WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinically oriented perspective

  1. Clinical Views: Object-Oriented Views for Clinical Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portoni, Luisa; Combi, Carlo; Pinciroli, Francesco

    1998-01-01

    We present here a prototype of a clinical information system for the archiving and the management of multimedia and temporally-oriented clinical data related to PTCA patients. The system is based on an object-oriented DBMS and supports multiple views and view schemas on patients' data. Remote data access is supported too.

  2. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  3. Digital Library Collaboration: A Service-Oriented Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Steven; Gibb, Forbes; Simmons, Susan; McMenemy, David

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration in the digital domain offers an opportunity to provide enhanced digital services and extended reach to the community. This article adopts a service-oriented perspective through which it considers environmental drivers for digital library collaboration; discusses emergent collaborative partnerships across UK educational institutions,…

  4. Manifesto: towards a clinically-oriented psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Chen, Ling Y

    2017-04-26

    New technologies to collect patient - reported outcomes have substantially solved the challenge of integrating a questionnaire in a busy clinical practice. At Memorial Sloan Kettering, we have been collecting patient reported outcomes electronically for many years. Our experience confirms the predicted benefits of obtaining patient reported outcomes but has also raised serious concerns about whether instruments developed for the research setting are appropriate for routine clinical use. We summarize four principles for a clinically - relevant psychometrics. First, minimize patient burden: the use of a large number of items for a single domain may be of interest for research but additional items have little clinical utility. Secondly, use simplified language: patients who do not have good language skills are typically excluded from research studies but will nonetheless present in clinical practice. Third, avoid dumb questions: many questionnaire items are inappropriate when applied to a more general population. Fourth, what works for the group may not work for the individual: group level statistics used to validate survey instruments can obscure problems when applied to a subgroup of patients. There is a need for a clinically-oriented psychometrics to help design, test, and evaluate questionnaires that would be used in routine practice. Developing statistical methods to optimize questionnaires will be highly challenging but needed to bring the potential of patient reported outcomes into widespread clinical use.

  5. Decision science a human-oriented perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Mengov, George

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a new perspective on human decision-making by comparing the established methods in decision science with innovative modelling at the level of neurons and neural interactions. The book presents a new generation of computer models, which can predict with astonishing accuracy individual economic choices when people make them by quick intuition rather than by effort. A vision for a new kind of social science is outlined, whereby neural models of emotion and cognition capture the dynamics of socioeconomic systems and virtual social networks. The exposition is approachable by experts as well as by advanced students. The author is an Associate Professor of Decision Science with a doctorate in Computational Neuroscience, and a former software consultant to banks in the City of London.  .

  6. Clinical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autobiographical memory plays a key role in psychological well-being, and the field has been investigated from multiple perspectives for more than thirty years. One large body of research has examined the basic mechanisms and characteristics of autobiographical memory during general cognition......, and another body has studied what happens to it during psychological disorders, and how psychological therapies targeting memory disturbances can improve psychological well-being. This edited collection reviews and integrates current theories on autobiographical memory when viewed in a clinical perspective....... It presents an overview of basic applied and clinical approaches to autobiographical memory, covering memory specificity, traumatic memories, involuntary and intrusive memories, and the role of self-identity. The book discusses a wide range of psychological disorders, including depression, posttraumatic...

  7. Systematic perspectives on diverging mathematical orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F.M. Strauss

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The popular view that mathematics is “objective” and “neutral” in the sense that it does not know different standpoints is contradicted by the factual state of modern mathematics. In the light of the dominant one-sided trends in the history of mathe-matics, fluctuating between arithmeticism and a geometrisation of this discipline, this article explores some provisional starting-points for a different view. This third option is explored by investigating some features of an acknowledgement of the uniqueness of number and space without neglecting the inter-aspectual connections between these two modal functions. An argument is advanced regarding the inevitability of employing analogical (or elementary basic concepts, and this perspective is articulated in terms of the theory of modal aspects. Numerical and spatial terms are discussed and eventually focused on a deepened understanding of the meaning of infinity. In addition to a brief look at the circularity present in the arithmeticist claim that mathematics could be fully arithmetised (Grünbaum, attention is also asked for the agreement between Aristotle and Cantor regarding the nature of continuity – assessed in terms of the irreducibility of the numerical and spatial aspects of reality. Finally a characterisation is given of the ontological assumpt-ions of intuitionism and axiomatic formalism.

  8. Classroom-oriented research from a complex systems perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Larsen-Freeman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bringing a complex systems perspective to bear on classroom-oriented research challenges researchers to think differently, seeing the classroom ecology as one dynamic system nested in a hierarchy of such systems at different levels of scale, all of which are spatially and temporally situated. This article begins with an introduction to complex dynamic systems theory, in which challenges to traditional ways of conducting classroom research are interwoven. It concludes with suggestions for research methods that are more consistent with the theory. Research does not become easier when approached from a complex systems perspective, but it has the virtue of reflecting the way the world works.

  9. Orienting and Onboarding Clinical Nurse Specialists: A Process Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mayra G; Watt, Jennifer L; Falder-Saeed, Karie; Lewis, Brennan; Patton, Lindsey

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have a unique advanced practice role. This article describes a process useful in establishing a comprehensive orientation and onboarding program for a newly hired CNS. The project team used the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies as a guide to construct a process for effectively onboarding and orienting newly hired CNSs. Standardized documents were created for the orientation process including a competency checklist, needs assessment template, and professional evaluation goals. In addition, other documents were revised to streamline the orientation process. Standardizing the onboarding and orientation process has demonstrated favorable results. As of 2016, 3 CNSs have successfully been oriented and onboarded using the new process. Unique healthcare roles require special focus when onboarding and orienting into a healthcare system. The use of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies guided the project in establishing a successful orientation and onboarding process for newly hired CNSs.

  10. Time perspective and attitude-behaviour consistency in future-oriented behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabinovich, A.; Morton, T.; Postmes, T.

    The authors propose that the salience of a distant-future time perspective, compared to a near-future time perspective, should increase attitude-behaviour and attitude-intention consistency for future-oriented behaviours. To test this prediction, time perspective was experimentally manipulated in

  11. BPMN as a Communication Language for the Process- and Event-Oriented Perspectives in Fact-Oriented Conceptual Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Peter

    In this paper we will show how the OMG specification of BPMN (Business Process Modeling Notation) can be used to model the process- and event-oriented perspectives of an application subject area. We will illustrate how the fact-oriented conceptual models for the information-, process- and event perspectives can be used in a 'bottom-up' approach for creating a BPMN model in combination with other approaches, e.g. the use of a textual description. We will use the common doctor's office example as a running example in this article.

  12. Male contraception: a clinically-oriented review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakis, George A; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of available female contraceptive methods, many pregnancies (~50%) are still undesired. Many men (>60%) want to participate equally with their partner in family planning; however, male contraceptive methods (MCMs) account for only 14% of those used worldwide and no pharmaceutical MCM is available so far. The only two MCMs currently available are condoms, which despite protecting against sexually transmitted diseases have high failure rates (~19%), and vasectomy, which though very efficient (99%) is poorly reversible (<50%). Among MCMs under investigation, male hormonal contraceptives (MHCs) are those that have come closest to commercialization. The action of MHCs relies on the disruption of spermatogenesis that exogenous androgen administration evokes by suppressing the hypophyseal-gonadal axis. Various regimens of androgens as monotherapy or in combination with progestins have been tested in clinical trials achieving a Pearl Index <1.0 (equal to that of the female oral contraceptive pill); however, concerns regarding the variable response rates observed (non-responders: 5-20%), the impracticality of parenteral administration and long-term prostate-associated or cardiovascular morbidity have deflected the interest of the pharmaceutical industry from further research. Non-hormonal contraception methods may be, at least theoretically, more specific by selectively disrupting spermatogenesis and sperm transport or fertilizing ability. Nevertheless, only a few have been tested in clinical trials (Reversible Inhibition of Sperm Under Guidance, RISUG, and Intra Vas Plugs); most of them are still in pre-clinical development or have been abandoned due to toxicity (gossypol). Consequently, until a reliable, safe and practical MCM is developed, women will continue to bear most of the contraception burden.

  13. Patient safety trilogy: perspectives from clinical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieras, Izabella; Sherman, Paul; Minsent, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the role a clinical engineering or healthcare technology management (HTM) department can play in promoting patient safety from three different perspectives: a community hospital, a national government health system, and an academic medical center. After a general overview, Izabella Gieras from Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, CA, leads off by examining the growing role of human factors in healthcare technology, and describing how her facility uses clinical simulations in medical equipment evaluations. A section by Paul Sherman follows, examining patient safety initiatives from the perspective of the Veterans Health Administration with a focus on hazard alerts and recalls. Dennis Minsent from Oregon Health & Science University writes about patient safety from an academic healthcare perspective, and details how clinical engineers can engage in multidisciplinary safety opportunities.

  14. Autobiographical Memory: A Clinical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanowitsch, Nadja; Gorenc, Lina; Herold, Christina J.; Schröder, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory (ABM) comprises memories of one’s own past that are characterized by a sense of subjective time and autonoetic awareness. Although ABM deficits are among the primary symptoms of patients with major psychiatric conditions such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) or chronic schizophrenia large clinical studies are scarce. We therefore summarize and discuss the results of our clinical studies on ABM deficits in the respective conditions. In these...

  15. Autobiographical Memory: a clinical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja eUrbanowitsch; Lina eGorenc; Christina J. Herold; Johannes eSchröder; Johannes eSchröder

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory (ABM) comprises memories of one’s own past that are characterized by a sense of subjective time and autonoetic awareness. Although ABM deficits are among the primary symptoms of patients with major psychiatric conditions such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) or chronic schizophrenia large clinical studies are scarce. We therefore summarize and discuss the results of our clinical studies on ABM deficits in the respective conditions. In these...

  16. Neonatal erythroderma – clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boull CL

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Christina L Boull, Kristen P Hook Department of Dermatology, Division of Pediatric Dermatology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Neonatal erythroderma is rare, but significant as it may be the initial manifestation of an array of infectious, metabolic, and genetic conditions, some of which are life-threatening. Initial management should focus on identifying and treating life threatening etiololgies and complications, including infection, and fluid, electrolyte, and temperature disturbances. Often, the etiology of erythroderma is difficult to quickly identify in the neonate, as there is significant clinical overlap between causative entities. Furthermore, rapid definitive diagnostic tests are lacking. Herein we provide a review of the specific clinical features and diagnostic tests, which can aid in making a correct diagnosis. Skin care for the erythrodermic infant is also discussed. We encourage subspecialist consultation when appropriate to aid in the evaluation, especially when initial testing is nondiagnostic. Keywords: psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, cutaneous candidiasis

  17. Time perspective and attitude-behaviour consistency in future-oriented behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Anna; Morton, Thomas; Postmes, Tom

    2010-03-01

    The authors propose that the salience of a distant-future time perspective, compared to a near-future time perspective, should increase attitude-behaviour and attitude-intention consistency for future-oriented behaviours. To test this prediction, time perspective was experimentally manipulated in three studies. Across studies, participants in the distant-future time perspective condition demonstrated a strong positive relationship between attitudes towards future-oriented behaviours (saving and environmental protection) and corresponding intentions, as well as between attitudes and behaviour. In the near-future time perspective condition, the relationship between attitudes and intentions and attitudes and behaviour was significantly weaker than in the distant-future time perspective condition. The theoretical implications of these results and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  18. Autobiographical Memory: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja eUrbanowitsch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Autobiographical memory (ABM comprises memories of one’s own past that are characterized by a sense of subjective time and autonoetic awareness. Although ABM deficits are among the primary symptoms of patients with major psychiatric conditions such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer Disease (AD or chronic schizophrenia large clinical studies are scarce. We therefore summarize and discuss the results of our clinical studies on ABM deficits in the respective conditions. In these studies ABM was assessed by using the same instrument – i.e. the Erweitertes Autobiographisches Gedächtnis Inventar (E-AGI – thus allowing a direct comparison between diagnostic groups. Episodic ABM, especially the richness of details was impaired already in MCI and in beginning AD. Semantic memories were spared until moderate stages, indicating a dissociation between both memory systems. A recency effect was detectable in cognitively unimpaired subjects and vanished in patients with AD. A similar pattern of deficits was found in patients with chronic schizophrenia but not in patients with major depression. These autobiographical memory deficits were not accounted for by gender, or education level and did not apply for the physiological ageing process in otherwise healthy elderly. In conclusion, ABM deficits are frequently found in AD and chronic schizophrenia and primarily involve episodic rather than semantic memories. This dissociation corresponds to the multiple trace theory which hypothesized that these memory functions refer to distinct neuronal systems. The semi-structured interview E-AGI used to discern ABM changes provided a sufficient reliability measures, moreover potential effects of a number of important confounders could be falsified so far. These findings underline the relevance of ABM-assessments in clinical practice.

  19. Autobiographical memory: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowitsch, Nadja; Gorenc, Lina; Herold, Christina J; Schröder, Johannes

    2013-12-10

    Autobiographical memory (ABM) comprises memories of one's own past that are characterized by a sense of subjective time and autonoetic awareness. Although ABM deficits are among the primary symptoms of patients with major psychiatric conditions such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) or chronic schizophrenia large clinical studies are scarce. We therefore summarize and discuss the results of our clinical studies on ABM deficits in the respective conditions. In these studies ABM was assessed by using the same instrument - i.e., the Erweitertes Autobiographisches Gedächtnis Inventar (E-AGI) - thus allowing a direct comparison between diagnostic groups. Episodic ABM, especially the richness of details was impaired already in MCI and in beginning AD. Semantic memories were spared until moderate stages, indicating a dissociation between both memory systems. A recency effect was detectable in cognitively unimpaired subjects and vanished in patients with AD. A similar pattern of deficits was found in patients with chronic schizophrenia but not in patients with major depression. These ABM deficits were not accounted for by gender, or education level and did not apply for the physiological ageing process in otherwise healthy elderly. In conclusion, ABM deficits are frequently found in AD and chronic schizophrenia and primarily involve episodic rather than semantic memories. This dissociation corresponds to the multiple trace theory which hypothesized that these memory functions refer to distinct neuronal systems. The semi-structured interview E-AGI used to discern ABM changes provided a sufficient reliability measures, moreover potential effects of a number of important confounders could be falsified so far. These findings underline the relevance of ABM-assessments in clinical practice.

  20. Are larks future-oriented and owls present-oriented? Age- and sex-related shifts in chronotype-time perspective associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Kati; van der Meer, Elke

    2013-12-01

    The chronotype (morningness/eveningness) relates to individual differences in circadian preferences. Time perspective (past, present, future) refers to the preference to rely on a particular temporal frame for decision-making processes and behavior. First evidence suggests that future time perspective is associated with greater morningness and present time perspective with greater eveningness. However, little is known about how chronotype-time perspective relationships may alter over the life span. This present study investigated links between chronotype and time perspective more thoroughly by taking age and sex into account as well. Seven hundred six participants aged between 17 and 74 completed German adaptations of the Morningness--Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) and Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI). Controlling for age and sex, relationships between morningness and future time perspective as well as between eveningness and present time perspective were replicated. These findings were supported by significant associations between time perspective and midpoint of sleep. Future time perspective was linked to earlier midpoints of sleep, indicating an early chronotype. Present time perspective was associated with later midpoints of sleep, indicating a late chronotype. However, age and sex had an impact on the chronotype-time perspective relationships. In all age groups, male larks were more future-oriented and less present-oriented, male owls more present-oriented and less future-oriented. The same conclusion could be drawn for female adolescents and young adults. For female adults above 30, there was no interrelationship between morningness and future time perspective but between eveningness and past time perspective. Female adult owls were more present-oriented as well as more past-oriented. Female adult larks were less present-oriented and less past-oriented. Findings are discussed in the light of neuroendocrine and serotonergic functioning.

  1. Market orientation seen in a value chain perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Anne-Mette; Stacey, Julia; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2002-01-01

    Market orientation is regarded as a prerequisite for a company's ability to create customer value and higher profits. Market orientation is usually regarded as something, which characterises a company. However, companies are part of value chains, and a lot of competition taking place...... in international markets is between the different value chains rather than between the individual companies. This is the reason why it makes more sense to look at the degree of market orientation in a complete value chain rather than the degree of market orientation of a single company....

  2. Patient-oriented health technologies: Patients' perspectives and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M; Rue, Tessa; Munson, Sean A; Ghomi, Reza Hosseini; Keppel, Gina A; Cole, Allison M; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Katon, Wayne

    2017-08-01

    For patient-oriented mobile health tools to contribute meaningfully to improving healthcare delivery, widespread acceptance and use of such tools by patients are critical. However, little is known about patients' attitudes toward using health technology and their willingness to share health data with providers. To investigate primary care patients' comfort sharing health information through mobile devices, and patients' awareness and use of patient portals. Patients (n=918) who visited one of 6 primary care clinics in the Northwest US completed a survey about health technology use, medical conditions, and demographics. More patients were comfortable sharing mobile health information with providers than having third parties store their information (62% vs 30%, Somers D=.33, phigher among patients with a chronic condition (AOR= 3.18, p=0.004). Comfort, awareness, and use of health technologies were variable. Practices introducing patient-facing health technologies should promote awareness, address concerns about data security, and provide education and training, especially to older adults and those with health literacy limitations. Patient-facing health technologies provide an opportunity for delivering scalable health education and self-management support, particularly for patients with chronic conditions who are already using patient portals.

  3. Mathematical Processes: A Viewpoint-oriented Manipulation Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2008-01-01

    View-point oriented manipulation of concepts can be helpful for generating new ideas in basic sciences and in the meantime, justifying the processes that are principally meaningful to the related disciplines. Mathematics, as a major ground for basic sciences, seems to be an appropriate exemplar t...

  4. Time Perspective, Life Satisfaction and Social Comparison Orientation in University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Nazmiye ÇİVİTCİ; Hülya ŞAHİN BALTACI

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictive power of time perspective for the life satisfaction and social comparison in university students. The participants (n= 441; 321 female and 120 male) are undergraduate students at a state university. The data of the study were collected through the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, The Satisfaction with Life Scale and IOWA-Netherlands Social Comparison Orientation Measure. In order to determine the prediction power of the time ...

  5. Explaining why larks are future-oriented and owls are present-oriented: self-control mediates the chronotype-time perspective relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milfont, Taciano L; Schwarzenthal, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies provide evidence for the chronotype-time perspective relationships. Larks are more future-oriented and owls are more present-oriented. The present study expands this initial research by examining whether the associations are replicable with other time perspective measures, and whether self-control explains the observed relationships. Chronotype was assessed with the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and the basic associations with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory were replicated in a sample of 142 New Zealand students, but not with other measures. Self-control mediated the influence of morningness on both future time perspective and delay of gratification. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. Tissue engineered constructs: perspectives on clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lichun; Arbit, Harvey M; Herrick, James L; Segovis, Suzanne Glass; Maran, Avudaiappan; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    In this article, a "bedside to bench and back" approach for developing tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs) for clinical applications is reviewed. The driving force behind this approach is unmet clinical needs. Preclinical research, both in vitro and in vivo using small and large animal models, will help find solutions to key research questions. In clinical research, ethical issues regarding the use of cells and tissues, their sources, donor consent, as well as clinical trials are important considerations. Regulatory issues, at both institutional and government levels, must be addressed prior to the translation of TEMPs to clinical practice. TEMPs are regulated as drugs, biologics, devices, or combination products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Depending on the mode of regulation, applications for TEMP introduction must be filed with the FDA to demonstrate safety and effectiveness in premarket clinical studies, followed by 510(k) premarket clearance or premarket approval (for medical devices), biologics license application approval (for biologics), or new drug application approval (for drugs). A case study on nerve cuffs is presented to illustrate the regulatory process. Finally, perspectives on commercialization such as finding a company partner and funding issues, as well as physician culture change, are presented.

  7. Re-orienting discussions of scientific explanation: A functional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Andrea I

    2015-08-01

    Philosophy of science offers a rich lineage of analysis concerning the nature of scientific explanation, but the vast majority of this work, aiming to provide an analysis of the relation that binds a given explanans to its corresponding explanandum, presumes the proper analytic focus rests at the level of individual explanations. There are, however, other questions we could ask about explanation in science, such as: What role(s) does explanatory practice play in science? Shifting focus away from explanations, as achievements, toward explaining, as a coordinated activity of communities, the functional perspective aims to reveal how the practice of explanatory discourse functions within scientific communities given their more comprehensive aims and practices. In this paper, I outline the functional perspective, argue that taking the functional perspective can reveal important methodological roles for explanation in science, and consequently, that beginning here provides resources for developing more adequate responses to traditional concerns. In particular, through an examination of the ideal gas law, I emphasize the normative status of explanations within scientific communities and discuss how such status underwrites a compelling rationale for explanatory power as a theoretical virtue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Framing biomimetics in a strategic orientation perspective (biopreneuring)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    somewhat overlooked. This paper fills some of that void. Business orientation literature is applied to identify some of the key strategic aspects associated with commercial translations. In closing, this paper briefly sketches out some key implications for business research and for affected decision-makers.......This paper discusses how design originally rooted in biology can be translated into applications outside its original domain (biomimetics), and thus become strategically important for commercial organisations. This paper will also discuss how concepts from organisation and management theory can...

  9. Re-orientating time in product design : a phenomenology-inspired perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, J.T.; Hengeveld, B.J.; Hummels, C.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a work in progress design case that is used to exemplify how a phenomenology-inspired perspective on time can impact the design of highly interactive systems and products. The design presents a calendar with a re-orientated layout that is based on a bodily relationship with time,

  10. Time Perspectives and Gambling in Adolescent Boys: Differential Effects of Present- and Future-Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Maria Anna; Sottili, Elena; Morsanyi, Kinga; Primi, Caterina

    2018-06-04

    Adolescent boys are characterised by increased risk-taking behavior, including a relatively high propensity to develop problem gambling habits. The association between gambling and sensitivity to immediately available rewards is well-established, suggesting that gamblers are less influenced by potential future consequences than non-gamblers. Nevertheless, existing studies have considered present- and future-orientation as two ends of the same continuum, and have not investigated the possibility that present and future perspectives might make independent contributions to gambling behavior. In the current study, we adopted Zimbardo's multidimensional approach, which discriminates between not only present and future perspectives, but also between a hedonistic and fatalistic present-orientation (in addition to positive and negative orientations towards the past). The participants were 223 male adolescents (mean age = 16.7 years). We investigated the effects of time perspectives on gambling frequency and gambling problem severity, after taking into account the effects of age, sensation seeking, and gambling-related cognitive distortions. Gambling frequency was significantly predicted by the present fatalistic perspective, and problem gambling was significantly (negatively) related to the future perspective. The present hedonistic and past negative perspectives were also significantly related to both gambling frequency and gambling problems, although they did not explain additional variance in gambling behavior when the effects of the other factors were controlled. Overall, these results offer a fresh perspective on the role of time perspectives in gambling behavior, with potential implications for understanding the origins of gambling problems and the development of novel interventions.

  11. Knowledge Management Orientation: An Innovative Perspective to Hospital Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Matina; Ghadiri Nejad, Mazyar; Bagzibagli, Kemal

    2017-12-01

    By considering innovation as a new project in hospitals, all the project management's standard steps should be followed in execution. This study investigated the validation of a new set of measures in terms of providing a procedure for knowledge management-oriented innovation that enriches the hospital management system. The relation between innovation and all the knowledge management areas, as the main constructs of project management, was illustrated by referring to project management standard steps and previous studies. Through consultations and meetings with a committee of professional project managers, a questionnaire was developed to measure ten knowledge management areas in hospital's innovation process. Additionally, a group of experts from hospital managers were invited to comment on the applicability of the questionnaires by considering if the items are measurable in hospitals practically. A close-ended, Likert-type scale items, consisted of ten sections, were developed based on project management body of knowledge thorough Delphi technique. It enables the managers to evaluate hospitals' situation to be aware whether the organization follows the knowledge management standards in innovation process or not. By pilot study, confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory factor analysis were conducted to ensure the validity and reliability of the measurement items. The developed items seem to have a potential to help hospital managers and subsequently delivering new products/services successfully based on the standard procedures in their organization. In all innovation processes, the knowledge management areas and their standard steps help hospital managers by a new tool as questionnaire format.

  12. The Orientation of Visual Space from the Perspective of Hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Luke P; Goller, Benjamin; Moore, Bret A; Altshuler, Douglas L; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2018-01-01

    Vision is a key component of hummingbird behavior. Hummingbirds hover in front of flowers, guide their bills into them for foraging, and maneuver backwards to undock from them. Capturing insects is also an important foraging strategy for most hummingbirds. However, little is known about the visual sensory specializations hummingbirds use to guide these two foraging strategies. We characterized the hummingbird visual field configuration, degree of eye movement, and orientation of the centers of acute vision. Hummingbirds had a relatively narrow binocular field (~30°) that extended above and behind their heads. Their blind area was also relatively narrow (~23°), which increased their visual coverage (about 98% of their celestial hemisphere). Additionally, eye movement amplitude was relatively low (~9°), so their ability to converge or diverge their eyes was limited. We confirmed that hummingbirds have two centers of acute vision: a fovea centralis , projecting laterally, and an area temporalis , projecting more frontally. This retinal configuration is similar to other predatory species, which may allow hummingbirds to enhance their success at preying on insects. However, there is no evidence that their temporal area could visualize the bill tip or that eye movements could compensate for this constraint. Therefore, guidance of precise bill position during the process of docking occurs via indirect cues or directly with low visual acuity despite having a temporal center of acute vision. The large visual coverage may favor the detection of predators and competitors even while docking into a flower. Overall, hummingbird visual configuration does not seem specialized for flower docking.

  13. The Orientation of Visual Space from the Perspective of Hummingbirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke P. Tyrrell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vision is a key component of hummingbird behavior. Hummingbirds hover in front of flowers, guide their bills into them for foraging, and maneuver backwards to undock from them. Capturing insects is also an important foraging strategy for most hummingbirds. However, little is known about the visual sensory specializations hummingbirds use to guide these two foraging strategies. We characterized the hummingbird visual field configuration, degree of eye movement, and orientation of the centers of acute vision. Hummingbirds had a relatively narrow binocular field (~30° that extended above and behind their heads. Their blind area was also relatively narrow (~23°, which increased their visual coverage (about 98% of their celestial hemisphere. Additionally, eye movement amplitude was relatively low (~9°, so their ability to converge or diverge their eyes was limited. We confirmed that hummingbirds have two centers of acute vision: a fovea centralis, projecting laterally, and an area temporalis, projecting more frontally. This retinal configuration is similar to other predatory species, which may allow hummingbirds to enhance their success at preying on insects. However, there is no evidence that their temporal area could visualize the bill tip or that eye movements could compensate for this constraint. Therefore, guidance of precise bill position during the process of docking occurs via indirect cues or directly with low visual acuity despite having a temporal center of acute vision. The large visual coverage may favor the detection of predators and competitors even while docking into a flower. Overall, hummingbird visual configuration does not seem specialized for flower docking.

  14. Patient perspectives on answering questions about sexual orientation and gender identity: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnadottir, Ragnhildur I; Bockting, Walter; Dowding, Dawn W

    2017-07-01

    To examine patients' perceptions of being asked about their sexual orientation and gender identity in the healthcare setting. Health disparities exist in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population, but further research is needed to better understand these disparities. To address this issue, experts recommend the routine collection of sexual orientation and gender identity data in health care. Nurses on the front line of patient care play a key role in the collection of these data. However, to enable nurses to conduct such assessments it is important to understand the perspective of the patients on being asked about their sexual orientation and gender identity in a healthcare setting. An integrative review was conducted using the methodology proposed by Whittemore and Knafl (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 2005, 52, 546). Six electronic databases were searched, and two reviewers independently reviewed papers for inclusion. Papers were included if they were empirical studies, peer-reviewed papers or reports, assessing patient perspectives on discussing sexual orientation and gender identity in the healthcare setting. Twenty-one relevant studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified. A majority of the studies indicated patients' willingness to respond to, and a perceived importance of, questions about sexual orientation and gender identity. However, fears of homophobia and negative consequences hindered willingness to disclose this information. This review indicates that in most cases patients are willing to answer routine questions about their sexual orientation in the healthcare setting and perceive them as important questions to ask. The findings of this review have implications for nurses looking to incorporate questions about sexual orientation into their routine patient assessment. The findings indicate that care providers need to be mindful of heteronormative assumptions and take steps to ensure they are knowledgeable about lesbian, gay

  15. Stepping into others’ shoes: a cognitive perspective on target audience orientation in written translation

    OpenAIRE

    Apfelthaler, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests what might allow translators to orient themselves towards their target audience in the translation process. To shed light on translators’ ability to put themselves into their target audience’s shoes, I adopt a cognitive perspective by drawing on current findings from psychology, cognitive science and neuroscience. I depart from the notion of target audience as applied to written translation. Aspects to this concept and the terminology of audience in translation studies are...

  16. The cultural shaping of alexithymia: values and externally oriented thinking in a Chinese clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Jessica; Tang, Qiuping; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Cai, Lin; Yao, Shuqiao; Ryder, Andrew G

    2013-05-01

    Alexithymia is a multi-faceted personality construct characterized by difficulties in identifying and describing emotional states. Originally based on observations of American psychosomatic patients, the construct is now studied in a variety of cultural contexts. However, few studies have critically examined alexithymia from a cultural perspective. Dere et al. [1] recently found support for the hypothesis that one alexithymia component - externally oriented thinking (EOT) - is linked to cultural values, among Euro-Canadian and Chinese-Canadian students. The current study examines this association in a Chinese clinical sample. Outpatients presenting at three hospital-based psychology clinics in Hunan province, China (N=268) completed a structured clinical interview and self-report measures of alexithymia and cultural values. All participants endorsed clinically significant levels of depressed mood, anhedonia, and/or fatigue. As expected, EOT was negatively predicted by Modernization and Euro-American values. Two other alexithymia components, difficulty identifying feelings and difficulty describing feelings, were unrelated to cultural values. These findings suggest that cultural variations in the importance placed on emotional experience must be taken into account in cross-cultural alexithymia research. Such studies should also consider separately the specific components of alexithymia; failure to do so can lead to overestimation of alexithymia in groups where scores are driven by culturally-promoted EOT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Design and Development of a Technology Based Orientation Manual for Clinical Research Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to use technology to develop an on-line orientation manual for clinical research coordinators. Many clinical research coordinators begin their careers as staff nurses and have little knowledge related to clinical research. As such, when they transition to a career in clinical research they lack the knowledge…

  18. Clinical skills training and structured internship orientation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of medical interns: enhancing professionalism and quality of medical practice in ... Overall Pre test mean score was 12.561±7.4307 while posttest mean score ... Orientation training of medical intern on critical work and professional issues ...

  19. Current status and perspectives of neurobehavioral approaches in guideline—oriented animal testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TakaH

    2002-01-01

    This presentation aims to overview the current status and perspective of behavioral approaches used in guideline-oriented toxicological studies for agricultural chemicals.Guidelines revised recently (MAFF,OECD,EPA) require sytematic observation of non-learning behavior using defined scales.The observational endpoints are organized into a battery (e.g.functional observational battery,FOB) and inculde home-cage and open-field observation of behavior reactivity to various stimuli(e.g.auditory,tactile,visual),grip strength,and motor activity under a novel environment.The outline of FOB will be illustrated and discussed in the first half of the presentation.One social concern in neurotoxicology is the impact of chemical exposure on cnognitive functions such as learning and memory as well as non-learning behavior.Guidelines describe the necessity of learning and memory tests when other data suggest potential effects on brain function,even though little information regarding cognitive status other than brain pathology can be obtained with FOB.This discrepancy arises from the lack of a simple method compatible with regular studies.One candidate method is fear-induced freezing of rats conditioned to context and auditory cue(Kim & Fanselow,1992).In order to evaluate this paradigm as a screening method,the effects of trimethyltin chloride (TMT) have been studied.Prior to the study,it has been characterized that oral administration of TMT to rats produces excitatory clinical signs and massive neural cell death in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions at lethal dose(8mg·kg-1),but not any abnormalities at sub-lethal doses (4mg·kg-1 or less).Oral administration of TMT at a sub-lethal dose produced a significant decrease in freezing time to the context (hippocampal-dependent measure),but not to the auditory cue.Administration of TMT at a sublethal dose significantly inhibited long-term potentiation in the CA1,but not in the dentate gyrus.These results suggest that the model can be

  20. Sexual orientations of women with polycystic ovary syndrome: Clinical observation in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hui Chen

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Our preliminary data showed that sexual orientation influenced the BMI of women with PCOS, but did not affect hyperandrogenism-related clinical or biochemical characteristics. This observation requires further confirmation.

  1. Ethics in clinical research: The Indian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    J Sanmukhani; C B Tripathi

    2011-01-01

    Ethics in clinical research focuses largely on identifying and implementing the acceptable conditions for exposure of some individuals to risks and burdens for the benefit of society at large. Ethical guidelines for clinical research were formulated only after discovery of inhumane behaviour with participants during research experiments. The Nuremberg Code was the first international code laying ethical principles for clinical research. With increasing research all over, World Health Organiza...

  2. Perspectives on clinical possibility: elements of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiffi, Daniele; Zanotti, Renzo

    2016-08-01

    Possibility is one of the most common modalities in reasoning and argumentation. Various kinds of modal concepts have been identified in philosophical and logical discussion of the metaphysics of modality. We focus here on the concept of clinical possibility. A critical analysis of what is intended as clinical possibility has not yet received sufficient examination, although the concept is extensively used in clinical reasoning. We present arguments to emphasize some desirable features associated with the concept of clinical possibility. We argue that almost all clinical possibilities are potentialities, that is, possibilities that may be actualized by effective, appropriate and feasible interventions. However, in some limited cases, even mere possibilities - which may or may not be actualized, since we do not have the required knowledge - may be involved in clinical reasoning, and we present some examples in this paper. We then introduce some basic views on the nature of possibility showing their validity and limitations when applied to the concept of clinical possibility. Lastly, we conjecture that clinical possibility is a normative modality that can be formalized in a multimodal system with epistemic and deontic logical operators. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Brazilian adolescents' prosocial moral judgment and behavior: relations to sympathy, perspective taking, gender-role orientation, and demographic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, N; Zhou, Q; Koller, S

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine demographic and individual difference variables that predict level of prosocial moral judgment and self-reported prosocial behavior and to test mediating or moderating relations among predictors. The relations of prosocial moral reasoning and self-reported prosocial behavior to perspective taking, sympathy, age, sociometric status, and gender-role orientation were examined with a sample of 149 Brazilian adolescents who completed a series of questionnaire measures. Prosocial moral judgment was expected to be predicted by both sympathy and perspective taking, whereas sympathy or prosocial moral judgment was expected to mediate the relations of femininity and perspective taking to prosocial behavior. Self-reported perspective taking and sympathy interacted when predicting prosocial moral judgment; adolescents who were high in either sympathy or perspective taking (or both) scored high in prosocial moral reasoning. A feminine orientation predicted sympathy and perspective taking, perspective taking predicted prosocial moral reasoning and sympathy, and sympathy had both direct and indirect paths (through moral judgment) to prosocial behavior. The findings generally were consistent with the contention that both the tendency to take others' perspectives and to sympathize are related to level of prosocial moral reasoning, which in turn motivates prosocial behavior. Moreover, patterns of correlations among variables were similar to those found in the United States.

  4. Orthokeratology: clinical utility and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charm J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jessie Charm Sight Enhancement Center, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Abstract: Orthokeratology (ortho-k is a special rigid contact lens worn at night to achieve myopic reduction and control. This review provides an overview on prescribing ortho-k, including clinical consideration on patient aspect and lens design; its clinical outcomes; and clinical efficacy and safety. Patient satisfaction was summarized. In order to achieve long-term healthy ortho-k treatment, it requires both patient and practitioners’ care and rapport to maintain good ocular health and lens conditions. Keywords: orthokeratology, efficacy, patient satisfaction, myopic reduction, myopic control

  5. Perspectives on Clinical Education: How physiotherapy students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyeyemia

    presumed that clinical teaching can effectively be done by any competent and experienced practitioner. This ... Becoming a competent physical therapist involves receiving .... Only an environment that reduces stress and opens the lines of ...

  6. Altruism in clinical research: coordinators' orientation to their professional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Kalbaugh, Corey A

    2012-01-01

    Research coordinators have significant responsibilities in clinical trials that often require them to find unique ways to manage their jobs, thus reshaping their professional identities. The purpose of this study was to identify how research coordinators manage role and ethical conflicts within clinical research trials. A qualitative study combining observation and 63 semistructured interviews at 25 research organizations was used. Altruism is a recurring theme in how research coordinators define and view their work. Altruism is adopted by research coordinators to: (1) Teach patient-subjects the appropriate reasons to participate in clinical research, (2) minimize the conflict between research and care, and (3) contest the undervaluation of coordinating. Altruism is a strategy used to handle the various conflicts they experience in a difficult job, and it has become part of the professional identity of clinical research coordinators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON MARKET-ORIENTED MODELS OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaciu Diana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of corporate governance requires not only the knowledge of economic, financial, managerial and sociological mechanisms and norms, but it must also incorporate an ethical dimension, while remaining aware of the demands of various stakeholders. The interest towards good governance practice is very present in the company laws of many countries. National differences may lead to specific attributes derived from the meaning that is given to the role of competition and market dispersion of capital. Based on a research consisting of a critical and comparative perspective, the present contribution is dominated by qualitative and mixed methods. In conclusion, it can be said that a market-oriented corporate governance model, though not part of the European Union’s convergence process, may very well respond to the increasing importance of investors’ rights and to the gradual evolution of corporate responsibilities, beyond the national context, with the aim of ensuring market liberalization.

  8. β-Thalassemia Intermedia: A Clinical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Taher, Ali T.; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease process in patients with β-thalassemia intermedia has substantially increased over the past decade. Earlier studies observed that patients with β-thalassemia intermedia experience a clinical-complications profile that is different from that in patients with β-thalassemia major. In this article, a variety of clinical morbidities are explored, and their associations with the underlying disease pathophysiology and risk factors are examined. These involve several organs and organ systems including the vasculature, heart, liver, endocrine glands, bone, and the extramedullary hematopoietic system. The effects of some therapeutic interventions on the development of clinical complications are also discussed. PMID:22762026

  9. STEMI time delays: A clinical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. de Boer (Menko Jan); F. Zijlstra (Felix)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSTEMI time delays have been introduced as a performance indicator or marker of quality of care. As they are only one part of a very complex medical process, one should be aware of concomitant issues that may be overlooked or even be more important with regard to clinical outcome of STEMI

  10. Clinical report writing: Process and perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    Clinical report writing in psychology and psychiatry is addressed. Audience/use analysis and the basic procedures of information gathering, diagnosis, and prognosis are described. Two interlinking processes are involved: the process of creation and the process of communication. Techniques for good report writing are presented.

  11. Implementing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in Emergency Departments: Patient and Staff Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Danielle; Kodadek, Lisa; Shields, Ryan; Peterson, Susan; Snyder, Claire; Schneider, Eric; Vail, Laura; Ranjit, Anju; Torain, Maya; Schuur, Jeremiah; Lau, Brandyn; Haider, Adil

    2016-12-01

    To identify patient and provider perspectives concerning collection of sexual orientation and gender identity (SO&GI) information in emergency departments (EDs). Semistructured interviews were conducted during the period of 2014-2015 with a diverse purposive sample of patients across the spectrum of sexual orientation and gender identities (n = 53) and ED nurses, physician assistants, physicians, and registrars (n = 38) in a major metropolitan area. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by multiple coders using constant comparative methods. Patients were willing to provide SO&GI information if collected safely and appropriately, and staff described willingness to collect SO&GI information to inform understanding of health disparities. Key themes across respondents were as follows: What will be done with the data? How will it be collected? Who will collect it? Is the environment conducive to safe disclosure? Confidentiality and potential sensitivity; standardized collection emphasizing population health; nurse intake and/or nonverbal data collection; and environmental cues and cultural competency promoting comfort for sexual and gender minorities emerged as critical considerations for effective implementation. Staff and patients are amenable to SO&GI data collection in EDs, but data quality and patient and provider comfort may be compromised without attention to specific implementation considerations.

  12. Clinical trials integrity: a CRO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, J E

    2001-01-01

    When contract research organizations (CROs) were first formed, pharmaceutical companies outsourced to them only certain aspects of the conduct of their clinical trials. At first CROs were highly specialized entities, providing, for example, either biostatistical advice, clinical research associates who monitored investigational sites for regulatory compliance, or regulatory support. Gradually, full service CROs emerged, offering a full range of services for clinical trials, including the selection of investigators and investigational sites, assistance with patient recruitment, safety surveillance and reporting, site audits, and data management and biostatistics. This evolving relationship between CROs and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries has resulted in CROs assuming more and more of the regulatory and ethical risks and responsibilities inherent in the conduct of clinical trials. In this full service role, CROs, unlike sponsors, are not interested in the outcome of study, but like sponsors, are subject to heavy regulation by the federal government, must follow applicable state laws, must respect international guidelines, and are obliged to follow their own operating procedures. Moreover, they are judged by the industry on the basis of the scope and quality of services provided, including the degree of adherence to the research protocol, regulatory requirements, and timelines; the quality of the professional working relationships with investigators and institutions, both academic and community-based; and the validity of the data. Further, CROs are subject to comprehensive audits by sponsoring companies, FDA, and other regulatory authorities. For all these reasons, CROs are being tasked with strict vigilance of all stages of the clinical trial process to ensure that the laws, regulations, and industry standards designed for the protection of human subjects and data integrity are maintained.

  13. Exploring Patient Activation in the Clinic: Measurement from Three Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Ledford, Christopher C.; Childress, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To further conceptualize and operationalize patient activation (PA), using measures from patient, physician, and researcher perspectives. Data Source/Study Setting. Multimethod observation in 2010 within a family medicine clinic. Study Design. Part of an intervention with 130 patients with type 2 diabetes, this observational study…

  14. Drug-induced psoriasis: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balak DMW

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Deepak MW Balak, Enes Hajdarbegovic Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Exposure to certain drugs can elicit an induction or exacerbation of psoriasis. Although well-conducted systematic studies on drug-related psoriasis are mostly lacking, traditionally strong associations have been documented for beta-blockers, lithium, antimalarial drugs such as (hydroxychloroquine, interferons, imiquimod, and terbinafine. More recently, new associations have been reported for monoclonal antibody- and small-molecule-based targeted therapies used for oncological and immunological indications, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immune checkpoint inhibitors. Recognizing potential drug-related psoriasis is of clinical relevance to allow an optimal management of psoriasis. However, in clinical practice, identifying medication-related exacerbations and induction of psoriasis can be challenging. The clinical and histopathological features of drug-provoked psoriasis may differ little from that of “classical” nondrug-related forms of psoriasis. In addition, the latency period between start of the medication and onset of psoriasis can be significantly long for some drugs. Assessment of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale could be used as a practical tool to better differentiate drug-related psoriasis. The first step in the management of drug-related psoriasis is cessation and replacement of the offending drug when deemed clinically possible. However, the induced psoriasis skin lesions may persist after treatment withdrawal. Additional skin-directed treatment options for drug-related psoriasis follows the conventional psoriasis treatment guidelines and includes topical steroids and vitamin D analogs, ultraviolet phototherapy, systemic treatments, such as acitretin, methotrexate, and fumaric acid esters, and biological treatments

  15. Current clinical research in orthodontics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon

    2006-10-01

    This essay explores briefly the approach of the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory to the systematic and rigorous investigation of the usual outcome of orthodontic treatment in the practices of experienced clinicians. CRIL's goal is to produce a shareable electronic database of reliable, valid, and representative data on clinical practice as an aid in the production of an improved environment for truly evidence-based orthodontic treatment.

  16. Death: clinical and forensic anthropological perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Etty Indriati, Etty Indriati

    2015-01-01

    All biological living beings inevitably die, and the ways to die vary although in essence death is a manifestation of the absence of Oxygen in the brain. After death, biological remains undertake proteolysis and decomposition. The aim of this article is to discuss clinical death, cerebral or medicolegal death, social death, phases of cerebral death, and biological process after death—which is important for forensic medicine and forensic anthropology. How long a person die, if the time elaps...

  17. Psychopathy in women: theoretical and clinical perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Wynn, Rolf; Høiseth, Marita H; Pettersen, Gunn

    2012-01-01

    Rolf Wynn,1,2 Marita H Høiseth,1 Gunn Pettersen,31Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Division of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatric Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 2Telemedicine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, 3Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: Prior research on psychopathy has primarily focused on the problem in men. Only a few studies ha...

  18. Current and future perspectives in clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been significant progress and controversy in the clinical management of patients with rectal cancer as well as important advances in the understanding the biology of these tumors. The panel will highlight relevant biologic and clinical developments. One of major advances has been in the understanding of the molecular basis for the development of colon and rectal cancer with many of the events leading to cancer development having been determined. Although there is much to be learned, there is now a much improved understanding of colon and rectal carcinogenesis with the prospect of being able to define high risk patient populations and the possibility of early detection (before cancer formation) now a real possibility. In addition, the identification of favorable or unfavorable subsets of patients wit rectal cancer based on molecular markers is under active investigation. These exciting developments will be summarized. In the clinical arena, there are a number of controversial issues in the management of patients with rectal cancer. For patients with distal rectal cancer, the goals of therapy have evolved from cure to cure with sphincter preservation. The role of resection with coloanal anastomosis as an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection is also being defined. A wide array of treatment programs of radiation therapy and chemotherapy and sphincter sparing surgery are under active investigation. The relative merits of preoperative chemo-irradiation versus postoperative chemo-irradiation continues to be debated. The utility of total mesorectal excision is being evaluated and the need for adjuvant therapy is being questioned. These clinical issues will be highlighted

  19. A clinical perspective of accelerated statistical reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, B.F.; Hudson, H.M.; Beekman, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential benefits of maximum likelihood reconstruction have been recognised for many years, the technique has only recently found widespread popularity in clinical practice. Factors which have contributed to the wider acceptance include improved models for the emission process, better understanding of the properties of the algorithm and, not least, the practicality of application with the development of acceleration schemes and the improved speed of computers. The objective in this article is to present a framework for applying maximum likelihood reconstruction for a wide range of clinically based problems. The article draws particularly on the experience of the three authors in applying an acceleration scheme involving use of ordered subsets to a range of applications. The potential advantages of statistical reconstruction techniques include: (a) the ability to better model the emission and detection process, in order to make the reconstruction converge to a quantitative image, (b) the inclusion of a statistical noise model which results in better noise characteristics, and (c) the possibility to incorporate prior knowledge about the distribution being imaged. The great flexibility in adapting the reconstruction for a specific model results in these techniques having wide applicability to problems in clinical nuclear medicine. (orig.). With 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. The Pedagogical Reflection Model - an educational perspective on clinical decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voergaard Poulsen, Bettina; Vibholm Persson, Stine; Skriver, Mette

    Clinical decision-making is important in patient-centred nursing, which is known in nursing education and research (1) The Pedagogical Reflection Model (PRM) can provide a framework that supports students’ decision-making in patient-specific situations. PRM is based on the assumption that clinical......) The aims of this study were to explore how nurse students and clinical supervisors use PRM as method to reflect before, during and after PRM guidance in relation to clinical decisions in the first year of clinical practice...... decision-making needs to take into account; 1) clinical experiences, 2) the perspective of the patient, 3) clinical observations and investigations, 4) knowledge about patients experiences of being a patient and ill, 5) medical knowledge about diseases, and 6) the organizational framework (2,3,4)(Figure 1...

  1. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  2. Managing neonatal bowel obstruction: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desoky SM

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah M Desoky,1 Ranjit I Kylat,2 Unni Udayasankar,1 Dorothy Gilbertson-Dahdal1 1Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Neonatal intestinal obstruction is a common surgical emergency and occurs in approximately 1 in 2,000 live births. The causes of obstruction are diverse with varied embryological origins, and some underlying etiologies are not yet well described. Some findings of neonatal bowel obstruction can be detected prenatally on ultrasound imaging. The obstruction is classified as “high” when the level of obstruction is proximal to the ileum, and “low” when the level of obstruction is at the ileum or colon. Early diagnosis of the type of intestinal obstruction and localization of the obstructive bowel segment guides timely and appropriate management of the underlying pathologic entity. Neonatal bowel obstructions are ideally managed at specialized centers with a large volume of neonatal surgery and dedicated pediatric surgical and anesthesia expertise. Although surgical intervention is necessary in most cases, initial management strategies often target underlying metabolic, cardiac, or respiratory abnormalities. Imaging plays a key role in early and accurate diagnosis of the abnormalities. When bowel obstruction is suspected clinically, initial imaging workup usually involves abdominal radiography, which may direct further evaluation with fluoroscopic examination such as upper gastrointestinal (UGI contrast study or contrast enema. This article provides a comprehensive review of clinical and radiological features of common and less common causes of intestinal obstruction in the neonatal age group, including esophageal atresia, enteric duplication cysts, gastric volvulus, congenital microgastria, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia

  3. Ethics in clinical research: the Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmukhani, J; Tripathi, C B

    2011-03-01

    Ethics in clinical research focuses largely on identifying and implementing the acceptable conditions for exposure of some individuals to risks and burdens for the benefit of society at large. Ethical guidelines for clinical research were formulated only after discovery of inhumane behaviour with participants during research experiments. The Nuremberg Code was the first international code laying ethical principles for clinical research. With increasing research all over, World Health Organization formulated guidelines in the form of Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. The US laid down its guidelines for ethical principles in the Belmont Report after discovery of the Tuskegee's Syphilis study. The Indian Council of Medical Research has laid down the 'Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research on Human Subjects' in the year 2000 which were revised in 2006. It gives twelve general principles to be followed by all biomedical researchers working in the country. The Ethics Committee stands as the bridge between the researcher and the ethical guidelines of the country. The basic responsibility of the Ethics Committee is to ensure an independent, competent and timely review of all ethical aspects of the project proposals received in order to safeguard the dignity, rights, safety and well-being of all actual or potential research participants. A well-documented informed consent process is the hallmark of any ethical research work. Informed consent respects individual's autonomy, to participate or not to participate in research. Concepts of vulnerable populations, therapeutic misconception and post trial access hold special importance in ethical conduct of research, especially in developing countries like India, where most of the research participants are uneducated and economically backward.

  4. MEMORY OPERATION AND ATTENTION CONCENTRATION FEATURES OF BUILDING PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMMUNICATIVE STRATEGIES IN PERSPECTIVE PROGRAMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Семеряк

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Memory operation and attention concentration features of building professionally oriented foreign language communicative strategies in perspective programmers have been analyzed in the article. The features of functioning and role of short-term, sensory, operational, long-term, semantic memory in the process of building foreign language professionally oriented communicative strategies in students majoring in programming have been in the spotlight of the author’s attention. Special conditions for successful memorizing of studying material by students have been identified. In the course of the pilot study it has been proven that active methods of teaching / learning enchance high concentration and makes it possible to activate long-term memory and, as a result, reflect necessary studying material in it. The impact of concentration on the efficiency of building professionally oriented foreign language communicative strategies in perspective programmers has been grounded. Mechanisms of concentration of students majoring in programming on studying activity have been analyzed.

  5. Problem-oriented clinical microbiology and infection. 2nd. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilary Humphreys; William, L. Irving [Royal College of Surgeons (Ireland)

    2004-08-01

    This medical textbook is problem-based, in line with current medical teaching, and covers 70 clinical cases. This second edition has been updated to include new material on AIDS/HIV, emerging antibiotic-resistant bacteria and new viral pathogens such as SARS. Sections are headed; Skin and mucous membranes; Respiratory tract; Gastrointestinal system which includes a case study entitled: Bob, a 55-year-old retired coal miner with abdominal pain; Genito-urinary system; Central nervous system; Systemic infections; Pregnancy and the neonate; and Miscellaneous. 29 ills., 125 photos.

  6. HCV viremia in clinical and biomedical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.B.; Tariq, W.Z.; Karamat, K.A.; Ghani, E.; Mushtaq, S.

    2000-01-01

    Sera of 172 patients from military / civil hospitals and general practitioners of Rawalpindi/Islamabad region and vicinity areas of northern Pakistan with anti-HCV IgG positive aerostats were tested at Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, between July and November, 1997 for detection of HCV viremia by reverse transcriptases polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Randomly selected 100 samples (40 viremia positive and 60 negative after PCR) were tested for serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. For each patient, information based upon clinical and laboratory findings was recorded on a performa to correlate the clinical and biochemical findings with the results of qualitative reverse transcriptase polymerase Chain Reaction (RT PCR) for HCV in Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients. Of the total 172 HCV infected (Anti HCV Positive), 61(35.61%) patients were found to be viremic. Active infection was more frequent in the age of 30 years onwards. The past history of jaundice, surgical operation and chronic renal failure was more frequent with the viremia positive cases. Although, statistically insignificant, there was evidence of some association of diabetes mellitus with viremia ALT levels and its mean were higher in viremics, 27(73%) of 37 cases with a minimum three months history of interferon treatment for hepatitis C were found negative for viremia. (author)

  7. AID Biology: A pathological and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenal; Tamrakar, Anubhav; Singh, Amit Kumar; Jain, Monika; Jaiswal, Ankit; Kodgire, Prashant

    2018-01-02

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), primarily expressed in activated mature B lymphocytes in germinal centers, is the key factor in adaptive immune response against foreign antigens. AID is responsible for producing high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies against an infectious agent, through the physiological DNA alteration processes of antibody genes by somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) and functions by deaminating deoxycytidines (dC) to deoxyuridines (dU), thereby introducing point mutations and double-stranded chromosomal breaks (DSBs). The beneficial physiological role of AID in antibody diversification is outweighed by its detrimental role in the genesis of several chronic immune diseases, under non-physiological conditions. This review offers a comprehensive and better understanding of AID biology and its pathological aspects, as well as addresses the challenges involved in AID-related cancer therapeutics, based on various recent advances and evidence available in the literature till date. In this article, we discuss ways through which our interpretation of AID biology may reflect upon novel clinical insights, which could be successfully translated into designing clinical trials and improving patient prognosis and disease management.

  8. Teleultrasound: Historical Perspective and Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Cunha Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The health care of patients in rural or isolated areas is challenged by the scarcity of local resources, limited patient access to doctors and hospitals, and the lack of specialized professionals. This has led to a new concept in telemedicine: teleultrasonography (or teleultrasound, which permits ultrasonographic diagnoses to be performed remotely. Telemedicine and teleultrasonography are effective in providing diagnostic imaging services to these populations and reduce health care costs by decreasing the number and duration of hospitalizations and reducing unnecessary surgical procedures. This is a narrative review to present the potential clinical applications of teleultrasonography in clinical practice. The results indicate that although barriers persist for implementing teleultrasonography in a more universal and routine way, advances in telecommunications, Internet bandwidth, and the high resolution currently available for portable ultrasonography suggest teleultrasonography applications will continue to expand. Teleultrasound appears to be a valuable addition to remote medical care for isolated populations with limited access to tertiary healthcare facilities and also a useful tool for education and training.

  9. Resident and proprietor perspectives on a recovery orientation in community-based housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piat, Myra; Boyer, Richard; Fleury, Marie-Josée; Lesage, Alain; O'Connell, Maria; Sabetti, Judith

    2015-03-01

    Stable housing is a fundamental human right, and an important element for both mental health recovery and social inclusion among people with serious mental illness. This article reports findings from a study on the recovery orientation of structured congregate community housing services using the Recovery Self-Assessment Questionnaire (RSA) adapted for housing (O'Connell, Tondora, Croog, Evans, & Davidson, 2005). The RSA questionnaires were administered to 118 residents and housing providers from 112 congregate housing units located in Montreal, Canada. Residents rated their homes as significantly less recovery-oriented than did proprietors, which is contrary to previous studies of clinical services or Assertive Community Treatment where RSA scores for service users were significantly higher than service provider scores. Findings for both groups suggest the need for improvement on 5 of 6 RSA factors. While proprietors favored recovery training and education, and valued resident opinion and experience, vestiges of a traditional medical model governing this housing emerged in other findings, as in agreement between the 2 groups that residents have little choice in case management, or in the belief among proprietors that residents are unable to manage their symptoms. This study demonstrates that the RSA adapted for housing is a useful tool for creating recovery profiles of housing services. The findings provide practical guidance on how to promote a recovery orientation in structured community housing, as well as a novel approach for reaching a common understanding of what this entails among stakeholders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Resident and Proprietor Perspectives of a Recovery Orientation in Community-Based Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piat, Myra; Boyer, Richard; Fleury, Marie-Josée; Lesage, Alain; O’Connell, Maria; Sabetti, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stable housing is a fundamental human right, and an important element for both mental health recovery and social inclusion among people with serious mental illness. This article reports findings from a study on the recovery orientation of structured congregate community housing services using the Recovery Self-Assessment Questionnaire (RSA) adapted for housing (O’Connell, Tondora, Croog, Evans, & Davidson, 2005). Methods The RSA questionnaires were administered to 118 residents and housing providers from 112 congregate housing units located in Montreal, Canada. Results Residents rated their homes as significantly less recovery-oriented than did proprietors, which is contrary to previous studies of clinical services or Assertive Community Treatment where RSA scores for service users were significantly higher than service provider scores. Findings for both groups suggest the need for improvement on 5 of 6 RSA factors. While proprietors favored recovery training and education, and valued resident opinion and experience, vestiges of a traditional medical model governing this housing emerged in other findings, as in agreement between the 2 groups that residents have little choice in case management, or in the belief among proprietors that residents are unable to manage their symptoms. Conclusions and Implications for Practice This study demonstrates that the RSA adapted for housing is a useful tool for creating recovery profiles of housing services. The findings provide practical guidance on how to promote a recovery orientation in structured community housing, as well as a novel approach for reaching a common understanding of what this entails among stakeholders. PMID:25559078

  11. Patellofemoral pain in athletes: clinical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabchi, Farzin; Abolhasani, Maryam; Mirshahi, Maryam; Alizadeh, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a very common problem in athletes who participate in jumping, cutting and pivoting sports. Several risk factors may play a part in the pathogenesis of PFP. Overuse, trauma and intrinsic risk factors are particularly important among athletes. Physical examination has a key role in PFP diagnosis. Furthermore, common risk factors should be investigated, such as hip muscle dysfunction, poor core muscle endurance, muscular tightness, excessive foot pronation and patellar malalignment. Imaging is seldom needed in special cases. Many possible interventions are recommended for PFP management. Due to the multifactorial nature of PFP, the clinical approach should be individualized, and the contribution of different factors should be considered and managed accordingly. In most cases, activity modification and rehabilitation should be tried before any surgical interventions. PMID:29070955

  12. Psychopathy in women: theoretical and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rolf Wynn,1,2 Marita H Høiseth,1 Gunn Pettersen,31Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Division of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatric Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 2Telemedicine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, 3Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: Prior research on psychopathy has primarily focused on the problem in men. Only a few studies have examined whether psychopathy even exists in women, and if so, how the disorder manifests itself in them. This paper presents a narrative review of the literature on gender and psychopathy. We briefly discuss why this is an important topic for women and we discuss its causes. The concept of psychopathy is defined and related to the diagnostic systems. The discussion includes a presentation of diagnostic tools, including the Hare Psychology Checklist – Revised, which are examined in relationship to the importance of biological gender. While emphasizing the similarities as well as the differences between the sexes, we discuss the matters of prevalence, behavioral expressions, comorbidity, progression, and treatment of the disorder.Keywords: psychopathy, antisocial, dissocial, personality disorder, sex, women, review

  13. Narcissistic personality disorder: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningstam, Elsa

    2011-03-01

    Narcissistic traits and narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) present specific diagnostic challenges. While they are often readily and straightforwardly identified, their presentation in some patients and the reasons for which such patients seek treatment may conceal significant narcissistic pathology. Recently, several empirical studies have confirmed that the phenotypic range of people with NPD includes individuals with insecure, shy, and hypersensitive traits with prominent internalized narcissistic features and functioning. Other studies have confirmed that internal emotional distress, interpersonal vulnerability, fear, pain, anxiety, a sense of inadequacy, and depressivity can also co-occur with narcissistic personality functioning. This paper focuses on integrating these findings into the diagnostic evaluation and initial negotiation of treatment for NPD. In patients with narcissistic traits or NPD, it is important to give attention to the two sides of character functioning, which include both self-serving and self-enhancing manifestations as well as hypersensitivity, fluctuations in self-esteem, and internal pain and fragility. This article highlights some of these seemingly incompatible clinical presentations of narcissistic traits and NPD, especially as they co-occur with depressivity and perfectionism, and it discusses implications for building a treatment alliance with a patient with such a predominant disorder of character functioning. The article also discusses the importance of retaining the NPD diagnosis as a separate type of personality disorder, with this range of features, in the upcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DMS-5).

  14. Intrauterine hypoxia: clinical consequences and therapeutic perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson LP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Loren P Thompson,1 Sarah Crimmins,1 Bhanu P Telugu,2 Shifa Turan1 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Animal Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA Abstract: Intrauterine hypoxia is a significant clinical challenge in obstetrics that affects both the pregnant mother and fetus. Intrauterine hypoxia can occur in pregnant women living at high altitude and/or with cardiovascular disease. In addition, placental hypoxia can be generated by altered placental development and spiral artery remodeling leading to placental insufficiency and dysfunction. Both conditions can impact normal maternal cardiovascular homeostasis leading to preeclampsia and/or impair transfer of O2/nutrient supply resulting in fetal growth restriction. This review discusses the mechanisms underlying altered placental vessel remodeling, maternal and fetal consequences, patient management, and potential future therapies for improving these conditions. Keywords: fetal growth restriction, oxidative stress, extravillous trophoblast invasion, Doppler ultrasound, pulsatility index, preeclampsia 

  15. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Clinical implications of the recent homeopathic medicine and its application to oriental medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Byung,Choi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study is to analyze the practical implications of homeopathic medicines, their status, their preparation systems and registration rules, recognized by the European Union and other countries. Contents : This paper covers the background of homeopathic medical principle, homeopathy throughout the world, the medicine status and clinical research, increases of the drug potency, the practical regulation of treatment, preparation techniques of homeopathic drugs and registration rules and the clinical practice. Homeopathy has been currently practised in over eighty countries throughout the world, especially in Europe. It had attracted considerable attentions in South and North America (notably in USA, Brazil, and Argentina, India and Pakistan. Although it is not dominantly popular in North America, constant growth has been nevertheless noted. Over the last thirty years, homeopathy has also developed or appeared in South Africa, Tunisia, Morocco, Venezuela, Israel, and Australia, etc. Result & suggestion : As over 300 million patients have put their trust in homeopathy, the study of the integration of homeopathy to oriental medicine, its development and feasibility in Korea are urgently needed. The products, substances, compositions of Homeopathic drugs are very similar to those of oriental medicine theory. Therefore their preparations and applications should prescribed and practised exclusively by oriental doctors. Applying the homeopathic theory and its preparation techniques to oriental medicine, the herbal acupuncture preparation should be modernized and various oriental products are to be developed. To this end, government and herbal acupuncture society need to interact each other for the development of oriental medicine.

  17. Effects of entrepreneurial orientation on start-up success: A gender perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Mui Hung Kee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the extent to which gender influences on the practice of Entrepreneurial Orien-tation (EO on Start-up Success. This study was conducted among Spin-off and Symbiosis Com-pany (SSC from all sectors in Peninsular Malaysia. Despite the remarkable research on EO and Start-up firms, there is a missing link on how gender provides different perspectives of EO practic-es among SSC, especially in Malaysia. A total of 120 SSC was chosen and the results show that EO was statistically related to Start-up Success and unveiled the magnitude of change that gender possesses in improving the relationship between EO practice and Start-up Success. The major implication of this study presents the unique contribution of gender in motivating SSC owners to engage in EO. Also, the difference of gender perceptions in business provides a variety of untapped opportunities in terms of entrepreneurial-related practices as different gender perceived different needs and capabilities. Future research is suggested to explore this phenomenon more extensively and develop a comprehensive model for the gender analysis. In brief, the discussion in this paper would help to strengthen the body of knowledge on Entrepreneurship and act as a future reference on SSC, EO, and Start-up Success.

  18. The concept of the death drive: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, Otto

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses Freud 's theory of the death drive in the light of clinical experience with severely self-destructive personality disorders, and contemporary object relations theory. Repetition compulsion, sadism and masochism, negative therapeutic reaction, suicide in depressed and in non-depressed patients, and destructive group processes are explored from this perspective. The paper concludes that the concept of the death drive is clinically relevant, but that this condition needs to be traced to the general dominance of aggressive affects as the primary etiological factor; only under severely pathological circumstances does this dominance lead to a focused drive to self-destruct.

  19. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS).

  20. [Clinical judgment is a schema. Conceptual proposals and training perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Clinical judgment is a critical concept for the development of nursing and nursing education. Its theoretical origins are multiple and its definition is not yet consensus. The analysis of the scientific and professional literature shows heterogeneous and dispersed points of views, notably on the role of intuition, on its cognitive and metacognitive dimensions, and on its proximity to other concepts. Between professional stakes and epistemological constructions, clinical judgment is still an emerging concept.To overcome the obstacle and contribute to the theoretical effort, we will argue that clinical judgment must be analyzed as a schema. It presents all the characteristics : diagnosis and information necessary for reasoning, rational decision-making process, metacognitive control and evaluation of decision-making. Perspectives then open to better understand the nursing activity.In conclusion, recommendations for developing clinical judgment in training will be presented.

  1. A globalization-oriented perspective on health, inequality and socio-economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Arno

    2012-01-01

    There has been an attention to inequality as a causal factor for deficient health in the medical journals over the last decades (Richard G. Wilkinson et al. and Schnell et al.); however, the reasons for inequality and the interactions of the underlying causes of inequality at the level of the world economy have not yet been properly explored in this kind of literature. The aim of this article is to provide a new, globalization-oriented, multi-disciplinary perspective on life expectancy, under-five mortality, inequality and socio-economic development in the world system, compatible with the advances in international sociological research on the subject over the last three decades. Taking up the traditions of quantitative sociology to study the effects of multinational corporation (MNC) penetration as a key determining variable for development outcomes such as socio-economic inequality and infant mortality, this article analyzes from the perspective of quantitative political science and economics this particular role of MNC penetration as the key variable for the determination of health, inequality and socio-economic development in 183 countries of the world system, using international social science standard data. As correctly predicted by quantitative sociology, but largely overlooked by the medical profession, the development style, implied by a high MNC penetration of their host countries, reflects the oligopolistic power, which transnational corporations wield over local economies. We took up an idea from Austro-American economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter (1883-1950), which states that the long-term effects of oligopolistic power are negative and lead toward economic and social stagnation. Our data show that although MNC penetration indeed led to certain short-term growth effects after 1990, today, social polarization and stagnation increase as a consequence of the development model, based on high MNC penetration. There is a negative trade-off between MNC

  2. Goal Orientations, Locus of Control and Academic Achievement in Prospective Teachers: An Individual Differences Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulus, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the prospective teachers' locus of control in goal orientations and of both orientations in academic achievement. The participants were 270 undergraduate students studying in different majors at the Faculty of Education in Pamukkale University. Goal Orientations and Locus of Control Scales were…

  3. Comprehensive perspective on the mechanism of preferred orientation in reactive-sputter-deposited nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Yuya; Noda, Suguru; Komiyama, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Texture control of sputter-deposited nitride films has provoked a great deal of interest due to its technological importance. Despite extensive research, however, the reported results are scattered and discussions about the origin of preferred orientation (PO) are sometimes conflicting, and therefore controversial. The aim of this study is to acquire a clear perspective in order to discuss the origin of PO of sputter-deposited nitrides. Among nitrides, we focus on titanium nitride (TiN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and tantalum nitride (TaN), which are three commonly used nitrides. First, we collected reported experimental results about the relation between operating conditions and PO, because PO is considered to be determined by film formation processes, such as surface diffusion or grain growth, which is affected by operating conditions. We also collected reported results about such PO-determining processes. Then, we categorized the PO-determining processes into an initial stage and a growth stage of film deposition, and further categorized each stage into a vapor-solid interface and a solid-solid interface. Then, we related each stage and interface to film morphology and to PO-determining processes. Finally, based on existing results, previous models, and proposed schema, we discuss the origin of PO. Based on previous experimental results on film morphology, PO of nitride films occurred in the growth stage at the vapor-solid interface, where the sticking process of the precursor and the surface diffusion process determine PO, rather than in the initial stage and in the growth stage at the solid-solid interface. TiN (002) PO, however, seems to be caused in the initial stage at the solid-solid interface

  4. Supervisee self-disclosure: a clinical psychology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Nicola; Fox, John R E; Golding, Laura; Daiches, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Clinical supervision is a multi-functional intervention within numerous psychotherapeutic professions, including clinical psychology. It often relies on supervisees' verbal disclosures of pertinent information. There is limited research on supervisee self-disclosure in the UK, and none using clinical psychology populations. This study aimed to address the limitations in the evidence base. It used a constructivist grounded theory methodology to investigate qualified UK clinical psychologists' use of self-disclosure in supervision in order to develop a theoretical understanding of their self-disclosure processes. Ten clinical psychologists from various time points across the career span were recruited to the study. Four core conceptual categories were identified in the analysis as being integral to participants' decision-making processes: 'Setting the Scene', 'Supervisory Relationship', 'Using Self-disclosure' and 'Reviewing Outcome of Self-disclosure'. These four categories are comprised of a number of subcategories. The study's findings are compared with the current literature base, and it is argued that there are tensions with the scientist-practitioner model as it could be interpreted to encourage an expert stance, which may limit the self-disclosure of qualified supervisees. The implications of this perspective are discussed. Supervision is a key process in supporting qualified clinical psychologists and the use of disclosure appears to be important in facilitating useful supervision. It appears that clinical psychologists go through a number of complex processes in deciding whether to self disclose. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: clinical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Fatih; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well recognized public health problem worldwide. TBI has previously been considered as a rare cause of hypopituitarism, but an increased prevalence of neuroendocrine dysfunction in patients with TBI has been reported during the last 15 years in most of the retrospective and prospective studies. Based on data in the current literature, approximately 15%–20% of TBI patients develop chronic hypopituitarism, which clearly suggests that TBI-induced hypopituitarism is frequent in contrast with previous assumptions. This review summarizes the current data on TBI-induced hypopituitarism and briefly discusses some clinical perspectives on post-traumatic anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. PMID:26251600

  6. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time.

  7. The DSM and Professional Practice: Research, Clinical, and Institutional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Michael

    2016-06-01

    How mental illnesses are defined has significant ramifications, given the substantial social and individual repercussions of these conditions. Using actor-network theory, I analyze how mental health professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in their work. Drawing on observations of a neuropsychological laboratory and interviews with 27 professionals (i.e., psychiatrists, psychologists), I investigate how the DSM is used in research, clinical, and institutional work. In research, the DSM influences study design and exclusion/inclusion criteria. In the clinic, the DSM influences how disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed. Institutionally, the DSM aligns the patient-professional encounter to insurance and pharmaceutical interests. I conclude that the DSM operates as multiple, context-specific taxonomies that pervasively influence professional practices, such that all possible actions must orient to DSM criteria, with professionals both a source and an object of institutionalized gaze. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  8. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are:

  9. GELLO: an object-oriented query and expression language for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Margarita; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Boxwala, Aziz A; Greenes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    GELLO is a purpose-specific, object-oriented (OO) query and expression language. GELLO is the result of a concerted effort of the Decision Systems Group (DSG) working with the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee (CDSTC) to provide the HL7 community with a common format for data encoding and manipulation. GELLO will soon be submitted for ballot to the HL7 CDSTC for consideration as a standard.

  10. A Christian educational perspective on the process oriented approach to intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Mechaéla Scott

    1992-01-01

    Within the classroom context, albeit school or university, intrinsic motivation can effectively be described and changed if a process-oriented approach is employed. The question is posed whether a process-oriented approach to motivation is acceptable to Christian education. To answer this question, intrinsic motivation and the process-oriented approach to motivation are described. A Christian view of self-knowledge and control, which are the main components of a process-oricnted approach to m...

  11. Practitioner perspectives on extended clinical placement programs in optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Sharon A; Cartledge, Amy; Guest, Daryl J; Cappuccio, Skye; Woods, Craig A

    2016-05-01

    Some universities are looking to provide a more diverse range of clinical learning experiences through extended clinical placement programs. This approach will potentially have a significant impact on practitioners. The aim of this study was to conduct a national survey of optometrists to ascertain their perspectives on participating in extended clinical placement programs. Members of Optometry Australia were invited to participate in a survey conducted during June and July 2014. A total of 268 practitioners participated (six per cent of registered Australian optometrists): 159 were predominantly employees or locums and 109 were owners or managers who identified as the key representative of a practice or organisation for the purpose of this survey. Almost two-thirds (65 per cent) of participants, who were employees or locums were supportive of extended clinical placement programs. Among this group, females were more likely to be supportive than males (p = 0.033). In comparison, just over one-third (34 per cent) of participants who were key decision-makers were supportive, with 30 per cent possibly supportive and 36 per cent not supportive. Among key decision-makers, males were more likely to be supportive (p = 0.009). The top three perceived advantages of supervising a student were: opportunity to mentor early career development, opportunity to give back to the profession and future recruitment. The top three perceived disadvantages were: burden on time, decrease in number of patients examined and burden on support staff. Suggested incentives for supervising students were credit for continuing professional development and financial remuneration. There appears to be moderate support for extended clinical placement programs; however, there are incentives that might engage a larger proportion of the profession in the future. These findings can inform the development of effective and sustainable clinical training programs for optometry students. Additionally

  12. Context and clinical reasoning : Understanding the medical student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Elexis; Ratcliffe, Temple; Schuwirth, Lambert; O'Neill, Daniel; Meyer, Holly; Madden, Shelby J; Durning, Steven J

    2018-04-27

    Studies have shown that a physician's clinical reasoning performance can be influenced by contextual factors. We explored how the clinical reasoning performance of medical students was impacted by contextual factors in order to expand upon previous findings in resident and board certified physicians. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework, our aim was to evaluate the verbalized clinical reasoning processes of medical students in order to describe what impact the presence of contextual factors has on their reasoning performance. Seventeen medical student participants viewed three video recordings of clinical encounters portraying straightforward diagnostic cases in internal medicine with explicit contextual factors inserted. Participants completed a computerized post-encounter form as well as a think-aloud protocol. Three authors analyzed verbatim transcripts from the think-aloud protocols using a constant comparative approach. After iterative coding, utterances were analyzed and grouped into categories and themes. Six categories and ten associated themes emerged, which demonstrated overlap with findings from previous studies in resident and attending physicians. Four overlapping categories included emotional disturbances, behavioural inferences about the patient, doctor-patient relationship, and difficulty with closure. Two new categories emerged to include anchoring and misinterpretation of data. The presence of contextual factors appeared to impact clinical reasoning performance in medical students. The data suggest that a contextual factor can be innate to the clinical scenario, consistent with situated cognition theory. These findings build upon our understanding of clinical reasoning performance from both a theoretical and practical perspective.

  13. The 7 C's for Creating Living Software: A Research Perspective for Quality-Oriented Software Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksit, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes the 7 C's for realizing quality-oriented software engineering practices. All the desired qualities of this approach are expressed in short by the term living software. The 7 C's are: Concern-oriented processes, Canonical models, Composable models, Certifiable models,

  14. Teachers, Sexual Orientation, and the Law in Canada: A Human Rights Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher expression on the subject of sexual orientation is a hotly contested topic that has led to many recent legal challenges in the United States and Canada. The purpose of this article is to offer readers an introduction to Canadian cases regarding teacher expression and sexual orientation and demonstrate how the application of a human rights…

  15. Data article on disposition towards enhancing SMEs' performance through entrepreneurial orientations: Perspectives from a developing economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibidunni, Ayodotun Stephen; Ibidunni, Oyebisi Mary; Olokundun, Maxwell Ayodele; Falola, Hezekiah Olubusayo; Salau, Odunayo Paul; Borishade, Taiye Tairat

    2018-06-01

    This article present data on the disposition of SME operators towards enhancing SMEs Performance through entrepreneurial orientations. Copies of structured questionnaire were administered to 102 SME owners/managers. Using descriptive and standard multiple regression statistical analysis, the data described how proactiveness, risk-taking and autonomy orientations significantly influenced SMEs' profitability, sales growth, customer satisfaction and new product success.

  16. Addressing narcissistic personality features in the context of medical care: integrating diverse perspectives to inform clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, J F; Collado-Rodriguez, A; Madan, A; Perez-Camoirano, N A; Galloway, S K; Borckardt, J J; Campbell, W K; Miller, J D

    2012-04-01

    Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is characterized by an unrealistic need for admiration, lack of empathy toward others, and feelings of superiority. NPD presents a unique and significant challenge in clinical practice, particularly in medical settings with limited provider contact time, as health professionals treat individuals who often require excessive admiration and have competing treatment needs. This practice review highlights real case examples across three distinct medically oriented clinical settings (inpatient and outpatient behavioral medicine and a Level I trauma center) to demonstrate the difficult and compromising situations that providers face when treating patients with general medical conditions and comorbid narcissistic personality features. The main goal of this article is to discuss the various challenges and obstacles associated with these cases in medical settings and discuss some strategies that may prove successful. A second goal is to bridge diverse conceptualizations of narcissism/NPD through the discussion of theoretical and empirical perspectives that can inform understanding of the clinical examples. Despite differing perspectives regarding the underlying motivation of narcissistic behavior, this practice review highlights that these paradigms can be integrated when sharing the same ultimate goal: to improve delivery of care across medically oriented clinical settings for patients with narcissistic features.

  17. [Hospital clinical engineer orientation and function in the maintenance system of hospital medical equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Zheng, Yunxin; He, Dehua; Jiang, Ruiyao; Chen, Ying; Jing, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The quantity of medical equipment in hospital rise quickly recent year. It provides the comprehensive support to the clinical service. The maintenance of medical equipment becomes more important than before. It is necessary to study on the orientation and function of clinical engineer in medical equipment maintenance system. Refer to three grade health care system, the community doctors which is called General practitioner, play an important role as the gatekeeper of health care system to triage and cost control. The paper suggests that hospital clinical engineer should play similar role as the gatekeeper of medical equipment maintenance system which composed by hospital clinical engineer, manufacture engineer and third party engineer. The hospital clinical engineer should be responsible of guard a pass of medical equipment maintenance quality and cost control. As the gatekeeper, hospital clinical engineer should take the responsibility of "General engineer" and pay more attention to safety and health of medical equipment. The responsibility description and future transition? development of clinical engineer as "General Engineer" is discussed. More attention should be recommended to the team building of hospital clinical engineer as "General Engineer".

  18. A Simplified Technique for Orientation of a Bone Anchored Auricular Prostheses: a Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein G. El Charkawi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A simple technique was presented in this clinical report for orientation of a bone anchored auricular prosthesis.Methods: The proposed technique includes drawing the intact ear on a transparent celluloid paper or radiographic film and flipping it to the opposite side and relating it to the fixed anatomical features on the face of patient.Results: The drawing, by this way provides a simple and easy way to duplicate and transfer the exact size and position of the intact ear to the defect side.Conclusions: This technique provides a simple, safe, inexpensive and time saving yet, an accurate and effective surgical template that orients the craniofacial implants to the confines of the definitive auricular prosthesis. It is indicated for restoration of single missing external ear either in aplasia, injuries and total resection.

  19. Time perspective in hereditary cancer: psychometric properties of a short form of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory in a community and clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Claire E; Homewood, Judi; Taylor, Alan; Mahmut, Mehmet; Meiser, Bettina

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to assess the psychometric properties of a 25-item short form of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory in a community sample (N = 276) and in individuals with a strong family history of cancer, considering genetic testing for cancer risk (N = 338). In the community sample, individuals with high past-negative or present-fatalistic scores had higher levels of distress, as measured by depression, anxiety, and aggression. Similarly, in the patient sample, past-negative time perspective was positively correlated with distress, uncertainty, and postdecision regret when making a decision about genetic testing. Past-negative-oriented individuals were also more likely to be undecided about, or against, genetic testing. Hedonism was associated with being less likely to read the educational materials they received at their clinic, and fatalism was associated with having lower knowledge levels about genetic testing. The assessment of time perspective in individuals at increased risk of cancer can provide valuable clinical insights. However, further investigation of the psychometric properties of the short form of this scale is warranted, as it did not meet the currently accepted criteria for psychometric validation studies.

  20. Patient retention at dental school clinics: a marketing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Suzanne C; Coe, Julie M

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the drivers of patient retention at dental school clinics from a services marketing perspective. An analysis of patient characteristics at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, screened between August 2010 and July 2011 (N=3604), was performed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations, and a binary logistic regression. The main findings were that 42 percent of patients in the study were retained and that no response to communication efforts (36 percent) and financial problems (28 percent) constituted the most common reasons for non-retention. Older age, having insurance, and living within a sixty-mile radius were significant drivers of retention (pskills to better service them, and consequently increasing retention. This will lead to providing a continuum of care and student education and to ensuring the sustainability and quality of the school's educational programs.

  1. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bütof, Rebecca; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  2. A clinical perspective on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhotra, Ritu M; Ikram, Mohd; Srivastava, Sunny; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucoadhesion can be defined as a state in which two components, of which one is of biological origin, are held together for extended periods of time by the help of interfacial forces. Among the various transmucosal routes, buccal mucosa has excellent accessibility and relatively immobile mucosa, hence suitable for administration of retentive dosage form. The objective of this paper is to review the works done so far in the field of mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems (MBDDS), with a clinical perspective. Starting with a brief introduction of the mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, oral mucosa, and the theories of mucoadhesion, this article then proceeds to cover the works done so far in the field of MBDDS, categorizing them on the basis of ailments they are meant to cure. Additionally, we focus on the various patents, recent advancements, and challenges as well as the future prospects for mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems. PMID:24683406

  3. Collective memory: a perspective from (experimental) clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Ineke; Moulds, Michelle L

    2008-04-01

    This paper considers the concept of collective memory from an experimental clinical psychology perspective. Exploration of the term collective reveals a broad distinction between literatures that view collective memories as a property of groups (collectivistic memory) and those that regard these memories as a property of individuals who are, to a greater or lesser extent, an integral part of their social environment (social memory). First, we argue that the understanding of collectivistic memory phenomena may benefit from drawing parallels with current psychological models such as the self-memory system theory of individualistic autobiographical memory. Second, we suggest that the social memory literature may inform the study of trauma-related disorders. We argue that a factual focus induced by collaborative remembering may be beneficial to natural recovery in the immediate aftermath of trauma, and propose that shared remembering techniques may provide a useful addition to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

  4. Psychotherapy in Argentina: a clinical case from an integrative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Beatriz

    2007-08-01

    The article describes psychotherapy practice in Argentina. It outlines the main features of training and regulation of clinical psychologists. A brief description of the main treatment approaches and the major current challenges is presented. Subsequently it delineates the probable treatment locations and options for a 30-year-old woman, Mrs. A, seeking psychological help in Argentina. The case is then considered from an integrative perspective starting with the intake process, which includes a comprehensive pretreatment assessment followed by the treatment plan. Its course is described as composed of four stages: (1) psychoeducational initial intervention, (2) psychotherapy for symptom alleviation, (3) marital treatment, and (4) psychoeducational final intervention. Posttreatment evaluation and possible outcome and prognosis are presented, as well as factors that might prevent improvement. The article ends with a hopeful view of the future role of psychotherapy in Argentina. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Familicide from a clinical-community psychology perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Pretorius-Heuchert

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article familicide and homicide-suicide acts in South Africa and elsewhere are discussed. Issues that are considered include the following: the definition of familicide, the incidence of cases, population groups involved, the role of suicide, the role of psychopathology, familial versus nonfamilial murderers, the influence of stress, male proprietariness in combination with an exaggerated sense of responsibility, age and gender, and sociopolitical influences. A n attempt is made to integrate the personal and societal factors of familicide from a clinical-community psychology perspective, relying specifically on the theories of Frantz Fanon and Hussein Bulhan. It is proposed that an understanding of the oppressor-oppressed relationship, as well as threats to that relationship, may shed light on the current high rate of familicide that occurs mostly among white Afrikaner, South African males, and their families.

  6. EGFR signaling in colorectal cancer: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saletti P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piercarlo Saletti,1 Francesca Molinari,2 Sara De Dosso,1 Milo Frattini2 1Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, Locarno, Switzerland Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains a formidable health burden worldwide, with up to 50% of patients developing metastases during the course of their disease. This group of CRC patients, characterized by the worst prognosis, has been extensively investigated to improve their life expectancy. Main efforts, focused on the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR, which plays a pivotal role in CRC pathogenesis, have led to the development and introduction in clinical practice of specific targeted therapies (ie, monoclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the scientific community has tried to identify molecular predictors of the efficacy of such therapies. However, it has become clear that EGFR alterations occurring in CRC are difficult to investigate, and therefore their predictive role is unclear. In contrast, the clinical role of two downstream members (KRAS and NRAS has been clearly demonstrated. Currently, EGFR-targeted therapies can be administered only to patients with wild-type KRAS and NRAS genes. Our review addresses the medical management of metastatic CRC. Specifically, we describe in detail the molecular biology of metastatic CRC, focusing on the EGFR signaling pathway, and we discuss the role of current and emerging related biomarkers and therapies in this field. We also summarize the clinical evidence regarding anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and examine potential future perspectives. Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR, gene mutations, cetuximab, panitumumab

  7. Treatnebt if Addiction - Clinical and Judicial Perspectives: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Fonseca

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The sporadic or chronic use of drugs and alcohol is directly related to conduct disorders and to the triggering of psychopathological states of sub-acute or chronic course. The excessive consumption of alcohol and excessive traffic/consumption of illicit drugs by individuals without mental illness or disability are actions of free will; they are therefore criminally responsible for their behaviour, even if they commit a crime during the state of intoxication, which the individual chose voluntarily to experience. In clinical practice, it is widely accepted that the treatment of these disorders is only effective when the patient accepts it voluntarily and that involuntary commitment (compulsive treatment is only carried out when the psychopathological state associated justifies the presuppositions of Article 12 of the Mental Health Law. However, if the compulsive treatment is of a penal character, mandated by a judge, the individual is obligated to accept treatment, independent of whether or not he suffers from mental illness. The authors present two case studies, one of drug addiction, the other of alcoholism, and discuss the clinical and judicial perspectives on the treatment of these clinical entities.

  8. Data management in clinical research: Synthesizing stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B; Farach, Frank J; Pelphrey, Kevin; Rozenblit, Leon

    2016-04-01

    This study assesses data management needs in clinical research from the perspectives of researchers, software analysts and developers. This is a mixed-methods study that employs sublanguage analysis in an innovative manner to link the assessments. We performed content analysis using sublanguage theory on transcribed interviews conducted with researchers at four universities. A business analyst independently extracted potential software features from the transcriptions, which were translated into the sublanguage. This common sublanguage was then used to create survey questions for researchers, analysts and developers about the desirability and difficulty of features. Results were synthesized using the common sublanguage to compare stakeholder perceptions with the original content analysis. Individual researchers exhibited significant diversity of perspectives that did not correlate by role or site. Researchers had mixed feelings about their technologies, and sought improvements in integration, interoperability and interaction as well as engaging with study participants. Researchers and analysts agreed that data integration has higher desirability and mobile technology has lower desirability but disagreed on the desirability of data validation rules. Developers agreed that data integration and validation are the most difficult to implement. Researchers perceive tasks related to study execution, analysis and quality control as highly strategic, in contrast with tactical tasks related to data manipulation. Researchers have only partial technologic support for analysis and quality control, and poor support for study execution. Software for data integration and validation appears critical to support clinical research, but may be expensive to implement. Features to support study workflow, collaboration and engagement have been underappreciated, but may prove to be easy successes. Software developers should consider the strategic goals of researchers with regard to the

  9. Czech copreneur orientations to business and family responsibilities: A mixed embeddedness perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jurik, N.; Křížková, A. (Alena); Pospíšilová, M. (Marie)

    2016-01-01

    This paper applies mixed-embeddedness approach to examine how state welfare policies, employment conditions and gender norms shape orientations to divisions of business and domestic labor among Czech copreneurs, i.e. romantic couples involved in businesses together. Twelve copreneur couples were interviewed. Women’s narratives are centered in analyzing motivations for business, divisions of labor, orientation to business/family and state policies. Female respondents expressed three orientatio...

  10. Generalizing Perspective-based Inspection to handle Object-Oriented Development Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Laitenberger, O.; Atkinson, C.

    1998-01-01

    The value of software inspection for uncovering defects early in the development lifecycle has been well documented. Of the various types of inspection methods published to date, experiments have shown perspective-based inspection to be one of the most effective, because of its enhanced coverage of the defect space. However, inspections in general, and perspective-based inspections in particular, have so far been applied predominantly in the context of conventional structured development meth...

  11. PERSPECTIVE: Translational neural engineering: multiple perspectives on bringing benchtop research into the clinical domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousche, Patrick; Schneeweis, David M.; Perreault, Eric J.; Jensen, Winnie

    2008-03-01

    A half-day forum to address a wide range of issues related to translational neural engineering was conducted at the annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society. Successful practitioners of translational neural engineering from academics, clinical medicine and industry were invited to share a diversity of perspectives and experiences on the translational process. The forum was targeted towards traditional academic researchers who may be interested in the expanded funding opportunities available for translational research that emphasizes product commercialization and clinical implementation. The seminar was funded by the NIH with support from the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. We report here a summary of the speaker viewpoints with particular focus on extracting successful strategies for engaging in or conducting translational neural engineering research. Daryl Kipke, PhD, (Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan) and Molly Shoichet, PhD, (Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto) gave details of their extensive experience with product commercialization while holding primary appointments in academic departments. They both encouraged strong clinical input at very early stages of research. Neurosurgeon Fady Charbel, MD, (Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Illinois at Chicago) discussed his role in product commercialization as a clinician. Todd Kuiken, MD, PhD, (Director of the Neural Engineering for Artificial Limbs at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, affiliated with Northwestern University) also a clinician, described a model of translational engineering that emphasized the development of clinically relevant technology, without a strong commercialization imperative. The clinicians emphasized the importance of communicating effectively with engineers. Representing commercial neural engineering was Doug Sheffield, PhD, (Director of New Technology at Vertis Neuroscience, Inc.) who

  12. Clinical Approach to the Standardization of Oriental Medical Diagnostic Pattern Identification in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, many stroke patients receive oriental medical care, in which pattern-identification plays a major role. Pattern-identification is Oriental Medicine's unique diagnostic system. This study attempted to standardize oriental medical pattern-identification for stroke patients. This was a community-based multicenter study that enrolled stroke patients within 30 days after their ictus. We assessed the patients' general characteristics and symptoms related to pattern-identification. Each patient's pattern was determined when two doctors had the same opinion. To determine which variables affect the pattern-identification, binary logistic regression analysis was used with the backward method. A total of 806 stroke patients were enrolled. Among 480 patients who were identified as having a certain pattern, 100 patients exhibited the Fire Heat Pattern, 210 patients the Phlegm Dampness Pattern, nine patients the Blood Stasis Pattern, 110 patients the Qi Deficiency Pattern, and 51 patients the Yin Deficiency Pattern. After the regression analysis, the predictive logistic equations for the Fire Heat, Phlegm Dampness, Qi Deficiency, and Yin Deficiency patterns were determined. The Blood Stasis Pattern was omitted because the sample size was too small. Predictive logistic equations were suggested for four of the patterns. These criteria would be useful in determining each stroke patient's pattern in clinics. However, further studies with large samples are necessary to validate and confirm these criteria.

  13. From Postcolonial Criticism to Critics on Postcolonial Poetics – Edward Said's Orientalism from an Iconographic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Akira Schickhaus

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Inside and outside the academy, Edward Said's work is both preeminent and controversial. Combining literary theory, the history of ideas, political analysis and the sociology of intellectuals, his groundbreaking book Orientalism has radically transformed the field of Oriental studies, arguably laying the foundation for postcolonial studies. Criticizing the condition of the Palestinian people, Said also has constantly provided a critique of US government policy in the Middle East and has thus proposed a model of intellectual skepticism which deals with political issues. This combination of political and academic interventions is one reason "for Said’s special position in contemporary Western intellectual life" (Kennedy 3. If we look at Said's classic monography as a painting of geographical knowledgelandscapes, an iconographical investigation into the traditions of knowledge and ideological styles becomes possible. This paper will begin by presenting Orientalism's arguments and will then summarize the main critiques aimed at Said. It continues to describe the analytic discourse in Orientalism based on the method of iconographic interpretation as described in Panofsky's collection of essays Meaning in the Visual Arts. This interdisciplinary approach intends to demonstrate the argumentative circularity and self-reflexivity inherent in Said's criticism: by drawing exclusively on Western histories of ideas, the concept Orientalism itself can become the object of postcolonial criticism.

  14. An Empirical Study on Entrepreneurial Orientation, Absorptive Capacity, and SMEs’ Innovation Performance: A Sustainable Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Zhai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a survey of 324 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs of the Yangtze River Delta in China, this study discusses the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation, absorptive capacity, environmental dynamism, and corporate technological innovation performance. The results based on a moderated moderation model show that the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and innovation performance is significantly positive. The absorptive capacity can positively moderate this relationship. When the external environment is in high dynamism, the moderating effect of absorptive capacity will be stronger than when the environment is in low dynamism.

  15. Physiotherapy students’ perceptions of an innovative approach to clinical practice orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faure

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The transition from the classroom to clinical practice is stressful for many students. In the current situation in South Africawith the shortages of clinicians’ posts in hospitals, this transition is evenmore difficult given the reduced time that clinicians have for supervisingundergraduate students. The University of Stellenbosch initiated structured peer-led introduction to clinical education (SPLICE, duringwhich senior physiotherapy students orientate second year students toclinical practice.The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of all of thesecond, third and fourth year students who took part in these SPLICEsessions. This information was captured using a questionnaire with open and closed questions. The response of all of the students was extremely positive. Common to all cohorts of students was the opinion of themotivational benefits of the sessions as well as the opinion that their confidence increased. Students in the variousyears of study differed in the ways in which they felt more confident. Closely linked were those comments referring to a sense of increased preparedness for clinical practice and a positive learning environment. A positive change inattitude towards clinical practice was also noted in many second year students.Further research is needed into the effect that SPLICE might have had on the second year students when they enterclinical practice as third year students. The role and opinions of patients during these sessions, and indeed during anyclinical education sessions, including clinical examinations, needs further investigation.

  16. Product Innovation in Sustainability-Oriented New Ventures : A Process Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keskin, D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recognition that new ventures are potential candidates of creating innovations necessary for sustainability, little is know on how they actually engage in this journey. Sustainability-oriented new ventures are confronted with high levels of uncertainty that stem from the liabilities of

  17. The Relationship between Future Goals and Achievement Goal Orientations: An Intrinsic-Extrinsic Motivation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie Qi; McInerney, Dennis M.; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Ortiga, Yasmin P.

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to study the relationships between students' future goals (FGs) and their immediate achievement goal orientations (AGOs) among 5733 Singaporean secondary school students (M age = 14.18, SD = 1.26; 53% boys). To this end, we hypothesized that the relationships between like valenced FGs and AGOs (both intrinsic or both extrinsic)…

  18. Transition to Adult-Oriented Health Care: Perspectives of Youth and Adults with Complex Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nancy L.; Barden, Wendy S.; Mills, Wendy A.; Burke, Tricia A.; Law, Mary; Boydell, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The transition to adulthood is extremely difficult for individuals with disabilities. We sought to explore the specific issue of transition to adult-oriented health care in a Canadian context. Methods: We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 15 youth and 15 adults with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and acquired brain…

  19. A Christian educational perspective on the process oriented approach to intrinsic motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechaéla Scott

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the classroom context, albeit school or university, intrinsic motivation can effectively be described and changed if a process-oriented approach is employed. The question is posed whether a process-oriented approach to motivation is acceptable to Christian education. To answer this question, intrinsic motivation and the process-oriented approach to motivation are described. A Christian view of self-knowledge and control, which are the main components of a process-oricnted approach to motivation, is subsequently given and the process-oriented approach to motivation is subjected to a Christian evaluation. The conclusions are drawn that this approach can fruitfully be used in Christian education, given that self-knowledge and control arc interpreted within the context of the concept of the student as God’s representative on earth and the fact that God equipped him adequately with cognitive, affective and conative abilities to respond to His call to discover, develop and rule the earth actively.

  20. Perspectives on the Cultural Appropriacy of Hong Kong's Target-Oriented Curriculum (TOC) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David Robert

    1999-01-01

    Explores the impact of Chinese culture on the school curriculum in Hong Kong. Argues that the Target-Oriented Curriculum (TOC) transplanted from western-based concepts is not commensurate with the local Chinese cultural context, and therefore leads to many problems when being implemented in schools. (Author/VWL)

  1. Calling Orientations of Junior Doctors and Medical Interns in India: Cultural, Occupational and Relational Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the factors that shape calling orientations within the Indian context. Based on the narratives of 72 junior doctors and medical interns, it is found that participants identify with harbouring a calling both prior and subsequent to occupational entry. Although factors such as self-recognition of talent and sensemaking of work as…

  2. CSR orientations as a guiding principle for innovativeness : a supply chain perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kibbeling, M.I.; Bij, van der J.D.; Weele, van A.J.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    A central debate in literature today concerns the relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and firm competitiveness. We advance this debate by proposing a sense-and-response mechanism in which CSR acts as a strategic orientation for developing within firm capabilities, in

  3. Student-Customer Orientation at a Higher Education Institution: The Perspective of Undergraduate Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koris, Riina; Örtenblad, Anders; Kerem, Katri; Ojala, Triinu

    2015-01-01

    Existing literature is polarized and primarily conceptual on the topic of student-customer orientation. Research into this phenomenon has failed to realize that higher education as such consists of several different educational experiences and has therefore addressed and studied the issue at too general a level, i.e. at the level of the higher…

  4. Can "Any" Teacher Teach Sexuality and HIV/AIDS? Perspectives of South African Life Orientation Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleve, Arnfinn; Flisher, Alan J.; Onya, Hans; Mukoma, Wanjiru; Klepp, Knut-Inge

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the perceived desirable characteristics of South African Life Orientation teachers for teaching sexuality and HIV/AIDS. We also investigate the extent to which these characteristics can be understood as parts of a role script for teaching HIV/AIDS and sexuality. Data were collected from teachers who taught Grade Eight and…

  5. In Defense of Language Rights: Rethinking the Rights Orientation from a Political Economy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses language rights as a legitimate political tool for language policy scholarship and activism. The article begins by engaging several critiques of language rights. It analyzes Ruiz's language-as-right orientation to language policy, and then reviews recent scholarship challenging language rights from poststructural and…

  6. The first pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic under a collaborative practice agreement in Qatar: clinical and patient-oriented outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, H F; AbdelSamad, O; Elmubark, A E; Al-Taweel, H M; Mohamed, A; Kheir, N; Mohamed Ibrahim, M I; Awaisu, A

    2016-08-01

    Optimal outpatient anticoagulation management requires a systematic and coordinated approach. Extensive evidence regarding the benefits of pharmacist-managed anticoagulation services has been reported in the literature. The quality and outcomes associated with pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics under collaborative practice agreements in the Middle East have rarely been reported. The first pharmacist-managed ambulatory anticoagulation clinic in Qatar was launched at Al-Wakrah Hospital in March 2013. The objectives of this study were to: (i) describe the practice model of the clinic, (ii) evaluate the quality of the clinic [i.e. the time in therapeutic range (TTR)] and the clinical outcomes (i.e. the efficacy and safety), and (iii) determine the patients' satisfaction and overall quality of life (QoL). Clinical outcome data were collected through a retrospective chart review of all patients managed from March 2013 to October 2014 at the pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic. Furthermore, the patient-oriented outcomes data were prospectively collected using the 24-item Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS). Each item was assessed using a 7-point Likert-type scale on which lower scores indicated better QoL and greater satisfaction. The clinical outcome data analyses included 119 patients who were enrolled at the clinic during the 19-month study period. The mean number of international normalized ratio (INR) tests/month was 65 ± 9, the average testing frequency was 2·7 ± 1·6 weeks, and the average %TTR was 76·8 ± 22·9%. There was one major bleeding event (0·67%/year), 12 minor bleeding events (8%/year) and two thromboembolic events (1·35%/year) recorded during the study period. Of the 119 patients, 50 participated in the satisfaction and QoL survey. The median (IQR) total QoL score of these subjects was 63 (48) (minimum-maximum achievable score: 24-168). Seventy-six per cent of the patients indicated 'a lot to very much' in terms of their

  7. Clinical and Insurance Perspectives on Intermediate Levels of Care in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric M

    2018-03-01

    This column compares a clinical perspective on the continuum of care for mental health and substance use disorders with a different perspective derived from publicly available insurance company documents and experience dealing with managed care utilization reviewers. The latter perspective tends to determine the need for access to levels of care based on the need for crisis stabilization, whereas the generally accepted clinical standard is more nuanced than the need for crisis stabilization alone. The column proposes that this discrepancy in perspectives makes a substantial contribution to disagreements between treating clinicians, such as therapists, and insurance utilization reviewers concerning the medical necessity of various requested levels of care.

  8. The future orientation of constructive memory: an evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest; Erickson-Klein, Roxanna; Rossi, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    We explore a new distinction between the future, prospective memory system being investigated in current neuroscience and the past, retrospective memory system, which was the original theoretical foundation of therapeutic hypnosis, classical psychoanalysis, and psychotherapy. We then generalize a current evolutionary theory of sleep and dreaming, which focuses on the future, prospective memory system, to conceptualize a new evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy. The implication of current neuroscience research is that activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity are the psychobiological basis of adaptive behavior, consciousness, and creativity in everyday life as well as psychotherapy. We summarize a case illustrating how this evolutionary perspective can be used to quickly resolve problems with past obstructive procrastination in school to facilitate current and future academic success.

  9. Effect of NICU Department Orientation Program on Mother’s Anxiety: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neonatal intensive care unit induces the high level of anxiety for mothers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of NICU orientation program on the anxiety of mothers who had preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial (three parallel groups. Participants included 99 mothers with preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU of Al- Zahra hospital, affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Mothers were randomly assigned to one of three groups (film, booklet, and control. Mothers completed the State- Trait Anxiety Inventory before entering to the NICU, and then mothers in the experiment groups became familiar with the NICU environment through watching a film or reading booklet. After the first NICU visit, all mothers completed the STAI and Cattell's Anxiety Questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 13 software. Results: There was no significant difference between three groups regarding state- trait anxiety before the intervention. After the first NICU visit, a significant reduction in maternal state anxiety was seen in the both experiment groups. There was no statistical significant difference regarding trait anxiety. Data obtained from Cattell's anxiety questionnaire after intervention, showed significant difference in state anxiety between groups. Conclusion: Employing film and booklet orientation strategy after preterm delivery can reduce the mother’s anxiety and beneficent for the mother, baby, family and health care system.

  10. [Clinical orientation and thought on several problems in post-marketed reassessment of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Su, Xia; Yu, Jie; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    The post-marketed reassessment is an important link to ensure the safety and effectiveness of traditional chinese medicine. It is also the expansion and stretch of new drug evaluation. Through the systematic, standard, rigorous post-marketed reassessment, the enterprise can full access to drugs after listing the efficacy and safety information, evaluate the interests and risk of the drug and provide the scientific basis for the drug use. It can also provide timely, scientific technology basis for government health decisions, the enterprise marketing decision and public health security. This paper mainly discussed the thought on clinical orientation of traditional chinese medicine in the post-marketed reassessment and how to reach the goal through systematic consideration and overall plan.

  11. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS.

  12. A Topic Space Oriented User Group Discovering Scheme in Social Network: A Trust Chain Based Interest Measuring Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, user group has become an effective platform for information sharing and communicating among users in social network sites. In present work, we propose a single topic user group discovering scheme, which includes three phases: topic impact evaluation, interest degree measurement, and trust chain based discovering, to enable selecting influential topic and discovering users into a topic oriented group. Our main works include (1 an overview of proposed scheme and its related definitions; (2 topic space construction method based on topic relatedness clustering and its impact (influence degree and popularity degree evaluation; (3 a trust chain model to take user relation network topological information into account with a strength classification perspective; (4 an interest degree (user explicit and implicit interest degree evaluation method based on trust chain among users; and (5 a topic space oriented user group discovering method to group core users according to their explicit interest degrees and to predict ordinary users under implicit interest and user trust chain. Finally, experimental results are given to explain effectiveness and feasibility of our scheme.

  13. Relationship between protean career orientation and work-life balance: A resource perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Direnzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Christy H.

    2015-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/job.1996 Despite the commonly held belief that a protean career orientation (PCO) enables employees to achieve more balance in their lives, little is known about the relationship between PCO and work-life balance. Using two waves of data collection separated by 2.5 years, this study examined the relationship between PCO and work-life balance among a sample of 367 college-educated employees in the Unite...

  14. The significance and perspectives of role playing as a teaching method in process oriented nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    小松, 万喜子; 冨岡, 詔子; 山崎, 章恵; 柳澤, 節子; 百瀬, 由美子

    1999-01-01

    This study was to report the results of students' responses to role playing which has been introduced as a teaching method in adult nursing clinical practice. About 80% of 79 students participated, positively evaluated their experiences in role playing as useful to their clinical practice, with 20% claiming negatively as not useful. An overall result suggested the usefulness of role playing as a method to enhance students' general readiness to their clinical practice. As students with negativ...

  15. Where to remove radioactive waste? Perspective for a problem-oriented sociological repository research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocke, P.; Grunwald, A.

    2006-01-01

    The search for a final disposal site for high-level nuclear waste in Germany is to characterize as an enduring and politicised conflict causing a blocked process of decision making. A social science based research on final disposals, reflecting this stalemate situation in Germany, did not take place since the middle of the 1980s. This book persues three aims, it analyses the conflict situation in an historical and a systematic view, it discusses the new decision- and participation procedures and it formulates a socio-scientific research perspective on waste disposal. Th volume directs to political decision makers, representants from industry and economy, scientists and actors from the citizen sector. (GL)

  16. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    OpenAIRE

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30?years but no research has captured nurses? clinicians? views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses? understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-struct...

  17. Hospital process orientation from an operations management perspective: development of a measurement tool and practical testing in three ophthalmic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Pedro D; Hagenbeek, Marie Louise; Vissers, Jan M H

    2013-11-13

    Although research interest in hospital process orientation (HPO) is growing, the development of a measurement tool to assess process orientation (PO) has not been very successful yet. To view a hospital as a series of processes organized around patients with a similar demand seems to be an attractive proposition, but it is hard to operationalize this idea in a measurement tool that can actually measure the level of PO. This research contributes to HPO from an operations management (OM) perspective by addressing the alignment, integration and coordination of activities within patient care processes. The objective of this study was to develop and practically test a new measurement tool for assessing the degree of PO within hospitals using existing tools. Through a literature search we identified a number of constructs to measure PO in hospital settings. These constructs were further operationalized, using an OM perspective. Based on five dimensions of an existing questionnaire a new HPO-measurement tool was developed to measure the degree of PO within hospitals on the basis of respondents' perception. The HPO-measurement tool was pre-tested in a non-participating hospital and discussed with experts in a focus group. The multicentre exploratory case study was conducted in the ophthalmic practices of three different types of Dutch hospitals. In total 26 employees from three disciplines participated. After filling in the questionnaire an interview was held with each participant to check the validity and the reliability of the measurement tool. The application of the HPO-measurement tool, analysis of the scores and interviews with the participants resulted in the possibility to identify differences of PO performance and the areas of improvement--from a PO point of view--within each hospital. The result of refinement of the items of the measurement tool after practical testing is a set of 41 items to assess the degree of PO from an OM perspective within hospitals. The

  18. Perspectives for geographically oriented management of fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Booij, C J H

    2010-06-01

    This article provides an overview of available systems for management of Fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal grain supply chain, with an emphasis on the use of predictive mathematical modeling. From the state of the art, it proposes future developments in modeling and management and their challenges. Mycotoxin contamination in cereal grain-based feed and food products is currently managed and controlled by good agricultural practices, good manufacturing practices, hazard analysis critical control points, and by checking and more recently by notification systems and predictive mathematical models. Most of the predictive models for Fusarium mycotoxins in cereal grains focus on deoxynivalenol in wheat and aim to help growers make decisions about the application of fungicides during cultivation. Future developments in managing Fusarium mycotoxins should include the linkage between predictive mathematical models and geographical information systems, resulting into region-specific predictions for mycotoxin occurrence. The envisioned geographically oriented decision support system may incorporate various underlying models for specific users' demands and regions and various related databases to feed the particular models with (geographically oriented) input data. Depending on the user requirements, the system selects the best fitting model and available input information. Future research areas include organizing data management in the cereal grain supply chain, developing predictive models for other stakeholders (taking into account the period up to harvest), other Fusarium mycotoxins, and cereal grain types, and understanding the underlying effects of the regional component in the models.

  19. Evaluation of Beckman Coulter DxI 800 immunoassay system using clinically oriented performance goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Neval; Schryver, Patricia G; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Baumann, Nikola A; Block, Darci R; Budd, Jeffrey R; Gaston, S J Stephen; Klee, George G

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of 24 immunoassays using the Beckman Coulter DxI 800 immunoassay systems at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN for trueness, precision, detection limits, linearity, and consistency (across instruments and reagent lots). Clinically oriented performance goals were defined using the following methods: trueness-published desirable accuracy limits, precision-published desirable biologic variation; detection limits - 0.1 percentile of patient test values, linearity - 50% of total error, and consistency-percentage test values crossing key decision points. Local data were collected for precision, linearity, and consistency. Data were provided by Beckman Coulter, Inc. for trueness and detection limits. All evaluated assays except total thyroxine were within the proposed goals for trueness. Most of the assays met the proposed goals for precision (86% of intra-assay results and 75% of inter-assay results). Five assays had more than 15% of the test results below the minimum detection limits. Carcinoembryonic antigen, total thyroxine and free triiodothyronine exceeded the proposed goals of ±6.3%, ±5% and ±5.7% for dilution linearity. All evaluated assays were within the proposed goals for instrument consistency. Lot-to-lot consistency results for cortisol, ferritin and total thyroxine exceeded the proposed goals of 3.3%, 11.4% and 7% at one medical decision level, while vitamin B12 exceeded the proposed goals of 5.2% and 3.8% at two decision levels. The Beckman Coulter DxI 800 immunoassay system meets most of these proposed goals, even though these clinically focused performance goals represent relatively stringent limits. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards a narrative theological orientation in a global village from a postmodern urban South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann-Albrecht Meylahn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This article was motivated by two of the major challenges which I believe congregations are facing within� the context of ministry, namely postmodernity and globalization. After seeking a fuller description of these two challenges I sought� a theological orientation within such a context (postmodern global village as well as an ecclesiological� praxis that could be transformative and redemptive within such a context. I� believe to have found in the narrative orientation an appropriate way for doing theology in the postmodern context. The climax of this journey (story is in the fusion of horizons between the theory-laden questions of descriptive theology and� the historical texts of the Christian faith within the narrative orientation. I discovered that truly transformative and redemptive praxis is only possible within� language communities� narrative communities. These narrative communities cannot exist in isolation, but are continuously confronted and relativised by the stories of other communities in the global village and therefore these language communities need to be open to the fragmentation and pluralism of the global village, otherwise they will not be able to respond to the reality of the globalization and postmodernity. The narrative communities needed a story (sacred story that did not deny the reality� of fragmentation� and pluralism, but could incorporate this reality into its story. I found this story in the story of the cross and� therefore refer to the narrative communities as communities� of� and under the cross� of Christ. These ideas formed the basis for a transformative praxis within a specific congregation, namely Pastoral Redemptive Communities. These narrative communities are not an answer to the postmodern global village, but they do offer a way of proclaiming Christ crucified and allowing the deconstruction of the cross to create a community which is a redemptive alternative to the reality of

  1. Basic life support through early clinical exposure: Students’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varshini Athipathy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an attempt is made to analyse the students’ perspective on ECE. The effectiveness of this program and the extent to which the students are benefitted is being evaluated.

  2. Veteran satisfaction and treatment preferences in response to a posttraumatic stress disorder specialty clinic orientation group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Jeremiah A; Walter, Kristen H; Bartone, Anne S; Chard, Kathleen M

    2015-06-01

    To maximize accessibility to evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has widely disseminated cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure (PE) therapy to VA clinicians. However, there is a lack of research on veteran preferences when presented with a range of psychotherapy and medication options. This study uses a mixed-method approach to explore veteran satisfaction with a VA PTSD specialty clinic pre-treatment orientation group, which provides education about available PTSD treatment options. This study also tested differences in treatment preference in response to the group. Participants were 183 US veterans. Most were White, male, and referred to the clinic by a VA provider. Results indicated high satisfaction with the group in providing an overview of services and helping to inform treatment choice. Most preferred psychotherapy plus medications (63.4%) or psychotherapy only (30.1%). Participants endorsed a significantly stronger preference for CPT versus other psychotherapies. PE was significantly preferred over nightmare resolution therapy and present-centered therapy, and both PE and cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy were preferred over virtual reality exposure therapy. Results suggest that by informing consumers about evidence-based treatments for PTSD, pre-treatment educational approaches may increase consumer demand for these treatment options. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  4. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs and bioinformatics (BI represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  5. Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...... at different time points along this longitudinal investigation are performed with a comprehensive set of omics platforms. These data sets are generated in a biological context, rather than biochemical compound class-driven manner, which we term "systems omics."...

  6. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses’ clinicians’ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses’ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. Conclusion There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An ‘ideal nurse’ may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community. PMID:23587282

  7. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses' clinicians' views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses' understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An 'ideal nurse' may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community.

  8. ‘BORN FREES’, NEGOTIATING THE TERRAIN TOWARDS SELFHOOD AND WELLNESS: A LIFE ORIENTATION PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meahabo Dinah Magano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was contextualised within the Life Orientation subject of ‘Self in Society’. It acknowledges that the present time is uniquely significant in South African history as the generation of youth leaving school are now considered ‘born frees’. This generation is considered to be free from the first-hand trauma that was experienced in the past; they supposedly live in a society free from the shackles of apartheid, and enjoy equality and human rights that affect their entire well-being. ‘Born frees’, it appears, are still negotiating the journey towards a new identity and freedom. The sample size was nine Grade 11 female learners who attend an urban school in Gauteng Province. The school was purposefully chosen because it had a good track record of class attendance and the learners are proficient in English. Questions revolved around the multiple aspects of self and well-being in society. Focus group sessions were held after which six of the learners completed a questionnaire with open-ended questions based on the sub-topics. All ethical considerations were observed. Findings revealed that these youths are in fact traversing a far more complex political, social, psychological, spiritual and economic landscape than that captured in the phrase ‘born frees’.

  9. Are School Policies Focused on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Associated with Less Bullying? Teachers’ Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Day, Jack K.; Ioverno, Salvatore; Toomey, Russell B.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying is common in U.S. schools and is linked to emotional, behavioral, and academic risk for school-aged students. School policies and practices focused on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) have been designed to reduce bullying and show promising results. Most studies have drawn from students’ reports: We examined teachers’ reports of bullying problems in their schools along with their assessments of school safety, combined with principals’ reports of SOGI-focused policies and practices. Merging two independent sources of data from over 3,000 teachers (California School Climate Survey) and nearly 100 school principals (School Health Profiles) at the school level, we used multi-level models to understand bullying problems in schools. Our results show that SOGI-focused policies reported by principals do not have a strong independent association with teachers’ reports of bullying problems in their schools. However, in schools with more SOGI-focused policies, the association between teachers’ assessments of school safety and bullying problems is stronger. Recent developments in education law and policy in the United States and their relevance for student well-being are discussed. PMID:26790701

  10. Are school policies focused on sexual orientation and gender identity associated with less bullying? Teachers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T; Day, Jack K; Ioverno, Salvatore; Toomey, Russell B

    2016-02-01

    Bullying is common in U.S. schools and is linked to emotional, behavioral, and academic risk for school-aged students. School policies and practices focused on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) have been designed to reduce bullying and show promising results. Most studies have drawn from students' reports: We examined teachers' reports of bullying problems in their schools along with their assessments of school safety, combined with principals' reports of SOGI-focused policies and practices. Merging two independent sources of data from over 3000 teachers (California School Climate Survey) and nearly 100 school principals (School Health Profiles) at the school level, we used multi-level models to understand bullying problems in schools. Our results show that SOGI-focused policies reported by principals do not have a strong independent association with teachers' reports of bullying problems in their schools. However, in schools with more SOGI-focused policies, the association between teachers' assessments of school safety and bullying problems is stronger. Recent developments in education law and policy in the United States and their relevance for student well-being are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. How inventory consignment programs can improve supply chain performance: a process oriented perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K. Malhotra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inventory Consignment (IC has largely been viewed as a method of shifting the ownership and cost burden of inventory from buyer to supplier to benefit the buyer. This primarily accounting based viewpoint has largely ignored process changes that can occur for both the buyer and supplier. This study addresses this gap in the extant literature by examining IC from a process perspective by specifically addressing: (1 the implementation issues in an IC program for both buyers and suppliers and (2 the financial and operational benefits from IC for both buyers and suppliers. Using the case study methodology, we examined three firms that had varying degrees of involvement and roles in IC programs. Based on our detailed work with these three firms and their supply chain linkages, we offer a series of propositions to demonstrate that IC is not just an accounting issue, but also a management practice that requires a series of process changes in order to be successful. These process changes in turn provide operational benefits for both buyers and suppliers via the mechanism of increased demand visibility to suppliers. Through this approach, this study makes a contribution beyond what has been examined in the prior literature which has mostly dealt with IC as an accounting based inventory management issue.

  12. Evaluation of clinical skills for first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and objective structured clinical evaluation as a tool of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate specialities require a combination of knowledge and clinical skills. The internship year is less structured. Clinical and practical skills that are picked up during training are not well regulated and the impact is not assessed. In this study, we assessed knowledge and skills using objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Aim: To evaluate the clinical skills of new first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and OSCE as a tool for assessment. Settings and Design: Observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty new first-year surgical residents (10 each in 2008 and 2009 participated in a detailed structured orientation programme conducted over a period of 7 days. Clinically important topics and skills expected at this level (e.g., suturing, wound care etc. were covered. The programme was preceded by an OSCE to test pre-programme knowledge (the "pre-test". The questions were validated by senior department staff. A post-programme OSCE (the "post-test" helped to evaluate the change in clinical skill level brought about by the orientation programme. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxson matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Passing performance was achieved by all participants in both pre- and post-tests. Following the orientation programme, significant improvement was seen in tasks testing the psychomotor and cognitive domains. (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0401, respectively. Overall reliability of the OSCE was found to be 0.7026 (Cronbach′s coefficient alpha. Conclusions: This study highlighted the lacunae in current internship training, especially for skill-based tasks. There is a need for universal inclusion of structured orientation programmes in the training of first-year residents. OSCE is a reliable, valid and effective method for the assessment of clinical skills.

  13. Working with Conflict in Clinical Supervision: Wise Supervisors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mary Lee; Barnes, Kristin L.; Evans, Amelia L.; Triggiano, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Eight female and 4 male supervisors identified by professional peers as highly competent were interviewed about experiences of conflict in supervision and their dependable strategies for managing it. Highly competent supervisors were open to conflict and interpersonal processing, willing to acknowledge shortcomings, developmentally oriented, and…

  14. Lessons and Perspectives on Balancing Research and Diversity-Oriented Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Diversity among scientists is necessary to bring together the range of personal and professional perspectives required to address many grand challenges of research in the earth and environmental sciences. Despite gains in recent decades, African Americans and American Indians remain severely under-represented at the graduate level in the environmental sciences, posing an impediment to ethnic diversity in the ranks of professional scientists. For example, the US National Science Foundation reported that in one recent year African Americans received 1,041 (3%) and American Indians received 120 (0.4%) of the 33,284 science and engineering doctoral degrees granted in the US. These fractions are smaller than African American and American Indian representation among bachelor's degree recipients, and they are smaller than representation in the general US population. Lessons from multiple disciplines (chemistry, medicine and geoscience) suggest that group learning, longitudinal mentoring and networking opportunities are critical elements in the retention of under-represented minority students and their conversion to professionals in scientific fields. With this in mind, I have worked to incorporate these elements into my own research program, which moved recently from a predominantly undergraduate institution to a research extensive university. I discuss the outcomes, successes and challenges of a recent project engaging 14 students and 5 faculty mentors from 6 institutions, including 2 HBCUs, in a yearlong study of secondary ecosystem succession in North Carolina. I frame this discussion in the general context of my own experience, as an American Indian academic, balancing diversity-related service and more traditionally recognized forms of scholarship (i.e. teaching and research) at both predominantly undergraduate and research extensive universities.

  15. Clinical outcome of nutrition-oriented intervention for primary intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing-Ya; Wen, Jie; Wu, Jiang; Wang, Ying; Cai, Wei

    2011-02-01

    primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare digestive disease and few studies have focused on the therapeutic effect in PIL patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate nutrition-oriented intervention in children with PIL. four children with PIL were studied. Their medical records were reviewed. Anthropometric measurements and blood tests were performed during a 8-18 month follow-up. during hospitalization, the 4 patients were subjected to diet intervention. Parenteral nutrition (PN) support was also given to 3 of them. Clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters of the patients were significantly improved at discharge. After discharge, the patients continued diet control, 2 of whom received intermittent PN support. The mean follow-up duration of the 4 patients was 13 months (range, 8-18 months) and they all kept in a stable condition without symptoms relapse. Weight, height and body mass index for age were normal during the follow-up, while total protein, albumin and immunoglobulin concentrations were still slightly below normal level. nutrition therapy is effective as a valid and safe therapeutic management for PIL patients. No growth retardation was observed in the 4 children after the therapy, but they are still at risk of nutrient malabsorption. Therefore, they need long-term, regular monitoring and intensive nutritional care.

  16. Integration of decentralized clinical data in a data warehouse: a service-oriented design and realization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanss, Sabine; Schaaf, T; Wetzel, T; Hahn, C; Schrader, T; Tolxdorff, T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a general concept and describe the difficulties for the integration of data from various clinical partners in one data warehouse using the Open European Nephrology Science Center (OpEN.SC) as an example. This includes a requirements analysis of the data integration process and also the design according to these requirements. This conceptual approach based on the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and paradigm of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA). Because we have to enhance the confidence of our partners in the OpEN.SC system and with this the willingness of them to participate, important requirements are controllability, transparency and security for all partners. Reusable and fine-grained components were found to be necessary when working with diverse data sources. With SOA the requested reusability is implemented easily. A key step in the development of a data integration process within such a health information system like OpEN.SC is to analyze the requirements. And to show that this is not only a theoretical work, we present a design - developed with RUP and SOA - which fulfills these requirements.

  17. Whiplash-associated disorders--predicting disability from a process-oriented perspective of coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Anne; Lindberg, Per

    2003-02-01

    To describe the coping process over time for patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). The study was conducted by following patients prospectively for 12 months. The orthopaedic clinic at a university hospital. Fifty-three patients out of 59 had complete data-sets. Two measures were used: the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ). The results showed that the proportion of variance in disability shared with coping increased over time. The importance of coping as an explanatory factor for disability increased during the one year follow-up. Thus, coping has a crucial role for disability. The possibility of a positive long-term outcome could therefore be improved by teaching patients to use active and adaptive coping strategies shortly after an accident.

  18. Description and status update on GELLO: a proposed standardized object-oriented expression language for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Margarita; Boxwala, Aziz A; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Greenes, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    A major obstacle to sharing computable clinical knowledge is the lack of a common language for specifying expressions and criteria. Such a language could be used to specify decision criteria, formulae, and constraints on data and action. Al-though the Arden Syntax addresses this problem for clinical rules, its generalization to HL7's object-oriented data model is limited. The GELLO Expression language is an object-oriented language used for expressing logical conditions and computations in the GLIF3 (GuideLine Interchange Format, v. 3) guideline modeling language. It has been further developed under the auspices of the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee, as a proposed HL7 standard., GELLO is based on the Object Constraint Language (OCL), because it is vendor-independent, object-oriented, and side-effect-free. GELLO expects an object-oriented data model. Although choice of model is arbitrary, standardization is facilitated by ensuring that the data model is compatible with the HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM).

  19. What's the Original Concept of Meridian and Acupuncture Point in Oriental Medicine? - A Perspective of Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Chang- Shik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Meridian and acupuncture point(MAP is a core theory of acupuncture and essential building blocks of oriental medicine. There still continue theoretic or experimental arguments and controversies on the origination or original concept of MAP, without any definite approval or disapproval of a hypothesis. The theory of MAP is an historic product and has never been outside of historic influences. This study discusses the original concept of meridian and acupuncture point theory and its historical evolution, based on the review of classic literatures on meridian including the mawangdui medical texts of Han dynasty. The concept of MAP served as a empirical reference system in clinical settings irrespective of the anatomical entity of MAP.

  20. Clinical review: Current state and future perspectives in the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Wiebke; Allolio, Bruno

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of diabetes insipidus (DI) is often challenging but essential, because treatment may vary substantially. This article analyzes the database and performance of currently used differential diagnostic tests for DI and discusses future perspectives for diagnostic improvement. A review of electronic and print data comprising original and review articles retrieved from the PubMed or Cochrane Library database up to January 2012 was conducted. The search term "polyuria polydipsia syndrome" was cross-referenced with underlying forms of disease and associated clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic MeSH terms. In addition, references from review articles and textbook chapters were screened for papers containing original data. Search results were narrowed to articles containing primary data with a description of criteria for the differential diagnosis of DI. Fifteen articles on differential diagnosis of DI were identified, mainly consisting of small series of patients, and mostly covering only part of the differential diagnostic spectrum of DI. Test protocols differed, and prospective validation of diagnostic criteria was consistently missing. Inconsistent data were reported on the diagnostic superiority of direct plasma arginine vasopressin determination over the indirect water deprivation test. Both test methods revealed limitations, especially in the differentiation of disorders with a milder phenotype. The available data demonstrate limitations of current biochemical tests for the differential diagnosis of DI, potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis and treatment. The newly available assay for copeptin, the C terminus of the vasopressin precursor, holds promise for a higher diagnostic specificity and simplification of the differential diagnostic protocol in DI.

  1. Synergies and Distinctions between Computational Disciplines in Biomedical Research: Perspective from the Clinical and Translational Science Award Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstam, Elmer V.; Hersh, William R.; Johnson, Stephen B.; Chute, Christopher G.; Nguyen, Hien; Sim, Ida; Nahm, Meredith; Weiner, Mark; Miller, Perry; DiLaura, Robert P.; Overcash, Marc; Lehmann, Harold P.; Eichmann, David; Athey, Brian D.; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Anderson, Nick; Starren, Justin B.; Harris, Paul A.; Smith, Jack W.; Barbour, Ed; Silverstein, Jonathan C.; Krusch, David A.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Becich, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical and translational research increasingly requires computation. Projects may involve multiple computationally-oriented groups including information technology (IT) professionals, computer scientists and biomedical informaticians. However, many biomedical researchers are not aware of the distinctions among these complementary groups, leading to confusion, delays and sub-optimal results. Although written from the perspective of clinical and translational science award (CTSA) programs within academic medical centers, the paper addresses issues that extend beyond clinical and translational research. The authors describe the complementary but distinct roles of operational IT, research IT, computer science and biomedical informatics using a clinical data warehouse as a running example. In general, IT professionals focus on technology. The authors distinguish between two types of IT groups within academic medical centers: central or administrative IT (supporting the administrative computing needs of large organizations) and research IT (supporting the computing needs of researchers). Computer scientists focus on general issues of computation such as designing faster computers or more efficient algorithms, rather than specific applications. In contrast, informaticians are concerned with data, information and knowledge. Biomedical informaticians draw on a variety of tools, including but not limited to computers, to solve information problems in health care and biomedicine. The paper concludes with recommendations regarding administrative structures that can help to maximize the benefit of computation to biomedical research within academic health centers. PMID:19550198

  2. Radiography students' perceptions of clinical placements - A Nigerian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbu, S.O.I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess undergraduate radiography student perception of clinical placements and to evaluate their clinical learning experiences. Methods: To evaluate student perception of clinical placements, a Likert-scale questionnaire was used to assess clinical practice, the practice-learning environment. One hundred and seventy-eight undergraduate [student] radiographers participated in the study. Results: The students indicated they had adequate and enjoyed their time on the clinical placement. They also indicated the qualified staff was supportive, friendly and approachable. The students were able to achieve their learning outcomes during the placement. However placement venues, according to the students, had inadequate learning resources. No radiographic/medical imaging research findings, whether locally generated or otherwise, were used in clinical practice. Conclusions: Clinical placements had adequate student support. It provided a pleasant learning experience for the students and it enhanced their skills. Staff was willing and available to assist learning. Nevertheless, the training institutions, professional body and clinical placement providers need to make an effort to address inadequate learning resources (e.g. IT, library, study rooms) as well as the non-utilization of radiographic/medical imaging research findings

  3. Childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Psychological perspectives of clinical approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Catena Quattropani; Teresa Buccheri

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This work focuses on clinical psychologist’ presence within childhood obesity prevention programmes in several countries. Method: The Authors collected articles considering psychological, biological and social aspects linked to childhood obesity. Results: Studies reveal that childhood obesity prevention programmes are based on biological, medical and educational aspects; clinical psychologists up until now have been engaged almost exclusively in the treatment of obesity. Conclusion...

  4. Toward an Ecological Perspective of Resident Teaching Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are…

  5. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  6. Horizon 2000: Vision of the development of a custom-oriented electric power market in a European perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-10-01

    After a perspective on the development in the seventies and eighties in chapter one, it is stated that, given the developments in the field of liberalization and the manifest internationalization of the European electricity market (chapter two), the Dutch electricity sector is not yet ready for an open European market (chapter three). A revision of the present electricity model does not seem to be the right method, because of the built-in contradictions and the reactive manner in which new developments can be handled (chapter four). Therefore, at this crossroad a new starting point has to be chosen in order for the Dutch electricity sector to be able to handle the developments in a pro-active way. At the same time this offers a solution to the instability, which threatens to the Dutch electricity market as a result of the fast growth of cogeneration capacity. In the new vision Horizon 2000 (outlined in chapters 5-9) the focus is shifted from central planning and cost pooling to customer-orientation within an open market. The market parties get, on the basis of autonomous responsibilities, multiple buying and selling options. A stepwise implementation of Horizon is explained in chapter 10, while the consequences of the market model Horizon 2000 are indicated as positive in chapter eleven. It must be stressed that this report is meant to be a working paper, open for discussion. Both the vision on the market and its consequences for the organization model have to be elaborated in more detail. 30 figs., 27 tabs.,

  7. Survey of Chinese Medicine Students to Determine Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Perspectives at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Kligler, Benjamin; Cohen, Hillel W; Marantz, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Research literacy and the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) are important initiatives in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which requires cultural change within educational institutions for successful implementation. To determine the self-assessed research and EBM perspectives of Chinese medicine Masters degree students at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY). A survey with 17 close-ended questions and one open-ended question was administered through Survey Monkey to students at PCOM-NY. The survey was sent to 420 Masters students and 176 (41.9%) responded. Students in all four years of the Masters degree indicated a generally high degree of interest in, and support for the value of research. However, increasing years (one to four years) in the program was associated with lower interest in post-graduation research participation and entering the doctoral program, and the fourth year students reported low levels of interest in having greater research content and training in their Masters degree programs. Students who responded to the open-ended question (23% of respondents) expressed enthusiasm for research and concerns about the relevance of research in Chinese medicine. Consistent with findings in similar studies at CAM colleges, interest in research, and EBM of the PCOM-NY Masters students appeared to decline with increasing years in the program. Concerns around paradigm and epistemological issues associated with research and EBM among Chinese medicine students and practitioners warrants further investigation, and may be an important challenge for integrative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. East to west – The optimal tilt angle and orientation of photovoltaic panels from an electricity system perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartner, Michael; Ortner, André; Hiesl, Albert; Haas, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adjustments of PV installation angles can reduce total electricity generation costs. • However total benefits are small (<1% of total costs) even for high PV shares. • In Austria and Germany adjustments toward east and steeper tilt can be beneficial. • PV market values drop significantly with high PV shares also for adjusted angles. • Also CO_2 reductions decrease but are still high even for a doubling of PV capacity. - Abstract: The integration of photovoltaic as a fluctuating renewable energy source has raised concerns about additional costs for the electricity system due to the variable nature of power output leading to more frequent and steeper ramping of conventional power plants and the need for backup capacity. One way to reduce those costs can be the variation of installation angles of PV panels at different locations to smoothen out the total production from PV in the whole system. To a certain extent steeper tilt angles can shift the production from summer months to winter months and the variation of the azimuth from east to west can partly shift production during the day increasing the production in morning or afternoon hours. However, for fixed mounted PV panels, there is one angle combination that maximizes the total output of the PV panel throughout the year and each deviation from this angle combination results in losses of total output. This paper evaluates the trade-off between annual energy losses and possible electricity generation cost reductions through adapting PV installation angles for the current electricity system and for potentially higher PV penetration levels in the future. A theoretical explanation why the annual maximum output of a PV system is not always the optimal solution from a system perspective is presented. To assess the effects of deviations from output maximizing angles at present, the wholesale market value of PV for various tilt angles and orientations in 23 regions of Austria and Germany using

  9. Objective Assessment of Joint Stiffness: A Clinically Oriented Hardware and Software Device with an Application to the Shoulder Joint

    OpenAIRE

    McQuade, Kevin; Price, Robert; Liu, Nelson; Ciol, Marcia A

    2012-01-01

    Examination of articular joints is largely based on subjective assessment of the “end-feel” of the joint in response to manually applied forces at different joint orientations. This technical report aims to describe the development of an objective method to examine joints in general, with specific application to the shoulder, and suitable for clinical use. We adapted existing hardware and developed laptop-based software to objectively record the force/displacement behavior of the glenohumeral...

  10. LASER CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (LCS AND ITS CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karganov Mikhail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS is based on the analysis of the spectrum of quasielastic light scatter during coherent monochromatic laser irradiation of micro-particles in biological fluids (blood serum, urine, oropharyngeal washout fluid, tear fluid etc.. Spectrum provides information on dynamic processes in the analyzed system: translation motion of scattering particles and their orientation and conformation dynamics. Special procedures of cluster analysis make it possible to find out to which linkage group a particular spectrum belongs. LCS allows evaluation of sub-fractional composition of biological fluids in a wide range of molecular sizes (from 1 to 10,000 nm, which determines principal novelty of this approach in ophthalmology.

  11. Clinical anxiety among final year dental students: The trainers and students perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Obarisiagbon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dental clinical setting, which is a significant learning environment for undergraduate dental students, may induce anxiety, which may adversely affect the clinical performance. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the factors provoking clinical anxiety in dental students from the trainers and students perspectives. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 6 th (final year dental students of University of Benin and their clinical trainers between January and March 2012 using the 38-item modified Moss and McManus clinical anxiety questionnaire. Results: Of the 67 participants, 32 (47.8% were 6 th year dental students while 35 (52.2% were clinical trainers. According to the students, the top clinical anxiety provoking situations were inability to meet requirements before exams, inability to pass the final exams, dealing with psychiatric patients, coping with uncooperative children, getting infected by patients, fracturing a tooth during extraction, extracting the wrong tooth, discovering calculus by the supervisor after scaling, accidental pulp exposure, inadvertently hurting patients and using the high speed hand piece. There existed concordance on the top two clinical anxiety provoking situations reported by the students and their clinical trainers. However, measuring blood pressure, taking pulse, presenting in the clinic, handling a syncopal attack, and accidental pulp exposure were statistically significant contrasting clinical anxiety provoking situations from dental students and trainers perspectives. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed that clinical trainers share largely the same perspectives with the dental students on the clinical anxiety provoking situations with slight variations. Fostering a supportive learning environment conducive to dental student learning by strengthen efforts to minimize clinical anxiety is a necessity.

  12. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Sami; Saini, Bandana; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy. Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software. Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients. This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future policies for the

  13. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Isaac

    Full Text Available Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy.Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software.Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients.This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future

  14. The Clinical Practice of Interventional Radiology: A European Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, Aoife N.; Reekers, Jim A.; Lee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management's refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  15. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  16. Evaluation of a Computerized Problem-Oriented Medical Record in a Hospital Department: Does it Support Daily Clinical Practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2007-01-01

    led to more time spent documenting clinical work, fragmentation of patient situation into separate problems, and lack of overview.Conclusion: The problem-oriented method for structuring a computerized medical record may provide a description of how physicians think or ought to think, but does...... not adequately support complex clinical work. While the CPOMR can be used for patients with few, simple problems who are admitted for only a short time, the CPOMR is not useful for patients with a complex set of problems or for patients admitted for longer periods of time. This is in accordance with criticism...

  17. Canine babesiosis: a perspective on clinical complications, biomarkers, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köster LS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Liza S Köster,1 Remo G Lobetti,2 Patrick Kelly1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, One Health Center for Zoonoses and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, St Kitts, West Indies; 2Bryanston Veterinary Hospital, Bryanston, South Africa Abstract: Canine babesiosis is a common tick transmitted disease of dogs worldwide. A number of Babesia sp. can infect dogs and the spectrum is increasing as molecular methods are developed to differentiate organisms. Clinical signs are generally attributed to hemolysis caused by the organisms in the erythrocytes but in some animals with some Babesia spp. there can be an immune mediated component to the anemia and/or a severe inflammatory reaction associated. This complicated form of canine babesiosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A variety of clinical markers has been investigated to enable clinicians to provide more accurate prognoses and adapt their treatments which vary according to the infecting species. In this review, we discuss the taxonomy, clinical signs, diagnostic imaging, clinical biomarkers, treatment, and prophylaxis of one of the most common and important diseases of dogs worldwide. Keywords: babesiosis, vector-borne disease, dog

  18. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Young Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus–positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  19. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  20. Clinical decision making-a functional medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorno, Joseph E

    2012-09-01

    As 21st century health care moves from a disease-based approach to a more patient-centric system that can address biochemical individuality to improve health and function, clinical decision making becomes more complex. Accentuating the problem is the lack of a clear standard for this more complex functional medicine approach. While there is relatively broad agreement in Western medicine for what constitutes competent assessment of disease and identification of related treatment approaches, the complex functional medicine model posits multiple and individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most or many of which have reasonable underlying science and principles, but which have not been rigorously tested in a research or clinical setting. This has led to non-rigorous thinking and sometimes to uncritical acceptance of both poorly documented diagnostic procedures and ineffective therapies, resulting in less than optimal clinical care.

  1. Candida bloodstream infection: a clinical microbiology laboratory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Kristóf, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) has been on the rise in several countries worldwide. Species distribution is changing; an increase in the percentage of non-albicans species, mainly fluconazole non-susceptible C. glabrata was reported. Existing microbiology diagnostic methods lack sensitivity, and new methods need to be developed or further evaluation for routine application is necessary. Although reliable, standardized methods for antifungal susceptibility testing are available, the determination of clinical breakpoints remains challenging. Correct species identification is important and provides information on the intrinsic susceptibility profile of the isolate. Currently, acquired resistance in clinical Candida isolates is rare, but reports indicate that it could be an issue in the future. The role of the clinical microbiology laboratory is to isolate and correctly identify the infective agent and provide relevant and reliable susceptibility data as soon as possible to guide antifungal therapy.

  2. ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING: CURRENT ROLE FROM THE CLINICAL LABORATORY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Posteraro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite availability of many antifungal agents, antifungal clinical resistance occurs, perhaps as a result of an infecting organism found to be resistant in vitro to one or more antifungals tested. Thus, antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST results, if timely generated by the clinical microbiology and communicated to clinicians, can aid them in the therapeutic decision making, especially for difficult-to-treat invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Although recently refined AFST methods are commercially available to allow a close antifungal resistance surveillance in many clinical setting, novel assays, relying on short-time antifungal drug exposure of fungal isolates, are upcoming tools for AFST. Based on emerging technologies such as flow cytometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and isothermal microcalorimetry, these assays could provide a reliable means for quicker and sensitive assessment of AFST.

  3. Pharmacological effect on pyeloureteric dynamics with a clinical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Helene U; Frimodt-Møller, Poul C; Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    We searched to review experimental and clinical trials concerning the capabilities of impacting on the ureteric and pelvic activity by means of pharmacological stimulation. Ureteropyeloscopy may cause high renal pelvic pressure. The normal pressure is in the range of 5-15 mmHg whereas pressure...... an increased risk of several complications related to endourological procedures including bleeding, perforation and infection. In other words, means by which intrarenal pressure could be lowered during endourological procedures might be beneficial with respect to clinical outcomes. In vitro experiments support...... systemic side effects. In vivo human studies are necessary to clarify the exact dose-response relationship and the degree of urothelial absorption of a drug before clinical use may be adopted....

  4. Clinical diabetes research using data mining: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Baiju R; Lipscombe, Lorraine L

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of the digitization of large amounts of information and the computer power capable of analyzing this volume of information, data mining is increasingly being applied to medical research. Datasets created for administration of the healthcare system provide a wealth of information from different healthcare sectors, and Canadian provinces' single-payer universal healthcare systems mean that data are more comprehensive and complete in this country than in many other jurisdictions. The increasing ability to also link clinical information, such as electronic medical records, laboratory test results and disease registries, has broadened the types of data available for analysis. Data-mining methods have been used in many different areas of diabetes clinical research, including classic epidemiology, effectiveness research, population health and health services research. Although methodologic challenges and privacy concerns remain important barriers to using these techniques, data mining remains a powerful tool for clinical research. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Addressing cultural diversity: the hepatitis B clinical specialist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jack; Smith, Elizabeth; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Richmond, Jacqueline; Lucke, Jayne

    2017-08-31

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection primarily affecting people from culturally diverse communities in Australia. While vaccination prevents infection, there is increasing mortality resulting from liver damage associated with chronic infection. Deficits in the national policy and clinical response to hepatitis B result in a low diagnosis rate, inadequate testing and diagnosis processes, and poor access to hepatitis B treatment services. While research identifies inadequate hepatitis B knowledge among people with the virus and primary health care workers, this project sought to identify how specialist clinicians in Australia negotiate cultural diversity, and provide often complex clinical information to people with hepatitis B. A vignette was developed and presented to thirteen viral hepatitis specialist clinicians prior to an electronically recorded interview. Recruitment continued until saturation of themes was reached. Data were thematically coded into themes outlined in the interview schedule. Ethical approval for the research was provided by the La Trobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Key messages provided to patients with hepatitis B by clinical specialists were identified. These messages were not consistently provided to all patients with hepatitis B, but were determined on perceptions of patient knowledge, age and highest educational level. While the vignette stated that English was not an issue for the patient, most specialists identified the need for an interpreter. Combating stigma related to hepatitis B was seen as important by the specialists and this was done through normalising the virus. Having an awareness of different cultural understandings about hepatitis B specifically, and health and well-being generally, was noted as a communication strategy. Key core competencies need to be developed to deliver educational messages to people with hepatitis B within clinical encounters. The provision of adequate resources to specialist clinics will

  6. Seniors' perspectives on care: a case study of the Alex Seniors health clinic, Calgary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marta; Rypien, Candace; Drummond, Neil; Harasym, Patricia; Nixon, Lara

    2015-02-25

    Primary care initiatives face an imperative to not only reduce barriers to care for their patients but also to uniquely accommodate the complex needs of at-risk patient populations. Patient-centered multidisciplinary care team models for primary care, like the Alex Seniors Clinic, are one approach for providing comprehensive care for marginalized seniors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore patient perspectives on the responsiveness of the Alex Seniors Clinic to their stated health needs. Themes reflected participants' perspectives on factors impacting their health needs as vulnerable seniors as well as on the measures that the Alex Seniors Clinic has taken to meet those needs. Factors impacting health included: the nature of their relationships to the physical environment in which they lived, the nature of the relationships they had to others in that environment, and independence and autonomy. Participants identified accessibility, respect and support, and advocacy as the ways in which the clinic was working to address those health needs. While respect and support, as well as advocacy, effectively addressed some patient needs, participants felt that accessibility problems continue to be health-related barriers for clinic patients. This may be due to the fact that issues of accessibility reflect larger community and social problems. Nevertheless, it is only through engaging the patient community for input on clinic approaches that an understanding can be gained of how closely a clinic's care goals are currently aligning with patient perspectives of the care and services they receive.

  7. Clinical Perspective The parent-child-therapist alliance: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health ... The parent-child-therapist alliance: A case study using a strategic approach. Thirusha Naidu, Sheethal Behari. Abstract. In this paper we present a single case study of a clinical approach that ...

  8. Collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings: The students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkala, Arja; Kivelä, Eeva; Käyhkö, Pirjo

    2016-03-01

    This study deals with student nurses' experiences of collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings where aged people are involved as age-experts in students' learning processes. The data were collected in 2012 using the contents of students' reflective writing assignments concerning elderly persons' life history interviews and the students' own assessments of their learning experiences in authentic elder care settings. The results, analyzed using qualitative content analysis, revealed mostly positive learning experiences. Interaction and collaborative learning activities in genuine gerontological clinical settings contributed to the students' understanding of the multiple age-related and disease-specific challenges as well as the issues of functional decline that aged patients face. Three types of factors influenced the students' collaborative learning experiences in gerontological clinical settings: student-related, patient-related and learning environment-related factors. According to the results, theoretical studies in combination with collaboration, in an authentic clinical environment, by student nurses, elderly patients, representatives of the elder care staff and nurse educators provide a feasible method for helping students transform their experiences with patients into actual skills. Their awareness of and sensitivity to the needs of the elderly increase as they learn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perspective: Recommendations for benchmarking pre-clinical studies of nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M.; Russell, Luisa M.; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery systems provide new opportunities to overcome the limitations associated with traditional small molecule drug therapy for cancer, and to achieve both therapeutic and diagnostic functions in the same platform. Pre-clinical trials are generally designed to assess therapeutic potential and not to optimize the design of the delivery platform. Consequently, progress in developing design rules for cancer nanomedicines has been slow, hindering progress in the field. Despite the large number of pre-clinical trials, several factors restrict comparison and benchmarking of different platforms, including variability in experimental design, reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data. To solve this problem, we review the variables involved in the design of pre-clinical trials and propose a protocol for benchmarking that we recommend be included in in vivo pre-clinical studies of drug delivery platforms for cancer therapy. This strategy will contribute to building the scientific knowledge base that enables development of design rules and accelerates the translation of new technologies. PMID:26249177

  10. Clinical Perspective The challenge of treating conduct disorder in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conduct disorder is one of the most frequent serious childhood problems that present for treatment in community clinic settings. Evidence-based treatments for conduct disorder are intensive and require considerable resources to implement. In low-resourced contexts it is often not feasible to implement evidence-based ...

  11. Clinical Perspective Linking theory and technique in a systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper describes a programme for disadvantaged children with learning problems (due to factors other than cognitive deficits), at the University of Cape Town (UCT) Child Guidance Clinic, developed in the absence of subsidised services for children in need of remediation of scholastic skills. In collaboration with teacher ...

  12. Clinical Perspective Challenges facing psychologists in a child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Working in a child psychology clinic is a constant reminder to staff that psychological practice and expectations regarding interventions require modification in our South African context. Using a case study, the author reflects on the way in which any meaningful psychological intervention needs to take a broad view of the ...

  13. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives | Tantawy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the publication of the sequence of the factor VIII (F8) gene in 1984, a large number of mutations that cause hemophilia A have been identified and a significant progress has been made in translating this knowledge for clinical diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Molecular genetic testing is used to determine the ...

  14. Clinical Perspective Working with a child's envy in the transference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karl Abrahams and Melanie Klein later placed envy at the crucial developing stages of the relationship between primary caregiver and infant. Klein boldly identified envy as a primary constitutional emotion. However, the presence and difficulties of envy in clinical work remain largely underreported, more so in work with ...

  15. The normativity of clinical health care: perspectives on moral realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortvedt, Per

    2012-06-01

    The paper argues that a particular version of moral realism constitutes an important basis for ethics in medicine and health care. Moral realism is the position that moral value is a part of the fabric of relational and interpersonal reality. But even though moral values are subject to human interpretations, they are not themselves the sole product of these interpretations. Moral values are not invented but discovered by the subject. Moral realism argues that values are open to perception and experience and that moral subjectivity must be portrayed in how moral values are discovered and perceived by the human subject. Moral values may exist independent of the particular subject's interpretative evaluations as a part of reality. This epistemological point about normativity is particularly significant in medical care and in health care. The clinician perceives moral value in the clinical encounter in a way that is important for competent clinical understanding. Clinical understanding in medical care and health care bears on the encounter with moral values in the direct and embodied relations to patients, with their experiences of illness and their vulnerabilities. Good clinical care is then partly conditioned upon adequate understanding of such moral realities.

  16. Effects of Coping-Oriented Couples Therapy on Depression: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenmann, Guy; Plancherel, Bernard; Beach, Steven R. H.; Widmer, Kathrin; Gabriel, Barbara; Meuwly, Nathalie; Charvoz, Linda; Hautzinger, Martin; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treating depression with coping-oriented couples therapy (COCT) as compared with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; A. T. Beck, C. Ward, & M. Mendelson, 1961) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT; M. M. Weissman, J. C. Markowitz, & G. L. Klerman, 2000). Sixty couples, including 1…

  17. Student evaluation of a problem-oriented module of clinical medicine within a revised dental curriculum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, C.J.J.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a revised dental curriculum, a 3(rd) year module on medical subjects was developed based on a mixture of self-study and problem-oriented approach using cases. Pairs of students had to select a specific medical problem and solve a paper patient case using a problem-solving cycle. Results

  18. Verbal Memory Impairment in Polydrug Ecstasy Users: A Clinical Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim P C Kuypers

    Full Text Available Ecstasy use has been associated with short-term and long-term memory deficits on a standard Word Learning Task (WLT. The clinical relevance of this has been debated and is currently unknown. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical relevance of verbal memory impairment in Ecstasy users. To that end, clinical memory impairment was defined as decrement in memory performance that exceeded the cut-off value of 1.5 times the standard deviation of the average score in the healthy control sample. The primary question was whether being an Ecstasy user (E-user was predictive of having clinically deficient memory performance compared to a healthy control group.WLT data were pooled from four experimental MDMA studies that compared memory performance during placebo and MDMA intoxication. Control data were taken from healthy volunteers with no drug use history who completed the WLT as part of a placebo-controlled clinical trial. This resulted in a sample size of 65 E-users and 65 age- and gender-matched healthy drug-naïve controls. All participants were recruited by similar means and were tested at the same testing facilities using identical standard operating procedures. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, Bayes factor, and logistic regressions.Findings were that verbal memory performance of placebo-treated E-users did not differ from that of controls, and there was substantial evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. History of use was not predictive of memory impairment. During MDMA intoxication of E-users, verbal memory was impaired.The combination of the acute and long-term findings demonstrates that, while clinically relevant memory impairment is present during intoxication, it is absent during abstinence. This suggests that use of Ecstasy/MDMA does not lead to clinically deficient memory performance in the long term. Additionally, it has to be investigated whether the current findings apply to more complex cognitive

  19. Verbal Memory Impairment in Polydrug Ecstasy Users: A Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; van Wel, Janelle H P; de Sousa Fernandes Perna, Elizabeth B; Linssen, Anke; Sambeth, Anke; Schultz, Benjamin G; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    Ecstasy use has been associated with short-term and long-term memory deficits on a standard Word Learning Task (WLT). The clinical relevance of this has been debated and is currently unknown. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical relevance of verbal memory impairment in Ecstasy users. To that end, clinical memory impairment was defined as decrement in memory performance that exceeded the cut-off value of 1.5 times the standard deviation of the average score in the healthy control sample. The primary question was whether being an Ecstasy user (E-user) was predictive of having clinically deficient memory performance compared to a healthy control group. WLT data were pooled from four experimental MDMA studies that compared memory performance during placebo and MDMA intoxication. Control data were taken from healthy volunteers with no drug use history who completed the WLT as part of a placebo-controlled clinical trial. This resulted in a sample size of 65 E-users and 65 age- and gender-matched healthy drug-naïve controls. All participants were recruited by similar means and were tested at the same testing facilities using identical standard operating procedures. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, Bayes factor, and logistic regressions. Findings were that verbal memory performance of placebo-treated E-users did not differ from that of controls, and there was substantial evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. History of use was not predictive of memory impairment. During MDMA intoxication of E-users, verbal memory was impaired. The combination of the acute and long-term findings demonstrates that, while clinically relevant memory impairment is present during intoxication, it is absent during abstinence. This suggests that use of Ecstasy/MDMA does not lead to clinically deficient memory performance in the long term. Additionally, it has to be investigated whether the current findings apply to more complex cognitive measures in diverse

  20. INVESTIGATING ``MARKETING ORIENTATION `` INFLUENCES ON ACHIEVING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE –WITHIN JORDANIAN MOBILE TELECOMMUNICATION INDUSTRY (BEHAVIOURAL- ATTITUDINAL PERSPECTIVE)

    OpenAIRE

    Ashour, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Several previous studies emphasised the importance of marketing orientation in achieving firms` competitive position, and many efforts have been focused on investigating Marketing Orientation-organizational performance relationship. However, the majority of previous researches have been conducted in Western cultures and within industrial contexts. This research is an attempt to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the adopted levels of Marketing Orientation (MO) for each mobile telecommun...

  1. Theory and practice of clinical ethics support services: narrative and hermeneutical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porz, R.; Landeweer, E.G.M.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce narrative and hermeneutical perspectives to clinical ethics support services (CESS). We propose a threefold consideration of 'theory' and show how it is interwoven with 'practice' as we go along. First, we look at theory in its foundational role: in our case 'narrative

  2. Social vs. Clinical Perspectives on the Use of Information: Implications for School-based Information Systems. Systemic Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotnik, Kenneth A.; And Others

    This paper presents a study of the contrast of social and clinical perspectives on the selection and use of information by school staff, including: (1) an outline of the context and activities of the study; (2) a definition and discussion of the basic distinction between social and clinical perspectives; (3) an examination of case material…

  3. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Historical and Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Goshtasbi, Khodayar; Mahmoodi, Amin; Tran, Diem K; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-12-01

    This review aims to highlight the clinical complexity of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) while presenting a brief historical discussion of cSDH. A thorough literature search of published English-language papers was performed in PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. cSDH affects 1-5.3 per 100,000 individuals annually, with the incidence expected to rise as the U.S. population ages. The symptoms of cSDH are often nonspecific, with headaches being the most common complaint. Other symptoms include weakness, balance and gait problems, and memory problems. A variety of clinical factors must be taken into account in the treatment of cSDH, and the multifaceted treatment paradigms continue to evolve. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Clinical governance; How been understood, what is needed? Nurses' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Sadeghi Bazargani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical Governance (CG is an overarching concept, using organizational capacity, safeguards high standards of the health services and provides a safe care for patients.  The aim of this research was to study nurses’ perception about Clinical Governance. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was done with Focus Group Discussions (FGD. Purposeful Sampling was used to select the objectives including 65 participants. Actually 7 FGD’s were held. Content analysis was used to extract the meaningful themes. Results:Nurses believed that patient centeredness and evidence based practice is the core of the CG concept. Also they mentioned that cultural change, staffs training, adequate financial and human resources are required to successfully implementation of CG in hospitals.  Conclusion: Spreading up a shared vision about CG and providing the required infrastructures in hospitals would be facilitate CG initiatives. Proper commitment of the managers and staff participation could lead an effective CG implementation.

  5. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical significance and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, K.; Teipel, S.J.; Hampel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease describes the recognition and diagnosis in patients with very mild dementia. Internationally accepted diagnostic criteria support the diagnosis based on clinical evaluation. Recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging as well as studies on specific proteins in the cerebro-spinal fluid that are related to distinct pathophysiological disease processes are most promising approaches to defining biological markers of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.) [de

  6. Development of clinically relevant implantable pressure sensors: perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-09-22

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians.  Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported.

  7. Magnetic resonance cardiac perfusion imaging-a clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunold, Peter; Schlosser, Thomas; Barkhausen, Joerg [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) with its clinical appearance of stable or unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in developed countries. In view of increasing costs and the rising number of CAD patients, there has been a major interest in reliable non-invasive imaging techniques to identify CAD in an early (i.e. asymptomatic) stage. Since myocardial perfusion deficits appear very early in the ''ischemic cascade'', a major breakthrough would be the non-invasive quantification of myocardial perfusion before functional impairment might be detected. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target-organ-specific parameters, such as relative and absolute myocardial perfusion imaging. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been proven to offer attractive concepts in this respect. However, some important difficulties have not been resolved so far, which still causes uncertainty and prevents the broad application of MR perfusion imaging in a clinical setting. This review explores recent technical developments in MR hardware, software and contrast agents, as well as their impact on the current and future clinical status of MR imaging of first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance cardiac perfusion imaging-a clinical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunold, Peter; Schlosser, Thomas; Barkhausen, Joerg

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) with its clinical appearance of stable or unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in developed countries. In view of increasing costs and the rising number of CAD patients, there has been a major interest in reliable non-invasive imaging techniques to identify CAD in an early (i.e. asymptomatic) stage. Since myocardial perfusion deficits appear very early in the ''ischemic cascade'', a major breakthrough would be the non-invasive quantification of myocardial perfusion before functional impairment might be detected. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target-organ-specific parameters, such as relative and absolute myocardial perfusion imaging. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been proven to offer attractive concepts in this respect. However, some important difficulties have not been resolved so far, which still causes uncertainty and prevents the broad application of MR perfusion imaging in a clinical setting. This review explores recent technical developments in MR hardware, software and contrast agents, as well as their impact on the current and future clinical status of MR imaging of first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging. (orig.)

  9. Biomarkers in prostate cancer - Current clinical utility and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Alexander; Tilki, Derya

    2017-12-01

    Current tendencies in the treatment course of prostate cancer patients increase the need for reliable biomarkers that help in decision-making in a challenging clinical setting. Within the last decade, several novel biomarkers have been introduced. In the following comprehensive review article, we focus on diagnostic (PHI ® , 4K score, SelectMDx ® , ConfirmMDx ® , PCA3, MiPS, ExoDX ® , mpMRI) and prognostic (OncotypeDX GPS ® , Prolaris ® , ProMark ® , DNA-ploidy, Decipher ® ) biomarkers that are in widespread clinical use and are supported by evidence. Hereby, we focus on multiple clinical situations in which innovative biomarkers may guide decision-making in prostate cancer therapy. In addition, we describe novel liquid biopsy approaches (circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA) that have been described as predictive biomarkers in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and might support an individual patient-centred oncological approach in the nearer future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Mental Disorders in a Holistic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available From a holistic perspective, psychiatric diseases are caused by the patient’s unwillingness to assume responsibility for his life, existence, and personal relations. The loss of responsibility arises from the repression of the fundamental existential dimensions of the patients. Repression of love and purpose causes depersonalization (i.e., a lack of responsibility for being yourself and for the contact with others, loss of direction and purpose in life. Repression of strength in mind and emotions leads to derealization (the breakdown of the reality testing, often with mental delusions and hallucinations. The repression of joy and gender leads to devitalization (emotional emptiness, loss of joy, personal energy, sexuality, and pleasure in life.The losses of existential dimensions are invariably connected to traumas with life-denying decisions. Healing the wounds of the soul by holding and processing will lead to the recovery of the person's character, purpose of life, and existential responsibility. It can be very difficult to help a psychotic patient. The physician must first love his patient unconditionally and then fully understand the patient in order to meet and support the patient to initiate the holistic process of healing. It takes motivation and willingness to suffer on behalf of the patients in order to heal, as the existential and emotional pain of the traumas resulting in insanity is often overwhelming. We believe that most psychiatric diseases can be alleviated or cured by the loving and caring physician who masters the holistic toolbox. Further research is needed to document the effect of holistic medicine in psychiatry.

  11. Perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services on the meaning and goals of clinical governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwedza, Ruyamuro K; Larkins, Sarah; Johnson, Julie K; Zwar, Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Definitions of clinical governance are varied and there is no one agreed model. This paper explored the perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services, located in North Queensland, Australia, on the meaning and goals of clinical governance. The study followed an embedded multiple case study design with semi-structured interviews, document analysis and non-participant observation. Participants included clinicians, non-clinical support staff, managers and executives. Similarities and differences in the understanding of clinical governance between health centre and committee case studies were evident. Almost one-third of participants were unfamiliar with the term or were unsure of its meaning; alongside limited documentation of a definition. Although most cases linked the concept of clinical governance to key terms, many lacked a comprehensive understanding. Similarities between cases included viewing clinical governance as a management and administrative function. Differences included committee members' alignment of clinical governance with corporate governance and frontline staff associating clinical governance with staff safety. Document analysis offered further insight into these perspectives. Clinical governance is well-documented as an expected organisational requirement, including in rural and remote areas where geographic, workforce and demographic factors pose additional challenges to quality and safety. However, in reality, it is not clearly, similarly or comprehensively understood by all participants.

  12. Clinical Report of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Bee Venom Therapy of Progressive muscle atrophy 1 Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Young-Ho

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors reports in order to study the effect of Bee Venom therapy of progressive muscle atrophy. The authors investigated 1 patient who is treated at Woosuk University Oriental Medical Hospital. The patient diagnosed by MRI EMG Hematology Muscle biopsy as progressive muscle atrophy is administered by Bee Venom therapy for 4 months. Bee Venom therapy is operated by 2 times per a week(every 3 days, 0.1cc per one operation, 0.05cc per one acupuncture point. The authors checked changes of this patient's chief symptoms by comparing before and after Bee Venom therapy is operated at 30 times. After Bee Venom therapy, the patient increased motor power & ROM, decreased general cooling sense & swallowing disorder. As above, the authors conclude that better results can be obtained Oriental Medical Treatment with Bee Venom therapy in progressive muscle atrophy

  13. The importance of clinical mistletoe cancer therapy and korean mistletoe pharmacopuncture preparation development and application possibility for oriental medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Byung Choi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Mistletoe extracts have been in use for around 85 years, predominantly in the area of cancer therapy. Today mistletoe preparations are among the most prescribed drugs in cancer medicine, thus constituting a standard biological therapy in the area of oncology. The purpose of this study is to analyze the practical implications of mistletoe cancer therapy, their clinical status, their preparation techniques and companies. Contents : Mistletoe therapy for cancer has been developed within the context of anthroposophical medicine. One major effect of mistletoe extract is that it stimulates the immune system and cancer defences. In Germany, a total of eight different mistletoe preparations are available, five developed by Anthroposophic Medicine and three evolved from research in phytotherapy. Therapy always consists of an introductory phase in order to test the patient′s tolerance, find the right dosage and choose the most suitable preparation. This paper covers the background of mistletoe medical plant materials, mistletoe therapy for cancer, the anthroposophical medicine and clinical research, the practical regulation of treatment, preparation of mistletoe drugs. Result & suggestion : Mistletoe extracts are a complementary teratment of cancer, widely used in intergrative cancer care. The study of the integration of korean mistletoe extracts to oriental cancer medicine, its development and feasibility in Korea are urgently needed. The products, substances, compositions of european mistletoe drugs are very similar to those of oriental medicine theory. Applying the mistletoe cancer therapy and its preparation techniques to oriental medicine, the herbal acupuncture preparation should be modernized and korean mistletoe products are to be developed. To this end, government and herbal acupuncture society need to interact each other for the development of oriental mistletoe cancer medicine.

  14. Screening EEG in Aircrew Selection: Clinical Aerospace Neurology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jonathan B.; Riley, Terrence

    2001-01-01

    As clinical aerospace neurologists we do not favor using screening EEG in pilot selection on unselected and otherwise asymptomatic individuals. The role of EEG in aviation screening should be as an adjunct to diagnosis, and the decision to disqualify a pilot should never be based solely on the EEG. Although a policy of using a screening EEG in an unselected population might detect an individual with a potentially increased relative risk, it would needlessly exclude many applicants who would probably never have a seizure. A diagnostic test performed on an asymptomatic individual without clinical indications, in a population with a low prevalence of disease (seizure) may be of limited or possibly detrimental value. We feel that rather than do EEGs on all candidates, a better approach would be to perform an EEG for a specific indication, such as family history of seizure, single convulsion (seizure) , history of unexplained loss of consciousness or head injury. Routine screening EEGs in unselected aviation applications are not done without clinical indication in the U.S. Air Force, Navy, or NASA. The USAF discontinued routine screening EEGs for selection in 1978, the U.S. Navy discontinued it in 1981 , and NASA discontinued it in 1995. EEG as an aeromedical screening tool in the US Navy dates back to 1939. The US Navy routinely used EEGs to screen all aeromedical personnel from 1961 to 1981. The incidence of epileptiform activity on EEG in asymptomatic flight candidates ranges from 0.11 to 2.5%. In 3 studies of asymptomatic flight candidates with epileptiform activity on EEG followed for 2 to 15 years, 1 of 31 (3.2%), 1 of 30 (3.3%), and 0 of 14 (0%) developed a seizure, for a cumulative risk of an individual with an epileptiform EEG developing a seizure of 2.67% (2 in 75). Of 28,658 student naval aviation personnel screened 31 had spikes and/or slow waves on EEG, and only 1 later developed a seizure. Of the 28,627 who had a normal EEG, 4 later developed seizures, or

  15. Neurogenetics in Peru: clinical, scientific and ethical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario; Espinoza-Huertas, Keren; Velit-Salazar, Mario R; Veliz-Otani, Diego; Tirado-Hurtado, Indira; Inca-Martinez, Miguel; Silva-Paredes, Gustavo; Milla-Neyra, Karina; Marca, Victoria; Ortega, Olimpio; Mazzetti, Pilar

    2015-07-01

    Neurogenetics, the science that studies the genetic basis of the development and function of the nervous system, is a discipline of recent development in Peru, an emerging Latin American country. Herein, we review the clinical, scientific and ethical aspects regarding the development of this discipline, starting with the first molecular diagnosis of neurogenetic diseases, to family and population-based genetic association studies. Neurogenetics in Peru aims to better explain the epidemiology of monogenic and complex neurodegenerative disorders that will help in implementing public health policies for these disorders. The characterization of Peru and its health system, legal issues regarding rare diseases and the historical milestones in neurogenetics are also discussed.

  16. An autoethnographic exploration of the use of goal oriented feedback to enhance brief clinical teaching encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Laura; Bourgeois-Law, Gisele; Ajjawi, Rola; Regehr, Glenn

    2017-03-01

    Supervision in the outpatient context is increasingly in the form of single day interactions between students and preceptors. This creates difficulties for effective feedback, which often depends on a strong relationship of trust between preceptor and student. Building on feedback theories focusing on the relational and dialogic aspects of feedback, this study explored the use of goal-oriented feedback in brief encounters with learners. This study used autoethnography to explore one preceptor's feedback interactions over an eight-month period both in the ambulatory setting and on the wards. Data included written narrative reflections on feedback interactions with twenty-three learners informed by discussions with colleagues and repeated reading of feedback literature. Thematic and narrative analyses of data were performed iteratively. Data analysis emphasized four recurrent themes. (1) Goal discussions were most effective when initiated early and integrated throughout the learning experience. (2) Both learner and preceptor goals were multiple and varied, and feedback needed to reflect this complexity. (3) Negotiation or co-construction of goals was important when considering the focus of feedback discussions in order to create safer, more effective interactions. (4) Goal oriented interactions offer potential benefits to the learner and preceptor. Goal oriented feedback promotes dialogue as it requires both preceptor and learner to acknowledge and negotiate learning goals throughout their interaction. In doing so, feedback becomes an explicit component of the preceptor-learner relationship. This enhances feedback interactions even in relatively brief encounters, and may begin an early educational alliance that can be elaborated with longer interactions.

  17. Informal Leadership in the Clinical Setting: Occupational Therapist Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Patrick Heard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leadership is vital to clinical, organizational, and professional success. This has compelled a high volume of research primarily related to formal leadership concepts. However, as organizations flatten, eliminate departmental structures, or decentralize leadership structures the relevance of informal leaders has markedly enhanced. Methods: Using a qualitative phenomenological methodology consistent with interpretative phenomenological analysis, this study examines the impact of informal leadership in the clinical setting for occupational therapists. Data was collected through the completion of semi-structured interviews with 10 peer-identified informal occupational therapy leaders in Ontario, Canada. Collected data was transcribed verbatim and coded for themes by multiple coders. Several methods were employed to support trustworthiness. Results: The results identify that informal leaders are collaborative, accessible, and considered the “go to” staff. They demonstrate professional competence knowledge, experience, and accountability and are inspirational and creative. Practically, informal leaders organically shape the practice environment while building strength and capacity among their peers. Conclusion: Recommendations for supporting informal leaders include acknowledgement of the role and its centrality, enabling informal leaders time to undertake the role, and supporting consideration of informal leadership concepts at the curriculum and professional level.

  18. Employment discrimination against obese women in obesity clinic's patients perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara-Gołębiowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The workplace is one of many areas of life where obese people are unfairly treated. According to the literature obese women are particularly susceptible to discrimination in employment. There is a lack of polish researches of this subject. The main objective of this study was to analyze personal, subjective experiences related to weight bias and discrimination against obese people in the workplace of obese Polish women. The study was carried out in a hospital clinic for obesity management. A total of 420 women with BMI>30, aged 21 to 72, participated in group interviews focused on the weight bias and discrimination against obese people in the workplace. In the group of clinically obese women, 5.3% of subjects had experienced employment discrimination and 10.5% had been victims of verbal and social abuse in the workplace. The most common psycho-physical consequences of the weight stigma were emotional problems, lack of motivation and overeating in response to stress. Weight-based discrimination in the workplace poses a problem in Poland. The weight stigma and occupational discrimination lead to psycho-physical discomfort which exacerbates overeating and obesity.

  19. Stem Cell Applications in Tendon Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common cause of morbidity and a significant health burden on society. Tendons are structural tissues connecting muscle to bone and are prone to tearing and tendinopathy, an overuse or degenerative condition that is characterized by failed healing and cellular depletion. Current treatments, for tendon tear are conservative, surgical repair or surgical scaffold reconstruction. Tendinopathy is treated by exercises, injection therapies, shock wave treatments or surgical tendon debridement. However, tendons usually heal with fibrosis and scar tissue, which has suboptimal tensile strength and is prone to reinjury, resulting in lifestyle changes with activity restriction. Preclinical studies show that cell therapies have the potential to regenerate rather than repair tendon tissue, a process termed tenogenesis. A number of different cell lines, with varying degrees of differentiation, have being evaluated including stem cells, tendon derived cells and dermal fibroblasts. Even though cellular therapies offer some potential in treating tendon disorders, there have been few published clinical trials to determine the ideal cell source, the number of cells to administer, or the optimal bioscaffold for clinical use.

  20. [Clinical neuropsychology in perspective: future challenges based on current developments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Tirapu-Ustárroz, Javier

    2012-02-01

    New lines of translational, interdisciplinary research are emerging among different fields of the neurosciences, which often point at clinical neuropsychology as the hinge discipline capable of linking the basic findings with their clinical implications and thereby endow them with some meaning for phenomenological experience. To establish the great lines of progress made in the fields of neuroscience and neuropsychology in recent years, so as to be able to foresee the strategic lines and priorities of neuroscience in the near future. To achieve this aim, the first step will be to identify the changes of paradigm that have taken place in the areas of neuroscience and psychology in the last two decades. The next step will be to propose new topics and fields of application that these changes in paradigm offer and demand from neuroscience. The false dichotomies of genes versus environment, mind versus brain, and reason versus emotion are considered, as are the new applications of neuropsychology to the understanding of psychopathological disorders, from the neurodegenerative to neurodevelopment, from 'dirty' drugs to cognitive and affective enhancers.

  1. Empathy in narcissistic personality disorder: from clinical and empirical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin-Sommers, Arielle; Krusemark, Elizabeth; Ronningstam, Elsa

    2014-07-01

    Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is associated with an assortment of characteristics that undermine interpersonal functioning. A lack of empathy is often cited as the primary distinguishing feature of NPD. However, clinical presentations of NPD suggest that empathy is not simply deficient in these individuals, but dysfunctional and subject to a diverse set of motivational and situational factors. Consistent with this presentation, research illustrates that empathy is multidimensional, involving 2 distinct emotional and cognitive processes associated with a capacity to respectively understand and respond to others' mental and affective states. The goal of this practice review is to bridge the gap between our psychobiological understanding of empathy and its clinical manifestations in NPD. We present 3 case studies highlighting the variability in empathic functioning in people with NPD. Additionally, we summarize the literature on empathy and NPD, which largely associates this disorder with deficient emotional empathy, and dysfunctional rather than deficient cognitive empathy. Because this research is limited, we also present empathy-based findings for related syndromes (borderline and psychopathy). Given the complexity of narcissism and empathy, we propose that multiple relationships can exist between these constructs. Ultimately, by recognizing the multifaceted relationship between empathy and narcissism, and moving away from an all or nothing belief that those with NPD simply lack empathy, therapists may better understand narcissistic patients' behavior and motivational structure. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Rethinking dry eye disease: a perspective on clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Anthony J; Tomlinson, Alan; Foulks, Gary N; Pepose, Jay S; Baudouin, Christophe; Geerling, Gerd; Nichols, Kelly K; Lemp, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Publication of the DEWS report in 2007 established the state of the science of dry eye disease (DED). Since that time, new evidence suggests that a rethinking of traditional concepts of dry eye disease is in order. Specifically, new evidence on the epidemiology of the disease, as well as strategies for diagnosis, have changed the understanding of DED, which is a heterogeneous disease associated with considerable variability in presentation. These advances, along with implications for clinical care, are summarized herein. The most widely used signs of DED are poorly correlated with each other and with symptoms. While symptoms are thought to be characteristic of DED, recent studies have shown that less than 60% of subjects with other objective evidence of DED are symptomatic. Thus the use of symptoms alone in diagnosis will likely result in missing a significant percentage of DED patients, particularly with early/mild disease. This could have considerable impact in patients undergoing cataract or refractive surgery as patients with DED have less than optimal visual results. The most widely used objective signs for diagnosing DED all show greater variability between eyes and in the same eye over time compared with normal subjects. This variability is thought to be a manifestation of tear film instability which results in rapid breakup of the tearfilm between blinks and is an identifier of patients with DED. This feature emphasizes the bilateral nature of the disease in most subjects not suffering from unilateral lid or other unilateral destabilizing surface disorders. Instability of the composition of the tears also occurs in dry eye disease and shows the same variance between eyes. Finally, elevated tear osmolarity has been reported to be a global marker (present in both subtypes of the disease- aqueous-deficient dry eye and evaporative dry eye). Clinically, osmolarity has been shown to be the best single metric for diagnosis of DED and is directly related to

  3. [Child sexual abuse: clinical perspectives and ethico-legal dilemmas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Alvaro; Ramírez, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In the review of the current literature, the main causing factors of the related conditions with child sexual abuse are the ethical dilemmas and legal implications. A review was conducted on the classic literature on this topic. In this articlesome difficult paradigmatic cases are presented in which the hypothetical dilemmas were solved. The main characteristics of child sexual abuse enable us to have a better argument to address these situations. Taking into account the literature reviewed and predictable courses of action, it is concluded that it is important to take into account each individual each case and its circumstances, and that prudence and clinical objectivity, as well as knowledge of the law, become essential requirements for proper action. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Technological advances in perioperative monitoring: Current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Minimal mandatory monitoring in the perioperative period recommended by Association of Anesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and American Society of Anesthesiologists are universally acknowledged and has become an integral part of the anesthesia practice. The technologies in perioperative monitoring have advanced, and the availability and clinical applications have multiplied exponentially. Newer monitoring techniques include depth of anesthesia monitoring, goal-directed fluid therapy, transesophageal echocardiography, advanced neurological monitoring, improved alarm system and technological advancement in objective pain assessment. Various factors that need to be considered with the use of improved monitoring techniques are their validation data, patient outcome, safety profile, cost-effectiveness, awareness of the possible adverse events, knowledge of technical principle and ability of the convenient routine handling. In this review, we will discuss the new monitoring techniques in anesthesia, their advantages, deficiencies, limitations, their comparison to the conventional methods and their effect on patient outcome, if any.

  5. Neoplastic stem cells: current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg, Axel; Brämswig, Kira; Herrmann, Harald; Karlic, Heidrun; Mirkina, Irina; Hubmann, Rainer; Laffer, Sylvia; Marian, Brigitte; Shehata, Medhat; Krepler, Clemens; Pehamberger, Hubert; Grunt, Thomas; Jäger, Ulrich; Zielinski, Christoph C; Valent, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Neoplastic stem cells have initially been characterized in myeloid leukemias where NOD/SCID mouse-repopulating progenitors supposedly reside within a CD34+/Lin- subset of the malignant clone. These progenitors are considered to be self-renewing cells responsible for the in vivo long-term growth of neoplastic cells in leukemic patients. Therefore, these cells represent an attractive target of therapy. In some lymphoid leukemias, NOD/SCID mouse-repopulating cells were also reported to reside within the CD34+/Lin- subfraction of the clone. More recently, several attempts have been made to transfer the cancer stem cell concept to solid tumors and other non-hematopoietic neoplasms. In several of these tumors, the cell surface antigens AC133 (CD133) and CD44 are considered to indicate the potential of a cell to initiate permanent tumor formation in vivo. However, several questions concerning the phenotype, self-renewal capacity, stroma-dependence, and other properties of cancer- or leukemia-initiating cells remain to be solved. The current article provides a summary of our current knowledge on neoplastic (cancer) stem cells, with special emphasis on clinical implications and therapeutic options as well as a discussion about conceptual and technical limitations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Okuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation.

  7. Estimating individual glomerular volume in the human kidney: clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Victor G; Zimanyi, Monika A; Samuel, Terence; Hughson, Michael D; Douglas-Denton, Rebecca N; Bertram, John F; Armitage, James A

    2012-05-01

    Measurement of individual glomerular volumes (IGV) has allowed the identification of drivers of glomerular hypertrophy in subjects without overt renal pathology. This study aims to highlight the relevance of IGV measurements with possible clinical implications and determine how many profiles must be measured in order to achieve stable size distribution estimates. We re-analysed 2250 IGV estimates obtained using the disector/Cavalieri method in 41 African and 34 Caucasian Americans. Pooled IGV analysis of mean and variance was conducted. Monte-Carlo (Jackknife) simulations determined the effect of the number of sampled glomeruli on mean IGV. Lin's concordance coefficient (R(C)), coefficient of variation (CV) and coefficient of error (CE) measured reliability. IGV mean and variance increased with overweight and hypertensive status. Superficial glomeruli were significantly smaller than juxtamedullary glomeruli in all subjects (P IGV mean and variability. Overall, mean IGV was particularly reliable with nine or more sampled glomeruli (R(C) > 0.95, IGV and estimated total glomerular number. Multiple comorbidities for CKD are associated with increased IGV mean and variance within subjects, including overweight, obesity and hypertension. Zonal selection and the number of sampled glomeruli do not represent drawbacks for future longitudinal biopsy-based studies of glomerular size and distribution.

  8. Clinical proteomics: Current status, challenges, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Horng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This account will give an overview and evaluation of the current advances in mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics platforms and technology. A general review of some background information concerning the application of these methods in the characterization of molecular sizes and related protein expression profiles associated with different types of cells under varied experimental conditions will be presented. It is intended to provide a concise and succinct overview to those clinical researchers first exposed to this foremost powerful methodology in modern life sciences of postgenomic era. Proteomic characterization using highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation of MS has been used to characterize biological samples of complex protein mixtures with vastly different protein structure and composition. These systems are then used to highlight the versatility and potential of the MS-based proteomic strategies for facilitating protein expression analysis of various disease-related organisms or tissues of interest. Major MS-based strategies reviewed herein include (1 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MS and electron-spray ionization proteomics; (2 one-dimensional or two-dimensional gel-based proteomics; (3 gel-free shotgun proteomics in conjunction with liquid chromatography/tandem MS; (4 Multiple reaction monitoring coupled tandem MS quantitative proteomics and; (5 Phosphoproteomics based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-MS/MS.

  9. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, Siddharth B.; Rose, Peter S.; Sim, Franklin; Okuno, Scott; Petersen, Ivy

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation

  10. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Lynch syndrome in the 21st century: clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A K; Roy, H K; Lynch, H T

    2016-03-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common of all inherited cancer syndromes, associated with substantially elevated risks for colonic and extracolonic malignancies, earlier onset and high rates of multiple primary cancers. At the genetic level, it is caused by a defective mismatch repair (MMR) system due to presence of germline defects in at least one of the MMR genes- MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2 or EPCAM. An impaired MMR function during replication introduces infidelity in DNA sequence and leads to ubiquitous mutations at simple repetitive sequences (microsatellites), causing microsatellite instability (MSI). Although previously, clinicopathological criteria such as Amsterdam I/II and Revised Bethesda Guidelines were commonly used to identify suspected LS mutation carriers, there has been a recent push towards universally testing, especially in case of colorectal cancers (CRCs), through immunohistochemistry for expression of MMR proteins or through molecular tests (polymerase chain reaction, PCR) for MSI, in order to identify LS mutation carriers and subject them to genetic testing to ascertain the specific gene implicated. In this review, we have discussed the latest diagnostic strategies and the current screening and treatment guidelines for colonic and extracolonic cancers in clinically affected and at-risk individuals for LS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Autophagy in the immune response to tuberculosis: clinical perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ní Cheallaigh, C

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of evidence points to autophagy as an essential component in the immune response to tuberculosis. Autophagy is a direct mechanism of killing intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis and also acts as a modulator of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In addition, autophagy plays a key role in antigen processing and presentation. Autophagy is modulated by cytokines; it is stimulated by T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ, and is inhibited by the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Vitamin D, via cathelicidin, can also induce autophagy, as can Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signals. Autophagy-promoting agents, administered either locally to the lungs or systemically, could have a clinical application as adjunctive treatment of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Moreover, vaccines which effectively induce autophagy could be more successful in preventing acquisition or reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  13. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in a Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastatic dissemination rely on cellular plasticity. Among the different phenotypes acquired by cancer cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT has been extensively illustrated. Indeed, this transition allows an epithelial polarized cell to acquire a more mesenchymal phenotype with increased mobility and invasiveness. The role of EMT is quite clear during developmental stage. In the neoplastic context in many tumors EMT has been associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype including local invasion and distant metastasis. EMT allows the cell to invade surrounding tissues and survive in the general circulation and through a stem cell phenotype grown in the host organ. The molecular pathways underlying EMT have also been clearly defined and their description is beyond the scope of this review. Here we will summarize and analyze the attempts made to block EMT in the therapeutic context. Indeed, till today, most of the studies are made in animal models. Few clinical trials are ongoing with no obvious benefits of EMT inhibitors yet. We point out the limitations of EMT targeting such tumor heterogeneity or the dynamics of EMT during disease progression.

  14. Amphetamine, past and present--a pharmacological and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, David J; Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-06-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine's diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine's distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed.

  15. Amphetamine, past and present – a pharmacological and clinical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine’s diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine’s distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  16. A comparative, developmental and clinical perspective of neurobehavioral sexual dimorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Paz eViveros

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurobiological mechanisms involved in sexual differentiation of the central nervous system will be presented with a comparative view across vertebrates. Women and men differ in a wide variety of behavioral traits and in the probabilities of developing certain mental disorders. A brief overview of sex-chromosome pathways underlying sexual dimorphisms will be provided. We will describe most common brain phenotypes derived in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging, discuss the challenges in interpreting these phenotypes vis-à-vis the underlying neurobiology and revise the known sex differences in brain structure from birth, through adolescence, to adulthood. Clinical and epidemiological data indicate important sex differences in the prevalence, course, and expression of psychopathologies such as schizophrenia, and mood disorders including major depression and bipolar illness. Recent evidence implies that mood disorders and psychosis share some common genetic predispositions, as well as some neurobiological basis. Therefore, modern research is emphasizing dimensional representation of mental disorders and conceptualization of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression as a continuum of cognitive deficits and neurobiological abnormalities. Herein, we have examined available evidence on cerebral sexual dimorphism in all three conditions to verify if sex differences vary quantitatively and/or qualitatively along the psychoses-depression continuum. Sex differences in posttraumatic disorders prevalence have also been described, thus data on differences at genomic and molecular levels will be considered. Finally, we will discuss the important contribution - advantages and limitations - of animal models in the investigation of underlying mechanisms of neurobehavioral sex differences in neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug dependence, with special emphasis in experimental models based on the neurodevelopmental and three hits hypotheses.

  17. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical instructors' effective teaching strategies: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Moridi, Glorokh; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Garibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    An important factor contributing to the quality of clinical education is instructors' teaching performance. The aim of this study was to identify clinical instructors' most effective teaching strategies from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All third- and fourth-year bachelor's nursing and midwifery students studying at the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences were recruited to the study by using the census method. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire and the self-report 30-item Clinical Instructors' Effective Teaching Strategies Inventory. The SPSS v.16.0 was used for data analysis. The most effective teaching strategies of clinical instructors from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives were respectively 'treating students, clients, and colleagues with respect' and 'being eager for guiding students and manage their problems'. Clinical instructors need to be eager for education and also be able to establish effective communication with students. Empowering clinical instructors in specialized and technical aspects of clinical education seems necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Extending the multicultural orientation (MCO) framework to group psychotherapy: A clinical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, D Martin; Chapman, Norah A

    2018-03-01

    Multicultural group work has received growing attention over the past two decades; however, there is a lack of conceptual frameworks to guide therapists' cultural processes within group therapy at present. As such, we extend the multicultural orientation (MCO) to group therapy in an effort to provide a conceptual framework for group therapists to effectively engage multicultural group work. The MCO framework was developed in an effort to operationalize therapists' cultural processes of cultural humility, cultural comfort, and cultural opportunity. Although the MCO framework has been empirically tested within an individual psychotherapy context, application to alternative therapeutic modalities is needed. Given the inherent multicultural nature of group therapy and calls for group therapist to be culturally competent in the delivery of group-based services, we extend the MCO framework to the practice of group therapy. In this article, we provide a rationale for the application of the MCO framework to the practice of group therapy, and illustrate how group therapists' cultural humility, comfort, and opportunities can assist in establishing a multicultural group orientation throughout the development of the group. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Student evaluation of a problem-oriented module of clinical medicine within a revised dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, C J; Plasschaert, A J M

    2006-05-01

    As part of a revised dental curriculum, a 3(rd) year module on medical subjects was developed based on a mixture of self-study and problem-oriented approach using cases. Pairs of students had to select a specific medical problem and solve a paper patient case using a problem-solving cycle. Results were presented in working groups and by writing an essay. The quality of the presentations was assessed by colleague students and by the teacher supervisor; the expert teacher in the field graded the essay. The results contributed for 40% to the overall grade of the module. A questionnaire filled out by 94% of the participating students showed that 85% of the students agreed in preferring this way of handling medical problems as compared with conventional, lecture-based education. Almost all of them enjoyed the provided opportunity to give a case presentation. The problem-oriented model was assessed as useful by 73% of the students. Knowledge concerning the topic chosen turned out to be higher than knowledge of other topics. Although this study cannot prove that this mode of education actually results in a better ability to cope with medical problems, it may contribute in several ways to the final competences in the area of general medicine in the undergraduate dental curriculum.

  20. Benefits and challenges of international clinical education from a US-based physiotherapist faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Black, Jill D

    2013-12-01

    The influence of internationalization on physiotherapist education in at least North American-based programmes has become more apparent. Faculty and students have been involved in various international activities. One category of activities includes international clinical education (ICE), where students earn clinical education credit for their learning activities at international sites. Although this educational strategy appears to be increasingly used in at least the United States and Canada, the related literature is limited in scope. The purpose of this portion of the present study was to investigate the benefits and challenges of ICE for US-based students, US-based physiotherapy programmes and international partners from the perspective of US-based faculty sending students for clinical education internationally. Content analysis was used for this qualitative study. Fifteen US-based faculty members who had experience in sending physiotherapist students for ICE were recruited. The primary researcher conducted semi-structured phone interviews, averaging approximately 60 minutes in length. The primary and secondary researchers completed data analysis using NVivo 8 software (QSR International Inc., Cambridge, MA). Benefits of ICE to the students included exposure to alternate health systems, broadening of student perspectives and clinical competence. Challenges consisted of funding and possible language barrier. Increased visibility, expanded global perspective and faculty collaborations were benefits to the programme. Ensuring a quality learning experience was the greatest programme challenge. Benefits to the international site included education and faculty collaborations/exchanges; challenges were language, student clinical preparation and unfamiliarity with the student evaluation tool. Because the sample was limited to 15 US-based faculty members, the results may not be relevant to all programmes inside or outside of the United States. Additionally, the study

  1. Relationship Between Learning Orientation And Business Performance And The Moderating Effect Of Competitive Advantage: An Accounting Services Firms Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Louis Martinette; Alice Obenchain-Leeson; Gladys Gomez; Jessica Webb

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the influence of learning orientation on business performance (achievement of sales and profit objectives) in the context of pure service, specifically that of public accounting services firms. The conceptual framework used in this research has been drawn from marketing, finance, and organizational behavior theory. Specifically, relationships related to learning orientation, sources of competitive advantage, and business performance have been identified. This research ...

  2. The Relationship Between Learning Orientation And Business Performance And The Moderating Effect Of Competitive Advantage: A Service Organization Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Louis A. Martinette; Alice Obenchain-Leeson

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the influence of learning orientation on business performance (the achievement of sales and profit objectives) in the context of pure service.  The conceptual framework used in this research has been drawn from marketing, finance, and organizational behavior theory. Specifically, relationships related to learning orientation, sources of competitive advantage, and business performance have been identified.  This research develops and tests a framework about learning orienta...

  3. Family accommodation in adult obsessive–compulsive disorder: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Albert, Alessandra Baffa, Giuseppe Maina Rita Levi Montalcini Department of Neuroscience, A.O.U. San Luigi Gonzaga, University of Turin, Turino, Italy Abstract: The term accommodation has been used to refer to family responses specifically related to obsessive–compulsive (OC symptoms: it encompasses behaviors such as directly participating in compulsions, assisting a relative with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD when he/she is performing a ritual, or helping him/her to avoid triggers that may precipitate obsessions and compulsions. At the opposite side, family responses to OCD may also include interfering with the rituals or actively opposing them; stopping accommodating OC symptoms or actively interfering with their performance is usually associated with greater distress and sometimes even with aggressive behaviors from the patients. This article summarizes progress of the recent research concerning family accommodation in relatives of patients with OCD. Family accommodation is a prevalent phenomenon both among parents of children/adolescents with OCD and relatives/caregivers of adult patients. It can be measured with a specific instrument, the Family Accommodation Scale, of which there are several versions available for use in clinical practice. The vast majority of both parents of children/adolescents with OCD and family members of adult patients show at least some accommodation; providing reassurances to obsessive doubts, participating in rituals and assisting the patient in avoidance are the most frequent accommodating behaviors displayed by family members. Modification of routine and modification of activities specifically due to OC symptoms have been found to be equally prevalent. Specific characteristics of patients (such as contamination/washing symptoms and of relatives (the presence of anxiety or depressive symptoms or a family history positive for another anxiety disorder are associated with a higher degree of family

  4. Bacterial genome sequencing in clinical microbiology: a pathogen-oriented review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagini, F; Greub, G

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been perceived as a technology with the potential to revolutionise clinical microbiology. Herein, we reviewed the literature on the use of WGS for the most commonly encountered pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories: Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci, mycobacteria and Chlamydia trachomatis. For each pathogen group, we focused on five different aspects: the genome characteristics, the most common genomic approaches and the clinical uses of WGS for (i) typing and outbreak analysis, (ii) virulence investigation and (iii) in silico antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Of all the clinical usages, the most frequent and straightforward usage was to type bacteria and to trace outbreaks back. A next step toward standardisation was made thanks to the development of several new genome-wide multi-locus sequence typing systems based on WGS data. Although virulence characterisation could help in various particular clinical settings, it was done mainly to describe outbreak strains. An increasing number of studies compared genotypic to phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility testing, with mostly promising results. However, routine implementation will preferentially be done in the workflow of particular pathogens, such as mycobacteria, rather than as a broadly applicable generic tool. Overall, concrete uses of WGS in routine clinical microbiology or infection control laboratories were done, but the next big challenges will be the standardisation and validation of the procedures and bioinformatics pipelines in order to reach clinical standards.

  5. Audiology Students' Perspectives of Enacting and Learning Clinical Communication: A Qualitative Interview and Video Reflexivity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Samantha; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Barr, Caitlin

    2018-03-27

    Effective clinical communication is pivotal to the provision of quality hearing health care. To date, audiology students reportedly felt ill-prepared when counseling patients about their hearing impairment, yet there is a paucity of studies exploring how clinical communication is taught and learned in audiology programs. Thus, the aims of the study were (a) to explore final year audiology students' perspectives of their own clinical communication skills during an in-house university clinical placement and (b) to explore students' perceptions of their clinical communication education. Using a qualitative description approach, students were asked to coview their filmed clinical encounter using video reflexivity during a semistructured interview on clinical communication education. Fifteen final year graduate audiology students from The University of Melbourne, Australia, participated in the study. The interviews were audio-recorded and analyzed thematically. The overarching themes of striving to be patient-centered, assessment shapes behavior, and power relations emerged from students' reflection of their own clinical encounter. In addition, the theme what students want described the perceived teaching methods that assisted students' clinical communication practices. The findings of this study highlight the challenges that students perceived during their clinical placement as they strive to enact a patient-centered interaction. An assessment rubric that incorporates communication skills can provide greater opportunities for feedback and self-reflection. Additionally, clinical communication education that adopts experiential learning and is longitudinally integrated into the curriculum can further reinforce students' communication learning needs.

  6. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  7. [A Street Clinic in a state capital in Northeast Brazil from the perspective of homeless people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cíntia Priscila da Silva; Rozendo, Célia Alves; Melo, Givânya Bezerra de

    2016-08-08

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Street Clinic strategy in Maceió, Alagoas State, Brazil, from the perspective of its users. This was a qualitative study in coverage areas of the Street Clinic in Maceió. Research subjects were 18 homeless individuals assisted by the clinic (10 men and 8 women), ranging from 20 to 40 years of age. Data were collected from September 2014 to February 2015 using a semi-structured interview. Content analysis was applied to the data and identified two categories: the first, the Street Clinic as such, revealed the strategy's critical points, challenges, and potentialities; the second showed the Street Clinic as social support, affect, and hope for change for the homeless. The strategy was rated positively by users, providing social support on health problems and other daily issues.

  8. Practical experience with graphical user interfaces and object-oriented design in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, I G; Cartwright, R Y; Farnan, L P

    1993-12-15

    The computing strategy in our laboratories evolved from research in Artificial Intelligence, and is based on powerful software tools running on high performance desktop computers with a graphical user interface. This allows most tasks to be regarded as design problems rather than implementation projects, and both rapid prototyping and an object-oriented approach to be employed during the in-house development and enhancement of the laboratory information systems. The practical application of this strategy is discussed, with particular reference to the system designer, the laboratory user and the laboratory customer. Routine operation covers five departments, and the systems are stable, flexible and well accepted by the users. Client-server computing, currently undergoing final trials, is seen as the key to further development, and this approach to Pathology computing has considerable potential for the future.

  9. Characteristics of student preparedness for clinical learning: clinical educator perspectives using the Delphi approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chipchase Lucinda S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During clinical placements, clinical educators facilitate student learning. Previous research has defined the skills, attitudes and practices that pertain to an ideal clinical educator. However, less attention has been paid to the role of student readiness in terms of foundational knowledge and attitudes at the commencement of practice education. Therefore, the aim of this study was to ascertain clinical educators’ views on the characteristics that they perceive demonstrate that a student is well prepared for clinical learning. Methods A two round on-line Delphi study was conducted. The first questionnaire was emailed to a total of 636 expert clinical educators from the disciplines of occupational therapy, physiotherapy and speech pathology. Expert clinical educators were asked to describe the key characteristics that indicate a student is prepared for a clinical placement and ready to learn. Open-ended responses received from the first round were subject to a thematic analysis and resulted in six themes with 62 characteristics. In the second round, participants were asked to rate each characteristic on a 7 point Likert Scale. Results A total of 258 (40.56% responded to the first round of the Delphi survey while 161 clinical educators completed the second (62.40% retention rate. Consensus was reached on 57 characteristics (six themes using a cut off of greater than 70% positive respondents and an interquartile deviation IQD of equal or less than 1. Conclusions This study identified 57 characteristics (six themes perceived by clinical educators as indicators of a student who is prepared and ready for clinical learning. A list of characteristics relating to behaviours has been compiled and could be provided to students to aid their preparation for clinical learning and to universities to incorporate within curricula. In addition, the list provides a platform for discussions by professional bodies about the role of placement

  10. Regulatory challenges in the review of data from global clinical trials: the PMDA perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Tanaka, A; Sato, T; Uyama, Y

    2013-08-01

    Regulatory agencies face challenges in reviewing data from global clinical trials (GCTs) in the era of globalization of drug development. One major challenge is consideration of ethnic factors in evaluating GCT data so as to extrapolate foreign population data to one's own national population. Here, we present the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) perspective in reviewing GCT data in new drug applications (NDAs) and discuss future challenges for new drug approval.

  11. Alcoholic liver disease patients’ perspective on coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention after hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjær; Hendriksen, Carsten; Schiødt, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aim and objective: To identify and describe the impact of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients after hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives. Background: Patients who have experienced...... were conducted with 10 alcoholic liver disease patients who were diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy and participated in a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention. Richard S. Lazarus's theory of stress and coping inspired the interview guide. Results: The significance...... of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients’ ability to cope with problems after surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives was characterised by the core category ‘regain control...

  12. Theory and practice of clinical ethics support services: narrative and hermeneutical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porz, Rouven; Landeweer, Elleke; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we introduce narrative and hermeneutical perspectives to clinical ethics support services (CESS). We propose a threefold consideration of 'theory' and show how it is interwoven with 'practice' as we go along. First, we look at theory in its foundational role: in our case 'narrative ethics' and 'philosophical hermeneutics' provide a theoretical base for clinical ethics by focusing on human identities entangled in stories and on moral understanding as a dialogical process. Second, we consider the role of theoretical notions in helping practitioners to understand their situation in clinical ethics practice, by using notions like 'story', 'responsibility', or 'vulnerability' to make explicit and explain their practical experience. Such theoretical notions help us to interpret clinical situations from an ethical perspective and to foster moral awareness of practitioners. And, thirdly, we examine how new theoretical concepts are developed by interpreting practice, using practice to form and improve our ethical theory. In this paper, we discuss this threefold use of theory in clinical ethics support services by reflecting on our own theoretical assumptions, methodological steps and practical experiences as ethicists, and by providing examples from our daily work. In doing so, we illustrate that theory and practice are interwoven, as theoretical understanding is dependent upon practical experience, and vice-versa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. An Endocrine Pharmacology Course for the Clinically-Oriented Pharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahwan, Ralf G.

    1976-01-01

    In view of trends in clinical pharmacy education, the role of the traditional basic sciences has to be reassessed. An endocrine pharmacology course comprised of 49 clock-hours and open for professional undergraduate and graduate credit is described that blends basic and applied pharmacology. (LBH)

  14. Microdose clinical trial by use of radioisotope and perspective of its possible utilization in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Many promising PET tracers have been developed by the progress of molecular imaging research, and new era could be opened by clinical trials using investigational products labeled by RI. Guidance for microdose clinical trial issued by MHLW in June, 2008, is the regulatory basis to develop PET tracer under clinical trial by the pharmaceutical affairs law. In this review, the discussion from the aspect of regulatory science is highlighted, particularly, on the topics of guidance for microdose and exploratory IND study including sub-therapeutic dose (type II) and therapeutic dose (type III), the revised GMP for investigational product including RI-labeled product, and to ward guidance for microdose clinical trial for biological product. Finally, the US FDA guidance developing medical imaging drug including biological product is introduced, and then perspective of possible utilization of in vivo radiopharmaceutical agents in drug development is discussed. (author)

  15. Pharmacists’ journey to clinical pharmacy practice in Ethiopia: Key informants’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemayehu B Mekonnen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients and providing medication consultation to staff. This area of practice is at the infant stage in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to explore key informants’ perspective in the implementation of clinical pharmacy practice in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Method: A qualitative study was conducted through in-depth interviews with the heads of departments (internal medicine, paediatrics, surgery, nurse, pharmacy, medical director, administration and pharmacy student representatives. Qualitative data analysis was done after audiotapes were transcribed verbatim and notes were compiled. Results: All of the respondents interviewed express diverse and conflicting perspectives on pharmacists’ role, varying from a health-care professional to a business man. Despite this, the current pace of change worldwide takes the professions’ mission to that of a provider of clinical pharmacy services. The data ascertained the change in pharmacy practice, and integrating clinical pharmacy services within the health-care system should be seen as a must. Pharmacists should delineate from a business perspective and focus on widening the scope of the profession of pharmacy and should come close to the patient to serve directly. Conclusions: Although the perception of people on traditional roles of pharmacists was weak, there were promising steps in developing clinical pharmacy practice within the health-care system. Moreover, the results of this study revealed a high demand for this service among health-care providers.

  16. Socio-Demographic and Practice-Oriented Factors Related to Proficiency in Problem Solving: A Lifelong Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Richard; Ederer, Peer

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relative importance of different socio-demographic and practice-oriented factors that are related to proficiency in problem solving in technology-rich environments (PSTREs) and by extension may be related to complex problem solving (CPS). The empirical analysis focuses on the proficiency measurements of PSTRE made…

  17. Software-based evaluation of toric IOL orientation in a multicenter clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirangan, Sanjeev; Feuchter, Lucas; Smith, Pamela; Nixon, Donald

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the rotational stability of a new one-piece hydrophobic acrylic toric intraocular lens (IOL) using a custom-developed software for analysis of slit-lamp photographs. In a prospective, multicenter study, 174 eyes were implanted with the TECNIS Toric IOL (Abbott Medical Optics, Inc., Santa Ana, CA). A custom-developed software was used to analyze high-resolution slit-lamp photographs of 156 eyes taken at day 1 (baseline) and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The software uses iris and sclera landmarks to align the baseline image and later images for comparison. Validation of software was performed through repeated analyses of protractor images rotated from 0.1° to 10.0° and randomly selected photographs of 20 eyes. Software validation showed precision (repeatability plus reproducibility variation) of 0.02° using protractor images and 2.22° using slit-lamp photographs. Good quality slit-lamp images and clear landmarks were necessary for precise measurements. At 6 months, 94.2% of eyes had 5° or less change in IOL orientation versus baseline; only 2 eyes (1.4%) had axis shift greater than 30°. Most eyes were within 5° or less of rotation between 1 and 3 months (92.9%) and 3 and 6 months (94.1%). Mean absolute axis change (± standard deviation) from 1 day to 6 months was 2.70° ± 5.51°. The new custom software was precise and quick in analyzing slit-lamp photographs to determine postoperative toric IOL rotation. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. "Are You Really Ready to Change?" An Actor-Oriented Perspective on a Farmers Training Setting in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller Mirza, Nathalie; Perret-Clermont, Anne-Nelly

    2016-01-01

    Far from following a linear process from its conception to its implementation, an educational design often involves discrepancies between what its promoters intended and what the participants actually do. In this paper, drawing from a sociocultural perspective to learning, we focus our attention precisely on some of the discrepancies observed…

  19. [Clinical study of post-stroke speech apraxia treated with scalp electric acupuncture under anatomic orientation and rehabilitation training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yujuan; Yang, Yuxia; Xiang, Rong; Chang, E; Zhang, Yanchun; Zuo, Bingfang; Zhang, Qianwei

    2015-07-01

    To compare the differences in the clinical efficacy on post-stroke speech disorder between scalp electric acupuncture (EA) under anatomic orientation combined with rehabilitation training and simple rehabilitation training. Sixty patients of post-stroke speech apraxia were randomized into an observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each one. In the observation group, under anatomic orientation, the scalp EA was adopted to the dominant hemisphere Broca area on the left cerebrum. Additionally, the speech rehabilitation training was combined. In the control group, the speech rehabilitation training was simply,used. The treatment lasted for 4 weeks totally. The speech movement program module in the psychological language assessment and treatment system of Chinese aphasia was used for the evident of efficacy assessment. The scores of counting, singing scale, repeating phonetic alphabet, repeating monosyllable and repeating disyllable were observed in the patients of the two groups. The assessment was done separately on the day of grouping and 4 weeks after treatment. In 4 weeks of treatment, the scores of counting, singing scale, repeating phonetic alphabet, repeating monosyllable and repeating disyllable were all improved as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (all Pspeech rehabilitation training obviously improves speech apraxia in stroke patients so that the speech disorder cani be relieved. The efficacy is better than that in simple rehabilitation training.

  20. Objective Assessment of Joint Stiffness: A Clinically Oriented Hardware and Software Device with an Application to the Shoulder Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Kevin; Price, Robert; Liu, Nelson; Ciol, Marcia A

    2012-08-30

    Examination of articular joints is largely based on subjective assessment of the "end-feel" of the joint in response to manually applied forces at different joint orientations. This technical report aims to describe the development of an objective method to examine joints in general, with specific application to the shoulder, and suitable for clinical use. We adapted existing hardware and developed laptop-based software to objectively record the force/displacement behavior of the glenohumeral joint during three common manual joint examination tests with the arm in six positions. An electromagnetic tracking system recorded three-dimensional positions of sensors attached to a clinician examiner and a patient. A hand-held force transducer recorded manually applied translational forces. The force and joint displacement were time-synchronized and the joint stiffness was calculated as a quantitative representation of the joint "end-feel." A methodology and specific system checks were developed to enhance clinical testing reproducibility and precision. The device and testing protocol were tested on 31 subjects (15 with healthy shoulders, and 16 with a variety of shoulder impairments). Results describe the stiffness responses, and demonstrate the feasibility of using the device and methods in clinical settings.

  1. Experimental and clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint structures with new scan orientations in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate MRI for visualization of acromioclavicular (ac) joint structures in cadaveric shoulders, asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with trauma of the ac-joint. Three cadaveric shoulders were examined to find adequate planes and sequences for MRI. Afterwards, MR images were correlated to corresponding anatomical sections. Six asymptomatic volunteers and 13 patients were scanned in a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision with three sequences in the following planes: (1) parallel to the clavicle; (2) orthogonal to the ac joint, each time a fat-suppressed proton density-weighted + T2-sequence (TR/TE 4,000/15 ms) was performed; (3) parallel to the clavicle, T1-SE (TR/TE 817/20 ms). The parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, field-of-view 180 mm, matrix 210 x 256 pixels. Standard of reference in the patients was clinical examination and conventional X-rays. Classification was by Rockwood grades I-VI. MRI allowed excellent visualization and diagnoses of ac-joint structures in volunteers and patients (n=6 normal, n=1 Rockwood I, n=5 Rockwood II, n=3 Rockwood III, n=4 Rockwood V). On MRI, in one lesion type II and III each, a lower lesion type was suspected clinically and by X-ray. In one patient additional information by MRI led to surgery. MRI allows excellent anatomical display of ac-joint structures and can give clinically relevant information on type and extension of ac-joint trauma, which may influence therapy. (orig.)

  2. Experimental and clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint structures with new scan orientations in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate MRI for visualization of acromioclavicular (ac) joint structures in cadaveric shoulders, asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with trauma of the ac-joint. Three cadaveric shoulders were examined to find adequate planes and sequences for MRI. Afterwards, MR images were correlated to corresponding anatomical sections. Six asymptomatic volunteers and 13 patients were scanned in a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision with three sequences in the following planes: (1) parallel to the clavicle; (2) orthogonal to the ac joint, each time a fat-suppressed proton density-weighted + T2-sequence (TR/TE 4,000/15 ms) was performed; (3) parallel to the clavicle, T1-SE (TR/TE 817/20 ms). The parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, field-of-view 180 mm, matrix 210 x 256 pixels. Standard of reference in the patients was clinical examination and conventional X-rays. Classification was by Rockwood grades I-VI. MRI allowed excellent visualization and diagnoses of ac-joint structures in volunteers and patients (n=6 normal, n=1 Rockwood I, n=5 Rockwood II, n=3 Rockwood III, n=4 Rockwood V). On MRI, in one lesion type II and III each, a lower lesion type was suspected clinically and by X-ray. In one patient additional information by MRI led to surgery. MRI allows excellent anatomical display of ac-joint structures and can give clinically relevant information on type and extension of ac-joint trauma, which may influence therapy. (orig.)

  3. Elimination of importance factors for clinically accurate selection of beam orientations, beam weights and wedge angles in conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2003-01-01

    A method of simultaneously optimizing beam orientations, beam weights, and wedge angles for conformal radiotherapy is presented. This method removes the need for importance factors by optimizing one objective only, subject to a set of rigid constraints. This facilitates the production of inverse solutions which, without trial-and-error modification of importance factors, precisely satisfy the specified constraints. The algorithm minimizes an objective function which is based upon the single objective to be optimized, but which is forced to an artificially high value when the constraints are not met, so that only satisfactory solutions are allowed. Due to the complex nature of the objective function space, including multiple local minima separated by large regions of plateau, a random search technique equivalent to fast simulated annealing is used for producing inverse plans. To illustrate the novel features of the new algorithm, a simulation is first presented, for the case of a cylindrical phantom. The morphology of the objective function space is shown to be significantly different for the new algorithm, compared to that for a conventional quadratic objective function. Clinical cases for prostate and craniopharyngioma are then presented. For the prostate case, the objective is to reduce irradiated rectal volume. Three-field, four-field, and six-field optimizations, with or without orientation optimization, are shown to provide solutions which are consistent with previously reported plans and class solutions. For the craniopharyngioma case, which involves the use of a high-precision stereotactic conformal technique, the objective is to reduce the irradiated volume of normal brain. Practically feasible beam angles are produced which, compared to a standard plan, provide a small but worthwhile sparing of normal brain. The algorithm is thereby shown to be robust and suitable for clinical application

  4. When and how experienced incivility dissuades proactive performance: An integration of sociometer and self-identity orientation perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilpzand, Pauline; Huang, Lei

    2018-04-16

    In this article we build on relational Sociometer Theory (Leary, 2005; Leary & Baumeister, 2000) to posit the impact of the belongingness threat of experienced incivility in one's work team on employee feelings of ostracism and subsequent engagement in proactive performance. Integrating the social-relational framework of Self-Identity Orientation Theory (Brewer & Gardner, 1996; Cooper & Thatcher, 2010), we nuance our predictions by hypothesizing that chronic self-identification orientations influence both the effect that experiencing incivility in one's work team exerts on feeling ostracized, and the impact that feeling ostracized has on subsequent employee proactive performance. Using a sample of 212 employees and their 51 supervising managers employed in an Internet service and solution company in China, we found support for our hypothesized model. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Alcoholic liver disease patients' perspective of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention after hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjaer; Hendriksen, Carsten; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2016-09-01

    To identify and describe the impact of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients after hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives. Patients who have experienced alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy have reduced quality of life, multiple complications, and social problems, and rehabilitation opportunities for these patients are limited. A grounded theory study and an evaluation study of a controlled intervention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 alcoholic liver disease patients who were diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy and participated in a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention. Richard S. Lazarus's theory of stress and coping inspired the interview guide. The significance of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients' ability to cope with problems after surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives was characterised by the core category 'regain control over the diseased body'. This is subdivided into three separate categories: 'the experience of being physically strong', 'togetherness' and 'self-control', and they impact each other and are mutually interdependent. Alcoholic liver disease patients described the strength of the rehabilitation as regaining control over the diseased body. Professionals and relatives of patients with alcoholic liver disease may need to focus on strengthening and preserving patients' control of their diseased body by facilitating the experience of togetherness, self-control and physical strength when interacting with and supporting patients with alcoholic liver disease. A coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention may help alcoholic liver disease patients to regain control over their diseased body and give patients the experience

  6. The problem-oriented system, problem-knowledge coupling, and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, L L; Zimny, N J

    1989-07-01

    The information tool to aid us in making the clinical decisions discussed in this presentation is called the PKC. Our goal with patients should be to couple the knowledge of the unique patient to the knowledge in the literature and get the best possible match. This approach requires combinatorial versus probabilistic thinking. In the real world, ideal matches are not found. Therefore, it is critical to exhaust the patient's uniqueness first and only then use probabilities to settle further uncertainties. It is an error to teach people how to deal with uncertainty instead of teaching them to clean up a great deal of the uncertainty first. Patients must be involved in this endeavor. In essence, they have a PhD in their own uniqueness, and it is this uniqueness that is very powerful in solving complex problems. This method of patient evaluation and management cannot be used with the unaided mind. It requires new and powerful information tools like the PKC. All information that is relevant to a problem should be included in the coupler. It should encompass differing points of view, and the rationale should be made explicit to clinician and patient alike. When complete, the coupler should represent an interdisciplinary compilation of questions and tests that are expected to be collected every time in the clinic for the type of problem the coupler represents. This method will provide a basis for quality control because the contents of the coupler now have defined what we expect to occur in every patient encounter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Alzheimer´s disease: a clinical-practice-oriented review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa eAlves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation in the field of Alzheimer´s disease (AD, the commonest cause of dementia, has been very active in recent years and it may be difficult for the clinician to keep up with all the innovations and to be aware of the implications they have in clinical practice. The authors, thus, reviewed recent literature on the theme in order to provide the clinician with an updated overview, intended to support decision-making on aspects of diagnosis and management. This article begins to focus on the concept of AD and on its pathogenesis. Afterwards, epidemiology and non-genetic risk factors are approached. Genetics, including genetic risk factors and guidelines for genetic testing, are mentioned next. Recommendations for diagnosis of AD, including recently proposed criteria, are then reviewed. Data on the variants of AD is presented. First approach to the patient is dealt with next, followed by neuropsychological evaluation. Biomarkers, namely MRI, SPECT, FDG PET, PiB PET, CSF tau and Aβ analysis, as well as available data on their diagnostic accuracy, are also discussed. Factors predicting rate of disease progression are briefly mentioned. Finally, non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments, including established and emerging drugs, are addressed.

  8. Orienting-defense responses and psychophysiological reactivity in isolated clinic versus sustained hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vera, María Paz; Sanz, Jesús; Labrador, Francisco J

    2007-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether patients with white-coat or isolated clinic hypertension (ICH) show, in comparison to patients with sustained hypertension (SH), a defense response pattern to novel stimuli and an enhanced psychophysiological reactivity to stress. Forty-three patients with essential hypertension were divided into two groups after 16 days of self-monitoring blood pressure (BP): ICH (24 men; self-measured BP men; self-measured BP >or= 135/85 mmHg). Defense responses were measured as the cardiac changes to phasic non-aversive auditory stimuli. Psychophysiological reactivity (heart and breath rate, blood volume pulse, electromyography, and skin conductance) was measured during mental arithmetic and video game tasks. The standard deviation of self-measured BPs and the difference between mean BPs at work and at home were used as indicators of cardiovascular reactivity to daily stress. No significant differences were seen in defense responses or psychophysiological reactivity to laboratory or naturally occurring stressors. These results do not support the hypothesis that ICH can be explained in terms of a generalized hyperreactivity to novel or stressful stimuli.

  9. Clinically orientated classification incorporating shoulder balance for the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsebaie, H B; Dannawi, Z; Altaf, F; Zaidan, A; Al Mukhtar, M; Shaw, M J; Gibson, A; Noordeen, H

    2016-02-01

    The achievement of shoulder balance is an important measure of successful scoliosis surgery. No previously described classification system has taken shoulder balance into account. We propose a simple classification system for AIS based on two components which include the curve type and shoulder level. Altogether, three curve types have been defined according to the size and location of the curves, each curve pattern is subdivided into type A or B depending on the shoulder level. This classification was tested for interobserver reproducibility and intraobserver reliability. A retrospective analysis of the radiographs of 232 consecutive cases of AIS patients treated surgically between 2005 and 2009 was also performed. Three major types and six subtypes were identified. Type I accounted for 30 %, type II 28 % and type III 42 %. The retrospective analysis showed three patients developed a decompensation that required extension of the fusion. One case developed worsening of shoulder balance requiring further surgery. This classification was tested for interobserver and intraobserver reliability. The mean kappa coefficients for interobserver reproducibility ranged from 0.89 to 0.952, while the mean kappa value for intraobserver reliability was 0.964 indicating a good-to-excellent reliability. The treatment algorithm guides the spinal surgeon to achieve optimal curve correction and postoperative shoulder balance whilst fusing the smallest number of spinal segments. The high interobserver reproducibility and intraobserver reliability makes it an invaluable tool to describe scoliosis curves in everyday clinical practice.

  10. Patient perspectives on care received at community acupuncture clinics: a qualitative thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Kimberly M; Chao, Maria T; Connelly, Erin; Locke, Adrianna

    2013-10-29

    Community acupuncture is a recent innovation in acupuncture service delivery in the U.S. that aims to improve access to care through low-cost treatments in group-based settings. Patients at community acupuncture clinics represent a broader socioeconomic spectrum and receive more frequent treatments compared to acupuncture users nationwide. As a relatively new model of acupuncture in the U.S., little is known about the experiences of patients at community acupuncture clinics and whether quality of care is compromised through this high-volume model. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perspectives on the care received through community acupuncture clinics. The investigators conducted qualitative, thematic analysis of written comments from an observational, cross-sectional survey of clients of the Working Class Acupuncture clinics in Portland, Oregon. The survey included an open-ended question for respondents to share comments about their experiences with community acupuncture. Comments were received from 265 community acupuncture patients. Qualitative analysis of written comments identified two primary themes that elucidate patients' perspectives on quality of care: 1) aspects of health care delivery unique to community acupuncture, and 2) patient engagement in health care. Patients identified unique aspects of community acupuncture, including structures that facilitate access, processes that make treatments more comfortable and effective and holistic outcomes including physical improvements, enhanced quality of life, and empowerment. The group setting, community-based locations, and low cost were highlighted as aspects of this model that allow patients to access acupuncture. Patients' perspectives on the values and experiences unique to community acupuncture offer insights on the quality of care received in these settings. The group setting, community-based locations, and low cost of this model potentially reduce access barriers for those who might not

  11. Gene Electrotransfer to Skin; Review of Existing Literature and Clinical Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, A.; Gehl, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer, which designates the combination of gene transfer and electroporation, is a non-viral means for transfecting genes into cells and tissues. It is a safe and efficient method and reports regarding the use of this technique in a variety of animal models and organs have been...... to now more than 40 papers have been published in which gene electrotransfer was the technique used for gene transfection to skin in vivo. The aim of this review is to summarize which plasmids were injected and the electrical parameters applied. Furthermore an overview of the clinical perspectives...

  12. The flare-up phenomenon in endodontics: a clinical perspective and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusow, R J

    1988-06-01

    The acute endodontic cellulitis exacerbation, which can be potentially fatal, is a definitive entity in endodontic flare-ups. Aerobic microbes, particularly streptococci, are the predominant causative microbes isolated. There was a noticeable absence of obligate anaerobes. This is significant for the selection of an antibiotic for therapy. Treatment parameters were presented. An endodontic cellulitis exacerbation is most unlikely with obligate anaerobes. An endodontic flare-up perspective was attempted with some clinical parameters. The proponents of routine one-visit endodontic treatment with prophylactic drugs to prevent cellulitis exacerbations do not appear to offer any advantage to the more traditional approaches to endodontic treatment of the patient, which may be more beneficial.

  13. Undergraduate student nurses' perspectives of an integrated clinical learning model in the mental health environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Gayelene; Lawrence, Karen; Polacsek, Meg

    2018-06-13

    Providing nursing students with appropriate clinical practice during their undergraduate programme is critical to ensuring that graduates meet the competency requirements to gain registration as a nurse. In response to the predicted nursing workforce shortage, universities have been significantly increasing the enrolment of undergraduate nurses into Bachelor of Nursing courses. This has placed a demand on the availability of clinical placements and often universities struggle to find appropriate places. In this study, a Bachelor of Nursing course incorporated an Integrated Clinical Learning Model (ICLM) for the first time during a mental health placement. The model offered students the flexibility of attending their clinical placement over a 16-week period instead of a traditional block of 4 weeks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the student perspective of this model and whether it prepared them for the nursing workforce. Focus groups were conducted with undergraduate nursing students following their mental health clinical placement at an acute and extended care inpatient unit. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Main themes included preparedness for practice, maintaining a work-life balance, and perceiving they were part of a team. The ICLM deepened students' knowledge and had a positive impact on their overall clinical learning. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Informatics in clinical research in oncology: current state, challenges, and a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Amar P S

    2011-01-01

    The informatics landscape of clinical trials in oncology has changed significantly in the last 10 years. The current state of the infrastructure for clinical trial management, execution, and data management is reviewed. The systems, their functionality, the users, and the standards available to researchers are discussed from the perspective of the oncologist-researcher. Challenges in complexity and in the processing of information are outlined. These challenges include the lack of communication and information-interchange between systems, the lack of simplified standards, and the lack of implementation and adherence to the standards that are available. The clinical toxicology criteria from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) are cited as a successful standard in oncology, and HTTP on the Internet is referenced for its simplicity. Differences in the management of information standards between industries are discussed. Possible future advances in oncology clinical research informatics are addressed. These advances include strategic policy review of standards and the implementation of actions to make standards free, ubiquitous, simple, and easily interpretable; the need to change from a local data-capture- or transaction-driven model to a large-scale data-interpretation model that provides higher value to the oncologist and the patient; and the need for information technology investment in a readily available digital educational model for clinical research in oncology that is customizable for individual studies. These new approaches, with changes in information delivery to mobile platforms, will set the stage for the next decade in clinical research informatics.

  15. Effect of Family Oriented Early Intervention Based on Localized Play Therapy on the Clinical Symptoms of Preschool Children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سعید رحیمی پردنجانی

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current study was aimed to investigate the effect of localized play therapy on reducing symptoms of attention deficiency and hyper activity/impulsivity in preschool children with ADHD. The method of this study was an applied semi-experimental study designed as pretest-posttest with control group. Twenty four mothers with ADHD children were selected through multi-stage sampling and randomly arranged in experimental or control groups. The experimental group participated in a 10 sessions Localized Play Therapy (LPT intervention program, while the control group was on the waiting list. Assessment tools were the Vanderbilt ADHD Teacher Rating Scale (Wolraich, et al., 1997 and a semiorganized clinical interview. Data were analyzed by using a repeated measure analysis of variance. The results showed that there were  significant differences between the control and experimental groups in attention deficiency and hyper activity/impulsivity scores of pre-test and post-test. In conclusion, it can be indicated that family oriented early intervention based on LPT is effective in reducing clinical symptoms of preschool children with ADHD. Therefore, this method can be considered as an effective therapeutic method for ADHD children by experts and parents

  16. Financial statements – basis for assessing the financial performance from the investors’ perspective, by means of prospectively oriented indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristita Rotila

    2009-12-01

    starting from the financial statements, we could approach the issue of assessing the financial performance only from the single perspective of the investors, also taking into account the market value of the company. The market value of a company represents the sum of the market values of the two components in the capital’s structure: shareholders’ equity and liabilities. It is considered that it is only in the case of shareholders’ equity that the market value differs from the accounting value, but this is not the case with liabilities, so the “market value added” will be researched only by taking account of shareholders’ equity.

  17. Birth weight and two possible types of maternal effects on male sexual orientation: a clinical study of children and adolescents referred to a Gender Identity Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderLaan, Doug P; Blanchard, Ray; Wood, Hayley; Garzon, Luisa C; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    This study tested predictions regarding two hypothesized maternal immune responses influencing sexual orientation: one affecting homosexual males with high fraternal birth order and another affecting firstborn homosexual individuals whose mothers experience repeated miscarriage after the birth of the first child. Low birth weight was treated as a marker of possible exposure to a maternal immune response during gestation. Birth weight was examined relative to sibship characteristics in a clinical sample of youth (N = 1,722) classified as heterosexual or homosexual based on self-reported or probable sexual orientation. No female sexual orientation differences in birth weight were found. Homosexual, compared to heterosexual, males showed lower birth weight if they had one or more older brothers--and especially two or more older brothers--or if they were an only-child. These findings support the existence of two maternal immune responses influencing male sexual orientation and possibly also cross-gender behavior and identity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Survey of Clinical Uncertainty from the Paediatric Basic Specialist Trainee Perspective

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate uncertainty from the Basic Specialist Trainee perspective. The survey of trainees explored 1) factors in decision making, 2) the personal impact of uncertainty, 3) the responses to both clinical errors and challenges to their decision making and 4) the potential strategies to address uncertainty. Forty-one (93%) of trainees surveyed responded. Important factors in decision making were clinical knowledge and senior colleague’s opinion. Sixty percent experienced significant anxiety post call as a consequence of their uncertainty. When errors are made by colleagues, the trainee’s response is acceptance (52.5%), and sympathy (32%).Trainees are strongly influenced by the opinions of senior colleagues often changing their opinions having made confident decisions. Solutions to address uncertainty include enhanced knowledge translation, and to a lesser extent, enhanced personal awareness and resilience awareness. To enhance the training experience for BST and lessen the uncertainty experienced these strategies need to be enacted within the training milieu.

  19. Market Orientation Capabilities: A Study of Learning Processes in Market-Oriented Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Silkoset, Ragnhild

    2009-01-01

    The literature operates with three perspectives on market orientation. These include market orientation as behavior (Kohli and Jaworski 1990; Narver and Slater 1990), market orientation as a unique resource (Hunt and Morgan 1995) and market orientation as a dynamic learning capability (Sinkula 1994; Day 1994b). A company's level of market orientation will vary with regard to the perspectives, including factors affecting a company’s degree of market orientation and the effect...

  20. Clinical data management: Current status, challenges, and future directions from industry perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Lu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhengwu Lu1, Jing Su21Smith Hanley Consulting, Houston, Texas; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAAbstract: To maintain a competitive position, the biopharmaceutical industry has been facing the challenge of increasing productivity both internally and externally. As the product of the clinical development process, clinical data are recognized to be the key corporate asset and provide critical evidence of a medicine’s efficacy and safety and of its potential economic value to the market. It is also well recognized that using effective technology-enabled methods to manage clinical data can enhance the speed with which the drug is developed and commercialized, hence enhancing the competitive advantage. The effective use of data-capture tools may ensure that high-quality data are available for early review and rapid decision-making. A well-designed, protocol-driven, standardized, site workflow-oriented and documented database, populated via efficient data feed mechanisms, will ensure regulatory and commercial questions receive rapid responses. When information from a sponsor’s clinical database or data warehouse develops into corporate knowledge, the value of the medicine can be realized. Moreover, regulators, payer groups, patients, activist groups, patient advocacy groups, and employers are becoming more educated consumers of medicine, requiring monetary value and quality, and seeking out up-todate medical information supplied by biopharmaceutical companies. All these developments in the current biopharmaceutical arena demand that clinical data management (CDM is at the forefront, leading change, influencing direction, and providing objective evidence. Sustaining an integrated database or data repository for initial product registration and subsequent postmarketing uses is a long-term process to maximize return on investment for organizations. CDM should be the owner of driving clinical data

  1. Patient perspectives: Tijuana cancer clinics in the post-NAFTA era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Ralph W

    2005-03-01

    This article contains observations and historical considerations on cancer and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the Tijuana, Mexico, area. There are approximately 2 dozen such clinics in Tijuana, some of which have been treating international cancer patients since 1963. Among the first clinics to be established were the Bio-Medical Center (Hoxsey therapy), Oasis of Hope (a Laetrile-oriented clinic), and a series of clinics affiliated with the Gerson diet therapy. These original clinics were established mainly by American citizens in response to increased regulation of nonstandard therapies in the United States, particularly after passage of the Kefauver-Harris Amendments to the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act in 1962. In the 1970s, the Tijuana clinics proliferated with the upsurge of interest in Laetrile (amygdalin). By 1978, 70,000 US cancer patients had taken Laetrile for cancer treatment, and many of those had gone to Tijuana to receive it. The popularity of the Tijuana clinics peaked in the mid-1980s. Although many new clinics opened after then, a dozen have folded in the past 10 years alone. The turning point for the clinics came with passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which facilitated greater cooperation among the antifraud authorities of Canada, the United States, and Mexico. In 1994, the tripartite members of NAFTA formed the Mexico-United States-Canada Health Fraud Work Group, or MUCH, whose brief is to strengthen the 3 countries' ability to prevent cross-border health fraud. Under the auspices of MUCH and its members, regulatory crackdowns began in earnest early in 2001. The clinics were also badly affected by the general downturn in travel after 9/11. If these trends continue, many Tijuana clinics are unlikely to survive. Some suggestions are made for how the Tijuana clinics could be reorganized and reformed to minimize the likelihood of governmental actions and to maximize public support. Such reforms center on 5

  2. Development of the supply chain oriented quality assurance system for aerospace manufacturing SMEs and its implementation perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Abdullahi; Cheng, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Aerospace manufacturing SMEs are continuously facing the challenge on managing their supply chain and complying with the aerospace manufacturing quality standard requirement due to their lack of resources and the nature of business. In this paper, the ERP system based approach is presented to quality control and assurance work in light of seamless integration of in-process production data and information internally and therefore managing suppliers more effectively and efficiently. The Aerospace Manufacturing Quality Assurance Standard (BS/EN9100) is one of the most recognised and essential protocols for developing the industry-operated-and-driven quality assurance systems. The research investigates using the ERP based system as an enabler to implement BS/EN9100 quality management system at manufacturing SMEs and the associated implementation and application perspectives. An application case study on a manufacturing SME is presented by using the SAP based implementation, which helps further evaluate and validate the approach and application system development.

  3. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; van Tilburg, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. Design: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. Setting: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  4. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in

  5. ["... so that Theo knows what he should do better". Client orientation in social-therapeutic child group work--an experiential report of quality management at a child guidance clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzien, Monika; Hausmann, Verena; Kornder, Theo; Manz-Gill, Brigitte

    2004-09-01

    Within the framework of internal evaluation and self-evaluation activities in a child guidance clinic, measures of success have to date been based primarily on the degree to which the delegating organisations are satisfied with the results of the counselling. The orientation of the success of counselling towards the results stems from the fact that the process of helping is not generally manifest to parents, schools, and education staff. It takes place in the context of direct contact between therapists and children, the immediate addresses of help, and therefore often remains "hidden". Since the children's perspective--their impressions and appraisals--has often been neglected in past assessment methods, it hardly plays any role at all in the discussion of quality at counselling centres. This made it all the more stimulating for all those involved to initiate improvement measures within the framework of quality management on the basis of a client survey and in this way to launch a shared learning process as to how client orientation can flow directly into everyday practice. This is certainly the first attempt of its kind in the work of child guidance clinics to develop an understanding of client orientation in line with the expectations of parents and children and to link this to the quality development of the service. In the first part of this experiential report, the external process coach provides a brief summary of the assessment method employed in connection with the introduction of internal quality management at the counselling centre. This is followed by the centre's own description of the concrete performance of the client survey with children using the example of social-therapeutic child group work. The study concludes with a discussion of the benefit drawn from this process for the improvement of this pedagogical project.

  6. COMMERCIALLY ORIENTED CLINICAL LABORATORIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, W. Max

    1964-01-01

    Out-of-state flat-rate mail order contract laboratories operating from states which have little or no legal control over them can do business in California without obedience to regulations that govern laboratories located within the state. The flat-rate contract principle under which some out-of-state laboratories operate is illegal in California. The use of such laboratories increases physician liability. Legislation for the control of these laboratories is difficult to construct, and laws which might result would be awkward to administer. The best remedy is for California physicians not to use an out-of-state laboratory offering contracts or conditions that it could not legally offer if it were located in California. PMID:14165875

  7. Dermatology Medical Education: A Multicenter Survey Study of the Undergraduate Perspective of the Dermatology Clinical Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Parastoo; Millsop, Jillian W; Johnson, Mary Ann N; Takahashi, Stefani R; Peng, David H; Badger, Joanna; Bahr, Brooks A; Shinkai, Kanade; Li, Chin-Shang; Fazel, Nasim

    2017-12-15

    Limited data are available regarding the undergraduate dermatology clinical clerkship curriculum in the United States. Our primaryaim is to assess medical students' perspectives of the dermatology clinical clerkship. A multicenter survey study was conducted, which included four California dermatology academic programs. A 17-item questionnaire was designed to investigate medical student perception with regard tothe overall educational value of the various teaching aspects of the dermatology clinical clerkship. A total of 152 medical student surveys were completed. Over half of the medical students felt proficient in diagnosing the most commondermatologic conditions. Eighty-seven percent of medical students were very satisfied with the dermatology clerkship. Ninety-one percent of students felt the length of the clerkship was appropriate. The vast majority of medical students reported a high level of proficiency in the treatment and diagnosis of common skin disorders. In contrast, our findings suggest that medical students may not begaining sufficient hands-on experience in conducting certain dermatologic procedures following the dermatology clerkship. Overall, medical studentperception of the dermatology clinical clerkship was mostly positive.

  8. Taking a new biomarker into routine use – A perspective from the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine; Hill, Robert; Hortin, Glen L; Thompson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to provide cost-effective healthcare based on “best practice.” Consequently, new biomarkers are only likely to be introduced into routine clinical biochemistry departments if they are supported by a strong evidence base and if the results will improve patient management and outcome. This requires convincing evidence of the benefits of introducing the new test, ideally reflected in fewer hospital admissions, fewer additional investigations and/or fewer clinic visits. Carefully designed audit and cost-benefit studies in relevant patient groups must demonstrate that introducing the biomarker delivers an improved and more effective clinical pathway. From the laboratory perspective, pre-analytical requirements must be thoroughly investigated at an early stage. Good stability of the biomarker in relevant physiological matrices is essential to avoid the need for special processing. Absence of specific timing requirements for sampling and knowledge of the effect of medications that might be used to treat the patients in whom the biomarker will be measured is also highly desirable. Analytically, automation is essential in modern high-throughput clinical laboratories. Assays must therefore be robust, fulfilling standard requirements for linearity on dilution, precision and reproducibility, both within- and between-run. Provision of measurements by a limited number of specialized reference laboratories may be most appropriate, especially when a new biomarker is first introduced into routine practice. PMID:21137030

  9. Exogenous near-infrared fluorophores and their applications in cancer diagnosis: biological and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Uselman, Ryan R; Yee, Douglas

    2011-05-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging is a rapidly growing research field which has the potential to be an important imaging modality in cancer diagnosis. Various exogenous NIR fluorophores have been developed for the technique, including small molecule fluorophores and nanoparticles. NIRF imaging has been used in animal models for the detection of cancer overthe last twenty years and has in recent years been used in human clinical trials. This article describes the types and characteristics of exogenous fluorophores available for in vivo fluorescent cancer imaging. The article also discusses the progression of NIRF cancer imaging over recent years and its future challenges, from both a biological and clinical perspective. in The review also looks at its application for lymph node mapping, tumor targeting and characterization, and tumor margin definition for surgical guidance. NIRF imaging is not in routine clinical cancer practice; yet, the authors predict that techniques using NIR fluorophores for tumor margin definition and lymph node mapping will enter clinical practice in the near future. The authors also anticipate that NIRF imaging research will lead to the development of flurophores with 'high brightness' that will overcome the limited penetration of this modality and be better suited for non invasive tumor targeting.

  10. When to invest in clinical guidelines for children? A practice oriented tool to facilitate decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalkers, Inge; Enthoven, Clair; Bunders, Joske; Dedding, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Children are not just small adults; they need to be diagnosed and treated in the context of their rapid growth and development. However, in guideline development, children's needs and interests are still overlooked. This study aims (1) to develop a tool that could stimulate guideline developers to take children into account on a more structural basis and (2) to explore how to facilitate children's participation in the process of guideline development. The method used was a three-phase multimethod sequential design. Professionals involved in guideline development participated in interviews (n = 12), filled in a questionnaire (n = 60) and/or participated in the focus group meeting (n = 11). This study results in a comprehensive understanding of the considerations that professionals take into account when deciding whether guidelines need to apply to children specifically. This resulted in a tool that assists guideline developers to make this assessment more accurately. It takes the form of a flowchart that guides users through a series of critical questions. The flowchart reminds guideline developers to consider children as a particular patient population when prioritizing and demarcating new guideline topics. It will help to ensure that clinical guidelines address children's unique health care needs and perspectives. Facilitating children's and parents' participation in the process of guideline development is perceived as challenging; nevertheless, it should be the next step in making paediatric guidelines more child-centred and family-centred. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Translational neural engineering: multiple perspectives on bringing benchtop research into the clinical domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousche, Patrick; Schneeweis, David M; Perreault, Eric J; Jensen, Winnie

    2008-03-01

    A half-day forum to address a wide range of issues related to translational neural engineering was conducted at the annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society. Successful practitioners of translational neural engineering from academics, clinical medicine and industry were invited to share a diversity of perspectives and experiences on the translational process. The forum was targeted towards traditional academic researchers who may be interested in the expanded funding opportunities available for translational research that emphasizes product commercialization and clinical implementation. The seminar was funded by the NIH with support from the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. We report here a summary of the speaker viewpoints with particular focus on extracting successful strategies for engaging in or conducting translational neural engineering research. Daryl Kipke, PhD, (Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan) and Molly Shoichet, PhD, (Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto) gave details of their extensive experience with product commercialization while holding primary appointments in academic departments. They both encouraged strong clinical input at very early stages of research. Neurosurgeon Fady Charbel, MD, (Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Illinois at Chicago) discussed his role in product commercialization as a clinician. Todd Kuiken, MD, PhD, (Director of the Neural Engineering for Artificial Limbs at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, affiliated with Northwestern University) also a clinician, described a model of translational engineering that emphasized the development of clinically relevant technology, without a strong commercialization imperative. The clinicians emphasized the importance of communicating effectively with engineers. Representing commercial neural engineering was Doug Sheffield, PhD, (Director of New Technology at Vertis Neuroscience, Inc.) who

  12. Essentials and Perspectives of Computational Modelling Assistance for CNS-oriented Nanoparticle-based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisała, Joanna; Heclik, Kinga I; Pogocki, Krzysztof; Pogocki, Dariusz

    2018-05-16

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a complex system controlling two-way substances traffic between circulatory (cardiovascular) system and central nervous system (CNS). It is almost perfectly crafted to regulate brain homeostasis and to permit selective transport of molecules that are essential for brain function. For potential drug candidates, the CNS-oriented neuropharmaceuticals as well as for those of primary targets in the periphery, the extent to which a substance in the circulation gains access to the CNS seems crucial. With the advent of nanopharmacology the problem of the BBB permeability for drug nano-carriers gains new significance. Compare to some other fields of medicinal chemistry, the computational science of nanodelivery is still prematured to offer the black-box type solutions, especially for the BBB-case. However, even its enormous complexity can be spell out the physical principles, and as such subjected to computation. Basic understanding of various physico-chemical parameters describing the brain uptake is required to take advantage of their usage for the BBB-nanodelivery. This mini-review provides a sketchy introduction into essential concepts allowing application of computational simulation to the BBB-nanodelivery design. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Critical Factors to Achieve Dockless Bike-Sharing Sustainability in China: A Stakeholder-Oriented Network Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-gang Shi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In China, dockless bike-sharing programs (DBSPs play a significant role in promoting the goals of sustainable urban travel and carbon emissions reduction. However, the sustainability of DBSPs is increasingly being challenged as various issues associated with different stakeholders emerge. While numerous studies have focused on the barriers to traditional bike-sharing programs, the sustainability performance of new-generation DBSPs is largely overlooked. It is accordingly imperative to understand the primary challenges that impede the sustainability of DBSPs and to consider what stimulative measures can be taken. In this study, we investigate the factors that are critical to DBSPs’ sustainability from a network perspective. Stakeholder-associated factors and their interrelations were identified via literature analysis and interviews, and the social network analysis (SNA method was employed to recognize the critical factors and links in DBSPs. As a result, 10 critical factors and 10 major interactions were identified and further classified into six challenges. Sharing transport schemes, legislative perfection, public private partnership (PPP, and product lifecycle management (PLM were proposed to govern these challenges. This paper contributes to the existing body of knowledge of bike-sharing programs via a network approach that integrates the key influencing factors with those factors’ associated stakeholders. Furthermore, these findings provide the government and operators with implications for mitigating the tough challenges and facilitating the sustainability of DBSPs.

  14. Industry and Patient Perspectives on Child Participation in Clinical Trials: The Pediatric Assent Initiative Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Donald; Squires, Liza; Sjostedt, Philip; Eichler, Irmgard; Turner, Mark A; Thompson, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Obtaining assent from children participating in clinical trials acknowledges autonomy and developmental ability to contribute to the consent process. This critical step in pediatric drug development remains poorly understood, with significant room for improving the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of the assent process. Beyond ethical necessity of informing children about their treatment, the assent process provides the advantages of including children in discussions about their diagnosis and treatment-allowing greater understanding of interventions included in the study. A formalized assent process acknowledges the child as a volunteer and provides a forum for questions and feedback. Legal, cultural, and social differences have historically prevented the development of clear, concise, and accessible materials to ensure children understand the clinical trial design. Published guidelines on obtaining pediatric assent are vague, with many decisions left to local institutional review boards and ethics committees, underscoring the need for collaboratively designed standards. To address this need, 2 surveys were conducted to quantify perspectives on assent in pediatric clinical trials. Two digital surveys were circulated in the United States and internationally (October 2014 to January 2015). The first survey targeted children, parents, and/or caregivers. The second polled clinical trial professionals on their organizations' experience and policies regarding pediatric assent. Forty-five respondents completed the child and parent/caregiver survey; 57 respondents completed the industry survey. Respondents from both surveys detailed experiences with clinical trials and the impediments to securing assent, offering potential solutions to attaining assent in pediatric patients. An important opportunity exists for standardized practices and tools to ensure pediatric patients make well-informed decisions regarding their participation in clinical trials, using materials

  15. New perspectives on the theory of justice: implications for physical therapy ethics and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Delany, Clare M; Townsend, Anne F; Swisher, Laura Lee

    2011-11-01

    Recent revisions of physical therapy codes of ethics have included a new emphasis concerning health inequities and social injustice. This emphasis reflects the growing evidence regarding the importance of social determinants of health, epidemiological trends for health service delivery, and the enhanced participation of physical therapists in shaping health care reform in a number of international contexts. This perspective article suggests that there is a "disconnect" between the societal obligations and aspirations expressed in the revised codes and the individualist ethical frameworks that predominantly underpin them. Primary health care is an approach to health care arising from an understanding of the nexus between health and social disadvantage that considers the health needs of patients as expressive of the health needs of the communities of which they are members. It is proposed that re-thinking ethical frameworks expressed in codes of ethics can both inform and underpin practical strategies for working in primary health care. This perspective article provides a new focus on the ethical principle of justice: the ethical principle that arguably remains the least consensually understood and developed in the ethics literature of physical therapy. A relatively recent theory of justice known as the "capability approach to justice" is discussed, along with its potential to assist physical therapy practitioners to further develop moral agency in order to address situations of health inequity and social injustice in clinical practice.

  16. A Clinician’s Perspective on Incorporating Therapeutic Lifestyle Change into Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. McIntosh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the unique perspective of a clinician who was originally trained as an acute care specialist but in recent years had the opportunity to witness the positive impact of therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC programs in managing chronic diseases. Through experience gained from conducting a multi-center clinical trial investigating the effects of TLC program in people with metabolic syndrome, Dr. Mark S. McIntosh discusses various aspects and challenges pertinent to implementing a successful TLC program. Patients, physicians, lifestyle counselors, work places, and home environment are all critical in forming an alliance for transforming the current sick-care approach to preventive, wellness-focused approach that is far more efficient,rewarding, and financially sustainable.

  17. Patient perspectives on antipsychotic treatments and their association with clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hong Liu-Seifert1, Olawale O Osuntokun1, Jenna L Godfrey2, Peter D Feldman11Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: This analysis examined patient-reported attitudes toward antipsychotic medication and the relationship of these attitudes with clinical outcomes and pharmacotherapy adherence. The analysis included three randomized, double-blind studies in patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition and randomly assigned to treatment with olanzapine 5–20 mg/day or another antipsychotic (haloperidol 2–20 mg/day, risperidone 2–10 mg/day, or ziprasidone 80–160 mg/day. Patient-reported improvements were significantly greater for olanzapine (n = 488 versus other treatments (haloperidol n = 145, risperidone n = 158, or ziprasidone n = 271 on multiple Drug Attitude Inventory items. A positive attitude toward medication reported by patients was significantly associated with greater clinical improvement on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and lower discontinuation rates. These results suggest that patients’ perceptions of treatment benefits are associated with objective clinical measures, including reduction of symptom severity and lower discontinuation rates. Furthermore, olanzapine may be associated with more positive treatment attitudes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of reasons for treatment adherence from patients’ own perspectives.Keywords: antipsychotic agents, medication adherence, patient satisfaction, schizophrenia, treatment efficacy

  18. Clinical perspectives of hybrid proton-fluorine magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Martijn; Mohades, Seyede G; Hackeng, Tilman M; Post, Mark J; Kooi, Marianne E; Backes, Walter H

    2013-05-01

    The number of applications of fluorine 19 (19F) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy in biomedical and clinical research is steadily growing. The 100% natural abundance of fluorine and its relatively high sensitivity for MR (83% to that of protons) make it an interesting nucleus for a wide range of MR applications. Fluorinated contrast media have a number of advantages over the conventionally used gadolinium-based or iron-based contrast agents. The absence of an endogenous fluorine background intensity in the human body facilitates reliable quantification of fluorinated contrast medium or drugs. Anatomy can be visualized separately with proton MR imaging, creating the application of hybrid hydrogen 1 (1H)/19F MR imaging. The availability of 2 channels (ie, the 1H and 19F channels) enables dual-targeted molecular imaging. Recently, novel developments have emerged on fluorine-based contrast media in preclinical studies and imaging techniques. The developments in fluorine MR seem promising for clinical applications, with contributions in therapy monitoring, assessment of lung function, angiography, and molecular imaging. This review outlines the translation from recent advances in preclinical MR imaging and spectroscopy to future perspectives of clinical hybrid 1H/19/F MR imaging applications.

  19. Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial viral infections in Malaysia: Demographic and Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Wong, K K; Hanafiah, A; Isahak, I

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major public health problem worldwide. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of respiratory syncytial and influenza virus infections and analyzed in respect to demography and clinical perspective. Methods : The specimens were processed by cell culture and immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (rRT-PCR) for detection of respiratory viruses. Results : Out of 505 specimens 189 (37.8%) were positive, in which RSV was positive in 124(24.8%) cases and influenza A was positive in 65(13%) cases. Positive cases for influenza virus A and RSV were analyzed based on demography: age, gender, ethnicity and clinical symptoms. There were no significant differences among gender, ethnicity and clinical symptoms in both RSV and influenza A virus infections. It was observed that children below 3 years of ages were more prone to RSV infections. On the contrary, influenza virus A infected all age groups of humans. RSV infects mostly child below 3 years of age and influenza virus infects all age group. No specificity of RSV and influenza infection in relation to demography.

  20. Patient perspectives of maintaining dignity in Indonesian clinical care settings: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmaningrum, Nurfika; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2018-03-01

    To gain an understanding towards the perspectives of hospitalized inpatients in Indonesia regarding maintaining dignity during clinical care. Dignity is a basic human right that is crucial for an individual's well-being. Respect for a person as a valuable human is a concept that is comparable to treating a person with dignity. Maintaining patient's dignity is an ethical goal of nursing care. Nevertheless, the concept is highly dependent on cultural context. This issue has not been well studied in Indonesia. This study used a qualitative descriptive design. Thirty-five participants were recruited by purposive sampling from medical to surgical wards of six public hospitals in Eastern Java, Indonesia. Data were collected in 2016 through individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Inductive content analysis was applied to the data. Four major categories which described qualities of nursing care essential for maintaining a patient's dignity in clinical care settings were revealed: (1) responsiveness; (2) respectful nurse-patient relationships; (3) caring characteristics and (4) personalized service. Our findings provide a cultural viewpoint of dignity for care recipients in Indonesia. The findings provide empirical support for linking dignified care and person-centred care principles with regards to cultural sensitivity. Nurses must not only be clinically competent but also culturally competent. The ability to provide culturally competent care is important for nurses as a strategy to maintain patient dignity during hospitalized care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Combining interdisciplinary and International Medical Graduate perspectives to teach clinical and ethical communication using multimedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Flynn, Eleanor; Delany, Clare

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, international medical graduates (IMGs) play a crucial role in addressing workforce shortages in healthcare. Their ability to deliver safe and effective healthcare in an unfamiliar cultural setting is intrinsically tied to effective communication. Hospital-based medical clinical educators, who play an important role in providing communication training to IMGs, would benefit from practical resources and an understanding of the relevant pedagogies to address these issues in their teaching. This paper examines the nature of an interdisciplinary collaboration to develop multimedia resources for teaching clinical and ethical communication to IMGs. We describe the processes and dynamics of the collaboration, and outline the methodologies from applied linguistics, medical education, and health ethics that we drew upon. The multimedia consist of three video clips of challenging communication scenarios as well as experienced IMGs talking about communication and ethics. The multimedia are supported by teaching guidelines that address relevant disciplinary concerns of the three areas of collaboration. In the paper's discussion we point out the pre-conditions that facilitated the interdisciplinary collaboration. We propose that such collaborative approaches between the disciplines and participants can provide new perspectives to address the multifaceted challenges of clinical teaching and practice.

  2. Action-Oriented Study Circles Facilitate Efforts in Nursing Homes to “Go from Feeding to Serving”: Conceptual Perspectives on Knowledge Translation and Workplace Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Westergren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Action-oriented study circles (AOSC have been found to improve nutrition in 24 nursing homes in Sweden. Little, however, is known about the conceptual use of knowledge (changes in staffs’ knowledge and behaviours. Methods. Qualitative and quantitative methods, structured questionnaires for evaluating participants’ (working in nursing homes experiences from study circles (n=592, 71 AOSC and for comparisons between AOSC participants (n=74 and nonparticipants (n=115. Finally, a focus group interview was conducted with AOSC participants (in total n=12. Statistical, conventional, and directed content analyses were used. Results. Participants experienced a statistically significant increase in their knowledge about eating and nutrition, when retrospectively comparing before participating and after, as well as in comparison to non-participants, and they felt that the management was engaged in and took care of ideas regarding food and mealtimes to a significantly greater extent than non-participants. The use of AOSC was successful judging from how staff members had changed their attitudes and behaviours toward feeding residents. Conclusions. AOSC facilitates professional development, better system performance, and, as shown in previous studies, better patient outcome. Based on a collaborative learning perspective, AOSC manages to integrate evidence, context, and facilitation in the efforts to achieve knowledge translation in a learning organisation. This study has implications also for other care settings implementing AOSC.

  3. STRUCTURE AND VALIDATION OF A CONTEXTUAL QUALITY OF LIFE SCALE FOR PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES IN SOCIAL SERVICES: AN ORGANIZATION-ORIENTED MEASURE FROM AN EXTERNAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Moliner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop and validate a scale on the Quality of Life (QoL of people with intellectual disabilities as assessed by family members (external perspective. The instrument measures improvement in QoL due to actions by organizations delivering services to individuals with intellectual disabilities (organization-oriented measure. In order to design the items for the scale, focus groups were set up with professionals dedicated to attending to individuals with intellectual disabilities. An initial scale of 20 items was constructed by consensus. A total of 1195 family members answered the questionnaire. In order to assess the structure of the scale, EFA recommended deleting 3 overlapping items. The final scale consisted of 17 items (α=95 and was composed of four main dimensions: self-determination (SD, social inclusion (SI, rights (RI and overall improvement (OI, which explained 74.83% of the variance. Finally, the consistency and validity were assessed. Convergent validity and discriminant validity were satisfactory. Moreover, CFA confirmed the structure of the scale. Main conclusions, limitations and practical implications are discussed.

  4. Orienting hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed.

  5. Nursing educator perspectives of overseas qualified nurses' intercultural clinical communication: barriers, enablers and engagement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Susan; Manias, Elizabeth; Woodward-Kron, Robyn

    2015-09-01

    To understand the intercultural communication experiences and associated communication training needs of overseas qualified nurses in the Australian healthcare system from the unique perspectives of nurse educators teaching in accredited bridging programmes. Overseas qualified nurses are an integral part of the nursing workforce in migration destination countries. Communication training needs are more complex when there are cultural, ethnic and language differences between nurses, other health professionals and patients. A qualitative, exploratory research design using semi-structured interviews. All (nine) organisations involved in conducting the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency approved preregistration bridging programmes for overseas qualified nurses within the state of Victoria, Australia, were involved in the study. Participants were 12 nurse educators employed in these organisations. Thematic analysis was undertaken. Three macro themes emerged about the overseas qualified nurses' intercultural communication: (1) pre-existing barriers and enablers to intercultural communication, for example, nurses' reluctance to engage in communicative strategies that build rapport with patients, (2) transitional behaviours and impact on communication, including maintenance of perceived cultural hierarchies between health professionals and (3) development of communicative competence, including expanding one's repertoire of conversational gambits. The findings point to the domains and causes of communication challenges facing overseas qualified nurses in new healthcare settings as well as strategies that the nurse educators and nurses can adopt. Communication cannot be merely regarded as a skill that can be taught in a didactic programme. Comprehensive understanding is needed about the sociocultural dimensions of these nurses' orientation, which can impact on how they communicate in their new healthcare settings. The findings can act as triggers for discussion

  6. A critical evaluation of the validity of episodic future thinking: A clinical neuropsychology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Amanda M

    2016-11-01

    Episodic future thinking is defined as the ability to mentally simulate a future event. Although episodic future thinking has been studied extensively in neuroscience, this construct has not been explored in depth from the perspective of clinical neuropsychology. The aim of this critical narrative review is to assess the validity and clinical implications of episodic future thinking. A systematic review of episodic future thinking literature was conducted. PubMed and PsycInfo were searched through July 2015 for review and empirical articles with the following search terms: "episodic future thinking," "future mental simulation," "imagining the future," "imagining new experiences," "future mental time travel," "future autobiographical experience," and "prospection." The review discusses evidence that episodic future thinking is important for adaptive functioning, which has implications for neurological populations. To determine the validity of episodic future thinking, the construct is evaluated with respect to related constructs, such as imagination, episodic memory, autobiographical memory, prospective memory, narrative construction, and working memory. Although it has been minimally investigated, there is evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for episodic future thinking. Research has not addressed the incremental validity of episodic future thinking. Practical considerations of episodic future thinking tasks and related constructs in a clinical neuropsychological setting are considered. The utility of episodic future thinking is currently unknown due to the lack of research investigating the validity of episodic future thinking. Future work is discussed, which could determine whether episodic future thinking is an important missing piece in standard clinical neuropsychological assessment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. [Working conditions in outpatient clinics adjacent to private pharmacies in Mexico City: perspective of physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Portillo, Sandra P; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Cuadra-Hernández, Silvia Magali; Idrovo, Álvaro J; Nigenda, Gustavo; Dreser, Anahí

    To analyse the working conditions of physicians in outpatient clinics adjacent to pharmacies (CAFs) and their organizational elements from their own perspective. We carried out an exploratory qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 CAF physicians in Mexico City. A directed content analysis technique was used based on previously built and emerging codes which were related to the experience of the subjects in their work. Respondents perceive that work in CAFs does not meet professional expectations due to low pay, informality in the recruitment process and the absence of minimum labour guarantees. This prevents them from enjoying the benefits associated with formal employment, and sustains their desire to work in CAF only temporarily. They believe that economic incentives related to number of consultations, procedures and sales attained by the pharmacy allow them to increase their income without influencing their prescriptive behaviour. They express that the monitoring systems and pressure exerted on CAFs seek to affect their autonomy, pushing them to enhance the sales of medicines in the pharmacy. Physicians working in CAFs face a difficult employment situation. The managerial elements used to induce prescription and enhance pharmacy sales create a work environment that generates challenges for regulation and underlines the need to monitor the services provided at these clinics and the possible risk for users. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Nursing leadership from the perspective of clinical group supervision: a paradoxical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondas, Terese

    2010-05-01

    Increase understanding of nursing leadership in group clinical supervision (CS). Leadership in CS has received little interest besides the theories in use and administrative CS. Hermeneutic interpretation of written narratives of 24 clinical nurse supervisors. Continuity in structuring, story and mission and reflection in group and leadership processes and theories of nursing and caring characterize leadership in CS. Leadership by inhibiting and creating fear, inapproachability and indistinctiveness were patterns in content brought to CS. Supervision when leadership was involved illuminated a reflexive change in focus from leadership to nursing care, from particular experiences to nursing and caring science, and from the unfamiliar to the well known and the well known to the unknown. Continuity and reflective changes using nursing and caring theories seem to be core ideas of nursing leadership from the perspective of CS. The poles of separation and communion show opposites of nursing leadership as it is illuminated in CS. The findings add knowledge to Bondas' theory of caritative leadership. CS is a reflexive practice of support and guidance that seems to have an impact on the trajectory of nursing care and staff development using nursing and caring theories.

  9. Gas-based electricity production: which possibilities? - Thermal plants with steam generator; Perspectives for mini-cogeneration in collective housing; Electricity production by gas plants: which orientations on a middle term?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrier, M.; Hubert, Charles-Emile; Lu, Long; Maire, Jacques; Bornard, Pierre; Garnier, Philippe-Jean; Jamme, Dominique; Cheylus, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    A set of articles proposes a comparison between coal fired and natural gas fired power stations, discusses the perspectives of low power cogeneration installations for collective housing (some examples are evoked). It also reports interventions of a meeting on middle-term orientation for gas-based electricity production during which interveners addressed several issues such as the opportunity of investment in new infrastructures, the evolution of the gas sector, modulation means

  10. Integration of Basic and Clinical Sciences: Faculty Perspectives at a U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, Dharini; van der Hoeven, Ransome; Zhu, Liang; Busaidy, Kamal; Quock, Ryan L

    2018-04-01

    Although dental education has traditionally been organized into basic sciences education (first and second years) and clinical education (third and fourth years), there has been growing interest in ways to better integrate the two to more effectively educate students and prepare them for practice. Since 2012, The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston (UTSD) has made it a priority to improve integration of basic and clinical sciences, with a focus to this point on integrating the basic sciences. The aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of basic and clinical science faculty members regarding basic and clinical sciences integration and the degree of integration currently occurring. In October 2016, all 227 faculty members (15 basic scientists and 212 clinicians) were invited to participate in an online survey. Of the 212 clinicians, 84 completed the clinician educator survey (response rate 40%). All 15 basic scientists completed the basic science educator survey (response rate 100%). The majority of basic and clinical respondents affirmed the value of integration (93.3%, 97.6%, respectively) and reported regular integration in their teaching (80%, 86.9%). There were no significant differences between basic scientists and clinicians on perceived importance (p=0.457) and comfort with integration (p=0.240), but the basic scientists were more likely to integrate (p=0.039) and collaborate (p=0.021) than the clinicians. There were no significant differences between generalist and specialist clinicians on importance (p=0.474) and degree (p=0.972) of integration in teaching and intent to collaborate (p=0.864), but the specialists reported feeling more comfortable presenting basic science information (p=0.033). Protected faculty time for collaborative efforts and a repository of integrated basic science and clinical examples for use in teaching and faculty development were recommended to improve integration. Although questions might be raised about

  11. Association of Betel Nut with Carcinogenesis: Revisit with a Clinical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Rajeshwar N.; Mehrotra, Ravi; Choudhury, Yashmin; Asotra, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Betel nut (BN), betel quid (BQ) and products derived from them are widely used as a socially endorsed masticatory product. The addictive nature of BN/BQ has resulted in its widespread usage making it the fourth most abused substance by humans. Progressively, several additives, including chewing tobacco, got added to simple BN preparations. This addictive practice has been shown to have strong etiological correlation with human susceptibility to cancer, particularly oral and oropharyngeal cancers. The PUBMED database was searched to retrieve all relevant published studies in English on BN and BQ, and its association with oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Only complete studies directly dealing with BN/BQ induced carcinogenesis using statistically valid and acceptable sample size were analyzed. Additional relevant information available from other sources was also considered. This systematic review attempts to put in perspective the consequences of this widespread habit of BN/BQ mastication, practiced by approximately 10% of the world population, on oral cancer with a clinical perspective. BN/BQ mastication seems to be significantly associated with susceptibility to oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Addition of tobacco to BN has been found to only marginally increase the cancer risk. Despite the widespread usage of BN/BQ and its strong association with human susceptibility to cancer, no serious strategy seems to exist to control this habit. The review, therefore, also looks at various preventive efforts being made by governments and highlights the multifaceted intervention strategies required to mitigate and/or control the habit of BN/BQ mastication. PMID:22912735

  12. Social and clinical dimensions of citizenship from the mental health-care provider perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Allison N; Clayton, Ashley; Gambino, Matthew; Rowe, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Citizenship is a theoretical framework regarding social inclusion and community participation of people with mental illnesses. It is defined by a person's connection to rights, responsibilities, roles, resources, and relationships. The application of this framework in public mental health settings is in its early stages. This study was an exploration of mental health providers' views of the potential contribution of this framework. Eight focus groups were conducted with 77 providers on teams in a large mental health center. A 12-item brief version of a 46-item measure of citizenship was a starting point for discussion of the relevance of the framework and citizenship supports in public mental health care. Two themes were presented: social, including relatedness, stigma, and meaningful choices, and clinical, including client empowerment and barriers to citizenship work in clinical settings. These themes are discussed in relation to the introduction of citizenship-oriented practices in mental health care. Participant comments reflect openness to the concept of citizenship and the need for greater access to normative community life for clients, but also skepticism regarding the ability of providers and mental health centers to incorporate citizenship approaches in current care models. Findings suggest there are challenges to developing and implementing citizenship supports in public mental health settings based on social and clinical factors and limitations. However, it is also noted that efforts to address challenges through consultation and education of providers can support the goal of a life in the community for persons with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Measures of clinical health among female-to-male transgender persons as a function of sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, S Colton; Pardo, Seth T; Labuski, Christine; Babcock, Julia

    2013-04-01

    The present study examined the sexual orientation classification system that was used in the DSM-IV-TR for categorizing those who met the Gender Identity Disorder diagnostic criteria in order to determine the extent to which female-to-male transgender persons (FTMs) differ on psychological variables as a function of sexual orientation. Participants were 605 self-identified FTMs from 19 different countries (83 % U.S.) who completed an internet survey assessing their sexual orientation, sexual identity, symptoms of depression and anxiety, stress (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales), social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), and health related quality of life (SF-36v2 Health Survey). Over half the sample (52 %) reported sexual attractions to both men and women. The most common sexual identity label reported was "queer." Forty percent of FTMs who had begun to transition reported a shift in sexual orientation; this shift was associated with testosterone use. Overall, FTMs ranged from normal to above average on all psychological measures. FTMs did not significantly differ by sexual attraction on any mental health variables, except for anxiety. FTMs attracted to both men and women reported more symptoms of anxiety than those attracted to men only. Results from the present study did not support a sexual orientation classification system in FTMs with regard to psychological well-being.

  14. Hereditary spastic paraparesis in adults. A clinical and genetic perspective from Tuscany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsucci, Daniele; Petrucci, Loredana; Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; Chico, Lucia; Simi, Paolo; Fogli, Antonella; Baldinotti, Fulvia; Simoncini, Costanza; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Arnoldi, Alessia; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Siciliano, Gabriele; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2014-05-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis or paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of neurogenetic conditions with prominent involvement of the pyramidal tracts. Aim of this study is the clinical and molecular characterization of a cohort of patients with HSP. Moreover, we aim to study the minimum prevalence of HSP in our area and to propose a schematic diagnostic approach to HSP patients based on the available data from the literature. Retrospective/perspective study on the subjects with clinical signs and symptoms indicative of pure or complicated HSP, in whom other possible diagnosis were excluded by appropriate neuroradiological, neurophysiologic and laboratory studies, who have been evaluated by the Neurogenetic Service of our Clinic in last two years (2011-2012). 45 patients were identified. The minimum prevalence of HSP in our area was of about 2.17-3.43/100,000. The SF-36 (quality of life) and SPRS (disease progression) scores were inversely related; the time-saving, four-stage scale of motor disability could predict the SPRS scores with a high statistical significance, and we encourage its use in HSP. Our study confirms SPG4 as the major cause of HSP. All SPG4 patients had a pure HSP phenotype, and the dominant inheritance was evident in the great majority of these subjects. SPG7 was the second genetic cause. Other genotypes were rarer (SPG10, SPG11, SPG17). Exact molecular diagnosis will allow a more accurate patient counseling and, hopefully, will lead to specific, targeted, therapeutic options for these chronic, still incurable diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Impact of individual clinical outcomes on trial participants' perspectives on enrollment in emergency research without consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, Louisa W; Baren, Jill M; Biros, Michelle H; Fleischman, Ross J; Govindarajan, Prasanthi R; Jones, Elizabeth B; Pancioli, Arthur M; Pentz, Rebecca D; Scicluna, Victoria M; Wright, David W; Dickert, Neal W

    2017-04-01

    Evidence suggests that patients are generally accepting of their enrollment in trials for emergency care conducted under exception from informed consent. It is unknown whether individuals with more severe initial injuries or worse clinical outcomes have different perspectives. Determining whether these differences exist may help to structure post-enrollment interactions. Primary clinical data from the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial were matched to interview data from the Patients' Experiences in Emergency Research-Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury study. Answers to three key questions from Patients' Experiences in Emergency Research-Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury study were analyzed in the context of enrolled patients' initial injury severity (initial Glasgow Coma Scale and Injury Severity Score) and principal clinical outcomes (Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale relative to initial injury severity). The three key questions from Patients' Experiences in Emergency Research-Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury study addressed participants' general attitude toward inclusion in the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial (general trial inclusion), their specific attitude toward being included in Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial under the exception from informed consent (personal exception from informed consent enrollment), and their attitude toward the use of exception from informed consent in the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial in general (general exception from informed consent enrollment). Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts was performed to provide contextualization and to determine the extent to which respondents framed their attitudes in terms of clinical experience. Clinical data from Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

  16. Clinical Perspective of 3D Total Body Photography for Early Detection and Screening of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Jenna E; Laino, Antonia M; Nufer, Kaitlin L; Adams, Laura; Raphael, Anthony P; Menzies, Scott W; Soyer, H Peter

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma incidence continues to increase across many populations globally and there is significant mortality associated with advanced disease. However, if detected early, patients have a very promising prognosis. The methods that have been utilized for early detection include clinician and patient skin examinations, dermoscopy (static and sequential imaging), and total body photography via 2D imaging. Total body photography has recently witnessed an evolution from 2D imaging with the ability to now create a 3D representation of the patient linked with dermoscopy images of individual lesions. 3D total body photography is a particularly beneficial screening tool for patients at high risk due to their personal or family history or those with multiple dysplastic naevi-the latter can make monitoring especially difficult without the assistance of technology. In this perspective, we discuss clinical examples utilizing 3D total body photography, associated advantages and limitations, and future directions of the technology. The optimal system for melanoma screening should improve diagnostic accuracy, be time and cost efficient, and accessible to patients across all demographic and socioeconomic groups. 3D total body photography has the potential to address these criteria and, most importantly, optimize crucial early detection.

  17. Difficulties of bachelor of nursing students in clinical practice - teacher's perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Longo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on representations of teachers about the difficulties perceived or felt by students in clinical training. This is the partial result of a study in construction process, carried out under the PhD in Educational Sciences in the area of Teacher Education. This research aims to understand the formative effect of the practice in the workplace in terms of knowledge acquisitions, development of professional knowledge and skills, and also in identity construction of teachers and students. This study is framed in the area of initial teacher education in nursing, more specifically in its practical component, and it is designed to answer the question: what are the main difficulties encountered by students in the workplace in initial nursing education? And the goal: to understand to what extent these difficulties can be constraints of learning and personal and professional development of the student. This is a study based on a qualitative approach of descriptive and interpretative nature. The sample is intentional, consisting of sixty-eight teachers of thirteen Nursing / Health High Schools in Portugal. Data collection was carried out through focus group, and their examination was performed using the thematic content analysis according to Bardin[1]. The results show, according to the teaching perspective, that the difficulties experienced by students are polarized around six main categories: the reality shock; interact with the medical monitor; the self training process; interaction with the teacher; interaction with the patient / family, and also interaction with the nursing staff.

  18. From embryonic stem cells to functioning germ cells: science, clinical and ethical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop

    2007-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells have been well recognized as cells having a versatile potential to differentiate into all types of cells in the body including germ cells. There are many research studies focusing on the differentiation processes and protocols to derive various types of somatic cells from embryonic stem cells. However, germ cells have unique differentiation process and developmental pathway compared with somatic cells. Consequently, they will require different differentiation protocols and special culture techniques. More understanding and established in vitro systems for gametogenesis will greatly contribute to further progression of knowledge and technology in germ cell biology, reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. Moreover if oocytes can be efficiently produced in vitro, this will play an important role on progression in nuclear transfer and nuclear reprogramming technology. The present article will provide concise review on past important discoveries, current ongoing studies and future views of this challenging research area. An ethical perspective has also been proposed to give comprehensive summary and viewpoint for future clinical application.

  19. Personalized translational epilepsy research - Novel approaches and future perspectives: Part I: Clinical and network analysis approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Felix; van Alphen, Natascha; Becker, Albert; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Deichmann, Ralf; Deller, Thomas; Freiman, Thomas; Freitag, Christine M; Gehrig, Johannes; Hermsen, Anke M; Jedlicka, Peter; Kell, Christian; Klein, Karl Martin; Knake, Susanne; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Liebner, Stefan; Norwood, Braxton A; Omigie, Diana; Plate, Karlheinz; Reif, Andreas; Reif, Philipp S; Reiss, Yvonne; Roeper, Jochen; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Schorge, Stephanie; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarzacher, Stephan W; Steinbach, Joachim P; Strzelczyk, Adam; Triesch, Jochen; Wagner, Marlies; Walker, Matthew C; von Wegner, Frederic; Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-11-01

    Despite the availability of more than 15 new "antiepileptic drugs", the proportion of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy has remained constant at about 20-30%. Furthermore, no disease-modifying treatments shown to prevent the development of epilepsy following an initial precipitating brain injury or to reverse established epilepsy have been identified to date. This is likely in part due to the polyetiologic nature of epilepsy, which in turn requires personalized medicine approaches. Recent advances in imaging, pathology, genetics and epigenetics have led to new pathophysiological concepts and the identification of monogenic causes of epilepsy. In the context of these advances, the First International Symposium on Personalized Translational Epilepsy Research (1st ISymPTER) was held in Frankfurt on September 8, 2016, to discuss novel approaches and future perspectives for personalized translational research. These included new developments and ideas in a range of experimental and clinical areas such as deep phenotyping, quantitative brain imaging, EEG/MEG-based analysis of network dysfunction, tissue-based translational studies, innate immunity mechanisms, microRNA as treatment targets, functional characterization of genetic variants in human cell models and rodent organotypic slice cultures, personalized treatment approaches for monogenic epilepsies, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, therapeutic focal tissue modification, computational modeling for target and biomarker identification, and cost analysis in (monogenic) disease and its treatment. This report on the meeting proceedings is aimed at stimulating much needed investments of time and resources in personalized translational epilepsy research. Part I includes the clinical phenotyping and diagnostic methods, EEG network-analysis, biomarkers, and personalized treatment approaches. In Part II, experimental and translational approaches will be discussed (Bauer et al., 2017) [1]. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  20. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Medical Management of Nonhospitalized Ulcerative Colitis: The Patient Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hillary Steinhart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of clinical practice guidelines were recently developed by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG to provide clinicians with recommendations for the medical management of nonhospitalized ulcerative colitis (UC patients. These guidelines were developed, reviewed and agreed on by expert clinicians and methodologists. Following the finalization of the guidelines, a group of patients with UC as well as several inflammatory bowel disease clinicians, were brought together for a half-day workshop to provide feedback from the patient perspective. At the workshop, the guideline development process was described and the guidelines were reviewed to ensure comprehension. Patients then had the opportunity to provide their insight to the relevance of the guideline development process and the content of the guidelines as it related to their personal experiences with UC. The patient group believed that, although the new guidelines will be a tremendous resource for the health care provider community, a more ‘lay-friendly’ version would better facilitate dialogue between patients and their health care practitioners. The importance of the patient/physician relationship is paramount when making decisions regarding treatment plans, in which patient preferences play a key role in determining the most appropriate therapy and dosing regimen, which, in turn, impact the likelihood of adherence to the treatment plan. It was also believed that quality of life issues were not fully addressed in the guidelines. Much could be learned from shared experiences and coping strategies that would empower patients to take charge of their health and become equal partners with their care providers.

  1. Renal denervation for the treatment of resistant hypertension: review and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu; Lohmeier, Thomas E; Tudorancea, Ionut; Laffin, Luke; Bakris, George L

    2015-10-01

    When introduced clinically 6 years ago, renal denervation was thought to be the solution for all patients whose blood pressure could not be controlled by medication. The initial two studies, SYMPLICITY HTN-1 and HTN-2, demonstrated great magnitudes of blood pressure reduction within 6 mo of the procedure and were based on a number of assumptions that may not have been true, including strict adherence to medication and absence of white-coat hypertension. The SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial controlled for all possible factors believed to influence the outcome, including the addition of a sham arm, and ultimately proved the demise of the initial overly optimistic expectations. This trial yielded a much lower blood pressure reduction compared with the previous SYMPLICITY trials. Since its publication in 2014, there have been many analyses to try and understand what accounted for the differences. Of all the variables examined that could influence blood pressure outcomes, the extent of the denervation procedure was determined to be inadequate. Beyond this, the physiological mechanisms that account for the heterogeneous fall in arterial pressure following renal denervation remain unclear, and experimental studies indicate dependence on more than simply reduced renal sympathetic activity. These and other related issues are discussed in this paper. Our perspective is that renal denervation works if done properly and used in the appropriate patient population. New studies with new approaches and catheters and appropriate controls will be starting later this year to reassess the efficacy and safety of renal denervation in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia: a clinical overview and applications with home-based technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedberg F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fred Friedberg,1 David A Williams,2 William Collinge31Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 3Collinge and Associates, Kittery, Maine, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia (FM is a persistent and disabling widespread pain condition often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive problems, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and headache. To date, the most thoroughly studied non-pharmacological approaches to managing FM are those with a focus on changing patient activities and beliefs that affect the illness. These interventions are intended to facilitate enduring improvement in pain and functional status. Lifestyle-oriented treatments include patient education, aerobic or other physical exercise, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT. These interventions in FM can be delivered in medical or behavioral health care settings by trained professionals, through patient-oriented treatment manuals, or via remote-access technologies. Non-pharmacological treatments, in particular exercise and CBT, have yielded effect sizes and cost–benefit ratios comparable to medications. This paper describes lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for FM and highlights selected literature reviews of these interventions. In addition, behavioral and practical issues are addressed that may affect these non-pharmacological treatments, including patient expectations, participant burden, and treatment availability. Recommendations are made to facilitate these interventions and potentially improve outcomes. In particular, the increasing availability of convenient home-based mobile technologies to deliver these non-pharmacological treatments is described.Keywords: cognitive-behavior therapy, exercise, education, mobile technology

  3. Perspectives on Research Participation and Facilitation Among Dialysis Patients, Clinic Personnel, and Medical Providers: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flythe, Jennifer E; Narendra, Julia H; Dorough, Adeline; Oberlander, Jonathan; Ordish, Antoinette; Wilkie, Caroline; Dember, Laura M

    2017-12-19

    Most prospective studies involving individuals receiving maintenance dialysis have been small, and many have had poor clinical translatability. Research relevance can be enhanced through stakeholder engagement. However, little is known about dialysis clinic stakeholders' perceptions of research participation and facilitation. The objective of this study was to characterize the perspectives of dialysis clinic stakeholders (patients, clinic personnel, and medical providers) on: (1) research participation by patients and (2) research facilitation by clinic personnel and medical providers. We also sought to elucidate stakeholder preferences for research communication. Qualitative study. 7 focus groups (59 participants: 8 clinic managers, 14 nurses/patient care technicians, 8 social workers/dietitians, 11 nephrologists/advanced practice providers, and 18 patients/care partners) from 7 North Carolina dialysis clinics. Clinics and participants were purposively sampled. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis. We identified 11 themes that captured barriers to and facilitators of research participation by patients and research facilitation by clinic personnel and medical providers. We collapsed these themes into 4 categories to create an organizational framework for considering stakeholder (narrow research understanding, competing personal priorities, and low patient literacy and education levels), relationship (trust, buy-in, and altruistic motivations), research design (convenience, follow-up, and patient incentives), and dialysis clinic (professional demands, teamwork, and communication) aspects that may affect stakeholder interest in participating in or facilitating research. These themes appear to shape the degree of research readiness of a dialysis clinic environment. Participants preferred short research communications delivered in multiple formats. Potential selection bias and inclusion of English-speaking participants only. Our findings

  4. State of the Art for Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy in Movement Disorders: A Clinical and Technological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Okun, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is a widely used brain surgery that can be applied for many neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS is American Food and Drug Administration approved for medication refractory Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia. Although DBS has shown consistent success in many clinical trials, the therapy has limitations and there are well-recognized complications. Thus, only carefully selected patients are ideal candidates for this surgery. Over the last two decades, there have been significant advances in clinical knowledge on DBS. In addition, the surgical techniques and technology related to DBS has been rapidly evolving. The goal of this review is to describe the current status of DBS in the context of movement disorders, outline the mechanisms of action for DBS in brief, discuss the standard surgical and imaging techniques, discuss the patient selection and clinical outcomes in each of the movement disorders, and finally, introduce the recent advancements from a clinical and technological perspective.

  5. Metacognition-oriented social skills training for individuals with long-term schizophrenia: methodology and clinical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottavi, Paolo; D'Alia, Daria; Lysaker, Paul; Kent, Jerillyn; Popolo, Raffaele; Salvatore, Giampaolo; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    There is much evidence indicating the presence of social deficits in schizophrenia and the detrimental effect of these deficits on global functioning in this population. As a result, social skills training (SST) has emerged as a legitimate psychosocial treatment, although effectiveness research has revealed small effect sizes and limited generalizability regarding the benefits of this treatment. In light of the strong evidence of metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia and the importance of metacognition to successful social functioning, we propose a novel therapeutic intervention wherein metacognitive remediation is integrated into SST: metacognition-oriented social skills training (MOSST). In the current paper, we present MOSST, an adapted SST programme wherein clients are also encouraged to have mindful contact with their own thoughts and to better consider and understand the mental states of others as well as the connection between mental states and behaviour. We present a case wherein an individual with schizophrenia successfully completed the MOSST programme. We outline directions for future research, starting with the logical next step of empirically testing the efficacy of MOSST. Currently social skills training is considered to be the elected psychosocial treatment for people affected by schizophrenia, although evidence indicates limited benefits. People with schizophrenia have metacognitive deficits, which interfere with proper social functioning. A metacognitive-oriented social skills training (MOSST) intervention has been developed by the authors.A treatment such as MOSST, which integrates social skills training and metacognitive training, promises to improve social skills through improving the metacognition. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Analisis Model Struktural Faktor-Faktor Pembentuk Fashion-Oriented Impulse Buying Produk Ritel Fashion Berdasarkan Sudut Pandang Konsumen Usia Remaja [Structural Model Analysis of Fashion-Oriented Impulse Buying of Retail Products Based on the Teenage Customer's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berto Mulia Wibawa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of globalization encourages many retailers from abroad with great capital to perform business activities especially in Indonesia. This also supported by the fashion industry which is currently growing. Unplanned purchases (or impulse buying is an act of purchase made by consumers who previously had no plans to buy the product. This study examines how fashion involvement influences positive emotion, hedonic consumption tendency, and fashion-oriented impulse buying at the retail fashion at Galaxy Mall Surabaya. The method of this study is using conclusive descriptive design with a multiple cross-sectional and judgmental sampling type. The distribution of questionnaires was done by direct survey to 188 customers of Zara, Pull & Bear and Stradivarius aged 15-21 who made purchases in one of those three stores in the last 1 month. The results of this study showed that fashion involvement has a positive effect on positive emotion, hedonic consumption tendency, and fashion-oriented impulse buying. A hedonic consumption tendency has a positive effect on positive emotions and fashion-oriented impulse buying. Other findings show that positive emotions have no influence towards fashion-oriented impulse buying. The results also recommended that retail mix strategy can be applied by Zara, Pull & Bear and Stradivarius to maximize retail revenue from potential customers by using the advantage of impulse buying behavior. Bahasa Indonesia Abstrak: Dampak globalisasi mendorong banyak pengusaha ritel dari luar negeri dengan kemampuan kapital yang besar melakukan aktivitas bisnis di Indonesia. Hal ini didukung oleh fenomena industri fashion yang saat ini semakin berkembang di Indonesia. Pembelian tak terencana (impulse buying merupakan tindakan pembelian yang dilakukan konsumen dimana sebelumnya belum ada rencana untuk membeli produk tersebut. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji hubungan fashion involvement, positive emotion, hedonic consumption

  7. Evaluating Success of Pediatric Dentistry Department at Mashhad Dental School (Iran in Clinical Skills Education from Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Nematollahi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodic evaluation of educational programs provides insight into the course and teaching effectiveness. Effective evaluation provides valuable information, which contributes to both student’s and course success. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of pediatric dentistry department at Mashhad dental school in clinical education from students’ perspectives.Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 fifth and sixth grade undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry at Mashhad dental school. A questionnaire including 21 multiple choice questions about 7 parts of clinical skills in pediatric dentistry was given to each student. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney in SPSS software. Results: According to the study results, among 7 different clinical skills in pediatric dentistry including: examination, behavior management, prevention, injection, restoration, pulp treatment and space management, the highest success rate of pediatric dentistry department was in prevention and injection and the lowest success rate in space management and behavior control. Furthermore, from the students’ perspective, male students compared to female students mentioned a higher rate of success in choosing the type of restoration material for pediatric dentistry department (P=0. 041. Conclusion: This study showed that the students’ self-reported clinical skills in different parts of pediatric dentistry has been adequate. Students reported a lack of confidence in “behavior management” and “space management” which warrants greater emphasis in the undergraduate curriculum.

  8. Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses--A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Margareta; Kullén Engström, Agneta; Ohlsson, Ulla; Sundler, Annelie J; Bisholt, Birgitta

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses. The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design. The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study. A questionnaire including the CLES+T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception. Students meeting CNTs agreed more strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor. In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a learning-oriented computer assisted instruction designed to improve skills in the clinical assessment of the nutritional status: a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Diego, Laura; Cuervo, Marta; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted instruction (CAI) is an effective tool for evaluating and training students and professionals. In this article we will present a learning-oriented CAI, which has been developed for students and health professionals to acquire and retain new knowledge through the practice. A two-phase pilot evaluation was conducted, involving 8 nutrition experts and 30 postgraduate students, respectively. In each training session, the software developed guides users in the integral evaluation of a patient's nutritional status and helps them to implement actions. The program includes into the format clinical tools, which can be used to recognize possible patient's needs, to improve the clinical reasoning and to develop professional skills. Among them are assessment questionnaires and evaluation criteria, cardiovascular risk charts, clinical guidelines and photographs of various diseases. This CAI is a complete software package easy to use and versatile, aimed at clinical specialists, medical staff, scientists, educators and clinical students, which can be used as a learning tool. This application constitutes an advanced method for students and health professionals to accomplish nutritional assessments combining theoretical and empirical issues, which can be implemented in their academic curriculum.

  10. [The General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy from the perspective of clinical psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In view of the fact that the suicide rate in Japan has remained high since 1998, the Basic Act on Suicide Prevention was implemented in 2006 with the objective of comprehensively promoting suicide prevention measures on a national scale. Based on this Basic Act, in 2007, the Japanese government formulated the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy as a guideline for recommended suicide prevention measures. These General Principles were revised in 2012 in accordance with the initial plan of holding a review after five years. The Basic Act places an emphasis on the various social factors that underlie suicides and takes the perspective that suicide prevention measures are also social measures. The slogan of the revised General Principles is "Toward Realization of a Society in which Nobody is Driven to Commit Suicide". The General Principles list various measures that are able to be used universally. These contents would be sufficient if the objective of the General Principles were "realization of a society that is easy to live in"; however, the absence of information on the effectiveness and order of priority for each measure may limit the specific effectiveness of the measures in relation to the actual prevention of suicide. In addition, considering that nearly 90% of suicide victims are in a state at the time of committing suicide in which a psychiatric disorder would be diagnosed, it would appear from a psychiatric standpoint that measures related to mental health, including expansion of psychiatric services, should be the top priority in suicide prevention measures. However, this is not the case in the General Principles, in either its original or revised form. Revisions to the General Principles related to clinical psychiatry provide more detailed descriptions of measures for individuals who unsuccessfully attempt suicide and identify newly targeted mental disorders other than depression; however, the overall proportion of contents relating to

  11. Factors Influencing the Application of a Biopsychosocial Perspective in Clinical Judgement of Chronic Pain: Interactive Management with Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Christopher P; McKenna-Plumley, Phoebe E; Durand, Hannah; Gormley, Emer M; Slattery, Brian W; Harney, Owen M; MacNeela, Padraig; McGuire, Brian E

    2017-09-01

    Though there is wide support for the application of biopsychosocial perspectives in clinical judgement of chronic pain cases, such perspectives are often overlooked due to either inadequate training or attitudes favoring a biomedical approach. Recent research has indicated that despite such explanations, both established general practitioners (GP) and medical students account for some psychosocial factors when making clinical judgements regarding chronic pain cases, but report not being likely to apply these in real-world, clinical settings due to numerous factors, including available time with patients. Thus, it is evident that a greater understanding of clinical judgement-making processes and the factors that affect application of these processes is required, particularly regarding chronic pain. The aims of the current study were to investigate medical students' conceptualizations of the factors that influence application of a biopsychosocial approach to clinical judgement-making in cases of chronic pain using interactive management (IM), model the relationships among these factors, and make recommendations to chronic pain treatment policy in light of the findings. The current study used IM to identify and model factors that influence the application of a biopsychosocial approach to clinical judgement-making in cases of chronic pain, based on medical students' conceptualizations of these factors. Two university classrooms. IM is a systems thinking and action mapping strategy used to aid groups in developing outcomes regarding complex issues, through integrating contributions from individuals with diverse views, backgrounds, and perspectives. IM commonly utilizes the nominal group technique and interpretive structural modeling, which in this context were employed to help medical students identify, clarify, and model influences on the application of biopsychosocial perspectives in treating chronic pain patients. Results of IM group work revealed 7 core

  12. World Gas Prospects: Which Role for the Middle East? Perspectives mondiales du gaz naturel : quel rôle pourrait jouer le Moyen-Orient ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabrelie M. F.

    2006-12-01

    vingt dernières années, le gaz naturel a enregistré le taux de croissance le plus élevé parmi les énergies fossiles, et sa part de marché est progressivement passée de 18,9 % en 1975 à 23 % en 1997. Aujourd'hui, des facteurs d'ordres économiques et environnementaux font du gaz naturel l'énergie de choix sur de nombreux marchés. Le gaz jouit en effet d'un certain nombre d'atouts (réserves importantes, flexibilité, utilisations performantes qui lui confèrent une place majeure dans tous les scénarios de prévision de demande énergétique. Le développement le plus spectaculaire se fera sans conteste dans le secteur électrique. Doté de réserves gazières considérables, le Moyen-Orient représentera une source d'approvisionnement essentielle pour bon nombre de pays industrialisés et plusieurs projets d'exportation de gaz par méthaniers ou par gazoducs sont déjà à l'étude. Par ailleurs, au cours des dix dernières années, la contribution du gaz naturel dans le bilan énergétique a augmenté de façon significative dans la plupart des pays du Moyen-Orient. La croissance de l'utilisation du gaz devrait se poursuivre à un rythme soutenu, en particulier sous l'influence du secteur électrique, de la pétrochimie et de l'autoconsommation de l'industrie pétrolière. Ces perspectives prometteuses de demande de gaz sur la plupart des marchés de la région pourraient conduire au développement d'un réseau de transport intrarégional. Toutefois, bien que des opportunités existent, elles ne doivent pas masquer les nombreux défis que cette région devra relever pour contribuer plus largement au bilan gazier mondial dans les années à venir.

  13. Promovendo o autocuidado a pacientes com cefaléia por meio da perspectiva oriental de saúde Promoviendo el autocuidado en pacientes con dolor de cabeza a través de la perspectiva oriental de salud Promoting self-care to patients suffering headache through the oriental perspective of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Wink

    2007-04-01

    Nursing graduation course, who presented headaches. Built from a subject of the Nursing Master Course of Federal University of Santa Catarina, the project was based in the concept of competence for self-care of Orem, understood through an oriental perspective of health. Three strategies of care were applied: the pain dairy, the focusing and the cranium-acupuncture, in monthly-weekly meetings and in individual meetings, for a two-month period. The participants related results of pain relief, discover of non-physical causes for pain and increase of welfare. It was possible to verify that the participants presented an individualized process of self-care development and that the strategies selected are suitable for the care.

  14. The rod orientation test in patients with right-hemisphere infarction : a clinical study of spatial perception in 154 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Meerwaldt (Johannes David (Jan))

    1982-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes a clinical study of disturbances of spatial perception. Chapter I gives a short review of hemispheric asymmetry. For a long time the right hemisphere was regarded as the minor hemisphere, of which substantial regions were thought to have no specific function.

  15. "Ms. B changes doctors": using a comic and patient transition packet to engineer patient-oriented clinic handoffs (EPOCH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincavage, Amber T; Lee, Wei Wei; Venable, Laura Ruth; Prochaska, Megan; Staisiunas, Daina D; Beiting, Kimberly J; Czerweic, M K; Oyler, Julie; Vinci, Lisa M; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-02-01

    Few patient-centered interventions exist to improve year-end residency clinic handoffs. Our purpose was to assess the impact of a patient-centered transition packet and comic on clinic handoff outcomes. The study was conducted at an academic medicine residency clinic. Participants were patients undergoing resident clinic handoff 2011-2013 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Two months before the 2012 handoff, patients received a "transition packet" incorporating patient-identified solutions (i.e., a new primary care provider (PCP) welcome letter with photo, certificate of recognition, and visit preparation tool). In 2013, a comic was incorporated to stress the importance of follow-up. Patients were interviewed by phone with response rates of 32 % in 2011, 43 % in 2012 and 36 % in 2013. Most patients who were interviewed were aware of the handoff post-packet (95 %). With the comic, more patients recalled receiving the packet (44 % 2012 vs. 64 % 2013, pcomic was associated with increased packet recall and improved follow-up rates.

  16. Thinking through postoperative cognitive dysfunction: How to bridge the gap between clinical and pre-clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovens, Iris B; Schoemaker, Regien G; van der Zee, Eddy A; Heineman, Erik; Izaks, Gerbrand J; van Leeuwen, Barbara L

    2012-10-01

    Following surgery, patients may experience cognitive decline, which can seriously reduce quality of life. This postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is mainly seen in the elderly and is thought to be mediated by surgery-induced inflammatory reactions. Clinical studies tend to define POCD as a persisting, generalised decline in cognition, without specifying which cognitive functions are impaired. Pre-clinical research mainly describes early hippocampal dysfunction as a consequence of surgery-induced neuroinflammation. These different approaches to study POCD impede translation between clinical and pre-clinical research outcomes and may hamper the development of appropriate interventions. This article analyses which cognitive domains deteriorate after surgery and which brain areas might be involved. The most important outcomes are: (1) POCD encompasses a wide range of cognitive impairments; (2) POCD affects larger areas of the brain; and (3) individual variation in the vulnerability of neuronal networks to neuroinflammatory mechanisms may determine if and how POCD manifests itself. We argue that, for pre-clinical and clinical research of POCD to advance, the effects of surgery on various cognitive functions and brain areas should be studied. Moreover, in addition to general characteristics, research should take inter-relationships between cognitive complaints and physical and mental characteristics into account. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. German Orientalism

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret Olin

    2011-01-01

    Review of: Suzanne L. Marchand, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race and Scholarship, Cambridge and Washington, D.C.: Cambridge University Press, 2009. This analysis of Suzanne L. Marchand’s German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race and Scholarship reads her contribution in part against the background of Edward Said’s path breaking book Orientalism. Differences lie in her more expansive understanding of the term ‘Oriental’ to include the Far East and her conce...

  18. From Servicescape to Loyalty in the Medical Tourism Industry: A Medical Clinic's Service Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minseong; Koo, Dong-Woo; Shin, Dong-Jin; Lee, Sae-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Medical tourism organizations have increasingly recognized that loyalty makes a medical clinic a marketing success. To increase understanding of the importance of medical clinics, this study examined the roles of servicescapes, emotions, and satisfaction in the development of customer loyalty toward medical clinics and destination. Data were collected among international medical tourists visiting Korea. Results identified that dimensions of medical clinics' servicescape (ie, medical clinic environment, medical treatment, staff, and doctor) influenced emotions and satisfaction among international medical tourists. Also, positive emotions and the 2 dimensions of satisfaction with a medical clinic and doctor mediate the influence of medical clinics' servicescapes on 2 types of loyalty (the medical clinic and Korea for medical care). Overall, these findings indicate that the interrelationship of servicescapes, positive emotion, and satisfaction is essential in influencing international medical tourists' loyalty to a medical clinic.

  19. Patient Acceptance of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Questions on Intake Forms in Outpatient Clinics: A Pragmatic Randomized Multisite Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullo, Jordan E; Foxen, Jilian L; Griffin, Joan M; Geske, Jennifer R; Gonzalez, Cesar A; Faubion, Stephanie S; van Ryn, Michelle

    2018-03-09

    To (1) test whether patient attitudes toward intake forms at three Midwestern outpatient clinics are significantly more negative among those who are asked to complete SOGI questions versus those who are not; and (2) gain an in-depth understanding of patient concerns about SOGI questions. Data were collected between 6/29/2015 and 2/29/2016 from new patients (N = 491) who presented at three outpatient clinics in a large academic medical center. This study was originally a quality improvement project, and later, institutional review board approval was obtained for secondary data analysis. Two-stage mixed-methods study. (1) Experimental: New patients at three sites were randomly assigned to complete either routine intake forms (control) or routine intake forms with SOGI questions (experimental); and (2) qualitative: interviews with patients who responded negatively to SOGI questions. There were no significant differences in patient attitudes between experimental and control groups (p > .05). Of those who received SOGI questions, only 3 percent reported being distressed, upset, or offended by the SOGI questions. Collection of SOGI data as a part of the routine clinical patient intake process is not distressing to 97 percent of patients who are heterosexual, cisgender, and older than 50 years. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  20. A semantic-web oriented representation of the clinical element model for secondary use of electronic health records data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Jiang, Guoqian; Oniki, Thomas A; Freimuth, Robert R; Zhu, Qian; Sharma, Deepak; Pathak, Jyotishman; Huff, Stanley M; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-05-01

    The clinical element model (CEM) is an information model designed for representing clinical information in electronic health records (EHR) systems across organizations. The current representation of CEMs does not support formal semantic definitions and therefore it is not possible to perform reasoning and consistency checking on derived models. This paper introduces our efforts to represent the CEM specification using the Web Ontology Language (OWL). The CEM-OWL representation connects the CEM content with the Semantic Web environment, which provides authoring, reasoning, and querying tools. This work may also facilitate the harmonization of the CEMs with domain knowledge represented in terminology models as well as other clinical information models such as the openEHR archetype model. We have created the CEM-OWL meta ontology based on the CEM specification. A convertor has been implemented in Java to automatically translate detailed CEMs from XML to OWL. A panel evaluation has been conducted, and the results show that the OWL modeling can faithfully represent the CEM specification and represent patient data.

  1. Medical school clinical placements - the optimal method for assessing the clinical educational environment from a graduate entry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Sarah; Hannigan, Ailish; Dornan, Tim; McGrath, Deirdre

    2018-01-05

    Educational environment is a strong determinant of student satisfaction and achievement. The learning environments of medical students on clinical placements are busy workplaces, composed of many variables. There is no universally accepted method of evaluating the clinical learning environment, nor is there consensus on what concepts or aspects should be measured. The aims of this study were to compare the Dundee ready educational environment measure (DREEM - the current de facto standard) and the more recently developed Manchester clinical placement index (MCPI) for the assessment of the clinical learning environment in a graduate entry medical student cohort by correlating the scores of each and analysing free text comments. This study also explored student perceptionof how the clinical educational environment is assessed. An online, anonymous survey comprising of both the DREEM and MCPI instruments was delivered to students on clinical placement in a graduate entry medical school. Additional questions explored students' perceptions of instruments for giving feedback. Numeric variables (DREEM score, MCPI score, ratings) were tested for normality and summarised. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to measure the strength of the association between total DREEM score and total MCPI scores. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the free text comments. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 67% (n = 180), with a completed response rate for the MCPI of 60% (n = 161) and for the DREEM of 58% (n = 154). There was a strong, positive correlation between total DREEM and MCPI scores (r = 0.71, p < 0.001). On a scale of 0 to 7, the mean rating for how worthwhile students found completing the DREEM was 3.27 (SD 1.41) and for the MCPI was 3.49 (SD 1.57). 'Finding balance' and 'learning at work' were among the themes to emerge from analysis of free text comments. The present study confirms that DREEM and MCPI total scores are strongly correlated

  2. Exposing emotional labour experienced by nursing students during their clinical learning experience: A Malawian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Msiska

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Effective clinical teaching and learning demands the emotional commitment of lecturers. The understanding of emotional labour in all its manifestations will help in the creation of caring clinical learning environments for student nurses in Malawi.

  3. Undergraduate nursing students' perspectives on clinical assessment at transition to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi Vivien; Wang, Wenru; Pua, Lay Hoon; Heng, Doreen Gek Noi; Enskär, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of clinical competence requires explicitly defined standards meeting the national standards of the nursing profession. This is a complex process because of the diverse nature of nursing practice. To explore the perceptions of final-year undergraduate nursing students regarding clinical assessment at transition to practice. An exploratory qualitative approach was adopted. Twenty-four students participated in three focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was conducted. Five themes emerged: the need for a valid and reliable clinical assessment tool, the need for a flexible style of reflection and specific feedback, the dynamic clinical learning environment, students' efforts in learning and assessment, and the unclear support system for preceptors. Workload, time, resource availability, adequate preparation of preceptors, and the provision of valid and reliable clinical assessment tools were deemed to influence the quality of students' clinical learning and assessment. Nursing leadership in hospitals and educational institutions has a joint responsibility in shaping the clinical learning environment and providing clinical assessments for the students.

  4. Perspective: clinical communication education in the United Kingdom: some fresh insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jo

    2012-08-01

    Clinical communication education is now part of the core curriculum of every medical school in the United Kingdom and the United States. It has emerged over 30 years because of various societal, political, and policy drivers and is supported by an impressive evidence base.For a variety of reasons, however, clinical communication has become separated from other parts of medical education and tends to be positioned in the early years of the curriculum, when students have limited experience of being in the clinical workplace and working with patients. The teachers of clinical communication, whether medical-school-based or clinically based, may not share learning goals for the subject and this may, therefore, provide a disintegrated learning experience for students.Clinical communication teachers need to inject fresh thinking into the teaching and learning of the subject to unite it with clinical practice in the authentic clinical workplace. Engaging with theories of workplace learning, which aim to overcome the theory/practice gap in vocational education, may be the way forward. The author suggests various ways that this might be achieved-for example, by situating clinical communication education throughout the whole undergraduate curriculum, by integrating the topic of clinical communication with other areas of medical education, by developing coteaching and curriculum design partnerships between medical school and clinical workplace, and by developing a greater range of postgraduate education that offers opportunities for professional development in clinical communication for qualified doctors that is complementary with what is taught in undergraduate education.

  5. Thinking through postoperative cognitive dysfunction : How to bridge the gap between clinical and pre-clinical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Iris B.; Schoemaker, Regien G.; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Heineman, Erik; Izaks, Gerbrand J.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.

    2012-01-01

    Following surgery, patients may experience cognitive decline, which can seriously reduce quality of life. This postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is mainly seen in the elderly and is thought to be mediated by surgery-induced inflammatory reactions. Clinical studies tend to define POCD as a

  6. Comparison of functionally orientated tooth replacement and removable partial dentures on the nutritional status of partially dentate older patients: a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Gerald; Allen, P Finbarr; O'Mahony, Denis; Flynn, Albert; Cronin, Michael; DaMata, Cristiane; Woods, Noel

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to conduct a randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) of partially dentate older adults comparing functionally orientated treatment based on the SDA concept with conventional treatment using RPDs to replace missing natural teeth. The two treatment strategies were evaluated according to their impact on nutritional status measured using haematological biomarkers. A randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) was conducted of partially dentate patients aged 65 years and older (Trial Registration no. ISRCTN26302774). Each patient provided haematological samples which were screened for biochemical markers of nutritional status. Each sample was tested in Cork University Hospital for serum Albumin, serum Cholesterol, Ferritin, Folate, Vitamin B12 and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (Vitamin D). A mixed model analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that for Vitamin B12 (p=0.9392), serum Folate (p=0.5827), Ferritin (p=0.6964), Albumin (p=0.8179), Serum Total Cholesterol (p=0.3670) and Vitamin D (p=0.7666) there were no statistically significant differences recorded between the two treatment groups. According to the mixed model analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) for Vitamin D there was a significant difference between levels recorded at post-operative time points after treatment intervention (p=0.0470). There was an increase of 7% in 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels recorded at 6 months compared to baseline (p=0.0172). There was no further change in recorded levels at 12 months (p=0.6482) and these increases were similar within the two treatment groups (p>0.05). The only measure which illustrated consistent significant improvements in nutritional status for either group were Vitamin D levels. However no significant difference was recorded between the two treatment groups. Functionally orientated prosthodontic rehabilitation for partially dentate older patients was no worse than conventional removable partial dentures in terms of impact on nutritional

  7. Sustainable development of a GCP-compliant clinical trials platform in Africa: the malaria clinical trials alliance perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutu, Bernhards R; Baiden, Rita; Diallo, Diadier; Smith, Peter G; Binka, Fred N

    2010-04-20

    The Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance (MCTA), a programme of INDEPTH network of demographic surveillance centres, was launched in 2006 with two broad objectives: to facilitate the timely development of a network of centres in Africa with the capacity to conduct clinical trials of malaria vaccines and drugs under conditions of good clinical practice (GCP); and to support, strengthen and mentor the centres in the network to facilitate their progression towards self-sustaining clinical research centres. Sixteen research centres in 10 African malaria-endemic countries were selected that were already working with the Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) or the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV). All centres were visited to assess their requirements for research capacity development through infrastructure strengthening and training. Support provided by MCTA included: laboratory and facility refurbishment; workshops on GCP, malaria diagnosis, strategic management and media training; and training to support staff to undertake accreditation examinations of the Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP). Short attachments to other network centres were also supported to facilitate sharing practices within the Alliance. MCTA also played a key role in the creation of the African Media & Malaria Research Network (AMMREN), which aims to promote interaction between researchers and the media for appropriate publicity and media reporting of research and developments on malaria, including drug and vaccine trials. In three years, MCTA strengthened 13 centres to perform GCP-compliant drug and vaccine trials, including 11 centres that form the backbone of a large phase III malaria vaccine trial. MCTA activities have demonstrated that centres can be brought up to GCP compliance on this time scale, but the costs are substantial and there is a need for further support of other centres to meet the growing demand for clinical trial capacity. The MCTA experience also indicates that

  8. The play's the thing: a clinical-developmental perspective on video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfond, Holly S; Salonius-Pasternak, Dorothy E

    2005-07-01

    In this article, computer and video games are discussed as electronic play. Major perspectives on play and salient developmental issues are presented, along with similarities and differences between electronic play and other types of play. The authors consider possible benefits and risks associated with this type of play, with particular attention paid to cognitive and socioemotional development. Recommendations for clinicians in their work with children, adolescents, and parents are discussed, as are future directions for research.

  9. Investigating the role of Clinical Nurse Consultants in one health district from multiple stakeholder perspectives: a cooperative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth; Bothe, Janine; Edgar, Denise; Beaven, Geraldine; Burgess, Bernadette; Dickson, Vhari; Dunn, Stephen; Horning, Lynda; Jensen, Janice; Kandl, Bronia; Nonu, Miriam; Owen, Fran; Moss, Cheryle

    2015-01-01

    The impetus for this research came from a group of 11 Clinical Nurse Consultants (CNCs) within a health service in NSW, Australia, who wanted to investigate the CNC role from multiple stakeholder perspectives. With support from academic researchers, the CNCs designed and implemented the study. The aim of this research project was to investigate the role of the CNC from the multiple perspectives of CNCs and other stakeholders who work with CNCs in the Health District. This was a co-operative inquiry that utilised qualitative descriptive research approach. Co-operative inquiry methods enabled 11 CNCs to work as co-researchers and to conduct the investigation. The co-researchers implemented a qualitative descriptive design for the research and used interviews (7) and focus groups (16) with CNC stakeholders (n = 103) to gather sufficient data to investigate the role of the CNC in the organisation. Thematic analysis was undertaken to obtain the results. The CNC role is invaluable to all stakeholders and it was seen as the "glue" which holds teams together. Stakeholder expectations of the CNC role were multiple and generally agreed. Five themes derived from the data are reported as "clinical leadership as core", "making a direct difference to patient care", "service development as an outcome", "role breadth or narrowness and boundaries", and "career development". There was clear appreciation of the work that CNCs do in their roles, and the part that the CNC role plays in achieving quality health outcomes. The role of the CNC is complex and the CNCs themselves often negotiate these complexities to ensure beneficial outcomes for the patient and organisation. For the wider audience this study has given further insights into the role of these nurses and the perspectives of those with whom they work.

  10. Orienteering injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering.

  11. A counselee-oriented perspective on risk communication in genetic counseling : Explaining the inaccuracy of the counselees' risk perception shortly after BRCA1/2 test result disclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Joel; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Oosterwijk, Jan; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Menko, Fred; Collee, J. Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tibben, Aad

    Purpose: Genetic counseling may help counselees understand their genetic risk of developing breast/ovarian cancer. However, many studies have shown that their perception of their risks is inaccurate. Information-oriented variables often predicted the level of accuracy, focusing on specific processes

  12. Evaluation of trauma service orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Orientation of residents to clinical services may be criticized as cumbersome, dull, and simplytoo much information. With the mandated resident-hour restrictions, the question arose: Do residents perceive the orientation to our trauma service as worthwhile? Residents attend a standardized orientation lecture on the first day of the rotation. Three weeks later, an eight-item, five-point Likert-scale survey is distributed to assess the residents' perceptions of the value of the orientation. Responses to each item were examined. Fifty-four (92%) of the residents completed the questionnaire between September 2005 and August 2006. Most indicated that orientation was helpful (85%), the Trauma Resuscitation DVD was informative (82%), the review of procedures was helpful (82%), and the instructor's knowledge was adequate (94%). Most (92%) disagreed with the statement that orientation should not be offered. Careful attention to orientation content and format is important to the perception that the orientation is worthwhile.

  13. Exercise and nutrition for head and neck cancer patients: a patient oriented, clinic-supported randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capozzi Lauren C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on physical activity and nutrition interventions aimed at positively impacting symptom management, treatment-related recovery and quality of life has largely excluded head and neck (HN cancer populations. This translates into a lack of clinical programming available for these patient populations. HN cancer patients deal with severe weight loss, with more than 70% attributed to lean muscle wasting, leading to extended recovery times, decreased quality of life (QoL, and impaired physical functioning. To date, interventions to address body composition issues have focused solely on diet, despite findings that nutritional therapy alone is insufficient to mitigate changes. A combined physical activity and nutrition intervention, that also incorporates important educational components known to positively impact behaviour change, is warranted for this population. Our pilot work suggests that there is large patient demand and clinic support from the health care professionals for a comprehensive program. Methods/Design Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to examine the impact and timing of a 12-week PA and nutrition intervention (either during or following treatment for HN cancer patients on body composition, recovery, serum inflammatory markers and quality of life. In addition, we will examine the impact of a 12-week maintenance program, delivered immediately following the intervention, on adherence, patient-reported outcomes (i.e., management of both physical and psychosocial treatment-related symptoms and side-effects, as well as return to work. Discussion This research will facilitate advancements in patient wellness, survivorship, and autonomy, and carve the path for a physical-activity and wellness-education model that can be implemented in other cancer centers. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT01681654

  14. Establishing the competences of clinical reasoning for nursing students in Taiwan: From the nurse educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Man; Huang, Chu-Yu; Lee-Hsieh, Jane; Cheng, Su-Fen

    2018-07-01

    Clinical reasoning is an essential core competence for nurses. Maintaining quality of care and safety of patients results from cultivation of student's clinical reasoning competency. However, the concept of clinical reasoning in nursing students is complex and its meaning and process needs further clarification. The objectives were to explore the meaning of clinical reasoning competency in Taiwanese nursing students and to operationalize the concept in order to structure a framework illustrating the process of clinical reasoning. Thirteen seasoned nursing experts who had more than ten years of experience in nursing education or clinical practice participated in the interviews. The interviews were conducted in settings that the participants perceived as convenient, quiet and free of disturbance. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. The interviews were audio-recorded and field notes were taken. The data were analyzed using Waltz et al.'s (2010) method of content analysis. The data revealed four domains and 11 competency indicators. The four domains include: awareness of clinical cues, confirmation of clinical problems, determination and implementation of actions, and evaluation and self-reflection. Each domain comprises of 2-4 indicators of clinical reasoning competency. In addition, this study established a framework for cultivation of clinical reasoning competency in nursing students. The indicators of clinical reasoning competency in nursing students are interwoven, interactive and interdependent to form a dynamic process. The findings of this study may facilitate evaluation of nursing students' clinical reasoning competency and development of instruments to assess clinical reasoning in nursing students. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring exploration orientation and its determinants : Some empirical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, H.R.; Volberda, H.W.; Sidhu, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Adopting an information-process perspective, this article conceptualizes exploration orientation in terms of scope of information acquisition. In line with this conceptualization, a multidimensional operational measure of exploration orientation is developed and its internal consistency established.

  16. Finding patients using similarity measures in a rare diseases-oriented clinical data warehouse: Dr. Warehouse and the needle in the needle stack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcelon, Nicolas; Neuraz, Antoine; Benoit, Vincent; Salomon, Rémi; Kracker, Sven; Suarez, Felipe; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Fischer, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Burgun, Anita

    2017-09-01

    In the context of rare diseases, it may be helpful to detect patients with similar medical histories, diagnoses and outcomes from a large number of cases with automated methods. To reduce the time to find new cases, we developed a method to find similar patients given an index case leveraging data from the electronic health records. We used the clinical data warehouse of a children academic hospital in Paris, France (Necker-Enfants Malades), containing about 400,000 patients. Our model was based on a vector space model (VSM) to compute the similarity distance between an index patient and all the patients of the data warehouse. The dimensions of the VSM were built upon Unified Medical Language System concepts extracted from clinical narratives stored in the clinical data warehouse. The VSM was enhanced using three parameters: a pertinence score (TF-IDF of the concepts), the polarity of the concept (negated/not negated) and the minimum number of concepts in common. We evaluated this model by displaying the most similar patients for five different rare diseases: Lowe Syndrome (LOWE), Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (DEB), Activated PI3K delta Syndrome (APDS), Rett Syndrome (RETT) and Dowling Meara (EBS-DM), from the clinical data warehouse representing 18, 103, 21, 84 and 7 patients respectively. The percentages of index patients returning at least one true positive similar patient in the Top30 similar patients were 94% for LOWE, 97% for DEB, 86% for APDS, 71% for EBS-DM and 99% for RETT. The mean number of patients with the exact same genetic diseases among the 30 returned patients was 51%. This tool offers new perspectives in a translational context to identify patients for genetic research. Moreover, when new molecular bases are discovered, our strategy will help to identify additional eligible patients for genetic screening. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Disrupting the downward spiral of chronic pain and opioid addiction with mindfulness-oriented recovery enhancement: a review of clinical outcomes and neurocognitive targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L

    2014-06-01

    Prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients are problems of growing medical and social significance. Chronic pain patients often require intervention to improve their well-being and functioning, and yet, the most commonly available form of pharmacotherapy for chronic pain is centered on opioid analgesics--drugs that have high abuse liability. Consequently, health care and legal systems are often stymied in their attempts to intervene with individuals who suffer from both pain and addiction. As such, novel, nonpharmacologic interventions are needed to complement pharmacotherapy and interrupt the cycle of behavioral escalation. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the downward spiral of chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse may be targeted by one such intervention, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), a new behavioral treatment that integrates elements from mindfulness training, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and positive psychology. The clinical outcomes and neurocognitive mechanisms of this intervention are reviewed with respect to their effects on the risk chain linking chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse. Future directions for clinical and pharmacologic research are discussed.

  18. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  19. Radiography students' perceptions of clinical placements - A Nigerian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogbu, S.O.I. [Department of Medical Radiography and Radiological Sciences, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, 11 Clement Nnakwe Close, Ugbene, Abakpa-Nike, Enugu State 400001 (Nigeria)], E-mail: sylvogbu_rad@yahoo.com

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: To assess undergraduate radiography student perception of clinical placements and to evaluate their clinical learning experiences. Methods: To evaluate student perception of clinical placements, a Likert-scale questionnaire was used to assess clinical practice, the practice-learning environment. One hundred and seventy-eight undergraduate [student] radiographers participated in the study. Results: The students indicated they had adequate and enjoyed their time on the clinical placement. They also indicated the qualified staff was supportive, friendly and approachable. The students were able to achieve their learning outcomes during the placement. However placement venues, according to the students, had inadequate learning resources. No radiographic/medical imaging research findings, whether locally generated or otherwise, were used in clinical practice. Conclusions: Clinical placements had adequate student support. It provided a pleasant learning experience for the students and it enhanced their skills. Staff was willing and available to assist learning. Nevertheless, the training institutions, professional body and clinical placement providers need to make an effort to address inadequate learning resources (e.g. IT, library, study rooms) as well as the non-utilization of radiographic/medical imaging research findings.

  20. Women’s involvement in clinical trials: historical perspective and future implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu KA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of considering the differences between the male and female sex in clinical decision-making is crucial. However, it has been acknowledged in recent decades that clinical trials have not always adequately enrolled women or analyzed sex-specific differences in the data. As these deficiencies have hindered the progress of understanding women’s response to medications, agencies in the United States have worked towards the inclusion of women in clinical trials and appropriate analysis of sex-specific data from clinical trials. This review outlines the history and progress of women’s inclusion in clinical trials for prescription drugs and presents considerations for researchers, clinicians, and academicians on this issue.

  1. Challenges and perspective of drug repurposing strategies in early phase clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shumei; Moulder, Stacy L; Ueno, Naoto T; Wheler, Jennifer J; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant investments in the development of new agents only 5% of cancer drugs entering Phase I clinical trials are ultimately approved for routine clinical cancer care. Drug repurposing strategies using novel combinations of previously tested anticancer agents could reduce the cost and improve treatment outcomes. At MD Anderson Cancer Center, early phase clinical trials with drug repurposing strategies demonstrated promising outcomes in patients with both rare and common treatment refractory advanced cancers. Despite clinical efficacy advancing drug repurposing strategies in the clinical trial trajectory beyond early phase studies has been challenging mainly due to lack of funding and interest from the pharmaceutical industry. In this review, we delineate our experience and challenges with drug repurposing strategies.

  2. The impact of demographic factors on the way lesbian and gay employees manage their sexual orientation at work: An intersectional perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Köllen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence demographic factors have on the way lesbians and gay men manage their sexual orientation at work. Design/methodology/approach : Based on data taken from a cross-sectional survey of 1308 gay and lesbian employees working in Germany, four regression models are proposed. The means of managing one's homosexuality at work was measured by the 31 items containing WSIMM from Anderson et al. (2001). Findings : Results indicate that bei...

  3. Does extrinsic goal framing enhance extrinsic goal-oriented individuals' learning and performance? An experimental test of the match perspective versus self-determination theory

    OpenAIRE

    Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Timmermans, Tinneke; Lens, Willy; Soenens, Bart; Van den Broeck, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Previous work within self-determination theory has shown that experimentally framing a learning activity in terms of extrinsic rather than intrinsic goals results in poorer conceptual learning and performance, presumably because extrinsic goal framing detracts attention from the learning activity and is less directly satisfying of basic psychological needs. According to the match perspective, experimental extrinsic, compared to intrinsic, goal framing should enhance learning and performance f...

  4. Clinical decision making in dermatology: observation of consultations and the patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex process and might be influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Little is known about this process in dermatology. The aim of this study was to explore the different types of management decisions made in dermatology and to identify factors influencing those decisions from observation of consultations and interviews with the patients. 61 patient consultations were observed by a physician with experience in dermatology. The patients were interviewed immediately after each consultation. Consultations and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and their content analysed using thematic content analysis. The most common management decisions made during the consultations included: follow-up, carrying out laboratory investigation, starting new topical treatment, renewal of systemic treatment, renewal of topical treatment, discharging patients and starting new systemic treatment. Common influences on those decisions included: clinical factors such as ineffectiveness of previous therapy, adherence to prescribing guidelines, side-effects of medications, previous experience with the treatment, deterioration or improvement in the skin condition, and chronicity of skin condition. Non-clinical factors included: patient's quality of life, patient's friends or relatives, patient's time commitment, travel or transportation difficulties, treatment-related costs, availability of consultant, and availability of treatment. The study has shown that patients are aware that management decisions in dermatology are influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Education programmes should be developed to improve the quality of decision making. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Social Dominance Orientation, Language Orientation, and Deaf Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The notion of the Deaf community as a linguistic-cultural minority has been increasingly recognized and studied over the last two decades. However, significant differences of opinion and perspective within that population typically have been neglected in the literature. Social dominance orientation (SDO), a theoretical construct, typically…

  6. TU-C-201-01: Clinical Implementation of HDR: A New User’s Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hallaq, H. [The University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent use of HDR has increased while planning has become more complex often necessitating 3D image-based planning. While many guidelines for the use of HDR exist, they have not kept pace with the increased complexity of 3D image-based planning. Furthermore, no comprehensive document exists to describe the wide variety of current HDR clinical indications. This educational session aims to summarize existing national and international guidelines for the safe implementation of an HDR program. A summary of HDR afterloaders available on the market and their existing applicators will be provided, with guidance on how to select the best fit for each institution’s needs. Finally, the use of checklists will be discussed as a means to implement a safe and efficient HDR program and as a method by which to verify the quality of an existing HDR program. This session will provide the perspective of expert HDR physicists as well as the perspective of a new HDR user. Learning Objectives: Summarize national and international safety and staffing guidelines for HDR implementation Discuss the process of afterloader and applicator selection for gynecologic, prostate, breast, interstitial, surface treatments Learn about the use of an audit checklist tool to measure of quality control of a new or existing HDR program Describe the evolving use of checklists within an HDR program.

  7. Current knowledge and future research on infant feeding in the context of HIV: basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sera L; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Chantry, Caroline J; Geubbels, Eveline P; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Cohan, Deborah; Vosti, Stephen A; Latham, Michael C

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, between 129,000 and 194,000 of the 430,000 pediatric HIV infections worldwide were attributable to breastfeeding. Yet in many settings, the health, economic, and social consequences of not breastfeeding would have dire consequences for many more children. In the first part of this review we provide an overview of current knowledge about infant feeding in the context of HIV. Namely, we describe the benefits and risks of breastmilk, the evolution of recommended infant feeding modalities in high-income and low-income countries in the last two decades, and contextualize the recently revised guidelines for infant feeding in the context of HIV current knowledge. In the second section, we suggest areas for future research on the postnatal prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in developing and industrialized countries. We suggest two shifts in perspective. The first is to evaluate PMTCT interventions more holistically, to include the psychosocial and economic consequences as well as the biomedical ones. The second shift in perspective should be one that contextualizes postnatal PMTCT efforts in the cascade of maternal health services. We conclude by discussing basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic research questions pertaining to a number of PMTCT efforts, including extended postnatal ARV prophylaxis, exclusive breastfeeding promotion, counseling, breast milk pasteurization, breast milk banking, novel techniques for making breast milk safer, and optimal breastfeeding practices. We believe the research efforts outlined here will maximize the number of healthy, thriving, HIV-free children around the world.

  8. Current Knowledge and Future Research on Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV: Basic, Clinical, Behavioral, and Programmatic Perspectives12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sera L.; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Chantry, Caroline J.; Geubbels, Eveline P.; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Cohan, Deborah; Vosti, Stephen A.; Latham, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, between 129,000 and 194,000 of the 430,000 pediatric HIV infections worldwide were attributable to breastfeeding. Yet in many settings, the health, economic, and social consequences of not breastfeeding would have dire consequences for many more children. In the first part of this review we provide an overview of current knowledge about infant feeding in the context of HIV. Namely, we describe the benefits and risks of breastmilk, the evolution of recommended infant feeding modalities in high-income and low-income countries in the last two decades, and contextualize the recently revised guidelines for infant feeding in the context of HIV current knowledge. In the second section, we suggest areas for future research on the postnatal prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in developing and industrialized countries. We suggest two shifts in perspective. The first is to evaluate PMTCT interventions more holistically, to include the psychosocial and economic consequences as well as the biomedical ones. The second shift in perspective should be one that contextualizes postnatal PMTCT efforts in the cascade of maternal health services. We conclude by discussing basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic research questions pertaining to a number of PMTCT efforts, including extended postnatal ARV prophylaxis, exclusive breastfeeding promotion, counseling, breast milk pasteurization, breast milk banking, novel techniques for making breast milk safer, and optimal breastfeeding practices. We believe the research efforts outlined here will maximize the number of healthy, thriving, HIV-free children around the world. PMID:22332055

  9. Integrative qualitative communication analysis of consultation and patient and practitioner perspectives: towards a theory of authentic caring in clinical relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Mendick, Nicola; Young, Bridget

    2011-03-01

    We developed a method whereby relationships can be studied simultaneously from the perspectives of each party and researchers' observations of their dialogue. Then we used this method to study how to recognise authentic, caring clinical relationships. Participants were 20 patients who had recently received surgery for breast cancer and nine surgeons with whom they had a post-operative consultation. We audiorecorded consultations, before interviewing patients and surgeons about their perceptions of the consultation and each other. Cross-case qualitative analyses (analysing consultations and surgeon and patient interviews, respectively) were supplemented by integrative, within-case analysis. Surgeons and patients described their relationship as personal and emotional, but emotional talk was absent from consultations. For patients and surgeons, their relationship depended, instead, on surgeons' expertise and character. Our integrative approach suggested that authentic caring in these relationships lay in practitioners' conscientious execution of their role and, contrary to currently influential views, not in an explicit emotional engagement. Relationships between patients and practitioners cannot be described adequately using analyses of interactions between them. Researchers will need to triangulate between these observations and the patient and practitioner perspectives in order to understand what makes for authentically caring relationships. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rational pharmacotherapy and clinical practice guidelines - Theories and perspectives on implementing pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Brouwers, JRBJ; Timmer, JW; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Several theories behind implementing clinical guidelines have been described within the literature. At first sight, these may seem different. However, there are similarities and eventually they are rather complementary than mutually exclusive. This article integrates several theoretical views on

  11. Two patients walk into a clinic...a genomics perspective on the future of schizophrenia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corvin, Aiden P

    2011-11-11

    Abstract Progress is being made in schizophrenia genomics, suggesting that this complex brain disorder involves rare, moderate to high-risk mutations and the cumulative impact of small genetic effects, coupled with environmental factors. The genetic heterogeneity underlying schizophrenia and the overlap with other neurodevelopmental disorders suggest that it will not continue to be viewed as a single disease. This has radical implications for clinical practice, as diagnosis and treatment will be guided by molecular etiology rather than clinical diagnostic criteria.

  12. Perspectives for medical informatics. Reusing the electronic medical record for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokosch, H U; Ganslandt, T

    2009-01-01

    Even though today most university hospitals have already implemented commercial hospital information systems and started to build up comprehensive electronic medical records, reuse of such data for data warehousing and research purposes is still very rare. Given this situation, the focus of this paper is to present an overview on exemplary projects, which have already tackled this challenge, reflect on current initiatives within the United States of America and the European Union to establish IT infrastructures for clinical and translational research, and draw attention to new challenges in this area. This paper does not intend to provide a fully comprehensive review on all the issues of clinical routine data reuse. It is based, however, on a presentation of a large variety of historical, but also most recent activities in data warehousing, data retrieval and linking medical informatics with translational research. The article presents an overview of the various international approaches to this issue and illustrates concepts and solutions which have been published, thus giving an impression of activities pursued in this field of medical informatics. Further, problems and open questions, which have also been named in the literature, are presented and three challenges (to establish comprehensive clinical data warehouses, to establish professional IT infrastructure applications supporting clinical trial data capture and to integrate medical record systems and clinical trial databases) related to this area of medical informatics are identified and presented. Translational biomedical research with the aim "to integrate bedside and biology" and to bridge the gap between clinical care and medical research today and in the years to come, provides a large and interesting field for medical informatics researchers. Especially the need for integrating clinical research projects with data repositories built up during documentation of routine clinical care, today still leaves

  13. Metastatic carcinoma of breast or a chordoma? A case report and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Sachin; Odrazka, Karel

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of chordoma in a patient who had been previously treated for ductal carcinoma of the breast. The initial clinical findings and radiological studies suggested a possibility of metastases. However, the findings also adhered to the classical presentations and findings of the chordoma of the base of skull. It was only after the surgical resection and immunohistochemical confirmation that the diagnosis of chordoma could be established. Here, we discuss chordoma with the analysis of our clinical intrigue.

  14. Distinguishing between Unipolar Depression and Bipolar Depression: Current and Future Clinical and Neuroimaging Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida, Jorge Renner Cardoso; Phillips, Mary Louise

    2012-01-01

    Differentiating bipolar disorder (BD) from recurrent unipolar depression (UD) is a major clinical challenge. Main reasons for this include the higher prevalence of depressive relative to hypo/manic symptoms during the course of BD illness and the high prevalence of subthreshold manic symptoms in both BD and UD depression. Identifying objective markers of BD might help improve accuracy in differentiating between BD and UD depression, to ultimately optimize clinical and functional outcome for a...

  15. Proprioceptive rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction in movement disorders: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eAbbruzzese

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are frequently associated with sensory abnormalities. In particular, proprioceptive deficits have been largely documented in both hypokinetic (Parkinson’s disease and hyperkinetic conditions (dystonia suggesting a possible role in their pathophysiology. Proprioceptive feedback is a fundamental component of sensorimotor integration allowing effective planning and execution of voluntary movements. Rehabilitation has become an essential element in the management of patients with movement disorders and there is a strong rationale to include proprioceptive training in rehabilitation protocols focused on mobility problems of the upper limbs. Proprioceptive training is aimed at improving the integration of proprioceptive signals using task intrinsic or augmented feedback. This perspective article reviews the available evidences on the effects of proprioceptive stimulation in improving upper limb mobility in patients with movement disorders and highlights the emerging innovative approaches targeted to maximizing the benefits of exercise by means of enhanced proprioception.

  16. Clinical utility of letrozole in the treatment of breast cancer: a Chinese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He DX

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dong-xu He,1 Xin Ma2 1National Engineering Laboratory for Cereal Fermentation Technology, 2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The incidence rate of breast cancers in People’s Republic of China has increased in the last decade, and many cases are responsive to hormone therapies. The third-generation aromatase inhibitor letrozole inhibits estrogen production, and is more efficacious than the estrogen receptor inhibitor tamoxifen. In recent years, letrozole has been widely used to treat postmenopausal breast cancers in People’s Republic of China. Also, metastatic, premenopausal, and male breast cancers have been effectively treated by a combination of letrozole with cytotoxic, radiation, or other therapies. In this review, we provide a perspective and summary of recent advances in the use of letrozole for breast cancer in Chinese patients. Keywords: breast cancer, Chinese, letrozole

  17. Health care consumers’ perspectives on pharmacist integration into private general practitioner clinics in Malaysia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saw PS

    2015-03-01

    information on the use and potential side effects of medications and screening for medication misadventure. The potential increase in costs passed on to consumers and GPs’ reluctance were perceived as barriers to integration. Conclusion: This study provides insights into consumers’ perspectives on the roles of pharmacists within private GP clinics in Malaysia. Consumers generally supported pharmacist integration into private primary health care clinics. However, for pharmacists to expand their capacity in providing integrated and collaborative primary care services to consumers, barriers to pharmacist integration need to be addressed. Keywords: pharmacist integration, private clinic, general practitioners, health care consumer, Malaysia

  18. Mexican-American perspectives on participation in clinical trials: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Arevalo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials are essential to advancing knowledge to reduce disease morbidity and mortality; however, ethnic and racial minorities remain under-represented in those studies. We explored knowledge and perceptions of clinical trials among Mexican-Americans in Texas. We conducted focus groups (N = 128 stratified by gender, language preference, and geographical location. This paper presents four emergent, primary themes: 1 knowledge and understanding of clinical trials, 2 fears and concerns about participating, 3 perceived benefits of participating, and 4 incentives to participate. Results suggest that lack of knowledge and understanding of clinical trials leads to misunderstanding about research, including fears and lack of trust. Participants indicated that fears related to perceived experimentation, harm, immigration status, and lack of clinical trial opportunities within their communities were barriers to participation. On the other hand, free healthcare access, helping family members in the future, and monetary incentives could facilitate participation. We also found differences across themes by language, gender, and place of residence. Findings from our study could inform the development of interventions to enhance recruitment of Mexican-American participants into clinical trials.

  19. Inhaled antibiotics in the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: clinical and drug delivery perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugianto, Tiffanie Daisy; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-01-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is a chronic, progressive, suppurative lung disease characterized by permanent dilatation of bronchial subdivisions, which further causes accumulation of sputum and bacterial infections. The advent of inhaled antibiotics over the past two decades has been expected to effectively attenuate the problem of chronic bacterial infections in CF and NCFB subjects with higher, local drug concentrations and minimal systemic side effects. This review summarizes and evaluates current clinical evidence of efficacy and adverse effects of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB, as well as ongoing preclinical and clinical studies, followed by a discussion of issues and challenges in clinical practice and drug delivery strategies, together with future research directions. The evidence base of the clinical efficacy of inhaled antibiotics in NCFB is limited and the degrees of reported clinical benefits have been modest and conflicting. Challenges surrounding inhaled antibiotics application and development include the lack of knowledge of disease factors and optimum management strategies, unreceptive lung pathophysiology and the lack of factors that support compliance and tolerability. Nonetheless, research continues to give birth to new clinical findings and novel formulations such as combination antibiotics and sustained-release formulations, which add great value to the development of efficacious, safe and convenient inhalable antibiotics of the future.

  20. An interpersonal perspective on depression: the role of marital adjustment, conflict communication, attributions, and attachment within a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heene, Els; Buysse, Ann; Van Oost, Paulette

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies have focused on the difficulties in psychosocial functioning in depressed persons, underscoring the distress experienced by both spouses. We selected conflict communication, attribution, and attachment as important domains of depression in the context of marital adjustment, and we analyzed two hypotheses in one single study. First, we analyzed whether a clinical sample of couples with a depressed patient would differ significantly from a control group on these variables. Second, we explored to what degree these variables mediate/moderate the relationship between depressive symptoms and marital adjustment. The perspectives of both spouses were taken into account, as well as gender differences. In total, 69 clinical and 69 control couples were recruited, and a series of multivariate analyses of variance and regression analyses were conducted to test both hypotheses. Results indicated that both patients and their partners reported less marital adjustment associated with more negative perceptions on conflict communication, causal attributions, and insecure attachment. In addition, conflict communication and causal attributions were significant mediators of the association between depressive symptoms and marital adjustment for both depressed men and women, and causal attributions also moderated this link. Ambivalent attachment was a significant mediator only for the female identified patients. Several sex differences and clinical implications are discussed.

  1. Combined effects of functionally-oriented exercise regimens and nutritional supplementation on both the institutionalised and free-living frail elderly (double-blind, randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzicki Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consistently swelling proportion of the frail elderly within a modern society challenges the overstrained public health sector to provide both adequate medical care and comprehensive assistance in their multiple functional deficits of daily living. Easy-to-apply and task-specific ways of addressing this issue are being sought out, with a view to proposing systemic solutions for nationwide application. Methods The present randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 7-week clinical trial aimed to determine whether specifically structured, intensive exercise regimens, combined with nutritional supplementation, might improve and help sustain individual muscle strength and mobility, and possibly enhance individual functional capabilities in an on-going quest for active prevention of care-dependency. Ninety-one frail elderly (F 71 M 20; mean age 79 years were recruited from both nursing home residents and community dwellers and randomly split into four groups: Group I – progressive resistance exercises (PRE + functionally-oriented exercises (FOE + nutritional supplementation (NS, Group II – PRE + FOE + placebo, Group III – standard exercises (SE + FOE + NS, Group IV – SE + FOE + placebo. Each group pursued a 45 min. exercise session 5 times weekly. The subjects' strength with regard to four muscle groups, i.e. hip and knee extensors and flexons, was assessed at 80% (1 RM weekly, whereas their balance and mobility at baseline and at the end of the study. Results The study was completed by 80 subjects. Despite its relatively short duration significant differences in muscle strength were noted both in Group I and Group II (p = 0.01; p = 0.04; respectively, although this did not translate directly into perceptible improvement in individual mobility. Notable improvements in individual mobility were reported in Group III and Group IV (p = 0.002, although without positive impact on individual muscle strength. Conclusion

  2. Application of machine learning classification for structural brain MRI in mood disorders: Critical review from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Na, Kyoung-Sae

    2018-01-03

    Mood disorders are a highly prevalent group of mental disorders causing substantial socioeconomic burden. There are various methodological approaches for identifying the underlying mechanisms of the etiology, symptomatology, and therapeutics of mood disorders; however, neuroimaging studies have provided the most direct evidence for mood disorder neural substrates by visualizing the brains of living individuals. The prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, ventral striatum, and corpus callosum are associated with depression and bipolar disorder. Identifying the distinct and common contributions of these anatomical regions to depression and bipolar disorder have broadened and deepened our understanding of mood disorders. However, the extent to which neuroimaging research findings contribute to clinical practice in the real-world setting is unclear. As traditional or non-machine learning MRI studies have analyzed group-level differences, it is not possible to directly translate findings from research to clinical practice; the knowledge gained pertains to the disorder, but not to individuals. On the other hand, a machine learning approach makes it possible to provide individual-level classifications. For the past two decades, many studies have reported on the classification accuracy of machine learning-based neuroimaging studies from the perspective of diagnosis and treatment response. However, for the application of a machine learning-based brain MRI approach in real world clinical settings, several major issues should be considered. Secondary changes due to illness duration and medication, clinical subtypes and heterogeneity, comorbidities, and cost-effectiveness restrict the generalization of the current machine learning findings. Sophisticated classification of clinical and diagnostic subtypes is needed. Additionally, as the approach is inevitably limited by sample size, multi-site participation and data-sharing are needed in the future. Copyright

  3. Economic Analyses in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Review of the Literature From a Clinical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jonas A. de, E-mail: jdesouza@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Santana, Iuri A.; Castro, Gilberto de [Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lima Lopes, Gilberto de [Johns Hopkins Singapore International Medical Centre (Singapore); Tina Shih, Ya-Chen [The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to describe cost-effectiveness and cost analysis studies across treatment modalities for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), while placing their results in context of the current clinical practice. We performed a literature search in PubMed for English-language studies addressing economic analyses of treatment modalities for SCCHN published from January 2000 to March 2013. We also performed an additional search for related studies published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the United Kingdom. Identified articles were classified into 3 clinical approaches (organ preservation, radiation therapy modalities, and chemotherapy regimens) and into 2 types of economic studies (cost analysis and cost-effectiveness/cost-utility studies). All cost estimates were normalized to US dollars, year 2013 values. Our search yielded 23 articles: 13 related to organ preservation approaches, 5 to radiation therapy modalities, and 5 to chemotherapy regimens. In general, studies analyzed different questions and modalities, making it difficult to reach a conclusion. Even when restricted to comparisons of modalities within the same clinical approach, studies often yielded conflicting findings. The heterogeneity across economic studies of SCCHN should be carefully understood in light of the modeling assumptions and limitations of each study and placed in context with relevant settings of clinical practices and study perspectives. Furthermore, the scarcity of comparative effectiveness and quality-of-life data poses unique challenges for conducting economic analyses for a resource-intensive disease, such as SCCHN, that requires a multimodal care. Future research is needed to better understand how to compare the costs and cost-effectiveness of different modalities for SCCHN.

  4. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Peter; Vickers, Michael M; O'Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen's κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting template and provide accessible references to original source

  5. Preceptors' perspectives of an integrated clinical learning model in a mental health environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Gayelene; Lawrence, Karen; Polacsek, Meg

    2018-02-14

    Supervised clinical practice is an essential component of undergraduate nursing students' learning and development. In the mental health setting, nursing students traditionally undertake four-week block placements. An integrated clinical learning model, where preceptors mentor students on an individual basis, has been used successfully in the clinical learning environment. This flexible model provides the opportunity for students to work across morning, afternoon, night and weekend shifts. There is a need to improve the evidence base for a flexible model for students undertaking a mental health placement. The aim of this study was to understand preceptors' experience of, and satisfaction with, a mental health integrated clinical learning model. Focus groups were used to elicit the views of preceptors from a mental health service. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of an integrated clinical learning model in the mental health setting. Participants suggested that students may benefit from flexible work arrangements, a variety of experiences and a more realistic experience of working in a mental health service. However, they found it challenging to mentor and evaluate students under this model. Most also agreed that the model impeded students' ability to engage with consumers and develop rapport with staff. The findings indicate the need to develop a placement model that meets the unique needs of the mental health setting. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Something has shifted: Nursing students' global perspective following international clinical placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Shelley; Duggan, Ravani; Dantas, Jaya A R; Boldy, Duncan

    2017-10-01

    To examine understandings of global health issues among nursing students following participation in an international clinical placement during their pre-registration university education. Universities use international clinical placements, especially in developing countries, to develop cultural awareness in students; however, little is known about the longer term influences on students' understandings of global nursing. A retrospective cross-sectional design was used, using an exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2014 with a purposive sample of 25 pre-registration nursing students from four Western Australian universities who undertook clinical placements across five countries. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Findings highlight that students developed new understandings around health systems including fragility of resource access, differences in clinical practice and variances in nursing roles between settings. Students also experienced challenges but were able to appreciate alternative world viewpoints. International clinical placements can develop greater awareness and help students form realistic strategies for using their nursing skills globally. Pre-placement training in cultural awareness and health system realities, along with strong supervisory support, is critical to success. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Clinical 3D printing: A protected health information (PHI) and compliance perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Henry; Kamali, Parisa; Lin, Samuel J; Halamka, John D

    2018-07-01

    Advanced manufacturing techniques such as 3-dimensional (3D) printing, while mature in other industries, are starting to become more commonplace in clinical care. Clinicians are producing physical objects based on patient clinical data for use in planning care and educating patients, all of which should be managed like any other healthcare system data, except it exists in the "real" world. There are currently no provisions in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) either in its original 1996 form or in more recent updates that address the nature of physical representations of clinical data. We submit that if we define the source data as protected health information (PHI), then the objects 3D printed from that data need to be treated as both (PHI), and if used clinically, part of the clinical record, and propose some basic guidelines for quality and privacy like all documentation until regulatory frameworks can catch up to this technology. Many of the mechanisms designed in the paper and film chart era will work well with 3D printed patient data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Barriers to clinical adoption of next generation sequencing: Perspectives of a policy Delphi panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna A. Messner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to inform policymakers by engaging expert stakeholders to identify, prioritize, and deliberate the most important and tractable policy barriers to the clinical adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS. A 4-round Delphi policy study was done with a multi-stakeholder panel of 48 experts. The first 2 rounds of online questionnaires (reported here assessed the importance and tractability of 28 potential barriers to clinical adoption of NGS across 3 major policy domains: intellectual property, coverage and reimbursement, and FDA regulation. We found that: 1 proprietary variant databases are seen as a key challenge, and a potentially intractable one; 2 payer policies were seen as a frequent barrier, especially a perceived inconsistency in standards for coverage; 3 relative to other challenges considered, FDA regulation was not strongly perceived as a barrier to clinical use of NGS. Overall the results indicate a perceived need for policies to promote data-sharing, and a desire for consistent payer coverage policies that maintain reasonably high standards of evidence for clinical utility, limit testing to that needed for clinical care decisions, and yet also flexibly allow for clinician discretion to use genomic testing in uncertain circumstances of high medical need.

  9. Clinical Pathways and the Patient Perspective in the Pursuit of Value-Based Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Nadler, Eric; Freeman-Daily, Janet; Mazharuddin, Samir; Kim, Edward S

    2017-01-01

    The art of practicing oncology has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. As more and more diagnostic tests, biomarker-directed therapies, and immunotherapies make their way to the oncology marketplace, oncologists will find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the many therapeutic options. Additionally, the cost of cancer care seems to be increasing. Clinical pathways are a systematic way to organize and display detailed, evidence-based treatment options and assist the practitioner with best practice. When selecting which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway, considerations must include the efficacy and safety, as well as costs, of the therapy. Pathway treatment regimens must be continually assessed and modified to ensure that the most up-to-date, high-quality options are incorporated. Value-based models, such as the ASCO Value Framework, can assist providers in presenting economic evaluations of clinical pathway treatment options to patients, thus allowing the patient to decide the overall value of each treatment regimen. Although oncologists and pathway developers can decide which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway based on the efficacy of the treatment, assessment of the value of that treatment regimen ultimately lies with the patient. Patient definitions of value will be an important component to enhancing current value-based oncology care models and incorporating new, high-quality, value-based therapeutics into oncology clinical pathways.

  10. Transplantation of Bioprinted Tissues and Organs: Technical and Clinical Challenges and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnic, Dino J; Leberfinger, Ashley N; Koduru, Srinivas V; Hospodiuk, Monika; Moncal, Kazim K; Datta, Pallab; Dey, Madhuri; Rizk, Elias; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-07-01

    : Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a revolutionary technology in building living tissues and organs with precise anatomic control and cellular composition. Despite the great progress in bioprinting research, there has yet to be any clinical translation due to current limitations in building human-scale constructs, which are vascularized and readily implantable. In this article, we review the current limitations and challenges in 3D bioprinting, including in situ techniques, which are one of several clinical translational models to facilitate the application of this technology from bench to bedside. A detailed discussion is made on the technical barriers in the fabrication of scalable constructs that are vascularized, autologous, functional, implantable, cost-effective, and ethically feasible. Clinical considerations for implantable bioprinted tissues are further expounded toward the correction of end-stage organ dysfunction and composite tissue deficits.

  11. Employee Health in the Mental Health Workplace: Clinical, Administrative, and Organizational Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jai L; Kapoor, Reena; Cole, Robert; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-04-01

    Issues of mental health and employee health have risen to increasing prominence in recent years. However, there have been few explorations of the clinical and administrative challenges that these issues raise, particularly in settings that are themselves mental health workplaces. In order to identify and understand such challenges, a brief case of acute employee illness in a mental health workplace is described followed by a discussion of salient clinical, administrative, and organizational considerations. The case raises questions about medicolegal responsibilities and relationships between clinicians and patients in mental health settings, illuminates tensions between clinical staff and human resources processes, and draws attention to the need for illness prevention and mental health promotion initiatives in the workplace. Increased awareness of these issues, complications, and potential solutions would benefit clinicians, administrators, and mental health institutions.

  12. Genetic drift. The real tiger mother: from the clinical geneticist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Natasha

    2011-09-01

    The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua raises questions about motherhood and what is admirable. Chua promotes strict, Old World, uncompromising values stressing academic performance above all, insisting on drilling and practice, and instilling respect for authority. As clinical geneticists, we meet an entirely different type of mother than Chua, the clinical genetics mother who fights illnesses, schools, hospital policies, and insurance companies. She battles not against her child but for her child. With brilliance and resilience, she creates a child-centered world. The stories of four clinical genetics mothers rally us to reject extreme parenting and appreciate the simple joys of childhood. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. [Clinical research activity of the French cancer cooperative network: Overview and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Claire; Morin, Franck; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Seitz, Jean-François; Girault, Cécile; Salles, Gilles; Haioun, Corinne; Deschaseaux, Pascal; Casassus, Philippe; Mathiot, Claire; Pujade-Lauraine, Éric; Votan, Bénédicte; Louvet, Christophe; Delpeut, Christine; Bardet, Étienne; Vintonenko, Nadejda; Hoang Xuan, Khê; Vo, Maryline; Michon, Jean; Milleron, Bernard

    The French Cancer Plan 2014-2019 stresses the importance of strengthening collaboration between all stakeholders involved in the fight against cancer, including cancer cooperative groups and intergroups. This survey aimed to describe the basics characteristics and clinical research activity among the Cancer Cooperative Groups (Groupes coopérateurs en oncologie). The second objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to their research activity. A questionnaire was sent to all the clinicians involved in 2014 as investigators in a clinical trial sponsored by one of the ten members of the Cancer Cooperative Groups network. The questions were related to their profile, research activity and the infrastructure existing within their healthcare center to support clinical research and related compliance activities. In total, 366 investigators responded to our survey. The academic clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Cooperative Groups represented an important part of the research activity of the investigators in France in 2014. These academic groups contributed to the opening of many research sites throughout all regions in France. Factors associated with a higher participation of investigators (more than 10 patients enrolled in a trial over a year) include the existing support of healthcare professionals (more than 2 clinical research associate (CRA) OR=11.16 [3.82-32.6] compared to none) and the practice of their research activity in a University Hospital Center (CHU) rather than a Hospital Center (CH) (OR=2.15 [1.20-3.83]). This study highlighted factors that can strengthen investigator clinical research activities and subsequently improve patient access to evidence-based new cancer therapies in France. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Big Data as a Driver for Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Learning Health Systems Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Dagliati

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Big data technologies are nowadays providing health care with powerful instruments to gather and analyze large volumes of heterogeneous data collected for different purposes, including clinical care, administration, and research. This makes possible to design IT infrastructures that favor the implementation of the so-called “Learning Healthcare System Cycle,” where healthcare practice and research are part of a unique and synergic process. In this paper we highlight how “Big Data enabled” integrated data collections may support clinical decision-making together with biomedical research. Two effective implementations are reported, concerning decision support in Diabetes and in Inherited Arrhythmogenic Diseases.

  15. Two patients walk into a clinic...a genomics perspective on the future of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvin Aiden P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Progress is being made in schizophrenia genomics, suggesting that this complex brain disorder involves rare, moderate to high-risk mutations and the cumulative impact of small genetic effects, coupled with environmental factors. The genetic heterogeneity underlying schizophrenia and the overlap with other neurodevelopmental disorders suggest that it will not continue to be viewed as a single disease. This has radical implications for clinical practice, as diagnosis and treatment will be guided by molecular etiology rather than clinical diagnostic criteria.

  16. Towards single embryo transfer? Modelling clinical outcomes of potential treatment choices using multiple data sources: predictive models and patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sa; McGowan, L; Hirst, Wm; Brison, Dr; Vail, A; Lieberman, Ba

    2010-07-01

    In vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatments involve an egg retrieval process, fertilisation and culture of the resultant embryos in the laboratory, and the transfer of embryos back to the mother over one or more transfer cycles. The first transfer is usually of fresh embryos and the remainder may be cryopreserved for future frozen cycles. Most commonly in UK practice two embryos are transferred (double embryo transfer, DET). IVF techniques have led to an increase in the number of multiple births, carrying an increased risk of maternal and infant morbidity. The UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has adopted a multiple birth minimisation strategy. One way of achieving this would be by increased use of single embryo transfer (SET). To collate cohort data from treatment centres and the HFEA; to develop predictive models for live birth and twinning probabilities from fresh and frozen embryo transfers and predict outcomes from treatment scenarios; to understand patients' perspectives and use the modelling results to investigate the acceptability of twin reduction policies. A multidisciplinary approach was adopted, combining statistical modelling with qualitative exploration of patients' perspectives: interviews were conducted with 27 couples at various stages of IVF treatment at both UK NHS and private clinics; datasets were collated of over 90,000 patients from the HFEA registry and nearly 9000 patients from five clinics, both over the period 2000-5; models were developed to determine live birth and twin outcomes and predict the outcomes of policies for selecting patients for SET or DET in the fresh cycle following egg retrieval and fertilisation, and the predictions were used in simulations of treatments; two focus groups were convened, one NHS and one web based on a patient organisation's website, to present the results of the statistical analyses and explore potential treatment policies. The statistical analysis revealed no characteristics that

  17. Cognitively oriented behavioral rehabilitation in combination with Qigong for patients on long-term sick leave because of burnout: REST--a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Therese; Ahlgren, Christina; Lindahl, Bernt; Burell, Gunilla; Steinholtz, Katarina; Edlund, Curt; Nilsson, Leif; Knutsson, Anders; Birgander, Lisbeth Slunga

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increase in the occurrence of burnout, there is no agreement on what kind of rehabilitation these patients should be offered. Primary aim of this study was to evaluate effects on psychological variables and sick leave rates by two different group rehabilitation programs for patients on long-term sick leave because of burnout. Rehabilitation program A (Cognitively oriented Behavioral Rehabilitation (CBR) and Qigong) was compared with rehabilitation program B (Qigong only). In a randomized clinical trial, 96 women and 40 men with a mean age of 41.6 +/- 7.4 years were allocated to one of the two rehabilitation programs. A per-protocol analysis showed no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the groups. Both groups improved significantly over time with reduced levels of burnout, self-rated stress behavior, fatigue, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and sick leave rates. In an intention-to-treat analysis, patients in program A had fewer obsessive-compulsive symptoms and larger effect sizes in self-rated stress behavior and obsessive-compulsive symptoms compared to patients in program B. This study showed no differences in effect between CBR and Qigong compared with Qigong only in a per-protocol analysis. Both rehabilitation programs showed positive effect for patients with burnout.

  18. The impact of rehabilitation using removable partial dentures and functionally orientated treatment on oral health-related quality of life: a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Gerald; Allen, P Finbarr; O'Mahony, Denis; Cronin, Michael; DaMata, Cristiane; Woods, Noel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different tooth replacement strategies for partially dentate older patients; namely functionally orientated treatment according to the principles of the shortened dental arch (SDA) and conventional treatment using removable partial dentures (RPDs) using a randomised controlled clinical trial. The primary outcome measure for this study was impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) measured using the short form of the oral health impact profile (OHIP-14). Patients aged 65 years and older were randomly allocated to two different treatment groups: the RPD group and the SDA group. For the RPD group each patient was restored to complete arches with cobalt-chromium RPDs used to replace missing teeth. For the SDA group, patients were restored to a premolar occlusion of 10 occluding pairs of natural and replacement teeth using resin bonded bridgework (RBB). OHRQoL was measured using the OHIP-14 questionnaire administered at baseline, 1 month, 6 months and 12 months after treatment intervention. In total, 89 patients completed the RCT: 44 from the RPD group and 45 from the SDA group. Analysis using a mixed model of covariance (ANCOVA) illustrated that treatment according to the SDA concept resulted in significantly better mean OHIP-14 scores compared with RPD treatment (premovable dentures in terms of impact on OHRQoL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Approach to acid-base disorders – a clinical chemistry perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table 1. Simple acid-base disorders. Disorder. pH. pCO2. HCO3. -. Clinical examples. Respiratory acidosis ... Lactic acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis and vomiting. Triple disorder: .... Renal tubular acidosis type 1 and 2. Ureteral diversion to ...

  20. The patient perspective of clinical training-an empirical study about patient motives to participate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevs, Florian; Gebele, Christoph; Tscheulin, Dieter K

    2014-10-01

    This study introduces a comprehensive model to explain patients' prosocial behavioral intentions to participate in clinical training. Using the helping decision model, the authors analyze the combined impact of factors that affect participation intentions. The model includes intrapersonal and interpersonal appraisals triggered by an awareness of the societal need for clinical training as a practical part of medical education. The results of our empirical study (N=317) show that personal costs and anxiety as negative appraisals and a warm glow as a positive appraisal affect participation intentions and fully mediate the effect of the patient's awareness of the societal need. The study results indicate that communication strategies should address patient beliefs about negative personal consequences of participation rather than highlighting the societal need for practical medical education related to clinical training. Based on the results, medical associations could develop guidelines and provide training for physicians on how to motivate patients to participate in clinical training, resulting in more patient-centered standardized consent discussions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. VEGF in nuclear medicine : Clinical application in cancer and future perspectives (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taurone, Samanta; Galli, Filippo; Signore, Alberto; Agostinelli, Enzo; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Minni, Antonio; Pucci, Marcella; Artico, Marco

    Clinical trials using antiangiogenic drugs revealed their potential against cancer. Unfortunately, a large percentage of patients does not yet benefit from this therapeutic approach highlighting the need of diagnostic tools to non-invasively evaluate and monitor response to therapy. It would also

  2. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sincan, Murat; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing) in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings) but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward.

  3. Setting priorities for improving the preoperative assessment clinic: the patients' and the professionals' perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edward, G.M.; de Haes, J.C.J.M.; Oort, F.J.; Lemaire, L.C.; Hollmann, M.W.; Preckel, B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The quality of the preoperative assessment clinic (PAC) is determined by many factors. Patients’ experiences are important indicators, but often overlooked. We prepare to set priorities to improve the PAC by obtaining detailed patients’ feedback on the quality of the PAC, and

  4. 50 years of pediatric immunology: progress and future, a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surjit; Gupta, Anju; Rawat, Amit

    2013-01-08

    Rapidly evolving advances in the field of immunology over the last few decades have impacted the practice of clinical medicine in many ways. In fact, understanding the immunological basis of disease has been pivotal in deciphering the pathogenesis of several disease processes, infective or otherwise. As of today, there is hardly any specialty of medicine which is not influenced by immunology. Pediatric rheumatological disorders, vasculitides, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDs) and autoimmune disorders fall under the domain of clinical immunology. This specialty is poised to emerge as a major clinical specialty in our country. The gulf between bench and bedside is narrowing down as our understanding of the complex immunological mechanisms gets better. However, a lot still needs to be done in this field as the morbidity and mortality of some of these conditions is unacceptably high in the Indian setup. A number of medical schools and institutes in the country now have the resources and the wherewithal to develop into specialized centres of clinical immunology. We need to concentrate on training more physicians and pediatricians in this field. The future is bright and the prospects exciting.

  5. Patient and family member perspectives on searching for cancer clinical trials: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgeway, Jennifer L; Asiedu, Gladys B; Carroll, Katherine; Tenney, Meaghan; Jatoi, Aminah; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    Clinical trials are vital in the context of ovarian cancer and may offer further treatment options during disease recurrence, yet enrollment remains low. Understanding patient and family member experiences with identifying trials can inform engagement and education efforts. Interviews were conducted with 33 patients who had experience with clinical trial conversations and 39 nominated family members. Thematic analysis examined experiences and generated findings for clinical practice. Trial conversations with providers at diagnosis were uncommon and often overwhelming. Most participants delayed engagement until later in the disease course. With hindsight, though, some wished they considered trials earlier. Difficulty identifying appropriate trials led some to defer searching to providers, but then they worried about missed opportunities. Most family members felt unqualified to search. Trial conversations during clinical encounters should start early and include specifying search responsibilities of providers, patients, and family. Patients and family members can be engaged in searches but need guidance. Trials should be discussed throughout the disease course, even if patients are not ready to participate or are not making a treatment decision. Education should focus on identifying trials that meet search criteria. Transparency regarding each individual's role in identifying trials is critical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowing "and" Acting in the Clinical Workplace: Trainees' Perspectives on Modelling and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, J. H.; Schoten, E. J.; Terpstra, O. T.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we discuss clinical workplace learning using a dual approach: a theoretical one and an empirical one. Drawing on the philosophical work of Aristotle, Polanyi and Schön we posit that the "knowing 'and' acting" underpinning day-to-day medical practice is personal and embraces by nature a tacit dimension.…

  7. Complexity perspectives on clinical decision making in an intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bock, Ben A.; Willems, Dick L.; Weinstein, Henry C.

    2017-01-01

    How to clarify the implications of complexity thinking for decision making in the intensive care unit (ICU)? Retrospective qualitative empirical research. Practitioners in an ICU were interviewed on how their decisions were made regarding a particular patient in a difficult, clinical situation.

  8. Clinical Perspective A case of effective single-session treatment for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports a systematic clinical case study of the psychological assessment and treatment of Daniel (9), a coloured South African boy with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (inattentive type). The case is of scientific interest because: (1) there was only a single treatment session, in which ...

  9. Current Concepts and Future Perspectives on Intraoperative Fluorescence Imaging in Cancer : Clinical Need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    Progress with technology and regulatory approvals has recently allowed the successful clinical translation of fluorescence molecular imaging to intra-operative applications. Initial studies have demonstrated a promising outlook for imaging cancer micro-foci, margins and lymph-nodes. However, not all

  10. Cartilage repair by mesenchymal stem cells: Clinical trial update and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Yuk-wai Lee

    2017-04-01

    The translational potential of this article: This review summarises recent MSC-related clinical research that focuses on cartilage repair. We also propose a novel possible translational direction for hyaline cartilage formation and a new paradigm making use of extra-cellular signalling and epigenetic regulation in the application of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  11. The Dreyfus model of clinical problem-solving skills acquisition: a critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Adolfo

    2010-06-14

    The Dreyfus model describes how individuals progress through various levels in their acquisition of skills and subsumes ideas with regard to how individuals learn. Such a model is being accepted almost without debate from physicians to explain the 'acquisition' of clinical skills. This paper reviews such a model, discusses several controversial points, clarifies what kind of knowledge the model is about, and examines its coherence in terms of problem-solving skills. Dreyfus' main idea that intuition is a major aspect of expertise is also discussed in some detail. Relevant scientific evidence from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience is reviewed to accomplish these aims. Although the Dreyfus model may partially explain the 'acquisition' of some skills, it is debatable if it can explain the acquisition of clinical skills. The complex nature of clinical problem-solving skills and the rich interplay between the implicit and explicit forms of knowledge must be taken into consideration when we want to explain 'acquisition' of clinical skills. The idea that experts work from intuition, not from reason, should be evaluated carefully.

  12. Feasibility of a semi-automated contrast-oriented algorithm for tumor segmentation in retrospectively gated PET images: phantom and clinical validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Montserrat; Fechter, Tobias; Nemer, Ursula; Nanko, Norbert; Mix, Michael; Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    PET/CT plays an important role in radiotherapy planning for lung tumors. Several segmentation algorithms have been proposed for PET tumor segmentation. However, most of them do not take into account respiratory motion and are not well validated. The aim of this work was to evaluate a semi-automated contrast-oriented algorithm (COA) for PET tumor segmentation adapted to retrospectively gated (4D) images. The evaluation involved a wide set of 4D-PET/CT acquisitions of dynamic experimental phantoms and lung cancer patients. In addition, segmentation accuracy of 4D-COA was compared with four other state-of-the-art algorithms. In phantom evaluation, the physical properties of the objects defined the gold standard. In clinical evaluation, the ground truth was estimated by the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) consensus of three manual PET contours by experts. Algorithm evaluation with phantoms resulted in: (i) no statistically significant diameter differences for different targets and movements (Δ φ =0.3+/- 1.6 mm); (ii) reproducibility for heterogeneous and irregular targets independent of user initial interaction and (iii) good segmentation agreement for irregular targets compared to manual CT delineation in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC  =  0.66+/- 0.04 ), Positive Predictive Value (PPV  =  0.81+/- 0.06 ) and Sensitivity (Sen.  =  0.49+/- 0.05 ). In clinical evaluation, the segmented volume was in reasonable agreement with the consensus volume (difference in volume (%Vol)  =  40+/- 30 , DSC  =  0.71+/- 0.07 and PPV  =  0.90+/- 0.13 ). High accuracy in target tracking position (Δ ME) was obtained for experimental and clinical data (Δ ME{{}\\text{exp}}=0+/- 3 mm; Δ ME{{}\\text{clin}}=0.3+/- 1.4 mm). In the comparison with other lung segmentation methods, 4D-COA has shown the highest volume accuracy in both experimental and clinical data. In conclusion, the accuracy in volume

  13. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in Clinical Settings and in Electronic Health Records: A Key to Ending LGBT Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Sean; Makadon, Harvey

    2014-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) 2011 report on the health of LGBT people pointed out that there are limited health data on these populations and that we need more research. It also described what we do know about LGBT health disparities, including lower rates of cervical cancer screening among lesbians, and mental health issues related to minority stress. Patient disclosure of LGBT identity enables provider-patient conversations about risk factors and can help us reduce and better understand disparities. It is essential to the success of Healthy People 2020's goal of eliminating LGBT health disparities. This is why the IOM's report recommended data collection in clinical settings and on electronic health records (EHRs). The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Office of the National Coordinator of Health Information Technology rejected including sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) questions in meaningful use guidelines for EHRs in 2012 but are considering this issue again in 2013. There is overwhelming community support for the routine collection of SOGI data in clinical settings, as evidenced by comments jointly submitted by 145 leading LGBT and HIV/AIDS organizations in January 2013. Gathering SOGI data in EHRs is supported by the 2011 IOM's report on LGBT health, Healthy People 2020, the Affordable Care Act, and the Joint Commission. Data collection has long been central to the quality assurance process. Preventive health care from providers knowledgeable of their patients' SOGI can lead to improved access, quality of care, and outcomes. Medical and nursing schools should expand their attention to LGBT health issues so that all clinicians can appropriately care for LGBT patients.

  14. [Music in health promotion and therapeutic practice. Cultural, theoretical and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastnak, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Music can serve as a shelter and music therapy can provide spaces for symbolic experience and the modification of behavioural and cognitive patterns. Explaining the power of music, ancient theories speak of an analogy between music and man. Similar views are also found in modern music therapy such as Sound Work, a voice-body-based model. Complementary to the aspect of analogy, the principle of transformation is of vital importance, such as the transitions between the five elements, the solid organs and the pentatonic scale in Chinese music therapy, for instance. Distinct modes of matter-mind-transitions define the theoretical framework of neuro-psychologically based music therapy. A triadic model encompassing neuro-endocrine, psychological and aesthetic facets explains the preventive and therapeutic effect of music in stress-associated disorders and burnout. Finally, a new voice-based model (Arion Psychovocal Therapy) is presented. Integrating anthropological theories, anatomical perspectives of movement, and artistic features it focuses on psychiatry, psycho-prevention, and public health and highlights the interdisciplinary nature of music in medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. [Clinical and communication simulation workshop for fellows in gastroenterology: the trainees' perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alon; Melzer, Ehud; Bar-Meir, Simon; Eliakim, Rami; Ziv, Amitai

    2006-11-01

    The continuing development in computer-based medical simulators provides an ideal platform for simulator-assisted training programs for medical trainees. Computer-based endoscopic simulators provide a virtual reality environment for training endoscopic procedures. This study illustrates the use of a comprehensive training model combining the use of endoscopic simulators with simulated (actor) patients (SP). To evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive simulation workshop from the trainee perspective. Four case studies were developed with emphasis on communication skills. Three workshops with 10 fellows in each were conducted. During each workshop the trainees spent half of the time in SP case studies and the remaining half working with computerized endoscopic simulators with continuous guidance by an expert endoscopist. Questionnaires were completed by the fellows at the end of the workshop. Seventy percent of the fellows felt that the endoscopic simulator was close or very close to reality for gastroscopy and 63% for colonoscopy. Eighty eight percent thought the close guidance was important for the learning process with the simulator. Eighty percent felt that the case studies were an important learning experience for risk management. Further evaluation of multi-modality simulation workshops in gastroenterologist training is needed to identify how best to incorporate this form of instruction into training for gastroenterologists.

  16. Valsartan combination therapy in the management of hypertension – patient perspectives and clinical utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T; McNamara, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality benefits of lowering blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients are well established, with most individuals requiring multiple agents to achieve BP control. Considering the important role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in the pathophysiology of hypertension, a key component of combination therapy should include a RAAS inhibitor. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) lower BP, reduce cardiovascular risk, provide organ protection, and are among the best tolerated class of antihypertensive therapy. In this article, we discuss two ARB combinations (valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ] and amlodipine/valsartan), both of which are indicated for the treatment of hypertension in patients not adequately controlled on monotherapy and as initial therapy in patients likely to need multiple drugs to achieve BP goals. Randomized, double-blind studies that have assessed the antihypertensive efficacy and safety of these combinations in the first-line treatment of hypertensive patients are reviewed. Both valsartan/HCTZ and amlodipine/valsartan effectively lower BP and are well tolerated in a broad range of patients with hypertension, including difficult-to-treat populations such as those with severe BP elevations, prediabetes and diabetes, patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome, and individuals who are obese, elderly, or black. Also discussed herein are patient-focused perspectives related to the use of valsartan/HCTZ and amlodipine/valsartan, and the rationale for use of single-pill combinations as one approach to enhance patient compliance with antihypertensive therapy. PMID:21949614

  17. Mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells: general insights and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomer HD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Helena D Zomer,1 Atanásio S Vidane,1 Natalia N Gonçalves,1 Carlos E Ambrósio2 1Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Food Engineering, University of São Paulo, Pirassununga, SP, Brazil Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells have awakened a great deal of interest in regenerative medicine due to their plasticity, and immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. They are high-yield and can be acquired through noninvasive methods from adult tissues. Moreover, they are nontumorigenic and are the most widely studied. On the other hand, induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can be derived directly from adult cells through gene reprogramming. The new iPS technology avoids the embryo destruction or manipulation to generate pluripotent cells, therefore, are exempt from ethical implication surrounding embryonic stem cell use. The pre-differentiation of iPS cells ensures the safety of future approaches. Both mesenchymal stem cells and iPS cells can be used for autologous cell transplantations without the risk of immune rejection and represent a great opportunity for future alternative therapies. In this review we discussed the therapeutic perspectives using mesenchymal and iPS cells. Keywords: cell transplantation, cell therapy, iPS, MSC

  18. Multicenter clinical perspectives on a broadband infrared light device for skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Amy Forman; Battle, Eliot F; Nikolaidis, Gregory

    2006-09-01

    Modalities for skin tightening include radiofrequency (RF) energy, lasers, and combination RF and diode lasers. A new broadband infrared light device (BILD) (Titan, Cutera, Inc, Brisbane, CA) targets water to achieve dermal heating and collagen remodeling for skin tightening. Although thousands of procedures have been performed worldwide with this device, only one article (to the author's knowledge) describing its performance in skin tightening has been published. Three US dermatologists report their experience with and provide their perspective on facial skin tightening with the BILD system. As early adopters, they each have 12 to 18 months experience with this system. One author (A.F.T.) treated 42 patients twice at 1-month intervals over 18 months. The mean improvement score was 1.83 (scale 0 to 4, with 4 denoting maximum improvement) with an average follow-up time of 3.7 months. More than 90% of treated patients showed visible improvement. No complications were observed and patient satisfaction was high. This paper presents the general consensus of the authors on patient selection and treatment protocol, their modifications of the manufacturer's treatment protocol, and the outcomes of 42 patients treated by one author (A.F.T.). The observations were gathered separately and turned out to be very similar. The recommendations are presented to help practitioners achieve consistently good results and avoid complications with the BILD procedure.

  19. Development and Implementation of an Electronic Clinical Formative Assessment: Dental Faculty and Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Michele L; Adams, Brooke N; Meadows, Melinda L; Jackson, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A traditional summative grading structure, used at Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD) for more than 30 years, was identified by faculty as outdated for assessing students' clinical performance. In an effort to change the status quo, a feedback-driven assessment was implemented in 2012 to provide a constructive assessment tool acceptable to both faculty and students. Building on the successful non-graded clinical evaluation employed at Baylor College of Dentistry, IUSD implemented a streamlined electronic formative feedback model (FFM) to assess students' daily clinical performance. An important addition to this evaluation tool was the inclusion of routine student self-assessment opportunities. The aim of this study was to determine faculty and student response to the new assessment instrument. Following training sessions, anonymous satisfaction surveys were examined for the three user groups: clinical faculty (60% response rate), third-year (D3) students (72% response rate), and fourth-year (D4) students (57% response rate). In the results, 70% of the responding faculty members preferred the FFM over the summative model; however, 61.8% of the D4 respondents preferred the summative model, reporting insufficient assessment time and low faculty participation. The two groups of students had different responses to the self-assessment component: 70.2% of the D4 respondents appreciated clinical self-assessment compared to 46% of the D3 respondents. Overall, while some components of the FFM assessment were well received, a phased approach to implementation may have facilitated a transition more acceptable to both faculty and students. Improvements are being made in an attempt to increase overall satisfaction.

  20. Clinical implementation of KRAS testing in metastatic colorectal carcinoma: the pathologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S

    2012-10-01

    Mutation status of the KRAS gene identifies a distinct disease subtype of metastatic colorectal carcinoma that does not respond to antibody therapeutics targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor. This is currently the only validated marker in metastatic colorectal carcinoma with a clear implication in treatment selection. KRAS testing is widely accepted in clinical practice to guide metastatic colorectal carcinoma therapeutic decisions, and there are many commercially available platforms to perform the test. To evaluate the critical role of pathologists in the full implementation of KRAS testing by optimizing tumor tissue collection and fixation procedures and by choosing testing technologies and reliable Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988-certified laboratories to perform the tests. Prospective clinical trials, retrospective studies, and quality assessment and survey reports were identified in the following databases: PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology Proceedings (American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting and Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium) and European Society for Medical Oncology Proceedings (Annals of Oncology European Society for Medical Oncology Congress and Annals of Oncology World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancers). More bona fide standards are needed to address the variety of available test methods, which have different performance characteristics including speed, sensitivity to detect rare mutations, and technical requirements. Refined standards addressing timing of KRAS testing, laboratory performance and accuracy, quality assurance and control, proper tissue collection, and appropriate result reporting would also be greatly beneficial. Pathologists should be aware that the amount of information they need to manage will increase, because future trends and technological advances will enhance the predictive power of diagnostic tests or the scope of the biomarker panels tested routinely across tumor types.

  1. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation

  2. [How to adapt to the requirements of "clinical value-oriented drug innovation" for pharmaceutical research in application process of new traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fang

    2017-05-01

    On August 9, 2015, the State Council promulgated the "Opinions of the State Council on the reform of drug and medical device review and approval system" (Guofa 2015 No. 44), and established the "clinical value-oriented drug innovation" model to encourage the research and development of new drugs. Following that, China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) promulgated the "Notice on several policies for drug registration review and approval" (2015 No. 230 ) on November 11, 2015, clearly specifying that CFDA would "implement one-time approval for clinical trials application of the new drugs, and no longer take a phased declaration, review and approval system; for the new drugs that apply for clinical trials, mainly review the scientific natureof the clinical protocols and the risk control of the new drugs to guarantee the safety of subjects". Accordingly, the evaluation ideas and forms of new drug registration have also been adjusted greatly. For example, issues like the rationality of the drug manufacturing process, whether the scale can reflect the stability of the process, whether the preparation process is sufficient, and whether the choice of dosage form is reasonable are no longer the focus of evaluation before clinical trials. Issues regarding whether the preparation process design is reasonable, whether the effective components can be transferred to the preparation to a maximum extent, whether the process parameters determined in small and middle pilot trials can adapt to the requirements of mass production, no longer act as the reasons for refusing the clinical trials. The corresponding risks shall be borne by the applicant as the subject of liability. The focus in registration evaluation is mainly transferred to how to ensure the consistence of quality between clinical trial samples and the samples already available on market by guaranteeing stable sources of drug raw materials and stable quality of medicines as well as control of the whole preparation

  3. Clinical Perspectives of Urocortin and Related Agents for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone, also known as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, on the cardiovascular system have been intensively researched since its discovery. Moreover, the actions of urocortin (Ucn I on the cardiovascular system have also been intensively scrutinized following the cloning and identification of its receptor, CRF receptor type 2 (CRFR2, in peripheral tissues including the heart. Given the cardioprotective actions of CRFR2 ligands, the clinical potential of not only Ucn I but also Ucn II and III, which were later identified as more specific ligands for CRFR2, has received considerable attention from researchers. In addition, recent work has indicated that CRF type 1 receptor may be also involved in cardioprotection against ischemic/reperfusion injury. Here we provide a historical overview of research on Ucn I and related agents, their effects on the cardiovascular system, and the clinical potential of the use of such agents to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Conduction disorders in the setting of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccaro, Chiara; Napodano, Massimo; Tarantini, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    The presence of periprocedural conduction disorders (CDs) and the need for permanent pacemaker (PPM) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are frequent findings in clinical practice. Notwithstanding, robust information on the prognostic and therapeutic implications of these complications are lacking. The newly occurrence of CD after TAVI seems related to the trauma of the conduction system during procedure. On the contrary, major predictors for PPM implantation after TAVI seem to be the use of CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) and the presence of CD before TAVI. An accurate pre-TAVI screening, careful valve implantation, as well as post-TAVI monitoring must be pursued to prevent avoidable PPM implantation. The aim of this report is to analyze the available data on this field and to propose some practical clinical tips to prevent or to manage these complications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Perceived critical success factors of electronic health record system implementation in a dental clinic context: An organisational management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidek, Yusof Haji; Martins, Jorge Tiago

    2017-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) make health care more efficient. They improve the quality of care by making patients' medical history more accessible. However, little is known about the factors contributing to the successful EHR implementation in dental clinics. This article aims to identify the perceived critical success factors of EHR system implementation in a dental clinic context. We used Grounded Theory to analyse data collected in the context of Brunei's national EHR - the Healthcare Information and Management System (Bru-HIMS). Data analysis followed the stages of open, axial and selective coding. Six perceived critical success factors emerged: usability of the system, emergent behaviours, requirements analysis, training, change management, and project organisation. The study identified a mismatch between end-users and product owner/vendor perspectives. Workflow changes were significant challenges to clinicians' confident use, particularly as the system offered limited modularity and configurability. Recommendations are made for all the parties involved in healthcare information systems implementation to manage the change process by agreeing system goals and functionalities through wider consensual debate, and participated supporting strategies realised through common commitment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. RE-AIM in Clinical, Community, and Corporate Settings: Perspectives, Strategies, and Recommendations to Enhance Public Health Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Harden

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The RE-AIM Framework is a planning and evaluation model that has been used in a variety of settings to address various programmatic, environmental, and policy innovations for improving population health. In addition to the broad application and diverse use of the framework, there are lessons learned and recommendations for the future use of the framework across clinical, community, and corporate settings. The purposes of this article are to: (A provide a brief overview of the RE-AIM Framework and its pragmatic use for planning and evaluation; (B offer recommendations to facilitate the application of RE-AIM in clinical, community, and corporate settings; and (C share perspectives and lessons learned about employing RE-AIM dimensions in the planning, implementation, and evaluation phases within these different settings. In this article, we demonstrate how the RE-AIM concepts and elements within each dimension can be applied by researchers and practitioners in diverse settings, among diverse populations and for diverse health topics.

  7. Clinical implications of aging with HIV infection: perspectives and the future medical care agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; Palella, Frank J

    2017-06-01

    : The increasing number of aging HIV-infected (HIV+) persons comprises a unique population at risk for illnesses and syndromes traditionally associated with the elderly. As a result, similar to the current need for primary care providers to manage chronic noninfectious comorbidities among aging persons with well controlled HIV infection, HIV clinical care will need to routinely involve geriatric medicine in a new HIV-geriatric discipline. The objective of this article is to provide a conceptual framework in which HIV and geriatric management considerations for healthcare professionals caring for HIV+ persons are integrated. The provision of contemporary HIV clinical care extends well beyond the achievement of HIV virologic suppression and antiretroviral therapy management and includes a need for careful characterization of geriatric syndromes based upon functional capacity and extent of disability. Screening for geriatric syndromes is both a multidisciplinary and multidimensional process, designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition, overall mental health, and socio-environmental circumstances. Although routine incorporation of geriatric assessment into clinical trials involving HIV+ persons is feasible, a current challenge is the availability of a consensus clinical definition of frailty or vulnerability. To maximize the efficiency, value, and convenience of outpatient care visits for older HIV+ persons, these visits should include encounters with multiple providers, including primary care clinicians, social workers, and geriatricians. Challenges may exist in the routine provision of these assessments to older HIV+ persons, but clearly such cross-disciplinary collaboration will not only markedly enhance the care of aging HIV+ persons but may also constitute a model of successful healthcare management that can be applied to all aging persons with changing healthcare needs.

  8. Clinical and Cultural Perspectives on Mental Illness in the U.S. Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-09

    psychiatric problems. In the latter instance, an individual may report for another medical condition (e.g., an accidental injury, somatic complaints) and be...to the somatic or physical symptoms which are recognized either by the patient, his supervisor, or his command’s medical officer. Self-referrals...mental patients presented a stereotyped clinical syndrome in which hypochondriasis and paranoia were prominent. It was equally axiomatic that

  9. Pain worlds: towards the integration of a sociocultural perspective of pain in clinical physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killick, Lara; Davenport, Todd E

    2014-12-01

    The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO-ICF) model has been advocated as a model of function to conceptualize physical therapist practice. Among its advances, the WHO-ICF model explicitly recognizes the existence of social factors that may influence patients' and clients' understanding of pain. However, understandings of the historical, social and cultural processes that shape the individual and collective experiences of pain and the therapeutic relationship remain limited. We call for a more intentional and sustained dialogue between clinical practice and sociology to help elucidate the nature, characteristics, complexities and clinical implications of one specific element of the WHO-ICF model, environmental factors. The purpose of this review is to advocate for the continued adoption of a sociological lens to help physical therapists better understand the broader networks of people, ideologies and practices in which people 'in pain' are enmeshed and the historical, geographical and cultural spaces in which they operate. In this review, we discuss existing empirical findings in sociology to introduce the concept of 'pain worlds', which can be applied by physical therapists to help characterize the sociocultural factors identified in the WHO-ICF model. Pain worlds is designed to complement the WHO-ICF model and assist in developing interdisciplinary research agendas that illuminate and examine the role, significance and clinical implications of sociocultural and environmental dimensions of pain. We conclude with a brief set of recommendations for the development of such translational research agendas and call for the integration of pain worlds in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Clinical aspects and perspectives of erlotinib in the treatment of patients with biliary tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with non-resectable biliary tract cancer have a poor prognosis even if treated with systemic chemotherapy. One hope for improving treatment is through molecular biology and the characterization of specific cancer driving alterations followed by the design of targeted drugs...... of patients benefitting from erlotinib. Until this subgroup has been defined, erlotinib has no value to biliary tract cancer patients in the daily clinic....

  11. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia C. Dobler; Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich; Carol L. Armour

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explain...

  12. Role of the clinical microbiology laboratory in infection control - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J

    2001-01-01

    for standardization and documentation of quality. Currently a national standard for infection control is being prepared. It consists of a main standard defining requirements for the management system and 12 subsidiary standards defining requirements for specific areas of infection control. Adoption of the standard...... will undoubtedly require additional resources for infection control at a local level, and some organizational changes may also be needed. Infection control should be maintained as an integrated part of clinical microbiology....

  13. Heterogeneity in recent-onset type 1 diabetes - a clinical trial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Jennifer B; Xu, Ping; Butte, Atul J; Wilson, Darrell M; Beam, Craig A; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) TrialNet is a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial network aimed at altering the disease course of T1D. The purpose of this study is to evaluate age-dependent heterogeneity in clinical, metabolic and immunologic characteristics of individuals with recent-onset T1D, to identify cohorts of interest and to aid in planning of future studies. Eight hundred eighty-three individuals with recent-onset T1D involved in five TrialNet studies were categorized by age as follows: ≥18 years, 12-17 years, 8-12 years and TrialNet studies, including C-peptide >0.2 pmol/mL, varies by age. Lower C-peptide level requirements for younger participants and other aspects of heterogeneity of recent-onset T1D patients, such as white blood cell count abnormalities and body mass index should be considered in the design of future clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Clinical perspective of coronary computed tomographic angiography in diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chung, Namsik

    2011-01-01

    Since a 4-detector row coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) was launched in 1998, CCTA has experienced rapid improvement of imaging qualities with the ongoing evolution of computed tomography (CT) technology. The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA to detect coronary artery stenosis is well established, whereas improvements are still needed to reduce the overestimation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and assess plaque composition. CCTA has been used to evaluate CAD in various clinical settings. For example, CCTA could be an efficient initial triage tool at emergency departments for patients with acute chest pain with low-to-intermediate risk because of its high negative predictive value. In patients with suspected CAD, CCTA could be a cost-effective alternative to myocardial perfusion imaging and exercise electrocardiogram for the initial coronary evaluation of patients with intermediate pre-test likelihood suspected CAD. However, in asymptomatic populations, there is a lack of studies that show an improved prognostic power of CCTA over other modalities. Therefore, the clinical use of CCTA to detect CAD for purposes of risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals should be discouraged. As CT technology evolves, CCTA will provide better quality coronary imaging and non-coronary information with lower radiation exposure. Future studies should cover these ongoing technical improvements and evaluate the prognostic power of CCTA in various clinical settings of CAD in large, well-designed, randomized trials. (author)

  15. Epidemiological and clinical perspectives on irritable bowel syndrome in India, Bangladesh and Malaysia: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Masudur; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2017-10-07

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder, common in clinic and in the community. It has a significant impact on both society and patients' quality of life. The epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of IBS may vary in different geographical regions due to differences in diet, gastrointestinal infection, socio-cultural and psycho-social factors, religious and illness beliefs, symptom perception and reporting. Although previous reviews and consensus reports on IBS in Asia have been published, Asia is quite diverse socio-demographically. In this context, India, Bangladesh and Malaysia share some similarities, including: (1) large proportion of the population living in rural areas; (2) rapid development and associated lifestyle changes in urban areas; and (3) dietary, cultural and religious practices. The present review explores the clinical and epidemiological data on IBS from these three major nations in South and South-East Asia. In-depth review of the literature revealed important differences between IBS in the East, as revealed by studies from these three countries, and the West; these include a predominantly rural profile, differences in bowel habit and symptom profile, raising concern with regards to diagnostic criteria and subtyping of IBS, higher dietary fiber consumption, frequent lactose malabsorption, parasitosis, and possible overlap between post-infectious IBS and tropical sprue. Moreover, the current perception on difference in prevalence of the disorder in these countries, as compared to the West, might be related to variation in survey methods.

  16. Novel perspectives on diagnosis and clinical significance of the post-thrombotic syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sophie; Newall, Fiona; Monagle, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Given the increase in venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in children, the incidence, diagnosis and management of post thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in children is of increasing interest. Current challenges facing clinicians caring for children with VTE is the limited evidence of the long-term outcomes for this cohort; specifically the significance and potential functional impairment associated with PTS. This paper reviews the current evidence to elucidate the risk factors for PTS in children, methods for diagnosis and management of PTS in children (aged less than 18 years). Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO database searches were undertaken using key search terms. Priority areas in need of further research are highlighted. Expert commentary: The two paediatric PTS assessment tools currently in use have been acknowledged to overcall the incidence of mild PTS in children. A PTS tool's ability to distinguish between clinically significant PTS and mild PTS is crucial. Variation in how PTS has been reported in children across the literature suggests that the real incidence of moderate and /or clinically significant PTS in children is unknown. Furthermore, evidence is lacking about the functional impairment experienced by children with clinically significant PTS and what this means for their long-term health.

  17. Imaging of Mucosal Inflammation: Current Technological Developments, Clinical Implications, and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian J. Waldner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various technological developments markedly improved imaging of mucosal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Although technological developments such as high-definition-, chromo-, and autofluorescence-endoscopy led to a more precise and detailed assessment of mucosal inflammation during wide-field endoscopy, probe-based and stationary confocal laser microscopy enabled in vivo real-time microscopic imaging of mucosal surfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Through the use of fluorochromes with specificity against a defined molecular target combined with endoscopic techniques that allow ultrastructural resolution, molecular imaging enables in vivo visualization of single molecules or receptors during endoscopy. Molecular imaging has therefore greatly expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern innovative endoscopy, which include the diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment of disease as well as the prediction of the therapeutic response of individual patients. Furthermore, non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, scintigraphy, and ultrasound provide helpful information as supplement to invasive endoscopic procedures. In this review, we provide an overview on the current status of advanced imaging technologies for the clinical non-invasive and endoscopic evaluation of mucosal inflammation. Furthermore, the value of novel methods such as multiphoton microscopy, optoacoustics, and optical coherence tomography and their possible future implementation into clinical diagnosis and evaluation of mucosal inflammation will be discussed.

  18. Patients' perspectives on psychiatric consultations in the Gender Identity Clinic: implications for patient-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Susan A; McPhillips, Rebecca

    2013-06-01

    To explore transsexual patients' perceptions of communication with psychiatrists in a Gender Identity Clinic and advance understanding of patient centered communication (PCC) in psychiatric, 'gatekeeping' settings. 21 qualitative interviews with a convenience sample of clinic patients. Interviews were coded at a semantic level and subject to an inductive thematic analysis. Patients' perceptions clustered into three themes: (1) aspects of communication that patients described liking; (2) aspects of communication that patients described disliking; and (3) aspects of communication that patients deemed challenging but necessary or useful. Patients described liking or disliking aspects of communication that reflect existing understandings of PCC. However, a striking feature of their accounts was how they were able to rationalize and reflect pragmatically on their negative communication experiences, welcoming doctors' challenges as an opportunity to consider their life-changing decision to transition from their natal gender. In certain clinical settings, current operationalizations of PCC may not apply. Patients' perceptions of communication may be enhanced if an analysis of their experiences formed part of the professional training of doctors, who could be invited to consider the functional specificity of communication across settings and the consequences (both immediate and post hoc) of their communication practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extubation versus tracheostomy in withdrawal of treatment-ethical, clinical, and legal perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay Haresh

    2010-06-01

    The provision of life-sustaining ventilation, such as tracheostomy to critically ill patients, is commonly performed. However, the utilization of tracheostomy or extubation after a withdrawal of treatment decision is debated. There is a dearth of practical information available to aid clinical decision making because withdrawal of treatment is a challenging scenario for all concerned. This is further complicated by medicolegal and ethical considerations. Care of the "hopelessly ill" patient should be based on daily evaluation and comfort making it impossible to fit into general algorithms. Although respect for autonomy is important in healthcare, it is limited for patients in an unconscious state. Beneficence remains the basis for withdrawing treatment in futile cases and underpins the "doctrine of double effect." This article presents a relevant clinical case of hypoxic brain injury where a question of withdrawal of treatment arose and examines the ethical, clinical, and medicolegal considerations inherent in such cases, including beneficence, nonmaleficence, and the "sanctity of life doctrine." In addition, the considerations of prognosis for recovery, patient autonomy, patient quality of life, and patient family involvement, which are central to decision making, are addressed. The varying legal frameworks that exist internationally regarding treatment withdrawal are also described. Good ethics needs sound facts, and despite the lack of legal foundation in several countries, withdrawal of treatment remains practiced, and the principles described within this article aim to aid clinician decision making during such complex and multifaceted end-of-life decisions.

  20. Facilitating and obstructing factors for development of learning in clinical practice: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfmark, A; Wikblad, K

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on what the student nurses found facilitating and obstructing for their learning during clinical practice. Earlier studies of experiences of learning in clinical practice have shown that factors as the possibilities of variations of experiences, the culture of the workplace, and communication between the educational institution and health care facilities are of importance. Less is known about the opportunities which students are given in order to practise the skills that they will be expected to perform as new graduate nurses. The experiences of 47 degree student nurses from two colleges in Sweden were gathered in weekly diaries during their final period of clinical practice. A content analysis technique was used to analyse their diaries. The students emphasized responsibility and independence, opportunities to practise different tasks, and receiving feedback as facilitating factors. Other perceived promoting factors included perceptions of control of the situation and understanding of the 'total picture'. Examples of obstructing factors were the nurses as supervisors not relying on the students, supervision that lacked continuity and lack of opportunities to practise. Perception of their own insufficiency and low self-reliance were drawbacks for some students. Recommended proposals are presented to lecturers and supervising staff concerning organizational and educational changes, and changes of attitudes for elucidating the students' experiences of different facilitating and obstructing factors. Changes may contribute to making easier the students' transition into the nursing profession.

  1. Stem cell transplantation for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: therapeutic potential and perspectives on clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Irene; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Zanetta, Chiara; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurological disease characterized by degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. There are currently no clinically impactful treatments for this disorder. Death occurs 3-5 years after diagnosis, usually due to respiratory failure. ALS pathogenesis seems to involve several pathological mechanisms (i.e., oxidative stress, inflammation, and loss of the glial neurotrophic support, glutamate toxicity) with different contributions from environmental and genetic factors. This multifaceted combination highlights the concept that an effective therapeutic approach should counteract simultaneously different aspects: stem cell therapies are able to maintain or rescue motor neuron function and modulate toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) at the same time, eventually representing the most comprehensive therapeutic approach for ALS. To achieve an effective cell-mediated therapy suitable for clinical applications, several issues must be addressed, including the identification of the most performing cell source, a feasible administration protocol, and the definition of therapeutic mechanisms. The method of cell delivery represents a major issue in developing cell-mediated approaches since the cells, to be effective, need to be spread across the CNS, targeting both lower and upper motor neurons. On the other hand, there is the need to define a strategy that could provide a whole distribution without being too invasive or burdened by side effects. Here, we review the recent advances regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALS with a focus on the minimally invasive strategies that could facilitate an extensive translation to their clinical application.

  2. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Claudia C; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Armour, Carol L

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds) and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk-benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  3. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia C. Dobler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI, focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk–benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  4. Orienteering club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2015-01-01

    Course d'orientation La reprise des courses d’orientation était attendue dans la région puisque près de 150 coureurs ont participé à la première épreuve automnale organisée par le club d’orientation du CERN sur le site de La Faucille. Les circuits ont été remportés par Yann Locatelli du club d’Orientation Coeur de Savoie avec 56 secondes d’avance sur Damien Berguerre du club SOS Sallanches pour le parcours technique long, Marie Vuitton du club CO CERN (membre également de l’Equipe de France Jeune) pour le parcours technique moyen avec presque 4 minutes d’avance sur Jeremy Wichoud du club Lausanne-Jorat, Victor Dannecker pour le circuit technique court devant Alina Niggli, Elliot Dannecker pour le facile moyen et Alice Merat sur le facile court, tous membres du club O’Jura. Les résultats comp...

  5. Oriental cholangiohepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheible, F.W.; Davis, G.B.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla

    1981-01-01

    The recent influx of immigrants from Southeast Asia into the United States has increased the likelihood of encountering unusual diseases heretofore rarely seen in this country. Among these disorders is Oriental cholangiohepatitis, a potentially life-threatening process whose early diagnosis is facilitated by roentgenographic findings. Ultrasonography can also provide useful information, although potential pitfalls in diagnosis should be recognized. (orig.)

  6. Oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheible, F.W.; Davis, G.B.

    1981-07-15

    The recent influx of immigrants from Southeast Asia into the United States has increased the likelihood of encountering unusual diseases heretofore rarely seen in this country. Among these disorders is Oriental cholangiohepatitis, a potentially life-threatening process whose early diagnosis is facilitated by roentgenographic findings. Ultrasonography can also provide useful information, although potential pitfalls in diagnosis should be recognized.

  7. Making sense of a new technology in clinical practice: a qualitative study of patient and physician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Regitze A S; Hansen, Ulla M; Johansen, Clea B; Hansen, Christian S; Jørgensen, Marit E; Fleischer, Jesper; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-09-22

    The number of new technologies for risk assessment available in health care is increasing. These technologies are intended to contribute to both improved care practices and improved patient outcomes. To do so however, there is a need to study how new technologies are understood and interpreted by users in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to explore patient and physician perspectives on the usefulness of a new technology to detect Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) in a specialist diabetes clinic. The technology is a handheld device that measures resting heart rate and conducts three cardiac autonomic reflex tests to evaluate heart rate variability. The study relied on three sources of data: observations of medical consultations where results of the CAN test were reported (n = 8); interviews with patients who had received the CAN test (n = 19); and interviews with physicians who reported results of the CAN test (n = 9). Data were collected at the specialist diabetes clinic between November 2013 and January 2014. Data were analysed using the concept of technological frames which is used to assess how physicians and patients understand and interpret the new technology. Physicians generally found it difficult to communicate test results to patients in terms that patients could understand and to translate results into meaningful implications for the treatment of patients. Results of the study indicate that patients did not recall having done the CAN test nor recall receiving the results. Furthermore, patients were generally unsure about the purpose of the CAN test and the implications of the results. Involving patients and physicians is essential when a new technology is introduced in clinical practice. This particularly includes the interpretation and communication processes related to its use. The integration of a new risk assessment technology into clinical practice can be accompanied by several challenges. It is suggested that

  8. Limbic encephalitis: Clinical spectrum and long-term outcome from a developing country perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Abajirao Jagtap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limbic encephalitis (LE is characterized by rapidly progressive short-term memory loss, psychiatric symptoms and seizures. We describe the clinical spectrum, underlying etiology and long-term follow-up of patients with LE from India. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included patients during the period of January 2009 and December 2011 with the clinical features consistent with LE with one or more of the following: (1 Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI evidence of temporal lobe involvement; (2 cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory abnormalities, or (3 detection of antineuronal antibodies. Patients with metastasis, infection, metabolic and nutritional deficits, stroke, were excluded. Results: There were 16 patients (9 females, mean age of presentation was 36.6 years (range 15-69 years. The mean duration of symptoms before presentation was 11 months (range 5 days-2 years. The most common symptom at presentation was short-term memory impairment in 7 patients followed by seizures in 5 and behavioral changes in three. Nine patients had seizures, 11 had change in behavior, language involvement in eight, cerebellar features in 3 and autonomic dysfunction in two. Four patients had associated malignancy, 3 of four presented with neurological symptoms and on investigations found to be have malignancy. Antineuronal antibody testing was done in 6 of 12 non paraneoplastic and two paraneoplastic patients, one positive for N-methyl-D-aspartate and one for anti-Hu antibody. MRI brain showed typical fluid attenuated inversion recovery or T2 bilateral temporal lobe hyperintensities in 50% of patients. At a mean follow-up of 21 months (3-36 months, 10 patients improved, 4 patients remained same and two patients expired. Conclusion: Early recognition of LE is important based upon clinical, MRI data in the absence of antineuronal surface antibody screen in developing nations. Early institution of immunotherapy will help in improvement in outcome of

  9. Final assessment of nursing students in clinical practice: Perspectives of nursing teachers, students and mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, Kristiina; Johnson, Martin; Isoaho, Hannu; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2017-12-01

    To describe the phenomenon of final assessment of the clinical practice of nursing students and to examine whether there were differences in assessments by the students and their teachers and mentors. Final assessment of students in clinical practice during their education has great importance for ensuring that enough high-quality nursing students are trained, as assessment tasks affect what the nursing student learns during the clinical practice. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional design. The population of this study comprised nursing students (n = 276) and their teachers (n = 108) in five universities of applied sciences in Finland as well as mentors (n = 225) who came from five partner hospitals. A questionnaire developed for this study contained questions about background variables as well as structured questions scored on a four-point scale, which also allowed the respondents to provide additional comments. When comparing the results related to nursing teachers' presence in the final assessment situation, it was found that teachers and mentors evaluated this as being carried out more often than nursing students suggested. Nursing students noted that fair and consistent assessment is carried out more often than nursing teachers thought. Mentors and teachers said that honest and direct criteria-based final assessment was carried out more often than nursing students evaluated. Nursing students and mentors need support from educational institutions and from nursing teachers in order to ensure the completion of a relevant assessment process. The findings of this study highlight an awareness of final assessment process. It is desirable to have a common understanding, for example, of how the assessment should be managed and what the assessment criteria are, as this will ensure a good quality process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Encouraging intrinsic motivation in the clinical setting: teachers' perspectives from the self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, C; Evans, P; Binnie, V; Ledezma, P; Fuentes, F

    2016-05-01

    Self-determination theory postulates that the three basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness have to be satisfied for students to achieve intrinsic motivation and internalisation of autonomous self-regulation towards academic activities. Consequently, the influence of the clinical teaching environment becomes crucial when satisfying these needs, particularly when promoting or diminishing students' intrinsic motivation. The aim of this study was to describe and understand how clinical teachers encourage intrinsic motivation in undergraduate dental students based on the three basic psychological needs described by the self-determination theory. A qualitative case study approach was adopted, and data were collected through semistructured interviews with nine experienced undergraduate clinical teachers of one dental school in Santiago, Chile. Interview transcripts were analysed by two independent reviewers using a general inductive approach. Several themes emerged outlining teaching strategies and behaviours. These themes included the control of external motivators; gradual transference of responsibility; identification and encouragement of personal interests; timely and constructive feedback; delivery of a vicarious learning experience; teamwork, team discussion, and presence of a safe environment, amongst others. Overall, teachers stressed the relevance of empowering, supporting and building a horizontal relationship with students. Our findings regarding dental education expand on the research outcomes from other health professions about how teachers may support students to internalise behaviours. An autonomy-supportive environment may lead students to value and engage in academic activities and eventually foster the use of an autonomy-supportive style to motivate their patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ethics committees and the changed clinical research environment in India in 2016: A perspective!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanish; Sule, Poonam; Bughediwala, Murtuza; Pandya, Vrunda; Sinha, Shilpi

    2017-01-01

    Institutional and Independent Ethics Committees (ECs) have as their primary mission the protection of human research subjects. The Central Drugs Standard Control Organization has in the period 2013-2016 introduced several new regulations and amendments to existing regulations overseeing the conduct of Research in India. Several of these have direct effect on the functioning of the EC from a review, approval, and oversight mechanism. The Ethics Council of Indian Society for Clinical Research conducted a questionnaire survey among EC members to understand the impact of these changes in their functioning. The domains surveyed included awareness about recent changes/amendments and impacts, serious adverse events (SAEs) and compensation, informed consent and audio-video recording, monitoring and auditing of research, and future working of ECs. Seventy-nine percent of ECs are of the opinion that the new regulations/guidelines will add to their existing burden in the process of review and approval, providing subject protection and research oversight. Even though 68% of ECs stated that they are comfortable with SAE assessment and compensation determination, they state that there is variability in calculation of compensation amount using the formulae. An overwhelming majority (80%) of ECs stated that they were not in favor of centralized EC for providing review, approval, and oversight of clinical studies. Ethics Committees act as local regulator for clinical trials at sites providing Human Subject protection. The survey captures the contemporary issues faced by the ECs and also raises important questions on the ease of doing research, oversight of approved research, and administrative burden on the EC. Recent changes in regulations have on the one hand empowered Ethics committees but brought in challenges in the way that they provide oversight and monitor research carried out at the site.

  12. Role of microRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callegari E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Callegari,1 Bahaeldin K Elamin,1,2 Silvia Sabbioni,3,5 Laura Gramantieri,4 Massimo Negrini1,5 1Dipartimento di Morfologia, Chirurgia e Medicina Sperimentale, Università di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; 2Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Khartoum, Sudan; 3Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e Biotecnologie, Università di Ferrara, Ferrara, 4Centro di Ricerca Biomedica Applicata e Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Policlinico S Orsola-Malpighi e Università di Bologna, Bologna, 5Tecnopolo "Laboratorio per le Tecnologie delle Terapie Avanzate", Università di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most deadly tumors, and current treatments for the disease are often ineffective. The discovery of the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs in hepatocarcinogenesis represents an important area of investigation for the development of their clinical applications. These molecules may act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors by directly or indirectly controlling the expression of key proteins involved in cancer-associated pathways. On the clinical side, because of their tumor-specific expression and stability in tissues and in the circulation, miRNAs have been proposed as novel diagnostic tools for classification and prognostic stratification of HCC. In recent years, the therapeutic potential of miRNAs has been demonstrated in various preclinical studies. Anti-miRNA oligonucleotides and miRNA mimics have been found to have antitumor activity. Moreover, by exploiting tumor-specific expression of miRNA, efforts have been aimed at improving targeting of tumor cells by replicative oncolytic viruses while sparing normal cells. These areas are expected to be explored further in the upcoming years to assess the clinical value of miRNA-based approaches in HCC and cancer in general. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, microRNA, micromarkers, oncolytic viruses

  13. [What and how to evaluate clinical-surgical competence. The resident and staff surgeon perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Sánchez, Carlos Roberto; Chávez-Vizcarra, Paola; Barragán-Ávila, María Cristina; Parra-Acosta, Haydee; Herrera-Mendoza, Renzo Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation is a means for significant and rigorous improvement of the educational process. Therefore, competence evaluation should allow assessing the complex activity of medical care, as well as improving the training process. This is the case in the evaluation process of clinical-surgical competences. A cross-sectional study was designed to measure knowledge about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences for the General Surgery residency program at the Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH). A 55-item questionnaire divided into six sections was used (perception, planning, practice, function, instruments and strategies, and overall evaluation), with a six level Likert scale, performing a descriptive, correlation and comparative analysis, with a significance level of 0.001. In both groups perception of evaluation was considered as a further qualification. As regards tools, the best known was the written examination. As regards function, evaluation was considered as a further administrative requirement. In the correlation analysis, evaluation was perceived as qualification and was significantly associated with measurement, assessment and accreditation. In the comparative analysis between residents and staff surgeons, a significant difference was found as regards the perception of the evaluation as a measurement of knowledge (Student t test: p=0.04). The results provide information about the concept we have about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences, considering it as a measure of learning achievement for a socially required certification. There is confusion as regards the perception of evaluation, its function, goals and scopes as benefit for those evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunoliposomes in clinical oncology: State of the art and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, María; Zalba, Sara; Garrido, María J

    2018-04-10

    Liposomal formulations entrapping a vast number of molecules have improved cancer therapies overcoming certain pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic limitations, many of which are associated with tumor characteristics. In this context, immunoliposomes represent a new strategy that has been widely investigated in preclinical cancer models with promising results, although few have reached the stage of clinical trials. This contrasts with the emerging clinical application of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This formulation allows the conjugation of different mAbs or antibody derivatives, such as monovalent variable fragments Fab', to the polymers covering the surface of liposomes. The combination of this targeting strategy together with drug encapsulation in a single formulation may contribute to enhance the efficacy of these associated agents, reducing their toxicities. In this paper we will consider how factors such as particle size, lipid composition and charge, lipid-polymer conjugation, method of production and type of ligand for liposome coupling influence the efficacy of these formulations. Furthermore, the high inter-individual variability in the tumor microenvironment, as well as the poor experimental designs for the PK characterization of liposomes, make the establishment of the relationship between plasma or tumor concentrations and efficacy difficult. Thus, adequate dosing regimens and patient stratification regarding the target expression may contribute to enhance the possibility of incorporating these immunoliposomes into the therapeutic arsenal for cancer treatments. All these issues will be briefly dealt with here, together with a section showing the state of the art of those targeted liposomes that are coming up for testing in clinical trials. Finally, some insights into future developments such as the combination of specificity and controlled release, based on the application of different stimuli, for the manipulation of stability and cargo release

  15. Challenges of stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T-J; Al-Habib, Mey; Gauthier, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    There are two types of approaches to regenerate tissues: cell-based and cell-free. The former approach is to introduce exogenous cells into the host to regenerate tissues, and the latter is to use materials other than cells in an attempt to regenerate tissues. There has been a significant advancement in stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration research in the past few years. Studies in small and large animals have demonstrated that pulp/dentin-like tissues can be regenerated partially or completely in the root canal space with apical openings of 0.7-3.0 mm using dental pulp stem cells, including stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and subpopulations of pulp stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) have also been shown to regenerate pulp-like tissue. In contrast, the cell-free approach has not produced convincing evidence on pulp regeneration. However, one crucial concept has not been considered nor defined in the field of pulp/dentin regeneration and that is the critical size defect of dentin and pulp. Without such consideration and definition, it is difficult to predict or anticipate the extent of cell-free pulp regeneration that would occur. By reasoning, cell-free therapy is unlikely to regenerate an organ/tissue after total loss. Similarly, after a total loss of pulp, it is unlikely to regenerate without using exogenously introduced cells. A cell homing approach may provide a limited amount of tissue regeneration. Although stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration has shown great promise, clinical trials are difficult to launch at present. This article will address several issues that challenge and hinder the clinical applications of pulp/dentin regeneration which need to be overcome before stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration can occur in the clinic.

  16. [Early clinical trials in paediatric oncology in Spain: a nationwide perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Francisco; Gallego, Soledad; Cañete, Adela; Mora, Jaume; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Cruz, Ofelia; Fernández, José María; Rives, Susana; Berlanga, Pablo; Hladun, Raquel; Juan Ribelles, Antonio; Madero, Luis; Ramírez, Manuel; Fernández Delgado, Rafael; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio; Mata, Cristina; Llort, Anna; Martín Broto, Javier; Cela, María Elena; Ramírez, Gema; Sábado, Constantino; Acha, Tomás; Astigarraga, Itziar; Sastre, Ana; Muñoz, Ascensión; Guibelalde, Mercedes; Moreno, Lucas

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death between the first year of life and adolescence, and some types of diseases are still a major challenge in terms of cure. There is, therefore, a major need for new drugs. Recent findings in cancer biology open the door to the development of targeted therapies against individual molecular changes, as well as immunotherapy. Promising results in adult anti-cancer drug development have not yet been translated into paediatric clinical practice. A report is presented on the activity in early paediatric oncology trials (phase I-II) in Spain. All members of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology Oncology (SEHOP) were contacted in order to identify early clinical trials in paediatric cancer opened between 2005 and 2015. A total of 30 trials had been opened in this period: 21 (70%) in solid tumours, and 9 (30%) in malignant haemopathies. A total of 212 patients have been enrolled. The majority was industry sponsored (53%). Since 2010, four centres have joined the international consortium of Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC), which has as its aim to develop novel therapies for paediatric tumours. A significant number of new studies have opened since 2010, improving the treatment opportunities for our children. Results of recently closed trials show the contribution of Spanish investigators, the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, and their benefits. The activity in clinical trials has increased in the years analysed. The SEHOP is committed to develop and participate in collaborative academic trials, in order to help in the advancement and optimisation of existing therapies in paediatric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Perspectives on clinical use of bioimpedance in hemodialysis: focus group interviews with renal care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Jenny; Henriksson, Catrin; Lindberg, Magnus; Furuland, Hans

    2018-05-23

    Inadequate volume control may be a main contributor to poor survival and high mortality in hemodialysis patients. Bioimpedance measurement has the potential to improve fluid management, but several dialysis centers lack an agreed fluid management policy, and the method has not yet been implemented. Our aim was to identify renal care professionals' perceived barriers and facilitators for use of bioimpedance in clinical practice. Qualitative data were collected through four focus group interviews with 24 renal care professionals: dieticians, nephrologists and nurses, recruited voluntarily from a nation-wide selection of hemodialysis centers, having access to a bioimpedance-device. The participants were connected to each other and a moderator via equipment for telemedicine and the sessions were recorded. The interviews were semi-structured, focusing on the participants' perceptions of use of bioimpedance in clinical practice. Thematic content analysis was performed in consecutive steps, and data were extracted by employing an inductive, interactive, comparative process. Several barriers and facilitators to the use of bioimpedance in clinical practice were identified, and a multilevel approach to examining barriers and incentives for change was found to be applicable to the ideas and categories that arose from the data. The determinants were categorized on five levels, and the different themes of the levels illustrated with quotations from the focus groups participants. Determinants for use of bioimpedance were identified on five levels: 1) the innovation itself, 2) the individual professional, 3) the patient, 4) the social context and 5) the organizational context. Barriers were identified in the areas of credibility, awareness, knowledge, self-efficacy, care processes, organizational structures and regulations. Facilitators were identified in the areas of the innovation's attractiveness, advantages in practice, and collaboration. Motivation, team processes and

  18. [The profile of Israeli travelers to developing countries: perspectives of a travel clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienlauf, Shmuel; Meltzer, Eyal; Leshem, Eyal; Rendi-Wagner, Pamela; Schwartz, Eli

    2010-09-01

    The number of Israeli travelers is increasing, including the number of travelers to developing countries. This study aimed to characterize the profile of Israeli travelers to developing countries. Data regarding demographics, travel destinations, trip duration and the purpose of travel were collected on travelers attending the pre-travel clinic at the Sheba Medical Center during a period of 9 years. Between the dates 1/1/1999 and 31/12/2007, 42,771 travelers presented for consultation at the Sheba Medical Center pre-travel clinic. The average age was 30.8 +/- 13.4 years and 54% of the travelers were males. The female proportion increased from 42% in 1999 to 49% in 2006. There was a steady increase in the number of travelers attending our clinic, except in 2003 (coinciding with the SARS epidemic). Post-army backpackers (20-25 year-old age group) were only 43% of the travelers. Children (60 years) comprised 4.4% and 4.6% of the travelers, respectively. The favorite destinations were Asia (55%), followed by Latin America (27%) and Africa (13%). The distribution of travel destinations varied significantly during the study period. Of note is the sharp decline in travel to Africa following the terrorist attack in Mombassa, Kenya (November 2002). The median trip duration changed during the study period, from 30 to 45 days, between 1999-2004 and 2005-2007 respectively. The majority (87%) of voyagers traveled for pleasure, 6% went for business, and 7% were representatives of governmental organizations. This study found an increasing diversity in the traveler population (more women, more children and older travelers) and more diversity in travel destinations. Disease outbreaks and terrorist attacks had transient negative impacts on the number of travelers.

  19. CURRENT PERSPECTIVES OF POTTER'S GLOBAL BIOETHICS AS A BRIDGE BETWEEN CLINICAL (PERSONALIZED) AND PUBLIC HEALTH ETHICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turina, Iva Sorta-Bilajac; Brkljacić, Morana; Grgas-Bile, Cecilija; Gajski, Domagoj; Racz, Aleksandar; Cengić, Tomislav

    2015-12-01

    In the context of modern scientific and technological developments in biomedicine and health care, and the potential consequences of their application on humans and the environment, Potter's global bioethics concept resurfaces. By actualizing Potter's original thoughts on individual bioethical issues, the universality of two of his books, which today represent the backbone of the world bioethical literature, "Bioethics--Bridge to the Future" and "Global Bioethics: Building on the Leopold Legacy", is emphasized. Potter's global bioethics today can legitimately be viewed as a bridge between clinical personalized ethics on the one hand and ethics of public health on the other.

  20. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    fractures were the most common injury. Thorax computed tomography was significantly superior to chest radiography in detecting pneumothorax , hemothorax and lung contusion. Eightyone life threatening lesions were detected and 50 (61%; pneumothorax 13, hemothorax 24, lung contusion 9,and pneumomediastinum 4 of these lesions could not be detected with plain chest radiography. The clinical management [in 15 patients (30%], and the forensic assesment was changed [in 14 (28%] patients were changed.  Conclusion:We concluded that using Computed Tomography of the thorax in thoracic travmas prive meticulous assesment in management of patients and forens icissues.

  1. Reflective journal writing: how it promotes reflective thinking in clinical nursing education: a students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J; Chabeli, M M

    2002-08-01

    According to the outcomes-based education and training system of education (OBET) in the country and the South African Nursing Council, education should focus on "creating" reflective learners and practitioners. This article seeks to determine the effectiveness of reflective journal writing in promoting the reflective thinking of learners in clinical nursing education and to validate the guidelines described in a bigger study on how to facilitate reflective thinking using reflective journal writing. A qualitative, contextual, explorative, descriptive research design was used to determine the learners' perceptions on whether reflective journal writing did promote their higher-level thinking skills during the six-month placement in a psychiatric clinical practice using the reflective diaries. From a population of seventeen fourth-year students, six volunteered to participate in a focus group interview. The data was analysed by means of the descriptive method of open coding of Tesch (in Creswell, 1994:154-156). Positive and negative results from the perceptions of the participants and a literature review served as a basis for deducing and describing guidelines for the effective use of reflective journal writing in promoting reflective thinking in clinical nursing education. The positive perception was the development of problem-solving skills attained through reflection by using analytical critical thinking, synthesis and the evaluation of situations. Self-evaluation leading to intellectual growth and self-awareness indicated a positive perception. Negative perceptions were that reflective journal writing is time consuming, content based with a lack of clear expectations from the teacher, and distrust of students about the information written. Guba's model of ensuring trustworthiness in qualitative research as described in Krefting (1991:215-222) was employed. It is concluded that reflective journal writing in clinical nursing education does promote reflective

  2. [Correlations between the dimensions of clinical learning environments from the perspective of medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui Sutton, Alicia; Flores Hernández, Fernando; Gutiérrez Barreto, Samuel; Castro Ramírez, Senyasen; Lavalle Montalvo, Carlos; Vilar Puig, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish correlations between the dimensions of clinical learning environments (ACA) considering variables like: health institutions, hospital offices, specialty, and year of residency. 4,189 doctors were evaluated through an online survey in 2012. The results revealed that the dimension of "educational processes" correlated best with others; specialties with the best ACA from the view of the medical residents were Internal Medicine and Surgery; and the third year residents had less favorable perceptions of their ACA. The pursuance of the academic program is relevant to physicians in training and teachers play an important role in the educational process.

  3. Making Sense of Missense in the Lynch Syndrome: The Clinical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T.; Jascur, Thomas; Lanspa, Stephen; Boland, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair system provides critical genetic housekeeping, and its failure is associated with tumorigenesis. Through distinct domains on the DNA mismatch repair proteins, the system recognizes and repairs errors occurring during DNA synthesis, but signals apoptosis when the DNA damage cannot be repaired. Certain missense mutations in the mismatch repair genes can selectively alter just one of these functions. This impacts the clinical features of tumors associated with defective DNA mismatch repair activity. New work reported by Xie et al. in this issue of the journal (beginning on page XXX) adds to the understanding of DNA mismatch repair. PMID:20978117

  4. Postconditioning hormesis put in perspective: an overview of experimental and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegant, F A C; Prins, H A B; Van Wijk, R

    2011-01-01

    A beneficial effect of applying mild stress to cells or organisms, that were initially exposed to a high dose of stress, has been referred to as 'postconditioning hormesis'. The initial high dose of stress activates intrinsic self-recovery mechanisms. Modulation of these endogenous adaptation strategies by administration of a subsequent low dose of stress can confer effects that are beneficial to the biological system. Owing to its potentially therapeutic applications, postconditioning hormesis is subject to research in various scientific disciplines. This paper presents an overview of the dynamics of postconditioning hormesis and illustrates this phenomenon with a number of examples in experimental and clinical research.

  5. "You Get Beautiful Teeth Down There": Racial/Ethnic Minority Older Adults' Perspectives on Care at Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E; Schenkel, Andrew B; Birenz, Shirley; Estrada, Ivette; Metcalf, Sara S; Wolff, Mark S

    2017-11-01

    To help eliminate reported racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequities in oral health care, listening to the perspectives of racial/ethnic minority older adults on their experiences with dental school clinics is needed. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of African American, Puerto Rican, and Dominican older adults who attend senior centers in upper Manhattan, New York City, regarding the care received at dental school clinics. Focus groups were conducted from 2013 to 2015 with 194 racial/ethnic minority men and women aged 50 years and older living in upper Manhattan. All of the 24 focus group sessions were digitally audiorecorded and transcribed for analysis. Groups conducted in Spanish were transcribed first in Spanish and then translated into English. Analysis of the transcripts was conducted using thematic content analysis. Seven subthemes were manifest in the data related to these adults' positive experiences with dental school clinics: excellent outcomes and dentists, painless and safe treatment, affordable care, honest and reputable, benefits of student training, accepting and helpful, and recommended by family and friends. Negative experiences centered around four subthemes: multiple visits required for treatment, loss of interpersonal communication due to use of technology, inconvenient location, and perceived stigma with Medicaid. This study provided novel evidence of the largely positive experiences with dental schools of racial/ethnic minority senior center attendees. Interventions targeted at the organization and provider level, including organizational motivation, resources, staff attributes, climate, and teamwork plus payment programs and services, insurance and affordability, and provider- and system-level supports, may improve health care processes and patient experiences of care.

  6. Heterogeneity in Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes – A Clinical Trial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Jennifer B.; Xu, Ping; Butte, Atul J.; Wilson, Darrell M.; Beam, Craig A.; Greenbaum, Carla J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an NIH-sponsored clinical trial network aimed at altering the disease course of type 1 diabetes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate age-dependent heterogeneity in clinical, metabolic, and immunologic characteristics of individuals with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D), to identify cohorts of interest and to aid in planning of future studies. Methods 883 individuals with recent onset T1D involved in five TrialNet studies were categorized by age as: ≥ 18, age 12-17, ages 8-12, and age TrialNet studies, including C-peptide >0.2 pmol/ml, varies by age. Lower C-peptide level requirements for younger participants should be considered in the design of future trials. These data also highlight subgroups of type 1 diabetes patients, such as those with abnormal WBC or who are overweight, which allow for targeted studies of etiopathology and interventions. PMID:25689602

  7. Platelet indices as markers of platelet turnover and aggregation: pathophysiological interpretation, clinical impact, perspectives in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinova L.I.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review is to characterize existing in open access bibliographical databases such as eLibrary and PubMed evidence on clinical impact of morphometric platelet indices as markers of platelet aggregation ability and turnover as a methodology and theoretical framework of further investigation. Studies results were pooled from open access bibliographic databases (eLibrary, and PubMed according to modified PRISMA algorithm. Relevant studies were identified by systematic searches of the original studies published during the last 10 years in the Russian and English languages. Results of 96 original studies in accordance with inclusion criteria were published during the last 10 years in scientific journals indexed in eLibrary, and PubMed. The majority of publications (64.58% consist of evidence pro diagnostic and prognostic significance of platelet indices. Studies demonstrating the significance of platelet indices as possible risk markers of thrombotic events in cardiovascular patients were predominating among "pro" publications. In 15.63% published results contradict concept of platelet indices usefulness as diagnostic and prognostic markers in clinical practice. Morphometric platelet indices can be considered as useful diagnostic and prognostic markers of thrombotic events in cardiovascular patients. Existing gaps in evidence suggest the need of further investigations.

  8. Repetitive concussions in adolescent athletes – translating clinical and experimental research into perspectives on rehabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgette D Semple

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sports-related concussions are particularly common during adolescence, a time when even mild brain injuries may disrupt ongoing brain maturation and result in long-term complications. A recent focus on the consequences of repetitive concussions amongst professional athletes has prompted the development of several new experimental models in rodents, as well as the revision of guidelines for best management of sports concussions. Here, we consider the utility of rodent models to understand the functional consequences and pathobiology of concussions in the developing brain, identifying the unique behavioral and pathological signatures of concussive brain injuries. The impact of repetitive concussions on behavioral consequences and injury progression is also addressed. In particular, we focus on the epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence underlying current recommendations for physical and cognitive rest after concussion, and highlight key areas in which further research is needed. Lastly, we consider how best to promote recovery after injury, recognizing that optimally-timed, activity-based rehabilitative strategies may hold promise for the adolescent athlete who has sustained single or repetitive concussions. The purpose of this review is to inform the clinical research community as it strives to develop and optimize evidence-based guidelines for the concussed adolescent, in terms of both acute and long-term management.

  9. The Immunology of Neuromyelitis Optica-Current Knowledge, Clinical Implications, Controversies and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiak-Zatonska, Michalina; Kalinowska-Lyszczarz, Alicja; Michalak, Slawomir; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2016-03-02

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with typical clinical manifestations of optic neuritis and acute transverse myelitis attacks. Previously believed to be a variant of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is now considered an independent disorder which needs to be differentiated from MS. The discovery of autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4-IgGs) changed our understanding of NMO immunopathogenesis and revolutionized the diagnostic process. AQP4-IgG is currently regarded as a specific biomarker of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOsd) and a key factor in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, AQP4-IgG seronegativity in 10%-25% of NMO patients suggests that there are several other factors involved in NMO immunopathogenesis, i.e., autoantibodies against aquaporin-1 (AQP1-Abs) and antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgGs). This manuscript reviews current knowledge about NMO immunopathogenesis, pointing out the controversial issues and showing potential directions for future research. Further efforts should be made to broaden our knowledge of NMO immunology which could have important implications for clinical practice, including the use of potential novel biomarkers to facilitate an early and accurate diagnosis, and modern treatment strategies improving long-term outcome of NMO patients.

  10. The Immunology of Neuromyelitis Optica—Current Knowledge, Clinical Implications, Controversies and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiak-Zatonska, Michalina; Kalinowska-Lyszczarz, Alicja; Michalak, Slawomir; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) with typical clinical manifestations of optic neuritis and acute transverse myelitis attacks. Previously believed to be a variant of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is now considered an independent disorder which needs to be differentiated from MS. The discovery of autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4-IgGs) changed our understanding of NMO immunopathogenesis and revolutionized the diagnostic process. AQP4-IgG is currently regarded as a specific biomarker of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOsd) and a key factor in its pathogenesis. Nevertheless, AQP4-IgG seronegativity in 10%–25% of NMO patients suggests that there are several other factors involved in NMO immunopathogenesis, i.e., autoantibodies against aquaporin-1 (AQP1-Abs) and antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgGs). This manuscript reviews current knowledge about NMO immunopathogenesis, pointing out the controversial issues and showing potential directions for future research. Further efforts should be made to broaden our knowledge of NMO immunology which could have important implications for clinical practice, including the use of potential novel biomarkers to facilitate an early and accurate diagnosis, and modern treatment strategies improving long-term outcome of NMO patients. PMID:26950113

  11. Medical student perspective: working toward specific and actionable clinical clerkship feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Haley A; Derman, Peter B; Clement, R Carter

    2012-01-01

    Feedback on the wards is an important component of medical student education. Medical schools have incorporated formalized feedback mechanisms such as clinical encounter cards and standardized patient encounters into clinical curricula. However, the system could be further improved as medical students frequently feel uncomfortable requesting feedback, and are often dissatisfied with the quality of the feedback they receive. This article explores the shortcomings of the existing medical student feedback system and examines the relevant literature in an effort to shed light on areas in which the system can be enhanced. The discussion focuses on resident-provided feedback but is broadly applicable to delivering feedback in general. A review of the organizational psychology and business administration literature on fostering effective feedback was performed. These insights were then applied to the setting of medical education. Providing effective feedback requires training and forethought. Feedback itself should be specific and actionable. Utilizing these strategies will help medical students and educators get the most out of existing feedback systems.

  12. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C.; German, Massiell L.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a “fighting spirit” in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases. PMID:26287927

  13. Patient attitudes about the clinical use of placebo: qualitative perspectives from a telephone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Robin; Chandros Hull, Sara; Colloca, Luana

    2016-04-04

    To examine qualitative responses regarding the use of placebo treatments in medical care in a sample of US patients.Survey studies suggest a deliberate clinical use of placebos by physicians, and prior research has found that although most US patients find placebo use acceptable, the rationale for these beliefs is largely unknown. Members of the Outpatient Clinic at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California interviewed research participants who had been seen for a chronic health problem at least once in the prior 6 months. 853 women (61%) and men, white (58%) and non-white participants aged 18-75 years. Qualitative responses on perceptions of placebo use from one-time telephone surveys were analysed for common themes and associations with demographic variables. Prior results indicated that a majority of respondents felt it acceptable for doctors to recommend placebo treatments. Our study found that a lack of harm (n=291, 46.1%) and potential benefit (n=250, 39.6%) were the most common themes to justify acceptability of placebo use. Responses citing potential benefit were associated with higher education (r=0.787; pright to know and power of the mind. Older age was associated with likelihood to cite overall physician, as opposed to treatment, related themes (r=0.753; prights-and-licensing/

  14. Resistance to EGFR inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer: Clinical management and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Chiara; Baldessari, Cinzia; Napolitano, Martina; Orsi, Giulia; Grizzi, Giulia; Bertolini, Federica; Barbieri, Fausto; Cascinu, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    In the last few years, the development of targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) expressing oncogenic driver mutations (e.g. EGFR) has changed the clinical management and the survival outcomes of this specific minority of patients. Several phase III trials demonstrated the superiority of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) over chemotherapy in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients. However, in the vast majority of cases EGFR TKIs lose their clinical activity within 8-12 months. Many genetic aberrations have been described as possible mechanisms of EGFR TKIs acquired resistance and can be clustered in four main sub-groups: 1. Development of secondary EGFR mutations; 2. Activation of parallel signaling pathways; 3. Histological transformation; 4. Activation of downstream signaling pathways. In this review we will describe the molecular alterations underlying each of these EGFR TKIs resistance mechanisms, focusing on the currently available and future therapeutic strategies to overcome these phenomena. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical development of platinum complexes in cancer therapy: an historical perspective and an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, D; Canetta, R

    1998-09-01

    The vast amount of basic research on platinum coordination complexes has produced, over the past 25 years, several thousand new molecules for preclinical screening and 28 compounds which have entered clinical development. The goals of these research activities have been to identify compounds with superior efficacy, reduced toxicity, lack of cross-resistance or improved pharmacological characteristics as compared with the parent compound, cisplatin. After the remarkable therapeutic effects of cisplatin had been established, only a few other platinum compounds succeeded in reaching general availability. Whereas carboplatin is an analogue with an improved therapeutic index (mostly driven by reduced organ toxicity) over that of cisplatin, new compounds clearly more active than or non-cross-resistant with cisplatin have not yet been identified. The platinum analogues that remain under investigation are focusing on expanding the utilisation of platinum therapy to tumour types not usually treated with, or responsive to, cisplatin or carboplatin. In addition, novel routes of administration constitute another avenue of research. The clinical development of platinum coordination complexes, with emphasis on those compounds still under active development, is reviewed.

  16. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C; German, Massiell L; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Bruggers, Carol S

    2015-10-01

    Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a "fighting spirit" in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases.

  17. Repetitive Concussions in Adolescent Athletes – Translating Clinical and Experimental Research into Perspectives on Rehabilitation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Lee, Sangmi; Sadjadi, Raha; Fritz, Nora; Carlson, Jaclyn; Griep, Carrie; Ho, Vanessa; Jang, Patrice; Lamb, Annick; Popolizio, Beth; Saini, Sonia; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Prins, Mayumi L.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Basso, D. Michele; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are particularly common during adolescence, a time when even mild brain injuries may disrupt ongoing brain maturation and result in long-term complications. A recent focus on the consequences of repetitive concussions among professional athletes has prompted the development of several new experimental models in rodents, as well as the revision of guidelines for best management of sports concussions. Here, we consider the utility of rodent models to understand the functional consequences and pathobiology of concussions in the developing brain, identifying the unique behavioral and pathological signatures of concussive brain injuries. The impact of repetitive concussions on behavioral consequences and injury progression is also addressed. In particular, we focus on the epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence underlying current recommendations for physical and cognitive rest after concussion, and highlight key areas in which further research is needed. Lastly, we consider how best to promote recovery after injury, recognizing that optimally timed, activity-based rehabilitative strategies may hold promise for the adolescent athlete who has sustained single or repetitive concussions. The purpose of this review is to inform the clinical research community as it strives to develop and optimize evidence-based guidelines for the concussed adolescent, in terms of both acute and long-term management. PMID:25883586

  18. Medical education and cognitive continuum theory: an alternative perspective on medical problem solving and clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, Eugène J F M

    2013-08-01

    Recently, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making have been viewed as products of two separate systems: "System 1," the unconscious, intuitive, or nonanalytic system, and "System 2," the conscious, analytic, or reflective system. This view has penetrated the medical education literature, yet the idea of two independent dichotomous cognitive systems is not entirely without problems.This article outlines the difficulties of this "two-system view" and presents an alternative, developed by K.R. Hammond and colleagues, called cognitive continuum theory (CCT). CCT is featured by three key assumptions. First, human reasoning, problem solving, and decision making can be arranged on a cognitive continuum, with pure intuition at one end, pure analysis at the other, and a large middle ground called "quasirationality." Second, the nature and requirements of the cognitive task, as perceived by the person performing the task, determine to a large extent whether a task will be approached more intuitively or more analytically. Third, for optimal task performance, this approach needs to match the cognitive properties and requirements of the task. Finally, the author makes a case that CCT is better able than a two-system view to describe medical problem solving and clinical reasoning and that it provides clear clues for how to organize training in clinical reasoning.

  19. Antibodies to Phosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Complex in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Analytical and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K; Willis, Rohan; Harris, E Nigel; Branch, Ware D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy-related morbidity accompanied by persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Current laboratory criteria for APS classification recommend testing for lupus anticoagulant as well as IgG and IgM anticardiolipin, and beta-2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies. However, there appears to be a subset of patients with classical APS manifestations who test negative for the recommended criteria aPL tests. While acknowledging that such patients may have clinical features that are not of an autoimmune etiology, experts also speculate that these "seronegative" patients may test negative for relevant autoantibodies as a result of a lack of harmonization and/or standardization. Alternatively, they may have aPL that target other antigens involved in the pathogenesis of APS. In the latter, autoantibodies that recognize a phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (PS/PT) complex have been reported to be associated with APS and may have diagnostic relevance. This review highlights analytical and clinical attributes associated with PS/PT antibodies, taking into consideration the performance characteristics of criteria aPL tests in APS with specific recommendations for harmonization and standardization efforts. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. When Does Salespeople’s Customer Orientation Lead to Customer Loyalty? : The Differential Effects of Relational and Functional Customer Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Homburg, Christian; Müller, Michael; Klarmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Is a customer orientation universally effective for salespeople? Or does its effectiveness depend on the selling situation? While previous research has largely neglected this question, this study investigates contextual influences on the link between customer-oriented behaviors and customer loyalty. To do so, it takes a role theory perspective on salesperson customer orientation by distinguishing functional customer orientation and relational customer orientation. It then investigates which t...

  1. European perspective on the management of rheumatoid arthritis: clinical utility of tofacitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalec P

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paweł Kawalec,1 Katarzyna Śladowska,2 Iwona Malinowska-Lipień,3 Tomasz Brzostek,3 Maria Kózka4 1Drug Management Department, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 2Department of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biology and Earth Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; 3Department of Internal and Community Nursing, Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 4Department of Clinical Nursing, Institute of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland Abstract: Xeljanz® (tofacitinib is an oral small-molecule inhibitor that reversibly inhibits Janus-activated kinase (JAK-dependent cytokine signaling, thus reducing inflammation. As a result of these mechanisms, effects on the immune system such as a moderate decrease in the total lymphocyte count, a dose-dependent decrease in natural killer (NK cell count, and an increase in B-cell count have been observed. Therefore, tofacitinib provides an innovative approach to modulating the immune and inflammatory responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which is especially important in individuals who do not respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or show a loss of response over time. The aim of this article was to review studies on the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of tofacitinib in patients with RA. Tofacitinib has been shown to reduce symptoms of RA and improve the quality of life in the analyzed groups of patients. Moreover, it showed high efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in Phase III randomized clinical trials on RA and was the first JAK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA in the RA therapy, thus providing a useful alternative

  2. Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) as a Culturally Relevant Pedagogy (CRP) in Qatar: a Perspective from Grade 10 Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treagust, David F.; Qureshi, Sheila S.; Vishnumolakala, Venkat Rao; Ojeil, Joseph; Mocerino, Mauro; Southam, Daniel C.

    2018-04-01

    Educational reforms in Qatar have seen the implementation of inquiry-based learning and other student-centred pedagogies. However, there have been few efforts to investigate how these adopted western pedagogies are aligned with the high context culture of Qatar. The study presented in this article highlights the implementation of a student-centred intervention called Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in selected independent Arabic government schools in Qatar. The study followed a theoretical framework composed of culturally relevant pedagogical practice and social constructivism in teaching and learning. A mixed method research design involving experimental and comparison groups was utilised. Carefully structured learning materials when implemented systematically in a POGIL intervention helped Grade 10 science students improve their perceptions of chemistry learning measured from pre- and post-tests as measured by the What Is Happening In this Class (WIHIC) questionnaire and school-administered achievement test. The study further provided school-based mentoring and professional development opportunities for teachers in the region. Significantly, POGIL was found to be adaptable in the Arabic context.

  3. Life cycle inventory analysis of regenerative thermal oxidation of air emissions from oriented strand board facilities in Minnesota - a perspective of global climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, W.J. [Potlatch Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Life cycle inventory analysis has been applied to the prospective operation of regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology at oriented strand board plants at Bemidji (Line 1) and Cook, Minnesota. The net system destruction of VOC`s and carbon monoxide, and at Cook a small quantity of particulate, has a very high environmental price in terms of energy and water use, global warming potential, sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions, solids discharged to water, and solid waste deposited in landfills. The benefit of VOC destruction is identified as minor in terms of ground level ozone at best and possibly slightly detrimental. Recognition of environmental tradeoffs associated with proposed system changes is critical to sound decision-making. There are more conventional ways to address carbon monoxide emissions than combustion in RTO`s. In an environment in which global warming is a concern, fuel supplemental combustion for environmental control does not appear warranted. Consideration of non-combustion approaches to address air emission issues at the two operations is recommended. 1 ref., 5 tabs.

  4. Soft tissue sarcomas in the precision medicine era: new advances in clinical practice and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Messina, Carlo; De Luca, Ida; Musso, Emmanuela; Casarin, Alessandra; Incorvaia, Lorena

    2018-04-04

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) represent a rare and heterogeneous group of solid tumours derived from mesenchymal progenitors and account for 1% of all adult malignancies. Although in the last decade anthracycline-based chemotherapy single agent or in combinations has been able to improve clinical benefits, prognosis is still poor and STSs represent an important unmet medical need. Continuous advances in cancer genetics and genomics have contributed to change management paradigms of STSs as it occurred for other solid tumours. Several treatments have been recently developed with the specific aim of targeting different cell pathways and immune-checkpoints that have been recognized to drive tumour progression. The following attempts to provide a review of literature focusing on the available data concerning novel treatments and future prospective for the management of metastatic STSs.

  5. Improving performance in golf: current research and implications from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kerrie; Tuttle, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Golf, a global sport enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities, involves relatively long periods of low intensity exercise interspersed with short bursts of high intensity activity. To meet the physical demands of full swing shots and the mental and physical demands of putting and walking the course, it is frequently recommended that golfers undertake golf-specific exercise programs. Biomechanics, motor learning, and motor control research has increased the understanding of the physical requirements of the game, and using this knowledge, exercise programs aimed at improving golf performance have been developed. However, while it is generally accepted that an exercise program can improve a golfer's physical measurements and some golf performance variables, translating the findings from research into clinical practice to optimise an individual golfer's performance remains challenging. This paper discusses how biomechanical and motor control research has informed current practice and discusses how emerging sophisticated tools and research designs may better assist golfers improve their performance.

  6. A perspective from clinical and business ethics on adverse events in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J T; Meier, C; Higdon, T

    1997-11-01

    Adverse events occur in a significant, but undetermined, number of hospitalized patients. These types of patient injuries are more often the result of faulty systems than human maleficence. A culture exists among health care providers that discourages the reporting of such events and resists the implementation of formal efforts to eliminate them. This resistance serves to perpetuate the problem. Both business and clinical ethics argue that sound reasons exist for hospitals to reduce, if not eliminate, adverse events. To do so is cost effective, particularly in a managed care environment. It is also at the heart of responsible professional behavior. Physicians are afforded an opportunity to be at the forefront in this quality improvement effort.

  7. Person-centered approaches in medicine: clinical tasks, psychological paradigms, and postnonclassic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezzich J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to demonstrate advances in methodological means suggested by Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept in association with a theoretical model of a Person-centered diagnosis and practical use of the construct for clinical psychology and medicine. This, to a greater extent, arises from the fact that the cultural-historical concept (due to its humanistic nature and epistemological content is closely related to the person-centered integrative approach. But for all that the concept corresponds to the ideals of postnonclassical model of scientific rationality with a number of ‘key’ features. Above all it manifests its “methodological maturity” to cope with open self-developing systems, which is most essential at the modern stage of scientific knowledge.The work gives consideration to ‘defining pillars’ of Person-centered approach in modern medicine, to humanistic traditions of the Russian clinical school, and high prospects in diagnostics of such mental constructs as “subjective pattern of disease” and “social situation of personal development in disease” - within the context of person-centered integrative diagnosis.This article discusses the need for implementation a cross-cultural study of subjective pattern of disease and its correlation with a particular “social situation of personality development under disease conditions”. It aims at development and substantiation of the model of person-centered integrative approach, enhancement of its diagnostic scope and, consequently, improvement of the model of person-centered care in modern psychiatry and medicine.

  8. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  9. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  10. Clinical potential of regulatory T cell therapy in liver diseases: An overview and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Claire Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes, that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg. The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients.Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases, chronic rejection and post-transplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases (GVHD and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the autoimmune liver diseases for more than three decades; thus the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients.

  11. European perspective on the management of rheumatoid arthritis: clinical utility of tofacitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Śladowska, Katarzyna; Malinowska-Lipień, Iwona; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kózka, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Xeljanz ® (tofacitinib) is an oral small-molecule inhibitor that reversibly inhibits Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-dependent cytokine signaling, thus reducing inflammation. As a result of these mechanisms, effects on the immune system such as a moderate decrease in the total lymphocyte count, a dose-dependent decrease in natural killer (NK) cell count, and an increase in B-cell count have been observed. Therefore, tofacitinib provides an innovative approach to modulating the immune and inflammatory responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is especially important in individuals who do not respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or show a loss of response over time. The aim of this article was to review studies on the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of tofacitinib in patients with RA. Tofacitinib has been shown to reduce symptoms of RA and improve the quality of life in the analyzed groups of patients. Moreover, it showed high efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in Phase III randomized clinical trials on RA and was the first JAK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the RA therapy, thus providing a useful alternative treatment strategy. Randomized controlled studies revealed a significant benefit over placebo in efficacy outcomes (American College of Rheumatology [ACR] 20 and ACR50 response rates); accordingly, clinically meaningful improvements in patient-related outcomes compared with placebo have been reported. The safety profile seems acceptable, although some severe adverse effects have been observed, including serious infections, opportunistic infections (including tuberculosis and herpes zoster), malignancies, and cardiovascular events, which require strict monitoring irrespective of the duration of tofacitinib administration. As an oral drug, tofacitinib offers an alternative to subcutaneous or intravenous biologic drugs and

  12. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connell, A. [University of Rochester Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  13. Distinguishing between unipolar depression and bipolar depression: current and future clinical and neuroimaging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso de Almeida, Jorge Renner; Phillips, Mary Louise

    2013-01-15

    Differentiating bipolar disorder (BD) from recurrent unipolar depression (UD) is a major clinical challenge. Main reasons for this include the higher prevalence of depressive relative to hypo/manic symptoms during the course of BD illness and the high prevalence of subthreshold manic symptoms in both BD and UD depression. Identifying objective markers of BD might help improve accuracy in differentiating between BD and UD depression, to ultimately optimize clinical and functional outcome for all depressed individuals. Yet, only eight neuroimaging studies to date have directly compared UD and BD depressed individuals. Findings from these studies suggest more widespread abnormalities in white matter connectivity and white matter hyperintensities in BD than UD depression, habenula volume reductions in BD but not UD depression, and differential patterns of functional abnormalities in emotion regulation and attentional control neural circuitry in the two depression types. These findings suggest different pathophysiologic processes, especially in emotion regulation, reward, and attentional control neural circuitry in BD versus UD depression. This review thereby serves as a call to action to highlight the pressing need for more neuroimaging studies, using larger samples sizes, comparing BD and UD depressed individuals. These future studies should also include dimensional approaches, studies of at-risk individuals, and more novel neuroimaging approaches, such as connectivity analysis and machine learning. Ultimately, these approaches might provide biomarkers to identify individuals at future risk for BD versus UD and biological targets for more personalized treatment and new treatment developments for BD and UD depression. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Orientation Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2014-01-01

    COURSE ORIENTATION Résultats de samedi 10 mai    C’est sur une carte entièrement réactualisée dans les bois de Versoix, que plus de 100 coureurs sont venus participer à la course d’orientation, type longue distance, préparée par des membres du club du CERN. Le terrain plutôt plat nécessitait une orientation à grande vitesse, ce qui a donné les podiums suivants :  Technique long avec 17 postes : 1er Jurg Niggli, O’Jura en 52:48, 2e Beat Muller, COLJ Lausanne-Jorat en 58:02, 3e Christophe Vuitton, CO CERN en 58:19 Technique moyen avec 13 postes : 1er Jean-Bernard Zosso, CO CERN, en 46:05 ; 2e Yves Rousselot, Balise 25 Besançon, en 55:11 ; 3e Laurent Merat, O'Jura, en 55:13 Technique court avec 13 postes : 1er Julien Vuitton, CO CERN en 40:59, 2e Marc Baumgartner, CO CERN en 43:18, 3e Yaelle Mathieu en 51:42 Su...

  15. Orienteering Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club d'orientation

    2013-01-01

    Courses d’orientation ce printemps Le Club d’orientation du CERN vous invite à venir découvrir la course d’orientation et vous propose, en partenariat avec d’autres clubs de la région, une dizaine de courses populaires. Celles-ci ont lieu les samedis après-midi, elles sont ouvertes à tous, quel que soit le niveau, du débutant au sportif confirmé, en famille ou en individuel, en promenade ou en course. Si vous êtes débutant vous pouvez profiter d’une petite initiation offerte par l’organisateur avant de vous lancer sur un parcours. Divers types de parcours sont à votre choix lors de chaque épreuve : facile court (2-3 km), facile moyen (3-5 km), technique court (3-4 km), technique moyen (4-5 km) et technique long (5-7 km). Les dates à retenir sont les suivantes : Samedi 23 mars: Pully (Vd) Samedi 13 avril: Pougny...

  16. Compiling standardized information from clinical practice: using content analysis and ICF Linking Rules in a goal-oriented youth rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Nadia A; Prodinger, Birgit; Dorjbal, Delgerjargal; Rubinelli, Sara; Schmitt, Klaus; Scheel-Sailer, Anke

    2017-09-23

    To illustrate how routinely written narrative admission and discharge reports of a rehabilitation program for eight youths with chronic neurological health conditions can be transformed to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. First, a qualitative content analysis was conducted by building meaningful units with text segments assigned of the reports to the five elements of the Rehab-Cycle ® : goal; assessment; assignment; intervention; evaluation. Second, the meaningful units were then linked to the ICF using the refined ICF Linking Rules. With the first step of transformation, the emphasis of the narrative reports changed to a process oriented interdisciplinary layout, revealing three thematic blocks of goals: mobility, self-care, mental, and social functions. The linked 95 unique ICF codes could be grouped in clinically meaningful goal-centered ICF codes. Between the two independent linkers, the agreement rate was improved after complementing the rules with additional agreements. The ICF Linking Rules can be used to compile standardized health information from narrative reports if prior structured. The process requires time and expertise. To implement the ICF into common practice, the findings provide the starting point for reporting rehabilitation that builds upon existing practice and adheres to international standards. Implications for Rehabilitation This study provides evidence that routinely collected health information from rehabilitation practice can be transformed to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health by using the "ICF Linking Rules", however, this requires time and expertise. The Rehab-Cycle ® , including assessments, assignments, goal setting, interventions and goal evaluation, serves as feasible framework for structuring this rehabilitation program and ensures that the complexity of local practice is appropriately reflected. The refined "ICF Linking Rules" lead to a standardized

  17. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland–Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07° in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6° out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed using the