clinical education theory (ICET). ICET provides critical theoretical support for inquiry and action to promote clinical education that improves development of clinical reasoning skill. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):7-13.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 (SCA36): «Costa da Morte ataxia».

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M; García-Murias, M; Sobrido, M J

    To describe the history of the discovery of SCA36 and review knowledge of this entity, which is currently the most prevalent hereditary ataxia in Galicia (Spain) owing to a founder effect. SCA36 is an autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia with late onset and slow progression. It presents with cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural hearing loss, and discrete motor neuron impairment (tongue atrophy with denervation, discrete pyramidal signs). SCA36 was first described in Japan (Asida River ataxia) and in Galicia(Costa da Morte ataxia). The condition is caused by a genetic mutation (intronic hexanucleotide repeat expansion) in the NOP56 gene on the short arm of chromosome 20 (20p13). Magnetic resonance image study initially shows cerebellar vermian atrophy that subsequently extends to the rest of the cerebellum and finally to the pontomedullary region of the brainstem without producing white matter lesions. Peripheral nerve conduction velocities are normal, and sensorimotor evoked potential studies show delayed conduction of stimuli to lower limbs. In patients with hearing loss, audiometric studies show a drop of >40dB in frequencies exceeding 2,500Hz. Auditory evoked potential studies may also show lack of waves I and II. Costa da Morte ataxia or SCA36 is the most prevalent SCA in the Spanish region of Galicia. Given the region's history of high rates of emigration, new cases may be diagnosed in numerous countries, especially in Latin America. Genetic studies are now available to patients and asymptomatic carriers. Since many people are at risk for this disease, we will continue our investigations aimed at elucidating the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms and discovering effective treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Information to cerebellum on spinal motor networks mediated by the dorsal spinocerebellar tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecina, Katinka; Fedirchuk, Brent; Hultborn, Hans

    2013-01-01

    of peripheral sensory input to the cerebellum in general, and during rhythmic movements such as locomotion and scratch. In contrast, the VSCT was seen as conveying a copy of the output of spinal neuronal circuitry, including those circuits generating rhythmic motor activity (the spinal central pattern generator...

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 neurodegeneration differentially affects error-based and strategic-based visuomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Díaz, Rosalinda; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Medrano-Montero, Jacqeline; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimé; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2013-12-01

    There are different types of visuomotor learning. Among the most studied is motor error-based learning where the sign and magnitude of the error are used to update motor commands. However, there are other instances where individuals show visuomotor learning even if the sign or magnitude of the error is precluded. Studies with patients suggest that the former learning is impaired after cerebellar lesions, while basal ganglia lesions disrupt the latter. Nevertheless, the cerebellar role is not restricted only to error-based learning, but it also contributes to several cognitive processes. Therefore, here, we tested if cerebellar ataxia patients are affected in two tasks, one that depends on error-based learning and the other that prevents the use of error-based learning. Our results showed that cerebellar patients have deficits in both visuomotor tasks; however, while error-based learning tasks deficits correlated with the motor impairments, the motor error-dependent task did not correlate with any motor measure.

  5. The nucleus raphe interpositus in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; Brunt, ER; Gierga, K; Schultz, C; Paulson, H; de Vos, RAI; Braak, H

    The nucleus raphe interpositus (RIP) plays an important role in the premotor network for saccades. Its omnipause neurons gate the activity of the burst neurons for vertical saccades lying within the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle and that for horizontal saccades

  6. Clinical spectrum of onchodermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the frequency and to see various dermatological presentations of onchocerciasis in black Africans of Sierra Leone. Local black patients of all age groups, attending dermatology outpatient department of Pak Field Hospital (established as a part of UN peacekeeping mission in Sierra Leone) with clinical diagnosis of onchodermatitis, based on symptomatology and morphological features of the disease, were included. UN troops were excluded. Laboratory investigations including blood complete picture and skin snips were carried out in all patients. Skin biopsy and nodule biopsy was performed in selected cases. Skin manifestations were recorded and categorized into various clinical patterns, i.e. acute, chronic, lichenified, onchocercoma, etc. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics in Instat. A total of 3011 patients, belonging to different local tribes, having a variety of skin disorders, were seen during the study period. One hundred and eighty-seven (6.2%) patients were found to have onchodermatitis. Patients were of all ages and both sexes, their ages ranging from 1 month to 73 years. Gender ratio was almost equal. A whole clinical spectrum of onchodermatitis was observed, chronic papular onchodermatitis being the most common pattern. Onchodermatitis with a large spectrum of clinical manifestations was seen in black Africans of the eastern part of Sierra Leone. (author)

  7. Clinical Mastery of Hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horevitz, Richard P.

    Hypnosis is an increasingly popular clinical intervention. The number of training courses in hypnosis is growing each year. Research on hypnosis training appears to show that limited exposure to training, as is typical in the common 3 to 5 day format of mass training, produces limited results. Only when training is extended over time do the…

  8. Radioimmunoimaging in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairemo, K.J.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the thesis radiolabeled antibodies were tested for screening of cancer in patients without previous knowledge of tumour histopathology. They were tested as well targeting known cancer, sometimes in unknown clinical stage. Methods for detection enhancement utilizing double-tracer techniques and alternative routes of administration were also investigated. (385 refs., 11 tabs.)

  9. Prolactinomas : clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    Prolactinoma are treated with dopamine agonists, which are effective in reducing prolactin and tumor size. Studies reporting clinical and radiological outcome are scarce. The study described in chapter 2, assesses long-term outcome in patients treated with dopamine agonists for macroprolactinoma. An

  10. Clinical Process Intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup Pedersen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    .e. local guidelines. From a knowledge management point of view, this externalization of generalized processes, gives the opportunity to learn from, evaluate and optimize the processes. "Clinical Process Intelligence" (CPI), will denote the goal of getting generalized insight into patient centered health...

  11. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...

  12. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...

  13. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  14. Electrogastroenterography in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel M. Kosenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The review contains the information on the basics of electrophysiological evaluation of motor-evacuator function of stomach. It describes the main methods for registration of electric activity of stomach and intestine, characterizes the registered parameters, and gives modern data on its clinical application.

  15. Clinical status of carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, R; Franks, C; Smaldone, L; Bragman, K; Rozencweig, M

    1987-07-01

    Carboplatin, a cisplatin derivative, shows promise of being an effective weapon against ovarian, cervical, and small-cell lung cancer, as well as epidermoid cancer of the head and neck, with fewer toxic effects than cisplatin. It has successfully completed phase III investigation and clinical trials continue.

  16. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  17. Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecker, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Describes technique involved in designing a clinical simulation problem for the allied health field of respiratory therapy; discusses the structure, content, and scoring categories of the simulation; and provides a sample program which illustrates a programming technique in BASIC, including a program listing and a sample flowchart. (MBR)

  18. Clinical application of ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin as a human natural hormone is involved in fundamental regulatory processes of eating and energy balance. Ghrelin signals the nutrient availability from the gastrointestinal tract to the central nervous system, up-regulates food intake and lowers energy expenditure mainly through hypothalamic mediators acting both centrally and peripherally including the gastrointestinal tract (motility, epithelium), promotes both neuro-endocrine and inflammatory signals to increase skeletal muscle growth and decrease protein breakdown, and increases lipolysis while body fat utilization is reduced. Ghrelin does more to exert its probably sentinel role around "human energy": it influences through mainly extra-hypothalamic actions the hedonic and incentive value of food, mood and anxiety, sleep-wake regulation, learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Recently numerous ghrelin gene-derived peptides were discovered, demonstrating the complexity within the ghrelin/ghrelin receptor axis. For clinical applications, not only the natural ghrelin and its slice variants, but also several modified or artificial molecules acting at ghrelin-associated receptors were and are developed. Current clinical applications are limited to clinical studies, focusing mainly on cachexia in chronic heart failure, COPD, cancer, endstage- renal-disease or cystic fibrosis, but also on frailty in elderly, gastrointestinal motility (e.g., gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, postoperative ileus), after curative gastrectomy, anorexia nervosa, growth hormone deficient patients, alcohol craving, sleep-wake regulation (e.g. major depression), or sympathetic nervous activity in obesity. The results of completed, preliminary studies support the clinical potential of ghrelin, ghrelin gene-derived peptides, and artificial analogues, suggesting that larger clinical trials are demanded to move ghrelin towards an available and reimbursed pharmaceutical intervention.

  19. Computers and clinical arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoebel, S B; Lovelace, D E

    1983-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are ubiquitous in normal and abnormal hearts. These disorders may be life-threatening or benign, symptomatic or unrecognized. Arrhythmias may be the precursor of sudden death, a cause or effect of cardiac failure, a clinical reflection of acute or chronic disorders, or a manifestation of extracardiac conditions. Progress is being made toward unraveling the diagnostic and therapeutic problems involved in arrhythmogenesis. Many of the advances would not be possible, however, without the availability of computer technology. To preserve the proper balance and purposeful progression of computer usage, engineers and physicians have been exhorted not to work independently in this field. Both should learn some of the other's trade. The two disciplines need to come together to solve important problems with computers in cardiology. The intent of this article was to acquaint the practicing cardiologist with some of the extant and envisioned computer applications and some of the problems with both. We conclude that computer-based database management systems are necessary for sorting out the clinical factors of relevance for arrhythmogenesis, but computer database management systems are beset with problems that will require sophisticated solutions. The technology for detecting arrhythmias on routine electrocardiograms is quite good but human over-reading is still required, and the rationale for computer application in this setting is questionable. Systems for qualitative, continuous monitoring and review of extended time ECG recordings are adequate with proper noise rejection algorithms and editing capabilities. The systems are limited presently for clinical application to the recognition of ectopic rhythms and significant pauses. Attention should now be turned to the clinical goals for detection and quantification of arrhythmias. We should be asking the following questions: How quantitative do systems need to be? Are computers required for the detection of

  20. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses’ clinicians’ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses’ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. Conclusion There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An ‘ideal nurse’ may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community. PMID:23587282

  1. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses' clinicians' views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses' understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An 'ideal nurse' may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community.

  2. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Danish clinical databases: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Clinical databases contain data related to diagnostic procedures, treatments and outcomes. In 2001, a scheme was introduced for the approval, supervision and support to clinical databases in Denmark.......Clinical databases contain data related to diagnostic procedures, treatments and outcomes. In 2001, a scheme was introduced for the approval, supervision and support to clinical databases in Denmark....

  4. 4 pitfalls to clinical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, John

    2012-11-01

    Four common mistakes can easily thwart clinical integration: Assuming that EHR adoption is the cornerstone of successful integration; Delaying the development of ambulatory services that support clinical integration; Believing that knowledge of clinical integration initiatives will passively diffuse through the ranks; Attaching too much weight to Federal Trade Commission/Department of Justice approval of a clinical integration model.

  5. Clinical Data Warehousing - A Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben Bach; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    1998-01-01

    In this article we present the concept of data warehousing, and its use in the clinical area. Clinical data warehousing will become very important in the near future, as healthcare enterprises need to gain more information from their clinical, administrative, and financial data, in order to impro...... in the area, and providing criteria for comparing clinical data warehouse systems....

  6. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  7. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Clinical ethics and happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devettere, R J

    1993-02-01

    Most contemporary accounts of clinical ethics do not explain why clinicians should be ethical. Those few that do attempt an explanation usually claim that clinicians should be ethical because ethical behavior provides an important good for the patient--better care. Both these approaches ignore the customary traditional reason for being ethical, namely, the good of the moral agent. This good was commonly called 'happiness'. The following article shows how the personal happiness of the moral agent provided a major reason for being ethical in the ancient philosophical and biblical traditions and how it continues to play a role in the more modern rights-based, Kantian and utilitarian theories. This history suggests that the personal happiness of the clinician, rightly understood, is a legitimate and important goal of clinical ethics.

  9. Transgressive first clinical experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Juul; Jeppesen, Lise Kofoed; Drachmann, Merete

    2014-01-01

    . The nursing students’ learning seems to be oriented towards socialization in the clinic as a workplace. This means that the nursing students seek to deal with overwhelming experiences concerning the naked bodies of patients and death, useful application of theoretical knowledge, the path from novice...... to advanced beginner, and adjusting to the workplace community. The conclusion is that the learning of nursing students during their first clinical in-service placement appears informal and not founded on evident best practice....... graduation as a Nurse. The Study has a qualitative methodology, inspired by Michael Eraut’s thoughts on learning in the workplace. When the workplace perspective is applied, learning seems to be concentrated on actual situations which the Learner is in, in contrast to employing constructed concepts...

  10. [Clinical diagnosis of dyslexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Hermosillo, A; Balderas Gil, A

    1980-01-01

    In 5 years of experience at the Instituto Nacional de la Comunicacion Humana, 302 clinical histories showed the diagnosis of dyslexia. The following parameters were studied: age, sex, heredofamilial history, gestation, psychomotor development, clinical picture, examination of the language (type, reading, spontaneous writing, dictation, mathematic concepts), laterality, scholarship, scholar failures, psychological study. The following results were obtained: Dyslexia was more important or frequent between 5 to 8.9 years of age. Males predominated 3:1. The heredofamilial history was important. Dyslexia prevailed in products of the first gestations. A high disturbance was found in the psychomotor development of a large percent of dyslexic patients. Examination of language was also important. Dyslexia was more frequent in right-handed patients. Scholar failures in one or more instances were found. The psychological study must be done. If dyslexia is diagnosed on time, it may be prevented and all unwanted sequelae may be avoided.

  11. Clinical physiopathology of hypernatremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sgambato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The maintenance of sodium levels at normal ranges has to be considered one of the most important and crucial physiological balance in order to preserve life. The increase of natremia determines the leakage of H2O from the inside of cells and the consequent brain cells withering, that causes encephalopathy at different stages and in some cases it can even lead to death. AIM OF THE STUDY The fundamentals of general physiopathology are analysed together with systems of compensation and brain adaptation in the three different aetiopathogenetic forms: primary increase of sodium (hypervolemic and haedematose form; missed introduction of pure water (mainly euvolemic form, with no aedema; loss of hypotonic fluids (hypovolemic form with dehydration. The three different clinical entities with their relative clinical approaches have been described.

  12. Horizons in clinical nanomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Karagkiozaki, Varvara

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine-the application of nanotechnology to health sciences-has the potential to address many important medical problems by exploiting the advanced physicochemical characteristics of nanostructured materials and devices. It can revolutionize conventional medicine by offering cutting-edge developments in the processes of diagnosing, treating, and preventing diseases, injuries, or genetic disorders. Thus, clinical nanomedicine holds promise to preserve and improve human health.This book provides a comprehensive overview on the forefront developments of nanotechnology in various domains of

  13. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  14. Managing clinical improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joanna; Simmonds, Lorraine

    This paper, the second of a three-part series looking at change management tools, provides a practical guide on how to use common project management principles in practice. Much of the literature on project management focuses on the business arena, with little reference to clinical settings. Identifying this literature and understanding its relevance to managing projects in healthcare can be difficult. This article provides a practical guide to identifying the key principles of good project management and applying these in health settings.

  15. Clinical versus actuarial judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, R M; Faust, D; Meehl, P E

    1989-03-31

    Professionals are frequently consulted to diagnose and predict human behavior; optimal treatment and planning often hinge on the consultant's judgmental accuracy. The consultant may rely on one of two contrasting approaches to decision-making--the clinical and actuarial methods. Research comparing these two approaches shows the actuarial method to be superior. Factors underlying the greater accuracy of actuarial methods, sources of resistance to the scientific findings, and the benefits of increased reliance on actuarial approaches are discussed.

  16. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke T. Annema

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  17. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Junichi; Masaki, Norie; Onoyama, Yasuto

    1987-01-01

    This chapter presents in greater detail radiotherapy used in each clinical setting. The descriptions are given under the following sections: the tongue and oral cavity; the maxilla, larynx, and pharynx; brain tumors; the eyes and orbit; pediatric tumors; lung cancer; the esophagus; breast cancer; the abdominal digestive system; the urogenital system; the uterine cervix; the ovaries and vulva; bone and soft tissues; the skin; hematopoietic tumors; lymph node metastases; and radiotherapy as palliative treatment. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Rural health clinics infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

  19. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  20. Applied clinical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book demonstrates how clinical engineering has applied engineering principles to the development and use of complex medical devices for the diagnosis and treatment of the sick and injured. It discusses the proper utilization of medical devices and equipment in the health-care industry and provides understanding of complex engineering systems, and their uses in the modern hospital or other health-care facility

  1. Athlete's Foot: Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M L

    1989-10-01

    In brief: Athletes are particularly prone to athlete's foot because they are generally more exposed than others to conditions that encourage fungal growth, eg, communal showers and locker rooms. Diagnosis of athlete's foot rests on clinical suspicion and laboratory testing. Treatment may consist of topical antifungal agents and, for more resistant cases, oral griseofulvin. Preventive measures include keeping the feet dry, wearing nonocclusive leather shoes or sandals and absorbent cotton socks, and applying talcum or antifungal powder at least twice daily.

  2. Comfrey: A Clinical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Staiger, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Comfrey has a centuries-old tradition as a medicinal plant. Today, multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of comfrey preparations for the topical treatment of pain, inflammation and swelling of muscles and joints in degenerative arthritis, acute myalgia in the back, sprains, contusions and strains after sports injuries and accidents, also in children aged 3 or 4 and over. This paper provides information on clinical trials and non-interventional studies...

  3. Clinical approach to diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Barbara, Giovanni; Tomassetti, Paola; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    Diarrhea is defined as reduced stool consistency, increased water content and number of evacuations per day. A wide array of causes and pathophysiological mechanisms underlie acute and chronic forms of diarrhea. This review focuses on the major clinical aspects which should aid clinicians to diagnose chronic diarrhea. Clinical history, physical examination and stool evaluation and the predominant stool characteristic, i.e., bloody, watery, and fatty diarrhea, may narrow the differential diagnosis. Although mainly involved in acute diarrhea, many different infectious agents, including bacteria, viruses and protozoa, can be identified in chronic bloody/inflammatory diarrhea by appropriate microbiological tests and colonoscopic biopsy analysis. Osmotic diarrhea can be the result of malabsorption or maldigestion, with a subsequent passage of fat in the stool leading to steatorrhea. Secretory diarrhea is due to an increase of fluid secretion in the small bowel lumen, a mechanism often identified in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The evaluation of the fecal osmotic gap may help to characterize whether a chronic diarrhea is osmotic or secretory. Fatty diarrhea (steatorrhea) occurs if fecal fat output exceeds the absorptive/digestive capacity of the intestine. Steatorrhea results from malabsorption or maldigestion states and tests should differentiate between these two conditions. Individualized diagnostic work ups tailored on pathophysiological and clinical features are expected to reduce costs for patients with chronic diarrhea.

  4. STRUCTURED CLINICAL EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabela Maria Barbosa Sampaio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a world experiencing profound technological and socio-political changes in areas of knowledge and capacity, healthcare can not remain static. A new kind of professional is required, whose practice is based on ethics, scientific standards, integrity, citizenship, and health promotion, who develops skills beyond healthcare, such as decision making, communication,leadership, management, and continuing education. No single method can assess all of these elements (knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and only a combination of methods is able to produce a valid evaluation. An alternative method exists: structured clinical assessments based on observation of "to do, or how to do" that aim to complete this evaluation by focusing attention on the performance of specific skills. In order to broaden the scope of evaluation methods that have been used in health education, this article, a literature review, intends to offer readers an overview of the diverse types of structured clinical evaluation, emphasizing Objective Structured Clinical Examination, the most widely used in Brazil, with a goal of advancing opportunities for health professionals to make use of this evaluative tool.

  5. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  6. Transforming practice into clinical scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Jacqueline; Acorn, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this paper were to explicate clinical scholarship as synonymous with the scholarship of application and to explore the evolution of scholarly practice to clinical scholarship. Boyer contributed an expanded view of scholarship that recognized various approaches to knowledge production beyond pure research (discovery) to include the scholarship of integration, application and teaching. There is growing interest in using Boyer's framework to advance knowledge production in nursing but the discussion of clinical scholarship in relation to Boyer's framework is sparse. Discussion paper. Literature from 1983-2015 and Boyer's framework. When clinical scholarship is viewed as a synonym for Boyer's scholarship of application, it can be aligned to this well established framework to support knowledge generated in clinical practice. For instance, applying the three criteria for scholarship (documentation, peer review and dissemination) can ensure that the knowledge produced is rigorous, available for critique and used by others to advance nursing practice and patient care. Understanding the differences between scholarly practice and clinical scholarship can promote the development of clinical scholarship. Supporting clinical leaders to identify issues confronting nursing practice can enable scholarly practice to be transformed into clinical scholarship. Expanding the understanding of clinical scholarship and linking it to Boyer's scholarship of application can assist nurses to generate knowledge that addresses clinical concerns. Further dialogue about how clinical scholarship can address the theory-practice gap and how publication of clinical scholarship could be expanded given the goals of clinical scholarship is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Classification and clinical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cantini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are at least nine classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (PsA that have been proposed and used in clinical studies. With the exception of the ESSG and Bennett rules, all of the other criteria sets have a good performance in identifying PsA patients. As the CASPAR criteria are based on a robust study methodology, they are considered the current reference standard. However, if there seems to be no doubt that they are very good to classify PsA patients (very high specificity, they might be not sensitive enough to diagnose patients with unknown early PsA. The vast clinical heterogeneity of PsA makes its assessment very challenging. Peripheral joint involvement is measured by 78/76 joint counts, spine involvement by the instruments used for ankylosing spondylitis (AS, dactylitis by involved digit count or by the Leeds dactylitis index, enthesitis by the number of affected entheses (several indices available and psoriasis by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. Peripheral joint damage can be assessed by a modified van der Heijde-Sharp scoring system and axial damage by the methods used for AS or by the Psoriatic Arthritis Spondylitis Radiology Index (PASRI. As in other arthritides, global evaluation of disease activity and severity by patient and physician and assessment of disability and quality of life are widely used. Finally, composite indices that capture several clinical manifestations of PsA have been proposed and a new instrument, the Psoriatic ARthritis Disease Activity Score (PASDAS, is currently being developed.

  8. BALANOPOSTHITIS: A CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The inflammation of the non - keratinized epithelium of the glans penis (i.e., Balanities and that of prepuce (i.e., posthitis together comprise the term Balanoposthitis. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the aetiological and p redisposing factors for the development of Balanoposthitis, and to know its relation with venereal and non - venereal disease, local and systemic precipitatin g factors. To know the prevalence of Balanoposthitis in STD clinic. Study design - retrospective study . MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study material consists of 75 cases of balanoposthitis attending out - patient department Skin & STD clinic during a period exten din g from Feb, 1998 to Feb, 1999 . CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF A CASE: Only those cases which have a history of redness of glans or mucous surface of prepuce, with or without genital discharge or ulcer on glans or mucosal surface of prepuce with or without discharge or growth on the penis or fissuring of fore skin were selected for the study. RESULTS: Incidence of balanoposthitis during the period from Feb. 98 to Feb.99 was – 11.53%, out of 650 new STD cases. It was observed that maximum number of pat i ents w as in the 21 - 30 age group (33.34%. The next predominant groups affected were 17 - 20 & 31 - 40 age group (20% each. The third most common age group affected was 41 - 50 (16%. In this study 69 patients (92% who presented with balanoposthitis of whatever cause were found to be uncircumcised, only 6 cases (8% were found to be circumcised. Most cases who presented with balanoposthitis gave a history of exposure to STD risk. CONCLUSIONS: Balanoposthitis is very commonly encountered condition in the STD clinics wi th a multi factorial aetiology. Infective causes dominated over the other possible causes, and 30% of the candidial infection had diabetes mellitus as a predisposing factor.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  11. Understanding Oracle Clinical

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This Short Cut is written to assist you, an Oracle Clinical Developer, with many of the tasks and decisions you may encounter on an occasional basis. These tasks involve study setup and maintenance, account maintenance, handling discrepancies, preparing data sets for analysis, batch-loading data, altering system-level settings and defining standard processes. A working knowledge of screen setup and procedure coding is assumed. Remote Data Capture (RDC), which moves data entry from the CRO or pharmaceutical company to the sites, is fast becoming the preferred way to gather and clean data for

  12. Clinical cognition and embodiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, John

    2004-01-01

    I first identify two different distinctions: between Cartesian cognition and embodied cognition, and between calculative rationality and intuitive know-how. I then suggest that, in the nursing literature, these two distinctions are run together, to create an opposition between 'Cartesian rationality' and 'embodied know-how'. However, it is vital to keep the two distinctions apart, because 'embodied knowing' is very frequently rational. In separating the idea of embodied cognition from non-rational intuition, I show how 'embodiment' leads to the concepts of distributed cognition and distributed expertise. This has extensive and important implications for how we understand clinical cognition in nursing.

  13. Tianeptine - A Clinical Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    More Patil Vidita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a wide spread disorder. The development of effective pharmacotherapy for major depression is important because it is such a widespread and debilitating mental disorder. The following review is based on the preclinical and clinical studies carried out on Tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant that lowers the adverse effects of stress on brain and memory. It is one of the many drugs being tested these days in the market as nootropics; it is presented as a “Smart Drug”. These are believed to be of low-risk and work to improve, enhance, or repair damage done to the brain via injury or disease.

  14. Clinical thinking in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Lloyd A

    2015-06-01

    I discuss the lack of precision in the term 'clinical reasoning' and its relationship to evidence-based medicine and critical thinking. I examine critical thinking skills, their underemphasis in medical education and successful attempts to remediate them. Evidence-based medicine (and evidence-based psychiatry) offer much but are hampered by the ubiquity and flaws of meta-analysis. I explore views of evidence-based medicine among psychiatry residents, as well as capacity for critical thinking in residents before and after a course in philosophy. I discuss decision making by experienced doctors and suggest possible futures of this issue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Clinical trials in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; M, Raghavendra

    2007-07-01

    The concept of outsourcing for the development and global studies on new drugs has become widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry due to its cost and uncertainty. India is going to be the most preferred location for contract pharma research and development due to its huge treatment naïve population, human resources, technical skills, adoption/amendment/implementation of rules/laws by regulatory authorities, and changing economic environment. But still 'miles to go' to fulfill the pre-requisites to ensure India's success. In spite of all the pitfalls, the country is ambitious and optimist to attract multinational pharmaceutical companies to conduct their clinical trials in India.

  16. Clinical neurogenetics: friedreich ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Abigail

    2013-11-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common autosomal recessive ataxia. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, typically with onset before 20 years of age. Signs and symptoms include progressive ataxia, ascending weakness and ascending loss of vibration and joint position senses, pes cavus, scoliosis, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. There are no disease-modifying medications to either slow or halt the progression of the disease, but research investigating therapies to increase endogenous frataxin production and decrease the downstream consequences of disrupted iron homeostasis is ongoing. Clinical trials of promising medications are underway, and the treatment era of Friedreich ataxia is beginning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Elastography in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Richard G

    2014-11-01

    Elastography is a new technique that evaluates tissue stiffness. There are two elastography methods, strain and shear wave elastography. Both techniques are being used to evaluate a wide range of applications in medical imaging. Elastography of breast masses and prostates have been shown to have high accuracy for characterizing masses and can significantly decrease the need for biopsies. Shear wave elastography has been shown to be able to detect and grade liver fibrosis and may decrease the need for liver biopsy. Evaluation of other organs is still preliminary. This article reviews the principles of elastography and its potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comfrey: a clinical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Christiane

    2012-10-01

    Comfrey has a centuries-old tradition as a medicinal plant. Today, multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of comfrey preparations for the topical treatment of pain, inflammation and swelling of muscles and joints in degenerative arthritis, acute myalgia in the back, sprains, contusions and strains after sports injuries and accidents, also in children aged 3 or 4 and over. This paper provides information on clinical trials and non-interventional studies published on comfrey to date and further literature, substantiating the fact that topical comfrey preparations are a valuable therapy option for the treatment of painful muscle and joint complaints. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Parkinsonian phenotype in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3): a two-case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettencourt, C.; Santos, C.; Coutinho, P.; Rizzu, P.; Vasconcelos, J.; Kay, T.; Cymbron, T.; Raposo, M.; Heutink, P.; Lima, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, which is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the ATXN3 gene. This disease presents clinical heterogeneity, which cannot be