WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical rating scale

  1. Clinical Usefulness of the Oppositional Defiant Disorder Rating Scale (ODDRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Laughlin, Elizabeth M.; Hackenberg, Jessica L.; Riccardi, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the "Oppositional Defiant Disorder Rating Scale" (ODDRS) in a population of children referred for ADHD evaluation. The diagnostic benefit of using a rating scale specific to Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), in addition to a broad range behavior scale, was also…

  2. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  3. A Measure for the Reliability of a Rating Scale Based on Longitudinal Clinical Trial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenen, Annouschka; Alonso, Ariel; Molenberghs, Geert

    2007-01-01

    A new measure for reliability of a rating scale is introduced, based on the classical definition of reliability, as the ratio of the true score variance and the total variance. Clinical trial data can be employed to estimate the reliability of the scale in use, whenever repeated measurements are taken. The reliability is estimated from the…

  4. A clinical rating scale for the assessment of facial aging in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Estimation of facial aging has assumed growing importance due to the advent of several antiaging therapies. Evidence-based estimation of global facial aging is often necessary, especially for validation of these treatment modalities. Most available methods are expensive and have been used in fair skinned individuals. Aim: We attempted to develop a clinical rating scale for the estimation of global facial aging applied on an Indian population which has brown to black skin. We have also measured the association of this rating scale score with the chronological age. Methods: Initially, a 14- item summated rating scale was developed with inputs from five dermatologists and a clinical pharmacologist. The rating scale was applied to 105 consenting subjects with healthy facial skin between 30 to 90 years of age. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was assessed. Results: The summated rating score showed a significant positive correlation with the chronological age (Pearson′s correlation coefficient 0.834, P < 0.001. We omitted one item from the scale due to a low inter-rater agreement. The resulting 13-item rating scale was internally consistent (Cronbach′s alpha: 0.905, with substantial inter- and intra-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.973 and 0.788, respectively. Principal components and predictive equation for perceptible age were identified on further computation. Limitations: Participants of this study were limited to a particular ethnic group from West Bengal and other neighboring states of Eastern India. Conclusions: We have developed and validated a 13-item rating scale for the quantification of global facial aging suitable for Indian (brown to black skin type. This scale can be utilized effectively for clinical estimation of global facial aging.

  5. Cut-off values of blessed dementia rating scale and its clinical application in elderly Taiwanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Han; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Tai, Chih-Ta; Liu, Ching-Kuan

    2006-08-01

    Although the Blessed Dementia Rating Scale (BDRS), a clinical screening instrument, has been applied extensively, no suitable cut-off values and clinical application have been proposed, particularly in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the precursor of dementia. The BDRS, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) were administrated in people aged 65 years and above, who were enrolled from southern Taiwan with multistep stratified random sampling and followed-up for 2 years. All subjects (total number = 3,027), with new onset of MCI (defined as CDR = 0.5) in the first year and dementia (defined as CDR > or = 1) in the second and third years were subjected to statistical analysis. In distinguishing normal from MCI, except in the literate group aged 65-74 years, MMSE was superior to BDRS, with cut-off values of 1 in both literate groups aged 65-74 years and > or = 75 years, and 1.5 and 2 in less educated groups aged 65-74 and > or = 75 years, respectively. In distinguishing MCI from dementia, BDRS had cut-off values of 2.5 in both literate groups aged 65-74 and > or = 75 years, and 2.5 and 3 in less educated groups aged 65-74 and > or = 75 years, respectively. These values were better than those for MMSE in all groups. BDRS might be considered as a better tool than MMSE to screen for MCI and dementia in the increasing proportion of literate elderly aged 65-74 years in the aging population. PMID:16911919

  6. Evidence Based Clinical Assessment of Child and Adolescent Social Phobia: A Critical Review of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, Bogdan T.; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social…

  7. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) - A Systematic Review of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students’ communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Results Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Discussion Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed

  8. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are ...

  9. The impact of MRI combined with visual rating scales on the clinical diagnosis of dementia: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhagen, Martijn V.; Guit, Gerard L. [Spaarne Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Haarlem (Netherlands); Hafkamp, Gerrit Jan; Kalisvaart, Kees [Spaarne Gasthuis, Department of Geriatrics, Haarlem (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Dementia is foremost a clinical diagnosis. However, in diagnosing dementia, it is advocated to perform at least one neuroimaging study. This has two purposes: to rule out potential reversible dementia (PRD), and to help determine the dementia subtype. Our first goal was to establish if MRI combined with visual rating scales changes the clinical diagnosis. The second goal was to demonstrate if MRI contributes to a geriatrician's confidence in the diagnosis. The dementia subtype was determined prior to and after MRI. Scoring scales used were: global cortical atrophy (GCA), medial temporal atrophy (MTA), and white matter hyperintensity measured according to the Fazekas scale. The confidence level of the geriatrician was determined using a visual analogue scale. One hundred and thirty-five patients were included. After MRI, the diagnosis changed in 23.7 % (CI 17.0 %-31.1 %) of patients. Change was due to vascular aetiology in 13.3 % of patients. PRD was found in 2.2 % of all patients. The confidence level in the diagnosis increased significantly after MRI (p = 0.001). MRI, combined with visual rating scales, has a significant impact on dementia subtype diagnosis and on a geriatrician's confidence in the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of mean cerebral blood flow using SPECT and dementia rating scales in the memory clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the association between mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) values using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and cognitive performance scores of three dementia rating scales (ADAS, MMSE, HDS-R). Mean CBF was measured by the 123I-IMP-ARG method in a selected group of 51 out-patients aged 41 to 90 years and by the 99mTc-ECD method in the other group of 57 out-patients aged 51 to 91 years. Simple regressions were calculated for each of the neuropsychological clusters and mCBF values. In 123I-IMP-ARG-SPECT study, there was a significant correlation between the mCBF values and HDS-R scores (R=0.37, p=0.01). 99mTc-ECD-SPECT study revealed statistically significant correlations between the mCBF values and ADAS scores (R=-0.48, p123I-IMP-ARG-SPECT study and 99mTc-ECD-SPECT study showed the progressive declines of mCBF with advancing cognitive dysfunctions. Using the cut-off point study (23/24 scores in MMSE and 20/21 scores in HDS-R), we have found that the patients with cognitive dysfunctions had lower mCBF values than the patients with those in each group of aged 60-69 years, 70-79 years, and 80-89 years. However, the difference of mCBF values between the groups with cognitive dysfunctions and without those had decreased gradually with advancing age. The present study suggests that SPECT can provide important functional informations to assess the cognitive impairment in patients with the memory disturbance. (author)

  11. Is there a linear relationship between the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale? A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishita Shigeru

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS is widely used for evaluating patients with schizophrenia, it has limited value in estimating the clinical weight of individual symptoms. The aim of this study was 4-fold: 1 to investigate the relationship of the BPRS to the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia Scale (CGI-SCH, 2 to express this relationship in mathematical form, 3 to seek significant symptoms, and 4 to consider a possible modified BPRS subscale. Methods We evaluated 150 schizophrenia patients using the BPRS and the CGI-SCH, then examined the scatter plot distribution of the two scales and expressed it in a mathematical equation. Next, backward stepwise regression was performed to select BPRS items that were highly associated with the CGI-SCH. Multivariate regression was conducted to allocate marks to individual items, proportional to their respective magnitude. We assessed the influence of modifications to the BPRS in terms of Pearson's r correlation coefficient and r-squared to evaluate the relationship between the two scales. Utilizing symptom weighting, we assumed a possible BPRS subscale. Results By plotting the scores for the two scales, a logarithmic curve was obtained. By performing a logarithmic transformation of the BPRS total score, the curve was modified to a linear distribution, described by [CGI-SCH] = 7.1497 × log10[18-item BPRS] - 6.7705 (p Conclusions Limited within our data, a logarithmic relationship was assumed between the two scales, and not only individual items of the BPRS but also their weightings were considered important for a linear relationship and improvement of the BPRS for evaluating schizophrenia.

  12. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Kim, Daeho; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Jo, Sun-Jin; Park, Yong Chon

    2015-01-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale), suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation), functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version). Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients. PMID:25600920

  13. Validity and clinical feasibility of the ADHD rating scale (ADHD-RS) A Danish Nationwide Multicenter Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szomlaiski, N; Dyrborg, J; Rasmussen, H;

    2008-01-01

    clinical standards. The HKD children were rated by parents and teachers at baseline and at follow-up 3 months later. Results: Internal validity of ADHD-RS was high and the factor structure supported the diagnostic classification system ICD-10. The questionnaire discriminated HKD patients in a mixed...

  14. Clinical assessment of bipolar depression: validity, factor structure and psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Young-Eun; Kim, Moon-Doo; Bahk, Won-Myong; Woo, Young Sup; Lee, Jonghun; Jang, Sae-Heon; Won, Seunghee; Min, Kyung Joon; Chung, Sangkeun; Kwon, Young-Joon; Jon, Duk-In; Lee, Kwanghun; Yoon, Bo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS) is a scale for assessment of the clinical characteristics of bipolar depression. The primary aims of this study were to describe the development of the Korean version of the BDRS (K-BDRS) and to establish more firmly its psychometric properties in terms of reliability and validity. Methods The study included 141 patients (62 male and 79 female) who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, were currently experiencing symptoms of depression...

  15. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emerge...

  16. Rating scales measuring the severity of psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, S D; Rothschild, A J; Flint, A J;

    2015-01-01

    into the following categories: (i) rating scales predominantly covering depressive symptoms, (ii) rating scales predominantly covering psychotic symptoms, (iii) rating scales covering delusions, and (iv) rating scales covering PD. For the vast majority of the scales, the clinical and psychometric validity had...

  17. Clinical use of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale: Is increased efficiency possible? A post hoc comparison of HDRS, Maier and Bech sub-scales, CGI and SCL-90 scores

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhe, H.G.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Jonghe, de, F.

    2005-01-01

    Background The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) is used as a semi–gold standard in research. In treatment guidelines, the HDRS measurements serve to determine response and remission and guide clinical decision making for nonresponders. However, its use in clinical practice is limited, possibly because the HDRS is time consuming. In addition, the multidimensional HDRS is criticized for not measuring a unidimensional aspect as depression severity. The Maier and the Bech, two 6-it...

  18. To what extent do single symptoms from a depression rating scale predict risk of long-term sickness absence among employees who are free of clinical depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugulies, R; Hjarsbech, PU; Aust, B; Christensen, KB; Andersen, RV; Borg, V

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Depression rating scales have predicted long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in previous studies. With this study, we investigated to what extent single symptoms from a depression rating scale predicted LTSA among employees who were free of clinical depression. METHODS: We studied 6......,670 female employees in the Danish eldercare sector. Frequency of 12 depressive symptoms over the last 2 weeks was assessed with the Major Depression Inventory. A symptom was considered as elevated if it was present at least "slightly more than half of the time." Data were linked to a national register on...... LTSA (≥3 weeks). We calculated hazard ratios (HR) from Cox's proportional hazard models to analyze whether a symptom predicted time to onset of LTSA during a 1-year follow-up. Analyses were adjusted for age, family status, health behaviors, occupational group, and previous LTSA. RESULTS: Of the 12...

  19. Feasibility, Reproducibility, and Clinical Validity of the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale--Revised for Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole M.; Yesensky, Jessica; Hessl, David; Berry-Kravis Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and the most common known genetic cause of autism. FXS is associated with psychiatric impairments, including anxiety disorders. There is a paucity of well-developed measures to characterize anxiety in FXS. However, such scales are needed to measure therapeutic…

  20. Clinical note: Validation of the Swedish version of the Parents’ Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH) Rating Scale for normal hearing infants and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, K. Jonas; Ludvigsson, Josefine; Morris, David Jackson;

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the present pilot study were to translate the PEACH Rating Scale into Swedish, examine the preliminary psychometric properties of this translation, and explore the association between age and the reported outcome. Study design: Responses on the PEACH Rating Scale were...

  1. Current Use of Depression Rating Scales in Mental Health Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun Jeong; Kim, Jung Bum; Shin, Im Hee; Lim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Cho, Gyung Ah; Sung, Hyung Mo; Jung, Sung Won; Zmimmerman, Mark; Lee, Yanghyun

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was to investigate the current use of depression rating scales by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists in Korea. Methods The questionnaires from many psychiatrists and clinical psychologists were included in the analysis. The questionnaire was composed of items about examining the percentage of patients clinically using depression rating scales, reasons for not use of them, the degree of satisfaction, the perceived agreement rate between the result of depression ratin...

  2. Item response theory analysis of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Elizabeth D; Staniewska, Dorota; Coyne, Karin S; Boyer, Stacey; White, Leigh Ann; Zach, Neta; Cedarbaum, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to examine dimensionality and item-level performance of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) across time using classical and modern test theory approaches. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were conducted using data from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Pooled Resources Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database with complete ALSFRS-R data (n = 888) at three time-points (Time 0, Time 1 (6-months), Time 2 (1-year)). Results demonstrated that in this population of 888 patients, mean age was 54.6 years, 64.4% were male, and 93.7% were Caucasian. The CFA supported a 4* individual-domain structure (bulbar, gross motor, fine motor, and respiratory domains). IRT analysis within each domain revealed misfitting items and overlapping item response category thresholds at all time-points, particularly in the gross motor and respiratory domain items. Results indicate that many of the items of the ALSFRS-R may sub-optimally distinguish among varying levels of disability assessed by each domain, particularly in patients with less severe disability. Measure performance improved across time as patient disability severity increased. In conclusion, modifications to select ALSFRS-R items may improve the instrument's specificity to disability level and sensitivity to treatment effects. PMID:26473473

  3. Rating scales in general practice depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Paykel, Eugene; Sireling, Lester;

    2015-01-01

    within major depressive disorder. The CID was compared to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). METHODS: 146 patients from a previous study in general practice with the CID were investigated. The item response theory model established by Rasch was used to investigate the scalability (a scale......BACKGROUND: Our objective was to investigate to what extent the Clinical Interview for Depression (CID) used in the general practice setting covers clinically valid subscales (depression, anxiety, and apathy) which can measure outcome of antidepressant therapy as well as identifying subsyndromes......׳s psychometric adequacy) of the subscales, and principal component analysis was used to identify subsyndromes with the symptoms of major depression according to DSM-5 or ICD-10. RESULTS: Whereas the HAM-D17 was found not to have an acceptable scalability, the three brief CID subscales for depression (six items...

  4. Severity rating scales for ciguatera fish poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, W R

    1993-06-01

    Severity of ciguatera fish poisoning is often quite variable. Two symptom check list rating scales were developed for quantifying illness severity and for selectively monitoring response to therapy in patients with chronic toxicity. Content validity was ascertained, and internal consistency reliability was demonstrated by means of the Cronbach alpha correlation coefficient (alpha = 0.9475). It was concluded that these instruments were valid and reliable, and that they conveniently and accurately recorded illness severity and treatment efficacy. They should prove useful in clinical settings and epidemiologic investigations. PMID:8342175

  5. A Combined Measure of Cognition and Function for Clinical Trials: The Integrated Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (iADRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Wessels, A.M.; Siemers, E.R.; Yu, P.; Andersen, S.W.; Holdridge, K.C.; Sims, J. R.; Sundell, K.; Stern, Y. (Yoni); Rentz, D.M.; B Dubois; Jones, R.W.; J. Cummings; Aisen, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally recognized that more sensitive instruments for the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are needed. The integrated Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (iADRS) combines scores from 2 widely accepted measures, the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study – instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-iADL). Disease progression and treatment differences as measured by the iADRS were analyzed using data f...

  6. Test Review: Autism Spectrum Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Amber N.; Wahlberg, Andrea C.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS) which are designed to measure behaviors in children between the ages of 2 and 18 that are associated with disorders on the autism spectrum as rated by parents/caregivers and/or teachers. The rating scales include items related to behaviors associated with Autism, Asperger's Disorder, and…

  7. A Combined Measure of Cognition and Function for Clinical Trials: The Integrated Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (iADRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, A.M.; Siemers, E.R.; Yu, P.; Andersen, S.W.; Holdridge, K.C.; Sims, J.R.; Sundell, K.; Stern, Y.; Rentz, D.M.; Dubois, B.; Jones, R.W.; Cummings, J.; Aisen, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally recognized that more sensitive instruments for the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are needed. The integrated Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (iADRS) combines scores from 2 widely accepted measures, the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study – instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-iADL). Disease progression and treatment differences as measured by the iADRS were analyzed using data from solanezumab EXPEDITION, EXPEDITION2, and EXPEDITION-EXT Studies; semagacestat IDENTITY Study; and donepezil ADCS – mild cognitive impairment (ADCS-MCI) Study. Psychometric properties of the iADRS were established through principal component analysis (PCA) and estimation of contributions of subscores and individual item scores to the iADRS total score. The iADRS performed better than most composites and scales in detecting disease progression and comparably or better than individual scales in detecting treatment differences. PCA demonstrated the iADRS can be divided into two principal components primarily representing cognitive items and instrumental ADLs. Dynamic ranges of the subscales were similar across all studies, reflecting approximately equal contributions from both subscales to the iADRS total score. In item analyses, every item contributed to the total score, with varying strength of contributions by item and across data sets. The iADRS demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties and was effective in capturing disease progression from MCI through moderate AD and treatment effects across the early disease spectrum. These findings suggest the iADRS can be used in studies of mixed populations, ensuring sensitivity to treatment effects as subjects progress during studies of putative disease-modifying agents. PMID:27019841

  8. Factor Structure Evaluation of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Caroline I.; Pandolfi, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the factor structure of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). Principal components analysis (PCA) and principal axis factor analysis (PAF) evaluated archival data from children presenting to a university clinic with suspected autism spectrum disorders (ASDs; N = 164). PCA did not replicate components identified by…

  9. Scale Invariant Properties in Heart Rate Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of heart beat is controlled by autonomic nervous system: accelerated by the sympathetic system and slowed by the parasympathetic system. Scaling properties in heart rate are usually related to the intrinsic dynamics of this physiological regulatory system. The two packages calculating local exponent spectra: Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima and Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (accessible from Physionet home page http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/101/23/e215) are tested, and then used to investigate the spectrum of singularity exponents in series of heart rates obtained from patients suffering from reduced left ventricle systolic function. It occurs that this state of a heart could be connected to some perturbation in the regulatory system, because the heart rate appears to be less controlled than in a healthy human heart. The multifractality in the heart rate signal is weakened: the spectrum is narrower and moved to higher values what indicate the higher activity of the sympatethic nervous system. (author)

  10. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Michael H.; Daniel, David G; Revicki, Dennis A; Carla M Canuso; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Alphs, Larry; Ishak, K Jack; Bartko, John J.; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder scale is a new rating scale adapted from the Clinical Global Impression scale for use in patients with schizoaffective disorder. The psychometric characteristics of the Clinical Global Impression for Schizoaffective Disorder are described.

  11. A new rating scale for negative symptoms: the Motor-Affective-Social Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trémeau, Fabien; Goggin, Michelle; Antonius, Daniel; Czobor, Pàl; Hill, Vera; Citrome, Leslie

    2008-09-30

    The commonly used rating scales for negative symptoms in schizophrenia have shown good reliability, but disagreement persists regarding both the content definition and the validity of several items. Instead, authors have recommended rating the specific behaviors that are defined as negative symptoms. To surmount these shortcomings, we developed a new rating scale for negative symptoms: the Motor-Affective-Social Scale (MASS). During a 5-minute structured interview, hand coverbal gestures, spontaneous smiles, voluntary smiling, and questions asked by the interviewer were counted and rated on 101 inpatients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Information on social behavior was obtained from nursing staff. The scale consisted of a total of eight items. The MASS showed high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha coefficient=0.81), inter-rater reliability, and test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient=0.81). Convergent validity analyses showed high correlations between MASS scores and scores on the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptom (SANS), and the negative symptoms subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The MASS showed excellent psychometric properties, practicality, and subject tolerability. Future research that includes the use of the MASS with other patient populations and that investigates the scale's sensitivity during clinical trials should be performed. PMID:18722021

  12. Clinical and psychometric validation of the psychotic depression assessment scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Pedersen, Christina Horsager; Uggerby, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), consisting of the 6-item melancholia subscale (HAM-D6) of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and 5 psychosis items from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), is a valid measure for the...... severity of psychotic depression. The aim of this study was to subject the PDAS, and its depression (HAM-D6) and psychosis (BPRS5) subscales to further validation. METHODS: Patients diagnosed with psychotic depression at Danish psychiatric hospitals participated in semi-structured interviews. Video...... recordings of these interviews were assessed by two experienced psychiatrists (global severity rating of psychotic depression, depressive symptoms and psychotic symptoms) and by two young physicians (rating on 27 symptom items, including the 11 PDAS items). The clinical validity and responsiveness of the...

  13. International versions of the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Hermann PG

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptom scales for aging women have clinically been used for years and the interest in measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL has increased in recent years. The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS is a formally validated scale according to the requirements for quality of life instruments. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of the instrument particularly concerning versions of the scale in different languages. MRS versions available The translations were performed following international methodological recommendations for the linguistic & cultural adaptation of HRQoL instruments. The first translation was done from the German original scale into English (UK & USA. The English version was used as the source language for the translations into French, Spanish, Swedish, Mexican/Argentine, Brazilian, Turkish, and Indonesian languages (attached as additional PDF files. Conclusion The MRS scale is obviously a valuable tool for assessing health related quality of life of women in the menopausal transition and is used worldwide. The currently available 9 language versions have been translated following international standards for the linguistic and cultural translation of quality of life scales. Assistance is offered to help interested parties in the translation process.

  14. Lethality of Suicide Attempt Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents an 11-point scale for measuring the degree of lethality of suicide attempts. The scale has nine example "anchors" and uses the relative lethality of an extensive table of drugs. The scale can be used reliably by nonmedical personnel with no prior training. (Author/BL)

  15. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  16. Inter-rater Agreement for the Clinical Dysphagia Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Se Woong; Lee, Seung Ah; Jung, Il-Young; Beom, Jaewon; Han, Tai Ryoon; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inter-rater agreement for the clinical dysphagia scale (CDS). Method Sixty-seven subjects scheduled to participate in a video-fluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were pre-examined by two raters independently within a 24-hour interval. Each item and the total score were compared between the raters. In addition, we investigated whether subtraction of items showing low agreement or modification of rating methods could enhance inter-rater agreement without significan...

  17. The Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ): scale development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Marc A; Thomas, Stuart W

    2011-01-01

    In line with dynamic systems and dialectical theories of development, it was theorized that a psychopathology such as an addiction could have several causes (equifinality) and that more specific diagnoses and treatments of the most salient clinical issues for individuals coming from different developmental paths could increase the success rates of most therapies. Further, the issues from a developmental dynamic systems perspective should include not only individual clinical issues, but also relational, familial, peer, and organizational functioning. The Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ) was developed as a research and clinical instrument relevant to these concerns. The 29 scales were based on naturalistic observations of patients in treatment and 12-step groups, attachment theory, and the clinical literature dealing with the addictions. The attachment scales were taken from classic attachment theory but, in line with more recent formulations, included relations to mother, father, and partner. Study 1 found the ACIQ to have good coefficient alphas (.79), and factor analyses revealed that the eight factors loaded on different attachment figures and sets of clinical issues rather than attachment styles per se. Study 2 found test-retest reliability to be, on average, .79. The results were in line with the developmental hypothesis that partner and father attachments are different than attachments to mother, and that family and peer relations as well as clinical issues need to be considered separately. PMID:22256681

  18. Does Scale Length Matter? A Comparison of Nine- versus Five-Point Rating Scales for the Mini-CEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Educators must often decide how many points to use in a rating scale. No studies have compared interrater reliability for different-length scales, and few have evaluated accuracy. This study sought to evaluate the interrater reliability and accuracy of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) scores, comparing the traditional mini-CEX…

  19. Reliability of Multi-Category Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard I.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Davis, John L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of multi-category scales is increasing for the monitoring of IEP goals, classroom and school rules, and Behavior Improvement Plans (BIPs). Although they require greater inference than traditional data counting, little is known about the inter-rater reliability of these scales. This simulation study examined the performance of nine…

  20. Reliability and Validity of Scores on the IFSP Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Lee Ann; McWilliam, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is presented regarding the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of scores for an investigator-developed individualized family service plan (IFSP) rating scale. One hundred and twenty IFSPs were rated using a 12-item instrument, the IFSP Rating Scale (McWilliam & Jung, 2001). Using principal components factor analysis…

  1. Critical Scale-invariance in Healthy Human Heart Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Sakata, Seiichiro; Hayano, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the robust scale-invariance in the probability density function (PDF) of detrended healthy human heart rate increments, which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state where the mean level of heart rate is dramatically changing. This scale-independent and fractal structure is markedly different from the scale-dependent PDF evolution observed in a turbulent-like, cascade heart rate model. These results strongly support the view that healthy huma...

  2. Using dementia rating scales in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the significance of dementia rating scales in the diagnosis of Alzheimer' s disease (AD).Methods: Probable AD patients(118 cases) diagnosed according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria and the normal controls(100 cases) were examined with a battery of neuropsychological tests and the dementia severity of AD patients was determined with clinical dementia rating(CDR). Changed neuropsychological characteristics of different AD dementia severities were analyzed. The discriminant analysis and ROC curve analysis were performed to analyze the specificity, the sensitivity, and the general accuracy of various dementia rating scales in the diagnosis of AD, and the area under the ROC curve. Results: The total cognition function in mild (CDR = 1), moderate(CDR = 2) and severe stages(CDR=3) of AD had an obvious trend of continuous decline, with the MMSE values 17.44 ± 2.64, 13.90 ± 4.32, and5.50± 3.90 respectively. The trend of decline of the verbal fluency function in AD was same as that of total cognition function. The visuospatial function was reduced in early stage of AD (CDR = 1 ) and completely lost in moderate and severe AD. Delay memory function began to show decline in the early stage of AD, and the decline turned apparent in moderate and severe AD. Immediate memory function showed unchanged in early stage of AD, while showed decline in moderate AD, and the decline became very quick in severe AD. The impairment of daily living ability and social activity function developed with the severity degree of AD. But the decline of social activity function was very quick in moderate stage of AD. In general, the leading scale to diagnose AD was FOM, followed by RVR, POD, MMSE, BD,ADL and DS. When MMSE was combined with one or more of FOM, RVR, BD, DS, the general accuracy in distinguishing AD from the normal controls was improved. Conclusion: Neuropsychological test is useful in the diagnosis of AD, especially in the early stage. The validity is improved when

  3. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  4. Construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Adami Fernando; Schlickmann Frainer Deivis; de Souza Almeida Fernando; de Abreu Luiz; Valenti Vitor E; Piva Demarzo Marcelo; de Mello Monteiro Carlos; de Oliveira Fernando R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Figure rating scales were developed as a tool to determine body dissatisfaction in women, men, and children. However, it lacks in the literature the validation of the scale for body silhouettes previously adapted. We aimed to obtain evidence for construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents. Methods The study was carried out with adolescent students attending three public schools in an urban region of the municipality of Florianopolis in the State o...

  5. Construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Adami, Fernando; Schlickmann Frainer, Deivis Elton; de Souza Almeida, Fernando; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Vitor E Valenti; Piva Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira; de Oliveira, Fernando R

    2012-01-01

    Background Figure rating scales were developed as a tool to determine body dissatisfaction in women, men, and children. However, it lacks in the literature the validation of the scale for body silhouettes previously adapted. We aimed to obtain evidence for construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents. Methods The study was carried out with adolescent students attending three public schools in an urban region of the municipality of Florianopolis in the State of Santa C...

  6. Critical Scale Invariance in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Sakata, Seiichiro; Hayano, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the robust scale-invariance in the probability density function (PDF) of detrended healthy human heart rate increments, which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state where the mean level of the heart rate is dramatically changing. This scale-independent and fractal structure is markedly different from the scale-dependent PDF evolution observed in a turbulentlike, cascade heart rate model. These results strongly support the view that a healthy human heart rate is controlled to converge continually to a critical state.

  7. The Secret to the "Best" Ratings from Any Evaluation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    Most faculty developers have a wide variety of rating scales that fly across their desk tops as their incremental program activities unfold during the academic year. The primary issue for this column is: What is the quality of those ratings used for decisions about people and programs? When students, faculty, and administrators rate a program or…

  8. Evaluating the quality of analytic ratings with Mokken scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A. Wind

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Greatly influenced by the work of Rasch (1960/1980, Mokken (1971 presented a nonparametric scaling procedure that is based on the theory of invariant measurement, but draws upon less strict requirements related to the scale of measurement. Because they are theoretically and empirically related to Rasch models, Mokken’s nonparametric models have been recognized as a useful exploratory tool for examining data in terms of the basic requirements for invariant measurement before the application of a parametric model. In particular, recent research has explored the use of polytomous versions of Mokken’s (1971 nonparametric scaling models as a technique for evaluating the quality of holistic ratings (Wind & Engelhard, in press and rating scales (Wind, 2014 for performance assessments in terms of the requirements for invariant measurement. The current study continues the extension of Mokken scaling to performance assessments by exploring the degree to which Mokken-based rating quality indices can be used to explore the quality of ratings assigned within domains on an analytic rubric. Using an illustrative analysis, this study demonstrates the use of a generalized rating design to explore the quality of analytic ratings within the framework of Mokken scaling. Findings from the illustrative analysis suggest that a generalized rating design can be used to examine the quality of analytic ratings in terms of the requirements for invariant measurement.

  9. Reliability and validity of a Portuguese version of the Young Mania Rating Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.A. Vilela

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The reliability and validity of a Portuguese version of the Young Mania Rating Scale were evaluated. The original scale was translated into and adapted to Portuguese by the authors. Definitions of clinical manifestations, a semi-structured anchored interview and more explicit rating criteria were added to the scale. Fifty-five adult subjects, aged 18 to 60 years, with a diagnosis of Current Manic Episode according to DSM-III-R criteria were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale as well as the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale in two sessions held at intervals from 7 to 10 days. Good reliability ratings were obtained, with intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.97 for total scores, and levels of agreement above 0.80 (P < 0.001 for all individual items. Internal consistency analysis resulted in an alpha = 0.67 for the scale as a whole, and an alpha = 0.72 for each standardized item (P < 0.001. For the concurrent validity, a correlation of 0.78 was obtained by the Pearson coefficient between the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. The results are similar to those reported for the English version, indicating that the Portuguese version of the scale constitutes a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of manic patients.

  10. A parametric investigation of ride quality rating scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Coates, G. D.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The relative merits of various category scales for the prediction of human discomfort response to vibration and the mathematical relationships that allow for transformations of subjective data from one scale to another scale were determined. A total of 16 category scales were studied and these represented various parametric combinations of polarity, scale type, and number of scalar points. Sixteen subject groups were used and each subject group evaluated its comfort/discomfort to vertical sinusoidal vibration using one of the rating scales. The passenger ride quality apparatus which can expose six subjects simultaneously to predetermined vibrations was utilized. The vibration stimuli were composed of repeats of selected sinusoidal frequencies applied at each of nine peak floor acceleration levels. A higher degree of reliability and discriminability was generally obtained from unipolar continuous type scales containing either seven or nine scalar points as opposed to the other scales investigated.

  11. Universal temperature and body-mass scaling of feeding rates

    OpenAIRE

    Rall, Björn C.; Brose, Ulrich; Hartvig, Martin; Kalinkat, Gregor; Schwarzmüller, Florian; Vucic-Pestic, Olivera; Petchey, Owen L

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of feeding rates is the basis to understand interaction strength and subsequently the stability of ecosystems and biodiversity. Feeding rates, as all biological rates, depend on consumer and resource body masses and environmental temperature. Despite five decades of research on functional responses as quantitative models of feeding rates, a unifying framework of how they scale with body masses and temperature is still lacking. This is perplexing, considering that the strength of fun...

  12. THE RATE OF CLINICAL RESPONSE OF ORAL LOADING SODIUM VALPROATE IN ACUTELY MANLC PATIENT

    OpenAIRE

    K SHAFIEE; M BAREKATEYN; N BASHARDOOST; Mahmoudi, J

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Acheiving accelerated clinical response is desirable in patients with acute manic episode. We conducted a prospective study to compare the rate of clinical response of oral loading sodium valproate versus standard dose titration. Methods: Fourty - two patients who met DSM - IV critevia for current manic episode and who had a "Young mania rating scale "score between 20 and 50 were randomly assigned on a double blind basis to recieve valproate oral "loading"(N = 21) at a dose...

  13. Sportsmanship rating scale in tennis competition with young players

    OpenAIRE

    Gimeno Marco, Fernando; Lacambra Correas, David; Marcén Muñío, Celia; Sáenz Ibáñez, Alfredo; Castillo Salazar, Susana; Sánchez Sanz, María Elisa

    2013-01-01

    World Conference on Psychology and Sociology 2012 CC BY-NC-ND [EN] This study presents the psychometric properties of a rating scale of sportsmanship in tennis competitions with young players. A total of 446 players used this scale to asses the games they played during a season (n=223). Analyses confirmed the discriminative capacity both sportsmanship(12)and unsportsmanlike(17)items, and high internal consistency of the overall scale (Cronbach's Alpha = 0,702). Moreover, the analysi...

  14. Prediction of the Scale Removal Rate in Heat Exchanger Piping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najwa S. Majeed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of predicting the mass transfer controlled CaCO3 scale removal rate has been investigated.Experiments were carried out using chelating agents as a cleaning solution at different time and Reynolds’s number. The results of CaCO3 scale removal or (mass transfer rate (as it is the controlling process are compared with proposed model of prandtl’s and Taylor particularly based on the concept of analogy among momentum and mass transfer.Correlation for the variation of Sherwood number ( or mass transfer rate with Reynolds’s number have been obtained .

  15. A brief interview for assessing compulsive hoarding: The Hoarding Rating Scale-Interview

    OpenAIRE

    Tolin, David F.; Frost, Randy O.; Steketee, Gail

    2010-01-01

    The present paper describes the development and validation of the Hoarding Rating Scale-Interview (HRS-I), a brief (5-10 minute) 5-item semi-structured interview that assesses the features of compulsive hoarding (clutter, difficulty discarding, acquisition, distress, and impairment). Trained interviewers administered the HRS-I to 136 adults (73 compulsive hoarding, 19 OCD, 44 non-clinical controls) along with a battery of self-report measures. An initial assessment was conducted in the clinic...

  16. The use of global rating scales for OSCEs in veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Emma; Bell, Catriona; Rhind, Susan; Hecker, Kent

    2015-01-01

    OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations) are widely used in health professions to assess clinical skills competence. Raters use standardized binary checklists (CL) or multi-dimensional global rating scales (GRS) to score candidates performing specific tasks. This study assessed the reliability of CL and GRS scores in the assessment of veterinary students, and is the first study to demonstrate the reliability of GRS within veterinary medical education. Twelve raters from two differen...

  17. Response and Remission in Adolescent Mania: Signal Detection Analyses of the Young Mania Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nick C.; Patrick, Danielle M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; Delbello, Melissa P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine optimal criteria for defining response and remission in adolescents with acute mania. Method: Data were analyzed from three treatment studies of adolescents with acute mania (N = 99). Trained raters completed the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and clinicians completed the Clinical Global…

  18. Clinical Application of Heart Rate Variability after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HeikkiVeliHuikuri

    2012-02-01

    Heart rate (HR variability has been extensively studied in patients surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The majority of studies have shown that patients with reduced or abnormal HR variability/turbulence have an increased risk of mortality within few years after an AMI. Various measures of HR dynamics, such as time-domain, spectral, and non-linear measures of HR variability, as well as HR turbulence, have been used in risk stratification of post-AMI patients. The prognostic power of various measures, except of those reflecting rapid R-R interval oscillations, has been almost identical, albeit some non-linear HR variability measures, such as short-term fractal scaling exponent, and HR turbulence, have provided somewhat better prognostic information than the others. Abnormal HR variability predicts both sudden and non-sudden cardiac death after AMI. Because of remodeling of the arrhythmia substrate after AMI, early measurement of HR variability to identify those at high risk should likely be repeated later in order to assess the risk of fatal arrhythmia events. Future randomized trials using HR variability/turbulence as one of the pre-defined inclusion criteria will show whether routine measurement of HR variability/turbulence will become a routine clinical tool for risk stratification of post-AMI patients.

  19. Reoperation versus clinical recurrence rate after ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, Frederik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Kehlet, Henrik; Strandfelt, Pernille; Bisgaard, Thue

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To compare the clinical recurrence rate with reoperation rate for recurrence after ventral hernia repair. BACKGROUND:: Reoperation is often used as an outcome measure after ventral hernia repair, but it is unknown whether reoperation rate reflects the overall clinical risk for...... recurrence. METHODS:: The study cohort was recruited from the Danish Ventral Hernia Database and the Danish National Patient Registry during January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2007. Inclusion criteria were primary umbilical/epigastric (umb/epi) or incisional hernia repair from a regional area of 2 million...... of 945 patients were eligible, and 902 patients responded to the questionnaire (response rate 95%) with a median postoperative follow-up of 41 months (range 0-48 months). The analysis comprised 646 patients with umb/epi and 256 patients with incisional hernia repair. Clinical examination was required...

  20. Revised Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet AKIN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to adapt the Revised Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (R-MARS; Plake & Parker, 1982 to Turkish and to examine its psychometric properties. The research was conducted on 372 pre-service teachers. Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that this scale yielded 2 factors, as original form and that the model was well fit. Internal consistency coefficient of the scale was .93 and test-retest reliability coefficient was .91. Also, corrected item-total correlations ranged .30 to .80. Thus, R-MARS can be used as a valid and reliable instrument in education and psychology.

  1. Scaling behaviour and memory in heart rate of healthy human

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Shi-Min; Peng, Hu; Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical ...

  2. Psychometric analysis of the Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale among university population of poor sleepers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubia Veqar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale is a 65 item self administered open source questionnaire. The scale is widely used in clinical practice but its psychometric properties are not well established. Therefore keeping in mind this lacuna the current study was designed for university population of poor sleepers in India. Aims: The purpose of this study was to establish the Pittsburgh sleep Quality Index test- retest reliability, validity and internal consistency of Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale. Materials and Methods: Twenty five subjects were randomly chosen from the screened population of poor sleepers. Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index and Insomnia severity index were administered on test day. Retest was administered after one week. Results: Eight males and seventeen females with mean age 24 + 7.04 were recruited. The test retest reliability for Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale total score showed excellent reliability (ICC 2,1 -0.93. The results also show that the total score is moderately correlated with Pittsburgh sleep Quality Index (r-0.31 and moderately correlated with Insomnia severity index (r-0.49. Internal consistency for the test was excellent (Cronbach′s alpha- 0.930 Conclusion: The study findings suggest that Pittsburgh insomnia rating scale has excellent internal consistency, test-retest reliability and good validity for university population of poor sleepers in India. It is an important first line of assessment scale for screening of sleep problems.

  3. A Comparison of the Counselor Rating Form and the Counselor Effectiveness Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Donald R.; Wampold, Bruce E.

    1982-01-01

    Compared two measures of perceived counselor expertness, trustworthiness, and attractiveness: the Counselor Rating Form (CRF) and the Counselor Effectiveness Rating Scale (CERS). Results showed expertness, trustworthiness, and attractiveness as measured by both instruments are not independent and are components of a single dimension of perceived…

  4. A Comparison of EFL Raters' Essay-Rating Processes across Two Types of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; He, Lianzhen

    2015-01-01

    This study used think-aloud protocols to compare essay-rating processes across holistic and analytic rating scales in the context of China's College English Test Band 6 (CET-6). A group of 9 experienced CET-6 raters scored the same batch of 10 CET-6 essays produced in an operational CET-6 administration twice, using both the CET-6 holistic…

  5. Mixed Rasch Modeling of the Self-Rating Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sehee; Min, Sae-Young

    2007-01-01

    In this study, mixed Rasch modeling was used on the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), a widely used measure of depression, among a non-Western sample of 618 Korean college students. The results revealed three latent classes and confirmed the unidimensionality of the SDS. In addition, there was a significant effect for gender in terms of class…

  6. Elevation Differences between MMPI-2 Clinical and Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales: Frequency, Origins, and Interpretative Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.; McNulty, John L.; Arbisi, Paul A.; Graham, John R.

    2006-01-01

    The frequency, origin, and interpretative implications of elevation differences on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) clinical and restructured clinical (RC) scales were examined. Two large clinical samples consisting of 1,770 outpatients and 2,438 inpatients were used for this study. Three potential factors…

  7. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Peng, Hu; Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-10-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  8. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Shi-Min; PENG Hu; YANG Hui-Jie; ZHOU Tao; ZHOU Pei-Ling; WANG Bing-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  9. Characterizing the effects of scale and heating rate on micro-scale explosive ignition criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafenrichter, Everett Shingo; Pahl, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Laser diode ignition experiments were conducted in an effort to characterize the effects of scale and heating rate on micro-scale explosive ignition criteria. Over forty experiments were conducted with various laser power densities and laser spot sizes. In addition, relatively simple analytical and numerical calculations were performed to assist with interpretation of the experimental data and characterization of the explosive ignition criteria.

  10. Refractory chronic migraine: long-term follow-up using a refractory rating scale

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Refractory chronic migraine (RCM) is often associated with disability and a low quality of life (QOL). RCM ranges in severity from mild to severe. There would be a benefit both clinically and in research use in categorizing RCM patients according to severity. This study utilized a unique RCM severity rating scale, tracking the clinical course over 10 years. A total of 129 patients, ages 19–72, were assigned a severity rating of 2–10 (10 = worst). Pain level and QOL were assessed. Over the 10 ...

  11. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, Luiz Gustavo de Andrade; Mendes, Renio dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main source of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for the contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behaviour. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  12. Variation of foraging rate and wing loading, but not resting metabolic rate scaling, of insect pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terblanche, John S.; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-08-01

    Morphological, physiological and behavioural variation with body size (i.e. scaling) may affect costs of living in a particular environment for insects and, ultimately, pollination or foraging success. However, few studies have directly assessed the scaling of these traits at the species level. Using two similar-sized pollinator species (the hawkmoth Macroglossum trochilus and the fly Moegistorhynchus longirostrus), we compare intraspecific scaling relationships of resting metabolic rate (RMR), foraging rate (FR) and wing loading (WL) to address this paucity of data. Scaling of RMR was similar for both taxa although the intercepts for the relationships differed. However, these two species showed variation in WL scaling relationships and fundamentally different FR scaling. For M. longirostrus, FR scaling was positive but non-significantly related to body mass while for M. trochilus FR scaling was negative. This suggests that variation in FR and WL, but not RMR scaling, among these flies and hawkmoths may impose significant energetic costs which could affect animal-plant interactions in the wild.

  13. The VAGUS insight into psychosis scale – Self-report & clinician-rated versions

    OpenAIRE

    Gerretsen, Philip; Remington, Gary; Borlido, Carol; Quilty, Lena; Hassan, Sabrina; Polsinelli, Gina; Teo, Celine; Mar, Wanna; Simon, Regina; Menon, Mahesh; Pothier, David D; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Caravaggio, Fernando; Mamo, David C.; Rajji, Tarek K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop self-report and clinician-rated versions of an insight scale that would be easy to administer, sensitive to small changes, and inclusive of the core dimensions of clinical insight into psychosis. Ten-item self-report (VAGUS-SR) and five-item clinician-rated (VAGUS-CR) scales were designed to measure the dimensions of insight into psychosis and evaluated in 215 and 140 participants, respectively (www.vagusonline.com). Tests of reliability and validity were ...

  14. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality which is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, they are not suitable for clinical applications owing to their high cost, large size. Also, their low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in real-time PAT. So, there is a growing need for an imaging system capable of real-time imaging for various clinical applications. In this work, we are using a nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to obtain the photoacoustic imaging. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with energy of ~1.4 mJ per pulse. So far, the reported frame rate for photoacoustic imaging is only a few hundred Hertz. We have demonstrated up to 7000 frames per second framerate in photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of fast moving obje ct. Phantom experiments were performed to test the fast imaging capability and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be used for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies.

  15. Construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adami Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Figure rating scales were developed as a tool to determine body dissatisfaction in women, men, and children. However, it lacks in the literature the validation of the scale for body silhouettes previously adapted. We aimed to obtain evidence for construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents. Methods The study was carried out with adolescent students attending three public schools in an urban region of the municipality of Florianopolis in the State of Santa Catarina (SC. The sample comprised 232 10-19-year-old students, 106 of whom are boys and 126 girls, from the 5th "series" (i.e. year of Primary School to the 3rd year of Secondary School. Data-gathering involved the application of an instrument containing 8 body figure drawings representing a range of children's and adolescents' body shapes, ranging from very slim (contour 1 to obese (contour 8. Weights and heights were also collected, and body mass index (BMI was calculated later. BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using z-scores, and as a dichotomous categorical variable, representing a diagnosis of nutritional status (normal and overweight including obesity. Results Results showed that both males and females with larger BMI z-scores chose larger body contours. Girls with higher BMI z-scores also show higher values of body image dissatisfaction. Conclusion We provided the first evidence of validity for a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents.

  16. On the Rate of Structural Change in Scale Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, David Karl John; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    We analyze the rate in which image details are suppressed as a function of the regularization parameter, using first order Tikhonov regularization, Linear Gaussian Scale Space and Total Variation image decomposition. The squared L2-norm of the regularized solution and the residual are studied as a...... function of the regularization parameter. For first order Tikhonov regularization it is shown that the norm of the regularized solution is a convex function, while the norm of the residual is not a concave function. The same result holds for Gaussian Scale Space when the parameter is the variance of the...

  17. Pharyngeal Residue Severity Rating Scales Based on Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Paul D; Hersey, Denise P; Leder, Steven B

    2016-06-01

    Identification of pharyngeal residue severity located in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses has always been a primary goal during fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Pharyngeal residue is a clinical sign of potential prandial aspiration making an accurate description of its severity an important but difficult challenge. A reliable, validated, and generalizable pharyngeal residue severity rating scale for FEES would be beneficial. A systematic review of the published English language literature since 1995 was conducted to determine the quality of existing pharyngeal residue severity rating scales based on FEES. Databases were searched using controlled vocabulary words and synonymous free text words for topics of interest (deglutition disorders, pharyngeal residue, endoscopy, videofluoroscopy, fiberoptic technology, aspiration, etc.) and outcomes of interest (scores, scales, grades, tests, FEES, etc.). Search strategies were adjusted for syntax appropriate for each database/platform. Data sources included MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-April Week 3 2015), Embase (OvidSP 1974-2015 April 20), Scopus (Elsevier), and the unindexed material in PubMed (NLM/NIH) were searched for relevant articles. Supplementary efforts to identify studies included checking reference lists of articles retrieved. Scales were compared using qualitative properties (sample size, severity definitions, number of raters, and raters' experience and training) and psychometric analyses (randomization, intra- and inter-rater reliability, and construct validity). Seven articles describing pharyngeal residue severity rating scales met inclusion criteria. Six of seven scales had insufficient data to support their use as evidenced by methodological weaknesses with both qualitative properties and psychometric analyses. There is a need for qualitative and psychometrically reliable, validated, and generalizable pharyngeal residue severity rating scales that are anatomically specific, image

  18. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  19. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS: We...... conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two...... investigators agreed on the inclusion of trials and the outcome scale. For each trial, we calculated the difference in effect size (i.e., standardized mean difference between nonblinded and blinded assessments). A difference in effect size of less than 0 suggested that nonblinded assessors generated more...

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Parent and Teacher ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Bilenberg, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence. Rating the severity of psychopathology and symptom load is essential in daily clinical practice and in research. The parent and teacher ADHD-Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) includes...... inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity subscales and is one of the most frequently used scales in treatment evaluation of children with ADHD. An extended version, mADHD-RS, also includes an oppositional defiant disorder subscale. The partial credit Rasch model, which is based on item response theory, was...... used to test the psychometric properties of this scale in a sample of 566 Danish school children between 6 and 16 years of age. The results indicated that parents and teachers had different frames of reference when rating symptoms in the mADHD-RS. There was support for the unidimensionality of the...

  1. In Search of Reaction Rate Scaling Law for Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Lou, Zhipeng; Li, Wenhai

    2015-11-01

    As a way of employing the flamelet approach, which was developed essentially for incompressible flows, to model supersonic combustion, the role ascribed to pressure has not been very convincing. That is, the reaction rate is often scaled on the square of the pressure in the finite Mach number flow field relative to the usually atmospheric static pressure field used in the generation of the flamelet library. This scaling assumption is quite simple and will therefore be very attractive if it has a sound theoretical basis and it works for a large selection of high-speed combustion flows. We try to find some justifications for different scaling laws, with the hope of coming up with a more universally-acceptable flamelet procedure for supersonic combustion.

  2. Knee instruments and rating scales designed to measure outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Merchán, E. Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the knee instruments and rating scales that are designed to measure outcomes are revised. Although the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form can be used as a general knee measure, no instrument is currently universally applicable across the spectrum of knee disorders and patient groups. Clinicians and researchers looking to use a patient-based score for measurement of outcomes must consider the specific patient population in which it has been evaluat...

  3. A consensus definition and rating scale for minimalist shoes

    OpenAIRE

    Esculier, Jean-Francois; Dubois, Blaise; Dionne, Clermont E.; Leblond, Jean; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Background While minimalist running shoes may have an influence on running biomechanics and on the incidence of overuse injuries, the term "minimalist" is currently used without standardisation. The objectives of this study were to reach a consensus on a standard definition of minimalist running shoes, and to develop and validate a rating scale that could be used to determine the degree of minimalism of running shoes, the Minimalist Index (MI). Methods For this modified Delphi study, 42 exper...

  4. Scaling laws for the upper ocean temperature dissipation rate

    OpenAIRE

    Bogucki, D.J.; Huguenard, K.; Haus, B.K.; Özgökmen, T.M.; Reniers, A.J.H.M.; Laxague, N.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of temperature dissipation rate χ within the upper ocean boundary layer, which is critical for climate forecasts, is very limited. Near-surface turbulence also affects dispersion of contaminants and biogeochemical tracers. Using high-resolution optical turbulence measurements, scaling laws for χ are investigated under forcing states where either the daytime heat flux or the wind stress forcing is dominant. We find that χ remains constant over 1.5 times the significant wave h...

  5. Heart rate detection from an electronic weighing scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel technique for beat-to-beat heart rate detection based on the ballistocardiographic (BCG) force signal from a subject standing on a common electronic weighing scale. The detection relies on sensing force variations related to the blood acceleration in the aorta, works even if wearing footwear and does not require any sensors attached to the body because it uses the load cells in the scale. We have devised an approach to estimate the sensitivity and frequency response of three commercial weighing scales to assess their capability to detect the BCG force signal. Static sensitivities ranged from 490 nV V−1 N−1 to 1670 nV V−1 N−1. The frequency response depended on the subject's mass but it was broad enough for heart rate estimation. We have designed an electronic pulse detection system based on off-the-shelf integrated circuits to sense heart-beat-related force variations of about 0.24 N. The signal-to-noise ratio of the main peaks of the force signal detected was higher than 30 dB. A Bland–Altman plot was used to compare the RR time intervals estimated from the ECG and BCG force signals for 17 volunteers. The error was ±21 ms, which makes the proposed technique suitable for short-term monitoring of the heart rate

  6. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives. PMID:26671457

  7. Psychometric Evaluation of the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in an Israeli Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkalim, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    The current study cross-culturally evaluated the psychometric properties of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2)/MMPI-2-Restructured Form Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales in psychiatric settings in Israel with a sample of 100 men and 133 women. Participants were administered the MMPI-2 and were rated by their therapists on a 188-item Patient Description Form. Results indicated that in most instances the RC Scales demonstrated equivalent or better internal consistencies and improved intercorrelation patterns relative to their clinical counterparts. Furthermore, external analyses revealed comparable or improved convergent validity (with the exceptions of Antisocial Behavior [RC4] and Ideas of Persecution [RC6] among men), and mostly greater discriminant validity. Overall, the findings indicate that consistent with previous findings, the RC Scales generally exhibit comparable to improved psychometric properties over the Clinical Scales. Implications of the results, limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:25354670

  8. Validity, reliability, and feasibility of clinical staging scales in dementia: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Tona, Klodiana Daphne; Janssen, Lieneke;

    2011-01-01

    New staging systems of dementia require adaptation of disease management programs and adequate staging instruments. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature on validity and reliability of clinically applicable, multidomain, and dementia staging instruments. A total of 23 articles...... in only 25%. The scales can be applied in ±15 minutes. Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), Global Deterioration scale (GDS), and Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) have been monitored on reliability and validity, and the CDR currently is the best-evidenced scale, also studied in international perspective......, and is available in 14 languages. Taking into account the increasing differentiation of Alzheimer's disease in preclinical and predementia stages, there is an urgent need for global rating scales to be refined as well....

  9. A Comparison of the Correlational Structures and Elevation Patterns of the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical (RC) and Clinical Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Amanda; Liljequist, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the MMPI-2 restructured clinical scales and the original clinical scales was evaluated using an outpatient clinical sample (N = 150). Similar patterns of correlations to those reported by Tellegen et al. in 2003, such as high correlations between the restructured scales and their original scale counterparts and lower…

  10. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  11. Susceptibility of the MMPI-2 Clinical, Restructured Clinical (RC), and Content Scales to Overreporting and Underreporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.; Graham, John R.; Arbisi, Paul A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined and compared the susceptibility of three Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) scale sets (Clinical, Restructured Clinical [RC], and Content) to over- and underreporting using five analog samples. Two samples of 85 and 191 undergraduate students, respectively, took the MMPI-2 under underreporting versus…

  12. Scale Specific and Scale Independent Measures of Heart Rate Variability as Risk Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yu; Levitan, J; Havlin, S; Saermark, K; Moelgaard, H; Thomsen, P E B; Möller, M; Hintze, U; Huikuri, H

    1999-01-01

    We study the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) using scale specific variance and scaling exponents as measures of healthy and cardiac impaired individuals. Our results show that the variance and the scaling exponent are highly uncorrelated. We find that the variance measure at certain scales are well suited to separate healthy subjects from heart patients. However, for cumulative survival probability the scaling exponents outperform the variance measure. Our risk study is based on a database containing recordings from 428 MI individuals (after myocardial infarct) and on database containing 105 healthy subjects and 11 heart patients. The results have been obtained by applying three recently developed methods (DFA - Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, WAV - Multiresolution Wavelet Analysis, and DTS - Detrended Time Series analysis) which are found to be highly correlated.

  13. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kottner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulness. From a measurement point of view pressure ulcer (PU risk assessment scales have serious limitations. Empirical evidence supporting the validity of PU risk assessment scale scores is weak and obtained scores contain varying amounts of measurement error. The concept of pressure ulcer risk is strongly related to the general health status and severity of illness. A clinical impact due do the application of these scales could also not be demonstrated. It is questionable whether completion of standardized pressure ulcer risk scales in clinical practice is really needed.Keywords: Braden pressure ulcer, prevention, risk assessment, nursing assessment, predictive value, clinical effectiveness, review

  14. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS: We...... conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two...... optimistic estimates of effect. We pooled the differences in effect size using inverse variance random-effects meta-analysis and used metaregression to identify potential reasons for variation. RESULTS: We included 24 trials in our review. The main meta-analysis included 16 trials (involving 2854 patients...

  15. Scaling laws for the upper ocean temperature dissipation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogucki, Darek J.; Huguenard, K.; Haus, B. K.; Özgökmen, T. M.; Reniers, A.; Laxague, N. J. M.

    2015-02-01

    Our understanding of temperature dissipation rate χ within the upper ocean boundary layer, which is critical for climate forecasts, is very limited. Near-surface turbulence also affects dispersion of contaminants and biogeochemical tracers. Using high-resolution optical turbulence measurements, scaling laws for χ are investigated under forcing states where either the daytime heat flux or the wind stress forcing is dominant. We find that χ remains constant over 1.5 times the significant wave height, while over a layer below, χ decays based on the local surface forcing. When the heat flux is dominant, traditional scaling based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory remains valid; χ ∝ z-1. When the wind stress dominates, we observe the emergence of a new scaling, χ ∝ z-1/2, which is explained by invoking the effect of small-scale coherent structures on vertical heat transport. These results have implications for improved modeling of the ocean's heat and CO2 intake.

  16. Quantitative regional validation of the visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Validate the four-point visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) on magnetic resonance images (MRI) through quantitative grey matter (GM) volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to justify its use in clinical practice. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 128 with subjective memory complaints underwent 3T MRI. PCA was rated according to the visual rating scale. GM volumes of six posterior structures and the total posterior region were extracted using IBASPM and compared among PCA groups. To determine which anatomical regions contributed most to the visual scores, we used binary logistic regression. VBM compared local GM density among groups. Patients were categorised according to their PCA scores: PCA-0 (n = 122), PCA-1 (n = 143), PCA-2 (n = 79), and PCA-3 (n = 13). All structures except the posterior cingulate differed significantly among groups. The inferior parietal gyrus volume discriminated the most between rating scale levels. VBM showed that PCA-1 had a lower GM volume than PCA-0 in the parietal region and other brain regions, whereas between PCA-1 and PCA-2/3 GM atrophy was mostly restricted to posterior regions. The visual PCA rating scale is quantitatively validated and reliably reflects GM atrophy in parietal regions, making it a valuable tool for the daily radiological assessment of dementia. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative regional validation of the visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Christiane; Benedictus, Marije R.; Koedam, Esther L.G.M.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Versteeg, Adriaan; Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Validate the four-point visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) on magnetic resonance images (MRI) through quantitative grey matter (GM) volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to justify its use in clinical practice. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 128 with subjective memory complaints underwent 3T MRI. PCA was rated according to the visual rating scale. GM volumes of six posterior structures and the total posterior region were extracted using IBASPM and compared among PCA groups. To determine which anatomical regions contributed most to the visual scores, we used binary logistic regression. VBM compared local GM density among groups. Patients were categorised according to their PCA scores: PCA-0 (n = 122), PCA-1 (n = 143), PCA-2 (n = 79), and PCA-3 (n = 13). All structures except the posterior cingulate differed significantly among groups. The inferior parietal gyrus volume discriminated the most between rating scale levels. VBM showed that PCA-1 had a lower GM volume than PCA-0 in the parietal region and other brain regions, whereas between PCA-1 and PCA-2/3 GM atrophy was mostly restricted to posterior regions. The visual PCA rating scale is quantitatively validated and reliably reflects GM atrophy in parietal regions, making it a valuable tool for the daily radiological assessment of dementia. (orig.)

  18. The improved Clinical Global Impression Scale (iCGI: development and validation in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadouri Alane

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI is frequently used in medical care and clinical research because of its face validity and practicability. This study proposes to improve the reliability of the Clinical Global Impression (CGI scale in depressive disorders by the use of a semi-standardized interview, a new response format, and a Delphi procedure. Methods Thirty patients hospitalised for a major depressive episode were filmed at T1 (first week in hospital and at T2 (2 weeks later during a 5' specific interview. The Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale and the Symptom Check List were also rated. Eleven psychiatrists rated these videos using either the usual CGI response format or an improved response format, with or without a Delphi procedure. Results The new response format slightly improved (but not significantly the interrater agreement, the Delphi procedure did not. The best results were obtained when ratings by 4 independent raters were averaged. In this situation, intraclass correlation coefficients were about 0.9. Conclusion The Clinical Global Impression is a useful approach in psychiatry since it apprehends patients in their entirety. This study shows that it is possible to quantify such impressions with a high level of interrater agreement.

  19. The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C–SSRS): Has the “Gold Standard” Become a Liability?

    OpenAIRE

    Giddens, Jennifer M.; Sheehan, Kathy Harnett; Sheehan, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The Columbia– Suicide Severity Rating Scale has become the gold standard for the assessment of suicidal ideation and behavior in clinical trials. Criticism of the instrument has been mounting. We examine whether the instrument meets widely accepted psychometric standards and maps to the United States Food and Drug Administration’s most recent 2012 algorithm for assessment of suicidal phenomena. Our goal is to determine if the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale should be retaine...

  20. Effect of clinic related factors on continuation rates of IUDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, A E; Goldstuck, N D

    1982-01-01

    This paper concerns factors relating to the clinic and the way in which the insertion of IUDs is managed from a psychological and technical standpoint. 3 aspects of clinical service are examined: 1) the influence of the psychological state at time of insertion, 2) individual differences in relation to side effects amongst users and the way in which those are influenced by managment techniques, and 3) technical aspects of the insertion of the device. Insertion pain and discomfort may influence subsequent tolerance of the IUD in 3 ways: 1) patient compliance may be enhanced by trouble-free insertion, 2) an unpleasant experience may influence attitudes towards the IUD, and 3) the experience of pain at insertion may reduce subsequent tolerance of discomfort. IUDs increase the amount of menstrual flow which, along with pain, constitute frequent requests for removal. Removal rates for pain and bleeding vary from 0-16.8/100 users. Removal rates for bleeding are also influenced by cultural attitudes. Insertion techniques influence acceptability of IUDs. Also, the incidence of expulsion, pregnancy, and removal declines with increasing age and parity. Discontinuation rates after 24 months were 91% for women below 2nd parity and only 37% for women of 6 or more parity. In the youngest age group the discontinuation rate was 76% compared with 35% in the oldest age group. The timing of IUD insertion and positioning of the IUD influence continuation rates. An implication of these concerns is that IUD insertion procedures may have to become more complex to achieve compatibility between IUD-uterine configurations. PMID:12264121

  1. Clinical evaluation of a novel respiratory rate monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory rate has been shown to be an important predictor of cardiac arrest, respiratory adverse events and intensive care unit admission and has been designated a vital sign. However it is often inadequately monitored in hospitals. We test the hypothesis that RespiraSense, a piezoelectric-based novel respiratory rate (RR) monitor which measures the differential motion of the chest and abdomen during respiratory effort, is not inferior to commonly used methods of respiratory rate measurement. Respiratory rate was compared between the developed RespiraSense device and both electrocardiogram and direct observation by nursing staff. Data was collected from 48 patients admitted to the post-anaesthesia care unit in a tertiary level hospital. The primary outcome measure was difference in average RR calculated over a 15 min interval between (1) RespiraSense and ECG and (2) RespiraSense and nurses' evaluation. The secondary outcome measure was the correlation between the respiratory rates measured using these three methods. The 95 % confidence interval for the difference in average RR between RespiraSense and ECG was calculated to be [-3.9, 3.1]. The 95 % confidence interval for the difference in average RR between RespiraSense and nurses' evaluation was [-5.5, 4.3]. We demonstrate a clinically relevant agreement between RR monitored by the RespiraSense device with both ECG-derived and manually observed RR in 48 post-surgical patients in a PACU environment. PMID:25900144

  2. The VAGUS insight into psychosis scale--self-report and clinician-rated versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerretsen, Philip; Remington, Gary; Borlido, Carol; Quilty, Lena; Hassan, Sabrina; Polsinelli, Gina; Teo, Celine; Mar, Wanna; Simon, Regina; Menon, Mahesh; Pothier, David D; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Caravaggio, Fernando; Mamo, David C; Rajji, Tarek K; Mulsant, Benoit H; Deluca, Vincenzo; Ganguli, Rohan; Pollock, Bruce G; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2014-12-30

    The aim of this study was to develop self-report and clinician-rated versions of an insight scale that would be easy to administer, sensitive to small changes, and inclusive of the core dimensions of clinical insight into psychosis. Ten-item self-report (VAGUS-SR) and five-item clinician-rated (VAGUS-CR) scales were designed to measure the dimensions of insight into psychosis and evaluated in 215 and 140 participants, respectively (www.vagusonline.com). Tests of reliability and validity were performed. Both the VAGUS-SR and VAGUS-CR showed good internal consistency and reliability. They demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity. Both versions were strongly correlated with one another and with the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight and Birchwood Insight Scale. Exploratory factor analyses identified three possible latent components of insight. The VAGUS-CR and VAGUS-SR are valid, reliable and easy to administer. They are build on previous insight scales with separate clinician-rated and self-report versions. The VAGUS-SR exhibited a multidimensional factor structure. Using a 10-point Likert scale for each item, the VAGUS has the capacity to detect small, temporally sensitive changes in insight, which is essential for intervention studies with neurostimulation or rapidly acting medications. PMID:25246410

  3. Assessment of competence for caesarean section with global rating scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish as reliable and valid the nine-point global rating scale for assessing residents' independent performance of Caesarean Section. Methods: The validation study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aga Khan University Hospital, from April to December 2008, and comprised 15 residents during 40 Caesarean Sections over 9 months. Independently two evaluators rated each procedure and the difficulty of each case. Results: The observations per faculty ranged from 1-8 (mean 4.07+- 2.56). The Year 4 residents were observed the most i.e. 32 (40%), followed by Year 3, 30 (37.5%); Year 2; 14 (17.5%); and Year 1, 4 (5%). Mean time required for observation of the surgery was 43.81+-14.28 (range: 20-90) with a mode of 45 min. Mean aggregate rating on all items showed gradual progression with the year of residency. The assessment tool had an internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha) of 0.9097 with low inter-rater reliability. Conclusion: The evaluation tool was found to be reliable and valid for evaluating a resident's competence for performing Caesarean Section. Training of the assessors is required for a better inter-rater agreement. (author)

  4. Burn-rate Measurement on Small-scale Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Maggi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale rocket motors are widely used by propulsion industries to carry out burn ratemeasurement for a variety of needs. Several automated data-reduction procedures have beenimplemented to derive burn rate from pressure-time profiles resulting from experimentation. Evenif these are easy and fast to use, these procedures are not completely reliable in that thesemeasure only the average behaviour of a motor. A new model has recently been proposed toovercome this problem. However, it was soon noticed that the results depend on the propellantgrain production and forming processes even if the motor hardware is the same. A series ofpropellant grains has been produced to be sampled to map the local ballistic behaviour andchanges introduced by the manufacturing process. In this study, sampling and testing proceduresare reported and the results of an almost complete grain mapping are discussed.

  5. The clinical utility of the MMPI-2-RF Suicidal/Death Ideation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Emily; Bodell, Lindsay; Carbonell, Joyce; Joiner, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern, with over 100 individuals dying by suicide per day in the United States alone. Therefore, suicide risk assessment is an essential aspect of mental health care. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008-2011; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008) has a Suicidal/Death Ideation (SUI) scale consisting of 5 items that describe recent suicidal ideation or behaviors. Although this scale has clear face validity, few studies have examined the clinical utility of this scale. The purpose of the current study was to examine associations between the SUI scale and other established measures of suicidal ideation and behavior, including the Depressive Symptom Inventory Suicidality Subscale (DSI-SS; Metalsky & Joiner, 1997), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS; Beck & Steer, 1991; Beck, Steer, & Ranieri, 1988), self-report of lifetime suicide attempts, and clinician ratings of suicide risk. Participants were 998 therapy- and assessment-seeking outpatients. Analyses indicated that the SUI scale was positively associated with other self-reported measures of suicidal ideation and behavior. Significant differences in SUI scale scores also emerged among the clinician rating categories of suicide risk. The SUI scale was able to predict previous suicide attempts over and above age, gender, and other MMPI-2-RF scales related to depression. Finally, relative risk ratios for suicide attempts indicate increased risk of suicidality, with higher T scores on the SUI scale. Overall, findings suggest that the MMPI-2-RF SUI scale may be a useful tool for identifying individuals at risk for suicidal ideation and behavior in clinical settings. PMID:25068910

  6. Validation of Empirically Derived Rating Scales for a Story Retelling Speaking Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Akiyo; Koizumi, Rie

    2013-01-01

    In recognition of the rating scale as a crucial tool of performance assessment, this study aims to establish a rating scale suitable for a Story Retelling Speaking Test (SRST), which is a semidirect test of speaking ability in English as a foreign language for classroom use. To identify an appropriate scale, three rating scales, all of which have…

  7. Entrustability Scales: Outlining Their Usefulness for Competency-Based Clinical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekman, Janelle; Gofton, Wade; Dudek, Nancy; Gofton, Tyson; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2016-02-01

    Meaningful residency education occurs at the bedside, along with opportunities for situated in-training assessment. A necessary component of workplace-based assessment (WBA) is the clinical supervisor, whose subjective judgments of residents' performance can yield rich and nuanced ratings but may also occasionally reflect bias. How to improve the validity of WBA instruments while simultaneously capturing meaningful subjective judgment is currently not clear. This Perspective outlines how "entrustability scales" may help bridge the gap between the assessment judgments of clinical supervisors and WBA instruments. Entrustment-based assessment evaluates trainees against what they will actually do when independent; thus, "entrustability scales"-defined as behaviorally anchored ordinal scales based on progression to competence-reflect a judgment that has clinical meaning for assessors. Rather than asking raters to assess trainees against abstract scales, entrustability scales provide raters with an assessment measure structured around the way evaluators already make day-to-day clinical entrustment decisions, which results in increased reliability. Entrustability scales help raters make assessments based on narrative descriptors that reflect real-world judgments, drawing attention to a trainee's readiness for independent practice rather than his/her deficiencies. These scales fit into milestone measurement both by allowing an individual resident to strive for independence in entrustable professional activities across the entire training period and by allowing residency directors to identify residents experiencing difficulty. Some WBA tools that have begun to use variations of entrustability scales show potential for allowing raters to produce valid judgments. This type of anchor scale should be brought into wider circulation. PMID:26630609

  8. The quenching time scale and quenching rate of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The average star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies has been declining since redshift of 2. A fraction of galaxies quench and become quiescent. We constrain two key properties of the quenching process: the quenching time scale and the quenching rate among galaxies. We achieve this by analyzing the galaxy number density profile in NUV-u color space and the distribution in NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram with a simple toy-model framework. We focus on galaxies in three mass bins between 10 to 10 and 10 to 10.6 solar mass. In the NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram, the red u-i galaxies exhibit a different slope from the slope traced by the star-forming galaxies. This angled distribution and the number density profile of galaxies in NUV-u space strongly suggest that the decline of the SFR in galaxies has to accelerate before they turn quiescent. We model this color-color distribution with a two-phase exponential decline star formation history. The models with an e-folding time in the second phase (the quenching p...

  9. Achievable Rates and Scaling Laws for Cognitive Radio Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devroye Natasha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cognitive radios have the potential to vastly improve communication over wireless channels. We outline recent information theoretic results on the limits of primary and cognitive user communication in single and multiple cognitive user scenarios. We first examine the achievable rate and capacity regions of single user cognitive channels. Results indicate that at medium SNR (0–20 dB, the use of cognition improves rates significantly compared to the currently suggested spectral gap-filling methods of secondary spectrum access. We then study another information theoretic measure, the multiplexing gain. This measure captures the number of point-to-point Gaussian channels contained in a cognitive channel as the SNR tends to infinity. Next, we consider a cognitive network with a single primary user and multiple cognitive users. We show that with single-hop transmission, the sum capacity of the cognitive users scales linearly with the number of users. We further introduce and analyze the primary exclusive radius, inside of which primary receivers are guaranteed a desired outage performance. These results provide guidelines when designing a network with secondary spectrum users.

  10. Achievable Rates and Scaling Laws for Cognitive Radio Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Devroye

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radios have the potential to vastly improve communication over wireless channels. We outline recent information theoretic results on the limits of primary and cognitive user communication in single and multiple cognitive user scenarios. We first examine the achievable rate and capacity regions of single user cognitive channels. Results indicate that at medium SNR (0–20 dB, the use of cognition improves rates significantly compared to the currently suggested spectral gap-filling methods of secondary spectrum access. We then study another information theoretic measure, the multiplexing gain. This measure captures the number of point-to-point Gaussian channels contained in a cognitive channel as the SNR tends to infinity. Next, we consider a cognitive network with a single primary user and multiple cognitive users. We show that with single-hop transmission, the sum capacity of the cognitive users scales linearly with the number of users. We further introduce and analyze the primary exclusive radius, inside of which primary receivers are guaranteed a desired outage performance. These results provide guidelines when designing a network with secondary spectrum users.

  11. Adaptation of abbreviated mathematics anxiety rating scale for engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Sayed Kushairi Sayed; Samat, Khairul Fadzli; Sultan, Al Amin Mohamed; Halim, Bushra Abdul; Ismail, Siti Fatimah; Mafazi, Nurul Wirdah

    2015-05-01

    Mathematics is an essential and fundamental tool used by engineers to analyse and solve problems in their field. Due to this, most engineering education programs involve a concentration of study in mathematics courses whereby engineering students have to take mathematics courses such as numerical methods, differential equations and calculus in the first two years and continue to do so until the completion of the sequence. However, the students struggled and had difficulties in learning courses that require mathematical abilities. Hence, this study presents the factors that caused mathematics anxiety among engineering students using Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (AMARS) through 95 students of Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM). From 25 items in AMARS, principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that there are four mathematics anxiety factors, namely experiences of learning mathematics, cognitive skills, mathematics evaluation anxiety and students' perception on mathematics. Minitab 16 software was used to analyse the nonparametric statistics. Kruskal-Wallis Test indicated that there is a significant difference in the experience of learning mathematics and mathematics evaluation anxiety among races. The Chi-Square Test of Independence revealed that the experience of learning mathematics, cognitive skills and mathematics evaluation anxiety depend on the results of their SPM additional mathematics. Based on this study, it is recommended to address the anxiety problems among engineering students at the early stage of studying in the university. Thus, lecturers should play their part by ensuring a positive classroom environment which encourages students to study mathematics without fear.

  12. Category-rating and magnitude estimation scaling techniques: an empirical comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Wegener, Bernd

    1983-01-01

    "The application of a system of measurement structures for category-rating and magnitude scales is tested with regard to numerous sensory and social judgment scales. Results indicate that, on the average, category-rating scales yield interval scales and multimodality matching scales yield logarithmic interval scales. However, marked interindividual differences are detected, pointing to different capabilities subjects have in coping with both methods. It is asked, therefore, how suboptimal sca...

  13. Item Response Theory Analyses of the Parent and Teacher Ratings of the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson

    2008-01-01

    The graded response model (GRM), which is based on item response theory (IRT), was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms in an ADHD rating scale. To accomplish this, parents and teachers completed the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale (DARS; Gomez et al., "Journal of Child Psychology and…

  14. The Weather-Beaten Dorsal Hand Clinical Rating, Shadow Casting Optical Profilometry, and Skin Capacitance Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Delvenne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laypeople commonly perceive some skin xerosis and withering (roughness changes during winter on some parts of the body, particularly on the dorsal hands. The aim of the study was to assess the withered skin surface changes occurring during the four seasons. A total of 47 menopausal women completed the study. A group of 31 volunteers were on hormone replacement therapy (HRT and 16 were out of HRT. Skin xerosis and scaliness were rated clinically. In addition, skin whitening was assessed by computerized shadow casting optical profilometry and by skin capacitance mapping. The volunteers were not using topical creams and over-the-counter products on their hands. Marked changes, recorded over the successive seasons, corresponded to patchy heterogeneous stratum corneum hydration and heterogeneous skin surface roughness changing over seasons; they likely resulted from changes in the environmental temperature and atmosphere moisture. The severity of the changes revealed by clinical inspection was not supported by similar directions of fluctuations in the instrumental assessments. This seemingly contradiction was in fact due to different levels of scale observation. The clinical centimetric scale and the instrumental inframillimetric scale possibly provide distinct aspects of a given biological impact.

  15. French version validation of the psychotic symptom rating scales (PSYRATS for outpatients with persistent psychotic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favrod Jerome

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most scales that assess the presence and severity of psychotic symptoms often measure a broad range of experiences and behaviours, something that restricts the detailed measurement of specific symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations. The Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS is a clinical assessment tool that focuses on the detailed measurement of these core symptoms. The goal of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the French version of the PSYRATS. Methods A sample of 103 outpatients suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders and presenting persistent psychotic symptoms over the previous three months was assessed using the PSYRATS. Seventy-five sample participants were also assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. Results ICCs were superior to .90 for all items of the PSYRATS. Factor analysis replicated the factorial structure of the original version of the delusions scale. Similar to previous replications, the factor structure of the hallucinations scale was partially replicated. Convergent validity indicated that some specific PSYRATS items do not correlate with the PANSS delusions or hallucinations. The distress items of the PSYRATS are negatively correlated with the grandiosity scale of the PANSS. Conclusions The results of this study are limited by the relatively small sample size as well as the selection of participants with persistent symptoms. The French version of the PSYRATS partially replicates previously published results. Differences in factor structure of the hallucinations scale might be explained by greater variability of its elements. The future development of the scale should take into account the presence of grandiosity in order to better capture details of the psychotic experience.

  16. Scaling and universality in heart rate variability distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, M. G.; Peng, C. K.; Mietus, J. E.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    We find that a universal homogeneous scaling form describes the distribution of cardiac variations for a group of healthy subjects, which is stable over a wide range of time scales. However, a similar scaling function does not exist for a group with a common cardiopulmonary instability associated with sleep apnea. Subtle differences in the distributions for the day- and night-phase dynamics for healthy subjects are detected.

  17. The Bipolar Affective Disorder Dimension Scale (BADDS – a dimensional scale for rating lifetime psychopathology in Bipolar spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current operational diagnostic systems have substantial limitations for lifetime diagnostic classification of bipolar spectrum disorders. Issues include: (1 It is difficult to operationalize the integration of diverse episodes of psychopathology, (2 Hierarchies lead to loss of information, (3 Boundaries between diagnostic categories are often arbitrary, (4 Boundaries between categories usually require a major element of subjective interpretation, (5 Available diagnostic categories are relatively unhelpful in distinguishing severity, (6 "Not Otherwise Specified (NOS" categories are highly heterogeneous, (7 Subclinical cases are not accommodated usefully within the current diagnostic categories. This latter limitation is particularly pertinent in the context of the increasing evidence for the existence of a broader bipolar spectrum than has been acknowledged within existing classifications. Method We have developed a numerical rating system, the Bipolar Affective Disorder Dimension Scale, BADDS, that can be used as an adjunct to conventional best-estimate lifetime diagnostic procedures. The scale definitions were informed by (a the current concepts of mood syndrome recognized within DSMIV and ICD10, (b the literature regarding severity of episodes, and (c our own clinical experience. We undertook an iterative process in which we initially agreed scale definitions, piloted their use on sets of cases and made modifications to improve utility and reliability. Results BADDS has four dimensions, each rated as an integer on a 0 – 100 scale, that measure four key domains of lifetime psychopathology: Mania (M, Depression (D, Psychosis (P and Incongruence (I. In our experience it is easy to learn, straightforward to use, has excellent inter-rater reliability and retains the key information required to make diagnoses according to DSMIV and ICD10. Conclusions Use of BADDS as an adjunct to conventional categorical diagnosis provides a

  18. The Mouse Grimace Scale: A Clinically Useful Tool?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Miller

    Full Text Available Medical research has a heavy and continuing demand for rodent models across a range of disciplines. Behavioural assessment of pain in such models is highly time consuming, thus limiting the number of models and analgesics that can be studied. Facial expressions are widely used to assess pain in human infants. Recently the mouse grimace scale (MGS has been developed and shown to be accurate and reliable, requiring only a short amount of training for the observer. This system therefore has the potential to become a highly useful tool both in pain research and clinical assessment of mouse pain. To date, the MGS has only been used as a research tool, however there is increasing interest in its use in cage-side clinical assessment. It is often wrongly assumed that MGS scores of animals not in pain (i.e. at baseline are zero. Here, we aimed to assess the variability in baseline MGS scores between cohorts, sexes and strains of mice. Establishing the presence of a consistent baseline MGS score could lead to a valuable clinical pain assessment tool for mice when baseline information from the individual mouse may not be available as a comparator. Results demonstrated a significant difference in baseline MGS scores between both sexes (males > females and strains of mice. The method used to score the facial action units (Live vs. retrospectively from still images demonstrated significant differences in scores with live scores being significantly lower than retrospective scoring from images. The level of variation shown demonstrates the need for further research to be undertaken with regard to establishing baseline MGS scores for specific strains and sexes of mice, taking into account the method of scoring, prior to considering clinical implementation of this method in pain assessment.

  19. The canine cognitive dysfunction rating scale (CCDR): a data-driven and ecologically relevant assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvin, Hannah E; McGreevy, Paul D; Sachdev, Perminder S; Valenzuela, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) is an age-related neurobehavioural syndrome which, although common, is severely under-diagnosed in community-based dogs. Using data from a large cross-sectional survey of older dogs (n=957), this study aimed to develop a clinical scale for assessing CCD. Data-driven analytical techniques were used to distil 27 significant behavioural items (previously identified as relevant to CCD) into an assessment tool with maximal cognito-behavioural breadth whilst maintaining clinical utility. The resulting CCD rating scale (CCDR) comprised 13 behavioural items, of which three were sensitive to the severity of the disease stage. When tested on an independent survey sample, the CCDR had an overall 98.9% diagnostic accuracy with a 77.8% positive predictive value and a 99.3% negative predictive value. Test-re-test reliability of the CCDR over 2months was also high (r=0.73, P<0.0001). In conjunction with veterinary assessment, the CCDR could be a valuable tool in research and clinical settings for both the assessment and longitudinal tracking of cognitive change. PMID:20542455

  20. Visual assessment of posterior atrophy development of a MRI rating scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koedam, Esther L.G.E.; Scheltens, Philip; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lehmann, Manja; Fox, Nick [UCL Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik; Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    To develop a visual rating scale for posterior atrophy (PA) assessment and to analyse whether this scale aids in the discrimination between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Magnetic resonance imaging of 118 memory clinic patients were analysed for PA (range 0-3), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) (range 0-4) and global cortical atrophy (range 0-3) by different raters. Weighted-kappas were calculated for inter- and intra-rater agreement. Relationships between PA and MTA with the MMSE and age were estimated with linear-regression analysis. Intra-rater agreement ranged between 0.93 and 0.95 and inter-rater agreement between 0.65 and 0.84. Mean PA scores were higher in AD compared to controls (1.6 {+-} 0.9 and 0.6 {+-} 0.7, p < 0.01), and other dementias (0.8 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.01). PA was not associated with age compared to MTA (B = 1.1 (0.8) versus B = 3.1 (0.7), p < 0.01). PA and MTA were independently negatively associated with the MMSE (B = -1.6 (0.5), p < 0.01 versus B = -1.4 (0.5), p < 0.01). This robust and reproducible scale for PA assessment conveys independent information in a clinical setting and may be useful in the discrimination of AD from other dementias. (orig.)

  1. Visual assessment of posterior atrophy development of a MRI rating scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a visual rating scale for posterior atrophy (PA) assessment and to analyse whether this scale aids in the discrimination between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Magnetic resonance imaging of 118 memory clinic patients were analysed for PA (range 0-3), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) (range 0-4) and global cortical atrophy (range 0-3) by different raters. Weighted-kappas were calculated for inter- and intra-rater agreement. Relationships between PA and MTA with the MMSE and age were estimated with linear-regression analysis. Intra-rater agreement ranged between 0.93 and 0.95 and inter-rater agreement between 0.65 and 0.84. Mean PA scores were higher in AD compared to controls (1.6 ± 0.9 and 0.6 ± 0.7, p < 0.01), and other dementias (0.8 ± 0.8, p < 0.01). PA was not associated with age compared to MTA (B = 1.1 (0.8) versus B = 3.1 (0.7), p < 0.01). PA and MTA were independently negatively associated with the MMSE (B = -1.6 (0.5), p < 0.01 versus B = -1.4 (0.5), p < 0.01). This robust and reproducible scale for PA assessment conveys independent information in a clinical setting and may be useful in the discrimination of AD from other dementias. (orig.)

  2. THE RATE OF CLINICAL RESPONSE OF ORAL LOADING SODIUM VALPROATE IN ACUTELY MANLC PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K SHAFIEE

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acheiving accelerated clinical response is desirable in patients with acute manic episode. We conducted a prospective study to compare the rate of clinical response of oral loading sodium valproate versus standard dose titration. Methods: Fourty - two patients who met DSM - IV critevia for current manic episode and who had a "Young mania rating scale "score between 20 and 50 were randomly assigned on a double blind basis to recieve valproate oral "loading"(N = 21 at a dose of 20 mg/kg in divided doses for 7 days and valproate "non -loading" at a starting dose of 10 mg/kg followed by standard titration which at day 6 , they recieved 20 mg/kg valproate. Patients were scored at day 0, 3, 5 and 7 by a blindraterusing YMRS. Results: There was no significat differences between the groups in advers events and useing of adjunctive tranquilizer .The efficacy of valproate in both two groups was similar but " the rate of improvement on YMRS" over the first 3 days was significantly greater in loading group. Conclusion: Valproate oral loading with sodium valproate can induced a more rapid clinical response in acutely manic patient.

  3. A rating scale for the assessment of objective and subjective formal Thought and Language Disorder (TALD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Tilo; Krug, Axel; Stratmann, Mirjam; Ghazi, Sayed; Schales, Christian; Frauenheim, Michael; Turner, Lena; Fährmann, Paul; Hornig, Tobias; Katzev, Michael; Grosvald, Michael; Müller-Isberner, Rüdiger; Nagels, Arne

    2014-12-01

    Formal thought disorder (FTD) is a core syndrome of schizophrenia. However, patients with other diagnoses, such as mania and depression amongst others, also present with FTD. We introduce a novel, comprehensive clinical rating scale, capturing the full variety of FTD phenomenology including subjective experiences. The 30-item Thought and Language Disorder (TALD) scale is based on a detailed review of the literature, encompassing all formal thought disorder symptoms reported from the early 20th century onwards. Objectively observable symptoms as well as subjective phenomena were included. Two hundred and ten participants (146 patients ICD-10 diagnoses: depression n=63, schizophrenia n=63, mania n=20; 64 healthy control subjects) were interviewed and symptoms rated with the TALD, TLC, HAMD, YMRS and SAPS/SANS. A principal component analyses was performed for the TALD to differentiate sub-syndromes. The principal component analysis revealed four FTD factors; objective and subjective as well as positive and negative factor dimensions. The correlation analyses with the TLC and the SAPS/SANS FTD sub-scores demonstrated the factor validity for the objective factors. The different diagnoses showed a distinct pattern of symptom severity in each of the factors, with mania patients exhibiting the highest value in the positive, objective dimension. The scale showed good psychometric results, which makes it a practicable, nosologically-open instrument for the detailed assessment of all FTD dimensions. The results strengthen the importance of subjective symptom assessment reported by the patient. PMID:25458572

  4. A succinct rating scale for radiology report quality

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chengwu; Kasales, Claudia J; Ouyang, Tao; Peterson, Christine M; Sarwani, Nabeel I; Tappouni, Rafel; Bruno, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Poorly written radiology reports are common among residents and are a significant challenge for radiology education. While training may improve report quality, a professionally developed reliable and valid scale to measure report quality does not exist. Objectives: To develop a measurement tool for report quality, the quality of report scale, with rigorous validation through empirical data. Methods: A research team of an experienced psychometrician and six senior radiologists conduct...

  5. Evaluating the quality of analytic ratings with Mokken scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie A. Wind

    2015-01-01

    Greatly influenced by the work of Rasch (1960/1980), Mokken (1971) presented a nonparametric scaling procedure that is based on the theory of invariant measurement, but draws upon less strict requirements related to the scale of measurement. Because they are theoretically and empirically related to Rasch models, Mokken’s nonparametric models have been recognized as a useful exploratory tool for examining data in terms of the basic requirements for invariant measurement before the application ...

  6. Dose-rate scaling factor estimation of THOR BNCT test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, an epithermal neutron test beam was designed and constructed at the Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor (THOR) for the purpose of preliminary dosimetric experiments in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A new epithermal neutron beam was designed at this facility, and is currently under construction, with clinical trials targeted in late 2004. Depth dose-rate distributions for the THOR BNCT test beam have been measured by means of activation foil and dual ion chamber techniques. Neutron and structure-induced gamma spectra measured at the test beam exit were configured into a source function for the Monte Carlo-based treatment planning code NCTPlan. Dose-rate scaling factors (DRSFs) were determined to normalize computationally derived dose-rate distributions with experimental measurements in corresponding mathematical and physical phantoms, and to thus enable accurate treatment planning using the NCTPlan code. A similar approach will be implemented in characterizing the new THOR epithermal beam in preparation for clinical studies. This paper reports the in-phantom calculated and experimental dosimetry comparisons and derived DRSFs obtained with the THOR test beam

  7. Zung, Beck, and Hamilton Rating Scales as Measures of Treatment Outcome: A Meta-Analytic Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Treatment studies using the Zung Self-Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression as dependent measures were reviewed to determine whether these scales provide comparable data for assessing treatment effects. Results indicated that the Zung and the Beck showed less change in depression following…

  8. Discriminant Validity of the Windward Rating Scale: Screening for Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Roger S.; Tomikawa, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    The Windward Rating Scale (WRS), a locally-developed teacher rating scale of student behavior, was evaluated for potential use as a screening measure. Pre-certification ratings of 720 learning disabled students and non-special education students in grades K-6 were analyzed. Psychometric properties and diagnostic efficiency of the WRS were…

  9. Development of the Self-Esteem Rating Scale for Children (Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Lian-Hwang

    1987-01-01

    Developed a teacher's rating scale of self-esteem for children. Participants were 231 school children in grades K-7. Used sociometric measures, popularity ranking by teachers, and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory to estimate validity. The Self-Esteem Rating Scale for Children (SERSC) included 12 behavioral characteristics rated most…

  10. The Construction and Norm-Finding of a Rating Scale for Diagnosing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hooshyari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation and diagnosis are determinants of treatment outcome; therefore, diagnostic tools should be accurate. The purpose of the present research is construction and norm-finding of a rating scale for the diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Method: A checklist based on behavioral symptoms of ADHD from clinical sources was constructed, based on interview with patients and the medical records. After being studied by specialists, this checklist was reduced to items and arranged in a rating scale format. The study population included Tehran's elementary school students (boys and girls from which a sample of 800 children was chosen in a random-cluster manner. Then teachers were asked to rate the students according to the scale characteristics. After two weeks, the subjects were tested and interviewed using a corrected form of the scale, the rating scale of Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP-IV and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV. After data analysis the scale was reduced to 23 items. Results: According to the results of the analysis, the scale had two factors: The first factor was hyperactivity that explained 37.41%, and the second factor was attention deficit that explained 33.78% of the total variance . Cronbach's alpha was 0.96 and the alpha of the two subscales, hyperactivity and attention deficit, was 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. Spearman-Brown Coefficient was 0.78 and scale coefficient correlation with a similar from (SNAP-IV was 0.82. Criterion validity coefficient of the scale was 0.76 and the content validity of the scale was confirmed by the experts. According to sensitivity analysis of the trait, the cutoff point of the scale was 35. Considering the above findings, we can safely use the above scale in clinical studies. Conclusion: Considering the obtained values in the psychometric indexes and the consensus among specialists on the basis of test content validity and

  11. Two New Rating Scales for Assessment of ADHD Symptoms in Italian Preschool Children: A Comparison between Parent and Teacher Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Anna Maria; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Two new rating scales are presented for the assessment of ADHD symptoms in Italian preschool children, and the agreement between parents and teachers on the presence of an ADHD profile is examined. Method: The scales were administered to parents and teachers of 180 children with a mean age of 5 years and 9 months, attending final year…

  12. On the context-dependent scaling of consumer feeding rates

    OpenAIRE

    Barrios-O'Neill, Daniel; Kelly, Ruth; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Ricciardi, Anthony; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Emmerson, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The stability of consumer-resource systems can depend on the form of feeding interactions (i.e. functional responses). Size-based models predict interactions - and thus stability - based on consumer-resource size ratios. However, little is known about how interaction contexts (e.g. simple or complex habitats) might alter scaling relationships. Addressing this, we experimentally measured interactions between a large size range of aquatic predators (4-6400 mg over 1347 feeding trials) and an in...

  13. Orbit width scaling of TAE instability growth rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth rate of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) driven unstable by resonant coupling of energetic charged particles is evaluated in the ballooning limit over a wide range of parameters. All damping effects are ignored. Variations in orbit width, aspect ratio, and the ratio of alfven velocity to energetic particle birth velocity, are explored. The relative contribution of passing and trapped particles, and finite Larmor radius effects, are also examined. The phase space location of resonant particles with interact strongly with the modes is described. The accuracy of the analytic results with respect to growth rate magnitude and parametric dependence is investigated by comparison with numerical results

  14. A comparison of the performance of rating scales used in the diagnosis of postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W M; Harris, B; Lazarus, J; Richards, C

    1998-09-01

    The results of a study looking into the association between thyroid status and depression in the postpartum period were reanalysed to explore the psychometric properties of the rating scales employed. The performance of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was found to be superior to that of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in identifying RDC-defined depression, and on a par with the observer-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, which it also matched for sensitivity to change in mood state over time. The anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale performed well, reflecting the fact that anxiety represents a prominent symptom in postnatal depression. PMID:9761410

  15. Examining rating scales using Rasch and Mokken models for rater-mediated assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    A variety of methods for evaluating the psychometric quality of rater-mediated assessments have been proposed, including rater effects based on latent trait models (e.g., Engelhard, 2013; Wolfe, 2009). Although information about rater effects contributes to the interpretation and use of rater-assigned scores, it is also important to consider ratings in terms of the structure of the rating scale on which scores are assigned. Further, concern with the validity of rater-assigned scores necessitates investigation of these quality control indices within student subgroups, such as gender, language, and race/ethnicity groups. Using a set of guidelines for evaluating the interpretation and use of rating scales adapted from Linacre (1999, 2004), this study demonstrates methods that can be used to examine rating scale functioning within and across student subgroups with indicators from Rasch measurement theory (Rasch, 1960) and Mokken scale analysis (Mokken, 1971). Specifically, this study illustrates indices of rating scale effectiveness based on Rasch models and models adapted from Mokken scaling, and considers whether the two approaches to evaluating the interpretation and use of rating scales lead to comparable conclusions within the context of a large-scale rater-mediated writing assessment. Major findings suggest that indices of rating scale effectiveness based on a parametric and nonparametric approach provide related, but slightly different, information about the structure of rating scales. Implications for research, theory, and practice are discussed. PMID:24950531

  16. Scaling laws for the upper ocean temperature dissipation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogucki, D.J.; Huguenard, K.; Haus, B.K.; Özgökmen, T.M.; Reniers, A.J.H.M.; Laxague, N.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of temperature dissipation rate χ within the upper ocean boundary layer, which is critical for climate forecasts, is very limited. Near-surface turbulence also affects dispersion of contaminants and biogeochemical tracers. Using high-resolution optical turbulence measurements, scal

  17. Screening for learning disabilities with teacher rating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, K A; Undheim, J O

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the use of teacher assessments in screening for learning disabilities. In a longitudinal study, 603 children were rated by their teachers in the second grade (age 8 to 9 years), and the ratings were correlated with examinations of reading, spelling, and intelligence in the third grade. The third-grade tests for reading, spelling, and intelligence classified children into groups with low achievement and dyslexia, and these two groups were compared with normally achieving children. The accuracy of teacher assessments, measured with correlation analysis, ROC curves, and kappa indices, showed that teachers were quite accurate in their judgment of low achievement, but somewhat less efficient in their judgment of specific reading difficulties. PMID:8133189

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale in Severely Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva-Medeiros, Paula Francielle; Duarte-Guerra, Leorides Severo; Santo, Marco Aurélio; Lotufo-Neto, Francisco; Wang, Yuan-Pang

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition worldwide and has frequent association with major depression. The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was applied to obese patients in order to detect briefly and systematically depressive symptoms. The objectives were: to estimate the reliability of the MADRS and to investigate the criterion validity of MADRS. The best cut-off point to detect depressive symptoms was determined in comparison with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Diagnosis (SCID-I). The sample was recruited consecutively from the waiting list of a bariatric surgery service of the university clinic. Trained clinical psychologists applied the assessment instruments. The final sample was comprised of 374 class III obese adults (women 79.9 %, mean age 43.3 years [SD 11.6], mean body mass index 47.0 kg/m2 [SD 7.1]). The mean total score of the MADRS was 7.73 (SD 11.33) for the total sample, with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of .93. Women presented higher mean score than men (8.08 versus 6.33; p = .23). The best cut-off point was 13/14 in accordance with the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, yielding a sensitivity of .81 and specificity of .85. The overall ability to discriminate depression according to area under the curve was .87. The results showed that the MADRS is a reliable and valid scale to detect depressive symptoms among patients seeking treatment in preoperative period, displaying adequate psychometric properties. PMID:26364907

  19. [Standardization of the Greek version of Zung's Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samakouri, M; Bouhos, G; Kadoglou, M; Giantzelidou, A; Tsolaki, K; Livaditis, M

    2012-01-01

    Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), introduced by Zung, has been widely used in research and in clinical practice for the detection of anxiety. The present study aims at standardizing the Greek version of SAS. SAS consists of 20 items rated on a 1-4 likert type scale. The total SAS score may vary from 20 (no anxiety at all) to 80 (severe anxiety). Two hundred and fifty four participants (114 male and 140 female), psychiatric patients, physically ill and general population individuals, aged 45.40±11.35 years, completed the following: (a) a demographic characteristics' questionnaire, (b) the SAS Greek version, (c) the Spielberg's Modified Greek State-Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI-Gr.-X) and (d) the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS). Seventy six participants answered the SAS twice within a 12th-day median period of time. The following parameters were calculated: (a) internal consistency of the SAS in terms of Cronbach's α co-efficient, (b) its test-retest reliability in terms of the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and (c) its concurrent and convergent validities through its score's Spearman's rho correlations with both the state and trait subscales of STAI-Gr X and the ZDRS. In addition, in order to evaluate SAS' discriminant validity, the scale's scores of the three groups of participants (psychiatric patients, physically ill and general population individuals) were compared among each other, in terms of Kruskall Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests. SAS Cronbach's alpha equals 0.897 while ICC regarding its test-retest reliability equals 0.913. Spearman's rho concerning validity: (a) when SAS is compared to STAI-Gr.-X (state), equals it 0.767, (b) when SAS is compared to STAI-Gr. X (trait), it equals 0.802 and (c) when SAS is compared to ZDRS, it equals 0.835. The mentally ill scored significantly higher in SAS compared to both the healthy and the general population. In conclusion, the SAS Greek version presents very satisfactory psychometric properties regarding

  20. Two-parameter characterization of chromosome-scale recombination rate

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The genome-wide recombination rate ($RR$) of a species is often described by one parameter, the ratio between total genetic map length ($G$) and physical map length ($P$), measured in centiMorgans per Megabase (cM/Mb). The value of this parameter varies greatly between species, but the cause for these differences is not entirely clear. A constraining factor of overall $RR$ in a species, which may cause increased $RR$ for smaller chromosomes, is the requirement of at least one chiasma per chro...

  1. Translation of the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) into Danish and a preliminary psychometric validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    A central challenge for empirical research of clinical supervision is how to measure the effectiveness of clinical supervision. The Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) measures supervisees' perception of the effectiveness of clinical supervision. The aims of this paper were to account for...

  2. Value and appropriate use of rating scales and apparative measurements in quantification of disability in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, H; Stecker, K; Fischer, P A

    1993-01-01

    Despite widespread use in pharmacotherapeutical trials, in the majority of rating scales used in Parkinson's disease (PD) validity, reliability and appropriate use have never been confirmed by statistical data. For this reason 350 unselected PD-pats. were investigated by an extensive standardized test-battery including registration of basis data, Columbia University Rating Scale (CURS), scale for assessment of functional disability (ADL), SCAG-scale, Hoehn & Jahr-scale (HY), mod. Webster step second-test (WSST), Purdue-pegboard, questionnaire for subjective complaints (SC), WDG, LPS1/2, 3/4, 6, 7, 10, clinical assessment of dementia, v. Zerssen-scale and orthostatic hypotension (60 degrees tilt up). For CURS, SCAG and ADL instrumental reliability was calculated by Cronbach's alpha. For CURS, SCAG, ADL and the total data of complete test battery (CTB) principal component analysis (PCA) was performed for data reduction. CURS, SCAG and ADL showed high internal consistency (alpha approximately > or = 0.9). For CURS 5 factors accounting for 66% total variance could be extracted by PCA. They represent gait, rigidity, tremor, right/left dexterity (eigenvalues > 1). For SCAG 3 factors (61% of total variance) representing dementia, depression and change of personality were extracted. For ADL 3 factors (67% of total variance) could be extracted, representing overall functional disability, handwriting and disability by pain. PCA of the CTB identified 8 interpretable factors (66% of total variance) characterizing at least partially the clinical profile of PD: 1. motor disability (assessment by rating-scales) 2. dementia, 3. motor-disability (assessment by apparative measurements), 4. depression, 5. orthostatic hypotension, 6. WDG, 7. tremor and 8. pain. Our data confirm the suitability of the investigated scales and give a rational base for their appropriate use in a sense of data reduction and economical evaluation. PMID:8439392

  3. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville Robert PT; Devillier Laura; Parkhurst Maria R; Rosenberg Steven A; Dudley Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scale...

  4. MRI visual rating scales in the diagnosis of dementia: evaluation in 184 post-mortem confirmed cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lorna; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; O'Brien, John T; Bouwman, Femke; Burton, Emma J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C; Ridgway, Gerard R; Schott, Jonathan M

    2016-04-01

    Accurately distinguishing between different degenerative dementias during life is challenging but increasingly important with the prospect of disease-modifying therapies. Molecular biomarkers of dementia pathology are becoming available, but are not widely used in clinical practice. Conversely, structural neuroimaging is recommended in the evaluation of cognitive impairment. Visual assessment remains the primary method of scan interpretation, but in the absence of a structured approach, diagnostically relevant information may be under-utilized. This definitive, multi-centre study uses post-mortem confirmed cases as the gold standard to: (i) assess the reliability of six visual rating scales; (ii) determine their associated pattern of atrophy; (iii) compare their diagnostic value with expert scan assessment; and (iv) assess the accuracy of a machine learning approach based on multiple rating scales to predict underlying pathology. The study includes T1-weighted images acquired in three European centres from 184 individuals with histopathologically confirmed dementia (101 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 28 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 55 patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration), and scans from 73 healthy controls. Six visual rating scales (medial temporal, posterior, anterior temporal, orbito-frontal, anterior cingulate and fronto-insula) were applied to 257 scans (two raters), and to a subset of 80 scans (three raters). Six experts also provided a diagnosis based on unstructured assessment of the 80-scan subset. The reliability and time taken to apply each scale was evaluated. Voxel-based morphometry was used to explore the relationship between each rating scale and the pattern of grey matter volume loss. Additionally, the performance of each scale to predict dementia pathology both individually and in combination was evaluated using a support vector classifier, which was compared with expert scan assessment to estimate clinical value

  5. Large scale high strain-rate tests of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the stages of development of some innovative equipment, based on Hopkinson bar techniques, for performing large scale dynamic tests of concrete specimens. The activity is centered at the recently upgraded HOPLAB facility, which is basically a split Hopkinson bar with a total length of approximately 200 m and with bar diameters of 72 mm. Through pre-tensioning and suddenly releasing a steel cable, force pulses of up to 2 MN, 250 μs rise time and 40 ms duration can be generated and applied to the specimen tested. The dynamic compression loading has first been treated and several modifications in the basic configuration have been introduced. Twin incident and transmitter bars have been installed with strong steel plates at their ends where large specimens can be accommodated. A series of calibration and qualification tests has been conducted and the first real tests on concrete cylindrical specimens of 20cm diameter and up to 40cm length have commenced. Preliminary results from the analysis of the recorded signals indicate proper Hopkinson bar testing conditions and reliable functioning of the facility.

  6. Discriminant Validity of a Teacher-Developed Rating Scale for Specific Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Roger S.; Tomikawa, Sandra

    Local teachers and other school personnel in Hawaii expressed a need for operational guidelines to use in deciding whether or not to refer students for diagnostic evaluations for specific learning disabilities (SLD). This project was designed to evaluate whether the Windward Rating Scale (WRS), a locally-developed teacher rating scale of student…

  7. Quantum quenches in free field theory: universal scaling at any rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumit R.; Galante, Damián A.; Myers, Robert C.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum quenches display universal scaling in several regimes. For quenches which start from a gapped phase and cross a critical point, with a rate slow compared to the initial gap, many systems obey Kibble-Zurek scaling. More recently, a different scaling behaviour has been shown to occur when the quench rate is fast compared to all other physical scales, but still slow compared to the UV cutoff. We investigate the passage from fast to slow quenches in scalar and fermionic free field theories with time dependent masses for which the dynamics can be solved exactly for all quench rates. We find that renormalized one point functions smoothly cross over between the regimes.

  8. Quantum Quenches in Free Field Theory: Universal Scaling at Any Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sumit R; Myers, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Quantum quenches display universal scaling in several regimes. For quenches which start from a gapped phase and cross a critical point, with a rate slow compared to the initial gap, many systems obey Kibble-Zurek scaling. More recently, a different scaling behaviour has been shown to occur when the quench rate is fast compared to all other physical scales, but still slow compared to the UV cutoff. We investigate the passage from fast to slow quenches in scalar and fermionic free field theories with time dependent masses for which the dynamics can be solved exactly for all quench rates. We find that renormalized one point functions smoothly cross over between the regimes.

  9. Variability in ESL Essay Rating Processes: The Role of the Rating Scale and Rater Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    Various factors contribute to variability in English as a second language (ESL) essay scores and rating processes. Most previous research, however, has focused on score variability in relation to task, rater, and essay characteristics. A few studies have examined variability in essay rating processes. The current study used think-aloud protocols…

  10. Development and Validation of a Rating Scale for Wind Jazz Improvisation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and validate a rating scale for collegiate wind jazz improvisation performance. The 14-item Wind Jazz Improvisation Evaluation Scale (WJIES) was constructed and refined through a facet-rational approach to scale development. Five wind jazz students and one professional jazz educator were asked to record…

  11. A new respiratory rate monitor: development and initial clinical experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hök, B; Wiklund, L; Henneberg, S

    1993-01-01

    against different kinds of interference, including motion artefacts. The sensor is nonexpensive, rugged, simple to apply and inherently safe. An instrument with continuous display of respiratory rate, and an audiovisual apnea alarm has been designed and built. The complete system has been tested on......The need for continuous, noninvasive, and reliable respiratory rate monitoring during recovery from general anesthesia has long been recognized. Alternative principles can be grouped into those detecting the respiratory effort, and those detecting the actual result, i.e. the respiratory gas flow...... patients during recovery after general anesthesia. In 16 patients, the respiratory rate displayed by the instrument has been correlated against that visually observed. A good correlation was obtained. Minor discrepancies can be explained from the fact that visual observation corresponds to the respiratory...

  12. A new respiratory rate monitor: development and initial clinical experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hök, B; Wiklund, L; Henneberg, S

    1993-01-01

    The need for continuous, noninvasive, and reliable respiratory rate monitoring during recovery from general anesthesia has long been recognized. Alternative principles can be grouped into those detecting the respiratory effort, and those detecting the actual result, i.e. the respiratory gas flow...... different kinds of interference, including motion artefacts. The sensor is nonexpensive, rugged, simple to apply and inherently safe. An instrument with continuous display of respiratory rate, and an audiovisual apnea alarm has been designed and built. The complete system has been tested on patients during...... recovery after general anesthesia. In 16 patients, the respiratory rate displayed by the instrument has been correlated against that visually observed. A good correlation was obtained. Minor discrepancies can be explained from the fact that visual observation corresponds to the respiratory effort, whereas...

  13. Pore-Scale Process Coupling and Effective Surface Reaction Rates in Heterogeneous Subsurface Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript provides a review of pore-scale researches in literature including experimental and numerical approaches, and scale-dependent behavior of geochemical and biogeochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media. A mathematical equation that can be used to predict the scale-dependent behavior of geochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media has been derived. The derived effective rate expression explicitly links the effective reaction rate constant to the intrinsic rate constant, and to the pore-scale variations in reactant concentrations in porous media. Molecular simulations to calculate the intrinsic rate constants were provided. A few examples of pore-scale simulations were used to demonstrate the application of the equation to calculate effective rate constants in heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the deviation of effective rate constant from the intrinsic rate in heterogeneous porous media is caused by the pore-scale distributions of reactants and their correlation, which are affected by the pore-scale coupling of reactions and transport.

  14. Validity of Depression Rating Scales during Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period: Impact of Trimester and Parity

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Shuang; Long, Qi; Newport, D. Jeffrey; Na, Hyeji; Knight, Bettina; Zach, Elizabeth B.; Morris, Natalie J.; Kutner, Michael; Stowe, Zachary N.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to delineate the optimal cutpoints for depression rating scales during pregnancy and the postpartum period and to assess the perinatal factors influencing these scores. Women participating in prospective investigations of maternal mental illness were enrolled prior to 28 weeks gestation and followed through 6 months postpartum. At each visit, subjects completed self-rated depression scales – Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Beck Depression...

  15. Two-parameter characterization of chromosome-scale recombination rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan

    2009-12-01

    The genome-wide recombination rate (RR) of a species is often described by one parameter, the ratio between total genetic map length (G) and physical map length (P), measured in centimorgans per megabase (cM/Mb). The value of this parameter varies greatly between species, but the cause for these differences is not entirely clear. A constraining factor of overall RR in a species, which may cause increased RR for smaller chromosomes, is the requirement of at least one chiasma per chromosome (or chromosome arm) per meiosis. In the present study, we quantify the relative excess of recombination events on smaller chromosomes by a linear regression model, which relates the genetic length of chromosomes to their physical length. We find for several species that the two-parameter regression, G = G(0) + k x P , provides a better characterization of the relationship between genetic and physical map length than the one-parameter regression that runs through the origin. A nonzero intercept (G(0)) indicates a relative excess of recombination on smaller chromosomes in a genome. Given G(0), the parameter k predicts the increase of genetic map length over the increase of physical map length. The observed values of G(0) have a similar magnitude for diverse species, whereas k varies by two orders of magnitude. The implications of this strategy for the genetic maps of human, mouse, rat, chicken, honeybee, worm, and yeast are discussed. PMID:19752285

  16. Examination of Racial Differences on the MMPI-2 Clinical and Restructured Clinical Scales in an Outpatient Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Yessenia; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Brown, Jessica S.; Anestis, Joye C.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the possibility of differential predictive accuracy of selected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Second Edition (MMPI-2) clinical and Restructured Clinical (RC) scales in a group of Black and White mental health center clients. Results indicate that Black clients scored higher than White clients on one…

  17. Event Rates in Randomized Clinical Trials Evaluating Cardiovascular Interventions and Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for evidence-based medicine. However, an accurate estimation of the event rate is crucial for their ability to test clinical hypotheses. Overestimation of event rates reduces the required sample size but can compromise the statistica

  18. The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C–SSRS): Has the “Gold Standard” Become a Liability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Jennifer M.; Sheehan, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The Columbia– Suicide Severity Rating Scale has become the gold standard for the assessment of suicidal ideation and behavior in clinical trials. Criticism of the instrument has been mounting. We examine whether the instrument meets widely accepted psychometric standards and maps to the United States Food and Drug Administration’s most recent 2012 algorithm for assessment of suicidal phenomena. Our goal is to determine if the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale should be retained as the preferred instrument for assessment of suicidal ideation and behavior. Method: Standard psychometric criteria dictate that categorizations to avoid type I and type II errors should be comprehensive and address the full spectrum (i.e., all dimensions) of a phenomenon. The criteria should also be well defined and consistent, and the wording throughout should be unambiguous. We examine the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale in terms of these criteria. Results: The Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale does not address the full spectrum of suicidal ideation or behavior. As a result, it has the potential to miss many combinations of suicidal ideation and behavior that present to clinicians in practice (type II error). Potential misclassifications (type I and II errors) are compounded by flawed navigation instructions; mismatches in category titles, definitions, and probes; and wording that is susceptible to multiple interpretations. Further, the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale in its current form does not map to the 2012 Food and Drug Administration’s draft classification algorithm for suicidal ideation and behavior. Conclusion: The evidence suggests that the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale is conceptually and psychometrically flawed and does not map to the Food and Drug Administration’s new standards. A new gold standard for assessment of suicidality may be warranted. PMID:25520890

  19. Differences in methylphenidate abuse rates among methadone maintenance treatment patients in two clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peles, Einat; Schreiber, Shaul; Linzy, Shirley; Domani, Yoav; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like prescription medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was suspected as being abused among methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients. We tested its presence in the routine urine monitoring of all patients in both Tel Aviv and Las Vegas MMT clinics. Data on demographic and addiction history, ADHD (Wender Utah Rating Scale), cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Exam), and lifetime DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnosis from admission were retrieved, and retention following 6 months. None of the 190 patients in Las Vegas tested positive for methylphenidate, while 14.7% (45/306) did in Tel Aviv. Abusers were less educated (p = 0.01), had higher ADHD scores (p = 0.02), lower cognitive scores (p = 0.05), and a higher benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse rate (p cannabis, opiates, and cocaine abuse and infectious disease. Of the methylphenidate abuse 42.2% have take-home methadone dose privileges. Not like opiate use, being methylphenidate positive did not relate to 6-months retention. Compared to Tel Aviv, Las Vegas patients were more educated, with lower BDZ, and cocaine abuse. The greater abuse of methylphenidate among ADHD subjects might indicate their using it as self-medication, raising a possible indication for its prescription for that subgroup of MMT patients. The high rate of methylphenidate abuse in Israel needs future study. PMID:25605438

  20. Further Clinical Validation of the Binge-Eating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steven M.; Todt, Ellen H.

    Previous research has shown significant correlations between the Binge Eating Scale (BES) and the Cognitive Factors Scale (CFS) using obese subjects who were not selected based on criteria for eating disorders. To determine if similar relationships between binging severity and cognitive factors would hold for subjects who did meet the criteria for…

  1. Construction and evaluation of a self rating scale for stress-induced Exhaustion Disorder, the Karolinska Exhaustion Disorder Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Besèr, Aniella; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Wahlberg, Kristina; Peterson, Ulla; Nygren, Åke; Åsberg, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged stress (≥ six months) may cause a condition which has been named exhaustion disorder (ED) with ICD-10 code F43.8. ED is characterised by exhaustion, cognitive problems, poor sleep and reduced tolerance to further stress. ED can cause long term disability and depressive symptoms may develop. The aim was to construct and evaluate a self-rating scale, the Karolinska Exhaustion Disorder Scale (KEDS), for the assessment of ED symptoms. A second aim was to examine the relationship between...

  2. Screening accuracy of Level 2 autism spectrum disorder rating scales. A review of selected instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Megan; Lecavalier, Luc

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this review was to examine the state of Level 2, caregiver-completed rating scales for the screening of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) in individuals above the age of three years. We focused on screening accuracy and paid particular attention to comparison groups. Inclusion criteria required that scales be developed post ICD-10, be ASD-specific, and have published evidence of diagnostic validity in peer-reviewed journals. The five scales reviewed were: the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), Gilliam Autism Rating Scale/Gilliam Autism Rating Scale-Second Edition (GARS/GARS-2), Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ), and Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale (ASDS). Twenty total studies were located, most examining the SCQ. Research on the other scales was limited. Comparisons between scales were few and available evidence of diagnostic validity is scarce for certain subpopulations (e.g., lower functioning individuals, PDDNOS). Overall, the SCQ performed well, the SRS and ASSQ showed promise, and the GARS/GARS-2 and ASDS demonstrated poor sensitivity. This review indicates that Level 2 ASD caregiver-completed rating scales are in need of much more scientific scrutiny. PMID:20591956

  3. Renormalization-Scale Uncertainty in the Decay Rate of False Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, Motoi; Nojiri, Mihoko M; Shoji, Yutaro

    2015-01-01

    We study radiative corrections to the decay rate of false vacua, paying particular attention to the renormalization-scale dependence of the decay rate. The decay rate exponentially depends on the bounce action. The bounce action itself is renormalization scale dependent. To make the decay rate scale-independent, radiative corrections, which are due to the field fluctuations around the bounce, have to be included. We show quantitatively that the inclusion of the fluctuations suppresses the scale dependence, and hence is important for the precise calculation of the decay rate. We also apply our analysis to a supersymmetric model and show that the radiative corrections are important for the Higgs-stau system with charge breaking minima.

  4. Scaling of Measured Glomerular Filtration Rate in Kidney Donor Candidates by Anthropometric Estimates of Body Surface Area, Body Water, Metabolic Rate, or Liver Size

    OpenAIRE

    Daugirdas, John T.; Meyer, Kathryn; Greene, Tom; Butler, Robert S.; Poggio, Emilio D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: GFR is scaled to body surface area (S), whereas hemodialysis dosage is scaled to total body water (V). Scaling to metabolic rate (M) or liver size (L) has also been proposed.

  5. Rating scale analysis and psychometric properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cipriani, D.J.; Hensen, Fenna; McPeck, D.L.; Kubec, G.L.; Thomas, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common cond

  6. Correlation and characteristics of self-rating and clinical rating of depression among alcoholics in the course of early abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Depression is an alcoholism relapse risk factor, but frequently stays underdiagnosed among treated alcoholics. The correlation and characteristics of self-reported and clinically assessed depression in the course of early alcohol abstinence were explored. Methods. A total of 100 inpatient, primary male alcoholics (20-60 years diagnosed according to Classificaton of Mental and Behavioural Disorders (ICD-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV were recruited consecutively. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were scored on admission (T1, after 4 weeks (T2 and after 8 weeks (T3. Student's t-test, repeated measures ANOVA and Pearson's correlation between the scores were done (p < 0.05. Factor analyses of symptoms were performed. Results: On HDRS T1, T2, T3 90,7%, 39.5%, 17.4% alcoholics were depressive, respectively. The mean HDRS vs BDI scores on T1, T2 and T3 were 15.16 ± 6.34, 7.35 ± 4.18, 4.23 ± 2.93 vs 14.20 ± 9.56, 8.14 ± 7.35, 5.30 ± 4.94, respectively. Depression severity significantly lowered in the course of abstinence (ANOVA. The HRDS and BDI correlations on T1, T2 and T3 were significant (r1 = 0.763, r2 = 0.684, r3 = 0.613 respectively. Dysphoric mood, anxious, vegetative and cognitive HDRS subscales on T1, T2 and T3 were detected, but not BDI factors, thus BDI symptoms were analysed. Conclusions. The majority of alcoholics had depression on admission. A predominant mild-degree with a significant lowering of depression severity and positive significant correlations between HRDS and BDI scores in the course of abstinence were detected. The dysphoric mood on the HDRS sub-scale, and self-blame, anhedonia and guilt BDI symptoms were most prominent and persisted. The BDI could be a useful tool not only for routine screening and reassessment of depression, but also for exploring emotional content during early abstinence and planning tailored

  7. A Rasch Rating Scale Modeling of the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale in a Sample of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hong; Wang, Chuang; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence (SSREI) scale in a sample of international students studying in the U.S. universities using Rasch analysis. The results indicated that the original five-category rating structure may not function effectively for the international student sample. The…

  8. A cross-syndrome evaluation of a new attention rating scale: The Scale of Attention in Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Nerelie C; Gray, Kylie M; Taffe, John R; Cornish, Kim M

    2016-10-01

    Whilst neuropsychological research has enhanced our understanding of inattentive and hyperactive behaviours among children with intellectual disability (ID), the absence of rating scales developed for this group continues to be a gap in knowledge. This study examined these behaviours in 176 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Down Syndrome (DS), or idiopathic ID using a newly developed teacher rating scale, the Scale of Attention in Intellectual Disability. Findings suggested that children with ASD had a significantly greater breadth of hyperactive/impulsive behaviours than those with DS or idiopathic ID. These findings support existing research suggesting differing profiles of attention and activity across groups. Understanding disorder-specific profiles has implications for developing strategies to support students with ID in the classroom. PMID:27348856

  9. A New Framework for the Analysis of Large Scale Multi-Rate Power Data

    OpenAIRE

    Çakmak, Hüseyin; Maass, Heiko; Bach, Felix; Kühnapfel, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    A new framework for the analysis of large scale, multi-rate power data is introduced. The system comprises high rate power grid data acquisition devices, software modules for big data management and large scale time series analysis. The power grid modeling and simulation modules enable to run power flow simulations. Visualization methods support data exploration for captured, simulated and analyzed energy data. A remote software control module for the proposed tools is provided.

  10. More than a (negative feeling: Validity of the perceived stress scale in Serbian clinical and non-clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Veljko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to test the validity of a Serbian version of the Perceived Stress Scale. The PSS was administered to 157 psychiatric outpatients, 165 adults from the non-clinical population, and 283 university students. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis supported a bifactor model of the PSS with one general factor and two specific factors reflecting perceived distress and perceived self-efficacy. Internal consistencies of the scale and its two subscales were adequate across clinical and non-clinical samples. Results supported the ability of the scale to discriminate between clinical and non-clinical samples. The PSS evidenced good convergent validity, showing moderate to high positive correlations with measures of unpleasant emotional states and moderate negative correlations with positive affect and life satisfaction. All but one correlation remained significant after controlling for the measures of emotional distress. The results of the present research support validity of the PSS and its use in both clinical and non-clinical samples. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179006

  11. Discrete Scale Invariance in the Cascade Heart Rate Variability Of Healthy Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D C

    2004-01-01

    Evidence of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in daytime healthy heart rate variability (HRV) is presented based on the log-periodic power law scaling of the heart beat interval increment. Our analysis suggests multiple DSI groups and a dynamic cascading process. A cascade model is presented to simulate such a property.

  12. The therapeutic effect of clinical trials: understanding placebo response rates in clinical trials – A secondary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walach Harald

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Placebo response rates in clinical trials vary considerably and are observed frequently. For new drugs it can be difficult to prove effectiveness superior to placebo. It is unclear what contributes to improvement in the placebo groups. We wanted to clarify, what elements of clinical trials determine placebo variability. Methods We analysed a representative sample of 141 published long-term trials (randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled; duration > 12 weeks to find out what study characteristics predict placebo response rates in various diseases. Correlational and regression analyses with study characteristics and placebo response rates were carried out. Results We found a high and significant correlation between placebo and treatment response rate across diseases (r = .78; p Conclusion Medication response rates and placebo response rates in clinical trials are highly correlated. Trial characteristics can explain some portion of the variance in placebo healing rates in RCTs. Placebo response in trials is only partially due to methodological artefacts and only partially dependent on the diagnoses treated.

  13. An observation on the bias in clinic-based estimates of malnutrition rates

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret E. Grosh; Fox, Kristin; Jackson, Maria

    1991-01-01

    Clinic-based data on malnutrition are the most readily available for following malnutrition levels and trends in most countries, but there is a bias inherent in clinic-based estimates of malnutrition rates. The authors compare annual clinic-based malnutrition data and those from four household surveys in Jamaica. The clinic data give lower estimates of malnutrition than the survey data in all four cases - significantly so in three. The size of the bias was variable over time, so the clinic da...

  14. Leverage hadoop framework for large scale clinical informatics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao; Bahroos, Neil; Sadhu, Eugene; Jackson, Tommie; Chukhman, Morris; Johnson, Robert; Boyd, Andrew; Hynes, Denise

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present our experiences using the Apache Hadoop framework for high data volume and computationally intensive applications, and discuss some best practice guidelines in a clinical informatics setting. There are three main aspects in our approach: (a) process and integrate diverse, heterogeneous data sources using standard Hadoop programming tools and customized MapReduce programs; (b) after fine-grained aggregate results are obtained, perform data analysis using the Mahout data mining library; (c) leverage the column oriented features in HBase for patient centric modeling and complex temporal reasoning. This framework provides a scalable solution to meet the rapidly increasing, imperative "Big Data" needs of clinical and translational research. The intrinsic advantage of fault tolerance, high availability and scalability of Hadoop platform makes these applications readily deployable at the enterprise level cluster environment. PMID:24303235

  15. Reliability and validity of the Chinese edition of modified clinical dementia rating scale without informant version: a preliminary study%改良临床痴呆评定量表中文版信效度的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙芸; 靳士立; 谢贞; 张勇辉; 刘晓华; 李美娟; 张宝华; 孔永彪; 杨建立

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the reliability and validity of the Chinese edition of modified clinical dementia rating scale without informant version (CDR-NI) for the assessment of cognitive impairment of Chinese community elderly.Methods Trained psychiatric nurses administered CDR-NI to 90 community-dwelling older adults,who had the complaints of cognitive decline; meanwhile,geriatric psychiatrists interviewed the elderly and their informants to give diagnoses of cognitive disorders and completed the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE).Thirty subjects received a re-test of CDR-NI two weeks later.Results ①Reliability:the internal consistency of CDR-NI,Cronbach' sα coefficient,was 0.84.The inter-rater and two weeks' re-test reliability coefficients were 0.90 and 0.81,respectively.②Validity:the correlation coefficient between CDR-NI and MMSE scores was-0.75 (P<0.01).According to CDR-NI staging score,MMSE scores for subjects without cognitive impairment,mild cognitive impairment and mild dementia were (27.6± 2.9),(23.4 ± 3.0) and (19.1 ± 3.8),respectively,the differences between the three groups were statistically significant (F=13.72,P<0.01).The weighted Kappa value between CDR-NI stages and clinical diagnosis was 0.87.Conclusion CDR-NI has good reliability and validity and is suitable to assess the cognitive impairment of community elderly,who had the complaints of cognitive decline and no available informants.%目的 评价临床痴呆评定量表的改良版-无知情人信息版(CDR-NI)用于中国社区老年人认知功能障碍评估的信效度.方法 经过培训的精神科护士对90例伴有认知功能下降主诉的社区老年人进行CDR-NI评定;同时老年精神科医师对对象及其亲属进行访谈以诊断认知功能障碍,并完成简易智能精神状态检查量表(MMSE)评定;30例对象两周后接受了CDR-NI的复测.结果 ①信度:CDR-NI内部一致性克朗巴赫α系数为0.84,不同评定者间

  16. Evaluating clinical teachers with the Maastricht clinical teaching questionnaire : How much 'teacher' is in student ratings?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, Tobias B. B.; Mainhard, Tim; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, A. D. (Debbie) C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Students are a popular source of data to evaluate the performance of clinical teachers. Instruments to obtain student evaluations must have proven validity. One aspect of validity that often remains underexposed is the possibility of effects of between-student differences and teacher and

  17. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kottner; Katrin Balzer

    2010-01-01

    Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulne...

  18. Should Global Items on Student Rating Scales Be Used for Summative Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the simplest indicators of teaching or course effectiveness is student ratings on one or more global items from the entire rating scale. That approach seems intuitively sound and easy to use. Global items have even been recommended by a few researchers to get a quick-read, at-a-glance summary for summative decisions about faculty. The…

  19. The Scaling of Maximum and Basal Metabolic Rates of Mammals and Birds

    CERN Document Server

    Barbosa, L A; Silva, J K L; Barbosa, Lauro A.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Silva, Jafferson K. L. da

    2004-01-01

    Allometric scaling is one of the most pervasive laws in biology. Its origin, however, is still a matter of dispute. Recent studies have established that maximum metabolic rate scales with an exponent larger than that found for basal metabolism. This unpredicted result sets a challenge that can decide which of the concurrent hypotheses is the correct theory. Here we show that both scaling laws can be deduced from a single network model. Besides the 3/4-law for basal metabolism, the model predicts that maximum metabolic rate scales as $M^{6/7}$, maximum heart rate as $M^{-1/7}$, and muscular capillary density as $M^{-1/7}$, in agreement with data.

  20. Turbulence-induced contact rates of plankton : the question of scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; MacKenzie, Brian

    1998-01-01

    methodology can bias encounter rate estimates in turbulent situations. We show that a scale based on the predator's reactive distance is more appropriate, as it has clear theoretical support, and is consistent with other mathematical treatments of encounter problems. Applying the reactive distance as the......Modelling encounter rates between planktonic predators and prey in turbulent waters requires an estimate of a spatial scale. One spatial scale proposed in the literature based on prey concentration is shown to be systematically inconsistent and its use is shown to imply that plankton sampling...... length scale produces encounter rates for small (e.g. 4 to 10 mm) fish larvae 2- to 3-fold lower than those using prey separation distance...

  1. The un-making of a method: From rating scales to the study of psychological processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Philip J.; Valsiner, Jaan

    2011-01-01

    Rating scales are standard instruments in psychology. They force the research participant to provide a numerical estimate of an assumed “degree” of some characteristic along a linear scale. We prove that such numerical estimates are artifacts based on unknown psychological processes that are used...... estimates by the rating task overlooks the qualitative (structural) relation between the implied opposites. We propose the reconstruction of the rating tasks into a method that accesses the process of meaning construction by the rater. When the rater faces a rating task, a field of meanings is constructed...... in terms of dialogical oppositions. These oppositions can be observed to lead to the moment of subjective synthesis (the rating outcome). Examples are given of the tracing of the process of subjective synthesis from an empirical study using NEO PI items. We claim that reconstruction of the rating task...

  2. Multi-scale modelling of polymer composite materials at high rates of strain

    OpenAIRE

    Lidgett, Mark Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The overall objective of this thesis was to develop a methodology for predicting the high strain rate properties of macro scale polymer composite materials through micro and meso scale finite element modelling. The focus in this study was on multi-layered multi-material polymer composite laminates consisting of 0/90 and ± 45 layers of either; S2 Glass/Epoxy or Carbon/Epoxy non crimp fabric. A multi-scale finite element modelling methodology was developed at the micro and meso scale for ...

  3. Stenting in the treatment of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Technical and clinical success rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to evaluate the technical and clinical success rates of percutaneous stent revascularization in the treatment of chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI). Patients and methods: 17 patients (12 female) with typical symptoms of CMI were treated by percutaneous stent placement for stenoses of the splanchnic arteries (celiac trunk; superior mesenteric artery, SMA; inferior mesenteric artery, IMA). The primary and secondary technical success, primary and secondary clinical success, and the long-term clinical outcome were determined. Results: a total of 24 stents were implanted in 21 splanchnic arteries (12 stents in the celiac trunk, 11 in the SMA and 1 in the IMA). The primary technical success rate was 91% (19/21 arteries), the secondary technical success rate was 95% (21/22 arteries). Clinical follow-up was available for 16 patients. The primary clinical success rate was 81% (13/16 patients). Following two secondary interventions, the secondary clinical success rate was 94% (15/16 patients). Long-term clinical success was achieved in 15 of 16 patients (94%) with a mean follow-up of 26 months. One patient died within 30 days of the intervention and two patients demonstrated major complications (1 dissection, 1 stent dislocation). None of the patients required surgical revascularization and none of the patients died due to recurrent mesenteric ischemia. (orig.)

  4. Pore and Continuum Scale Study of the Effect of Subgrid Transport Heterogeneity on Redox Reaction Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Zhang, Changyong; Yang, Xiaofan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    A micromodel system with a pore structure for heterogeneous flow and transport was used to investigate the effect of subgrid transport heterogeneity on redox reaction rates. Hematite reductive dissolution by injecting a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) at variable flow rates was used as an example to probe the variations of redox reaction rates in different subgrid transport domains. Experiments, pore-scale simulations, and macroscopic modeling were performed to measure and simulate in-situ hematite reduction and to evaluate the scaling behavior of the redox reaction rates from the pore to macroscopic scales. The results indicated that the measured pore-scale rates of hematite reduction were consistent with the predictions from a pore scale reactive transport model. A general trend is that hematite reduction followed reductant transport pathways, starting from the advection-dominated pores toward the interior of diffusion-dominated domains. Two types of diffusion domains were considered in the micromodel: a micropore diffusion domain, which locates inside solid grains or aggregates where reactant transport is limited by diffusion; and a macropore diffusion domain, which locates at wedged, dead-end pore spaces created by the grain-grain contacts. The rate of hematite reduction in the advection-dominated domain was faster than those in the diffusion-controlled domains, and the rate in the macropore diffusion domain was faster than that in the micropore domain. The reduction rates in the advection and macropore diffusion domains increased with increasing flow rate, but were affected by different mechanisms. The rate increase in the advection domain was controlled by the mass action effect as a faster flow supplied more reactants, and the rate increase in the macropore domain was more affected by the rate of mass exchange with the advection domain, which increased with increasing flow rate. The hematite reduction rate in the micropore domain was, however

  5. Hot Melt Extrusion: Development of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion for an Insoluble Drug from Mini-scale to Clinical Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Dudhedia, Mayur S; Zimny, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the study was to develop an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) for an insoluble compound X by hot melt extrusion (HME) process. The focus was to identify material-sparing approaches to develop bioavailable and stable ASD including scale up of HME process using minimal drug. Mixtures of compound X and polymers with and without surfactants or pH modifiers were evaluated by hot stage microscopy (HSM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC), which enabled systematic selection of ASD components. Formulation blends of compound X with PVP K12 and PVP VA64 polymers were extruded through a 9-mm twin screw mini-extruder. Physical characterization of extrudates by PLM, XRPD, and mDSC indicated formation of single-phase ASD's. Accelerated stability testing was performed that allowed rapid selection of stable ASD's and suitable packaging configurations. Dissolution testing by a discriminating two-step non-sink dissolution method showed 70-80% drug release from prototype ASD's, which was around twofold higher compared to crystalline tablet formulations. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study in dogs showed that bioavailability from ASD of compound X with PVP VA64 was four times higher compared to crystalline tablet formulations. The HME process was scaled up from lab scale to clinical scale using volumetric scale up approach and scale-independent-specific energy parameter. The present study demonstrated systematic development of ASD dosage form and scale up of HME process to clinical scale using minimal drug (∼500 g), which allowed successful clinical batch manufacture of enabled formulation within 7 months. PMID:26729533

  6. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  7. The Reliability and Validity of the Clinical Competence Evaluation Scale in Physical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshino, Jun; Usuda, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To examine the internal consistency, criterion-related validity, factorial validity, and content validity of the Clinical Competence Evaluation Scale in Physical Therapy (CEPT). [Subjects] The subjects were 278 novice physical therapy trainees and 119 tutors from 21 medical facilities. [Methods] The trainees self-evaluated their clinical competences and the tutors evaluated trainee competences using the CEPT. Overall trainee autonomy was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) f...

  8. Effects of Post-Fire Salvage Logging on Erosion Rates at Multiple Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Robichaud, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Brown, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Forest managers sometimes harvest burned trees after wildfires to realize economic value, reduce fuel loads, or achieve other operational goals. This logging can be controversial because some ecosystem effects are negative, yet the potential impacts on erosion rates have not been clearly identified. Our objectives were to quantify hillslope-scale erosion rates and compare the hillslope erosion rates to rates from larger (swale) and smaller (rill) scales. Soil characteristics, vegetative regrowth, and erosion rates were measured in logged areas and unlogged controls at seven severely burned sites in the western US. One site had replicated measurements at all three scales, five sites had only hillslope or swale scale measurements, and one site had only rill measurements. Erosion rates from hillslopes (70-170 m2) and swales (0.1-2.6 ha) were measured with sediment fences. Rill erosion rates were measured with rill experiments, where water was applied to a hillslope at five flow rates for 12 min each; water samples were collected at a point 9 m downslope. At the hillslope scale the passage of heavy logging equipment reduced soil water repellency, compacted the soil, reduced vegetative regrowth rates, and generally increased erosion rates by one or two orders of magnitude relative to the controls. The rill experiments also showed greater rates of rill incision and erosion from the areas disturbed by heavy logging equipment relative to the controls. At the swale scale erosion rates were higher in the logged areas than the controls when measurements were replicated and simultaneous but there was no detectable change in the other study areas. Overall, the absolute erosion rates from both logged and unlogged areas tended to decline over time while the relative difference in erosion tended to increase due to the slower vegetative recovery in the more heavily disturbed areas. The potential adverse effects of salvage logging can be minimized by reducing compaction and

  9. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  10. TO COMPARE THE CLINICAL EFFICACY OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE DENTIFRICE VIZ PARODONTAX®, PARODONTAX® WITH SCALING AND SCALING ALONE IN PATIENTS WITH GINGIVITIS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Incorporating herbal extracts in the formulation of toothpastes is becoming an accepted mode of chemical plaque control. Parodontax® is a herbal toothpaste designed to reduce bleeding gums and prevent gingivitis and periodontitis. The aim of the present study is to compare the clinical efficacy of commercially available dentifrice viz Parodontax®, Parodontax® with scaling and scaling alone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety patients with gingivitis had been referred to the Department of Dentistry, Adhichunchanagiri Institute of Medical Sciences. The subjects were randomly allocated into 3 groups. Group I- Parodontax® tooth paste only (n=30, Group II-Parodontax® with scaling (n=30, Group III–scaling only (n=30. Clinical parameters were assessed using Gingival Index, Plaque Index and Bleeding Index at baseline, 4 and 6 weeks. OBSERVATIONS: The results of the present study therefore have confirmed the effectiveness of initial therapy, in the form of repeated oral hygiene instruction and thorough scaling and root planning in conjunction with Parodontax, in significantly reducing the clinical parameters of gingivitis and periodontal disease. CONCLUSION: The present study revealed that when Parodontax used in conjunction with scaling and root planning has shown to be effective anti-plaque agent. Further, the combined use of parodontax with scaling and root planning has been shown to reduce gingival inflammation and sulcular bleeding significantly over 6months period. However, it is important for therapeutic products to be tested within the context of their possible use. Therefore Parodontax used as an adjunct to convention universal therapy in the treatments of patients with varying degrees of gingival and periodontal diseases, it is important for these products to be tested accordingly.

  11. The MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical Scales in the Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Comorbid Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Erika J.; Miller, Mark W.; Orazem, Robert J.; Weierich, Mariann R.; Castillo, Diane T.; Milford, Jaime; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Keane, Terence M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Restructured Clinical Scales (RCSs) in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) receiving clinical services at Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers. Study 1 included 1,098 men who completed the MMPI-2 and were…

  12. Empirical Correlates and Expanded Interpretation of the MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (Cynicism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Paul B.; Kelso, Kristy M.; McCord, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The recent release of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has received much attention from the clinical psychology community. Particular concerns have focused on Restructured Clinical Scale 3 (RC3; Cynicism). This article briefly reviews the major criticisms and responses regarding the restructuring of…

  13. Adapting CEF-Descriptors for Rating Purposes: Validation by a Combined Rater Training and Scale Revision Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, Claudia; Martin, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We explore how a local rating scale can be based on the Common European Framework CEF-proficiency scales. As part of the scale validation (Alderson, 1991; Lumley, 2002), we examine which adaptations are needed to turn CEF-proficiency descriptors into a rating scale for a local context, and to establish a practicable method to revise the initial…

  14. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, W Brent

    2009-03-03

    The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

  15. The Incremental Validity and Clinical Utility of the MMPI-2 Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Margarita B.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The incremental validity and clinical utility of the recently developed Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (Fptsd) was examined in relation to the family of MMPI-2 F scales in distinguishing feigned post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from disability claimants with PTSD.…

  16. The MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical Scales in the Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Comorbid Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Erika J.; Miller, Mark W.; Orazem, Robert J.; Weierich, Mariann R.; Castillo, Diane T.; Milford, Jaime; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Keane, Terence M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Restructured Clinical Scales (RCSs) in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) receiving clinical services at Veterans Affairs medical centers. Study 1 included 1,098 men who completed the MMPI-2 and were assessed for a range of psychological disorders via structured clinical interview. Study 2 included 136 women who completed the MMPI-2 and were interviewed with the Cli...

  17. Development of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease activity rating scale: reliability, validity and factorial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Michiko; Takai, Kenichi; Nakajima, Kazuo; Kagawa, Koujiro

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Activity Rating Scale (CARS) to measure life-related activity in patients with COPD, and to confirm its reliability and constructive validity in a factorial structure model. The subjects consisted of 114 patients with COPD. An 88-item life-related activity list, generated previously from a literature review, was administered. The secondary structural model consisted of four factors with 12 items. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis by structural equation modeling showed the fit criteria to be statistically significant. The internal consistency of the 12 items was highly reliable (Cronbach's alpha = 0.924). The CARS score was correlated with pulmonary function tests, breathlessness, and the health-related quality of life (QOL) scales in Pearson correlation coefficient. The results suggest that the COPD Activity Rating Scale is a valid scale for the assessment of life-related activity in patients with COPD. PMID:12603718

  18. The Clinical Utility of the MMPI-2-RF Suicidal/Death Ideation Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Gottfried, Emily; Bodell, Lindsay; Carbonell, Joyce; Joiner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern with over 100 individuals dying by suicide per day in the United States alone. Therefore, suicide risk assessment is an essential aspect of mental health care. The MMPI-2-RF has a Suicidal/Death Ideation (SUI) scale consisting of 5 items that describe recent suicidal ideation or behaviors. Although this scale has clear face validity, few studies have examined the clinical utility of this scale. The purpose of the current study was to examine associatio...

  19. Assessing Children’s Homework Performance: Development of Multi-Dimensional, Multi-Informant Rating Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Thomas J.; Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Watkins, Marley W.; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Eagle, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Efforts to develop interventions to improve homework performance have been impeded by limitations in the measurement of homework performance. This study was conducted to develop rating scales for assessing homework performance among students in elementary and middle school. Items on the scales were intended to assess student strengths as well as deficits in homework performance. The sample included 163 students attending two school districts in the Northeast. Parents completed the 36-item Hom...

  20. A Caregiver-Child Social/Emotional and Relationship Rating Scale (CCSERRS)1

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, Robert B.; Groark, Christina J.; Fish, Larry

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the construction and pilot reliability, validity, and psychometric properties of a new caregiver-child rating scale that emphasizes caregiver-child social-emotional interactions and relationships. While the scale was developed and studied in the context of orphanages for young children, it potentially could be used in non-residential early care and education settings as well as for parent-child interactions in the home. The intent was to assess a few dimensions that compreh...

  1. Factor Structure of the Korean Version of Illness Intrusiveness Rating Scale: Cross-cultural Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Daeho; Kim, Kwang-iel; Lee, Haewon; Choi, Joonho; Park, Yong-Chon

    2005-01-01

    The Illness Intrusiveness Rating Scale (IIRS) measures illness-induced disruptions to 13 domains of lifestyles, activities, and interests. A stable three-factor structure has been well documented; however, the cross-cultural validity of this scale needs to be tested. This study investigated the factor structure of the Korean version of IIRS in 712 outpatients at a university medical center. A predominant diagnosis of the patients was rheumatoid arthritis (47%). The Center for Epidemiological ...

  2. The development and validation of a rating scale for ESL essay writing

    OpenAIRE

    Hattingh, Karien; Johann L. van der Walt

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an empirical procedure for developing and validating a rating scale for assessing essays in English as a second language. The study was motivated by a concern for the validity of the scoring grid currently used to assess ESL essay writing at Grade 12 in the final end-of-year examination in South Africa. Following an argument-based validation framework based on the work of Kane, we describe the development, trialling and revision of a rating scale. An empirical procedure...

  3. Peri- og postmenopausale symptomer og plager målt med Menopause Rating Scale (MRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Formålet med denne oppgaven var å evaluere peri- og postmenopausale symptomer og plager hos et tilfeldig utvalg kvinner, målt ved Menopause Rating Scale (MRS). Studien baserer seg på kontrollgruppen i en undersøkelse ved St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim. Vår studiepopulasjon bestod av 406 kvinner etter ekskludering. Vi brukte en modifisert utgave av Menopause rating scale, MRS, hvor 11 symptomer deles inn i tre kategorier; psykiske, somato-vegetative og urogenitale symptomer. Menopausealder ble ...

  4. Non-linear and scale-invariant analysis of the Heart Rate Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Kalda, J; Vainu, M; Laan, M

    2003-01-01

    Human heart rate fluctuates in a complex and non-stationary manner. Elaborating efficient and adequate tools for the analysis of such signals has been a great challenge for the researchers during last decades. Here, an overview of the main research results in this field is given. The following question are addressed: (a) what are the intrinsic features of the heart rate variability signal; (b) what are the most promising non-linear measures, bearing in mind clinical diagnostic and prognostic applications.

  5. Comparison and application of three visual rating scales for white matter lesions in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马万欣

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical value of three visual rating scales (VRS) for white matter lesions (WML) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) .Methods Totally 184 subjects,including 107 AD patients,47 MCI patients and 30 normal controls,were recruited.All subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological tests and were examined with a standard protocol of MR imaging.WML burden was rated with the Age-Related White Matter Changes (AR-

  6. The Reliability of Methodological Ratings for speechBITE Using the PEDro-P Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; Power, Emma; Togher, Leanne; McCabe, Patricia; Munro, Natalie; Smith, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Background: speechBITE (http://www.speechbite.com) is an online database established in order to help speech and language therapists gain faster access to relevant research that can used in clinical decision-making. In addition to containing more than 3000 journal references, the database also provides methodological ratings on the PEDro-P (an…

  7. Usefulness of a Clinician Rating Scale in Identifying Preschool Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopin, Chaya; Healey, Dione; Castelli, Katia; Marks, David; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Behavioral Rating Inventory for Children (BRIC), a novel clinician inventory for preschoolers. Method: Completion of the BRIC for 214 preschoolers follows 2 evaluation sessions, generally separated by less than 2 weeks. Items are submitted to a Principal Components…

  8. Heart rate, anxiety and performance of residents during a simulated critical clinical encounter: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Samuel; Horeczko, Timothy; Cotton, Dale; Bair, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Background High-fidelity patient simulation has been praised for its ability to recreate lifelike training conditions. The degree to which high fidelity simulation elicits acute emotional and physiologic stress among participants – and the influence of acute stress on clinical performance in the simulation setting – remain areas of active exploration. We examined the relationship between residents’ self-reported anxiety and a proxy of physiologic stress (heart rate) as well as their clinical ...

  9. Adalimumab safety and mortality rates from global clinical trials of six immune-mediated inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Burmester, G R; Mease, P; Dijkmans, B A C; Gordon, K; Lovell, D; Panaccione, R.; J. Perez; Pangan, A L

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Clinical trials of tumour necrosis factor antagonists have raised questions about the potential risk of certain serious adverse events (SAE). To assess the safety of adalimumab in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over time and across five other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases and to compare adalimumab malignancy and mortality rates with data on the general population. Methods: This analysis included 19 041 patients exposed to adalimumab in 36 global clinical trials in RA, psoriatic...

  10. Islet Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR) Dose Predicts Insulin Independence in Clinical Islet Autotransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Papas, Klearchos K.; Bellin, Melena D.; Sutherland, David E.R.; Suszynski, Thomas M.; Kitzmann, Jennifer P; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Mueller, Kathryn R; Beilman, Gregory J.; Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Colton, Clark K.; Koulmanda, Maria; Weir, Gordon C; Wilhelm, Josh J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reliable in vitro islet quality assessment assays that can be performed routinely, prospectively, and are able to predict clinical transplant outcomes are needed. In this paper we present data on the utility of an assay based on cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in predicting clinical islet autotransplant (IAT) insulin independence (II). IAT is an attractive model for evaluating characterization assays regarding their utility in predicting II due to an absence of confoundin...

  11. Islet Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR) Dose Predicts Insulin Independence in Clinical Islet Autotransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Papas, Klearchos K; Bellin, Melena D.; Sutherland, David E. R.; Suszynski, Thomas M.; Kitzmann, Jennifer P.; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Mueller, Kathryn R.; Beilman, Gregory J.; Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Gopalakrishnan Loganathan; Colton, Clark K.; Maria Koulmanda; Weir, Gordon C.; Josh J Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reliable in vitro islet quality assessment assays that can be performed routinely, prospectively, and are able to predict clinical transplant outcomes are needed. In this paper we present data on the utility of an assay based on cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in predicting clinical islet autotransplant (IAT) insulin independence (II). IAT is an attractive model for evaluating characterization assays regarding their utility in predicting II due to an absence of confounding ...

  12. Self-esteem, stress and self-rated health in family planning clinic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Young Rodney; Rohrer James E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The independent effects of stress on the health of primary care patients might be different for different types of clinic populations. This study examines these relationships in a low-income female population of patients attending a family planning clinic. Methods This study investigated the relevance of different sources of personal stress and social support to self-rated health, adjusting for mental health, health behavior and demographic characteristics of subjects. Fiv...

  13. The development of a noise annoyance scale for rating residential noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong Kwan; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2005-09-01

    In this study, 5-point and 7-point verbal noise annoyance scales were developed. The 5-point annoyance scale for outside environmental noise was developed from a survey conducted in four Korean cities. An auditory experiment using residential noises such as airborne, bathroom drainage, and traffic noises was conducted to compare the effectiveness of the 5-point and 7-point scales for rating residential indoor noise. Result showed that the 7-point scale yielded more detailed responses to indoor residential noise. In addition, auditory experiments were conducted to develop a noise annoyance scale for the classification of common residential noises. The modifiers used in the scales were selected according to the method proposed by ICBEN (International Commission on the Biological 12Effect of Noise) Team 6. As a result, the difference between the intensity of 21 modifiers investigated in the survey and the auditory experiment was very small. It was also found that the intensity of the selected modifiers in the 7-point noise annoyance scale was highly correlated with noise levels, and that the intensity difference between each pair of successive levels in the 7-point annoyance scale was almost identical.

  14. A scaling method for combustion stability rating of coaxial gas liquid injectors in a subscale chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scaling method to examine combustion stability characteristics of a coaxial injector is devised based on the acoustics and combustion dynamics in a chamber. The method is required for a subscale test of stability rating with a model chamber, which is cost effective compared with an actual full scale test. First, scaling and similarity rules are considered for stability rating and thereby, three conditions of acoustic, hydrodynamic, and flame condition similarities are proposed. That is, for acoustic similarity, the natural or resonant frequencies in the actual chamber should be maintained in the model chamber. And, two parameters of density ratio and velocity ratio are derived for the requirement of hydrodynamic and flame condition similarities between the actual and the model conditions. Next, one example of an actual combustion chamber with high performance is selected and the proposed scaling method is applied to the chamber for understanding of the method. The design operating condition for a model test is presented by mass flow rates of propellants. Stability boundaries can be identified on the coordinate plane of chamber pressure and mixture ratio of fuel and oxidizer by applying the scaling method

  15. Diagnostic Assessment of Asperger's Disorder: A Review of Five Third-Party Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan M.

    2005-01-01

    Five rating scales for screening and detection of Asperger's Disorder, three commercially available and two research instruments, are evaluated with reference to psychometric criteria outlined by Bracken in 1987 ("Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment," 4, 313). Reliability and validity data reported in examiner's manuals or published reports…

  16. Technical Analysis of the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale--Second Edition--Teacher Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Clark, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The reliability and validity of scores on the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale-second edition-teacher version (DBRS-II-T) was analyzed. The DBRS-II-T was designed to assess teacher observations of students referred for behavioral difficulties. The five-factor model fit the data poorly, but convergent and diagnostic validities were excellent.…

  17. Quality of Child Care Using the Environment Rating Scales: A Meta-Analysis of International Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Harriet J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Cárcamo, Rodrigo A.; Harrison, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study provides a systematic examination of child care quality around the globe, using the Environment Rating Scales (ERS). Additional goals of this study are to examine associations between ERS process quality and structural features (group size, caregiver-child ratio) that underpin quality and between ERS and more proximal aspects of…

  18. Measuring Depression at the End of Life: Is the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale a Valid Instrument?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Megan; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2009-01-01

    Depression at the end of life is a common mental health issue with serious implications for quality of life and decision making. This study investigated the reliability and validity of one of the most frequently used measures of depression, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in 422 patients with terminal cancer admitted to a palliative…

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MEASUREMENT FOR DISSIPATION RATE SCALING EXPONENT IN HEATED WALL TURBULENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜楠; 王玉春; 舒玮; 王振东

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations have been devoted to the study of scaling law of coarse-grained dissipation rate structure function for velocity and temperature fluctuation of non-isotropic and inhomogeneous turbulent flows at moderate Reynolds number. Much attention has been paid to the case of turbulent boundary layer, which is typically the nonistropic and inhomogeneous trubulence because of the dynamically important existence of organized coherent structure burst process in the near wall region. Longitudinal velocity and temperature have been measured at different vertical positions in turbulent boundary layer over a heated and unheated flat plate in a wind tunnel using hot wire anemometer. The influence of non-isotropy and inhomogeneity and heating the wall on the scaling law of the dissipation rate structure function is studied because of the existence of organized coherent structure burst process in the near wall region. The scaling law of coarse-grained dissipation rate structure function is found to be independent of the mean velocity shear strain and the heating wall boundary condition. The scaling law of the dissipation rate structure function is verified to be in agreement with the hierarchical structure model that has been verified valid for isotropic and homogeneous turbulence.

  20. Oppositional Defiant Disorder Rating Scale: Preliminary Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommersen, Paul; Murray, Candice; Ohan, Jeneva L.; Johnston, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors report the psychometric properties of a parent-completed rating scale based on the criteria for oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition-Text Revision" ("DSM-IV-TR"). Mothers of 294 boys and 48 girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder…

  1. Work Adjustment Theory: An Empirical Test Using a Fuzzy Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Beryl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A fuzzy graphic rating scale elicited work preferences and job perceptions of 166 (of 170) Australian bank employees. Correspondence between preferences and perceptions correlated significantly with job satisfaction. Satisfaction and performance related to tenure intentions; this relation was higher for poorer performers. (SK)

  2. An Examination of the Structure and Construct Validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Kasey; Watson, David

    2016-01-01

    The Wender Utah Rating Scale (Ward, Wender, & Reimherr, 1993 ) has been widely used in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) research to assess childhood symptoms retrospectively, but little research has examined its factor structure and specificity in predicting ADHD versus other psychopathology. Consequently, this study had 2 goals: (a) to examine the Wender Utah Rating Scale's structure, and (b) to explicate the construct validity of this measure by relating factors from our structural analyses to other ADHD, psychopathology, and personality measures. Structural analyses in an adult community sample (N = 294) yielded a 3-factor structure of aggression (e.g., angry), internalizing distress (e.g., depressed), and academic difficulties (e.g., underachiever). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that these factors failed to display specificity in their associations with ADHD versus other psychopathology. Aggression and internalizing distress associated most strongly with indicators of externalizing (e.g., ill temper, manipulativeness) and internalizing psychopathology (e.g., depression, anxiety), respectively. Academic difficulties associated most strongly with ADHD symptoms, but these relations were relatively weak. Taken together, these findings raise concerns about the Wender Utah Rating Scale's construct validity, although additional longitudinal research is needed to clarify to what extent the Wender Utah Rating Scale validly assesses childhood ADHD symptoms. PMID:27050760

  3. Multi-scale Modeling in Clinical Oncology: Opportunities and Barriers to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; An, Gary; Saut, Oliver; Luebeck, E Georg; Popel, Aleksander S; Ribba, Benjamin; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Weis, Jared A; Ye, Kaiming; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchical processes spanning several orders of magnitude of both space and time underlie nearly all cancers. Multi-scale statistical, mathematical, and computational modeling methods are central to designing, implementing and assessing treatment strategies that account for these hierarchies. The basic science underlying these modeling efforts is maturing into a new discipline that is close to influencing and facilitating clinical successes. The purpose of this review is to capture the state-of-the-art as well as the key barriers to success for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. We begin with a summary of the long-envisioned promise of multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology, including the synthesis of disparate data types into models that reveal underlying mechanisms and allow for experimental testing of hypotheses. We then evaluate the mathematical techniques employed most widely and present several examples illustrating their application as well as the current gap between pre-clinical and clinical applications. We conclude with a discussion of what we view to be the key challenges and opportunities for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. PMID:27384942

  4. Scale Factor Determination of Micro-Machined Angular Rate Sensors Without a Turntable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaisser Alexander; GAO Zhongyu; ZHOU Bin; ZHANG Rong; CHEN Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a digital readout system to detect small capacitive signals of a micro-machined angular rate sensor. The flexible parameter adjustment ability and the computation speed of the digital signal processor were used to develop a new calibration procedure to determine the scale factor of a gyroscope without a turntable. The force of gravity was used to deflect the movable masses in the sensor, which resulted in a corresponding angular rate input. The gyroscope scale factor was then measured without a turntable. Test results show a maximum deviation of about 1.2% with respect to the scale factor determined on a turntable with the accuracy independent of the manufacturing process and property variations. The calibration method in combination with the improved readout electronics can minimize the calibration procedure and, thus, reduce the manufacturing costs.

  5. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  6. Evaluation of the Short Parkinson's Evaluation Scale: a new friendly scale for the evaluation of Parkinson's disease in clinical drug trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, J M; Bass, H; Bonuccelli, U; Brooks, D; Klotz, P; Korczyn, A D; Kraus, P; Martinez-Martin, P; Morrish, P; Van Sauten, W; Van Hilten, B

    1997-08-01

    The extensive use of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) has revealed low interrater reliability in some items and redundancy in others. In view of these shortcomings, we have structured a new scale that includes a zero-to three-point scale for each item in the evaluation of PD. The mental axis includes memory, thought disorders, and depression. Activities of daily living (ADL) includes eight items: speech, eating, feeding, dressing, hygiene, handwriting, walking, and turning in bed. The motor examination includes eight items: speech, tremor, rest and posture, rigidity, finger tapping, arising from chair, gait, and postural stability. Complications of therapy were also included: dyskinesias, dystonia, motor fluctuations, and freezing episodes, collected by history. In addition, a global scoring for motor fluctuations that should complement the Hoehn and Yahr Scale was incorporated. In this report, we present a statistical analysis of the ADL, motor evaluation, and complications of therapy sections. Concerning the interrater reliability mean, Kendall's W values were >0.9 for most of the items in the Short Parkinson's Evaluation Scale (SPES). Kendall's W <0.8 (motor evaluation) was found for two items of the SPES and nine items of the UPDRS. The mean interrater reliability for both scales across all seven centers (seven Kendall's W for seven centers) (Mann-Whitney test) showed no statistical differences between the scales. Spearman's correlations between items of both scales were significant. Factor analysis of the SPES and UPDRS data revealed a four-factor solution that explained approximately 60% of the data. All participating centers found the SPES easier to apply and quicker to complete, when compared with the UPDRS. The results obtained strongly favor the introduction of SPES for clinical practice. PMID:9260730

  7. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging at 7000 frames per second using clinical ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography, a hybrid imaging modality combining optical and ultrasound imaging, is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, such photoacoustic imaging systems are difficult to translate into clinical applications owing to their high cost, bulky size often requiring an optical table to house such lasers. Moreover, the low pulse repetition rate of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in high frame rate photoacoustic imaging. In this work, we have demonstrated up to 7000 Hz photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of a fast moving object. We used a ~140 nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to capture and display the photoacoustic images. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with ~1.4 mJ energy per pulse. So far, the reported 2-dimensional photoacoustic B-scan imaging is only a few tens of frames per second using a clinical ultrasound system. Therefore, this is the first report on 2-dimensional photoacoustic B-scan imaging with 7000 frames per second. We have demonstrated phantom imaging to view and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be useful for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies. PMID:26977342

  8. More than a (negative) feeling: Validity of the perceived stress scale in Serbian clinical and non-clinical samples

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Veljko; Gavrilov-Jerković Vesna

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test the validity of a Serbian version of the Perceived Stress Scale. The PSS was administered to 157 psychiatric outpatients, 165 adults from the non-clinical population, and 283 university students. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis supported a bifactor model of the PSS with one general factor and two specific factors reflecting perceived distress and perceived self-efficacy. Internal consistencies of the...

  9. Not Worth the Extra Cost? Diluting the Differentiation Ability of Highly Rated Products by Altering the Meaning of Rating Scale Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Martin; Heinzle, Stefanie Lena; Decker, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, the use of rating scales has grown in popularity in various fields, including customer online reviews and energy labels. Rating scales convey important information on attributes of products or services that consumers evaluate in their purchase decisions. By applying multidim...

  10. Self-esteem, stress and self-rated health in family planning clinic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, James E; Young, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    Background The independent effects of stress on the health of primary care patients might be different for different types of clinic populations. This study examines these relationships in a low-income female population of patients attending a family planning clinic. Methods This study investigated the relevance of different sources of personal stress and social support to self-rated health, adjusting for mental health, health behavior and demographic characteristics of subjects. Five hundred women who attended family planning clinics were surveyed and 345 completed the form for a response rate of 72 percent. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that liking oneself was related to good self-rated health (Odds ratio = 7.11), but stress or support from children, parents, friends, churches or spouses were not significant. White non-Hispanic and non-white non-Hispanic respondents had lower odds of reporting good self-rated health than Hispanic respondents (odds ratios were 2.87 and 2.81, respectively). Exercising five or more days per week also was related to good self-rated health. Smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day, and obese III were negatively related to good self-rated health (odds ratios were .19 and .22, respectively with corresponding p-values equal to .0043 and .0332). Conclusions Among younger low-income women, addressing low self-esteem might improve health status. PMID:15176984

  11. Self-esteem, stress and self-rated health in family planning clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rodney

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The independent effects of stress on the health of primary care patients might be different for different types of clinic populations. This study examines these relationships in a low-income female population of patients attending a family planning clinic. Methods This study investigated the relevance of different sources of personal stress and social support to self-rated health, adjusting for mental health, health behavior and demographic characteristics of subjects. Five hundred women who attended family planning clinics were surveyed and 345 completed the form for a response rate of 72 percent. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that liking oneself was related to good self-rated health (Odds ratio = 7.11, but stress or support from children, parents, friends, churches or spouses were not significant. White non-Hispanic and non-white non-Hispanic respondents had lower odds of reporting good self-rated health than Hispanic respondents (odds ratios were 2.87 and 2.81, respectively. Exercising five or more days per week also was related to good self-rated health. Smoking 20 or more cigarettes per day, and obese III were negatively related to good self-rated health (odds ratios were .19 and .22, respectively with corresponding p-values equal to .0043 and .0332. Conclusions Among younger low-income women, addressing low self-esteem might improve health status.

  12. Clinical Pregnancy After Assisted Hatching Rate in Young women undergoing Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Sunaidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The ability of a blast cyst to hatch, or escape, from the Zona Pellucida (ZP that surrounds and protects the embryo during its first few days of development is one of many critical events that must occur for successful reproduction. Implantation of the embryo in the uterine lining is impossible unless hatching occurs. Hard or thick ZP will therefore impaire the implantation process and reduce the pregnancy rate. Approach: Retrospective analysis of patients' records who had ICSI cycles comparing pregnancy rate for women with and without assisted hatching between Jan and Dec 2010, this was to evaluate the overall effect of AH on pregnancy rates in younger women (less than 37 years old undergoing ICSI cycles at Mustasharak medical center, ABHA, Saudi Arabia. The studied population was divided into four different subgroups according to age and the differences in clinical pregnancy rate among the assisted hatching group and control group were calculated. Results: Clinical pregnancy rate was found to be significantly higher statistically in young women who underwent laser assisted hatching after ICSI. Conclusion: Laser assisted hatching has a positive impact on the clinical pregnancy rate following ICSI in young age group.

  13. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somerville Robert PT

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scales in both static bags and the WAVE bioreactor. Both bioreactors produced comparable numbers of cells; however the cultures generated in the WAVE bioreactor had a higher percentage of CD4+ cells and had a less activated phenotype. Conclusions The WAVE bioreactor simplifies the process of rapidly expanding tumor reactive lymphocytes under GMP conditions, and provides an alternate approach to cell generation for ACT protocols.

  14. Detection of changes in the fractal scaling of heart rate and speed in a marathon race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billat, Véronique L.; Mille-Hamard, Laurence; Meyer, Yves; Wesfreid, Eva

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to detect changes in the fractal scaling behavior of heart rate and speed fluctuations when the average runner’s speed decreased with fatigue. Scaling analysis in heart rate (HR) and speed (S) dynamics of marathon runners was performed using the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and the wavelet based structure function. We considered both: the short-range ( α1) and the long-range ( α2) scaling exponents for the DFA method separated by a change-point, n0=64=5.3 min (box length), the same for all the races. The variability of HR and S decreased in the second part of the marathon race, while the cardiac cost time series (i.e. the number of cardiac beats per meter) increased due to the decreasing speed behavior. The scaling exponents α1 and α2 of HR and α1 of S, increased during the race ( pexercise on the heart rate and speed variability.

  15. Depression in memory clinic patients: prevalence, symptoms and validity of standardized depression scales

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    List of papers. The papers are removed from the thesis due to publisher restrictions. Paper I: Knapskog AB, Barca ML, Engedal K. A comparison of the validity of the Cornell Scale and the MADRS in detecting depression among memory clinic patients. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2011;32(4):287-94. doi:10.1159/000334983 Paper II: Knapskog AB, Barca ML, Engedal K. Prevalence of depression among memory clinic patients as measured by the Cornell Scale of Depression in Dementia. Aging Ment Heal...

  16. Discriminant of validity the Wender Utah rating scale in Iranian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Farokhzadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the normalization of the Wender Utah rating scale which is used to detect adults with Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Available sampling method was used to choose 400 parents of children (200 parents of children with ADHD as compared to 200 parents of normal children. Wender Utah rating scale, which has been designed to diagnose ADHD in adults, is filled out by each of the parents to most accurately diagnose of ADHD in parents. Wender Utah rating scale was divided into 6 sub scales which consist of dysthymia, oppositional defiant disorder; school work problems, conduct disorder, anxiety, and ADHD were analyzed with exploratory factor analysis method. The value of (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin KMO was 86.5% for dysthymia, 86.9% for oppositional defiant disorder, 77.5% for school related problems, 90.9% for conduct disorder, 79.6% for anxiety and 93.5% for Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, also the chi square value based on Bartlett's Test was 2242.947 for dysthymia, 2239.112 for oppositional defiant disorder, 1221.917 for school work problems, 5031.511 for conduct, 1421.1 for anxiety, and 7644.122 for ADHD. Since mentioned values were larger than the chi square critical values (P<0.05, it found that the factor correlation matrix is appropriate for factor analysis. Based on the findings, we can conclude that Wender Utah rating scale can be appropriately used for predicting dysthymia, oppositional defiant disorder, school work problems, conduct disorder, anxiety, in adults with ADHD.

  17. Discriminant of validity the Wender Utah rating scale in Iranian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhzadi, Farideh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Salmanian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is the normalization of the Wender Utah rating scale which is used to detect adults with Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Available sampling method was used to choose 400 parents of children (200 parents of children with ADHD as compared to 200 parents of normal children). Wender Utah rating scale, which has been designed to diagnose ADHD in adults, is filled out by each of the parents to most accurately diagnose of ADHD in parents. Wender Utah rating scale was divided into 6 sub scales which consist of dysthymia, oppositional defiant disorder; school work problems, conduct disorder, anxiety, and ADHD were analyzed with exploratory factor analysis method. The value of (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin) KMO was 86.5% for dysthymia, 86.9% for oppositional defiant disorder, 77.5% for school related problems, 90.9% for conduct disorder, 79.6% for anxiety and 93.5% for Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, also the chi square value based on Bartlett's Test was 2242.947 for dysthymia, 2239.112 for oppositional defiant disorder, 1221.917 for school work problems, 5031.511 for conduct, 1421.1 for anxiety, and 7644.122 for ADHD. Since mentioned values were larger than the chi square critical values (P<0.05), it found that the factor correlation matrix is appropriate for factor analysis. Based on the findings, we can conclude that Wender Utah rating scale can be appropriately used for predicting dysthymia, oppositional defiant disorder, school work problems, conduct disorder, anxiety, in adults with ADHD. PMID:24902016

  18. [Influence of chitosan on clinical-biochemical rates and protein metabolism of patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭgarin, E K; Pogozheva, A V

    2008-01-01

    The article tells about influence of combined chitosan (5 g/day) and triweekly dietotherapy on clinical-biochemical rates and nitrogen balance of patients with cardiovascular diseases. We obtained data indicating negative influence of chitosan on nitrogen balance. PMID:19227863

  19. Validation of the Brazilian version of the Clinical Gait and Balance Scale and comparison with the Berg Balance Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Almeida Oliveira Baggio

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To validate the Clinical Gait and Balance Scale (GABS for a Brazilian population of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and to compare it to the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Methods One hundred and seven PD patients were evaluated by shortened UPDRS motor scale (sUPDRSm, Hoehn and Yahr (HY, Schwab and England scale (SE, Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I, Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q, BBS and GABS. Results The internal consistency of the GABS was 0.94, the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were 0.94 and 0.98 respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was 0.72, with a sensitivity of 0.75 and specificity of 0.6, to discriminate patients with a history of falls in the last twelve months, for a cut-off score of 13 points. Conclusions Our study shows that the Brazilian version of the GABS is a reliable and valid instrument to assess gait and balance in PD.

  20. Feature analysis of the scale factor variation on a constant rate biased ring laser gyro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiqiao Qin; Zongsheng Huang; Xingshu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Scale factor of a constant rate biased ring laser gyro (RLG) is studied both theoretically and experimentally.By analyzing experimental data, we find that there are three main terms contributing to the scale factor deviation. One of them is independent of time, the second varies linearly with time and the third varies exponentially with time. Theoretical analyses show that the first term is caused by experimental setup,the second and the third are caused by un-uniform thermal expension and cavity loss variation of the RLG.

  1. Upscaling of reaction rates in reactive transport using pore-scale reactive transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Arnold, B. W.; Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Srinivasan, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 during geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks, confined aquifers, or faults, resulting in mineral precipitation and dissolution. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes among hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at the (sub) pore-scale. In this research pore-scale modeling of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and heterogeneous reaction at the mineral surface is applied to account for permeability alterations caused by precipitation-induced pore-blocking. This work is motivated by the observed CO2 seeps from a natural analog to geologic CO2 sequestration at Crystal Geyser, Utah. A key observation is the lateral migration of CO2 seep sites at a scale of ~ 100 meters over time. A pore-scale model provides fundamental mechanistic explanations of how calcite precipitation alters flow paths by pore plugging under different geochemical compositions and pore configurations. In addition, response function of reaction rates will be constructed from pore-scale simulations which account for a range of reaction regimes characterized by the Damkohler and Peclet numbers. Newly developed response functions will be used in a continuum scale model that may account for large-scale phenomena mimicking lateral migration of surface CO2 seeps. Comparison of field observations and simulations results will provide mechanistic explanations of the lateral migration and enhance our understanding of subsurface processes associated with the CO2 injection. This work is supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  2. The performance of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales as measures of clinical severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mario; Vandeleur, Caroline; Weniger, Godehard; Prinz, Susanne; Vetter, Stefan; Egger, Stephan T

    2016-05-30

    The aim of this study was to examine the performance of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) against other measures of functioning and mental health in a full three-year cohort of admissions to a psychiatric hospital. A sample of N=1719 patients (35.3% females, aged 17-78 years) was assessed using observer-rated measures and self-reports of psychopathology at admission. Self-reports were available from 51.7% of the sample (34.4% females, aged 17-76 years). Functioning and psychopathology were compared across five ICD-10 diagnostic groups: substance use disorders, schizophrenia and psychotic disorders, affective disorders, anxiety/somatoform disorders and personality disorders. Associations between the measures were examined, stratifying by diagnostic subgroup. The HoNOS were strongly linked to other measures primarily in psychotic disorders (except for the behavioral subscale), while those with substance use disorders showed rather poor links. Those with anxiety/somatoform disorders showed null or only small associations. This study raises questions about the overall validity of the HoNOS. It seems to entail different levels of validity when applied to different diagnostic groups. In clinical practice the HoNOS should not be used as a stand-alone instrument to assess outcome but rather as part of a more comprehensive battery including diagnosis-specific measures. PMID:27137958

  3. Validade da versão em português da Clinical Dementia Rating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Montaño Maria Beatriz M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a validade da versão em português da Clinical Dementia Rating para classificar a função cognitiva de idosos. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se o instrumento Mini-Mental State Examination para rastreamento de déficit cognitivo em coorte composta por 424 idosos. Foram selecionados todos que obtiveram escores 26. Os 156 idosos selecionados foram submetidos a uma avaliação clínica e testes neuropsicológicos para diagnóstico de casos de demência. Tanto os casos como os não-casos foram classificados segundo a versão em português da Clinical Dementia Rating em: normais, casos questionáveis e casos de demência leve, moderada ou grave. RESULTADOS: Entre os 156 avaliados, 122 eram não-casos, destes 62 (51% foram classificados como normais (CDR=0 e questionáveis 60 (49% (CDR=0,5. Entre os 34 casos de demência, 17 (50% foram classificados como demência leve (CDR=1, 8 (23% moderada (CDR=2 e 6 (18% grave (CDR=3. Apenas três (9% dos casos foram considerados questionáveis pelo Clinical Dementia Rating. Sua sensibilidade foi de 91,2% e a especificidade de 100%, com valor preditivo positivo de 100% e negativo de 97,6%. As pontuações no Mini-Mental State Examination declinaram significativamente conforme o grau de demência. CONCLUSÕES: O Clinical Dementia Rating mostrou ser instrumento válido para classificar o grau de demência entre idosos. Quase metade dos não-casos foram casos questionáveis pelo Clinical Dementia Rating e podem corresponder a casos de transtorno cognitivo leve, com maior risco de conversão em demência.

  4. Polymethylmethacrylate-assisted ventral discectomy: Rate of pseudarthrosis and clinical outcome with a minimum follow-up of 5 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier-Hauff Klaus

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA assisted ventral discectomy has been criticized for high rates of graft migration and pseudarthrosis when compared with various other fusion procedures for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD, therefore rendering it not the preferred choice of treatment today. Recently however spine surgery has been developing towards preservation rather than restriction of motion, indicating that fusion might not be necessary for clinical success. This study presents a long term comparison of clinical and radiological data from patients with pseudarthrosis and solid arthrodesis after PMMA assisted ventral discectomy was performed. Methods From 1986 to 2004 416 patients underwent ventral discectomy and PMMA interposition for DDD. The clinical and radiological outcome was assessed for 50 of 127 eligible patients after a mean of 8.1 years. Based on postoperative radiographs the patients were dichotomized in those with a pseudarthrosis (group A and those with solid arthrodesis (group B. Results Pseudarthrosis with movement of more than 2 of the operated segment was noted in 17 cases (group A. In 33 cases no movement of the vertebral segment could be detected (group B. The analysis of the clinical data assessed through the neck disability index (NDI, the visual analogue scale (VAS of neck and arm pain and Odom's criteria did not show any significant differences between the groups. Patients from group B showed a trend to higher adjacent segment degeneration (ASD than group A (p = 0.06. This correlated with the age of the patients. Conclusions PMMA assisted discectomy shows a high rate of pseudarthrosis. But the clinical long-term success does not seem to be negatively affected by this.

  5. Time Scale Analysis of Interest Rate Spreads and Output Using Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gallegati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper adds to the literature on the information content of different spreads for real activity by explicitly taking into account the time scale relationship between a variety of monetary and financial indicators (real interest rate, term and credit spreads and output growth. By means of wavelet-based exploratory data analysis we obtain richer results relative to the aggregate analysis by identifying the dominant scales of variation in the data and the scales and location at which structural breaks have occurred. Moreover, using the “double residuals” regression analysis on a scale-by-scale basis, we find that changes in the spread in several markets have different information content for output at different time frames. This is consistent with the idea that allowing for different time scales of variation in the data can provide a fruitful understanding of the complex dynamics of economic relationships between variables with non-stationary or transient components, certainly richer than those obtained using standard time domain methods.

  6. Turbulent time scales and the temperature variance dissipation rate in natural convection in lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulent heat transfer is of basic interest for the development and analysis of the lead-bismuth cooled accelerator-driven nuclear reactor concept. Results of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) for Rayleigh-Benard convection for the Rayleigh number Ra = 105 in a fluid with the Prandtl number Pr = 0,025, which corresponds to liquid lead-bismuth, are used to analyze turbulent time scales and the temperature variance dissipation rate. These results indicate that an application of the thermal or mixed time scale may considerably improve the standard heat flux model at this Rayleigh- and Prandtl numbers. Standard temperature variance dissipation rate model is investigated using the DNS results for Rayleigh-Benard convection at Pr equals 0,025, Ra equals 105. The analysis of the standard temperature variance dissipation rate model shows the importance of wall functions and the qualitatively good predictions by the standard model for this type of flow. Quantitatively this model over-predicts the results of direct numerical simulation by about 25%. The two-point correlation method is used to model the temperature variance dissipation rate. Comparison with DNS results shows qualitatively and quantitatively good predictions of the new model. The new temperature variance dissipation rate model leads therefore to an increased accuracy of turbulent heat flux models for this type of flow. An additional advantage is a minimal increase in model complexity which makes no special demands on model implementation into computer codes

  7. Validation of the Spanish Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression and Zung Self-Rating Depression Scales: a comparative validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ruiz-Grosso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depressive disorders are leading contributors to burden of disease in developing countries. Research aiming to improve their diagnosis and treatment is fundamental in these settings, and psychometric tools are widely used instruments to support mental health research. Our aim is to validate and compare the psychometric properties of the Spanish versions of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Spanish version of the CES-D was revised by 5 native Spanish speaking psychiatrists using as reference the English version. A locally standardized Spanish version of the ZSDS was used. These Spanish versions were administered to 70 patients with a clinical diagnosis of DSM-IV Major Depressive Episode (MDE, 63 without major depression but with clinical diagnosis of other psychiatric disorders (OPD, and 61 with no evidence of psychiatric disorders (NEP. For both scales, Cronbach's alpha (C-α and Hierarchical McDonald Omega for polychoric variables (MD-Ω were estimated; and receiver operating characteristics (ROC analysis performed. For the CES-D and ZSDS scales, C-α was 0.93 and 0.89 respectively, while MD-Ω was 0.90 and 0.75 respectively. The area under the ROC curve in MDE+OPD was 0.83 for CES-D and 0.84 for ZSDS; and in MDE+NEP was 0.98 for CES-D and 0.96 for ZSDS. Cut-off scores (co for the highest proportions of correctly classified (cc individuals among MDE+OPD were ≥29 for CES-D (sensitivity (ss = 77.1/specificity (sp = 79.4%/(cc = 78.2% and ≥47 for ZSDS (ss = 85.7%/sp = 71.4%/cc = 78.9%. In the MDE+NEP, co were ≥24 for the CES-D (ss = 91.4%/sp = 96.7%/cc = 93.9% and ≥45 for the ZSDS (ss = 91.4%/sp = 91.8%/cc = 91.6%. CONCLUSION: Spanish versions of the CES-D and ZSDS are valid instruments to detect depression in clinical settings and could be useful for both epidemiological

  8. Multi-scale Modeling of the Cardiovascular System: Disease Development, Progression, and Clinical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhang; Barocas, Victor H; Berceli, Scott A; Clancy, Colleen E; Eckmann, David M; Garbey, Marc; Kassab, Ghassan S; Lochner, Donna R; McCulloch, Andrew D; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death in the western world. With the current development of clinical diagnostics to more accurately measure the extent and specifics of CVDs, a laudable goal is a better understanding of the structure-function relation in the cardiovascular system. Much of this fundamental understanding comes from the development and study of models that integrate biology, medicine, imaging, and biomechanics. Information from these models provides guidance for developing diagnostics, and implementation of these diagnostics to the clinical setting, in turn, provides data for refining the models. In this review, we introduce multi-scale and multi-physical models for understanding disease development, progression, and designing clinical interventions. We begin with multi-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanics for diagnosis, clinical decision support, personalized and precision medicine in cardiology with examples in arrhythmia and heart failure. We then introduce computational models of vasculature mechanics and associated mechanical forces for understanding vascular disease progression, designing clinical interventions, and elucidating mechanisms that underlie diverse vascular conditions. We conclude with a discussion of barriers that must be overcome to provide enhanced insights, predictions, and decisions in pre-clinical and clinical applications. PMID:27138523

  9. The Verbal Rating Scale Is Reliable for Assessment of Postoperative Pain in Hip Fracture Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, R. D.; Lauritsen, J.; Ovesen, O.;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hip fracture patients represent a challenge to pain rating due to the high prevalence of cognitive impairment. Methods. Patients prospectively rated pain on the VRS. Furthermore, patients described the changes in pain after raising their leg, with one of five descriptors. Agreement...... assessing possible change in pain from the selected descriptors. Cognitive status was quantified by the short Orientation-Memory-Concentration Test. Results. 110 patients were included. Paired scores with maximum disagreement of one scale point reached 97% at rest and 95% at straight leg raise. Linear...

  10. A Review. A Criterion-related Study of Three Sets of Rating Scales Used for Measuring and Evaluating the Instrumental Achievement of First and Second Year Clarinet Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radocy, Rudolf E.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews a study that examined the validity of different rating scales for measuring instrumental achievement with the clarinet. Rejects the contention that the new rating scales are superior to the Clarinet Performance Rating Scale. (BSR)

  11. Effect of orientation and loading rate on compression behavior of small-scale Mo pillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, much work has focused on the size effect in face centered cubic (fcc) structures, however few pillar studies have focused on body centered cubic (bcc) metals. This paper explores the role of bcc crystal structure on the size effect, through compression testing of [001] and [235] Molybdenum (Mo) small-scale pillars manufactured by focused ion beam (FIB). The pillar diameters ranged from 200 nm to 5 μm. Results show that the relationship between yield stress and diameter exhibits an inverse relationship (σy ∝ d-0.22 for [001] Mo and σy ∝ d-0.34 for [235] Mo) weaker than that observed for face centered cubic (fcc) metals (σy ∝ d-0.6to-1.0). Additional tests at various loading rates revealed that small-scale Mo pillars exhibit a strain rate sensitivity similar to bulk Mo.

  12. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system

  13. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  14. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  15. Thermoneutral zone and scaling of metabolic rate on body mass in small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    A 4-species animal model suitable for experimental study of the effect of change in gravitational loading on the scale relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass is used to study the effect of temperature on metabolic rate in six male animals, 8-10 months of age, of each of the four species in the ambient temperature range 20-36 C. The measurements taken permitted partitioning of total body heat output into sensible heat loss by radiation, conduction and convection, and into latent heat loss by evaporation of water from the body surface. It is shown that the condition of thermoneutrality is important for metabolic scale effect studies, and that the thermoneutral zone for the species considered here is a narrow one.

  16. Validation of the German version of the extended ALS functional rating scale as a patient-reported outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Susanne; Vielhaber, Stefan; Körner, Sonja; Machts, Judith; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dengler, Reinhard; Petri, Susanne

    2013-09-01

    The revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) is a well-established rating instrument to assess the functional status of ALS patients. A recent innovation was the addition of three further items designed to improve its sensitivity at lower levels of physical function (ALSFRS-Extension, ALSFRS-EX). Neither the ALSFRS-R nor the ALSFRS-EX has been validated in German yet. The aim of the present study was the validation of the German version of a self-administered form of the ALSFRS-EX. Seventy-six patients participated in the study. Psychometric analysis included reliability assessment and factorial analysis. To evaluate convergent validity, correlations between ALSFRS-EX items and the MRC score, spasticity, tongue movement, pulmonary function, ALSAQ-40 and Borg dyspnoea scales (upright and supine) were performed. Internal consistency as measured by Cronbach's alpha (total scale 0.868, subscales 0.690-0.938) and corrected item to total correlations (all above 0.50) was high. Test-retest reliability assessed by Spearman's rho (0.882-0.972) and Cohen's Kappa (0.63-0.92) was also high. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation yielded a four-factor solution accounting for approximately 79% of the variance. Clinical parameters were strongly correlated with respective items and subscores of the ALSFRS-EX (muscle strength 0.568-0.833 p < 0.01; spasticity -0.236 to -0.376 p < 0.05; tongue movement 0.437-0.818 p < 0.01; pulmonary function 0.485-0.577 p < 0.01). ALSAQ-40 and Borg score correlated highly with the corresponding ALSFRS-EX items. The German self-report version of the ALSFRS-EX possesses very good psychometric properties similar to the original scale including high internal consistency and test-retest reliability as well as excellent convergent validity. PMID:23736973

  17. The base-scale entropy analysis of short-term heart rate variability signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin; NING Xinbao

    2005-01-01

    The complexity of heart rate variability (HRV) signal can reflect physiological functions and healthy status of heart system. Detecting complexity of the short-term HRV signal has an important practical meaning. We introduce the base-scale entropy method to analyze the complexity of time series. The advantages of our method are its simplicity, extremely fast calculation for very short data and anti-noise characteristic. For the well-known chaotic dynamical system―logistic map, it is shown that our complexity behaves similarly to Lyapunov exponents, and is especially effective in the presence of random Gaussian noise. This paper addresses the use of base-scale entropy method to 3 low-dimensional nonlinear deterministic systems. At last, we apply this idea to short-term HRV signal, and the result shows the method could robustly identify patterns generated from healthy and pathologic states, as well as aging. The base-scale entropy can provide convenience in practically applications.

  18. Effect of meditation on scaling behavior and complexity of human heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sarkar; Barat, P.

    2006-01-01

    The heart beat data recorded from samples before and during meditation are analyzed using two different scaling analysis methods. These analyses revealed that mediation severely affects the long range correlation of heart beat of a normal heart. Moreover, it is found that meditation induces periodic behavior in the heart beat. The complexity of the heart rate variability is quantified using multiscale entropy analysis and recurrence analysis. The complexity of the heart beat during mediation ...

  19. Psychometric evaluation of the altered states of consciousness rating scale (OAV)

    OpenAIRE

    Studerus, E; Gamma, A.; Vollenweider, F X

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The OAV questionnaire has been developed to integrate research on altered states of consciousness (ASC). It measures three primary and one secondary dimensions of ASC that are hypothesized to be invariant across ASC induction methods. The OAV rating scale has been in use for more than 20 years and applied internationally in a broad range of research fields, yet its factorial structure has never been tested by structural equation modeling techniques and its psychometric properties ...

  20. Psychometric Evaluation of the Altered States of Consciousness Rating Scale (OAV)

    OpenAIRE

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2010-01-01

    Background The OAV questionnaire has been developed to integrate research on altered states of consciousness (ASC). It measures three primary and one secondary dimensions of ASC that are hypothesized to be invariant across ASC induction methods. The OAV rating scale has been in use for more than 20 years and applied internationally in a broad range of research fields, yet its factorial structure has never been tested by structural equation modeling techniques and its psychometric properties h...

  1. Effect of meditation on scaling behavior and complexity of human heart rate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, A

    2006-01-01

    The heart beat data recorded from samples before and during meditation are analyzed using two different scaling analysis methods. These analyses revealed that mediation severely affects the long range correlation of heart beat of a normal heart. Moreover, it is found that meditation induces periodic behavior in the heart beat. The complexity of the heart rate variability is quantified using multiscale entropy analysis and recurrence analysis. The complexity of the heart beat during mediation is found to be more.

  2. Large-scale calculations of the beta-decay rates and r-process nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzov, I.N.; Goriely, S. [Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bruxelles (Belgium); Pearson, J.M. [Inst. d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bruxelles (Belgium)]|[Lab. de Physique Nucleaire, Univ. de Montreal, Montreal (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state and {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich nuclei is outlined. The structure of the {beta}-strength functions in stable and short-lived nuclei is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations and recent experimental data. (orig.)

  3. Validity of the Parent Young Mania Rating Scale in a Community Mental Health Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, William R; Clark, Steven C.; Wirth, Laurel; Simon, Cindy

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of using the Parent Young Mania Rating Scale (P-YMRS) to distinguish pediatric bipolar disorder from other psychiatric conditions. The design of the study was a retrospective chart review. The setting of the study was community mental health. Participants included 130 children and adolescents. Measurements were based on P-YMRS scores. An ANOVA revealed a significant difference between mean scores of patients with and without bipolar dis...

  4. The endoscopy Global Rating Scale – Canada: Development and implementation of a quality improvement tool

    OpenAIRE

    MacIntosh, Donald; Dubé, Catherine; Hollingworth, Roger; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; Daniels, Sandra; Ghattas, George

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing use of gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly for colorectal cancer screening, and increasing emphasis on health care quality highlight the need for endoscopy facilities to review the quality of the service they offer.OBJECTIVE: To adapt the United Kingdom Global Rating Scale (UK-GRS) to develop a web-based and patient-centred tool to assess and improve the quality of endoscopy services provided.METHODS: Based on feedback from 22 sites across Canada that completed the...

  5. Regional processes in mangrove ecosystems: Spatial scaling relationships, biomass, and turnover rates following catastrophic disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, G.A.; Smith, T. J., III; Whelan, K.R.T.; Doyle, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological processes and local-scale structural dynamics of mangroves are relatively well studied. Regional-scale processes, however, are not as well understood. Here we provide long-term data on trends in structure and forest turnover at a large scale, following hurricane damage in mangrove ecosystems of South Florida, U.S.A. Twelve mangrove vegetation plots were monitored at periodic intervals, between October 1992 and March 2005. Mangrove forests of this region are defined by a -1.5 scaling relationship between mean stem diameter and stem density, mirroring self-thinning theory for mono-specific stands. This relationship is reflected in tree size frequency scaling exponents which, through time, have exhibited trends toward a community average that is indicative of full spatial resource utilization. These trends, together with an asymptotic standing biomass accumulation, indicate that coastal mangrove ecosystems do adhere to size-structured organizing principles as described for upland tree communities. Regenerative dynamics are different between areas inside and outside of the primary wind-path of Hurricane Andrew which occurred in 1992. Forest dynamic turnover rates, however, are steady through time. This suggests that ecological, more-so than structural factors, control forest productivity. In agreement, the relative mean rate of biomass growth exhibits an inverse relationship with the seasonal range of porewater salinities. The ecosystem average in forest scaling relationships may provide a useful investigative tool of mangrove community biomass relationships, as well as offer a robust indicator of general ecosystem health for use in mangrove forest ecosystem management and restoration. ?? Springer 2006.

  6. Shifts in mass-scaling of respiration, feeding, and growth rates across life-form transitions in marine pelagic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hirst, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic rate of organisms may be viewed as a basic property from which other vital rates and many ecological patterns emerge and that follows a universal allometric mass scaling law, or it may be considered a property of the organism that emerges as a result of the adaptation to the...... life-form-dependent allometries that have similar scaling but different intercepts, such that the mass-specific rates converge on a rather narrow size-independent range. In contrast, ingestion and growth rates follow a near-universal taxa-independent ~3/4 mass scaling power law.We argue that the...... environment, with consequently fewer universal mass scaling properties. Here, we examine the mass scaling of respiration and maximum feeding (clearance and ingestion rates) and growth rates of heterotrophic pelagic organisms over an ~1015 range in body mass. We show that clearance and respiration rates have...

  7. Two-Locus Likelihoods Under Variable Population Size and Fine-Scale Recombination Rate Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, John A; Spence, Jeffrey P; Chan, Jeffrey; Song, Yun S

    2016-07-01

    Two-locus sampling probabilities have played a central role in devising an efficient composite-likelihood method for estimating fine-scale recombination rates. Due to mathematical and computational challenges, these sampling probabilities are typically computed under the unrealistic assumption of a constant population size, and simulation studies have shown that resulting recombination rate estimates can be severely biased in certain cases of historical population size changes. To alleviate this problem, we develop here new methods to compute the sampling probability for variable population size functions that are piecewise constant. Our main theoretical result, implemented in a new software package called LDpop, is a novel formula for the sampling probability that can be evaluated by numerically exponentiating a large but sparse matrix. This formula can handle moderate sample sizes ([Formula: see text]) and demographic size histories with a large number of epochs ([Formula: see text]). In addition, LDpop implements an approximate formula for the sampling probability that is reasonably accurate and scales to hundreds in sample size ([Formula: see text]). Finally, LDpop includes an importance sampler for the posterior distribution of two-locus genealogies, based on a new result for the optimal proposal distribution in the variable-size setting. Using our methods, we study how a sharp population bottleneck followed by rapid growth affects the correlation between partially linked sites. Then, through an extensive simulation study, we show that accounting for population size changes under such a demographic model leads to substantial improvements in fine-scale recombination rate estimation. PMID:27182948

  8. Psychometric properties and clinical relevance of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale in Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. de Bruin; R.K.A. van Kampen; T. van Kooten; A.M. Meijer

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated reliability, validity, and clinical relevance of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS) in Dutch adolescents. Methods: The Dutch translation of the ASHS was administered to 186 normal-sleeping adolescents and 112 adolescents with insomnia. Their sleep variables

  9. Scale Development of a Measure to Assess Community-Based and Clinical Intervention Group Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick A.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Neufeld, Sharon; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2008-01-01

    Though group interventions are widely used in community-based and clinical settings, there are few brief instruments for assessing the group environment. Two studies on the development of a brief measure to assess intervention group environments are described, and psychometric properties of the new scale are presented. The new measure is based on…

  10. Global scale analysis of the stream power law parameters based on worldwide 10Be denudation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Marie-Alice; Mudd, Simon; Attal, Mikael

    2015-04-01

    The stream power law, expressed as E = KAmSn where E is erosion rate [LT-1], K is erodibility [T-1L(1-2m)], A is drainage area [L2], S is channel gradient [L/L] and m and n are constants, is the most widely used model for bedrock channel incision. Despite its simplicity and limitations, the model has proved useful for a large number of applications such as topographic evolution, knickpoint migration, palaeotopography reconstruction, and the determination of uplift patterns and rates. However, the unknown parameters K, m and n are often fixed arbitrarily or are based on assumptions about the physics of the erosion processes that are not always valid, which considerably alters the use and interpretation of the model. In this study, we compile published 10Be basin-wide erosion rates (n = 1335) in order to assess the m/n ratio (or concavity index), the slope exponent n and erodibility coefficient K using the integral method of channel profile analysis. These three parameters are calculated for 66 areas and allow for a global scale analysis in terms of climatic, tectonic and environmental settings. Our results suggest that (i) many sites are too noisy or do not have enough data to predict n and K with a satisfying level of confidence; (ii) the slope exponent is predominantly greater than one, meaning that the relationship between erosion rate and the channel gradient is non-linear, supporting the idea that incision is a threshold controlled process. Furthermore, a multi-regression analysis and the calculation of n and K using a reference concavity index m/n = 0.45 demonstrate that (iii) many intuitive or previously demonstrated local-scale trends, such as the correlation between erosion rate and climate, do not appear at a global scale.

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation to Brazil of Medication Adherence Rating Scale for psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icaro Carvalho Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this research was to make a cross-cultural adaptation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS for psychiatric patients to the Brazilian context. Methods The procedure consisted of four phases: translation of the original scale, back-translation, review by an Expert Committee and Pre-test study with a patients’ sample. Results The Expert Committee corrected the items’ translation when necessary and modified the scale administration format and its instructions from self-report to face-to-face interview form in order to ensure easy understanding by the target population. During Pre-test, the instructions and most of the items were properly understood by patients, with the exception of three of them which had to be changed in order to ensure better understanding. The Pre-test sample was composed by 30 psychiatric patients, with severe and persistent disorders mainly single (46.7%, female (60.0%, with a mean age of 43.8 years old and an average of five years of education. Conclusion The Brazilian version of MARS scale is now adapted to the Brazilian Portuguese language and culture and is easily understood by the psychiatric target population. It is necessary to do further research to evaluate the scale psychometric qualities of validity and reliability in order to use it in Brazil.

  12. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Canis Lupus LLC and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Departments of Human Oncology, Medical Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa

  13. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between

  14. Dose rates modeling of pressurized water reactor primary loop components with SCALE6.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matijević, Mario, E-mail: mario.matijevic@fer.hr; Pevec, Dubravko, E-mail: dubravko.pevec@fer.hr; Trontl, Krešimir, E-mail: kresimir.trontl@fer.hr

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Shielding analysis of the typical PWR primary loop components was performed. • FW-CADIS methodology was thoroughly investigated using SCALE6.0 code package. • Versatile ability of SCALE6.0/FW-CADIS for deep penetration models was proved. • The adjoint source with focus on specific material can improve MC modeling. - Abstract: The SCALE6.0 simulation model of a typical PWR primary loop components for effective dose rates calculation based on hybrid deterministic–stochastic methodology was created. The criticality sequence CSAS6/KENO-VI of the SCALE6.0 code package, which includes KENO-VI Monte Carlo code, was used for criticality calculations, while neutron and gamma dose rates distributions were determined by MAVRIC/Monaco shielding sequence. A detailed model of a combinatorial geometry, materials and characteristics of a generic two loop PWR facility is based on best available input data. The sources of ionizing radiation in PWR primary loop components included neutrons and photons originating from critical core and photons from activated coolant in two primary loops. Detailed calculations of the reactor pressure vessel and the upper reactor head have been performed. The efficiency of particle transport for obtaining global Monte Carlo dose rates was further examined and quantified with a flexible adjoint source positioning in phase-space. It was demonstrated that generation of an accurate importance map (VR parameters) is a paramount step which enabled obtaining Monaco dose rates with fairly uniform uncertainties. Computer memory consumption by the S{sub N} part of hybrid methodology represents main obstacle when using meshes with large number of cells together with high S{sub N}/P{sub N} parameters. Detailed voxelization (homogenization) process in Denovo together with high S{sub N}/P{sub N} parameters is essential for precise VR parameters generation which will result in optimized MC distributions. Shielding calculations were also

  15. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of

  16. Dose rates modeling of pressurized water reactor primary loop components with SCALE6.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Shielding analysis of the typical PWR primary loop components was performed. • FW-CADIS methodology was thoroughly investigated using SCALE6.0 code package. • Versatile ability of SCALE6.0/FW-CADIS for deep penetration models was proved. • The adjoint source with focus on specific material can improve MC modeling. - Abstract: The SCALE6.0 simulation model of a typical PWR primary loop components for effective dose rates calculation based on hybrid deterministic–stochastic methodology was created. The criticality sequence CSAS6/KENO-VI of the SCALE6.0 code package, which includes KENO-VI Monte Carlo code, was used for criticality calculations, while neutron and gamma dose rates distributions were determined by MAVRIC/Monaco shielding sequence. A detailed model of a combinatorial geometry, materials and characteristics of a generic two loop PWR facility is based on best available input data. The sources of ionizing radiation in PWR primary loop components included neutrons and photons originating from critical core and photons from activated coolant in two primary loops. Detailed calculations of the reactor pressure vessel and the upper reactor head have been performed. The efficiency of particle transport for obtaining global Monte Carlo dose rates was further examined and quantified with a flexible adjoint source positioning in phase-space. It was demonstrated that generation of an accurate importance map (VR parameters) is a paramount step which enabled obtaining Monaco dose rates with fairly uniform uncertainties. Computer memory consumption by the SN part of hybrid methodology represents main obstacle when using meshes with large number of cells together with high SN/PN parameters. Detailed voxelization (homogenization) process in Denovo together with high SN/PN parameters is essential for precise VR parameters generation which will result in optimized MC distributions. Shielding calculations were also performed for the reduced PWR

  17. Phenomenological features of dreams: Results from dream log studies using the Subjective Experiences Rating Scale (SERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Tracey L; Claudatos, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Self-ratings of dream experiences were obtained from 144 college women for 788 dreams, using the Subjective Experiences Rating Scale (SERS). Consistent with past studies, dreams were characterized by a greater prevalence of vision, audition, and movement than smell, touch, or taste, by both positive and negative emotion, and by a range of cognitive processes. A Principal Components Analysis of SERS ratings revealed ten subscales: four sensory, three affective, one cognitive, and two structural (events/actions, locations). Correlations (Pearson r) among subscale means showed a stronger relationship among the process-oriented features (sensory, cognitive, affective) than between the process-oriented and content-centered (structural) features-a pattern predicted from past research (e.g., Bulkeley & Kahan, 2008). Notably, cognition and positive emotion were associated with a greater number of other phenomenal features than was negative emotion; these findings are consistent with studies of the qualitative features of waking autobiographical memory (e.g., Fredrickson, 2001). PMID:26945159

  18. On acquiring data for large-scale crack bridging at high strain rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Massabò, R.; Cox, B.N.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to design test geometries and loading histories that are suitable for probing the large-scale bridging effects of through-thickness reinforcement that is shearing at high strain rates. The bridging effects are represented by a cohesive law and tests are sought that...... most easily assessed. Numerical results show that the hypothetical rate dependence in the cohesive law causes strong and measurable changes in the regime of steady-state behavior, if the tests are properly selected to vary the crack sliding speed. The estimates of information content are conservative...... will determine any rate dependence in its parameters. The end-notched flexure test is studied, because it allows easy application of time-dependent loading and has proven to be an information-rich test in the quasi-static case. However, dynamic conditions greatly complicate fracture behavior, with...

  19. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling

  20. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Bryan A.; Shkedy, Clive I.; Powell, Adam C.; Happe, Laura E.; Royalty, Julie A.; Miao, Michael T.; Smith, Gary L.; Long, James W.; Gupta, Amit K.

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05). For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008) from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20). These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations. PMID:26870963

  1. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A Loy

    Full Text Available Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011 and after (2013 the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR. After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05. For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008 from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20. These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  2. Development and validation of a new global well-being outcomes rating scale for integrative medicine research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Iris R

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers are finding limitations of currently available disease-focused questionnaire tools for outcome studies in complementary and alternative medicine/integrative medicine (CAM/IM. Methods Three substudies investigated the new one-item visual analogue Arizona Integrative Outcomes Scale (AIOS, which assesses self-rated global sense of spiritual, social, mental, emotional, and physical well-being over the past 24 hours and the past month. The first study tested the scale's ability to discriminate unhealthy individuals (n = 50 from healthy individuals (n = 50 in a rehabilitation outpatient clinic sample. The second study examined the concurrent validity of the AIOS by comparing ratings of global well-being to degree of psychological distress as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI in undergraduate college students (N = 458. The third study evaluated the relationships between the AIOS and positively- and negatively-valenced tools (Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the Positive States of Mind Scale in a different sample of undergraduate students (N = 62. Results Substudy (i Rehabilitation patients scored significantly lower than the healthy controls on both forms of the AIOS and a current global health rating. The AIOS 24-hours correlated moderately and significantly with global health (patients r = 0.50; controls r = 0.45. AIOS 1-month correlations with global health were stronger within the controls (patients r = 0.36; controls r = 0.50. Controls (r = 0.64 had a higher correlation between the AIOS 24-hour and 1-month forms than did the patients (r = 0.33, which is consistent with the presumptive improvement in the patients' condition over the previous 30 days in rehabilitation. Substudy (ii In undergraduate students, AIOS scores were inversely related to distress ratings, as measured by the global severity index on the BSI (rAIOS24h = -0.42, rAIOS1month = -0.40. Substudy (iii AIOS scores were significantly

  3. Effects of acupressure on progress of labor and cesarean section rate: randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Reginaldo Roque Mafetoni; Antonieta Keiko Kakuda Shimo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effects of acupressure at the SP6 point on labor duration and cesarean section rates in parturients served in a public maternity hospital. METHODS This controlled, randomized, double-blind, pragmatic clinical trial involved 156 participants with gestational age ≥ 37 weeks, cervical dilation ≥ 4 cm, and ≥ 2 contractions in 10 min. The women were randomly divided into an acupressure, placebo, or control group at a university hospital in an inland city in the state of Sa...

  4. Combined student ratings and self-assessment provide useful feedback for clinical teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Stalmeijer, Renée E.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Wolfhagen, Ineke H. A. P.; Peters, Wim G.; van Coppenolle, Lieve; Scherpbier, Albert J J A

    2009-01-01

    Many evaluation instruments have been developed to provide feedback to physicians on their clinical teaching but written feedback alone is not always effective. We explored whether feedback effectiveness improved when teachers’ self-assessment was added to written feedback based on student ratings. 37 physicians (10 residents, 27 attending physicians) from different specialties (Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, Ophthalmology, ENT, and Psyc...

  5. Frequency, Clinical Correlates, and Ratings of Behavioral Changes in Primary Brain Tumor Patients: A Preliminary Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Grahame K Simpson; Koh, Eng-Siew; Whiting, Diane; Wright, Kylie M.; Simpson, Teresa; Firth, Rochelle; Gillett, Lauren; Younan, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have addressed the specific behavioral changes associated with primary brain tumor (PBT). This paper will report on the frequency and demographic/clinical correlates of such behaviors, and the reliability of rating such behaviors among people with PBT, family informants, and clinicians. The association of behavioral changes and patient functional status will also be discussed. Methods A total of 57 patients with 37 family informants were recruited from two large...

  6. Reduced breastfeeding rates among obese mothers: a review of contributing factors, clinical considerations and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bever Babendure, Jennie; Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Mendias, Elnora; Moramarco, Michael W; Davila, Yolanda R

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with significantly lower rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Increasing rates of obesity among reproductive-age women has prompted the need to carefully examine factors contributing to lower breastfeeding rates in this population. Recent research has demonstrated a significant impact of breastfeeding to reduce the risk of obesity in both mothers and their children. This article presents a review of research literature from three databases covering the years 1995 to 2014 using the search terms of breastfeeding and maternal obesity. We reviewed the existing research on contributing factors to lower breastfeeding rates among obese women, and our findings can guide the development of promising avenues to increase breastfeeding among a vulnerable population. The key findings concerned factors impacting initiation and early breastfeeding, factors impacting later breastfeeding and exclusivity, interventions to increase breastfeeding in obese women, and clinical considerations. The factors impacting early breastfeeding include mechanical factors and delayed onset of lactogenesis II and we have critically analyzed the potential contributors to these factors. The factors impacting later breastfeeding and exclusivity include hormonal imbalances, psychosocial factors, and mammary hypoplasia. Several recent interventions have sought to increase breastfeeding duration in obese women with varying levels of success and we have presented the strengths and weaknesses of these clinical trials. Clinical considerations include specific techniques that have been found to improve breastfeeding incidence and duration in obese women. Many obese women do not obtain the health benefits of exclusive breastfeeding and their children are more likely to also be overweight or obese if they are not breastfed. Further research is needed into the physiological basis for decreased breastfeeding among obese women along with effective

  7. A study of the clinical factors correlate to glomerular filtration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relative correlation between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and various clinical factors and to offer theory basis for the measurement of GFR by the calculation method. Methods: GFR of 50 cases of normal renal function group and 72 cases of renal insufficient group were determined using clearance of 99Tcm-DTPA, and serum creatinine (SCr). Blood urea nitrogen, uric acid, serum potassium, sodium, calcium and hemoglobin were determined simultaneously; and heart rate, urine specific gravity, 24 h urine protein quantum, average artery pressure, body-weight index and body-surface area were determined simultaneously as well. Age and isotope dose for determining GFR were recorded. The simple correlation analysis of GFR in every group with different primary diseases to every other clinical factor above-mentioned were performed and the multiple correlation analysis of every clinical factor above-mentioned that were significantly correlated with GFR to GFR were performed again. Results: For normal renal function group and renal insufficient group, correlation coefficient (r) between GFR and SCr were -0.449 and -0.275, respectively (P < 0.05). The correlations between GFR and other clinical factors were with different trends. Conclusion: In renal insufficient patients with different primary diseases and normal renal function subjects the SCr is the ideal index for estimating GFR

  8. Implications of two Holocene time-dependent geomagnetic models for cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is a major influence on in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates at a given location (in addition to atmospheric pressure and, to a lesser extent, solar modulation effects). A better understanding of how past fluctuations in these influences affected production rates should allow more accurate application of cosmogenic nuclides. As such, this work explores the cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models with new paleomagnetic data from sediment cores in addition to new archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved resolution and accuracy over the previous versions, in part due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. In addition, Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109) developed another time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field, based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data from the same underlying paleomagnetic database as the Korte et al. models, but extending to 14 ka. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC - the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to each other and to results using the earlier models. In addition, predictions of each new model using RC are tested empirically using recently published production rate calibration data for both 10Be and 3He, and compared to predictions using corresponding time-varying geocentric dipolar RC formulations and a static geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model. Results for the few calibration sites from geomagnetically sensitive regions suggest that the

  9. Sleep continuity scale in Alzheimer's disease (SCADS): application in daily clinical practice in an Italian center for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, R; Sinforiani, E; Terzaghi, M; Rezzani, C; Zucchella, C

    2015-03-01

    Sleep disorders can occur in many neurodegenerative disorders; in a previous paper we constructed a scale investigating sleep discontinuity/fragmentation with the aim to obtain a rapidly and easily administered tool suitable for early identification and longitudinal monitoring of sleep disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We introduced this instrument in the daily clinical practice in a center for dementia; here we present the results of our experience. Two hundred and sixteen AD outpatients referred to the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Unit at the IRCCS C. Mondino National Neurological Institute, Pavia, Italy, in the period October 2012 to March 2014 were administered the scale. The questionnaire global score was correlated with measures of cognitive, functional and behavioral impairment; a significant association was found with Mini-Mental State (p = 0.005), Activities of Daily Living (p = 0.01), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (p = 0.01) and Clinical Dementia Rating (p = 0.0005). The present data indicate that the previously validated questionnaire proves to be a suitable, rapid and easy to use tool in investigating sleep quality in AD in daily clinical practice. An early identification and longitudinal monitoring of sleep disturbances in AD may improve pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:25294429

  10. The Symptom Frequency Characteristics of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Possible Symptom Clusters of Depressive Disorders in Korea: The CRESCEND Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sae-Heon; Park, Young-nam; Jae, Young-Myo; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Jeong, Seung-Hee; Kim, Jung-Bum

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study analyzed the symptom frequencies of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) to understand the characteristics of each item and to propose the possible symptoms clusters. Methods From psychiatric clinics of 18 Hospitals in Korea, 1,183 patients, diagnosed with major depressive disorder (psychotic or non-psychotic), dysthymia or depressive disorder not otherwise specified. according to DSM-IV criteria, participated in this study from January 2006 to August 2008. ...

  11. Population-Scale Sequencing Data Enable Precise Estimates of Y-STR Mutation Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Thomas; Gymrek, Melissa; Poznik, G David; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Erlich, Yaniv

    2016-05-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are mutation-prone loci that span nearly 1% of the human genome. Previous studies have estimated the mutation rates of highly polymorphic STRs by using capillary electrophoresis and pedigree-based designs. Although this work has provided insights into the mutational dynamics of highly mutable STRs, the mutation rates of most others remain unknown. Here, we harnessed whole-genome sequencing data to estimate the mutation rates of Y chromosome STRs (Y-STRs) with 2-6 bp repeat units that are accessible to Illumina sequencing. We genotyped 4,500 Y-STRs by using data from the 1000 Genomes Project and the Simons Genome Diversity Project. Next, we developed MUTEA, an algorithm that infers STR mutation rates from population-scale data by using a high-resolution SNP-based phylogeny. After extensive intrinsic and extrinsic validations, we harnessed MUTEA to derive mutation-rate estimates for 702 polymorphic STRs by tracing each locus over 222,000 meioses, resulting in the largest collection of Y-STR mutation rates to date. Using our estimates, we identified determinants of STR mutation rates and built a model to predict rates for STRs across the genome. These predictions indicate that the load of de novo STR mutations is at least 75 mutations per generation, rivaling the load of all other known variant types. Finally, we identified Y-STRs with potential applications in forensics and genetic genealogy, assessed the ability to differentiate between the Y chromosomes of father-son pairs, and imputed Y-STR genotypes. PMID:27126583

  12. Clinical utility of the Snaith-Hamilton-Pleasure scale in the Chinese settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-hua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Snaith-Hamilton-Pleasure-Scale (SHAPS is a self-reported scale evaluating anhedonia for neuropsychiatric disorders. It has demonstrated with impressive psychometric properties and advantages in its applicability over other similar instruments. However, very few studies have been conducted to examine the clinical utility of the SHAPS in the context of Chinese settings. The current study aimed to examine the clinical utility of the translated version of the SHAPS in the Chinese clinical settings. Methods A Chinese version of SHAPS was administered to 336 college students to examine the internal consistency and test-retest reliability at a 4-week interval. Moreover, the translated SHAPS was also administered to 141 patients with major depression, 72 patients with schizophrenia, and 72 healthy controls to examine its clinical discrimination. Results The internal consistency of the SHAPS for the non-clinical sample and test-retest reliability at a 4- week interval were 0.85 and 0.64, respectively. Moreover, the SHAPS also showed an excellent internal consistency (alpha was 0.93 and a one-factor solution with the first factor accounted for 51.53% of the variance in the clinical psychiatric samples. ANOVA of the SHAPS total score indicated that the patients with depression scored significantly more anhedonia than the patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls (p Conclusions These findings suggest that the Chinese version of the SHAPS is a useful and promising instrument in assessing anhedonia for clinical patients and non-clinical individuals in the Chinese settings.

  13. Test-retest reliability of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Margareta; Blomberg, Karin; Holmefur, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale evaluates the student nurses' perception of the learning environment and supervision within the clinical placement. It has never been tested in a replication study. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CLES + T scale. The CLES + T scale was administered twice to a group of 42 student nurses, with a one-week interval. Test-retest reliability was determined by calculations of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) and weighted Kappa coefficients. Standard Error of Measurements (SEM) and Smallest Detectable Difference (SDD) determined the precision of individual scores. Bland-Altman plots were created for analyses of systematic differences between the test occasions. The results of the study showed that the stability over time was good to excellent (ICC 0.88-0.96) in the sub-dimensions "Supervisory relationship", "Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward" and "Role of the nurse teacher". Measurements of "Premises of nursing on the ward" and "Leadership style of the manager" had lower but still acceptable stability (ICC 0.70-0.75). No systematic differences occurred between the test occasions. This study supports the usefulness of the CLES + T scale as a reliable measure of the student nurses' perception of the learning environment within the clinical placement at a hospital. PMID:25814151

  14. Precision of power-law NHPP estimates for multiple systems with known failure rate scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power-law non-homogeneous Poisson process, also called the Crow-AMSAA model, is often used to model the failure rate of repairable systems. In standard applications it is assumed that the recurrence rate is the same for all systems that are observed. The estimation of the model parameters on the basis of past failure data is typically performed using maximum likelihood. If the operational period over which failures are observed differs for each system, the Fisher information matrix is numerically inverted to quantify the precision of the parameter estimates. In this paper, the extended case is considered where the recurrence rate between the different systems may vary with known scaling factors and it is shown that the standard error of the parameter estimates can be quantified using analytical formulae. The scaling factors allow to apply the model to a wider range of problems. The analytical solution for the standard error simplifies the application and allows to better understand how the precision of the model varies with the extent of available data. The good performance and the practical use of the method is illustrated in an example

  15. Detecting Parental Deception Using a Behavior Rating Scale during Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfolk, Philip A.; Floyd, Randy G.

    2016-01-01

    It is often assumed that parents completing behavior rating scales during the assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can deliberately manipulate the outcomes of the assessment. To detect these actions, items designed to detect over-reporting or under-reporting of results are sometimes embedded in such rating scales. This…

  16. Clinical evaluation of the JPEG2000 compression rate of CT and MR images for long term archiving in PACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to evaluate an acceptable compression rate of JPEG2000 for long term archiving of CT and MR images in PACS. Nine CT images and 9 MR images that had small or minimal lesions were randomly selected from the PACS at our institute. All the images are compressed with rates of 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 40:1 and 80:1 by the JPEG2000 compression protocol. Pairs of original and compressed images were compared by 9 radiologists who were working independently. We designed a JPEG2000 viewing program for comparing two images on one monitor system for performing easy and quick evaluation. All the observers performed the comparison study twice on 5 mega pixel grey scale LCD monitors and 2 mega pixel color LCD monitors, respectively. The PSNR (Peak Signal to Noise Ratio) values were calculated for making quantitative comparisions. On MR and CT, all the images with 5:1 compression images showed no difference from the original images by all 9 observers and only one observer could detect a image difference on one CT image for 10:1 compression on only the 5 mega pixel monitor. For the 20:1 compression rate, clinically significant image deterioration was found in 50% of the images on the 5M pixel monitor study, and in 30% of the images on the 2M pixel monitor. PSNR values larger than 44 dB were calculated for all the compressed images. The clinically acceptable image compression rate for long term archiving by the JPEG2000 compression protocol is 10:1 for MR and CT, and if this is applied to PACS, it would reduce the cost and responsibility of the system

  17. Clinical evaluation of the JPEG2000 compression rate of CT and MR images for long term archiving in PACS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Soon Joo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Yong Hoon [Inje University Image Research Center, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate an acceptable compression rate of JPEG2000 for long term archiving of CT and MR images in PACS. Nine CT images and 9 MR images that had small or minimal lesions were randomly selected from the PACS at our institute. All the images are compressed with rates of 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 40:1 and 80:1 by the JPEG2000 compression protocol. Pairs of original and compressed images were compared by 9 radiologists who were working independently. We designed a JPEG2000 viewing program for comparing two images on one monitor system for performing easy and quick evaluation. All the observers performed the comparison study twice on 5 mega pixel grey scale LCD monitors and 2 mega pixel color LCD monitors, respectively. The PSNR (Peak Signal to Noise Ratio) values were calculated for making quantitative comparisions. On MR and CT, all the images with 5:1 compression images showed no difference from the original images by all 9 observers and only one observer could detect a image difference on one CT image for 10:1 compression on only the 5 mega pixel monitor. For the 20:1 compression rate, clinically significant image deterioration was found in 50% of the images on the 5M pixel monitor study, and in 30% of the images on the 2M pixel monitor. PSNR values larger than 44 dB were calculated for all the compressed images. The clinically acceptable image compression rate for long term archiving by the JPEG2000 compression protocol is 10:1 for MR and CT, and if this is applied to PACS, it would reduce the cost and responsibility of the system.

  18. Relaxation rate and scaling function of the critical system 3-methylpentane-nitroethane-cyclohexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowski, I; Mirzaev, S Z; Kaatze, U

    2008-08-14

    The critical system 3-methylpentane-nitroethane-cyclohexane (3-MP-NE-CH) has been investigated and compared to the limiting binary systems 3-MP-NE as well as NE-CH in order to study the degree of renormalization in the critical exponents of the ternary system. The solubility curves of the 3-MP-NE-CH system have been determined at various molar ratios of the nonpolar constituents in order to obtain the plait points as a function of mixture composition. At the col point (the mixture with the lowest transition temperature) and two further plait point compositions shear viscosity, dynamic light scattering, and frequency-dependent ultrasonic attenuation coefficient measurements have been performed as a function of temperature near the critical temperatures. The fluctuation correlation length and the relaxation rate of fluctuations display power law behavior as a function of reduced temperature, with universal critical exponents nu = 0.63 and nuZ(0) = 1.928, respectively, as characteristic for binary critical mixtures. In conformity with the 3-MP-NE and NE-CH critical mixtures the scaling function in the ultrasonic spectra nicely agrees with the empirical scaling function of the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell dynamic scaling theory. Hence with respect to power laws and scaling the 3-MP-NE-CH system behaves like a quasibinary mixture. The individual amplitudes of the relaxation rate show a minimum at the col point composition, corresponding with a maximum in the background viscosity of the liquids. The amount of the adiabatic coupling constant g, derived from the amplitudes in the ultrasonic spectra, increases monotonously when going from NE-CH (/g/ = 0.1) to 3-MP-NE (/g/ = 0.26). PMID:18715094

  19. Monitoring of radiation dose rates around a clinical nuclear medicine site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring of radiation dose around the nuclear medicine site is an important study issue. In this study, TLD-100H radiation dosimeters were used to measure the ambient radiation dose rates around a clinical nuclear medicine site in order to investigate the latent hot zones of radiation exposure. Results of this study showed that the radiation doses measured from all piping and storage systems were comparable to the background dose. A relatively high dose was observed at the single bend point of waste water piping of the PET/CT. Another important finding was the unexpected high dose rates observed at the non-restricted waiting area (NRWA) of SPECT. To conclude, this study provides useful information for further determination of an appropriate dose reduction strategy to achieve the ALARA principle in a clinical nuclear medicine site. - Highlights: • Observed unexpected high dose rates in the non restricted waiting area. • Provides useful Radiation Dose Rates information in nuclear medicine radioactive waste water pipeline system. • Provide TLD setup method in environmental radiation dose evaluate

  20. Validation of the Rowland universal dementia assessment scale for multicultural screening in Danish memory clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T Rune; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Gottrup, Hanne; Lützhøft, Jan; Høgh, Peter; Waldemar, Gunhild

    Background/Aims: The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) is a brief cognitive screening test that was developed to detect dementia in multicultural populations. The RUDAS has not previously been validated in multicultural populations outside of Australia. The aim of this study was...... to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the RUDAS in a multicultural sample of patients referred to Danish memory clinics. Methods: Data were collected from 137 consecutive patients (34 with an immigrant background) in three Danish memory clinics. All patients were given the RUDAS as a supplement to...

  1. Clinical Frailty Scale in an Acute Medicine Unit: a Simple Tool That Predicts Length of Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Salina; Taabazuing, Mary-Margaret; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to external stressors. When frail older adults are admitted to hospital, they are at increased risk of adverse events including falls, delirium, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a practical and efficient tool for assessing frailty; however, its ability to predict outcomes has not been well studied within the acute medical service. Objective To examine the CFS in elderly patients admitted to the acute medical ward and its association with length of stay. Design Prospective cohort study in an acute care university hospital in London, Ontario, Canada, involving 75 patients over age 65, admitted to the general internal medicine clinical teaching units (CTU). Measurements Patient demographics were collected through chart review, and CFS score was assigned to each patient after brief clinician assessment. The CFS ranges from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill) based on descriptors and pictographs of activity and functional status. The CFS was collapsed into three categories: non-frail (CFS 1–4), mild-to-moderately frail (CFS 5–6), and severely frail (CFS 7–8). Outcomes of length of stay and 90-day readmission were gathered through the LHSC electronic patient record. Results Severe frailty was associated with longer lengths of stay (Mean = 12.6 ± 12.7 days) compared to mild-to-moderate frailty (mean = 11.2 ± 10.8 days), and non-frailty (mean = 4.1 ± 2.1 days, p = .014). This finding was significant after adjusting for age, sex, and number of medications. Participants with higher frailty scores showed higher readmission rates when compared with those with no frailty (31.2% for severely frail, vs. 34.2% for mild-to-moderately frail vs. 19% for non-frail) although there was no significant difference in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion The CFS helped identify patients that are more likely to have prolonged hospital stays on the acute medical ward. The CFS is an easy to use tool which

  2. Validation of the Official Slovak Version of the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Matej Skorvanek; Michal Minar; Milan Grofik; Katarina Kracunova; Vladimir Han; Frantisek Cibulcik; Jan Necpal; Ladislav Gurcik; Peter Valkovic

    2015-01-01

    After successful clinimetric testing of the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS), a program for translation and validation of non-English versions of the UDysRS was initiated. The aim of this study was to validate and confirm the factor structure of the Slovak translation of the UDysRS. We examined 251 patients with Parkinson’s disease and dyskinesia using the Slovak version of the UDysRS. The average age of our sample was 65.2 ± 9.2 years and average disease duration was 10.9 ± 5.0 years...

  3. Rasch analysis in the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Garde, B; Kreiner, S

    1995-01-01

    . Content, construct, criterion and convergent validity were examined, as well as the inter-rater reliability. The final rating scale has three special characteristics: 1) it reflects the regularity in the recovery of mobility after stroke; 2) the sum of item scores comprises the information contained in...... the 10-item subscores; 3) the score sum is independent of age, side of hemiparesis, and gender of the patient. Latent trait analysis (Rasch) was found to be an ideal model for statistical investigation of these properties....

  4. DYNAMICS OF CHOICE: RELATIVE RATE AND AMOUNT AFFECT LOCAL PREFERENCE AT THREE DIFFERENT TIME SCALES

    OpenAIRE

    Aparicio, Carlos F; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4∶1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right lever one pellet); Phase 2 reversed the food-amount ratio to 1∶4, and in Phase 3 the food-amount ratio was 3∶2. At a relatively extended time scale, ...

  5. Internal Clinical Acceptance Test of the Dose Rate of 106Ru/106Rh Ophthalmic Applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Episcleral brachytherapy using 106Ru/106Rh ophthalmic applicators is a proven method of therapy for uveal melanomas, sparing the globe and in many cases, conserving vision. In its certificates, Bebig, the manufacturer of the product, indicates a dose rate for the 106Ru/106Rh ophthalmic applicators which ensures traceability to the NIST standard (12/2001). Since the introduction of the NIST calibration, the quality of the calibration provided by Bebig to the clinical user has been examined for 45 ophthalmic applicators with a plastic scintillator measurement system. Of these, 20 ophthalmic applicators had a dose rate at the dose specification reference point that exceeded the dose rate stated in the manufacturer's certificate by up to 23%. (author)

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Presentation of Hairy Cell Leukemia (Hcl and Rate of Response to Cladribine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Forat Yazdi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HCL is a rare malignant condition that is curable if diagnosed early. HCL can present with reduced blood cells and splenomegaly which maybe misdiagnosed with other conditions. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of early clinical and laboratory findings as well as the response rate of patients to the standard treatment regimen of Cladribine. Methods: The study was an uncontrolled clinical trial including 25 HCL patients referring to Oncology Clinics of Shahid Sadoughi (Yazd - Iran and Shahid Beheshti (Tehran - Iran between 1999 and 2005. Data was gathered by a pre–designed questionnaire. 21 out of 25 patients were treated with Cladribine and the clinical and laboratory response was assessed. Results: Of the 25 patients studied, 20 patients (80% were male and 5 patients (20% were female. Most of the patients at diagnosis were 55–67 years old and the most common presenting symptom was fatigue and lassitude secondary to anemia. Two patients were asymptomatic and were diagnosed incidentally. Splenomegaly was the main clinical finding which was present in about 80% of the males and all of the females. Accordingly, hairy cells in the peripheral blood smear, leukopenia and anemia were the most common laboratory findings. In contrast to previous results, pancytopenia was found in only 60% of the patients. Response rate was 90% (19 out of 21 of which 61.9% (13 patients and 28.5% (6 patients had complete remission (CR and partial remission (PR, respectively. Conclusion: According to the results, it can be concluded that HCL should be considered as a possible diagnosis in the context of fatigue, splenomegaly and reduced blood cell count. The results of the present study were similar to other similar international studies.

  7. Analysis of medication incidents and development of a Medication Incident Rate Clinical Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headford, C; McGowan, S; Clifford, R

    2001-07-01

    Most health service organisations depend solely upon spontaneous voluntary reporting of medication incidents and a wide variety of available denominators are used in order to calculate the Medication Incident Rate (MIR). This paper describes how nursing staff and clinical pharmacists reviewed medication incident data, revised and established new systems of reporting and developed a clinically useful, rate-based MIR Clinical Indicator. In order to make the MIR more meaningful, the frequency of occurrence of incidents was considered within the context of the total number of medications given to patients. This was achieved by undertaking a point prevalence audit of all inpatient medication charts (n=372) to determine the total number of doses of medication given to patients during a 24 hour period (n=3211). This value was then used as the denominator for the MIR indicator. During 1998, a total of 475 medication incidents were reported; the average number of incidents was 1.3 per 24 hours. The MIR per 1000 doses was calculated to be 0.4. In most cases (77%) the incident caused no harm to the patient and no change in treatment was required, and the most 'severe' category for any incident was that active treatment was required (3% of reported incidents). The most common type of incident was the omission of a dose of medication (50%). A wide range of drugs were involved in the incidents, most commonly morphine (3.4%). The authors consider that the development and use of the MIR Clinical Indicator has positively influenced clinical practice in some areas at the authors' hospital. PMID:15484647

  8. The Parent Mealtime Action Scale revised (PMAS-R): Psychometric characteristics and associations with variables of clinical interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Helen; Harclerode, Whitney; Williams, Keith E

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide a revised and more psychometrically-examined version of the Parent Mealtime Action Scale (PMAS-R), then to examine how well the PMAS-R subscales explained variance for four variables relevant in clinical settings. Study participants included 238 parents of children referred to a hospital-based feeding program (72.3% male children; mean age = 72.2 months; 80 with autism spectrum disorder, 77 with other special needs, 81 with no special needs). Parents completed questionnaires to report child demographics and diet habits. Parents also used a five-point rating instead of the original three-point rating to report their usage of the 31 PMAS feeding practices. Using five-point ratings, the nine subscales of the PMAS-R demonstrated improved internal reliability and test-retest reliability compared to those published for the original PMAS. ANCOVA indicated that special needs status was the child demographic variable most associated with PMAS-R feeding practices. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that after controlling for child demographics, the nine PMAS-R subscales explained 26-49% of the variance for four variables of clinical interest (fruit and vegetable consumption, snack consumption, total food variety, and weight status). These variables of clinical interest were most often associated with "permissive" feeding practices including low Daily Fruit and Vegetable (FV) Availability, rarely using Insistence on Eating during meals, often using Many Food Choices, and often using Child-Selected Meals. The present study provides a more psychometrically-sound measure of child feeding practices, documents the association between "permissive feeding" and variables of clinical interest, and identifies specific parent practices included in "permissive feeding". PMID:27221356

  9. Validity and test–retest reliability of the Persian version of the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadpanah M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Ahmadpanah,1 Meisam Sheikhbabaei,1 Mohammad Haghighi,1 Fatemeh Roham,1 Leila Jahangard,1 Amineh Akhondi,2 Dena Sadeghi Bahmani,3 Hafez Bajoghli,4 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,3 Serge Brand3,5 1Behavioral Disorders and Substances Abuse Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 2Hamadan Educational Organization, Ministry of Education, Hamadan, Iran; 3Center for Affective, Stress, and Sleep Disorders, Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Sport, Exercise and Health Science, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background and aims: The Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS is an expert’s rating tool to assess the severity and symptoms of depression. The aim of the present two studies was to validate the Persian version of the MADRS and determine its test–retest reliability in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorders (MDD. Methods: In study 1, the translated MADRS and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS were applied to 210 patients diagnosed with MDD and 100 healthy adults. In study 2,200 patients diagnosed with MDD were assessed with the MADRS in face-to-face interviews. Thereafter, 100 patients were assessed 3–14 days later, again via face-to-face-interviews, while the other 100 patients were assessed 3–14 days later via a telephone interview. Results: Study 1: The MADRS and HDRS scores between patients with MDD and healthy controls differed significantly. Agreement between scoring of the MADRS and HDRS was high (r=0.95. Study 2: The intraclass correlation coefficient (test–retest reliability was r=0.944 for the face-to-face interviews, and r=0.959 for the telephone interviews. Conclusion: The present data suggest that the Persian MADRS has high validity and excellent test–retest reliability over

  10. High heart rate: more than a risk factor. Lessons from a clinical practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Bertomeu, Vicente; Murga, Nekane; de Pablo, Carmen; Asín, Enrique

    2009-11-12

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that an elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with coronary atherosclerosis independently of other risk factors. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether HR is itself the cause or there is merely an association between HR and mortality in this population. A total of 1686 patients with hypertension and chronic ischemic heart disease were included in this study. According to the resting HR, the patients were distributed in 3 groups (group 1: HR82 bpm). 580 patients (34.4%) belonged to group 1; 936 (55.5%) to group 2 and 170 (10.1%) to group 3. Patients with high HR exhibited a poorer prognosis not only due to a worse clinical profile (more concomitant cardiovascular risk factors and organ damage), but suggestively because despite the use of a similar number of drugs, patients with higher HR were associated with lesser risk control rates in daily clinical practice. Despite current guidelines that do not still recognize HR as a cardiovascular risk factor, it appears that physicians should pay more attention to it in clinical practice since high HR is warning about an increased risk. PMID:18684521

  11. Clinical and epidemiological features of the 2014 large-scale dengue outbreak in Guangzhou city, China

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yong Ping; Luo, Yasha; Chen, Yuan; Lamers, Mart Matthias; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Xiao Han; Sanyal, Sumana; Mok, Chris Ka Pun; Liu, Zhong Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue virus is transmitted by mosquito around the tropical and sub-tropical regions. There was a large-scale dengue epidemic in Guangdong province, China during 2014 and around fifty thousands dengue fever cases, including six deaths, have been reported. In this study, we aimed to understand the clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed dengue virus (DENV) infection and determined the origin of the virus from the outbreak. Methods We have summariz...

  12. Evaluating Depressive Symptoms in Schizophrenia: A Psychometric Comparison of the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Schennach, Rebecca; Obermeier, Michael; Seemüller, Florian; Jäger, Markus; Schmauss, Max; Laux, Gerd; Pfeiffer, Herbert; Naber, Dieter; Schmidt, Lutz G.; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Heuser, Isabella; Maier, Wolfgang; Lemke, Matthias R.; Rüther, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare two measures of depression in patients with schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorder, including patients with delusional and schizoaffective disorder, to conclude implications for their application. Sampling and Methods: A total of 278 patients were assessed using the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17). The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was also applied. A...

  13. The reliability and validity of the rating scale of criminal responsibility for mentally disordered offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixiong; Zhang, Qingting; Huang, Fuyin; Guan, Wei; Tang, Tao; Liu, Chao

    2014-03-01

    In China, the criminal responsibility of the mentally disordered offenders is divided into three levels, there are the whole responsibility, diminished responsibility and irresponsibility. According to the Criminal Law, "If a mental disordered patient causes harmful consequences at a time when he is unable to recognize or control his own conduct, upon verification and confirmation through legal procedure, he shall not bear criminal responsibility." That means there are two standards of assessing criminal responsibility, namely volitional and cognitive capacity. It is as equal as the Mc'Naughton Rule and the Irresistible Impulse Test. But for a long time, the criminal responsibility was assessed mainly by experience because of lacking of standardized assessment instrument. Recently, we have developed "the rating scale of criminal responsibility for mentally disordered offenders (RSCRs)". The scale includes eighteen items, namely criminal motivation, aura before offense, inducement of crime, time and place and object and tool selectivity of crime, emotion during the crime, shirking responsibility after offense, concealing the truth during inquest, camouflage, understanding the nature of the offense, estimating the consequence of the offense, impairment of life ability, impairment of learning or work, impairment of insight, impairment of reality testing, and impairment of self-control. This scale can be applicable for all cases and easy to use. This scale had been tried out in several forensic psychiatry institutes, the Cronbach α of the scale is 0.93, and all items have high correlation with the total score of the scale (r=0.50-0.89). Two factors were extracted by the factorial analysis, and the cumulative squared loading was 68.62%. The scores of the three levels were 9.66 ± 5.11, 26.54 ± 5.21 and 40.08 ± 7.90 respectively and highly significant differences were observed among groups. By establishing discrimination analysis among three levels, classification

  14. The Swedish Version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale: Revised (RAADS-R). A Validation Study of a Rating Scale for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lisa M. J.; Naswall, Katharina; Manouilenko, Irina; Nylander, Lena; Edgar, Johan; Ritvo, Riva Ariella; Ritvo, Edward; Bejerot, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of diagnostic instruments for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R), an 80-item self-rating scale designed to assist clinicians diagnosing ASD in adults. It was administered to 75…

  15. Validity and reliability analysis of the Chinese parent version of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scale (6-18 years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Lili; Wu, Lijie; Zou, Xiaobing; Luo, Xuerong; Xia, Kun; Wang, Yimin; Xu, Xiu; Ge, Xiaoling; Sun, Caihong; Deng, Hongzhu; Fombonne, Eric; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Yan, Weili; Wang, Yi

    2015-12-15

    This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of the Chinese parent version of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scale (ASRS, 6-18 years) for a general sample of Chinese children. The study involved assessing 1625 community-based subjects aged 6-12 years from four sites (Shanghai, Guangzhou, Changsha, and Harbin city) in China and 211 clinic-based participants aged 6-18 with a confirmed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) ranged from 0.585 to 0.929, and the test-retest reliability (interclass correlations) ranged from 0.542 to 0.749, indicating no significant difference between the two tests at an interval of 2-4 weeks. The construct validity was relatively excellent, and the concurrent validity with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) (Pearson correlations) was 0.732 between the two total scores. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses showed excellent and comparable discriminant validity of the ASRS with respect to the SRS, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.9507 (95% CI: 0.93-0.97) versus 0.9703 (95% CI: 0.96-0.98), respectively. Our data suggested a cutoff ≥60 for the Chinese version of the ASRS, with good accuracy in screening autism symptoms (sensitivity=94.2%, specificity=77%). The Chinese parent version of the ASRS is therefore a reliable and valid tool for screening autistic symptoms in Chinese children in general. PMID:26384573

  16. Effects of risperidone on core symptoms of autistic disorder based on childhood autism rating scale: An open label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padideh Ghaeli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of risperidone in patients afflicted by autistic disorder especially with regards to its three core symptoms, including "relating to others", "communication skills", and "stereotyped behaviors" based on Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS. Materials and Methods: An 8-week open-label study of risperidone for treatment of autistic disorder in children 4-17 years old was designed. Risperidone dose titration was as follow: 0.02 mg/kg/day at the first week, 0.04 mg/kg/day at the second week, and 0.06 mg/kg/day at the third week and thereafter. The outcome measures were scores obtained by CARS, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC, and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I scale. Results: Fifteen patients completed this study. After 8 weeks, CARS total score decreased significantly, (P=0.001. At the end of the study, social interactions and verbal communication skills of the patients were significantly improved (P<0.001, P=0.03, respectively. However, stereotypic behaviors did not show any significant change in this study. Increase in appetite and somnolence were the most reported side effects. Conclusion: This study suggests that risperidone may be an effective treatment for the management of core symptoms of autistic disorder.

  17. Clinical results of iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we report the clinical results of iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy at Kanazawa University Hospital. The study population consisted of 166 patients diagnosed with T1c-T3bN0M0 prostate cancer treated with high dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy and followed up for 6 months or longer. Treatment consisted of external beam radiotherapy to the prostate at 44 Gy/22 fractions and high dose rate brachytherapy at 18 Gy/3 fractions. Median follow-up interval was 31.5 months (range 6.2-88.7). The overall 5-year biological recurrence-free survival rate was 93.0%. The 5-year biological recurrence-free survival rates for the patients in low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups according to the D'Amico risk classification criteria were 96.1%, 89.0% and 91.6%, respectively. When limited to the group that did not receive adjuvant hormonal therapy, the 5-year biological recurrence-free survival rates for the patients in low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups were 96.0%, 96.3% and 82.9%, respectively. Grade 3 or greater adverse effects were rare. Urethral stricture was observed in only 1.0% of the patients. Eighty percent of patients retained erectile function after high dose rate brachytherapy and reported satisfaction with sexual function. High dose rate brachytherapy is considered a good form of treatment for localized prostate cancer, although longer follow-up is necessary. (author)

  18. Physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the specific star formation rates of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-01-01

    Two explanations have been put forward to explain the observed conformity between the colours and specific star formation rates (SFR/$M_*$) of galaxies on large scales: 1) the formation times of their surrounding dark matter halos are correlated (commonly referred to as "assembly bias"), 2) gas is heated over large scales at early times, leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies (commonly referred to as "pre-heating") . To distinguish between the pre-heating and assembly bias scenarios, we search for relics of energetic feedback events in the neighbourhood of central galaxies with different specific star formation rates. We find a significant excess of very high mass ($\\log M_* > 11.3$) galaxies out to a distance of 2.5 Mpc around low SFR/$M_*$ central galaxies compared to control samples of higher SFR/$M_*$ central galaxies with the same stellar mass and redshift. We also find that very massive galaxies in the neighbourhood of low SFR/$M_*$ galaxies have muc...

  19. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Song; NIU Hui-xia; ZHAO Lu; GAO Yuan; LU Jia-meng; SHI Chang-he; Chandra Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Background The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was shown to be a reliable and valid measurement for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA).The Brazilian version and the Japanese version of SARAwere favorable for good reliability and validity.This study aimed to translate SARA into Chinese and test its reliability and validity in measurement of cerebellar ataxia.Methods SARA was translated into Chinese.A total 39 patients with degeneration cerebellar ataxia were evaluated independently by two neurologists with the Chinese version of SARA.Then the patients were evaluated by one of above neurologists with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS).The statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows.Results The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA was 0.78,which represents a good internal consistence.The correlation coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA scores between the two evaluators was 0.86,illustrating that the inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of SARA was good.The correlation coefficient between the Chinese version of SARA and ICARS was 0.91,illustrating that the criterion validity of Chinese version of SARA was not bad.Conclusions The Chinese version of SARA is reliable and effective for the assessment of degeneration cerebellar ataxia.Compared with ICARS,the evaluation of Chinese version of SARA is more objective,the assessment time is shortened,and the maneuverability is better.

  20. Telephone reminders reduced the non-attendance rate in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Maja Haunstrup; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Non-attendance is a global health-care problem. The aim of the present study was 1) to investigate if a telephone reminder could reduce the non-attendance rate, 2) to study reasons for non-attendance and 3) to evaluate if a permanent implementation would be economically advantageous...... in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic like ours. METHODS: This was a comparative intervention study with a historical control group in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic. The study lasted six months. Patients with a scheduled appointment in the first three-month period received no reminder...... (control group, n = 2,705). Patients in the following three-month period were reminded by telephone one weekday in advance of their appointment, when possible (intervention group, n = 2,479). Non-attending patients in the intervention group received a questionnaire. Based on the results, a financial cost...

  1. Improving Treatment Trial Outcomes for Rett Syndrome: The Development of Rett-specific Anchors for the Clinical Global Impression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neul, Jeffrey L; Glaze, Daniel G; Percy, Alan K; Feyma, Tim; Beisang, Arthur; Dinh, Thuy; Suter, Bernhard; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Snape, Mike; Horrigan, Joseph; Jones, Nancy E

    2015-11-01

    Rett syndrome is a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder. Although the clinical consequences of Rett syndrome are profound and lifelong, currently no approved drug treatments are available specifically targeted to Rett symptoms. High quality outcome measures, specific to the core symptoms of a disorder are a critical component of well-designed clinical trials for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The Clinical Global Impression Scale is a measure of global clinical change with strong face validity that has been widely used as an outcome measure in clinical trials of central nervous system disorders. Despite its favorable assay sensitivity in clinical trials, as a global measure, the Clinical Global Impression Scale is not specific to the signs and symptoms of the disorder under study. Development of key anchors for the scale, specific to the disorder being assessed, holds promise for enhancing the validity and reliability of the measure for disorders such as Rett syndrome. PMID:25895911

  2. Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity from spontaneous oscillations of blood pressure and heart rate: proven clinical value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Gian Domenico; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa

    2015-04-01

    The baroreceptor-heart rate reflex (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS) is a key mechanism contributing to the neural regulation of the cardiovascular system. Several methods have been proposed so far to assess BRS by analyzing the spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. These methods are inherently simple, non-invasive and low-cost. This study is an attempt to address the question of whether spontaneous baroreflex methods have proven to be of value in the clinical setting. In the first part of this article, we critically review most representative clinical studies using spontaneous BRS techniques either for risk stratification or treatment evaluation, these being major issues in the clinical management of the patients. In the second part, we address two important aspects of spontaneous BRS measurements: measurability and reliability. Estimation of BRS in the studies selected for the review was performed according to the sequence, transfer function, alpha-index and phase-rectified signal averaging method. Arterial blood pressure was recorded non-invasively during supine, short-term (Measurability and reliability can be a major issue in the measurement of spontaneous BRS, particularly in some patient populations like post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patents. Main causes of poor measurability are: non-sinus rhythm, a high rate of ectopic beats and the need for recorded time series of RR interval and arterial blood pressure to satisfy the constraints of the different BRS estimation algorithms. As for reliability, within-subject variability is rather high in the measurements of spontaneous BRS and, therefore, should be carefully taken into account when BRS measurements are used to detect treatment effects in individual patients. PMID:25798657

  3. Psychometric evaluation of the altered states of consciousness rating scale (OAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Studerus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The OAV questionnaire has been developed to integrate research on altered states of consciousness (ASC. It measures three primary and one secondary dimensions of ASC that are hypothesized to be invariant across ASC induction methods. The OAV rating scale has been in use for more than 20 years and applied internationally in a broad range of research fields, yet its factorial structure has never been tested by structural equation modeling techniques and its psychometric properties have never been examined in large samples of experimentally induced ASC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study conducted a psychometric evaluation of the OAV in a sample of psilocybin (n = 327, ketamine (n = 162, and MDMA (n = 102 induced ASC that was obtained by pooling data from 43 experimental studies. The factorial structure was examined by confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modeling, hierarchical item clustering (ICLUST, and multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC modeling. The originally proposed model did not fit the data well even if zero-constraints on non-target factor loadings and residual correlations were relaxed. Furthermore, ICLUST suggested that the "oceanic boundlessness" and "visionary restructuralization" factors could be combined on a high level of the construct hierarchy. However, because these factors were multidimensional, we extracted and examined 11 new lower order factors. MIMIC modeling indicated that these factors were highly measurement invariant across drugs, settings, questionnaire versions, and sexes. The new factors were also demonstrated to have improved homogeneities, satisfactory reliabilities, discriminant and convergent validities, and to differentiate well among the three drug groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The original scales of the OAV were shown to be multidimensional constructs. Eleven new lower order scales were constructed and demonstrated to have desirable psychometric

  4. High pressure pulsed avalanche discharges: Scaling of required preionization rate for homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneous high-pressure discharges can be formed by pulsed avalanche breakdown, provided that the individual avalanche heads have diffused to a large enough radius to overlap before streamer breakdown occurs. The overlap condition can be met by using an external mechanism to preionize the neutral gas, e.g., x-rays or uv radiation. There are several scenarios, (1) to preionize the gas, and then trigger the discharge by the sudden application of an electric field, (2) to apply an overvoltage over the discharge and trigger the discharge by external ionization, or (3) to have a continuous rate of external ionization and let the E field rise, with a comparatively long time constant τ, across the breakdown value (E/n)0. The authors here study the last of these scenarios, which gives a very efficient use of the preionization source because the avalanche startpoint can accumulate during the pre-avalanche phase. The authors have found that the required avalanche startpoint density Nst.p, defined as the density of individual single, or clusters of, electrons at the time when the electric field crosses the breakdown value, scales with pressure and rise time as Nst.p ∝ p21/4τ-3/4. This pressure scaling disagrees with the p3/2 scaling found by Levatter and Lin (J. Appl. Phys. 51(1), 210), while the rise time scaling agrees satisfactorily with their results. For an E field which rises slowly across the breakdown value, the pre-avalanche accumulation of electrons must be taken into account, as well as the fact that the density ne of free electrons becomes larger than the density Nst.p of independent avalanche heads: when electron impact ionization closely balances attachment, individual electrons are replaced by clusters of electrons which are too close to form individual avalanche heads

  5. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouache, Moussa A.; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac0.67, where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  6. Practical Dyspnea Assessment: Relationship Between the 0–10 Numerical Rating Scale and the Four-Level Categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale of Dyspnea Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Miriovsky, Benjamin J.; Currow, David C.; Herndon, James E.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wilcock, Andrew; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    Context Measurement of dyspnea is important for clinical care and research. Objectives To characterize the relationship between the 0–10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and four-level categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale (VDS) for dyspnea assessment. Methods This was a substudy of a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing palliative oxygen to room air for relief of refractory breathlessness in patients with life-limiting illness. Dyspnea was assessed with both a 0–10 NRS and a four-level categorical VDS over the one-week trial. NRS and VDS responses were analyzed in cross section and longitudinally. Relationships between NRS and VDS responses were portrayed using descriptive statistics and visual representations. Results Two hundred twenty-six participants contributed responses. At baseline, mild and moderate levels of breathlessness were reported by 41.9% and 44.6% of participants, respectively. NRS scores demonstrated increasing mean and median levels for increasing VDS intensity, from a mean (SD) of 0.6 (±1.04) for VDS none category to 8.2 (1.4) for VDS severe category. The Spearman correlation coefficient was strong at 0.78 (P < 0.0001). Based on the distribution of NRS scores within VDS categories, we calculated test characteristics of two different cutpoint models. Both models yielded 75% correct translations from NRS to VDS; however, Model A was more sensitive for moderate or greater dyspnea, with fewer misses downcoded. Conclusion There is strong correlation between VDS and NRS measures for dyspnea. Proposed practical cutpoints for the relationship between the dyspnea VDS and NRS are 0 for none, 1–4 for mild, 5–8 for moderate, and 9–10 for severe. PMID:26004401

  7. Assessment of dose rate scaling factors used in NCTPlan treatment planning code for the BNCT beam of THOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) at Tsing Hua University in Taiwan has been used to investigate the feasibility and to enhance the technology of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for years. A rebuilt epithermal beam port for BNCT at THOR was finished in the summer of 2004, and then researches and experiments were performed to hasten the first clinical treatment case of BNCT in Taiwan in the near future. NCTPlan, a Monte Carlo-based clinical treatment planning code, was used to calculate the dose-rate distributions of BNCT in this work. A self-made Snyder head phantom with a servo-motor control system was irradiated in front of the THOR BNCT beam exit. The phantom was made from a 3 mm shell of quartz wool impregnated with acrylic casting resin mounted on an acrylic base, and was filled with water. Gold foils (bare and cadmium-covered) and paired ion chambers (one with graphite wall and filled with CO2 gas, another with A-150 plastic tissue equivalent wall and filled with tissue equivalent gas) were placed inside the Snyder phantom to measure and estimate the depth-dose distributions in the central axis of the beam. Dose components include the contribution of thermal neutrons, fast neutrons, photons and emitted α particles from 10B(n,α)7Li reaction. Comparison and analysis between computed and measured results of depth-dose distributions were made in this work. Dose rate scaling factors (DRSFs) were defined as normalization factors derived individually for each dose component in the BNCT in-phantom radiation field that provide the best agreement between measured and computed data. This paper reports the in-phantom calculated and experimental dosimetry and the determined DRSFs used in NCTPlan code for the BNCT beam of THOR.

  8. Experimental study on scaling law of outgassing rate with a pumping parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outgassing rate of a small test chamber made of 304 type stainless steel has been measured as a function of pumping speed in a range from 0.3 to 200 ιs. In the experiment the chamber has been first exposed to the air and then pumped with different pumping speeds for 3 days at room temperature of 20 degC without baking. The typical outgassing rates of the chamber are determined from the measurement of steady pressures at the pumping time of 72 h. As a result of experiment, it is found that measured outgassing rates q obey a set of power laws of q1=c1(S/A)m1 and q2=c2(S/A)m2 where S/A is the ratio of pumping speed S to surface area A of the chamber, c1 and c2 are constants, exponents of m1 and m2 are 0.8282 for S/A≥ 10-3 ι/scm2 and 0.4655 for S/A≤ 10-3 ι/scm2, respectively. Technical application of the obtained scaling law is discussed in connection with the design of pumping system for a large vacuum device. (author)

  9. Relationship between Dehalococcoides DNA in ground water and rates of reductive dechlorination at field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Wilson, John T; Kampbell, Donald H

    2006-09-01

    Certain strains of Dehalococcoides bacteria can dechlorinate chlorinated ethylenes to harmless products. This study was conducted to determine if there is a valid association between the density of Dehalococcoides DNA in ground water and the observed rates of reductive dechlorination at field scale. Dehalococcoides DNA in water from monitoring wells was determined using the quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) with DNA primer set specific for Dehalococcoides organisms. Dechlorination rate constants were extracted from field data using the BIOCHLOR software. Of the six conventional plumes surveyed, "generally useful" rates of dechlorination (greater than or equal to 0.3 per year) of cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) along the flow path were observed at three sites where Dehalococcoides DNA was detected, and little attenuation of cis-DCE and VC occurred at two sites where Dehalococcoides DNA was not detected. At the two sites where there was no net direction of ground water flow, the relationship between the density of Dehalococcoides DNA in ground water and the trend in concentrations of chlorinated ethylenes over time in monitoring wells was not so consistent as that observed for the conventional plumes. A comparison of our study to a field study performed by Lendvay and his coworker indicated that monitoring wells did not efficiently sample the Dehalococcoides organisms in the aquifer. PMID:16889813

  10. Clinical value of 99mTc uptake rate determination in diagnosis of hashimoto's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of 99mTc uptake rate determination for diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease. Methods: 99mTc thyroid imaging was performed on 21 patients with HT hyperthyroidism, 29 patients with HT hypothyroidism and 97 controls. 99mTc uptake rate was calculated. Serum thyroid hormones (FT3, FT4, TSH) and antibodies (TGA, TPO-AB) were determined in all these subjects with CLIA and RIA respectively. Results: Thyroid imaging revealed swelling of the gland and asymmetrical distribution of radioactivity in both the hyper and hypo-thyroidism patients. 99mTc uptake rate was increased in the hyperthyroid group (6.07 ± 4.69), being significantly higher than that in controls (p99mTc thyroid imaging and uptake rate determination can accurately reveal the size, shape and condition of radioactivity distribution of the gland as well as presence of any nodule. Combined with serum thyroid hormones and antibodies measurement, the 99mTc study can be of great importance in the diagnosis and management of Hashimoto's disease

  11. Clinical and Radiographic Factors Predicting Hearing Preservation Rates in Large Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Daniel; Westerberg, Brian D; Dong, Charles; Akagami, Ryojo

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Postoperative hearing preservation rates for patients with large vestibular schwannomas range from 0 to 43%. The clinical and radiographic factors predicting hearing preservation in smaller vestibular schwannomas are well described; however, their importance in larger tumors is unclear. We investigated factors predicting hearing preservation in large vestibular schwannomas. Design Retrospective review. Setting Quaternary care academic center. Participants A total of 85 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas > 3 cm underwent retrosigmoid resections. Main Outcomes Measures Preoperative and postoperative serviceable hearing rates. Methods Clinical and radiographic data including preoperative and postoperative audiograms, preoperative symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging features, and postoperative facial weakness were analyzed. Results Hearing was preserved in 41% of patients (17 of 42) with preoperative serviceable hearing. Hypertension and diabetes increased the likelihood of preoperative hearing loss. Preoperative tinnitus predicted a lower likelihood of hearing preservation. No radiographic factors predicted hearing preservation; however, larger tumor size, smaller fourth ventricular width, and the presence of a cerebrospinal fluid cleft surrounding the tumor predicted postoperative facial weakness. Conclusion Systemic comorbidities may influence hearing loss preoperatively in patients with large vestibular schwannomas. The absence of tinnitus may reflect hearing reserve and propensity for hearing preservation. Preoperative radiographic features did not predict hearing preservation despite some associations with postoperative facial weakness. PMID:27175312

  12. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  13. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  14. Improving Clinical Remission Rates in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Previsit Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, Jeffrey R; Kaplan, Jess L; Winter, Harland S; Moran, Christopher J; Israel, Esther J

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the intestine which can lead to malnutrition, poor quality of life, and colon cancer.(1-4) Although there is no cure for the disease, clinical remission is the primary goal.(5) The Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease at MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) adopted a Previsit Planning (PVP) model to identify and discuss symptomatic patients prior to their appointments to identify specific issues that impact disease management.(6-8) The Registry from ImproveCareNow (ICN), the international Quality Improvement Collaborative for the management of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis in pediatric and adolescent patients, was used to capture information from each ambulatory visit and hospitalization. Using the Model for Improvement framework, the team began a weekly review and made care recommendations of patients with active disease who were cared for by one physician. Interventions were modified over multiple Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) improvement cycles to increase the number of providers and to include patients with mild or moderate disease activity.(9) Feedback from the providers regarding this process was elicited via a REDCap survey and the clinical remission rate was tracked using the ICN Registry. The clinical remission rate for the Center's patients increased from 77% (n=597) in September 2014 to 83% (n=585) in August 2015 and has been maintained. 78% of responding providers indicated that they found the PVP recommendations helpful "all of the time". One hundred percent who responded to the survey said that they have used at least one recommendation provided to them. PVP for management of a chronic disease in pediatrics is feasible, even in a high volume practice. This process at MGHfC has resulted in the improvement of clinical remission rate. PDSA cycles were used to document successes and failures to help guide the work. Ongoing expansion of this PVP practice to all

  15. Statistical Optimization of Xanthan Gum Production and Influence of Airflow Rates in Lab-scale Fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moshaf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate and optimize the possibility of xanthan gum production by Xanthomonas campestris PTCC1473 in 500ml shake flasks on the second grade date palm. Using an experimental response surface methodology (RSM coupled with a central composite design (CCD, three major independent variables (nitrogen source, phosphor source and agitation rate were evaluated for their individual and interactive effects on biomass and xanthan gum production in submerged fermentation. The optimum conditions selected for gum production were 3.15 g.l-1 for nitrogen source, 5.03 g.l-1 for phosphor source, and 394.8 rpm for agitation rate. Reconfirmation test was conducted, and the experimental value obtained for xanthan production under optimum conditions was about 6.72±0.26 g.l-1, which was close to 6.51 g.l-1 as predicted by the model. A higher yield of biomass production was obtained at 13.74 g.l-1 for nitrogen source, 4.66 g.l-1 for phosphor source, and 387.42 rpm for agitation rate. In the next stage, scale-up from the shake flasks to the 1-L batch fermentors was carried. By using the optimum conditions for xanthan gum, the biomass and xanthan gum concentrations after 72h in three levels of air flow rate (0.5, 1 and 1.5 vvm were obtained as 3.98, 5.31 and 6.04 g.l-1,and 11.32, 15.16 and 16.84 g.l-1, respectively. Overall, the second grade date palm seemed to exhibit promising properties that can open new pathways for the production of efficient and cost-effective xanthan gum.

  16. Natural-Scale Lava Flow Experiments on Video: Variations with Temperature, Slope, and Effusion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, J. A.; Wysocki, R.; Edwards, B. R.; Lev, E.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of active basaltic lava flows and analog materials show that flow dynamics and final flow morphology are strongly determined by the rapidly evolving rheology of the lava crust which constrains the downslope advance of the lava flow. The non-dimensional factor Ψ (ratio of the time scale of crust formation to advective heat loss) provides a useful means of comparing different flows. The key parameters that control Ψ include the melt viscosity, temperature, effusion rate, and slope. Experimental lava flows, up to several meters long created in the Syracuse University Lava Project permit these variables to be investigated independently and in combination in volume-limited flows (inflated lobes, break-outs, and bubbles (limu o'Pele), that provide additional information on lava crust development. New, continuous flow (cooling-limited) experiments show downslope variations under constant flow conditions.

  17. False discovery rate estimation for large-scale homogeneous discrete p-values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale homogeneous discrete p-values are encountered frequently in high-throughput genomics studies, and the related multiple testing problems become challenging because most existing methods for the false discovery rate (FDR) assume continuous p-values. In this article, we study the estimation of the null proportion and FDR for discrete p-values with common support. In the finite sample setting, we propose a novel class of conservative FDR estimators. Furthermore, we show that a broad class of FDR estimators is simultaneously conservative over all support points under some weak dependence condition in the asymptotic setting. We further demonstrate the significant improvement of a newly proposed method over existing methods through simulation studies and a case study. PMID:26492596

  18. The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: psychometric features within a clinical population and a cut-off point to differentiate clinical patients from healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, M.A.M.; Danner, U.N.; Larsen, J.K.; Veer, N. van der; Elburg, A.A. van; Ridder, D.T. de; Evers, C.; Stice, E.; Engels, R.C.E.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) is a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Research has provided evidence of the reliability and validity of this scale in non-clinical populations. Our study is the first to examine the psych

  19. A psychometric evaluation of the Personality Assessment Inventory - short form clinical scales in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Samuel J; Siefert, Caleb J; Shorey, Hal S; Antonius, Daniel; Shiva, Andrew; Kehl-Fie, Kendra; Blais, Mark A

    2009-12-30

    Few studies have assessed the psychometric properties of the Personality Assessment Inventory short-form (PAI-SF) clinical scales, and none have conducted these evaluations using participants from psychiatric inpatient units. The present study evaluated item-level tests of scaling assumptions of the PAI-SF using a large (N=503) clinical sample of participants who completed the PAI during their admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Internal consistency reliability was high across scales, and tests of item-scale convergence and discrimination generally confirmed hypothesized item groupings. Scale-level correlations supported unique variance being measured by each scale. Finally, agreement between the PAI short- and full-form scales was found to be high. The results are discussed with regards to scale interpretation. PMID:19879654

  20. Physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the specific star formation rates of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-12-01

    Two explanations have been put forward to explain the observed conformity between the colours and specific star formation rates (SFR/M*) of galaxies on large scales: (1) the formation times of their surrounding dark matter haloes are correlated (commonly referred to as `assembly bias'), (2) gas is heated over large scales at early times, leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies (commonly referred to as `pre-heating'). To distinguish between the pre-heating and assembly bias scenarios, we search for relics of energetic feedback events in the neighbourhood of central galaxies with different specific SFRs. We find a significant excess of very high mass (log M* > 11.3) galaxies out to a distance of 2.5 Mpc around low SFR/M* central galaxies compared to control samples of higher SFR/M* central galaxies with the same stellar mass and redshift. We also find that very massive galaxies in the neighbourhood of low-SFR/M* galaxies have much higher probability of hosting radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). The radio-loud AGN fraction in neighbours with log M* > 11.3 is four times higher around passive, non star-forming centrals at projected distances of 1 Mpc and two times higher at projected distances of 4 Mpc. Finally, we carry out an investigation of conformity effects in the recently publicly released Illustris cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, which includes energetic input both from quasars and from radio mode accretion on to black holes. We do not find conformity effects of comparable amplitude on large scales in the simulations and we propose that gas needs to be pushed out of dark matter haloes more efficiently at high redshifts.

  1. Fine scale distribution constrains cadmium accumulation rates in two geographical groups of Franciscana dolphin from Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Fine scale distribution of two Argentine stocks constrains the Cd accumulation rates. • Cadmium levels and accumulation patterns were different between geographic groups. • Marine diet has a major influence than the impact degree of origin environment. • Engraulis anchoita is the main Cd vector species in Argentine shelf for Franciscana. • Information is valuable for the conservation of Franciscana, a vulnerable species. -- Abstract: Franciscana dolphin is an endemic cetacean in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean and is classified as Vulnerable A3d by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Cadmium accumulation was assessed in two geographic groups from Argentina; one inhabits the La Plata River estuary, a high anthropogenic impacted environment, and the other is distributed in marine coastal, with negligible pollution. Despite the environment, marine dolphins showed an increase of renal Cd concentrations since trophic independence; while in estuarine dolphins was from 6 years. This is associated with dietary Argentine anchovy which was absent in the diet of estuarine dolphins, being a trophic vector of cadmium in shelf waters of Argentina. Cluster analysis also showed high levels of cd in association with the presence of anchovy in the stomach. The difference in the fine scale distribution of species influences dietary exposure to Cd and, along with other data, indicates two stocks in Argentina

  2. Islet Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR Dose Predicts Insulin Independence in Clinical Islet Autotransplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klearchos K Papas

    Full Text Available Reliable in vitro islet quality assessment assays that can be performed routinely, prospectively, and are able to predict clinical transplant outcomes are needed. In this paper we present data on the utility of an assay based on cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR in predicting clinical islet autotransplant (IAT insulin independence (II. IAT is an attractive model for evaluating characterization assays regarding their utility in predicting II due to an absence of confounding factors such as immune rejection and immunosuppressant toxicity.Membrane integrity staining (FDA/PI, OCR normalized to DNA (OCR/DNA, islet equivalent (IE and OCR (viable IE normalized to recipient body weight (IE dose and OCR dose, and OCR/DNA normalized to islet size index (ISI were used to characterize autoislet preparations (n = 35. Correlation between pre-IAT islet product characteristics and II was determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis.Preparations that resulted in II had significantly higher OCR dose and IE dose (p<0.001. These islet characterization methods were highly correlated with II at 6-12 months post-IAT (area-under-the-curve (AUC = 0.94 for IE dose and 0.96 for OCR dose. FDA/PI (AUC = 0.49 and OCR/DNA (AUC = 0.58 did not correlate with II. OCR/DNA/ISI may have some utility in predicting outcome (AUC = 0.72.Commonly used assays to determine whether a clinical islet preparation is of high quality prior to transplantation are greatly lacking in sensitivity and specificity. While IE dose is highly predictive, it does not take into account islet cell quality. OCR dose, which takes into consideration both islet cell quality and quantity, may enable a more accurate and prospective evaluation of clinical islet preparations.

  3. Validity, reliability, and feasibility of clinical staging scales in dementia: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Tona, Klodiana Daphne; Janssen, Lieneke; Burns, Alistair; Lobo, Anatonio; Robert, Philippe; Sartorius, Norman; Stoppe, Gabriela; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2011-01-01

    describing 12 staging instruments were identified (N = 6109 participants, age 65-87). Reliability was studied in most (91%) of the articles and was judged moderate to good. Approximately 78% of the articles evaluated concurrent validity, which was good to very good, while discriminant validity was assessed...... perspective, and is available in 14 languages. Taking into account the increasing differentiation of Alzheimer's disease in preclinical and predementia stages, there is an urgent need for global rating scales to be refined as well....

  4. The evaluation of music therapy process in the intersubjective perspective: the music therapy rating scale. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Raglio, Alfredo; Traficante,; Oasi,

    2011-01-01

    A Raglio1, D Traficante2, O Oasi31Sospiro Foundation, Cremona, Italy; 2Education Technologies Research Center (CRTI), 3Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, ItalyAbstract: This study presents a tool (Music Therapy Rating Scale [MTRS]) to evaluate the progression of the relationship between the patient and the therapist during music therapy sessions. The rating scale was developed from an intersubjective framework and from an improvisational music therapy te...

  5. The factor structure of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (Expanded Version) in a sample of forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J. van; Vuijk, P.J.; Harte, J.M.; Smit, B.L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Severe behavioral problems, aggression, unlawful behavior, and uncooperativeness make the forensic psychiatric population both hard to treat and study. To fine-tune treatment and evaluate results, valid measurement is vital. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Extended (BPRS-E) is a widely used scale

  6. Scaling of the growth rate of magnetic islands in the heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Schoeffler, K M; Swisdak, M

    2012-01-01

    Current sheets thinner than the ion inertial length are unstable to the tearing instability and will develop magnetic islands that grow due to magnetic reconnection. We investigate whether the growth of magnetic islands in a current sheet can continue indefinitely, or in the case of the heliosheath until reaching a neighboring current sheet, and at what rate the islands grow. We investigate the development and growth of magnetic islands using a particle-in-cell code, starting from particle noise. Performing a scaling of the growth of magnetic islands versus the system size, we find that the growth rate is independent of the system size up to the largest simulation we were able to complete. The islands are able to continue growing as long as they merge with each other and maintain a high aspect ratio. Otherwise there is not enough magnetic tension to sustain reconnection. When applied to the sectored magnetic fields in the heliosheath, we show that the islands can continue growing until they reach the sector w...

  7. Effect of Feeding Rate on the Cold Cap Configuration in a Laboratory-Scale Melter - 13362

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level-waste melter feed is converted into glass in a joule-heated melter, where it forms a floating layer of reacting feed, called the cold cap. After the glass-forming phase becomes connected, evolving gases produce bubbles that form a foam layer under the feed. The bubbles coalesce into cavities, from which most of the gases are released around the edges of the cold cap while gases also escape through small shafts in the reacting feed. The foam layer insulates the cold cap from the heat transferred from the molten glass below. The cold cap behavior was investigated in a laboratory-scale assembly with a fused silica crucible. A high-alumina waste simulant was fed into the crucible and the feed charging rate was varied from 3 to 7 mL min-1. After a fixed amount of time (35 min), feed charging was stopped and the crucible was removed from the furnace and quenched on a copper block to preserve the structure of the cold cap during cooling. During the rapid quenching, thermal cracking of the glass and cold cap allowed it to be broken up into sections for analysis. The effect of the charging rate on the height, area and volume of the cold cap was determined. The size of the bubbles collected in the foam layer under the feed increased as the cold cap expanded and the relationship between these bubbles and temperature will be determined for input into a mathematical model. (authors)

  8. Clinical utility of Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) among patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj; Gether, Ulrik; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders. RESULTS: We found, that a cut-off of 3 on the screen correctly identified the presence of comorbid personality disorder in 73.1% of the patients. The sensitivity and specificity were 0.80 and 0.70, respectively. LIMITATIONS: The findings cannot......BACKGROUND: Personality disorder frequently co-occurs with depression and seems to be associated with a poorer outcome of treatment and increased risk for recurrences. However, the diagnosing of personality disorder can be lengthy and requires some training. Therefore, a brief screening interview...... for comorbid personality disorder among patients suffering from depression would be of clinical use. METHOD: The present study aimed to assess the utility of the Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) as a screen for personality disorder in a population of patients recently...

  9. The Brief Accessibility, Responsiveness, and Engagement Scale: A Tool for Measuring Attachment Behaviors in Clinical Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Jonathan G; Novak, Joshua R; Davis, Stephanie Y; Busby, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Measuring attachment behaviors is relevant to creating secure couple relationships. This article seeks to test and examine the reliability and validity of the Brief Accessibility, Responsiveness, and Engagement (BARE) Scale-a practical measure of couple attachment-in a clinical sample. Couples took the BARE and other assessments measuring relationship functioning (self and partner reports of relationship satisfaction, relationship stability, positive and negative communication, and attachment styles). Results suggest that the BARE appears to be a reliable and valid tool for assessing couple attachment and can accurately predict and classify whether the couples belong in the clinical or nonclinical group, as well as their level of relationship satisfaction. Results also indicate attachment behaviors are related to relationship outcomes. PMID:26748730

  10. Deciphering the clinical effect of drugs through large-scale data integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Sonny Kim

    -effect data have been implemented. Chapter 3 presents two articles that showcase the application of systems chemical biology approaches to understand and model drug side-effect data. The first approach applies machine learning methods to cluster side-effects, drugs, proteins and clinical outcomes in networks......This thesis presents the work carried out at the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark. The thesis includes four articles describing large-scale data integration and methods for the prediction of drug side-effects. Chapter 2 presents ChemProt, a novel disease....... This work demonstrates the power of a strategy that uses clinical data mining in association with chemical biology in order to reduce the search space and aid identification of novel drug actions. The second article described in chapter 3 outlines a high confidence side-effect-drug interaction dataset. We...

  11. A method to perform multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations in the clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to model the track structure of clinical mega-voltage photon beams in a reasonable time, it is necessary to use a multiscale approach incorporating a track-structure algorithm for the regions of interest and a condensed history algorithm for the rest of the geometry. This paper introduces a multi-scale Monte Carlo system, which is used to hand off particle trajectory information between the two algorithms. Since condensed history algorithms ignore electrons with energy below a fixed threshold and those electrons are important to the track structure on the micrometre scale, it is necessary to hand over all charged particles to the track-structure algorithm only in a volume that extends beyond the scoring volume. Additionally, the system is validated against experimental results for radio-isotope gamma spectra. (authors)

  12. Effects of acupressure on progress of labor and cesarean section rate: randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Roque Mafetoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the effects of acupressure at the SP6 point on labor duration and cesarean section rates in parturients served in a public maternity hospital. METHODS This controlled, randomized, double-blind, pragmatic clinical trial involved 156 participants with gestational age ≥ 37 weeks, cervical dilation ≥ 4 cm, and ≥ 2 contractions in 10 min. The women were randomly divided into an acupressure, placebo, or control group at a university hospital in an inland city in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2013. Acupressure was applied to the SP6 point during contractions for 20 min. RESULTS The average labor duration was significantly different between the SP6 acupressure group [221.5 min (SD = 162.4] versus placebo [397.9 min (SD = 265.6] and versus control [381.9 min (SD = 358.3] (p = 0.0047; however, the groups were similar regarding the cesarean section rates (p = 0.2526 and Apgar scores in the first minute (p = 0.9542 and the fifth minute (p = 0.7218 of life of the neonate. CONCLUSIONS The SP6 acupressure point proved to be a complementary measure to induce labor and may shorten the labor duration without causing adverse effects to the mother or the newborn. However, it did not affect the cesarean section rate.

  13. The Changing Patterns in Referral Rates of Geriatric Cats and Dogs to an University Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem ÜLGEN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving quality of care and nutrition of pet animals and advanced diagnosis and treatment by developing technologies, lead to an increase in survival rate. As the present authors were unaware of finding documented reports for several diseases, it was aimed to investigate the number and health status of geriatric cats and dogs which were brought to Internal Medicine clinics of our faculty’s training and research hospital within six years. Twenty-four cats and 10 dogs enrolled in the study were found to be healthy, whereas multiple health concerns were diagnosed in totally 1354 animals (n=403 for cats, n=951 for dogs. Increase in survival rate within 6 years was determined as 27.7% increase for cats and as 5.3% increase for dogs. The urinary system diseases for cats and cardiovascular system diseases for dogs were found to be the most frequent diagnosis. Geriatric animal rates varied between 4.2 and 12.3% for cats and 6.2 and 15.7% for dogs within years which were not expected as higher.

  14. EXTRACTION AND DETERMINATION OF COLLAGEN PEPTIDE AND ITS CLINICAL IMPORTANCE FROM TILAPIA FISH SCALES (OREOCHROMIS NILOTICUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Hemanth kumar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Tilapia are one of the most widely introduced fish globally that has clearly emerged as a very promising group in aquaculture. Oreochromis mossambicus was the first tilapia species to be taken up for large scale aquaculture, followed by Oreochromis niloticus, Oreochromis aureus and Tilapia rendalli. Today O. niloticus contributes more than 80% of tilapia aquaculture production globally. O. mossambicus was introduced in India as early as 1952 with a view to filling some unoccupied ecological niches, mainly pond aquaculture and reservoir fisheries. Tilapia fish scales found to have more percentage of Type I collagen. Fish collagen is complex structural protein that helps to maintain the strength and flexibility of skin, ligaments, bones, joints, muscles, tendons, gums, eyes, blood vessels, nails and hair. Collagen can be obtained from fish scales, fish skins by advanced enzymatic digestion methods in biotechnology. The Protein content of the above is more than 90% and having 18 kinds of amino acids out of which 7 are essential for human consumption. These products are easily absorbable and having high biological value promoting the absorption of vitamins and minerals. The enzymatic digestion technology process releases a lot of peptides in molecular collagen that helps humans in many physiological functions. Collagen has been used in biomedical pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. In this paper we have determined the collagen extracted from Tilapia fish scales and also its clinical importance.

  15. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-08-14

    concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

  16. The Swedish Version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale: Revised (RAADS-R). A Validation Study of a Rating Scale for Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Lisa M. J.; Naswall, Katharina; Manouilenko, Irina; Nylander, Lena; Edgar, Johan; Ariella Ritvo, Riva; Ritvo, Edward; Bejerot, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of diagnostic instruments for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R), an 80-item self-rating scale designed to assist clinicians diagnosing ASD in adults. It was administered to 75 adults with ASD and 197 comparison cases. Also, a subset completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Three out of four subscales had high internal cons...

  17. Parent-Youth Rating Concordance for Hair Pulling Variables, Functional Impairment, and Anxiety Scale Scores in Trichotillomania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Franklin, Martin E.; Piacentini, John A.; Khanna, Muniya; Moore, Phoebe; Cashin, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of cross-informant rating concordance is critical for the assessment of child and adolescent problems in clinical and research settings. We explored parent-youth rating concordance for hair pulling variables, functional impairment, and anxiety symptoms in a sample of child and adolescent hair pullers (n = 133) satisfying conservative…

  18. Clinical and biochemical characteristics of Cushing’s disease with different suppression rates by high-dose dexamethasone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志清

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical and biochemical characteristics of Cushing’s disease with different suppression rates by high-dose dexamethasone.Methods Two hundred and two consecutive patients with

  19. Change of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale subscales with treatment and placebo: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell UH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike H Mitchell,1 Sterling C Hilton2 1Brigham Young University, Department of Exercise Sciences, 2Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations, Provo, UT, USA Background: In 2003, the 10-question International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale (IRLS was developed as a means of assessing the severity of restless legs syndrome. Two subscales were identified: symptom severity (SS 1 and symptom impact (SS 2. Only one study has investigated the subscales' responsiveness to a 12-week treatment with ropinirole. This current study was undertaken to assess the impact of a 4-week, non-pharmaceutical treatment on the two subscales and to explore whether or not both subscales were impacted by the observed placebo effect. Methods: The pooled data from questionnaires of 58 patients (41 from both treatment groups and 17 from the sham treatment control group, who participated in two clinical studies, were reviewed. Their change in score over a 4-week trial was computed. The average change in both subscales in both groups was computed and t-tests were performed. Results: In the treatment group, the average scores of both subscales changed significantly from baseline to week 4 (P<0.005 for both. Compared to the control, SS 1 changed (P<0.001, but not SS 2 (P=0.18. In the sham treatment group, the scores for SS 1 changed significantly (P=0.002, but not for SS 2 (P=0.2. Conclusion: This study corroborated findings from an earlier study in which both subscales changed with a 12-week drug treatment. It also showed that the observed placebo effect is attributed to a small but significant change in symptom severity, but not symptom impact. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, RLS severity scale, IRLS subscales, symptom impact, symptom severity

  20. Personnel selection and emotional stability certification: establishing a false negative error rate when clinical interviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The security plans of nuclear plants generally require that all personnel who are to have unescorted access to protected areas or vital islands be screened for emotional instability. Screening typically consists of first administering the MMPI and then conducting a clinical interview. Interviews-by-exception protocols provide for only those employees to be interviewed who have some indications of psychopathology in their MMPI results. A problem arises when the indications are not readily apparent: False negatives are likely to occur, resulting in employees being erroneously granted unescorted access. The present paper describes the development of a predictive equation which permits accurate identification, via analysis of MMPI results, of those employees who are most in need of being interviewed. The predictive equation also permits knowing probably maximum false negative error rates when a given percentage of employees is interviewed

  1. Developing a Valuation Function for the Preference-Based Multiple Sclerosis Index: Comparison of Standard Gamble and Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuspinar, Ayse; Pickard, Simon; Mayo, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The standard gamble (SG) and rating scale (RS) are two approaches that can be employed to elicit health state preferences from patients in order to inform decision making. The objectives of this study were: (i) to contribute evidence towards the similarities and differences in the SG and the RS to reflect patient preferences, and (ii) to develop a multi-attribute utility function (MAUF) (i.e., scoring algorithm) for the PBMSI. Study Design Two samples were recruited for the study. The first sample provided cross-sectional data to generate the preference weights which were then used to develop (D) the MAUFD. The distribution of SG and RS were compared across levels of perceived difficulty. The second sample provided additional data to validate (V) the MAUF, termed MAUFV. Results The mean RS values ranged from 0.39 to 0.65, whereas the mean SG values were much higher ranging from 0.80 to 0.91. Correlations between the two methods were very low ranging from -0.29 to 0.15. Bland-Altman plots revealed the extent of differences in values produced by the two methods. Conclusion In contemplating trade-offs in the selection of a preference-based elicitation approach for a MAUF that could guide clinical decision making, results suggest the RS is preferable in terms of feasibility and validity for MS patients. The PBMSI with patient preferences shows promise as a measure of health-related quality of life for MS. PMID:27123850

  2. Grain-Size Based Additivity Models for Scaling Multi-rate Uranyl Surface Complexation in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Hu, Qinhong

    2016-07-31

    The additivity model assumed that field-scale reaction properties in a sediment including surface area, reactive site concentration, and reaction rate can be predicted from field-scale grain-size distribution by linearly adding reaction properties estimated in laboratory for individual grain-size fractions. This study evaluated the additivity model in scaling mass transfer-limited, multi-rate uranyl (U(VI)) surface complexation reactions in a contaminated sediment. Experimental data of rate-limited U(VI) desorption in a stirred flow-cell reactor were used to estimate the statistical properties of the rate constants for individual grain-size fractions, which were then used to predict rate-limited U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. The result indicated that the additivity model with respect to the rate of U(VI) desorption provided a good prediction of U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. However, the rate constants were not directly scalable using the additivity model. An approximate additivity model for directly scaling rate constants was subsequently proposed and evaluated. The result found that the approximate model provided a good prediction of the experimental results within statistical uncertainty. This study also found that a gravel-size fraction (2 to 8 mm), which is often ignored in modeling U(VI) sorption and desorption, is statistically significant to the U(VI) desorption in the sediment.

  3. Criterion Noise in Ratings-Based Recognition: Evidence from the Effects of Response Scale Length on Recognition Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Tullis, Jonathan G.; Lee, Ji Hae

    2013-01-01

    Rating scales are a standard measurement tool in psychological research. However, research has suggested that the cognitive burden involved in maintaining the criteria used to parcel subjective evidence into ratings introduces "decision noise" and affects estimates of performance in the underlying task. There has been debate over whether…

  4. Heart rate control with adrenergic blockade: Clinical outcomes in cardiovascular medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Feldman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available David Feldman1, Terry S Elton2, Doron M Menachemi3, Randy K Wexler41Heart Failure/Transplant and VAD Programs, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; 2Division of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 3Heart Failure Services, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, The Heart Institute, Sakler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Holon, Israel; 4Department of Clinical Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: The sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating various cardiovascular parameters including heart rate (HR and HR variability. Aberrant sympathetic nervous system expression may result in elevated HR or decreased HR variability, and both are independent risk factors for development of cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Epidemiologic studies have established that impaired HR control is linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One successful way of decreasing HR and cardiovascular mortality has been by utilizing β-blockers, because their ability to alter cell signaling at the receptor level has been shown to mitigate the pathogenic effects of sympathetic nervous system hyperactivation. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that β-blocker-mediated HR control improvements are associated with decreased mortality in postinfarct and heart failure patients. Although improved HR control benefits have yet to be established in hypertension, both traditional and vasodilating β-blockers exert positive HR control effects in this patient population. However, differences exist between traditional and vasodilating β-blockers; the latter reduce peripheral vascular resistance and exert neutral or positive effects on important metabolic parameters. Clinical evidence suggests that attainment of HR control is an important treatment objective for patients with cardiovascular

  5. High-dose rate brachytherapy in localized penile cancer: short-term clinical outcome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess clinical outcomes of high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy (HIB) in localized penile carcinoma. From 03/2006 to 08/2013, patients with biopsy-proven T1-T2 (<4 cm) non-metastatic localized penile squamous cell carcinoma underwent HIB. Under general anaesthesia, after Foley catheter placement, needles were placed in the target volume using a dedicated template. Planification was carried out with a post-implant CT-scan to deliver a total dose of 36 Gy in 9 fractions over 5 days (in adjuvant setting) or 39 Gy in 9 fractions over 5 days (as monotherapy). Dose-volume adaptation was manually achieved using graphical optimization. Dosimetric data and clinical outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicities were graded using the CTC v4.0. With a median follow-up of 27 months [5.1-83], 12 patients including 8 T1a, 3 T1b and 1 T2 N0 underwent HIB (sole therapy: 11 pts; adjuvant: 1 pt). The actuarial 5-year relapse-free, cause-specific and overall survival rates were 83%, 100% and 78% respectively. Comparing pre and post treatment evaluation, no IPSS or IIEF-5 changes were reported. Dermatitis was reported systematically 1 month after HIB including 6 G1, 5 G2 and 1 G3. Only 1 experienced long-term G3 successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. One urethral meatus stenosis G3 required meatotomy. In selected patients with T1-T2 localized penile cancer, HIB may be considered as an optional conservative therapy. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm these encouraging preliminary results

  6. Detection Rate and Clinical Impact of Respiratory Viruses in Children with Kawasaki Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hye Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; The purpose of this prospective case-control study was to survey the detection rate of respiratory viruses in children with Kawasaki disease (KD by using multiplex reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and to investigate the clinical implications of the prevalence of respiratory viruses during the acute phase of KD. &lt;B&gt;Methods:&lt;/B&gt; RT-PCR assays were carried out to screen for the presence of respiratory syncytial virus A and B, adenovirus, rhinovirus, parainfluenza viruses 1 to 4, influenza virus A and B, metapneumovirus, bocavirus, coronavirus OC43/229E and NL63, and enterovirus in nasopharyngeal secretions of 55 KD patients and 78 control subjects. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/B&gt; Virus detection rates in KD patients and control subjects were 32.7% and 30.8%, respectively (P=0.811. However, there was no significant association between the presence of any of the 15 viruses and the incidence of KD. Comparisons between the 18 patients with positive RT-PCR results and the other 37 KD patients revealed no significant differences in terms of clinical findings (including the prevalence of incomplete presentation of the disease and coronary artery diameter. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; A positive RT-PCR for currently epidemic respiratory viruses should not be used as an evidence against the diagnosis of KD. These viruses were not associated with the incomplete presentation of KD and coronary artery dilatation.

  7. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic…

  8. Effectiveness and clinical response rates of a residential eating disorders facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Michael P; Bluett, Ellen J; Cullum, Jodi L; Mitchell, P R; Powers, Pauline S; Lensegrav-Benson, Tera; Quakenbush-Roberts, Benita

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a residential treatment program for adults and adolescents with eating disorders across a wide spectrum of measures. Data on body mass, eating disorder severity, depression, anxiety, and two measures of quality of life were collected on 139 consecutively admitted adolescents and 111 adults at a residential treatment program (N = 250). The same measures were completed at post-treatment. Group level analyses showed that adults and adolescents improved on all measures analyzed. Only 1.7% of adolescents and 2.3% of adults were below a Body Mass Index of 18.5 at discharge. Positive results across diagnoses and ages are reported for three subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory-3, with clinical response rates reported. Using clinical responder analyses, it was found that for all individuals struggling with secondary issues, 74.7% were responders on the Beck Depression Inventory-II, 41.0% on the Beck Anxiety Inventory, 63.5% on a measure of quality of life, and 95.8% were responders on the physical subscale and 72.6% on the mental subscale of the SF-36-v2. This study suggests that residential treatment for eating disorders is effective at the group level, and it was effective for the majority of individuals within the group. PMID:26214231

  9. Pore-scale imaging of biofilm grown under varying flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, G.; Connolly, J.; Davit, Y.; Gerlach, R.; Wood, B. D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2012-12-01

    Biofilm growth in porous media can influence porosity, permeability, dispersion, diffusion, and mass transport of solutes. Even small scale changes in pore morphology have been shown to significantly influence the hydrodynamics of porous systems. The direct observation of biofilm formation and development in porous media is challenging. To date, porous media-associated biofilm research has focused predominantly on investigations of biomass formation in two-dimensional systems, due to (1) the opaque nature of common porous materials, and (2) the direct dependence of conventional biofilm imaging techniques on optically transparent systems. In order to further understand porous media-associated biofilm growth, techniques for quantitatively assessing the three-dimensional spatial distribution of biomass, non-destructively, within opaque porous materials is required for the development of improved reactive transport and biofilm growth models. Through the addition of a barium sulfate suspension to the aqueous phase of experimental column growth reactors, delineation of the biofilm matrix from both the solid and free-flowing aqueous phases is attainable using synchrotron based x-ray computed microtomography. Using this technique, three-dimensional imaging of biofilm within glass bead-packed column growth reactors is possible at a resolution on the order of 10 um/pixel. Results will be presented where biofilm growth characteristics and changes in porous media hydrodynamics associated with bioclogging have been investigated across the Darcy flow regime and into the steady inertial flow regime (0.1 tests and differential pressure measurements. In addition, pore scale imaging enables the analysis of spatial changes to macropore morphology, as well as spatial variation in properties potentially relevant to reactive transport models such as biofilm thickness, reactive surface area, and attachment surface area. Quantitative analysis of these parameters will be discussed for

  10. Reference Values for the Marx Activity Rating Scale in a Young Athletic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenneth L.; Peck, Karen Y.; Thompson, Brandon S.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Owens, Brett D.; Marshall, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activity-related patient-reported outcome measures are an important component of assessment after knee ligament injury in young and physically active patients; however, normative data for most activity scales are limited. Objective: To present reference values by sex for the Marx Activity Rating Scale (MARS) within a young and physically active population while accounting for knee ligament injury history and sex. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Methods: All incoming freshman entering a US Service Academy in June of 2011 were recruited to participate in this study. MARS was administered to 1169 incoming freshmen (203 women) who consented to participate within the first week of matriculation. All subjects were deemed healthy and medically fit for military service on admission. Subjects also completed a baseline questionnaire that asked for basic demographic information and injury history. We calculated means with standard deviations, medians with interquartile ranges, and percentiles for ordinal and continuous variables, and frequencies and proportions for dichotomous variables. We also compared median scores by sex and history of knee ligament injury using the Kruskal-Wallis test. MARS was the primary outcome of interest. Results: The median MARS score was significantly higher for men when compared with women (χ2 = 13.22, df = 1, P < 0.001) with no prior history of knee ligament injury. In contrast, there was no significant difference in median MARS scores between men and women (χ2 = 0.47, df = 1, P = 0.493) who reported a history of injury. Overall, median MARS scores were significantly higher among those who reported a history of knee ligament injury when compared with those who did not (χ2 = 9.06, df = 1, P = 0.003). Conclusion: Assessing activity as a patient-reported outcome after knee ligament injury is important, and reference values for these instruments need to account for the influence of prior injury and sex

  11. [A behavioural rating scale of activity engagement in psychogeriatric day care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2014-09-01

    The Participation Scale was developed as an observational measure of activity engagement (as rated by group facilitators) of adult day care clients with mild to moderate dementia. In a consecutive sample of 448 subjects Mokken scaling procedure was conducted to assess the latent structure of 27 questionnaire items. The study included an exploratory and a confirmatory approach. For that purpose the sample was randomly divided into two halves. Exploratory analysis revealed three dimensions of participation that adequately captured the item structure: motivation (10 items; Loevinger's H = 0.48), competence (7 items; H = 0.56) and self-confidence (4 items; H = 0.57). The structure was validated in a confirmatory analysis. In a stepwise multiple regression model 49% of the variance in motivation was explained by independent behavioural measures of apathy and affect. Apathy and cognitive impairment were significant predictors of competence in participation (R(2) = 31.2%). Negative affect was the main predictor of reduced self-confidence (R(2) = 37.9%). Cross-validation of these exploratory regression models on the confirmatory sample explained 39.6%, 29.2% and 23.1% of the variance in motivation, competence and self-confidence, respectively. Test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2(A,1)) as determined in a random subsample of 56 participants, were 0.77 (motivation), 0.85 (competence) and 0.76 (self-confidence). The three measures allow the differentiation and ordering of individual participants on separate dimensions of activity engagement in psychogeriatric day care. PMID:25007866

  12. Comparison of 5 health care professionals’ratings of the clinical significance of drug related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Christine; Hojsted, Jette; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel;

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients have medicines reviews conducted by different health care professionals in different settings. Introducing a clinical panel to drug related problems (DRPs) to evaluate their clinical significance is common practice. The clinical panel discuss the potential consequences and com...

  13. Turbulence-enhanced prey encounter rates in larval fish : Effects of spatial scale, larval behaviour and size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; MacKenzie, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Turbulent water motion has several effects on the feeding ecology of larval fish and other planktivorous predators. In this paper, we consider the appropriate spatial scales for estimating relative velocities between larval fish predators and their prey, and the effect that different choices of...... scales might have on encounter and ingestion rates. Four possible scaling choices have been used in the literature, giving rise to varying estimates of the effect of turbulence on encounter rate. We argue that the correct scale is that based on the larval reactive distance, and that this interpretation......, small larvae are more likely to benefit from turbulence-increased encounter than larger larvae. Overall ingestion rate probability (= probability of encounter x probability of successful pursuit) is likely to be highest at moderate-high levels of turbulence. In most larval fish habitats, turbulence...

  14. Development of a New Attention Rating Scale for Children with Intellectual Disability: The Scale of Attention in Intellectual Disability (SAID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Nerelie C.; Gray, Kylie M.; Taffe, John R.; Cornish, Kim M.

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties with attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity are thought to be as common among children with intellectual disability (ID) as they are in children without ID. Despite this, there is a lack of scales to specifically assess ADHD symptomatology in children and adolescents with ID. This article describes the development and evaluation of…

  15. A Self-Efficacy Scale for Clinical Nurse Leaders: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Mattia J; Nokes, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Introduced in 2003, the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role is the first new nursing role introduced in more than 30 years. The hallmark of CNL practice is the management of client-centered care and clinical excellence at the point of care. As part of multifaceted efforts to implement the CNL role, understanding how an individual's self-efficacy with the identified role competencies changes over time has important implications for individuals, educational programs preparing CNLs, and health care organizations employing CNLs. In this study, preliminary psychometric analyses assessing the construct validity, reliability, and discriminant validity for a new state-specific scale (CNL Self-Efficacy Scale) that assesses nurses' perceptions of their ability to function effectively as a CNL are reported. Because self-confidence is a key predictor of successful role transition, job satisfaction, and job performance, measuring individuals' self-confidence with the core competencies associated with the CNL role over time will be important to gain the full benefit of this innovative, unit-based advanced generalist role. PMID:26259337

  16. Multi-scale modeling of the impact response of a strain-rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel

    OpenAIRE

    Canadinç, Demircan; Önal, Orkun; Özmenci, Cemre

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry, and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial ten...

  17. IMPACT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING ON RATES AND CLINICAL PROGNOSIS OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN SOUTHERN MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Robert A.; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; García-García, Lourdes; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; de León, Alfredo Ponce

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and incidence and mortality rates of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and treatment outcomes. Materials From 1995-2010, we analyzed data from 1062 patients with TB and from 2001-2004, 2951 contacts in Southern Mexico. Patients with acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and mycobacteriological evaluation and received treatment by the local DOTS program. Results Consumers of 1-10 (LS) or 11 or more (HS) cigarettes per day incidence (1.75 and 11.79) and mortality (HS,17.74) smoker-nonsmoker rate ratios were significantly higher for smokers. Smoker population was more likely to experience unfavorable treatment outcomes (HS, adjusted OR 2.36) and retreatment (LS and HS, adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 2.14 and 2.37). Contacts that smoked had a higher probability of developing active TB (HR 2.38) during follow up. Conclusions Results indicate the need of incorporating smoking prevention and cessation, especially among men, into international TB control strategies. PMID:22982014

  18. Validation of cross-cultural child mental health and psychosocial research instruments: adapting the Depression Self-Rating Scale and Child PTSD Symptom Scale in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tol Wietse A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of culturally adapted and validated instruments for child mental health and psychosocial support in low and middle-income countries is a barrier to assessing prevalence of mental health problems, evaluating interventions, and determining program cost-effectiveness. Alternative procedures are needed to validate instruments in these settings. Methods Six criteria are proposed to evaluate cross-cultural validity of child mental health instruments: (i purpose of instrument, (ii construct measured, (iii contents of construct, (iv local idioms employed, (v structure of response sets, and (vi comparison with other measurable phenomena. These criteria are applied to transcultural translation and alternative validation for the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS and Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS in Nepal, which recently suffered a decade of war including conscription of child soldiers and widespread displacement of youth. Transcultural translation was conducted with Nepali mental health professionals and six focus groups with children (n = 64 aged 11-15 years old. Because of the lack of child mental health professionals in Nepal, a psychosocial counselor performed an alternative validation procedure using psychosocial functioning as a criterion for intervention. The validation sample was 162 children (11-14 years old. The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS and Global Assessment of Psychosocial Disability (GAPD were used to derive indication for treatment as the external criterion. Results The instruments displayed moderate to good psychometric properties: DSRS (area under the curve (AUC = 0.82, sensitivity = 0.71, specificity = 0.81, cutoff score ≥ 14; CPSS (AUC = 0.77, sensitivity = 0.68, specificity = 0.73, cutoff score ≥ 20. The DSRS items with significant discriminant validity were "having energy to complete daily activities" (DSRS.7, "feeling that life is not worth living" (DSRS.10, and

  19. A rating scale experiment on loudness, noisiness and annoyance of environmental sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, K.; Takagi, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-12-01

    How people judge loudness, noisiness and annoyance of sounds was investigated by using a variety of environmental sounds. Fifty male and female subjects, aged from 18 to 60 years, heard 59 environmental sounds as well as seven kinds of white noise and judged their loudness, noisiness and annoyance on rating scales. Average scores on the three concepts given to the steady white noises are approximately in linear proportion to the level of the noise, with high correlation coefficients. The relationships were used to convert the scores given to the sounds to the levels of white noise which would have the same scores and can be regarded as points of subjective equality ( PSE's) of the sounds. It is found that the PSE thus obtained concerning loudness is best correlated among the three with Perceived Level and that concerning annoyance is least correlated with the level. Scattergrams of PSE's between the three concepts plotted against each other showed considerably high correlations. They are more correlated when sounds such as music, church bell, birds, etc., being on average judged pleasant or neutral, are excluded. This suggests that the human responses concerning those three concepts of auditory sensation and/or perception are mutually correlated. Lower correlation between loudness and annoyance, however, suggests sounds heard as equally loud could be differently annoying. More detailed analysis of the results showed that the judgement of loudness was not independent of noisiness and/or annoyance of the sound.

  20. Kejadian Post Dural Puncture Headache dan Nilai Numeric Rating Scale Pascaseksio Sesarea dengan Anestesi Spinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Irawan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of post dural puncture headache (PDPH is associated with the size of duramater diameter puncture caused by the puncture itself. There are two factors related to this problem, the size of the needle and the shape of the needle’s-end. The purpose of this study was to obtain an overview of incidence of PDPH in patients undergoing caesarean section with regional spinal anesthesia in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung in January–April 2010. This research was conducted on 115 pregnant woman with physical status of American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA II, range of age was 18 to 45 years old. This research was an observational study with cross-sectional design. The incidence of PDPH after the use of Quincke type needle no. 25 was 68.2%, while with Quincke type needle no. 27 was 31.8%, and no PDPH was found on the use of pencil point type needle no. 27. The numeric rating scale (NRS from PDPH on the use of Quincke type needle no. 25 was 3–7, while on Quincke type needle no. 27 was 2–6, and 0 in pencil point type needle no. 27. As the conclusion, the greatest incidence of PDPH in patients undergoing caesarean section, based on spinal needle type, occurs most with no. 25 Quincke type needles, and less with no. 27 and none with no. 27.

  1. Is the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale appropriate to detect Mild Cognitive Impairment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Belaus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have tried to assess the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS capability to detect incipient dementia or Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, but the results are not clear. The aim of this research was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the MDRS, and to localize the optimal cutoff score for MCI. Methodology. A neuropsychological battery that included the MDRS was administered to 60 older adults of both genders (Mean age=68.38, SD=6.80 in Cór- doba, Argentina, who were then classified as “Control” (34 cases or “MCI” (26 cases according to performance in the neuropsychological evaluation, excluding the MDRS. The criteria used were those stated by the Sociedad Española de Neurología. We performed mean comparisons in order to evaluate if the MDRS was able to detect the group differences. Then, a logistic regression with the MDRS total score as the predictor variable and the group as the criterion variable was performed to determine the cutoff score. Results. Even though the mean comparisons showed a significant difference in the MDRS (p=.004, the diagnostic accuracy was only 63% with a 133 points cutoff score. The sensitivity was 42% and the specificity was 79%. Conclusions. The MDRS does not seem to be a useful tool to detect MCI since it generates numerous misclassified cases. The development of more accurate tools becomes fundamental in order to detect MCI.

  2. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  3. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the {open_quotes}unmixedness.{close_quotes} Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines which have (1) a wide range of operation/stability, (2) a minimal amount of pollutant formation, and (3) high combustion efficiency. Specifically, with regard to pollutants, the goals are to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions by at least 10%, obtain less than 20 PPM of both CO and UHC, and increase the combustion efficiency by 5%.

  4. The Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS in clinical trials: cross-cultural validation in venous thromboembolism patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Stefan J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS is a 15-item patient-reported instrument of satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment. It includes a 12-item ACTS Burdens scale and a 3-item ACTS Benefits scale. Its role in clinical trials and other settings should be supported by evidence that it is both clinically meaningful and scientifically sound. The aim of the study was to evaluate the measurement performance of the ACTS (Dutch, Italian, French, German and English language versions in patients with venous thromboembolism based on traditional psychometric methods. Methods ACTS Burdens and Benefits scale data from a large clinical trial (EINSTEIN DVT involving 1336 people with venous thromboembolism were analysed at both the scale and item level. Five key psychometric properties were examined using traditional psychometric methods: acceptability, scaling assumptions, reliability (including internal consistency reliability, test-retest reproducibility; validity (including known groups and discriminant validity; and responsiveness. These methods of examination underpin the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for patient-reported outcome instrument evaluation. Results Overall, the 12-item ACTS Burdens scale and 3-item ACTS Benefits scale met the psychometric criteria evaluated at both item and scale levels, with the exception of some relatively minor issues in the Dutch language version, which were just below reliability criteria (i.e. alpha = 0.72, test-retest intraclass correlation = 0.79. A consistent finding from item-level evaluations of aggregate endorsement frequencies and skewness suggested that response scales may be improved by reducing the number of response options from five to four. Conclusions Both the ACTS Burdens and ACTS Benefits scales consistently satisfied traditional reliability and validity criteria across multiple language datasets, supporting it as a clinically useful patient

  5. Can we improve the clinical utility of respiratory rate as a monitored vital sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyou; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; McKenna, Thomas M; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-06-01

    Respiratory rate (RR) is a basic vital sign, measured and monitored throughout a wide spectrum of health care settings, although RR is historically difficult to measure in a reliable fashion. We explore an automated method that computes RR only during intervals of clean, regular, and consistent respiration and investigate its diagnostic use in a retrospective analysis of prehospital trauma casualties. At least 5 s of basic vital signs, including heart rate, RR, and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, were continuously collected from 326 spontaneously breathing trauma casualties during helicopter transport to a level I trauma center. "Reliable" RR data were identified retrospectively using automated algorithms. The diagnostic performances of reliable versus standard RR were evaluated by calculation of the receiver operating characteristic curves using the maximum-likelihood method and comparison of the summary areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). Respiratory rate shows significant data-reliability differences. For identifying prehospital casualties who subsequently receive a respiratory intervention (hospital intubation or tube thoracotomy), standard RR yields an AUC of 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.69), whereas reliable RR yields an AUC of 0.67 (0.57-0.77), P < 0.05. For identifying casualties subsequently diagnosed with a major hemorrhagic injury and requiring blood transfusion, standard RR yields an AUC of 0.60 (0.49-0.70), whereas reliable RR yields 0.77 (0.67-0.85), P < 0.001. Reliable RR, as determined by an automated algorithm, is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of respiratory pathology and major hemorrhage in a trauma population. It may be a useful input to a wide variety of clinical scores and automated decision-support algorithms. PMID:19008777

  6. Empirical Correlates of Low Scores on MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in a Sample of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeyeva, Tatyana V.; Tellegen, Auke; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the authors explored the meaning of low scores on the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical (RC) scales. Using responses of a sample of university students (N = 811), the authors examined whether low (T less than 39), within-normal-limits (T = 39-64), and high (T greater than 65) score levels on the RC scales are…

  7. Depression and anxiety in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence rates based on a comparison of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the hospital, Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covic Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recognised that depression is prevalent in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, recent studies have also highlighted significant levels of anxiety in RA patients. This study compared two commonly used scales, the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, in relation to their measurement range and cut points to consider the relative prevalence of both constructs, and if prevalence rates may be due to scale-specific case definition. Methods Patients meeting the criteria for RA were recruited in Leeds, UK and Sydney, Australia and asked to complete a survey that included both scales. The data was analysed using the Rasch measurement model. Results A total of 169 RA patients were assessed, with a repeat subsample, resulting in 323 cases for analysis. Both scales met Rasch model expectations. Using the 'possible+probable' cut point from the HADS, 58.3% had neither anxiety nor depression; 13.5% had anxiety only; 6.4% depression only and 21.8% had both 'possible+probable' anxiety and depression. Cut points for depression were comparable across the two scales while a lower cut point for anxiety in the DASS was required to equate prevalence. Conclusions This study provides further support for high prevalence of depression and anxiety in RA. It also shows that while these two scales provide a good indication of possible depression and anxiety, the estimates of prevalence so derived could vary, particularly for anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of comparisons across studies and selection of scales for clinical use.

  8. Impact of a Metabolic Screening Bundle on Rates of Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Psychiatry Resident Outpatient Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechers, Ilse R.; Viron, Mark; Stoklosa, Joseph; Freudenreich, Oliver; Henderson, David C.; Weiss, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is widely acknowledged that second-generation antipsychotics are associated with cardiometabolic side effects, rates of metabolic screening have remained low. The authors created a quality-improvement (QI) intervention in an academic medical center outpatient psychiatry resident clinic with the aim of improving rates of…

  9. A rate-dependent multi-scale crack model for concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karamnejad, A.; Nguyen, V.P.; Sluys, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical approach for modeling cracking in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials under dynamic loading is presented. In the model, a discontinuous crack model is used at macro-scale to simulate fracture and a gradient-enhanced damage model has been used at meso-scale to simulate diffu

  10. Novel Clinical Scale for Evaluating Pre-Operative Risk of Cerebral Herniation from Traumatic Epidural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Wen-Hao; Hu, Lian-Shui; Li, Jun; Luo, Fei; Lin, Jun-Ming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Kang; Zheng, Jian-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Secondary massive cerebral infarction (MCI) is the predominant prognostic factor for cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma (EDH) and determines the need for decompressive craniectomy. In this study, we tested the clinical feasibility and reliability of a novel pre-operative risk scoring system, the EDH-MCI scale, to guide surgical decision making. It is comprised of six risk factors, including hematoma location and volume, duration and extent of cerebral herniation, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and presence of preoperative shock, with a total score ranging from 0 to 18 points. Application of the EDH-MCI scale to guide surgical modalities for initial hematoma evacuation surgery for 65 patients (prospective cohort, 2012.02-2014.01) showed a significant improvement in the accuracy of the selected modality (95.38% vs. 77.95%; p = 0.002) relative to the results for an independent set of 126 patients (retrospective cohort, 2007.01-2012.01) for whom surgical modalities were decided empirically. Results suggested that simple hematoma evacuation craniotomy was sufficient for patients with low risk scores (≤9 points), whereas decompressive craniectomy in combination with duraplasty were necessary only for those with high risk scores (≥13 points). In patients with borderline risk scores (10-12 points), those having unstable vital signs, coexistence of severe secondary brainstem injury, and unresponsive dilated pupils after emergent burr hole hematoma drainage had a significantly increased incidence of post-traumatic MCI and necessity of radical surgical treatments. In conclusion, the novel pre-operative risk EDH-MCI evaluation scale has a satisfactory predictive and discriminative performance for patients who are at risk for the development of secondary MCI and therefore require decompressive craniectomy. PMID:25393339

  11. A rate-dependent multi-scale crack model for concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Karamnejad, A.; Nguyen, V.P.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical approach for modeling cracking in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials under dynamic loading is presented. In the model, a discontinuous crack model is used at macro-scale to simulate fracture and a gradient-enhanced damage model has been used at meso-scale to simulate diffuse damage. The traction-separation law for the cohesive zone model at macro-scale is obtained from the meso-scale information through the discontinuous computational homogenization method. The meth...

  12. Clinical value of serum cystatin C by ELISA for estimation of glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xunhui; Zou, Jianzhou; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Xin, Dingguang; Ren, Yushen

    2004-01-01

    The search for whether endogenous markers of changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by serum cystatin C assay and serum cystatin C compare with creatinine clearance by the Cockeroft-Gault formula and the evaluation of its clinical significance as a marker of GFR is important in clinical practice at present. Serum cystatin C was determined by sandwich enzyme immunoassay using a kit. Control blood samples were collected from 70 healthy subjects and 168 patients with various kidney diseases. Creatinine clearance (Cockeroft-Gault formula) as a measure of GFR, in 168 patients with various kidney diseases, depends on the creatinine clearance; GFR parameters were used to divide patients into two groups. The GFR was >80 mL/min in 38 patients (group A) and cystatin C was measured as normal value range and a reference interval of 1.05+/-0.18 micro g/mL (mean+/-1.96 SD, 95% confidence limits for the upper references limit is 1.4 microg/mL). In group A, serum cystatin C had no correlation to the creatinine clearance (r=0.171, P>0.05) and in group B, serum cystatin C was closely correlated to the creatinine clearance (r=-0.771, Pcystatin C (area under the curve=0.8461, SE=0.057) and creatinine clearance (area under the curve=0.7642, SE=0.068). These data suggest that combined measurement of serum cystatin C is useful to estimate GFR, especially to detect the reduction of GFR. Further studies are required to evaluate the whether serum cystatin C as a more sensitive marker of early renal injury might be extremely useful, particularly in nonproteinuric or unapparent renal disease. PMID:15065209

  13. Correlation of atrophic change of brain stem by MRI and the degree of symptoms from the ataxia rating scale between Machado-Joseph disease and olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated atrophic changes of brain stem and the degree of symptoms from the ataxia rating scale in 13 cases of Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and 10 cases of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Patients with MJD and OPCA and normal controls were examined using 1.5-T MRI. Furthermore, we evaluated 3 cases of each two groups with a long-term follow-up study. We used International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) for the evaluation of ataxia. The MRI of patients with MJD disclosed remarkably reduced width of the middle cerebellar peduncles and the dilatation of 4th ventricle, which correlated with the limb ataxia in ICARS. On the other hand, the MRI of patients with OPCA revealed diminished anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the pons. The latter of which correlated inversely with the total ICARS. In long-term follow up, MJD showed slow progression of atrophic change and clinical course contrasted to OPCA. In conclusion, we suggested that atrophic changes of brain stem of MJD and OPCA were well correlated with ataxia rating scale, ICARS. (author)

  14. The relation of putamen nucleus 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine uptake to total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of dopaminergic deficiency in the striatum to the severity of locomotor disability in Parkinson's disease has been consistently shown with 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA in positron emission tomography. Recently, 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine, an alternative tracer with similar distribution kinetics has been used to facilitate data analysis. Locomotor disability in Parkinson's disease can be measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was used in conjunction with 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine -PET to clinically examine a group of five Parkinson's disease patients. An inverse relation similar to that previously demonstrated with 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA was found between the putamen nucleus 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine influx constant and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score. This finding suggests that like 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine can be used to accurately measure the degree of locomotor disability caused by Parkinson's disease. (author)

  15. What does measure the scaling exponent of the correlation sum in the case of human heart rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säkki, M.; Kalda, J.; Vainu, M.; Laan, M.

    2004-03-01

    It is shown that in the case of human heart rate, the scaling behavior of the correlation sum (calculated by the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm) is a result of the interplay of various factors: finite resolution of the apparatus (finite-size effects), a wide dynamic range of mean heart rate, the amplitude of short-time variability being a decreasing function of the mean heart rate. This is done via constructing a simple model of heart rhythm: a signal with functionally modulated Gaussian noise. This model reproduces the scaling behavior of the correlation sum of real medical data. The value of the scaling exponent depends on all the above-mentioned factors, and is a certain measure of short-time variability of the signal.

  16. Clinical scale preparation and evaluation of 131I-Rituximab for Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with anti CD20 MoAb conjugated to a β- emitting radioisotope like 131I or 90Y has the added advantage of delivering radiation not only to tumor cells that bind the antibody but also due to a crossfire effect, to neighboring tumor cells inaccessible to the antibody. In order to make available an indigenous radioimmunotherapeutic agent for Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL), radioiodinated Rituximab has been prepared and evaluated at a clinical scale. Radioiodination of Rituximab was performed by the conventional Chloramine T method using 7.4 GBq Na131I in a lead shielded plant. Six batches of radioiodination were prepared and characterized by electrophoresis and HPLC to evaluate the reproducibility of the product. The product remained stable retaining the radiochemical purity > 95% upto 5 days after radioiodination. In vitro cell binding studies and biodistribution studies in normal Swiss mice have indicated the potential of this molecule as a radioimmunotherapeutic agent for NHL. (orig.)

  17. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

    2012-02-01

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  18. Rating of Patient Satisfaction Factors in a Clinical Hyperbaric Centre of a Greek Navy Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Chandrinou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modern medical technology has promoted the creation and improved the organization of Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Units (DHMU.Objective: This study evaluates patient satisfaction regarding services provided by the DHMU’s in Attica, Greece.Material and Method: This is a descriptive study, its sample constitutes of 91 patients admitted at the DHMU of Navy for Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO therapy. For the collection of data an anonymous selfadministered, 2-part questionnaire was utilized. The first part consisted of questions recording sociodemographicdata, while the second constituted of questions investigating the satisfaction of patients from the DHMU with a five-point Likert scale. The data was analyzed using SPSS (ver 17.Results: A total of 91 patients (53 male, 38 female with a mean age of 35.5 years, sd=+/-7.245 participated in the study. Most of them 44% were university graduates. Patients’ satisfaction from theservices provided at DHMU was up to 85.7%, while 87.6% of them highly appreciated the prompt initiating and availability of sessions and rated telephone communication with the DHMU as exceptional. Personnel were described by patients as polite (94.4%, respectful (95.6% and discrete (94.5%. The 92% of patients understood the importance of abiding by the rules of safety from nurses. Gender, age and the number or treatments were the characteristics that correlated statistically withpatients’ satisfaction from the services provided at a Greek Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Unit.Conclusion: The patients rated care and access to the particular D.H.M.U. as most excellent. Greek patients experience great satisfaction from the Naval Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Unit.

  19. Clinical Dementia Rating Performed Several Years prior to Death Predicts Regional Alzheimer’s Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeri, Michal Schnaider; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Schmeidler, James; Wysocki, Michael; Grossman, Hillel Z.; Purohit, Dushyant P.; Perl, Daniel P.; Haroutunian, Vahram

    2011-01-01

    Aims To assess the relationships between early and late antemortem measures of dementia severity and Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology severity. Methods 40 residents of a nursing home, average age at death 82.0, participated in this longitudinal cohort study with postmortem assessment. Severity of dementia was measured by Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) at two time points, averaging 4.5 and 1.0 years before death. Densities of postmortem neuritic plaques (NPs) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were measured in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. Results For most brain areas, both early and late CDRs were significantly associated with NPs and NFTs. CDRs assessed proximal to death predicted NFTs beyond the contribution of early CDRs. NPs were predicted by both early and late CDRs. NPs were predictive of both early and late CDRs after controlling for NFTs. NFTs were only associated significantly with late CDR in the cerebral cortex after controlling for NPs. Conclusions Even if assessed several years before death, dementia severity is associated with AD neuropathology. NPs are more strongly associated with dementia severity than NFTs. NFTs consistently associate better with late than early CDR, suggesting that these neuropathological changes may occur relatively later in the course of the disease. PMID:18367838

  20. Development and applications of the SWAN rating scale for assessment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, C; Salgado-Azoni, C A; Ferreira, T L; Lima, R F; Ciasca, S M

    2015-11-01

    This study reviewed the use of the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity-symptoms and Normal-behaviors (SWAN) rating scale in diagnostic and evolutive approaches to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and in correlational studies of the disorder. A review of articles published in indexed journals from electronic databases was conducted and 61 articles on the SWAN scale were analyzed. From these, 27 were selected to a) examine use of SWAN in research on attention disorders and b) verify evidence of its usefulness in the areas of genetics, neuropsychology, diagnostics, psychiatric comorbidities, neuroimaging, pharmacotherapy, and to examine its statistical reliability and validity in studies of diverse populations. This review of articles indicated a growing use of the SWAN scale for diagnostic purposes, for therapy, and in research on areas other than ADHD, especially when compared with other reliable scales. Use of the scale in ADHD diagnosis requires further statistical testing to define its psychometric properties. PMID:26313140

  1. Development and applications of the SWAN rating scale for assessment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brites

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reviewed the use of the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity-symptoms and Normal-behaviors (SWAN rating scale in diagnostic and evolutive approaches to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and in correlational studies of the disorder. A review of articles published in indexed journals from electronic databases was conducted and 61 articles on the SWAN scale were analyzed. From these, 27 were selected to a examine use of SWAN in research on attention disorders and b verify evidence of its usefulness in the areas of genetics, neuropsychology, diagnostics, psychiatric comorbidities, neuroimaging, pharmacotherapy, and to examine its statistical reliability and validity in studies of diverse populations. This review of articles indicated a growing use of the SWAN scale for diagnostic purposes, for therapy, and in research on areas other than ADHD, especially when compared with other reliable scales. Use of the scale in ADHD diagnosis requires further statistical testing to define its psychometric properties.

  2. The clinical significance of detection to heart rate deceleration capacity and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-rong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the change of heart rate deceleration capacity ( DC and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and its relationship with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods: DC, LVEF, time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were measured in 66 patients with CHF and 34 healthy adults (control group by using 24h Holter recordings and Echocardiography. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals( SDNN, squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals ( RMSSD,low frequency power( LFn and high frequency power( HFn and the changes of LVEF were compared between  the two groups,the relationship between DC,LVEF and HRV were studied in patients with CHF. Results: The median value of DC in the patients with CHF was significantly lower than that in control group( 3.1 ± 2.4 ms vs 7.2 ± 1.3 ms,P <0.01.Incidence of abnormal DC in the CHF group was 57.5%,which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0.01.The HRV index, including SDNN、RMSSD、LFn、HFn, in the CHF group was significantly lower than that in normal control group (P < 0.01. Significant positive correlation between HRV index and LVEF were confirmed (P < 0.01. Conclusions: DC and HRV index are lower in patients with CHF and have a good correlation with the left ventricular ejection fraction.

  3. RATING SCALE COMPETENCIES IN THE DISCIPLINE OF «CULTURAL STUDIES» FOR STUDENTS OF OIL AND GAS PROFILE

    OpenAIRE

    Il’dus Islamovich Zailalov; Venera Rifmirovna Zailalova

    2015-01-01

    The authors examine the competence-based approach as the most promising to date in education, requiring the introduction of new technologies, methods, systems assessment competencies.The article presents the scale of formation of competences of students of the technical University in cultural studies based on a point rating system. A point rating system made in accordance with the curriculum of the discipline «cultural Studies». Demonstrates the use of active learning methods, allowing to ful...

  4. A review on the use of NEO-PI-R validity scales in normative, job selection, and clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Blanch

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In this study we review the use of the Positive Presentation Management (PPM and Negative Presentation Management (NPM scales, two NEO-PI-R derived measures originally devised to control for biased and distorted responses. These scales have been used with normative, job selection and clinical samples, in cross-sectional and experimental studies. Methods: Web-based and manual searches in personality and psychological assessment journals were conducted, and information on the PPM and NPM scales was systematically recorded. Means, standard deviations and reliability coefficients were summarized and compared between three types of samples: normative, job selection and clinical. Results: Five studies were performed with normative samples (33%, 3 with employment samples (20% and 7 with clinical samples (47%. Cross-sectional designs were most common (60%, although there were also experimental studies (40%. Reported reliability coefficients were lower than usually accepted. There were differences in mean PPM and NPM scores in regard to the study sample background. Conclusions: There were some discrepancies when reporting PPM and NPM results across the reviewed studies. Normative and employment samples scored higher in PPM than clinical samples. Clinical samples scored higher in NPM than normative and employment samples The PPM and NPM scales could be useful in applied situations, although parallel sources of information should be taken into account to detect distorted responses to the questionnaire. However, the results on these scales should be systematically reported in future studies.

  5. Scaling of number, size, and metabolic rate of cells with body size in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, M; Allen, Andrew P.; Brown, James H.; Gillooly, James F; Herman, Alexander B.; Woodruff, William H.; West, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    The size and metabolic rate of cells affect processes from the molecular to the organismal level. We present a quantitative, theoretical framework for studying relationships among cell volume, cellular metabolic rate, body size, and whole-organism metabolic rate that helps reveal the feedback between these levels of organization. We use this framework to show that average cell volume and average cellular metabolic rate cannot both remain constant with changes in body size because of the well ...

  6. Halo, Central Tendency, and Leniency in performance appraisel: A comparison between a graphic rating scale and a behaviourally based measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. C. Birkenbach

    1984-11-01

    Full Text Available The process of performance appraisal can serve important employee development as well as organizational administrative functions. However, the reliable and accurate assessment of performance could be hampered by rating errors such as halo, leniency, and central tendency. Because the traditional approach to appraisal by means of graphic rating scales is considered to be susceptible to these errors, behaviourally based measures have been developed which have the claimed advantage of being relatively resistant to rating errors. This study compared the ratings given to a group of employees on a graphic rating scale and a behavioural observation scale. The results did not support the superiority of the BOS in resisting rating errors. OpsommingDie proses van prestasiebeoordeling speel 'n belangrike rol in die ontwikkeling van werknemers asook om administratiewe besluite te maak oor personeel. Die betroubare en akkurate evaluering van werkprestasie kan egter belemmer word deur beoordelingsfoute soos die stralekranseffek, toegeeflikheid, en sentrale neiging. Omrede die alombekende grafiese beoordelingskaal veronderstel is om baie vatbaar te wees vir beoordelingsfoute is daar die afgelope paar jaar aandag geskenk aan die ontwikkeling van gedragsgeoriënteerde beoordelingsmetodes. Dit word aangevoer dat laasgenoemde minder onderworpe is aan beoordelingsfoute. Hierdie studie het die beoordelings van 'n groep werkers op 'n grafiese beoordelingskaal en 'n gedragswaarnemingskaal met mekaar vergelyk. Die resultate kon nie ondersteuning verleen aan die standpunt dat grafiese skale meer vatbaar is vir beoordelingsfoute nie.

  7. Hemorrhagic transformation: A review of the rate of hemorrhage in the major clinical trials of acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    EdwardSanderConnolly Jr.; EricSSussman

    2013-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating disease that is often complicated by hemorrhagic transformation. While significant advances have been made over the past two decades with regard to emergent treatment of AIS, many of these therapeutic options are limited by an increased risk of hemorrhage. Here, we sought to review the rates of hemorrhagic transformation in the major clinical trials of AIS intervention. Since the reviewed clinical trials vary significantly with regard to study design,...

  8. Hemorrhagic Transformation: A Review of the Rate of Hemorrhage in the Major Clinical Trials of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sussman, Eric S; Connolly, E. Sander

    2013-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating disease that is often complicated by hemorrhagic transformation. While significant advances have been made over the past two decades with regard to emergent treatment of AIS, many of the therapeutic options are limited by an increased risk of hemorrhage. Here, we sought to review the rates of hemorrhagic transformation in the major clinical trials of AIS intervention. Since the reviewed clinical trials vary significantly in terms of study design, eligibi...

  9. Improvement in the clinical cure rate of outpatient management of pelvic inflammatory disease following a change in therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Piyadigamage, A; Wilson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: In the United Kingdom many genitourinary medicine clinics use oral doxycycline and metronidazole to treat pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). A retrospective case note review of PID treatment at our department in 2000 showed that the clinical cure rate (CCR) was only 55% with oral doxycycline and metronidazole for 2 weeks. We therefore added ceftriaxone 250 mg intramuscularly to the doxycycline and metronidazole for treating PID. We have repeated the review and compared the results ...

  10. Positive Outcomes Influence the Rate and Time to Publication, but Not the Impact Factor of Publications of Clinical Trial Results

    OpenAIRE

    Suñé, Pilar; Suñé, Josep Maria; Montoro, J. Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Publication bias may affect the validity of evidence based medical decisions. The aim of this study is to assess whether research outcomes affect the dissemination of clinical trial findings, in terms of rate, time to publication, and impact factor of journal publications. Methods and Findings: All drug-evaluating clinical trials submitted to and approved by a general hospital ethics committee between 1997 and 2004 were prospectively followed to analyze their fate and publication....

  11. Association of Biodiversity with the Rates of Micropollutant Biotransformations among Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plant Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, Damian E.; Lee, Tae Kwon; Park, Joonhong; Fenner, Kathrin; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.; Ackermann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Biodiversities can differ substantially among different wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) communities. Whether differences in biodiversity translate into differences in the provision of particular ecosystem services, however, is under active debate. Theoretical considerations predict that WWTP communities with more biodiversity are more likely to contain strains that have positive effects on the rates of particular ecosystem functions, thus resulting in positive associations between those two variables. However, if WWTP communities were sufficiently biodiverse to nearly saturate the set of possible positive effects, then positive associations would not occur between biodiversity and the rates of particular ecosystem functions. To test these expectations, we measured the taxonomic biodiversity, functional biodiversity, and rates of 10 different micropollutant biotransformations for 10 full-scale WWTP communities. We have demonstrated that biodiversity is positively associated with the rates of specific, but not all, micropollutant biotransformations. Thus, one cannot assume whether or how biodiversity will associate with the rate of any particular micropollutant biotransformation. We have further demonstrated that the strongest positive association is between biodiversity and the collective rate of multiple micropollutant biotransformations. Thus, more biodiversity is likely required to maximize the collective rates of multiple micropollutant biotransformations than is required to maximize the rate of any individual micropollutant biotransformation. We finally provide evidence that the positive associations are stronger for rare micropollutant biotransformations than for common micropollutant biotransformations. Together, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in biodiversity can indeed translate into differences in the provision of particular ecosystem services by full-scale WWTP communities. PMID:25398862

  12. Investigating the Clinical Usefulness of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) in a Tertiary Level, Autism Spectrum Disorder Specific Assessment Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Fiona J.; Gibbs, Vicki M.; Schmidhofer, Katherine; Williams, Megan

    2012-01-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS; Constantino and Gruber in Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, 2005) is a commonly used screening tool for identifying children with possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the relationship between SRS scores and eventual diagnostic outcome…

  13. Assessment of correct fixing rate for precise point positioning ambiguity resolution on a global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Pan

    2013-06-01

    Ambiguity resolution (AR) for a single receiver has been a popular topic in Global Positioning System (GPS) recently. Ambiguity-resolution methods for precise point positioning (PPP) have been well documented in recent years, demonstrating that it can improve the accuracy of PPP. However, users are often concerned about the reliability of ambiguity-fixed PPP solution in practical applications. If ambiguities are fixed to wrong integers, large errors would be introduced into position estimates. In this paper, we aim to assess the correct fixing rate (CFR), i.e., number of ambiguities correctly fixing to the total number of ambiguities correctly and incorrectly fixing, for PPP user ambiguity resolution on a global scale. A practical procedure is presented to evaluate the CFR of PPP user ambiguity resolution. GPS data of the first 3 days in each month of 2010 from about 390 IGS stations are used for experiments. Firstly, we use GPS data collected from about 320 IGS stations to estimate global single-differenced (SD) wide-lane and narrow-lane satellite uncalibrated phase delays (UPDs). The quality of UPDs is evaluated. We found that wide-lane UPD estimates have a rather small standard deviation (Std) between 0.003 and 0.004 cycles while most of Std of narrow-lane estimates are from 0.01 to 0.02 cycles. Secondly, many experiments have been conducted to investigate the CFR of integer ambiguity resolution we can achieve under different conditions, including reference station density, observation session length and the ionospheric activity. The results show that the CFR of PPP can exceed 98.0 % with only 1 h of observations for most user stations. No obvious correlation between the CFR and the reference station density is found. Therefore, nearly homogeneous CFR can be achieved in PPP AR for global users. At user end, higher CFR could be achieved with longer observations. The average CFR for 30-min, 1-h, 2-h and 4-h observation is 92.3, 98.2, 99.5 and 99.7 %, respectively

  14. Enhancing biomass energy yield from pilot-scale high rate algal ponds with recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates the effect of recycling on biomass energy yield in High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs). Two 8 m(3) pilot-scale HRAPs treating primary settled sewage were operated in parallel and monitored over a 2-year period. Volatile suspended solids were measured from both HRAPs and their gravity settlers to determine biomass productivity and harvest efficiency. The energy content of the biomass was also measured. Multiplying biomass productivity and harvest efficiency gives the 'harvestable biomass productivity' and multiplying this by the energy content defines the actual 'biomass energy yield'. In Year 1, algal recycling was implemented in one of the ponds (HRAPr) and improved harvestable biomass productivity by 58% compared with the control (HRAPc) without recycling (HRAPr: 9.2 g/m(2)/d; HRAPc: 5.8 g/m(2)/d). The energy content of the biomass grown in HRAPr, which was dominated by Pediastrun boryanum, was 25% higher than the control HRAPc which contained a mixed culture of 4-5 different algae (HRAPr: 21.5 kJ/g; HRAPc: 18.6 kJ/g). In Year 2, HRAPc was then seeded with the biomass harvested from the P. boryanum dominated HRAPr. This had the effect of shifting algal dominance from 89% Dictyosphaerium sp. (which is poorly-settleable) to over 90% P. boryanum in 5 months. Operation of this pond was then switched to recycling its own harvested biomass, which maintained P. boryanum dominance for the rest of Year 2. This result confirms, for the first time in the literature, that species control is possible for similarly sized co-occurring algal colonies in outdoor HRAP by algal recycling. With regard to the overall improvement in biomass energy yield, which is a critical parameter in the context of algal cultivation for biofuels, the combined improvements that recycling triggered in biomass productivity, harvest efficiency and energy content enhanced the harvested biomass energy yield by 66% (HRAPr: 195 kJ/m(2)/day; HRAPc: 118 kJ/m(2)/day). PMID:23764593

  15. Delayed heart rate recovery after treadmill test: comparison with clinical, exercise and myocardial perfusion parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbalance autonomic nervous tone are fundamental risk factors for cardiac death. Recent studies reported abnormal heart rate recovery(HRR) after the treadmill exercise test is a powerful predictor of significant excess mortality. To evaluate HRR as an index of coronary artery disease(CAD). we have compared perfusion defect. 252 patients(147 men) underwent exercise myocardial perfusion imaging were included. The value for HRR was defined as the decrease in heart rate from peak exercise to 1 minute after termination of exercise. Myocardial perfusion imaging was acquired at 1 hour after 740MBq 99mTc-MIBI injection using dual head gamma camera(Vertex Plus, ADAC, USA). Summed stress score(SSS) and stress ejection fraction(sEF) were obtained from AutoQUANT program. 23 beats/min was defined as the lowest normal value for HRR. Patients were divided two groups: abnormal HRR(abHRR) and normal HRR(nHRR). We compared clinical(age, sex, pervious CAD history, DM, HTN), exercise test(exercise capacity, duration) and myocardial perfusion parameters(SSS, sEF) between two groups. Mean value of HRR was 50.814.2 beat/min. There were 25 patients(9.9%) with an abHRR. Patient with abHRR were generally in older age(61.59.2 vs 54.48.9yr), were more likely men(72 vs 56.8%), had a higher frequency of DM(16.7 vs 9%), HTN(52 vs 27.6%) and CAD history (28 vs 7%) compared to nHRR. In exercise and myocardial perfusion parameters, abHRR were showed more positive result(60 vs 30%), had short exercise duration(7.0±3.0 vs 9.1±2.7min) and small exercise capacity(7.2±2.3 vs 10.0±2.7Mets) compared to nHRR, had a higher frequency of CAD(76 vs 41.4%) and multivessel disease(25 vs 6.5%), had larger SSS(8.1±8.8 vs 3.7±6.3) and had smaller sEF(47.7±14.3 vs 57.9±10.3%) compared to nHRR. AbHRR was frequently found in patients with CAD, large myocardial perfusion defect and decreased LV function. It seems that the HRR may be considered a reliable index of the severity of CAD

  16. Retrospective Assessment of ADHD Symptoms in Childhood: Discriminatory Validity of Finnish Translation of the Wender Utah Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisaari, Sasa; Laasonen, Marja; Leppamaki, Sami; Tani, Pekka; Hokkanen, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the discriminatory validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and its five suggested subscales (Conduct Problems, Impulsivity Problems, Mood Difficulties, Inattention/Anxiety, Academic Concerns) in a Finnish sample. Method: WURS was administered to 114 adults, aged 18 to 55 years. Participants with ADHD (n = 37) and…

  17. The Ethical Issues Rating Scale: An Instrument for Measuring Ethical Orientation of College Students toward Various Business Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Larry G.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Factor analysis of data from 213 college business students supported the existence of 5 constructs for the Ethical Issues Rating Scale, an instrument measuring respondents' assessment of the importance of various ethical issues. Suggestions about refining the instrument and using it are discussed. (SLD)

  18. The Forgotten Half of Program Evaluation: A Focus on the Translation of Rating Scales for Use with Hispanic Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Shannon J.; Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Onati, Lenna L.

    2012-01-01

    Extension professionals often work with diverse clientele; however, most assessment tools have been developed and validated with English-speaking samples. There is little research and practical guidance on the cultural adaptation and translation of rating scales. The purpose of this article is to summarize the methodological work in this area as…

  19. Comparing the use of global rating scale with checklists for the assessment of central venous catheterization skills using simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene W Y; Zalunardo, Nadia; Pachev, George; Beran, Tanya; Brown, Melanie; Hatala, Rose; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    The use of checklists is recommended for the assessment of competency in central venous catheterization (CVC) insertion. To explore the use of a global rating scale in the assessment of CVC skills, this study seeks to compare its use with two checklists, within the context of a formative examination using simulation. Video-recorded performances of CVC insertion by 34 first-year medical residents were reviewed by two independent, trained evaluators. Each evaluator used three assessment tools: a ten-item checklist, a 21-item checklist, and a nine-item global rating scale. Exploratory principal component analysis of the global rating scale revealed two factors, accounting for 84.1% of the variance: technical ability and safety. The two checklist scores correlated positively with the weighted factor score on technical ability (0.49 [95% CI 0.17-0.71] for the 10-item checklist; 0.43 [95% CI 0.10-0.67] for the 21-item checklist) and negatively with the weighted factor score on safety (-0.17 [95% CI -0.48-0.18] for the 10-item checklist; -0.13 [95% CI -0.45-0.22] for the 21-item checklist). A checklist score of 80% on both checklists. All these candidates committed serious errors. In conclusion, the practice of universal adoption of checklists as the preferred method of assessment of procedural skills should be questioned. The inclusion of global rating scales should be considered. PMID:21877217

  20. Use of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) for Children with High Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Murray, Michael J.; Morrow, Jill D.; Yurich, Kirsten K. L.; Cothren, Shiyoko; Purichia, Heather; Mahr, Fauzia; Bouder, James N.; Petersen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The authors of the "Childhood Autism Rating Scale" (CARS) state in the manual that the best cutoff score for distinguishing low functioning autism (LFA) from intellectual disability is 30 for children and 28 for adolescents and adults. This study determined that a cutoff score of 25.5 was most accurate in differentiating between high functioning…

  1. Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Child Anxiety: Signal Detection Analysis Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporino, Nicole E.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Kendall, Philip C.; Albano, Anne Marie; Sherrill, Joel; Piacentini, John; Sakolsky, Dara; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda; Rynn, Moira; McCracken, James; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; March, John; Walkup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine optimal Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) percent reduction and raw score cut-offs for predicting treatment response and remission among children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. Method: Data were from a subset of youth (N = 438; 7-17 years of age) who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study…

  2. Comparing the Use of Global Rating Scale with Checklists for the Assessment of Central Venous Catheterization Skills Using Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene W. Y.; Zalunardo, Nadia; Pachev, George; Beran, Tanya; Brown, Melanie; Hatala, Rose; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The use of checklists is recommended for the assessment of competency in central venous catheterization (CVC) insertion. To explore the use of a global rating scale in the assessment of CVC skills, this study seeks to compare its use with two checklists, within the context of a formative examination using simulation. Video-recorded performances of…

  3. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A [Princeton University

    2013-05-15

    This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE legacy waste problems.

  4. A randomized clinical trial evaluating the success rate of ethanol wet bonding technique and two adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Pouran Samimi; Mojgan Rafizadeh; Shantia Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    Background : Composite resin restorations may have a short lifespan due to the degradation of resin-dentin interface. Ethanol wet bonding technique may extend the longevity of resin-dentin bond. The purpose of this one year randomized clinical trial was to compare clinical performance of two adhesives with ethanol wet bonding technique. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was performed on 36 non-carious cervical lesions in 12 patients restored with composite resin using ...

  5. Measuring agreement between rating interpretations and binary clinical interpretations of images: a simulation study of methods for quantifying the clinical relevance of an observer performance paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies, that are often used to evaluate medical imaging systems, differ from ‘live’ clinical interpretations in several respects which could compromise their clinical relevance. The aim was to develop methodology for quantifying the clinical relevance of a laboratory ROC study. A simulator was developed to generate ROC ratings data and binary clinical interpretations classified as correct or incorrect for a common set of images interpreted under clinical and laboratory conditions. The area under the trapezoidal ROC curve (AUC) was used as the laboratory figure-of-merit and the fraction of correct clinical decisions as the clinical figure-of-merit. Conventional agreement measures (Pearson, Spearman, Kendall and kappa) between the bootstrap-induced fluctuations of the two figures of merit were estimated. A jackknife pseudovalue transformation applied to the figures of merit was also investigated as a way to capture agreement existing at the individual image level that could be lost at the figure-of-merit level. It is shown that the pseudovalues define a relevance-ROC curve. The area under this curve (rAUC) measures the ability of the laboratory figure-of-merit-based pseudovalues to correctly classify incorrect versus correct clinical interpretations. Therefore, rAUC is a measure of the clinical relevance of an ROC study. The conventional measures and rAUC were compared under varying simulator conditions. It was found that design details of the ROC study, namely the number of bins, the difficulty level of the images, the ratio of disease-present to disease-absent images and the unavoidable difference between laboratory and clinical performance levels, can lead to serious underestimation of the agreement as indicated by conventional agreement measures, even for perfectly correlated data, while rAUC showed high agreement and was relatively immune to these details. At the same time rAUC was sensitive to factors such

  6. Hazard rate estimation for location-scale distributions under complete and censored data

    CERN Document Server

    Surucu, Baris

    2012-01-01

    In reliability and life testing studies, the topic of estimating hazard rate has received great attention in recent years since an estimate of hazard rate is a quite useful tool for making decisions. Some works have included nonparametric approaches while some have considered parametric structural models for complete as well as censored data sets; see Meeker et al. (1992), Antoniadis and Gr\\'egoire (1999), Rai and Singh (2003), Bezandry et al. (2005), Brunel and Comte (2008), and Mahapatra et al. (2012). Depending on the shapes of the hazard rate, efficiencies differ markedly across proposed estimators. This situation is remarkable especially when different estimation techniques are utilized for unknown parameters of underlying distributions in parametric approaches. That is, estimated hazard rate (and also reliability) at a specific time point t as functions of these estimators leads to inconsistent coverage probabilities as distributional convergence of hazard rate estimator may not be at the desired rate f...

  7. Acceptance rate of clinical study endpoints and adequacy of source documentation: experience from clinical study endpoint review in NEAT001/ANRS143

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Berenguer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: NEAT001/ANRS143 was an open-label, randomized, non-inferiority study comparing raltegravir+darunavir/r(RGV+DRV/r vs. tenofovir/emtricitabine+darunavir/r (TDF/FTC+DRV/r in HIV-infected antiretroviral naïve adults. Primary efficacy outcome was a composite of virological and clinical events by week 96. Materials and Methods: Clinical trial units collected and translated supporting documentation (SD related to the investigator-reported events. A coordinator checked events and SD for consistency and completeness. The Endpoint Review Committee (ERC determined if clinical events met pre-defined diagnostic criteria in categories “confirmed” or “probable”. The ERC of 12 experienced, independent clinicians served in groups of three conducting individual reviews in writing, blinded to treatment arm. Differences of opinion were adjudicated in a second review by direct dialogue between reviewers. “Confirmed” events required adequate SD like laboratory, radiographic or pathology diagnostic reports. “Probable” events were typically based on clinical criteria. Results: Of the 164 serious and 3,964 adverse events reported in the study, 133 qualified for endpoint review, for a total of 153 adjudications:Sixty of 111 per protocol endpoints were confirmed (n=53 or probable (n=7, which equals an acceptance rate of 54%. In two confirmed cases, SD was partly adequate and evaluation uncertain. Of 51 rejected events, 13 had insufficient SD, two were recurrent events. The rate of rejected events was comparable between treatments with 41% rejected events in the RGV+DRV/r arm compared to 52% in the TDF/FTC+DRV/r arm. The IRIS acceptance rate was low (3 of 18, demonstrating the difference in perception of IRIS in daily patient management and the stricter protocol definition. Conclusions: Blinded endpoint review prevented unacceptably high false positive event rates documenting that real-time ascertainment of clinical endpoints is crucial for

  8. The Impact of the Flow Field Heterogeneity and of the Injection Rate on the Effective Reaction Rates in Carbonates: a Study at the Pore Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J. P. P.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate rocks are notoriously difficult to characterize. Their abrupt facies variations give rise to drastic changes in the petrophysical properties of the reservoir. Such heterogeneity, when further associated with variations in rock mineralogy due to diagenetic processes, result in a challenging scenario to model from the pore to the field scale. Micro-CT imaging is one of the most promising technologies to characterize porous rocks. The understanding at the pore scale of reactive and non-reactive transport is being pushed forward by recent developments in both imaging capability - 3D images with resolution of a few microns - and in modeling techniques - flow simulations in giga-cell models. We will present a particle-based method capable of predicting the evolution of petrophysical properties of carbonate cores subjected to CO2 injection at reservoir conditions (i.e. high pressures and temperatures). Reactive flow is simulated directly on the voxels of high resolution micro-CT images of rocks. Reactants are tracked using a semi-analytical streamline tracing algorithm and rock-fluid interaction is controlled by the diffusive flux of particles from the pores to the grains. We study the impact of the flow field heterogeneity and of the injection rate on the sample-averaged (i.e. effective) reaction rate of calcite dissolution in three rocks of increasing complexity: a beadpack, an oolitic limestone and a bioclastic limestone. We show how decreases in the overall dissolution rate depend on both the complexity of the pore space and also on the flow rate. This occurs even in chemically homogenous rocks. Our results suggest that the large differences observed between laboratory and field scale rates could, in part, be explained by the inhomogeneity in the flow field at the pore scale and the consequent transport-limited flux of reactants at the solid surface. Our results give valuable insight into the processes governing carbonate dissolution and provide a starting

  9. Predicting dangerousness with two Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory psychopathy scales: the importance of egocentric and callous traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salekin, Randall T; Ziegler, Tracey A; Larrea, Maria A; Anthony, Virginia Lee; Bennett, Allyson D

    2003-04-01

    Psychopathy in youth has received increased recognition as a critical clinical construct for the evaluation and management of adolescents who have come into contact with the law (e.g., Forth, Hare, & Hart, 1990; Frick, 1998; Lynam, 1996, 1998). Although considerable attention has been devoted to the adult construct of psychopathy and its relation to recidivism, psychopathy in adolescents has been less thoroughly researched. Recently, a psychopathy scale (Murrie and Cornell Psychopathy Scale; Murrie & Cornell, 2000) was developed from items of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI; Millon, 1993). This scale was found to be highly related to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (Hare, 1991) and was judged to have demonstrated good criterion validity. A necessary step in the validation process of any psychopathy scale is establishing its predictive validity. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of the MACI Psychopathy Scale to predict recidivism with 55 adolescent offenders 2 years after they had been evaluated at a juvenile court evaluation unit. In addition, we devised a psychopathy scale from MACI items that aligned more closely with Cooke and Michie (2001) and Frick, Bodin, and Barry's (2001) recommendations for the refinement of psychopathy and tested its predictive validity. Results indicate that both scales had predictive utility. Interpersonal and affective components of the revised scale were particularly important in the prediction of both general and violent reoffending. PMID:12700018

  10. Telephone reminders reduced the non-attendance rate in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Maja Haunstrup; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2015-01-01

    in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic like ours. METHODS: This was a comparative intervention study with a historical control group in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic. The study lasted six months. Patients with a scheduled appointment in the first three-month period received no reminder...

  11. The Effects of Changes in the Order of Verbal Labels and Numerical Values on Children's Scores on Attitude and Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lucy; Hartley, James

    2012-01-01

    Research with adults has shown that variations in verbal labels and numerical scale values on rating scales can affect the responses given. However, few studies have been conducted with children. The study aimed to examine potential differences in children's responses to Likert-type rating scales according to their anchor points and scale…

  12. Stenting for symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rate mirabile: The long-term clinical and angiographic outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jang Hyun; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Symptomatic vertebral artery (VA) stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rate mirabile (CRM) has not been reported. We report the long-term clinical and angiographic outcome after stenting for symptomatic VA stenosis in the patient with bilateral CRM. This report is the first case that symptomatic VA stenosis associated with bilateral CRM was treated with stenting.

  13. Modified bathroom scale and balance assessment: a comparison with clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchêne, Jacques; Hewson, David; Rumeau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Frailty and detection of fall risk are major issues in preventive gerontology. A simple tool frequently used in daily life, a bathroom scale (balance quality tester: BQT), was modified to obtain information on the balance of 84 outpatients consulting at a geriatric clinic. The results computed from the BQT were compared to the values of three geriatric tests that are widely used either to detect a fall risk or frailty (timed get up and go: TUG; 10 m walking speed: WS; walking time: WT; one-leg stand: OS). The BQT calculates four parameters that are then scored and weighted, thus creating an overall indicator of balance quality. Raw data, partial scores and the global score were compared with the results of the three geriatric tests. The WT values had the highest correlation with BQT raw data (r = 0.55), while TUG (r = 0.53) and WS (r = 0.56) had the highest correlation with BQT partial scores. ROC curves for OS cut-off values (4 and 5 s) were produced, with the best results obtained for a 5 s cut-off, both with the partial scores combined using Fisher's combination (specificity 85 %: 0.48), and with the empirical score (specificity 85 %: 8). A BQT empirical score of less than seven can detect fall risk in a community dwelling population. PMID:27217987

  14. Evaluating autism in a Chinese population:the Clinical Autism Diagnostic Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grace Hao; Thomas L Layton; Xiao-Bing Zou; Dong-Yun Li

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to report on the psychometric measures and discriminatory function of a new diagnostic test for autism spectrum disorders, the Clinical Autism Diagnostic Scale (CADS). Methods: The CADS was used to test 216 children in the study, including 86 with low-functioning autism specturm disorders (ASD), 16 children with highfunctioning ASD, 16 with pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified, 7 with Asperger syndrome, 65 with typical development, 11 children with language impairments and 15 with intellectual disabilities. Ages ranged from 38-73 months. Behaviors for the groups were compared across seven domains. Results: The results indicated the instrument was reliable, valid, and successfully differentiated the different groups of children with and without autism. All ASD groups were found to display difficulties in the domains of sensory behaviors and stereotyped behaviors. The play and social domains were found to measure similar underlying concepts of behaviors, while the receptive language and expressive language domains were also found to measure similar underlying-language concepts. The group of children diagnosed as having low-functioning autism performed less well on all tested domains in the instrument than did the other three groups of children with ASD, and these other three groups each also presented unique patterns of behaviors and differed on individual domains. Conclusions: CADS is a reliable and valid test. It successfully differentiates the abilities of children with ASD at different levels of functioning.

  15. A Clinical Indications Prediction Scale Based on TWIST1 for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraju V. Boregowda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their stem/progenitor properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs also exhibit potent effector (angiogenic, antiinflammatory, immuno-modulatory functions that are largely paracrine in nature. It is widely believed that effector functions underlie most of the therapeutic potential of MSCs and are independent of their stem/progenitor properties. Here we demonstrate that stem/progenitor and effector functions are coordinately regulated at the cellular level by the transcription factor Twist1 and specified within populations according to a hierarchical model. We further show that manipulation of Twist1 levels by genetic approaches or by exposure to widely used culture supplements including fibroblast growth factor 2 (Ffg2 and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma alters MSC efficacy in cell-based and in vivo assays in a predictable manner. Thus, by mechanistically linking stem/progenitor and effector functions our studies provide a unifying framework in the form of an MSC hierarchy that models the functional complexity of populations. Using this framework, we developed a CLinical Indications Prediction (CLIP scale that predicts how donor-to-donor heterogeneity and culture conditions impact the therapeutic efficacy of MSC populations for different disease indications.

  16. A Clinical Indications Prediction Scale Based on TWIST1 for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boregowda, Siddaraju V; Krishnappa, Veena; Haga, Christopher L; Ortiz, Luis A; Phinney, Donald G

    2016-02-01

    In addition to their stem/progenitor properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) also exhibit potent effector (angiogenic, antiinflammatory, immuno-modulatory) functions that are largely paracrine in nature. It is widely believed that effector functions underlie most of the therapeutic potential of MSCs and are independent of their stem/progenitor properties. Here we demonstrate that stem/progenitor and effector functions are coordinately regulated at the cellular level by the transcription factor Twist1 and specified within populations according to a hierarchical model. We further show that manipulation of Twist1 levels by genetic approaches or by exposure to widely used culture supplements including fibroblast growth factor 2 (Ffg2) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) alters MSC efficacy in cell-based and in vivo assays in a predictable manner. Thus, by mechanistically linking stem/progenitor and effector functions our studies provide a unifying framework in the form of an MSC hierarchy that models the functional complexity of populations. Using this framework, we developed a CLinical Indications Prediction (CLIP) scale that predicts how donor-to-donor heterogeneity and culture conditions impact the therapeutic efficacy of MSC populations for different disease indications. PMID:26981553

  17. Impact of Surgical Varicocele Repair on Pregnancy Rate in Subfertile Men With Clinical Varicocele and Impaired Semen Quality: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Joo Yong; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Hyungmin; Seo, Ju Tae; Cho, Kang Su

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the impact of surgical varicocele repair on the pregnancy rate through new meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials that compared surgical varicocele repair and observation. Materials and Methods The PubMed and Embase online databases were searched for studies released before December 2012. References were manually reviewed, and two researchers independently extracted the data. To assess the quality of the studies, the Cochrane risk of bias as a quality assessment tool...

  18. The Scale for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of Gifted and Talented Students: Study of Factor Structure, Reliability and Validity

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Feyzullah

    2014-01-01

    Th is study aims to develop a nomination scale that helps primary class teachers assessthe possible gift ed and talented students in their classes with their behavioral characteristics.Within this scope, validity check and reliability analysis studies were done.Th e study was fulfi lled based on descriptive survey model. As a result of the validitycheck of the Scale for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of the Gift ed and TalentedStudents (SRBCGTS), it was realized that the gift ed and ta...

  19. Brief Report: A Scale for Rating Conversational Impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Jessica; Fine, Jonathan; Ginsberg, Gary; Vaccarella, Liezanne; Szatmari, Peter

    2007-01-01

    There are few well-standardized measures of conversational breakdown in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The study's objective was to develop a scale for measuring pragmatic impairments in conversations of individuals with ASD. We analyzed 46 semi-structured conversations of children and adolescents with high-functioning ASD using a functional…

  20. Type I Error Rates and Power Estimates of Selected Parametric and Nonparametric Tests of Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; Algina, James

    1987-01-01

    Estimated Type I Error rates and power are reported for the Brown-Forsythe, O'Brien, Klotz, and Siegal-Tukey procedures. The effect of aligning the data using deviations from group means or group medians is investigated. (RB)

  1. Description, evaluation and clinical decision making according to various fetal heart rate patterns. Inter-observer and regional variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O; Bøttcher, L M; Weber, Tom

    1992-01-01

    departments, especially between departments far apart. It is concluded that we still need a scientific clarification of which specific heart rate changes are the best predictors of fetal stress. Artificial intelligence programs for interpreting fetal cardiotocograms and ECG signals constitute one promising......At 10 Danish obstetrical departments, 116 residents (42 senior and 74 junior) participated in a study to assess inter-observer and regional variability in the description and evaluation of and clinical decision regarding 11 fetal heart rate patterns. The 11 traces included normal as well as...... pathological patterns, and normal as well as clinically asphyxiated babies. Five antepartum and six intrapartum patterns were included. A total of 1,276 descriptions and evaluations were obtained. The degree of agreement in description of fetal heart rate changes was high regarding the baseline and the...

  2. Resolved rate and torque control schemes for large scale space based kinematically redundant manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    1991-01-01

    Resolved rate control of kinematically redundant ground based manipulators is a challenging problem. The structural, actuator, and control loop frequency characteristics of industrial grade robots generally allow operation with resolved rate control; a rate command is achievable with good accuracy. However, space based manipulators are different, typically have less structural stiffness, more motor and joint friction, and lower control loop cycle frequencies. These undesirable characteristics present a considerable Point of Resolution (POR) control problem for space based, kinematically redundant manipulators for the following reason: a kinematically redundant manipulator requires an arbitrary constraint to solve for the joint rate commands. A space manipulator will not respond to joint rate commands because of these characteristics. A space based manipulator simulation, including free end rigid body dynamics, motor dynamics, motor striction/friction, gearbox backlash, joint striction/friction, and Space Station Remote Manipulator System type configuration parameters, is used to evaluate the performance of a documented resolved rate control law. Alternate schemes which include torque control are also evaluated.

  3. Personality and psychopathology: mapping the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales onto the Five Factor Model of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Bagby, R Michael

    2008-06-01

    The MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales (Tellegen et al., 2003) reflect a recent shift for this instrument toward the measurement of contemporary conceptualizations of psychopathology. The current investigation aimed to replicate and extend the theoretical and empirical linkage between the RC scales and dimensional models of personality and to investigate how well the RC scales conform to a higher-order structure of psychopathology. Participants were 271 psychiatric patients who had been administered the MMPI-2 and revised NEO Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1992) as part of a routine psychological evaluation. The results indicated that the RC scales map onto the Five Factor Model of personality as hypothesized and in congruence with previous findings in personality and psychopathology. The RC scales conformed to a higher-order structure of internalizing, externalizing, and thought disturbance, replicating and extending previous work concerning hierarchical structures of psychopathology. PMID:18540801

  4. Dynamic evolutionary change in post-Paleozoic echinoids and the importance of scale when interpreting changes in rates of evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Melanie J.; Smith, Andrew B.

    2015-03-01

    How ecological and morphological diversity accrues over geological time has been much debated by paleobiologists. Evidence from the fossil record suggests that many clades reach maximal diversity early in their evolutionary history, followed by a decline in evolutionary rates as ecological space fills or due to internal constraints. Here, we apply recently developed methods for estimating rates of morphological evolution during the post-Paleozoic history of a major invertebrate clade, the Echinoidea. Contrary to expectation, rates of evolution were lowest during the initial phase of diversification following the Permo-Triassic mass extinction and increased over time. Furthermore, although several subclades show high initial rates and net decreases in rates of evolution, consistent with "early bursts" of morphological diversification, at more inclusive taxonomic levels, these bursts appear as episodic peaks. Peak rates coincided with major shifts in ecological morphology, primarily associated with innovations in feeding strategies. Despite having similar numbers of species in today's oceans, regular echinoids have accrued far less morphological diversity than irregular echinoids due to lower intrinsic rates of morphological evolution and less morphological innovation, the latter indicative of constrained or bounded evolution. These results indicate that rates of evolution are extremely heterogenous through time and their interpretation depends on the temporal and taxonomic scale of analysis.

  5. Scaling and wavelet-based analyses of the long-term heart rate variability of the Eastern Oyster

    CERN Document Server

    Ritto, P A; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2004-01-01

    Characterisations of the long--term behaviour of heart rate variability in humans have emerged in the last few years as promising candidates to became clinically significant tools. We present two different statistical analyses of long time recordings of the heart rate variation in the Eastern Oyster. The circulatory system of this marine mollusk has important anatomical and physiological dissimilitudes in comparison to that of humans and it is exposed to dramatically different environmental influences. Our results resemble those previously obtained in humans. This suggests that in spite of the discrepancies, the mechanisms of long--term cardiac control on both systems share a common underlying dynamic.

  6. Influence of Growth Rate on Microstructural Length Scales in Directionally Solidified NiAl-Mo Hypo-Eutectic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfei; Ma, Xuewei; Ren, Huiping; Chen, Lin; Jin, Zili; Li, Zhenliang; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the Ni-46.1Al-7.8Mo (at.%) alloy was directionally solidified at different growth rates ranging from 15 μm/s to 1000 μm/s under a constant temperature gradient (334 K/cm). The dependence of microstructural length scales on the growth rate was investigated. The results show that, with the growth rate increasing, the primary dendritic arm spacings (PDAS) and secondary dendritic arm spacings (SDAS) decreased. There exists a large distribution range in PDAS under directional solidification conditions at a constant temperature gradient. The average PDAS and SDAS as a function of growth rate can be given as λ1 = 848.8967 V-0.4509 and λ2 = 64.2196 V-0.4140, respectively. In addition, a comparison of our results with the current theoretical models and previous experimental results has also been made.

  7. CBCL Clinical Scales Discriminate ADHD Youth with Structured-Interview Derived Diagnosis of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Joseph; Ball, Sarah W.; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Kaiser, Roselinde; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between the clinical scales of the child behavior checklist (CBCL) and the comorbid diagnosis of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a large sample of youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: The sample consisted of 101 girls and 106 boys ages 6 to 17 with ADHD. Conditional…

  8. The Appraisal of Social Concerns Scale: Psychometric Validation with a Clinical Sample of Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Luke T.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Telch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The Appraisal of Social Concerns (ASC) Scale was created by Telch et al. (2004) to improve upon existing self-report measures of social anxiety-related cognition. In a largely nonclinical sample, the ASC was found to possess three factors and was psychometrically sound. In a smaller clinical sample, the ASC demonstrated sensitivity to the effects…

  9. A comparison of a patient-rated visual analogue scale with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for social anxiety disorder: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    興津, 裕美

    2014-01-01

    博士(医学) 乙第2814号, 著者名:Hiromi Okitsu・Jitsuki Sawamura・Katsuji Nishimura・Yasuto Sato・Jun Ishigooka,タイトル:A comparison of a patient-rated visual analogue scale with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for social anxiety disorder: A cross-sectional study,掲載誌:Open Journal of Psychiatry (2161-7325),巻・頁・年:4巻1号 p.68~74 (2014),著作権関連情報:Copyright © 2014 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.,DOI:10.4236/ojpsych.2014.41010...

  10. Reduced breastfeeding rates among obese mothers: a review of contributing factors, clinical considerations and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Bever Babendure, Jennie; Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Mendias, Elnora; Moramarco, Michael W.; Davila, Yolanda R.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with significantly lower rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Increasing rates of obesity among reproductive-age women has prompted the need to carefully examine factors contributing to lower breastfeeding rates in this population. Recent research has demonstrated a significant impact of breastfeeding to reduce the risk of obesity in both mothers and their children. This article presents a review of research literature from three database...

  11. Predictors of Parent-Rated Credibility in a Clinical Psychotherapy Trial for Adolescent Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Daniel; Brent, David A.; Bridge, Jeffrey; Kolko, David; Birmaher, Boris; Baugher, Marianne

    2001-01-01

    The authors have reported that adolescents with major depressive disorder had a higher remission rate with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) than with systemic behavioral family therapy (SBFT) or nondirective supportive therapy (NST). Parent-rated treatment credibility deteriorated from baseline to end of treatment if patients were treated with SBFT or NST, compared with CBT. The present study evaluated the following variables as predictors of change in parent- rated credibility over time ac...

  12. Introducing EMMIE: An evidence rating scale to encourage mixed-method crime prevention synthesis reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, S. D.; Tilley, N.; Bowers, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This short report describes the need for, and the development of, a coding system to distil the quality and coverage of systematic reviews of the evidence relating to crime prevention interventions. The starting point for the coding system concerns the evidence needs of policymakers and practitioners. Methods The coding scheme (EMMIE) proposed builds on previous scales that have been developed to assess the probity, coverage and utility of evidence both in health and criminal justi...

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life in Parkinson disease: Correlation between Health Utilities Index III and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS in U.S. male veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiner-Fisman Galit

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To apply a scaled, preference-based measure to the evaluation of health-related quality of life (HRQoL in Parkinson's disease (PD; to evaluate the relationship between disease-specific rating scales and estimated HRQoL; and to identify predictors of diminished HRQoL. Background Scaled, preference-based measures of HRQoL ("utilities" serve as indices of impact of disease, and can be used to generate quality-adjusted estimates of survival for health-economic evaluations. Evaluation of utilities for PD and their correlation with standard rating scales have been limited. Methods Utilities were generated using the Health Utilities Index Mark III (HUI-III on consecutive patients attending a PD Clinic between October 2003 and June 2006. Disease severity, medical, surgical (subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS, and demographic information were used as model covariates. Predictors of HUI-III utility scores were evaluated using the Wilxocon rank-sum test and linear regression models. Results 68 men with a diagnosis of PD and a mean age of 74.0 (SD 7.4 were included in the data analysis. Mean HUI-III utility at first visit was 0.45 (SD 0.33. In multivariable models, UPDRS-II score (r2 = 0.56, P Conclusions Poor self-care in PD reflected by worsening UPDRS-II scores is strongly correlated with low generic HRQoL. HUI-III-based health utilities display convergent validity with the UPDRS-II. These findings highlight the importance of measures of independence as determinants of HRQoL in PD, and will facilitate the utilization of existing UPDRS data into economic analyses of PD therapies.

  14. Mapping the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales Onto Mood Markers in an Israeli Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkalim, Eleanor; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Almagor, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    This study cross-culturally evaluated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2/MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF) emotion-focused Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales to examine whether their patterns of associations with positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) are as expected based on Tellegen, Watson, and Clark's ( 1999a , 1999b ) mood model. The sample was composed of 100 men and 133 women from psychiatric settings in Israel who completed the MMPI-2 and the Mood Check List (MCL; Zevon & Tellegen, 1982 ). Results indicated that RCd was substantially correlated with both PA and NA in opposite directions, and that RC2 and RC7 were more highly correlated with PA and NA, respectively. Further, when compared with their Clinical Scale counterparts, RC2 and RC7 exhibited comparable convergent validities and improved discriminant properties. Findings provide support for Tellegen et al.'s ( 2003 ) goal to link the RC scales to contemporary conceptualizations of mood. PMID:26960114

  15. Using cosmogenic isotopes to measure basin-scale rates of erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a new and different approach to interpreting the abundance of in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides such as 36Cl, 26Al, and 10Be. Unlike most existing models, which are appropriate for evaluating isotope concentrations on bedrock surfaces, this model can be used to interpret isotope concentration in fluvial sediment. Because sediment is a mixture of material derived from the entire drainage basin, measured isotope abundances can be used to estimate spatially-averaged rates of erosion and sediment transport. Their approach has the potential to provide geomorphologists with a relatively simple but powerful means by which to constrain rates of landscape evolution. The model considers the flux of cosmogenic isotopes into and out of various reservoirs. Implicit in model development are the assumptions that a geomorphic steady-state has been reached and that sampled sediment is spatially and temporally representative of all sediment leaving the basin. Each year, the impinging cosmic-ray flux produces a certain quantity of cosmogenic isotopes in the rock and soil of a drainage basin. For a basin in steady state, the outgoing isotope flux is also constant. They solve for the rate of mass loss as a function of isotope abundance in the sediment, the cosmic ray attenuation length, the isotope half life, and the effective isotope production rate. There are only a few published measurements of cosmogenic isotope abundance in sediment. They calculated model denudation rates for sediment samples from Zaire and central Texas. The denudation rates they calculated appear reasonable and are similar to those they have measured directly on granite landforms in Georgia and southeastern California and those calculated for the Appalachian Piedmont

  16. Tau energy scale and $\\mu \\rightarrow \\tau$ misidentification rate estimated with early 2016 data using Z events.

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents results of the tau energy scale ($\\tau$~ES) measured using $\\mathrm{Z\\rightarrow \\tau_{\\mu} \\tau_{h}}$, and $\\mu \\rightarrow \\tau$ misidentification rate measured using $\\mathrm{Z\\rightarrow \\mu \\mu}$. Both measurements were made with 6.3 fb$^{-1}$ of pp data at $\\mathrm{\\sqrt{s}} = 13$~TeV collected by the CMS detector in first half of 2016.

  17. WebCIS: large scale deployment of a Web-based clinical information system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hripcsak, G.; Cimino, J. J.; Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    WebCIS is a Web-based clinical information system. It sits atop the existing Columbia University clinical information system architecture, which includes a clinical repository, the Medical Entities Dictionary, an HL7 interface engine, and an Arden Syntax based clinical event monitor. WebCIS security features include authentication with secure tokens, authorization maintained in an LDAP server, SSL encryption, permanent audit logs, and application time outs. WebCIS is currently used by 810 phy...

  18. Social Responsiveness Scale-aided analysis of the clinical impact of copy number variations in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Daalen, Emma; Kemner, Chantal; Verbeek, Nienke E; van der Zwaag, Bert; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Rump, Patrick; Houben, Renske; van 't Slot, Ruben; de Jonge, Maretha V; Staal, Wouter G; Beemer, Frits A; Vorstman, Jacob A S; Burbach, J Peter H; van Amstel, Hans Kristian Ploos; Hochstenbach, Ron; Brilstra, Eva H; Poot, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Recent array-based studies have detected a wealth of copy number variations (CNVs) in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Since CNVs also occur in healthy individuals, their contributions to the patient's phenotype remain largely unclear. In a cohort of children with symptoms of ASD, diagnosis of the index patient using ADOS-G and ADI-R was performed, and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) was administered to the index patients, both parents, and all available siblings. CNVs were identified using SNP arrays and confirmed by FISH or array CGH. To evaluate the clinical significance of CNVs, we analyzed three families with multiple affected children (multiplex) and six families with a single affected child (simplex) in which at least one child carried a CNV with a brain-transcribed gene. CNVs containing genes that participate in pathways previously implicated in ASD, such as the phosphoinositol signaling pathway (PIK3CA, GIRDIN), contactin-based networks of cell communication (CNTN6), and microcephalin (MCPH1) were found not to co-segregate with ASD phenotypes. In one family, a loss of CNTN5 co-segregated with disease. This indicates that most CNVs may by themselves not be sufficient to cause ASD, but still may contribute to the phenotype by additive or epistatic interactions with inherited (transmitted) mutations or non-genetic factors. Our study extends the scope of genome-wide CNV profiling beyond de novo CNVs in sporadic patients and may aid in uncovering missing heritability in genome-wide screening studies of complex psychiatric disorders. PMID:21837366

  19. Correlates of Honor Rating In a Clinical Clerkship Employing a Faculty Forum Evaluation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaRosa, Debra A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A relationship was found between a surgery clerk's chances of receiving an honor rating and level of student advocacy, number of completed patient interview and physical examination write-ups, and examination scores. Several less relevant variables had no relationship with honor ratings, lending support to the faculty forum evaluation approach.…

  20. Impact of Verbal Scale Labels on the Elevation and Spread of Performance Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlemeier, Hans; Hemker, Bas; van den Bergh, Huub

    2013-01-01

    In recent years many countries have introduced authentic performance-based assessments in their national exam systems. Teachers' ratings of their own candidates' performances may suffer from errors of leniency and range restriction. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of manipulating the descriptiveness, balancedness, and polarity of…

  1. Variance in population firing rate as a measure of slow time-scale correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Snyder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Correlated variability in the spiking responses of pairs of neurons, also known as spike count correlation, is a key indicator of functional connectivity and a critical factor in population coding. Underscoring the importance of correlation as a measure for cognitive neuroscience research is the observation that spike count correlations are not fixed, but are rather modulated by perceptual and cognitive context. Yet while this context fluctuates from moment to moment, correlation must be calculated over multiple trials. This property undermines its utility as a dependent measure for investigations of cognitive processes which fluctuate on a trial-to-trial basis, such as selective attention. A measure of functional connectivity that can be assayed on a moment-to-moment basis is needed to investigate the single-trial dynamics of populations of spiking neurons. Here, we introduce the measure of population variance in normalized firing rate for this goal. We show using mathematical analysis, computer simulations and in vivo data how population variance in normalized firing rate is inversely related to the latent correlation in the population, and how this measure can be used to reliably classify trials from different typical correlation conditions, even when firing rate is held constant. We discuss the potential advantages for using population variance in normalized firing rate as a dependent measure for both basic and applied neuroscience research.

  2. Heart rate variability measurement and clinical depression in acute coronary syndrome patients: narrative review of recent literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris PR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patricia RE Harris,1 Claire E Sommargren,2 Phyllis K Stein,3 Gordon L Fung,4,5 Barbara J Drew6,7 1ECG Monitoring Research Lab, 2Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Heart Rate Variability Laboratory, School of Medicine, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA; 4Asian Heart & Vascular Center at Mount Zion, Division of Cardiology, University of California, 5Cardiology Consultation Service, Cardiac Noninvasive Laboratory, and The Enhanced External Counterpulsation Unit, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, 6Division of Cardiology, 7Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Aim: We aimed to explore links between heart rate variability (HRV and clinical depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, through a review of recent clinical research literature. Background: Patients with ACS are at risk for both cardiac autonomic dysfunction and clinical depression. Both conditions can negatively impact the ability to recover from an acute physiological insult, such as unstable angina or myocardial infarction, increasing the risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes. HRV is recognized as a reflection of autonomic function. Methods: A narrative review was undertaken to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical research, using the PubMed database, January 2013. The search terms “heart rate variability” and “depression” were used in conjunction with “acute coronary syndrome”, “unstable angina”, or “myocardial infarction” to find clinical studies published within the past 10 years related to HRV and clinical depression, in patients with an ACS episode. Studies were included if HRV measurement and depression screening were undertaken during an ACS hospitalization or within 2 months of hospital discharge. Results: Nine clinical studies met the inclusion criteria. The

  3. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable planning of erosion control measures in the Central Andes requires robust knowledge about natural denudation rates. We explore a large dataset combining new and published 10Be (and 26Al) catchment-wide denudation rates from a swath at 17 to 19° S spanning the Western Cordillera that rises from sea level to 5500 m elevation; the Altiplano at ~4000 m; the Eastern Cordillera with elevations up to 6500 m; the Interandean Zone; the Subandean Zone; and the Chaco Plain at 300 m. The selected catchments span a large spread regarding morphometric and climate properties where mean slope angles range from 1 to 31°, and mean precipitation from 100 to 3900 mm/a. The denudation rates (0.0036 to 1.93 mm/a) are averaged over millennia, and reveal two to three magnitudes difference across the Central Andes. The regional distribution of denudation rates clearly demonstrates a more complex interaction of geomorphological, geological and meteorological parameters with the dominant geomorphological processes. In order to elucidate the key controls on denudation, we use multivariate statistics such as principal component analysis in order to remove potentially redundant predictors of denudation in the studied catchments. These predictors include catchment elevation, topographic relief, hillslope inclination, mean precipitation, tree cover, specific stream power, channel steepness indices, sinuosity, drainage density and hypsometric index that we derived from the SRTM 90 m Digital Elevation Database, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and the Terra MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields dataset. Additionally, the rock strength index (PLI) was estimated based on geological units. Preliminary results allow distinguishing five different longitudinal domains of denudation on the basis of climatic regime, hillslope steepness, and the degree of accumulated crustal deformation. We find that the pattern of 10Be catchment-wide denudation rates in the Central Andes

  4. Objectifying Acupuncture Effects by Lung Function and Numeric Rating Scale in Patients Undergoing Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maimer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Poststernotomy pain and impaired breathing are common clinical problems in early postoperative care following heart surgery. Insufficiently treated pain increases the risk of pulmonary complications. High-dose opioids are used for pain management, but they may cause side effects such as respiratory depression. Study Design. We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled, observer-blinded, three-armed clinical trial with 100 patients. Group 1 (n=33 and Group 2 (n=34 received one 20 min session of standardized acupuncture treatment with two different sets of acupoints. Group 3 (n=33 served as standard analgesia control without additional intervention. Results. Primary endpoint analysis revealed a statistically significant analgesic effect for both acupuncture treatments. Group 1 showed a mean percentile pain reduction (PPR of 18% (SD 19, P<0.001. Group 2 yielded a mean PPR of 71% (SD 13, P<0.001. In Group 1, acupuncture resulted in a mean forced vital capacity (FVC increase of 30 cm3 (SD 73 without statistical significance (P=0.303. In Group 2, posttreatment FVC showed a significant increase of 306 cm3 (SD 215, P<0.001. Conclusion. Acupuncture revealed specific analgesic effects after sternotomy. Objective measurement of poststernotomy pain via lung function test was possible.

  5. Decrease in the rate of sensitization and clinical allergy to natural rubber latex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Michelle S B; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the 1980s, a striking increase in natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy was seen. Since then, many measures have been taken to prevent NRL allergy. OBJECTIVES: To investigate changes in the prevalence of NRL sensitization/clinical NRL allergy over time from 2002 to 2013. METHODS: All...

  6. Scaling of the rupture dynamics of polymer chains pulled at one end at a constant rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugmann, S; Sokolov, I M

    2009-02-01

    We consider the rupture dynamics of a homopolymer chain pulled at one end at a constant loading rate r . Compared to single bond breaking, the existence of the chain introduces two aspects into rupture dynamics: The non-Markovian aspect in the barrier crossing and the slow down of the force propagation to the breakable bond. The relative impact of both these processes is investigated, and the second one was found to be the most important at moderate loading rates. The most probable rupture force is found to decrease with the number of bonds as f{max} proportional, variant-[ln(const N/r)]2/3 and finally to approach a saturation value independent on N . All of our analytical findings are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations. PMID:19391768

  7. Scaling of metabolic rate on body mass in small mammals at 2.0 g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Smith, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    It is postulated that augmentation of gravitational loading should produce a shift in the classic Kleiber mammalian allometric relationship between metabolic rate and total body mass by an increase in both these parameters. Oxygen consumption rate and body mass measurements of 10 male rabbits 8 months of age were obtained initially for 1.0 g, and then over a 9-week period of chronic centrifugation at 2.0 g. Analysis of covariance showed that the positioning constant at 2.0 g is increased by 17 percent from that at 1.0 g at the P less than 0.001 level, and the exponent is increased by 8 percent at the P = 0.008 level. It is concluded that abatement of gravitational loading in spaceflight will result in a lowering of both allometric parameters.

  8. Methodology to assess the maximum irrigation rates at regional scale using geostatistics and GIS

    OpenAIRE

    Paz Bécares, José Miguel de; Albert, C; Visconti Reluy, Fernando; Jiménez, G; Ingelmo Sánchez, Florencio; M. J. Molina; Sánchez, J.

    2012-01-01

    Soil water holding capacity is an important parameter for irrigation scheduling and water balance modelling in fields. In the framework of precision irrigation the knowledge of the spatial distribution of this parameter is useful to advice the maximum irrigation rate specifically for each field in an irrigation district, region, etc. The soil water holding capacity (SWHC) can be assessed as the soil water content between the field capacity (FC) and the permanent wilting point (PWP). In this w...

  9. Scaling properties of rainfall and their impact on rain rate estimation from weather radar

    OpenAIRE

    Verrier, Sébastien; Barthès, Laurent; Mallet, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    International audience In this paper we consider an alternative approach based on the measurements of a Dual-Beam Spectropluviometer (DBS), in Palaiseau (France). This instrument, described elsewhere (Verrier et al., 2011), provides measurements of diameter, fall speed and time of arrival of raindrops. The latter data can therefore be used to compute simultaneous rain rates and reflectivity factors that can be compared without instrument-to-instrument discrepancy.

  10. Bulimia and anorexia nervosa in winter depression: lifetime rates in a clinical sample.

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, N P; Dilsaver, S C

    1996-01-01

    Symptoms of an eating disorder (hyperphagia, carbohydrate craving, and weight gain) are characteristic of wintertime depression. Recent findings suggest that the severity of bulimia nervosa peaks during fall and winter months, and that persons with this disorder respond to treatment with bright artificial light. However, the rates of eating disorders among patients presenting for the treatment of winter depression are unknown. This study was undertaken to determine these rates among 47 patien...

  11. Disagreements in meta-analyses using outcomes measured on continuous or rating scales: observer agreement study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendal, Britta; Higgins, Julian P T; Jüni, Peter; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Trelle, Sven; Nüesch, Eveline; Wandel, Simon; Jørgensen, Anders W; Gesser, Katarina Margareta; Ilsøe-Kristensen, Søren; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    differed less than 0.1 in their point estimates or confidence intervals. RESULTS: The agreement was 53% at trial level and 31% at meta-analysis level. Including all pairs, the median disagreement was SMD=0.22 (interquartile range 0.07-0.61). The experts agreed somewhat more than the PhD students at trial...... the reviews but to the protocols, where the relevant outcome was highlighted. The agreement was analysed at both trial and meta-analysis level, pairing the observers in all possible ways (45 pairs, yielding 2025 pairs of trials and 450 pairs of meta-analyses). Agreement was defined as SMDs that...... level (61% v 46%), but not at meta-analysis level. Important reasons for disagreement were differences in selection of time points, scales, control groups, and type of calculations; whether to include a trial in the meta-analysis; and data extraction errors made by the observers. In 14 out of the 100...

  12. Complication rate of posterior capsule rupture with vitreous loss during phacoemulsification at a Hawaiian cataract surgical center: a clinical audit

    OpenAIRE

    Chen M; LaMattina KC; Patrianakos T; Dwarakanathan S

    2014-01-01

    Ming Chen,1 Kara C LaMattina,2 Thomas Patrianakos,2 Surendar Dwarakanathan2 1Department of Surgery, Division of Ophthalmology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA; 2Division of Ophthalmology, John H Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL, USA Purpose: To compare the complication rate of posterior capsule rupture (PCR) with vitreous loss during phacoemulsification at an ambulatory surgical center with published results as a clinical audit for quality control. Methods: A retrospe...

  13. Post-Exercise Heart Rate Recovery Independently Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye Sun; Choi, Suk-Won; Han, Seong-Woo; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kang, Seok-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) is an index of parasympathetic function associated with clinical outcome in patients with chronic heart failure. However, its relationship with the pro-inflammatory response and prognostic value in consecutive patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has not been investigated. Methods We measured HRR and pro-inflammatory markers in 107 prospectively and consecutively enrolled, recovered ADHF patients (71 male, 59 ± 15 years, mea...

  14. Clinical Variables Affecting The Pregnancy Rate of Intracervical Insemination Using Cryopreserved Donor Spermatozoa: A Retrospective Study in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Jun Chen; Li-Ping Wu; Hai-Lian Lan; Li Zhang; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether several clinical variables can affect the pregnancy rate of intracervical insemination (ICI) using cryopreserved donor spermatozoa. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, age, years of infertility, cervicitis, urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) surge, insemination number, uterus position, endometrial thickness and morphology, maximal follicle diameter, and the number of dominant follicles on the day of human chorionic gon...

  15. Investigation of 360-degree instrumentation effects: application of the Rasch rating scale model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulas, John T; Hannum, Kelly M

    2007-01-01

    Performance appraisals have been frequently investigated for inaccuracies attributable to raters. In addition to rater contributions, problems in measurement can arise from properties of instrumentation. If administered items do not parallel the full range of employee performance, a restriction of range can occur. Here employees are rated similarly (no distinction made) not because of rater error, but because of an instrument floor or ceiling effect. A RASCH measurement procedure was applied to a 360-degree dataset in order to uncover potential instrumentation effects. A similar magnitude ceiling effect was found across rater categories. It is recommended that performance appraisal practitioners consider including items of greater difficulty in their criterion measures. PMID:18250526

  16. Power scaling of supercontinuum seeded megahertz-repetition rate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, R; Stephanides, A; Prandolini, M J; Gronloh, B; Jungbluth, B; Mans, T; Tavella, F

    2014-03-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers with high average power are possible with novel high-power Yb:YAG amplifiers with kW-level output powers. We demonstrate a compact wavelength-tunable sub-30-fs amplifier with 11.4 W average power with 20.7% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency. For parametric amplification, a beta-barium borate crystal is pumped by a 140 W, 1 ps Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier at 3.25 MHz repetition rate. The broadband seed is generated via supercontinuum generation in a YAG crystal. PMID:24690803

  17. A new radioisotope method of measuring flow rate of aqueous humour in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first clinical experiences are described with measurements of the intraocular fluid flow by means of contactly applied 22NaCl and external gamma rays detectors. In various types of glaucoma considerable differences in the speed of the intraocular fluid outflow have been observed. Half-time of outflow in open angle glaucoma was significantly prolonged in corellation with the increasing age of patients. Half-time of the outflow was markedly accelerated after the performed fistulizing antiglaucomatous operations. (author)

  18. Simultaneous estimation of local- and flowpath-scale rate-limited mass transfer parameters using electrical-resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Ong, J. B.; Lane, J. W.; Curtis, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    In the presence of rate-limited mass transfer (RLMT), conventional chemical sampling of the subsurface preferentially pulls pore water from the mobile domain. Therefore, the characteristics of the immobile domain must be inferred from the mobile tracer signal, which is modified with transport and immobile exchange over a representative length. Because conventional chemical data are not directly sensitive to the immobile zone, this representative length must be sufficient to allow enough exchange between the two domains to inform immobile parameter estimation (e.g., optimal Damkohler range). Flowpath "averaged" RLMT parameters may not well describe the true field variability in the immobile domain size and exchange coefficient, parameters which control the retention and subsequent long-term release of contaminants. In contrast, bulk electrical conductivity is sensitive to the volume-weighted ionic tracer concentration in both the mobile and immobile domains. When co-located bulk conductivity and fluid conductivity are analyzed concurrently, estimates can be obtained for (1) effective RLMT parameters averaged along the upgradient flowpath and (2) local-scale RLMT parameters for the volume from which chemical samples and electrical measurements are taken. Here, we use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), for the first time, to discriminate and identify effective flowpath and local-scale RLMT parameters, informing the true spatial variability in mass transfer. We apply this technique at the field scale at a uranium contamination site in Naturita, Colorado, USA. Inverse modeling was used to optimize parameter estimates to best simulate both the observed bulk and fluid conductivity, and objectively determine parameter sensitivity, correlation, and confidence. Local RLMT parameters were found to be most sensitive to changes in bulk conductivity, while effective flowpath parameters were most sensitive to changes in fluid conductivity. Observed non-linear hysteresis

  19. On measurements and their quality. Paper 4: verbal anchors and the number of response options in rating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W

    2014-05-01

    This is the last in a short series of papers on measurement theory and practice with particular relevance to intervention research in nursing, midwifery, and healthcare. Understanding how it is that people respond to the questions posed by researchers is fundamental to progress in the social and health sciences. For decades methodologists in psychology, marketing, education, and survey research have studied this issue. In this paper I review this diverse empirical literature to synthesize basic principles for creating rating scales which can reduce measurement error and increase the quality of resulting data. After introducing a theoretical framework known as the cognitive aspects of survey methods (CASM), I review the fundamentals of psychological scaling theory and discuss how it has been used to study the meanings of verbal response options and provide an illustration of how the quality of measurements may be influenced by our choice of the verbal phrases we present as response options. Next, I review the research on the optimal number of response options to use in various measurement situations and how verbal and numeric anchors can combine to influence data quality. Finally, I summarize the issues covered and present recommendations for best practice when creating and using rating scales in research. PMID:24125584

  20. Investigating self-esteem in individuals with schizophrenia: relevance of the Self-Esteem Rating Scale-Short Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc; Laisné, François

    2006-06-30

    Studies investigating self-esteem in individuals with severe mental illness, either as a treatment goal, outcome or correlate to other variables, have increased over the past few years. One of the main difficulties in assessing self-esteem is the assessment itself, often measuring global and stable self-esteem as in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, or requiring extensive training and long interviews. The present article aims at demonstrating the relevance of the French and English versions of the Self-Esteem Rating Scale-Short Form with individuals with severe mental illness. The instrument's reliability and validity were investigated in a sample of 250 French Canadian college students, 247 British college students and three samples of English- or French-speaking individuals with severe mental illness (N=254, N=150 and N=171). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that a shorter version of the instrument (20 items), with a positive and a negative self-esteem factor, had a great validity for all the samples studied. The Self-Esteem Rating Scale-Short Form, with its positive and negative self-esteem subscales, appears to be a valid and reliable self-esteem measure for individuals with mental health problems. Limitations of this study and future directions are discussed. PMID:16725210

  1. Effect of Heterogeneous Transmission Rate on Epidemic Spreading Over Scale Free Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sagar, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    In the present work the spread of epidemic is studied over complex networks which are characterized by power law degree distribution of links and heterogeneous rate of disease transmission. The random allocation of epidemic transmission rates to the nodes results in the heterogeneity, which in turn causes the segregation of nodes in terms of various sub populations. The aim of the study is to gain microscopic insight into the effect of interactions among various sub populations in the spreading processes of disease over such networks. The discrete time Markov chain method based upon the susceptible infected susceptible (SIS) model of diseases transmission has been used to describe the spreading of epidemic over the networks. The study is parameterized in terms of variable $\\lambda$, defined as the number of contacts a node makes with the fraction of its neighboring nodes. From the simulation results, it is found that the spread of epidemic on such networks is critical in terms of number of minimum contacts ma...

  2. Saw-Scaled Viper Bites in Sri Lanka: Is It a Different Subspecies? Clinical Evidence from an Authenticated Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanathasan, Ariaranee; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Peranantharajah, Thambipillai; Coonghe, Anthonia

    2012-01-01

    The saw-scaled viper (SSV) (Echis carinatus) is considered to be a highly venomous snake in Sri Lanka despite any published clinical justification. Being a rarity, the clinical profile of SSV bites is not well established in Sri Lanka. We report a series of 48 (n-48) SSV bites from the Northern Province of Sri Lanka. The majority (65%) of victims had evidence of local envenoming at the site of the bite; however, 29% showed spontaneous bleeding and 71% had coagulopathy. There were no deaths in...

  3. Concordance between DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for delirium diagnosis in a pooled database of 768 prospectively evaluated patients using the delirium rating scale-revised-98

    OpenAIRE

    Meagher, David; Morandi, Alessandro; Inouye, Sharon K.; Ely, Wes; Adamis, Dimitrios; Maclullich, Alasdair J; Rudolph, James L; Neufeld, Karin; Leonard, Maeve; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Davis, Daniel; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Kreisel, Stefan; Thomas, Christine; Hasemann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5) provides new criteria for delirium diagnosis. We examined delirium diagnosis using these new criteria compared with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fourth edition (DSM-IV) in a large dataset of patients assessed for delirium and related presentations. Methods: Patient data (n = 768) from six prospectively collected cohorts, clinically assessed using DSM-IV and the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R98), were poo...

  4. Estimating the optimal radiotherapy utilisation rate based on clinical guidelines and best available evidence and comparing it to current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has previously been suggested that approximately 50% of all cancer patients should receive radiation. However, this estimate is not evidence-based. To estimate the ideal proportion of new cases of cancer that should receive external beam radiotherapy at least once during the course of their illness based on the best available evidence, and develop a model of radiotherapy utilisation that is useful for future changes in cancer incidence, stage at presentation and indications for radiotherapy. A systematic review of international guidelines on the treatment of cancers of the specific tumour-sites was undertaken. An optimal radiotherapy utilisation tree was constructed, depicting the indications for radiotherapy at various stages of cancer. The proportion of patients with clinical attributes that indicated a benefit from radiotherapy was obtained by inserting epidemiological data into the radiotherapy utilisation tree. The optimal proportion of patients with cancer that should receive radiotherapy was then calculated using TreeAge software The proportion of cancer patients in whom external beam radiotherapy is indicated was calculated to be 53% of all cancer. This estimate includes the following recommended optimal radiotherapy utilisation rates for the commonest cancers - breast 83%, lung 76%, prostate 60%, rectum 61%, melanoma 23% and gynaecological cancer 31%. Ideal utilisation rates for each cancer were compared with the published utilisation rates of radiotherapy in Australia and internationally over the last decade. Significant differences were found between the evidence-based recommended radiotherapy utilisation rate and the actual rates reported in clinical practice particularly for rectal and prostate cancer. This methodology allows comparison of optimal rates with actual rates to identify areas where improvements in the evidence-based use of radiotherapy can be made and provides valuable data for radiotherapy service planning

  5. Clinical use of estimated glomerular filtration rate for evaluation of kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Bo; Lindhardt, Morten; Rossing, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Estimating glomerular filtration rate by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formulas gives a reasonable estimate of kidney function for e.g. classification of chronic kidney disease. Additionally the estimated glomerular filtration rate...... is a significant predictor for cardiovascular disease and may along with classical cardiovascular risk factors add useful information to risk estimation. Several cautions need to be taken into account, e.g. rapid changes in kidney function, dialysis, high age, obesity, underweight and diverging and unanticipated...

  6. Development and validation of the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS) in a community sample and individuals with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Quilty, Lena C; Sproule, Beth A; Cyriac, Anna; Michael Bagby, R; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2015-09-30

    Anhedonia, a core symptom of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), is predictive of antidepressant non-response. In contrast to the definition of anhedonia as a "loss of pleasure", neuropsychological studies provide evidence for multiple facets of hedonic function. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS), a dynamic scale that measures desire, motivation, effort and consummatory pleasure across hedonic domains. Following item selection procedures and reliability testing using data from community participants (N=229) (Study 1), the 17-item scale was validated in an online study with community participants (N=150) (Study 2). The DARS was also validated in unipolar or bipolar depressed patients (n=52) and controls (n=50) (Study 3). Principal components analysis of the 17-item DARS revealed a 4-component structure mapping onto the domains of anhedonia: hobbies, food/drink, social activities, and sensory experience. Reliability of the DARS subscales was high across studies (Cronbach's α=0.75-0.92). The DARS also demonstrated good convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed the DARS showed additional utility over the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in predicting reward function and distinguishing MDD subgroups. These studies provide support for the reliability and validity of the DARS. PMID:26250147

  7. Probing f(R cosmology with sterile neutrinos via measurements of scale-dependent growth rate of structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-He Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we constrain the dimensionless Compton wavelength parameter B0 of f(R gravity as well as the mass of sterile neutrino by using the cosmic microwave background observations, the baryon acoustic oscillation surveys, and the linear growth rate measurements. Since both the f(R model and the sterile neutrino generally predict scale-dependent growth rates, we utilize the growth rate data measured in different wavenumber bins with the theoretical growth rate approximatively scale-independent in each bin. The employed growth rate data come from the peculiar velocity measurements at z=0 in five wavenumber bins, and the redshift space distortions measurements at z=0.25 and z=0.37 in one wavenumber bin. By constraining the f(R model alone, we get a tight 95% upper limit of log10⁡B0<−4.1. This result is slightly weakened to log10⁡B0<−3.8 (at 2σ level once we simultaneously constrain the f(R model and the sterile neutrino mass, due to the degeneracy between the parameters of the two. For the massive sterile neutrino parameters, we get the effective sterile neutrino mass mν,sterileeff<0.62 eV (2σ and the effective number of relativistic species Neff<3.90 (2σ in the f(R model. As a comparison, we also obtain mν,sterileeff<0.56 eV (2σ and Neff<3.92 (2σ in the standard ΛCDM model.

  8. MM-MDS: a multidimensional scaling database with similarity ratings for 240 object categories from the Massive Memory picture database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hout, Michael C; Goldinger, Stephen D; Brady, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive theories in visual attention and perception, categorization, and memory often critically rely on concepts of similarity among objects, and empirically require measures of "sameness" among their stimuli. For instance, a researcher may require similarity estimates among multiple exemplars of a target category in visual search, or targets and lures in recognition memory. Quantifying similarity, however, is challenging when everyday items are the desired stimulus set, particularly when researchers require several different pictures from the same category. In this article, we document a new multidimensional scaling database with similarity ratings for 240 categories, each containing color photographs of 16-17 exemplar objects. We collected similarity ratings using the spatial arrangement method. Reports include: the multidimensional scaling solutions for each category, up to five dimensions, stress and fit measures, coordinate locations for each stimulus, and two new classifications. For each picture, we categorized the item's prototypicality, indexed by its proximity to other items in the space. We also classified pairs of images along a continuum of similarity, by assessing the overall arrangement of each MDS space. These similarity ratings will be useful to any researcher that wishes to control the similarity of experimental stimuli according to an objective quantification of "sameness." PMID:25390369

  9. MM-MDS: a multidimensional scaling database with similarity ratings for 240 object categories from the Massive Memory picture database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Hout

    Full Text Available Cognitive theories in visual attention and perception, categorization, and memory often critically rely on concepts of similarity among objects, and empirically require measures of "sameness" among their stimuli. For instance, a researcher may require similarity estimates among multiple exemplars of a target category in visual search, or targets and lures in recognition memory. Quantifying similarity, however, is challenging when everyday items are the desired stimulus set, particularly when researchers require several different pictures from the same category. In this article, we document a new multidimensional scaling database with similarity ratings for 240 categories, each containing color photographs of 16-17 exemplar objects. We collected similarity ratings using the spatial arrangement method. Reports include: the multidimensional scaling solutions for each category, up to five dimensions, stress and fit measures, coordinate locations for each stimulus, and two new classifications. For each picture, we categorized the item's prototypicality, indexed by its proximity to other items in the space. We also classified pairs of images along a continuum of similarity, by assessing the overall arrangement of each MDS space. These similarity ratings will be useful to any researcher that wishes to control the similarity of experimental stimuli according to an objective quantification of "sameness."

  10. Using the Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC) and Childhood Autism Rating Scales (CARS) to Predict Long Term Outcomes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nah, Yong-Hwee; Young, Robyn L.; Brewer, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive validity of the Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC; Young, Autism detection in early childhood: ADEC. Australian Council of Educational Research, Camberwell, VIC 2007) and a well-established screening tool, the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS; Schopler et al. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS).…

  11. High Rate of Resistance to Quinupristin-Dalfopristin in Enterococcus faecium Clinical Isolates from Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Won Sup; Ko, Kwan Soo; Song, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Mi Young; Park, Sulhee; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Choon-Kwan; Lee, Hyuck; Kim, Shin-Woo; Chang, Hyun-Ha; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Jung, Sook-In; Son, Jun Seong; Yeom, Joon-Sup

    2005-01-01

    We tested the in vitro susceptibilities of 603 enterococcal isolates from eight tertiary-care hospitals in Korea. The quinupristin-dalfopristin resistance rate in Enterococcus faecium was very high (25 isolates, 10.0%). It was suggested that both clonal spread and the sporadic emergence of quinupristin-dalfopristin-resistant isolates may explain the high prevalence of quinupristin-dalfopristin resistance in Korea.

  12. Heart Rate as a Covergent Measure in Clinical and Developmental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, L. Alan; Waters, Everett

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the utility of heart rate recordings in several areas of research: (1) construct validation, (2) determination of the functional or adaptive significance of behaviors, (3) observation and hypothesis generation, and (4) assessment of process and outcome in the treatment of artistic children. (Author/SB)

  13. Measurement scales in clinical research of the upper extremity, part 2: outcome measures in studies of the hand/wrist and shoulder/elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalamente, Marie; Coffelt, Laureen; Elfar, John; Gaston, Glenn; Hammert, Warren; Huang, Jerry; Lattanza, Lisa; Macdermid, Joy; Merrell, Greg; Netscher, David; Panthaki, Zubin; Rafijah, Greg; Trczinski, Douglas; Graham, Brent

    2013-02-01

    Part 1 of this article outlined the basic characteristics of useful clinical measurement instruments and described scales used to measure general health, pain, and patient satisfaction. Part 2 describes the features of some of the scales most commonly used in clinical research in the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder. PMID:23351913

  14. Satisfacción de las mujeres con la experiencia del parto: validación de la Mackey Satisfaction Childbirth Rating Scale Women's satisfaction with the experience of childbirth: validation of the Mackey Childbirth Satisfaction Rating Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mas-Pons

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la fiabilidad y validez de contenido y concepto de la Mackey Childbirth Satisfaction Rating Scale, escala para medir la satisfacción de las mujeres con el parto y el nacimiento. Métodos: Se utilizó el método de traducción-retrotraducción para obtener una versión adaptada de la escala. Para la validación se seleccionó una muestra de 325 mujeres que habían tenido un hijo sano mediante parto vaginal. La recogida de datos se realizó con un cuestionario autocumplimentado que incluía la escala adaptada, expectativas ante el parto y variables obstétricas y sociodemográficas. Se valoró la fiabilidad en una submuestra de 45 mujeres que cumplimentaron de nuevo la escala a los 15-30 días. Se analizó la estructura factorial y la consistencia interna. Se evaluó la validez de concepto analizando la relación entre la satisfacción con la experiencia y el cumplimiento de las expectativas y preferencias en el manejo del dolor. Resultados: En el estudio test-retest se obtuvo un coeficiente de correlación intraclase de 0,93 para la escala global. El análisis factorial identificó seis factores que explicaban el 69,42% de la varianza. El coeficiente alfa de Cronbach fue de 0,94 para la escala global, oscilando entre 0,72 y 0,96 en las subescalas. La satisfacción con la experiencia del parto fue superior en las mujeres cuyas expectativas se habían cumplido, así como en las que accedieron al método de alivio del dolor elegido. Conclusiones: Se ha obtenido un instrumento de medida de la satisfacción con la experiencia del parto y el nacimiento, adaptado a nuestro contexto y con buenas características psicométricas.Objectives To determine the reliability and the content and construct validity of the Mackey Childbirth Satisfaction Rating Scale to measure women's satisfaction with labor and delivery. Methods The translation-back translation method was used to obtain an adapted version of the scale. For the validation

  15. Item response theory : How Mokken scaling can be used in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, R.; Van der Ark, L.A.; Lin, L.C.; Fieo, R.; Deary, I.J.; Meijer, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. To demonstrate the principles and application of Mokken scaling. Background. The history and development of Mokken scaling is described, some examples of applications are given, and some recent development of the method are summarised. Design. Secondary analysis of data obtained by cross-secti

  16. Clinical Variables Affecting The Pregnancy Rate of Intracervical Insemination Using Cryopreserved Donor Spermatozoa:A Retrospective Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether several clinical variables can affectthe pregnancy rate of intracervical insemination (ICI using cryopreserved donor spermatozoa.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, age, years of infertility, cervicitis, urinaryluteinizing hormone (LH surge, insemination number, uterus position, endometrial thickness andmorphology, maximal follicle diameter, and the number of dominant follicles on the day of humanchorionic gonadotropin (HCG administration were retrospectively analyzed in 501 women whounderwent their first ICI cycle using cryopreserved donor spermatozoa.Results: Increased age, length of infertility (>5 years, retroverted uterine position, and endometrialthickness (14 mm were associated with lower rates of pregnancy.Conclusion: In older women with infertile periods longer than five years, especially those with aretroverted uterus, intrauterine insemination (IUI combined with ovarian stimulation should berecommended. In vitro fertilization with donor spermatozoa (IVFD should be offered earlier toachieve a much higher success rate.

  17. Magnitude of placebo response and response variance in antidepressant clinical trials using structured, taped and appraised rater interviews compared to traditional rating interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Faucett, James; Brown, Walter A

    2014-04-01

    The high failure rate of antidepressant clinical trials is due in part to a high magnitude of placebo response and considerable variance in placebo response. In some recent trials enhanced patient interview techniques consisting of Structured Interview Guide for the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (SIGMA) interviews, audiotaping of patient interviews and 'central' appraisal with Rater Applied Performance Scale (RAPS) criteria have been implemented in the hope of increasing reliability and thus reducing the placebo response. However, the data supporting this rationale for a change in patient interview technique are sparse. We analyzed data from depressed patients assigned to placebo in antidepressant clinical trials conducted at a single research site between 2008 and 2012. Three trials included 34 depressed patients undergoing SIGMA depression interviews with taping and RAPS appraisal and 4 trials included 128 depressed patients using traditional interview methods. Using patient level data we assessed the mean decrease in total MADRS scores and the variability of the decrease in MADRS scores in trials using SIGMA interviews versus trials using traditional interviews. Mean decrease in total MADRS score was significantly higher in the 3 trials that used SIGMA interviews compared to the 4 trials using traditional interviews (M = 13.0 versus 8.3, t(df = 160) = 2.04, p = 0.047). Furthermore, trials using SIGMA had a larger magnitude of response variance based on Levene's test for equality of variance (SD = 12.3 versus 9.4, F = 7.3, p = 0.008). The results of our study suggest that enhanced patient interview techniques such as SIGMA interviews, audiotaping and RAPS appraisal may not result in the intended effect of reducing the magnitude of placebo response and placebo variance. PMID:24477068

  18. RATING SCALE COMPETENCIES IN THE DISCIPLINE OF «CULTURAL STUDIES» FOR STUDENTS OF OIL AND GAS PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il’dus Islamovich Zailalov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors examine the competence-based approach as the most promising to date in education, requiring the introduction of new technologies, methods, systems assessment competencies.The article presents the scale of formation of competences of students of the technical University in cultural studies based on a point rating system. A point rating system made in accordance with the curriculum of the discipline «cultural Studies». Demonstrates the use of active learning methods, allowing to fully assess readiness competencies. The most effective method of practice-oriented education is situational tasks (case-methods, which aims not only to consolidate the theoretical material, but also on the development of skills of analysis, critical thinking, skills of joint discussion of problems and decision making. Presents three levels of complexity of the case objectives, to evaluate the readiness competencies in the discipline. The authors point rating scale with the modules and activities, giving a total idea of the level of mastering the discipline. In accordance with the goals of the discipline «cultural Studies» GEF lists generated by the students of oil and gas profile of General cultural and professional competences. Defined criteria of formation of competences: formed partially formed not formed. These criteria are translated into traditional assessment scale in the discipline. The conclusion about the importance of this assessment, as it allows you to identify how obtained competence differ from the expected, to represent the dynamics of the development of each student and to identify what competencies should work in the future.

  19. A Pilot Evaluation of Associations Between Displayed Depression References on Facebook and Self-reported Depression Using a Clinical Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Megan Andreas; Christakis, Dimitri A.; Egan, Katie G.; Jelenchick, Lauren A.; Cox, Elizabeth; Young, Henry; Villiard, Hope; Becker, Tara

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine associations between displayed depression symptoms on Facebook and self-reported depression symptoms using a clinical screen. Public Facebook profiles of undergraduates from two universities were examined for displayed depression references. Profiles were categorized as depression symptom displayers or non-displayers. Participants completed an online PHQ-9 depression scale. Analyses examined associations between PHQ-9 score and depression symptom d...

  20. Explicit calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rates in small pores to elucidate molecular scale fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Faux, David A.; McDonald, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A model linking the molecular-scale dynamics of fluids confined to nano-pores to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rates is proposed. The model is fit to experimental NMR dispersions for water and oil in an oil shale assuming that each fluid is characterised by three time constants and L\\'{e}vy statistics. Results yield meaningful and consistent intra-pore dynamical time constants, insight into diffusion mechanisms and pore morphology. The model is applicable to a wide range of poro...