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Sample records for clinical radiobiology vol

  1. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  2. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 18. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology contain two review articles (prediction of normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy, ?H2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) and 34 contributions to the following topics: Hypoxia and molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; biological imaging of the tumor micromilieu; DNA repair, genomic instability and carcerogenesis; molecular factors of radiation resistance; actual controversial discussion on possible irradiation caused metastasis risk enhancement; EGFR inhibition and irradiation; biology of experimental radiation/ normal tissue toxicity

  3. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 20. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  4. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 8, special issue 1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication contains the abstracts of all papers and posters presented at the symposium. The headings were as follows: Radiobiology of the lung, mediation of radiation damage in the lung, clinical studies, future clinical directions, as well as documentation and management. (MG)

  5. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 25. Proceedings

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    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologie; Cordes, Nils [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Radioonkologie; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Rodemann, H. Peter [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Strahlenbiologie; Rothkamm, Kai [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Lab. fuer Strahlentherapie und Experimentelle Radioonkologie; Zips, Daniel (ed.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie

    2016-05-01

    The proceedings of the 25th symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology include papers on the following issues: radiotherapy individualization based on imaging; pre-clinic imaging and new experimental methods; methods and models, micromilieu and metabolism, combined therapy; secondary tumors following radiotherapy; radiogenic effects in normal tissue; resistance mechanism of tumors and normal tissue; personalized radio-oncology - which biological data are needed; pre-clinic and personalized radio-oncology; biomarkers - pre-clinic and translational; translational examinations for personalized radio-oncology.

  6. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 18. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 18. Proceedings

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    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemann, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2009-07-15

    The proceedings on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology contain two review articles (prediction of normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy, ?H2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) and 34 contributions to the following topics: Hypoxia and molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; biological imaging of the tumor micromilieu; DNA repair, genomic instability and carcerogenesis; molecular factors of radiation resistance; actual controversial discussion on possible irradiation caused metastasis risk enhancement; EGFR inhibition and irradiation; biology of experimental radiation/ normal tissue toxicity.

  7. Radiobiological and clinical aspects of neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological investigations and their interpretation are discussed. The history of neutrontherapy, the results of RBE-investigations in man as well as clinical results are given. The hypothesis on reaction of human tissue and tumours towards neutron irradiation is presented. (A.S.)

  8. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were dealt with: DNA repair as therapeutical target in radiation therapy, biological imaging and tumor microenvironment, molecular factors of radiation therapy, molecular factors and modulation of the radiation reaction of normal tissues, experimental tumor therapy, EGFR inhibition, the endothel cell as primary target of radiation therapy, molecular and cellular foundations of the radiation biology of protons and ions. (HSI)

  9. Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text-book (electronic book - multi-media CD-ROM) constitutes a course-book - author's collection of lectures. It consists of 13 lectures in which the reader acquaints with the basis of radiobiology: Introduction to radiobiology; Physical fundamentals of radiobiology; Radiation of cells; Modification of radiation damage of cells; Reparation of radiation damage of cells; Radiation syndromes and their modification; Radiation injury; Radiation damage of tissues; Effect of radiation on embryo and fetus; Biological effects of incorporated radionuclides; Therapy of acute irradiation sickness; Delayed consequences of irradiation; Radiation oncology and radiotherapy. This course-book may be interesting for students, post-graduate students of chemistry, biology, physics, medicine as well as for teachers, scientific workers and physicians. (author)

  10. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  11. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mangoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  12. Studies in the radiobiology of osteoradionecrosis and their clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, R.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1987-10-01

    The radiobiology of osteoradionecrosis is a complex of cellular death and cellular functional impairments from radiation energy transfers. Four studies of irradiated patients and a data base from 536 patients with osteoradionecrosis revealed separate pathophysiologic conditions for osteoradionecrosis induced by early trauma, osteoradionecrosis induced by late trauma, and spontaneous osteoradionecrosis. A large body of data suggested useful clinical guidelines for the management of irradiated patients. The guidelines, in part, include a recommendation for deferring radiation treatment for 21 days after tissue wounding, if possible; a relative contraindication to wounding tissue during a radiation course; a recommendation for the use of hyperbaric oxygen before wounding; and a strong recommendation to provide comprehensive dental care to the irradiated patient.

  13. Skin carcinomas: Radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have led to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of properties and routes of spread of the diverse

  14. Skin carcinomas: radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have lead to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of tumor biological properties of the diverse malignant

  15. Actual issues of clinical radiobiology and their experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information being collector for some tens years in frame of clinical study of radiation effects in man in broad range of dose and exposure variant has been summarised and systematized. It has been formulated the questions which could be answered under only clinical observation with many difficulties: diagnostical and prognostical criteria for evaluation of therapy efficiency in non-bonemarrow syndrome of acute radiation disease choice and confirmaty of methods of bonemarrow syndrome therapy in overlethal range of dose; improving of preclinical examination of means and methods of acute radiation syndrome prophylaxis and treatment; comparative analysis of the role of various radiation factory in development of oncological and severe somatic disease and possibility of these effects modification. Some limitations in extrapolation of experimental data onto clinical practice has been discussed and optimal forms of cooperation are shown

  16. Postoperative radiotherapy in DBCG during 30 years. Techniques, indications and clinical radiobiological experience

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    Overgaard, Marie; Juul Christensen, Jens (Dept. of Oncology and Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-05-15

    During the time period 1977-2007 postoperative radiotherapy in DBCG has varied considerably with regard to techniques and indications together with changes in the extent of surgery and adjuvant systemic therapy. The radiation treatment has been developed on the basis of clinical, radiophysical and radiobiological principles, encompassing also practical problems such as available equipment in the different centres and at times lack of sufficient machine capacity. The paper focus especially on the comprehensive work done prior to the DBCG 82 b and c studies, in order to optimize radiotherapy in all aspects prior to the evaluation of the efficacy of this treatment modality. The results from these trials did succeed in clear evidence that radiotherapy has an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of early breast cancer. In parallel to these studies a new and challenging use of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery was evaluated in the DBCG TM 82 protocol. The experience obtained with different techniques in this study formed the basis for the current principles of radiotherapy after lumpectomy. Reduction of radiation related morbidity has been a major issue for the DBCG radiotherapy group, and in this aspect several studies, including quality control visits, have been carried out to make the relevant modifications and to evaluate deviations from the guidelines between the centres. The background for the changes in radiotherapy is described for each of the programme periods as well as future perspectives which will include further refinements of the target and adjustments of dose and fractionation in selected patients

  17. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 16; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 16. Proceedings

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    Baumann, M.; Dahm-Daphi, J.; Dikomey, E.; Petersen, C.; Rodemann, H.P.; Zips, D. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: DNA repair as therapeutical target in radiation therapy, biological imaging and tumor microenvironment, molecular factors of radiation therapy, molecular factors and modulation of the radiation reaction of normal tissues, experimental tumor therapy, EGFR inhibition, the endothel cell as primary target of radiation therapy, molecular and cellular foundations of the radiation biology of protons and ions. (HSI)

  18. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 19. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 19. Proceedings

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    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemann, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2010-12-18

    The proceedings include review contributions on radio-oncology, and new radiation technologies and molecular prediction; and poster sessions on the following topics: hypoxia; molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; molecular targeting; DNA repair; biological imaging; biology of experimental radiations; normal tissue toxicity; modern radiotherapy; tumor hypoxia and metabolic micro milieu; immune system and radiotherapy.

  19. Clinical radiobiology of glioblastoma multiforme. Estimation of tumor control probability from various radiotherapy fractionation schemes

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    Pedicini, Piernicola [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Negrar, Verona (Italy); Simeon, Vittorio [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Laboratory of Preclinical and Translational Research, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Tini, Paolo; Pirtoli, Luigi [University of Siena and Tuscany Tumor Institute, Unit of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine Surgery and Neurological Sciences, Siena (Italy); Chiumento, Costanza [Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Napoli (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate a radiobiological set of parameters from the available clinical data on glioblastoma (GB). A number of clinical trial outcomes from patients affected by GB and treated with surgery and adjuvant radiochemotherapy were analyzed to estimate a set of radiobiological parameters for a tumor control probability (TCP) model. The analytical/graphical method employed to fit the clinical data allowed us to estimate the intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity (α), repair capability (b), and repopulation doubling time (T{sub d}) in a first phase, and subsequently the number of clonogens (N) and kick-off time for accelerated proliferation (T{sub k}). The results were used to formulate a hypothesis for a scheduleexpected to significantly improve local control. The 95 % confidence intervals (CI{sub 95} {sub %}) of all parameters are also discussed. The pooled analysis employed to estimate the parameters summarizes the data of 559 patients, while the studies selected to verify the results summarize data of 104 patients. The best estimates and the CI{sub 95} {sub %} are α = 0.12 Gy{sup -1} (0.10-0.14), b = 0.015 Gy{sup -2} (0.013-0.020), α/b = 8 Gy (5.0-10.8), T{sub d} = 15.4 days (13.2-19.5), N = 1 . 10{sup 4} (1.2 . 10{sup 3} - 1 . 10{sup 5}), and T{sub k} = 37 days (29-46). The dose required to offset the repopulation occurring after 1 day (D{sub prolif}) and starting after T{sub k} was estimated as 0.30 Gy/day (0.22-0.39). The analysis confirms a high value for the α/b ratio. Moreover, a high intrinsic radiosensitivity together with a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation and moderate repopulation kinetics were found. The results indicate a substantial independence of the duration of the overall treatment and an improvement in the treatment effectiveness by increasing the total dose without increasing the dose fraction. (orig.) [German] Schaetzung eines strahlenbiologischen Parametersatzes auf der Grundlage klinischer Daten bei

  20. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy part II: current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. It includes the physics and chemistry of the absorption of radiation, a description of the biological systems used to obtain a quantitative relationship between dose and biological effect, as well as a review of the basic principles in radiation biology that have been established. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing x-rays. This led to development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons

  1. Basic radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiology, a branch of science concerned with the action of ionizing radiation on biological tissues and living organisms, is a combination of two disciplines: radiation physics and biology. For use in radiobiology and radiation protection the physical quantity that is useful for defining the quality of an ionizing radiation beam is the linear energy transfer (LET). In contrast to the stopping power, which focuses attention on the energy loss by an energetic charged particle moving through a medium, the LET focuses attention on the linear rate of energy absorption by the absorbing medium as the charged particle traverses the medium. When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation the standard physical effects between radiation and the atoms or molecules of the cells occur first and the possible biological damage to cell functions follows later. The biological effects of radiation result mainly from damage to the DNA, which is the most critical target within the cell; however, there are also other sites in the cell that, when damaged, may lead to cell death

  2. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  3. Determination of radiobiological parameters for the safe clinical application of BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present report the effects of BNCT irradiation on the skin and spinal cord of Fischer 344 rats, for known concentrations of 10B in the blood and these normal tissues, are compared with the effects of the neutron beam alone or photon irradiation. The biological effectiveness of irradiation in the presence of the capture agents BSH and BPA have been compared. Irradiations were carried out using the thermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Therapy experiments were also carried out as part of this study, using the rat 9L-gliosarcoma cell line, in order to establish the potential therapeutic advantage that might be achieved using the above capture agents. This cell line grows as a solid tumor in vivo as well as in vitro. The implications of these findings, with respect to the clinical use of the Petten HBII based epithermal neutron beam, will be discussed

  4. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  5. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

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    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  6. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  7. Radiobiological Research in JINR

    CERN Document Server

    Krasavin, E A

    2000-01-01

    The results of long-term radiobiological and radiation-genetical research in DRRR (Division of Radiobiology) are summarized. The different radiation-induced effects in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian and human cells after irradiation by gamma-rays and heavy charged particles are considered. The important role of DNA repair processes in biological effectiveness of different types of radiation were shown. The data on mutagenic action of such kinds of radiation on pro- and eukaryotic cells were analyzed. On the basis of our data the hypersensitivity of human and mammalian chromosomes after low doses of gamma-rays (10-20 sGy) was revealed. The radiobiological effect of ^{211}At - methylene blue complex on human melanoma cells was studied. The extremely high effectiveness of this complex on melanoma cells was shown.

  8. Research in Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the tables of contents for the reports published by the University of Utah Radiobiology Laboratory from 1953--1987. Also included is a keyword index for the reports, and references for all books, book and symposia chapters and journal article published by Laboratory staff between 1950 and 1988

  9. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  10. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  11. Radiobiology with heavy charged particles: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarsgard, L.D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, B.C. Cancer Research Centre and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation will attempt to briefly review some of radiobiological data on the effects of heavy charged particles and to discuss the influence of those studies on the clinical application which followed. (orig./MG)

  12. Conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy in the management of adult soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities: clinical and radiobiological results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The outcome of adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant irradiation was evaluated to (a) determine the appropriate treatment volume and radiation dosage in the postoperative setting, and (b) correlate in vitro radiobiological parameters obtained prior to therapy with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four consecutive adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities (40 lower, 24 upper) who underwent conservative surgery and adjuvant irradiation (7 preoperative, 50 postoperative, 7 perioperative) between 1978 and 1991 were reviewed. The initial radiation field margin surrounding the tumor bed/scar was retrospectively analyzed in all postoperative patients. Initial field margins were < 5 cm in 12 patients, 5-9.9 cm in 32 and ≥ 10 cm in 6. Patients with negative pathological margins were initially treated with traditional postoperative doses (64-66 Gy); however, in later years the postoperative dose was reduced to 60 Gy. Thirteen cell lines were established prior to definite therapy, and radiobiological parameters (multitarget and linear-quadratic) were obtained and correlated with outcome. Results: Postoperative patients treated with an initial field margin of < 5 cm had a 5-year local control of 30.4% vs. 93.2% in patients treated with an initial margin of ≥ 5 cm (p = 0.0003). Five-year local control rates were similar in patients treated with initial field margins of 5-9.9 cm (91.6%) compared with those treated with ≥ 10 cm margins (100%) (p = 0.49). While postoperative patients receiving < 60 Gy had a worse local control than those receiving ≥ 60 Gy (p = 0.08), no difference was seen in local control between patients receiving less than traditional postoperative doses (60-63.9 Gy) (74.4%) vs. those receiving 64-66 Gy (87.0%) (p = 0.5). The local control of patients treated in the later years of the study, with strict attention to surgical and radiotherapeutic

  13. Department of Radiobiology - foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program of the Department of Radiobiology of the Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics is performed by two laboratories: 1/Laboratory of Neutron Therapy and Applied in Radiobiology Therapy and Agriculture. 2/ Laboratory of Radiation and Environmental Mutagenesis. The aim of the first mentioned Laboratory is to determine the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of fast 5.6 MeV neutrons with regard to regime of fractionation. Our goal is to reduce the number of fraction of neutron therapy what makes possible increasing the total dose. The second mentioned Laboratory engages in research on the mutagenesis in rape-seed in vitro regeneration of dihaploids and pollen grains. The object is to find how much fast neutrons, X and γ-rays irradiations stimulate the dihaploide production and to determine their reaction in flower buds microspores and anther cultures. (author)

  14. Radiobiology of Radiosurgery for the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Santacroce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Leksell radiosurgery is defined as “the delivery of a single, high dose of irradiation to a small and critically located intracranial volume through the intact skull.” Before its birth in the early 60s and its introduction in clinical therapeutic protocols in late the 80s dose application in radiation therapy of the brain for benign and malignant lesions was based on the administration of cumulative dose into a variable number of fractions. The rationale of dose fractionation is to lessen the risk of injury of normal tissue surrounding the target volume. Radiobiological studies of cell culture lines of malignant tumors and clinical experience with patients treated with conventional fractionated radiotherapy helped establishing this radiobiological principle. Radiosurgery provides a single high dose of radiation which translates into a specific toxic radiobiological response. Radiobiological investigations to study the effect of high dose focused radiation on the central nervous system began in late the 50s. It is well known currently that radiobiological principles applied for dose fractionation are not reproducible when single high dose of ionizing radiation is delivered. A review of the literature about radiobiology of radiosurgery for the central nervous system is presented.

  15. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported.

  16. Toward a national consensus: teaching radiobiology to radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The ASTRO Joint Working Group on Radiobiology Teaching, a committee composed of members having affiliations with several national radiation oncology and biology-related societies and organizations, commissioned a survey designed to address issues of manpower, curriculum standardization, and instructor feedback as they relate to resident training in radiation biology. Methods and Materials: Radiation biology instructors at U.S. radiation oncology training programs were identified and asked to respond to a comprehensive electronic questionnaire dealing with instructor educational background, radiation biology course content, and sources of feedback with respect to curriculum planning and resident performance on standardized radiation biology examinations. Results: Eighty-five radiation biology instructors were identified, representing 73 radiation oncology residency training programs. A total of 52 analyzable responses to the questionnaire were received, corresponding to a response rate of 61.2%. Conclusion: There is a decreasing supply of instructors qualified to teach classic, and to some extent, clinical, radiobiology to radiation oncology residents. Additionally, those instructors with classic training in radiobiology are less likely to be comfortable teaching cancer molecular biology or other topics in cancer biology. Thus, a gap exists in teaching the whole complement of cancer and radiobiology curricula, particularly in those programs in which the sole responsibility for teaching falls to one faculty member (50% of training programs are in this category). On average, the percentage of total teaching time devoted to classic radiobiology (50%), clinical radiobiology (30%), and molecular and cancer biology (20%) is appropriate, relative to the current makeup of the board examination. Nevertheless large variability exists between training programs with respect to the total number of contact hours per complete radiobiology course (ranging from

  17. Radiobiology and Epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium and to co-ordinate the Belgian contribution to the 'International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry'; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to ionizing radiation in mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (3) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (4) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (5) to monitor the early variations of gene expression induced by ionising radiation and cytokines; (6) to evaluate the use of cytokines and natural substances for improving radiotherapy protocols; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are reported

  18. Radiobiology and Epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C; Holmstock, L

    2001-04-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium and to co-ordinate the Belgian contribution to the 'International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry'; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to ionizing radiation in mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (3) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (4) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (5) to monitor the early variations of gene expression induced by ionising radiation and cytokines; (6) to evaluate the use of cytokines and natural substances for improving radiotherapy protocols; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are reported.

  19. Microirradiation techniques in radiobiological research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guido A Drexler; Miguel J Ruiz-Gómez

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to review the uses of laser microirradiation and ion microbeam techniques within the scope of radiobiological research. Laser microirradiation techniques can be used for many different purposes. In a specific condition, through the use of pulsed lasers, cell lysis can be produced for subsequent separation of different analytes. Microsurgery allows for the identification and isolation of tissue sections, single cells and subcellular components, using different types of lasers. The generation of different types of DNA damage, via this type of microirradiation, allows for the investigation of DNA dynamics. Ion microbeams are important tools in radiobiological research. There are only a limited number of facilities worldwide where radiobiological experiments can be performed. In the beginning, research was mostly focused on the bystander effect. Nowadays, with more sophisticated molecular and cellular biological techniques, ion microirradiation is used to unravel molecular processes in the field of radiobiology. These include DNA repair protein kinetics or chromatin modifications at the site of DNA damage. With the increasing relevance of charged particles in tumour therapy and new concepts on how to generate them, ion microbeam facilities are able to address unresolved questions concerning particle tumour therapy.

  20. Melanomas: radiobiology and role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This course will review the radiobiology of malignant melanoma (MM) and the clinical use of radiation therapy for metastatic melanoma and selected primary sites. The course will emphasize the scientific principles underlying the clinical treatment of MM. Introduction: The incidence of malignant melanoma has one of the fastest growth rates in the world. In 1991, there were 32,000 cases and 7,000 deaths from MM in the United States. By the year 2000, one of every 90 Americans will develop MM. Wide local excision is the treatment of choice for Stage I-II cutaneous MM. Five-year survival rates depend on (a) sex: female-63%, male-40%; (b) tumor thickness: t 4 mm-25%; (c) location: extremity-60%, trunk-41%; and (d) regional lymph node status: negative-77%, positive-31%. Despite adequate surgery, 45-50% of all MM patients will develop metastatic disease. Radiobiology: Both the multi-target model: S = 1-(1-e-D/Do)n and the linear quadratic mode: -In(S) = alpha x D + beta x D2 predict a possible benefit for high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy) radiation therapy for some MM cell lines. The extrapolation number (n) varies from 1-100 for MM compared to other mammalian cells with n=2-4. The alpha/beta ratios for a variety of MM cell lines vary from 1 to 33. Other radiobiologic factors (repair of potentially lethal damage, hypoxia, reoxygenation, and repopulation) predict a wide variety of clinical responses to different time-dose prescriptions including high dose per fraction (> 400 cGy), low dose per fraction (200-300 cGy), or b.i.d. therapy. Based on a review of the radiobiology of MM, no single therapeutic strategy emerges which could be expected to be successful for all tumors. Time-Dose Prescriptions: A review of the retrospective and prospective clinical trials evaluating various time-dose prescriptions for MM reveals: (1) MM is a radiosensitive tumor over a wide range of diverse time-dose prescriptions; and (2) The high clinical response rates to a

  1. Radiobiology software for educational purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand radio-nuclide therapy and the basis of radiation protection, it is essential to understand radiobiology. With limited time for classroom teaching and limited time and resources for radiobiology experiments students do not acquire firm grasp of theoretical mathematical models and experimental knowledge of target theory and Linear quadratic models that explain nature of cell survival curves. We believe that this issue might be addressed with numerical simulation of cell survival curves using mathematical models. Existing classroom teaching can be reoriented to understand the subject using the concept of modeling, simulation and virtual experiments. After completion of the lecture, students can practice with simulation tool at their convenient time. In this study we have developed software that can help the students to acquire firm grasp of theoretical and experimental radiobiology. The software was developed using FreeMat ver 4.0, open source software. Target theory, linear quadratic model, cell killing based on Poisson model have been included. The implementation of the program structure was to display the menu for the user choice to be made and then program flows depending on the users choice. The program executes by typing 'Radiobiology' on the command line interface. Students can investigate the effect of radiation dose on cell, interactively. They can practice to draw the cell survival curve based on the input and output data and they can also compare their handmade graphs with automatically generated graphs by the program. This software is in the early stage of development and will evolve on user feedback. We feel this simulation software will be quite useful for students entering in the nuclear medicine, radiology and radiotherapy disciplines. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  3. Neutron radiobiology revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reviews the experimental results of normal tissue and tumour studies in animals. The dose per fraction dependence of the RBE in normal tissues has been long recognised, together with the steeper increase of RBE at low doses for late responding tissues compared with acute reactions. The dose dependence for tumours is more complex, because of hypoxia and reoxygenation, as well as differences in repair capability after high LET damage. A comparison of tumour and normal tissue RBE values shows that there is little experimental evidence for a therapeutic advantage at clinically relevant doses. In particular, the RBE for slow growing tumours is even lower than that for the faster growing mouse tumours. The reasons for the loss of expected neutron benefits in clinically relevant experiments are discussed. The disappointing prospects for neutrons are contrasted with the current multifactorial approaches to overcoming resistance to more conventional low LET radiations, including acceleration, hyperfractionation and several types of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. (orig.)

  4. In vitro irradiation system for radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cell cultures provide important information on basic tumor biology and radiobiology, they are not representative of the complexity of three-dimensional (3-D) solid tumors. In particular, new models reproducing clinical conditions as closely as possible are needed for radiobiological studies to provide information that can be translated from bench to bedside. We developed a novel system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of 3-D tumor spheroids, the in vitro model considered as a bridge between the complex architectural organization of in vivo tumors and the very simple one of in vitro monolayer cell cultures. The system exploits the same equipment as that used for patient treatments, without the need for dedicated and highly expensive instruments. To mimic the passage of radiation beams through human tissues before they reach the target tumor mass, 96-multiwell plates containing the multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are inserted into a custom-built phantom made of plexiglass, the material most similar to water, the main component of human tissue. The system was used to irradiate CAEP- and A549-derived MCTS, pre-treated or not with 20 μM cisplatin, with a dose of 20 Gy delivered in one session. We also tested the same treatment schemes on monolayer CAEP and A549 cells. Our preliminary results indicated a significant increment in radiotoxicity 20 days after the end of irradiation in the CAEP spheroids pre-treated with cisplatin compared to those treated with cisplatin or irradiation alone. Conversely, the effect of the radio- chemotherapy combination in A549-derived MCTS was similar to that induced by cisplatin or irradiation alone. Finally, the 20 Gy dose did not affect cell survival in monolayer CAEP and A549 cells, whereas cisplatin or cisplatin plus radiation caused 100% cell death, regardless of the type of cell line used. We set up a system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of tumor cells

  5. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  6. Challenges in radiobiological modeling: can we decide between LQ and LQ-L models based on reviewed clinical NSCLC treatment outcome data?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the dose-response of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of long-term local tumor control (LC) after conventional and hypofractionated photon radiotherapy, modeled with the linear-quadratic (LQ) and linear-quadratic-linear (LQ-L) approaches and to estimate the clinical α/β ratio within the LQ frame. We identified studies of curative radiotherapy as single treatment through MedLine search reporting 3-year LC as primary outcome of interest. Logistic models coupled with the biologically effective dose (BED) at isocenter and PTV edge according to both the LQ and LQ-L models with α/β = 10 Gy were fitted. Additionally, α/β was estimated from direct LQ fits. Thirty one studies were included reporting outcome of 2319 patients. The LQ-L fit yielded a significant value of 11.0 ± 5.2 Gy for the dose threshold (Dt) for BED10 at the isocenter. The LQ and LQ-L fits did not differ substantially. Concerning the estimation of α/β, the value obtained from the direct LQ fit for the complete fractionation range was 3.9 [68 % CI: 2.2–9.0] Gy (p > 0.05). Both LQ and LQ-L fits can model local tumor control after conventionally and hypofractionated irradiation and are robust methods for predicting clinical effects. The observed dose-effect for local control in NSCLC is weaker at high doses due to data dispersion. For BED10 values of 100–150 Gy in ≥3 fractions, the differences in isoeffects predicted by both models can be neglected. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-016-0643-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  7. Radiobiology and radiation protection. Recent developments and future trends in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28th annual meeting of the Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz, held from October 23 - 25, 1996 in Hannover, discussed the various aspects of the leading theme, radiation protection and radiobiology, recent developments and future trends in radiobiology. The papers presented in the proceedings volume address the three main aspects: (1) Mechanisms of the radiation effects - molecular and cellular mechanisms, genetic and prenatal radiation effects, cancerogenesis and mutagenesis; (2) Novel methods in radiobiology research: microdosimetry from the biological angle, novel methods in molecular biology including computerized simulation of DNA, methods of biological dosimetry, radiobiological aspects of neutrons and other densely ionizing radiation (Pt, Rn); (3) Knowledge and concepts for radiological protection: individual radiosensitivity, radiobiological aspects in medical applications of ionizing radiation, accidents in industry, radiation exposure in aeronautics and astronautics. (vhe)

  8. Proceedings of the third arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy, vol.a,b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for peaceful uses of atomic energy vol.A: (1) reactor,materials,energy; (2) nuclear raw materials; (3) radiocesium-waste; (4) nuclear safety; (5) nuclear physics; (6) radiochemistry; (7) radiobiology; vol.B: (1) nuclear medicine; (2) agriculture and soil science; (3) isotope hydrology; (4) food preservation; (5) insect eradication; (6 )industrial application; (7) nuclear activation analysis; (8) health physics and environmental studies

  9. The significance of the choice of radiobiological (NTCP) models in treatment plan objective functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A Clinician's discrimination between radiation therapy treatment plans is traditionally a subjective process, based on experience and existing protocols. A more objective and quantitative approach to distinguish between treatment plans is to use radiobiological or dosimetric objective functions, based on radiobiological or dosimetric models. The efficacy of models is not well understood, nor is the correlation of the rank of plans resulting from the use of models compared to the traditional subjective approach. One such radiobiological model is the Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP). Dosimetric models or indicators are more accepted in clinical practice. In this study, three radiobiological models, Lyman NTCP, critical volume NTCP and relative seriality NTCP, and three dosimetric models, Mean Lung Dose (MLD) and the Lung volumes irradiated at lOGy (V|0) and 20Gy (V20), were used to rank a series of treatment plans using, harm to normal (Lung) tissue as the objective criterion. None of the models considered in this study showed consistent correlation with the Radiation Oncologists plan ranking. If radiobiological or dosimetric models are to be used in objective functions for lung treatments, based on this study it is recommended that the Lyman NTCP model be used because it will provide most consistency with traditional clinician ranking.

  10. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives

  11. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia; Lopez, Jesus [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico); ISSSTE General Hospital Dr. Santiago Ramon y Cajal, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  12. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerología de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  13. Soft x rays for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethal effects and chromosome aberrations induced in cells exposed to low energy (soft) X rays demonstrated that these relatively low energy X rays are just as effective as those of higher energy for radiobiological studies, and even more effective for irradiating cultured mammalian cells than laboratory animals. (author)

  14. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems

  15. Workshop on radiobiological effectiveness of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons has become the subject of some heated discussions in both scientific and radiation-protection oriented communities. This has become especially so since the realization that neutron exposures of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima were considerably lower than previously assumed, thus ''devaluating'' the importance of what we thought was a solid human data base. At the same time, more recent data from radiobiological research appeared to indicate that, at least for some biological endpoints, the RBE of neutrons at low doses and low dose rates was increased dramatically compared to the RBE at higher dose and dose rates. As a consequence, the protection of health against neutrons became a subject of some urgency. The objective of this workshop was to evaluate the existing data base in order to determine the need for additional research in this field. 22 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Scientific projection paper for space radiobiological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nationale for the radiobiological research requirements for space is rooted in a national commitment to the exploration of space, mandated in the form of the National Space Act. This research is almost entirely centered on man; more specifically, on the effects of the space radiation environment on man and his protection from them. The research needs discussed in this presentation include the space radiation environment; dosimetry; radiation biology-high LET particles (dose/response); and operational countermeasures

  17. The Fundamentals of Imaging Physics and Radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Selman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Like its well-known predecessor, this new and expanded Ninth Edition presents numerous important changes, beginning with the title and continuing throughout the text. Drawing on current knowledge and his own extensive experience, Dr. Selman provides a thorough revision and overview of each previously included chapter. Definitions, foundations, and principles are presented along with changes in methods and procedures. The text presents five new chapters on computed tomography, radioactivity and diagnostic nuclear medicine, radiobiology, protection in radiology/health physics, and nonradiologic

  18. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantel, Florent; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine; Chevalier, François; Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas; Testard, Isabelle; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  19. Optimal fractionation from radiobiological view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not only in animal experiments but also from analyses of clinical data important knowledge could be obtained in recent years, that deal with the course of biological processes in tumor and normal tissue during fractionated irradiation. Relevant are differences in the capacity for recovery from sublethal radiation injury and in repopulation. Chronically reacting normal tissues show a clearly higher repair capacity than tumors, that can be used for hyperfractionation with reduced single dosis. However, strong attention must be given to repairing time, that the selective benefit is not endangered by incomplete recovery. On the other side clinical analyses have confirmed that the stem cell repopulation - going on in several tumor types, so e.g. in squamous cell carcinomas, during the time of conventional treatment - can make a considerable contribution to radioresistance. The actual level of knowledge justifies further clinical experiments with unconventional fractionation, especially with accelerated hyperfractionation. (author)

  20. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  1. Radiation monitoring considerations for radiobiology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, conducts a wide variety of radiobiology and radioecology research in a number of facilities on the Hanford Reservation. Review of radiation monitoring problems associated with storage, plant and animal experiments, waste handling and sterile facilities shows that careful monitoring, strict procedural controls and innovative techniques are required to minimize occupational exposure and control contamination. Although a wide variety of radioactivity levels are involved, much of the work is with extremely low level materials. Monitoring low level work is mundane and often impractical but cannot be ignored in today's ever tightening controls

  2. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Hutt, Julie A.; Padilla, Mabel T.; Gott, Katherine M.

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  3. Generalized calculus in radiobiology: Physical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Antoranz, J C; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Non-extensive statistical physics has allowed to generalize mathematical functions such as exponential and logarithms. The same framework is used to generalize sum and product so that the operations allow a more fluid way to work with mathematical expressions emerging from non-additive formulation of statistical physics. In this work we employ the generalization of the exponential, logarithm and product to obtain a formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. Also we provide experimental recommendations to determine the universal characteristics of living tissues in interaction with radiation. These results have a potential application in radiobiology and radiation oncology.

  4. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  5. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  6. Clinical biophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbar, M.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.

    1985-01-01

    Chapters are included on clinical decision making, principles of biomedical engineering, computers and their medical uses, clinical radiobiology, diagnostic x-ray radiology, clinical applications of ultrasonics, nuclear medicine, NMR imaging, diagnostic imaging, bioelectric techniques in diagnosis and therapy, biophysical aspects of the clinical laboratory, and biophysical aspects of modern surgery.

  7. Biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of my biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology is presented. Early adventures involved developing ''state-vector models'' for specific harmful effects (cell killing, life shortening) of exposure to radiation. More recent adventures led to developing ''hazard-function models'' for predicting biological effects (e.g., cell killing, mutations, tumor induction) of combined exposure to different toxicants. Hazard-function models were also developed for predicting harm to man from exposure to large radiation doses. Major conclusions derived from the modeling adventures are as follows: (1) synergistic effects of different genotoxic agents should not occur at low doses; (2) for exposure of the lung or bone marrow to large doses of photon radiation, low rates of exposure should be better tolerated than high rates; and (3) for some types of radiation (e.g., alpha particles and fission neutrons), moderate doses delivered at a low rate may be more harmful than the same dose given at a high rate. 53 refs., 7 figs

  8. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsässer, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  9. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  10. Radiobiological evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments of patients with head and neck cancer: A dual-institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Narayanasamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, evaluation of clinical efficacy of treatment planning stems from the radiation oncologist's experience in accurately targeting tumors, while keeping minimal toxicity to various organs at risk (OAR involved. A more objective, quantitative method may be raised by using radiobiological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potential correlation of OAR-related toxicities to its radiobiologically estimated parameters in simultaneously integrated boost (SIB intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans of patients with head and neck tumors at two institutions. Lyman model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP and the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP models were used in the Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART analysis. In this study, 33 patients with oropharyngeal primaries in the head and neck region were used to establish the correlation between NTCP values of (a bilateral parotids with clinically observed rates of xerostomia, (b esophagus with dysphagia, and (c larynx with dysphagia. The results of the study indicated a strong correlation between the severity of xerostomia and dysphagia with Lyman NTCP of bilateral parotids and esophagus, respectively, but not with the larynx. In patients without complications, NTCP values of these organs were negligible. Using appropriate radiobiological models, the presence of a moderate to strong correlation between the severities of complications with NTCP of selected OARs suggested that the clinical outcome could be estimated prior to treatment.

  11. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the α/β ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor α/β and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF2) data, and the above α/β ratio, the estimated median α value was 0.077 Gy-1, β was 0.009 Gy-2, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy9.3 (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis

  12. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, J. C. [Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States); Smith, S. K.; Watson, C. R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives.

  13. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    OpenAIRE

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-01-01

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent t...

  14. In vivo tumor radiobiology of heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of tumor cells systems to irradiation with carbon, neon and argon beams at various positions in the plateau and extended-peak regions of the Bragg ionization curve is being evaluated from experiments conducted both in vivo and in vitro. The radiobiological end points being studied include: tumor volume response, cellular survival after tumor irradiation in situ, and cell-kinetic parameters

  15. Research in radiobiology. Annual report, Internal Irradiation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual progress report for the Radiobiology Division of the University of Utah College of Medicine is presented. Summaries of twenty-four projects concerning the metabolism, dosimetry and toxicity of a variety of actinide elements in beagles or rats are given. Individual papers within this report have been separately indexed and abstracted for the data base

  16. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Prather, J. (Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  17. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part I: physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synopsis of the introductory paragraph of the DEGRO consensus S2e-guideline recommendations for the radiotherapy of benign disorders, including physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk. This work is based on the S2e-guideline recommendations published November 14, 2013. The basic principles of radiation physics and treatment delivery, evaluation of putative underlying radiobiological mechanisms, and the assessment of genetic and cancer risk following low-dose irradiation will be presented. Radiation therapy of benign diseases is performed according to similar physical principles as those governing treatment of malignant diseases in radiation oncology, using the same techniques and workflows. These methods comprise usage of orthovoltage X-ray units, gamma irradiation facilities, linear accelerators (LINACs), and brachytherapy. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models recently confirmed the clinically observed anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose X-irradiation, and implicated a multitude of radiobiological mechanisms. These include modulation of different immunological pathways, as well as the activities of endothelial cells, mono- and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and macrophages. The use of effective dose for radiogenic risk assessment and the corresponding tumor incidence rate of 5.5 %/Sv are currently controversially discussed. Some authors argue that the risk of radiation-induced cancers should be estimated on the basis of epidemiological data. However, such data are rarely available at present and associated with high variability. Current radiobiological studies clearly demonstrate a therapeutic effectiveness of radiation therapy used to treat benign diseases and implicate various molecular mechanisms. Radiogenic risks should be taken into account when applying radiation treatment for benign diseases. (orig.)

  18. Proceedings of 19. symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings include review contributions on radio-oncology, and new radiation technologies and molecular prediction; and poster sessions on the following topics: hypoxia; molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; molecular targeting; DNA repair; biological imaging; biology of experimental radiations; normal tissue toxicity; modern radiotherapy; tumor hypoxia and metabolic micro milieu; immune system and radiotherapy.

  19. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    OpenAIRE

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I.; Detti, B.; Bonomo, P; Greto, D.; Paiar, F.; Simontacchi, G.; Meattini, I.; Scoccianti, S.; Masoni, T.; Ciabatti, C.; Turkaj, A.; Serni, S.; Minervini, A.; Gacci, M.

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care eve...

  20. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  1. Radiobiology Department. Report of Activities 1977-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different research activities carried out by the Radiobiology Department of the CNEA over the 4-year period 1977-1980 are summarized. These activities were devoted to the study of the effects of radiation on different biological systems, to the search for adequate experimental models, and to the development of techniques permiting a correct evaluation of the information obtained. Topics covered are genetics, microbiology, somatic effects of radiation, pathology and the operation of the animal's house. (M.E.L.)

  2. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wéra, A.-C.; Riquier, H.; Heuskin, A.-C.; Michiels, C.; Lucas, S.

    2011-12-01

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  3. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wera, A.-C., E-mail: anne-catharine.wera@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium); Riquier, H., E-mail: helene.riquier@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Unite de Recherche de Biologie Cellulaire (URBC), University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Heuskin, A.-C., E-mail: anne-catherine.heuskin@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium); Michiels, C., E-mail: carine.michiels@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Unite de Recherche de Biologie Cellulaire (URBC), University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@fundp.ac.be [NAmur Research Institute for LIfe Sciences (NARILIS), Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium)

    2011-12-15

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  4. (RadioBiological Optimization of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Biological optimization” (BIOP means planning treatments using (radiobiological criteria and models, that is, tumour control probability and normal-tissue complication probability. Four different levels of BIOP are identified: Level I is “isotoxic” individualization of prescription dose at fixed fraction number. is varied to keep the NTCP of the organ at risk constant. Significant improvements in local control are expected for non-small-cell lung tumours. Level II involves the determination of an individualized isotoxic combination of and fractionation scheme. This approach is appropriate for “parallel” OARs (lung, parotids. Examples are given using our BioSuite software. Hypofractionated SABR for early-stage NSCLC is effectively Level-II BIOP. Level-III BIOP uses radiobiological functions as part of the inverse planning of IMRT, for example, maximizing TCP whilst not exceeding a given NTCP. This results in non-uniform target doses. The NTCP model parameters (reflecting tissue “architecture” drive the optimizer to emphasize different regions of the DVH, for example, penalising high doses for quasi-serial OARs such as rectum. Level-IV BIOP adds functional imaging information, for example, hypoxia or clonogen location, to Level III; examples are given of our prostate “dose painting” protocol, BioProp. The limitations of and uncertainties inherent in the radiobiological models are emphasized.

  5. Treatment plan comparison between helical tomotherapy and MLC-based IMRT using radiobiological measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Costa Ferreira, Brigida; Shi, Chengyu; Lind, Bengt K.; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2007-07-01

    The rapid implementation of advanced treatment planning and delivery technologies for radiation therapy has brought new challenges in evaluating the most effective treatment modality. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and helical tomotherapy (HT) are becoming popular modes of treatment delivery and their application and effectiveness continues to be investigated. Presently, there are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate and optimize IMRT plans based on user-defined objective functions for the internal target volume (ITV) and organs at risk (OAR). However, the radiobiological parameters of the different tumours and normal tissues are typically not taken into account during dose prescription and optimization of a treatment plan or during plan evaluation. The suitability of a treatment plan is typically decided based on dosimetric criteria such as dose-volume histograms (DVH), maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation of the dose distribution. For a more comprehensive treatment plan evaluation, the biologically effective uniform dose ({\\bar{\\bar{D}}}) is applied together with the complication-free tumour control probability (P+). Its utilization is demonstrated using three clinical cases that were planned with two different forms of IMRT. In this study, three different cancer types at different anatomical sites were investigated: head and neck, lung and prostate cancers. For each cancer type, a linac MLC-based step-and-shoot IMRT plan and a HT plan were developed. The MLC-based IMRT treatment plans were developed on the Philips treatment-planning platform, using the Pinnacle 7.6 software release. For the tomotherapy HiArt plans, the dedicated tomotherapy treatment planning station was used, running version 2.1.2. By using {\\bar{\\bar{D}}} as the common prescription point of the treatment plans and plotting the tissue response probabilities versus {\\bar{\\bar{D}}} for a range of prescription doses

  6. Hypo-fractionated treatment in radiotherapy: radio-biological models Tcp and NTCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time the breast cancer in Mexico has the first place of incidence of the malignant neoplasia s in the women, and represents 11.34% of all the cancer cases. On the other hand, the treatments for cancer by means of ionizing radiations have been dominated under the approaches of the medical radio-oncologists which have been based on test and error by many years. The radio-biological models, as the Tcp, NTCP and dosimetric variables, for their clinical application in the conventional radiotherapy with hypo-fractionation have as purpose predicting personalized treatment plans that they present most probability of tumor control and minor probability of late reactions, becoming this way support tools in the decisions taking for the patient treatments planning of Medical Physicists and Radio-oncologists. (Author)

  7. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for

  8. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Peixoto Xavier, C [University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Costa Ferreira, B [University of Aveiro, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Khouri, L; Carmo Lopes, M do [IPOCFG, EPE, Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for

  9. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-09-10

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  10. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  11. An irradiation facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological studies

    CERN Document Server

    Besserer, J; Dellert, M; Gahn, C; Moosburger, M; Pemler, P; Quicken, P; Distel, L; Schuessler, H

    1999-01-01

    A vertical beam facility for radiobiological experiments was designed and constructed at the Munich Tandem-Accelerator Laboratory. The main part of the facility is a 90 deg. dipole magnet bending the beam of protons or heavy particles into a vertical upward direction, which is advantageous for wet-cell irradiation. After collimation the beam is spread out passively by thin scattering foils and dynamically by magnetic coils. A homogeneity of the radiation field better than +-5% has been achieved over the diameter of the exit window of 60 mm. The dose rate can be widely adjusted from single particles to more than 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles (i.e. hundreds of Grays) per second. The dose measurement is based on single-particle counting and on standard dosimeters. The detector system for dosimetry and irradiation control is described. In a first radiobiological experiment the cell survival of chinese hamster cells was measured after irradiation with 22.7 MeV protons and compared with the X-ray result.

  12. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  13. Influence of oxygen on the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    The simulation of the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism may be very helpful in studying the radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation when the water radical clusters formed by the densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particle may form DSBs damaging DNA molecules in living cells. It is possible to study not only the efficiency of individual radicals but also the influence of other species or radiomodifiers (mainly oxygen) being present in water medium during irradiation. The mathematical model based on Continuous Petri nets (proposed by us recently) will be described. It makes it possible to analyze two main processes running at the same time: chemical radical reactions and the diffusion of radical clusters formed during energy transfer. One may study the time change of radical concentrations due to the chemical reactions running during diffusion process. Some orientation results concerning the efficiency of individual radicals in DSB formation (in the case of Co60 radiation) will be presented; the influence of oxygen present in water medium during irradiation will be shown, too.

  14. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p+), the overall probability of injury (pI), the overall probability of control/benefit (pB), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D¯¯). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D¯¯ diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p+ index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of pB are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of pI are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (DB¯¯) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8 Gy

  15. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  16. Use of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory to Conduct Charged Particle Radiobiology Studies Relevant to Ion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathryn D; Blakely, Eleanor A; Story, Michael D; Lowenstein, Derek I

    2016-06-01

    Although clinical studies with carbon ions have been conducted successfully in Japan and Europe, the limited radiobiological information about charged particles that are heavier than protons remains a significant impediment to exploiting the full potential of particle therapy. There is growing interest in the U.S. to build a cancer treatment facility that utilizes charged particles heavier than protons. Therefore, it is essential that additional radiobiological knowledge be obtained using state-of-the-art technologies and biological models and end points relevant to clinical outcome. Currently, most such ion radiotherapy-related research is being conducted outside the U.S. This article addresses the substantial contributions to that research that are possible at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is the only facility in the U.S. at this time where heavy-ion radiobiology research with the ion species and energies of interest for therapy can be done. Here, we briefly discuss the relevant facilities at NSRL and how selected charged particle biology research gaps could be addressed using those facilities. PMID:27195609

  17. Operation and Maintenance of the National Radiobiology Archives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Anthony C. James; Stacey L. McCord

    2012-03-07

    The National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) are an archival program, started in 1989, to collect, organize and maintain data, laboratory notebooks, and animal tissue specimens from government (Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies) sponsored radiobiology life-span animal studies. These unique records, histopathology slides and paraffin embedded tissue blocks are maintained in a central facility and are available for further research study. The materials include electronic and paper records for each of more than 6,000 life-span-observations on dogs as well as details of major studies involving nearly 30,000 mice. Although these studies were performed over many years and at different laboratories with differing data management systems, the NRA has translated them into a standardized set of relational database tables. These can be distributed to interested individuals on written request. Specific Aims are: (1) To Maintain the Archive of Written Records from the Animal Experiments - The USTUR continued to maintain the NRA archives which consist of approximately 175 storage boxes containing laboratory notebooks, animal exposure records, animal pathologic records, and radiographs. These were stored in a 6,000 square foot leased facility in Richland, WA. Additionally, through a collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Low Dose Program, many of these records were scanned into digital files. These totaled 34 GB of data, which are saved in 2,407 separate PDF files that are organized by box number and animal identification number. (2) To Maintain the Archive of Animal Tissues at Washington State University - The USTUR continued to house the NRA dog tissue collection in the leased facility. The NRA tissue collection consisted of pathology slides and tissue blocks. Approximately 25% of the laboratory facility was dedicated to the storage of the NRA materials. (3) To Organize the Datasets of These Animals in the Context of Other Datasets so

  18. Characterization and performances of DOSION, a dosimetry equipment dedicated to radiobiology experiments taking place at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, G; Balanzat, E; Boumard, F; Carniol, B; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Etasse, D; Fontbonne, C; Frelin, A -M; Hommet, J; Peronnel, J; Salvador, S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, radiobiology experiments using heavy ions at GANIL(Grand Acc\\'el\\'erateur National d'Ions Lourds) are conducted under the supervision of the CIMAP (Center for research on Ions, MAterials and Photonics). In this context, a new beam monitoring equipment named DOSION has been developed. It allows to perform measurements of accurate fluence and dose maps in near real time for each biological sample irradiated. In this paper, we present the detection system, its design, performances, calibration protocol and measurements performed during radiobiology experiments. This setup is currently available for any radiobiology experiments if one wishes to correlate one's own sample analysis to state of the art dosimetric references.

  19. Vibration Theory, Vol. 1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present collection of MATLAB exercises has been published as a supplement to the textbook, Svingningsteori, Bind 1 and the collection of exercises in Vibration theory, Vol. 1A, Solved Problems. Throughout the exercise references are made to these books. The purpose of the MATLAB exercises is ...... is to give a better understanding of the physical problems in linear vibration theory and to surpress the mathematical analysis used to solve the problems. For this purpose the MATLAB environment is excellent....

  20. Method for validating radiobiological samples using a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an immediate need for rapid triage of the population in case of a large scale exposure to ionizing radiation. Knowing the dose absorbed by the body will allow clinicians to administer medical treatment for the best chance of recovery for the victim. In addition, today's radiotherapy treatment could benefit from additional information regarding the patient's sensitivity to radiation before starting the treatment. As of today, there is no system in place to respond to this demand. This paper will describe specific procedures to mimic the effects of human exposure to ionizing radiation creating the tools for optimization of administered radiation dosimetry for radiotherapy and/or to estimate the doses of radiation received accidentally during a radiation event that could pose a danger to the public. In order to obtain irradiated biological samples to study ionizing radiation absorbed by the body, we performed ex-vivo irradiation of human blood samples using the linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC was implemented and calibrated for irradiating human whole blood samples. To test the calibration, a 2 Gy test run was successfully performed on a tube filled with water with an accuracy of 3% in dose distribution. To validate our technique the blood samples were ex-vivo irradiated and the results were analyzed using a gene expression assay to follow the effect of the ionizing irradiation by characterizing dose responsive biomarkers from radiobiological assays. The response of 5 genes was monitored resulting in expression increase with the dose of radiation received. The blood samples treated with the LINAC can provide effective irradiated blood samples suitable for molecular profiling to validate radiobiological measurements via the gene-expression based biodosimetry tools. (orig.)

  1. A statistical method for descriminating between alternative radiobiological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological models assist understanding of the development of radiation damage, and may provide a basis for extrapolating dose-effect curves from high to low dose regions. Many models have been proposed such as multitarget and its modifications, enzymatic models, and those with a quadratic dose response relationship (i.e. αD + βD2 forms). It is difficult to distinguish between these because the statistical techniques used are almost always limited, in that one method can rarely be applied to the whole range of models. A general statistical procedure for parameter estimation (Maximum Liklihood Method) has been found applicable to a wide range of radiobiological models. The curve parameters are estimated using a computerised search that continues until the most likely set of values to fit the data is obtained. When the search is complete two procedures are carried out. First a goodness of fit test is applied which examines the applicability of an individual model to the data. Secondly an index is derived which provides an indication of the adequacy of any model compared with alternative models. Thus the models may be ranked according to how well they fit the data. For example, with one set of data, multitarget types were found to be more suitable than quadratic types (αD + βD2). This method should be of assitance is evaluating various models. It may also be profitably applied to selection of the most appropriate model to use, when it is necessary to extrapolate from high to low doses

  2. The radiobiology/radiation protection interface in healthcare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current knowledge of radiation effects is reviewed and implications for its application in healthcare considered. The 21st L H Gray conference gathered leading experts in radiobiology, radiation epidemiology, radiation effect modelling, and the application of radiation in medicine to provide an overview of the subject. The latest radiobiology research in non-targeted effects such as genomic instability and the bystander effect challenge the old models, but the implications for health effects on humans are uncertain. Adaptive responses to external stresses, of which radiation is one, have been demonstrated in cells and animal models, but it is not known how these might modify human dose-effect relationships. Epidemiological evidence from the Japanese A-bomb survivors provides strong evidence that there is a linear relationship between the excess risk of cancer and organ dose that extends from about 50 mSv up to 2.5 Sv, and results from pooled data for multiple epidemiological studies indicate that risks extend down to doses of 20 mSv. Thus linear extrapolation of the A-bomb dose-effect data provides an appropriate basis for radiological protection standards at the present time. Risks from higher dose diagnostic procedures fall within the range in which health effects can be demonstrated. There is therefore reason for concern about the rise in the number of computed tomography (CT) scans performed in many countries, and in particular the use of CT for screening of asymptomatic individuals. New radiotherapy techniques allow high dose radiation fields to be conformed more effectively to target volumes, and reduce doses to critical organs, but they tend to give a higher and more uniform dose to the whole body which may increase the risk of second cancer. It is important that radiation protection practitioners keep abreast of developments in understanding of radiation effects and advise the medical community about the implications of fundamental research when

  3. Strategies to improve the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy: Radiobiologic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of improving the therapeutic index (dose to tumor/dose to normal organs) and, hence, the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT). One method investigated was to increase the biologic response for a given radiation dose to tumor. To enhance the biologic efficacy of the dose, initial studies focused on first understanding the radiobiology of RIT irradiation and determining what role factors, such as radiation repair, repopulation, and redistribution, play in determining RIT response. In vitro studies using 4 colon carcinoma cell lines have compared the radiobiologic efficacy of low dose-rate irradiation delivered by Yttrium-90 (Y-90) with conventional high dose-rate external beam irradiation (XRT). Results suggested that one factor which determined a cell's sensitivity to Y-90 irradiation was its ability to repair radiation sublethal damage. In vivo studies demonstrated that those cell lines which were more sensitive to Y-90 irradiation in vitro were also more sensitive to RIT in vivo. For a more radioresistant line, WiDr, RIT was approximately two-fold less effective than an equivalent dose of single fraction XRT, while for a more radiosensitive line, LS174T, RIT was approximately as effective as an equivalent dose of single fraction XRT. Therefore, a tumor's response to RIT in vivo appeared to be, in part, dependent on the tumor cell's ability to repair radiation damage. Finally, studies investigated strategies at enhancing the biologic efficacy of RIT irradiation by combining RIT with chemotherapy agents that can potentially inhibit radiation repair. Agents, such as 5-fluorouracil, appeared to be synergistic with RIT irradiation n vitro and may therefore prove promising in improving the therapeutic index of RIT

  4. Knowledge evolution on effects of ionizing radiations on living being. New prospects of radiobiological researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge increase of all the steps going from the material radiation interaction to the risk evaluation, prevention and irradiation consequences treatment leads to new prospects in radiobiology research, such as the low doses effects. (A.B.)

  5. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  6. Press breakfast, radiobiology stakes: an European context, Thursday 25 March 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiobiology endeavours to know the ionizing radiations effects on living systems, particular at low doses exposures. The researches in this area contribute to the elaboration of international regulation on nuclear industry. The individual radiosensitivity is an other aspect of the research in radiobiology. These studies should allow the establishing of radiation protection standards founded on a direct approach and an individual estimation of the level of acceptable dose. (N.C.)

  7. Collimator design for spatially-fractionated proton beams for radiobiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsin; Meyer, Juergen; Sandison, George

    2016-07-01

    Preclinical and translational research is an imperative to improve the efficacy of proton radiotherapy. We present a feasible and practical method to produce spatially-modulated proton beams for cellular and small animal research for clinical and research facilities. The University of Washington (UW) 50.5 MeV proton research beamline hosting a brass collimation system was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. This collimator consisted of an array of 2 cm long slits to cover an area of 2  ×  2 cm2. To evaluate the collimator design effects on dose rate, valley dose and the peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) the following parameters were varied; slit width (0.1–1.0 mm), peak center-to-center distance (1–3 mm), collimator thickness (1–7 cm) and collimator location along the beam axis. Several combinations of slit widths and 1 mm spacing achieved uniform dose at the Bragg peak while maintaining spatial modulation on the beam entrance. A more detailed analysis was carried out for the case of a slit width of 0.3 mm, peak center-to-center distance of 1 mm, a collimator thickness of 5 cm and with the collimator flush against the water phantom. The dose rate at 5 mm depth dropped relative to an open field by a factor of 12 and produced a PVDR of 10.1. Technical realization of proton mini-beams for radiobiology small animal research is demonstrated to be feasible. It is possible to obtain uniform dose at depth while maintaining reasonable modulation at shallower depths near the beam entrance. While collimator design is important the collimator location has a strong influence on the entrance region PVDRs and on dose rate. These findings are being used to manufacture a collimator for installation on the UW cyclotron proton beam nozzle. This collimator will enable comparative studies on the radiobiological efficacy of x-rays and proton beams.

  8. A comparative analysis of radiobiological models for cell surviving fractions at high doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisheh, B; Edgren, M; Belkić, Dž; Mavroidis, P; Brahme, A; Lind, B K

    2013-04-01

    for the cell surviving fractions are exponentials at low as well as high doses, and this is in agreement with the behaviour of the corresponding experimental data. This is an important improvement over the LQ model which predicts a Gaussian at high doses. Overall and for the highlighted reasons, it was concluded that the PLQ, USC and LQL models are theoretically well-founded. They could prove useful compared to the other proposed radiobiological models in clinical applications for obtaining uniformly accurate cell surviving fractions encountered in stereotactic high-dose radiotherapy as well as at medium and low doses.

  9. Evaluation of radiobiological effects in 3 distinct biological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. The present work aims at sharing the process of development of advanced biological models to study radiobiological effects. Recognizing several known limitations and difficulties of the current monolayer cellular models, as well as the increasing difficulties to use advanced biological models, our group has been developing advanced biological alternative models, namely three-dimensional cell cultures and a less explored animal model (the Zebra fish - Danio rerio - which allows the access to inter-generational data, while characterized by a great genetic homology towards the humans). These 3 models (monolayer cellular model, three-dimensional cell cultures and zebra fish) were externally irradiated with 100 mGy, 500 mGy or 1 Gy. The consequences of that irradiation were studied using cellular and molecular tests. Our previous experimental studies with 100 mGy external gamma irradiation of HepG2 monolayer cells showed a slight increase in the proliferation rate 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post irradiation. These results also pointed into the presence of certain bystander effects 72 h post irradiation, constituting the starting point for the need of a more accurate analysis realized with this work. At this stage, we continue focused on the acute biological effects. Obtained results, namely MTT and clonogenic assays for evaluating cellular metabolic activity and proliferation in the in vitro models, as well as proteomics for the evaluation of in vivo effects will be presented, discussed and explained. Several hypotheses will be presented and defended based on the facts previously demonstrated. This work aims at sharing the actual state and the results already available from this medium-term project, building the proof of the added value on applying these advanced models, while demonstrating the strongest and weakest points from all of them (so allowing the comparison between them and to base the subsequent choice for research groups starting

  10. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcu Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  11. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Loredana G; Bezak, Eva

    2009-10-01

    Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling) is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  12. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  13. Fisheries Radiobiology and the Discharge of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United Kingdom authorizations to discharge radioactive wastes are granted by the Minister of Housing and Local Government, the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, and by the Secretary of State for Scotland. The hazards arising from contamination of aquatic animals and plants concern the Department of Fisheries ; before authorizations to discharge liquid wastes have been given, the Department has made independent forecasts of permissible levels of discharge based on extensive studies carried out in its research vessels and radiobiological laboratory: for example, where fish have been affected this has meant studies of fish populations and fish migration: uptake of radioactivity by fish : public consumption of fish : commercial distribution of affected fish: L.D.50: effects of radiation on tissue, etc. In the course of such work there has been close consultation with the Atomic Energy Authority, and agreement with the Atomic Energy Authority about the safety factor to be incorporated during the first two years of discharge. During these two years, monitoring data collected by the Atomic Energy Authority and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food enable checks and revisions of the original estimates to be made, and at the end of that time formal authorizations, based on operating experience, are issued. (author)

  14. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  15. [Radiobiological analysis of cancerogenic risk values in radioepidemiological investigations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present article consisted in critical analysis of the epidemiological approach to radiocancerogenic risk estimation in region of low level radiation (LLR). The estimation is making by means of mathematician models that ignore a principal difference in biological action of LLR and high level radiation (HLR). The main formal characteristic of LLR action is the presence of a plateau in beginning of a dose-effect curve of radiogenic risk. It may be argued by the following positions: repeating the plateau-phenomenon on various radiobiological effects, in different tests and bioobjects, first; a paradoxical trend of reciprocal ERR/Sv increasing regarding dose decreasing in region of plateau, second, and third, the increasing of the curvature in dose-effect curve beginning. The presence of a plateau is associated with the presence of a real radiogenic risk threshold. Besides, the analysis of processes influencing significantly the dynamics of initial radiation injury of biologically important macromolecules showed the preference in region of LLR those, decreasing/eliminating genome damages. There is follows from mentioned above a necessity to evaluate radiogenic risks in LLR region separately from HLR region. PMID:18825986

  16. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  17. Dosimetry for radiobiological experiments using energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of the Bevalac facility of energetic heavy ions with range greater than the size of small mammals makes possible the determination of the biological effects of relatively well defined high LET, whole body irradiation. With the increasing application of high-energy heavy ions in radiobiology there is a corresponding need to develop reliable techniques of both relative and absolute absorbed dose measurement. This paper describes dosimetry studies by the Health Physics Department of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with activation detectors, ionization chambers, nuclear emulsion, thermoluminescent dosimeters and X-ray film. The application of these techniques to an experiment designed to study the leukemogenic effect of the whole-body irradiation of mice by 250 MeV/amu carbon ions is briefly described. Values of absorbed dose in tissue, obtained during this experiment, with a nitrogen filled ionization chamber and 7LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters are compared and shown to be in good agreement. As a result of this work a value for the average energy to produce an ion pair (W) in nitrogen by 250 MeV/amu 6+C ions of 37 +- eV was determined. Values of the efficiency of 7LiF relative to 60Co γ-rays for ions with dE/dx in the range 110-260 MeV g-1 cm2 are reported

  18. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium

  19. Radiobiological basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present neutron standards, adopted more than 20 yr ago from a weak radiobiological data base, have been in doubt for a number of years and are currently under challenge. Moreover, recent dosimetric re-evaluations indicate that Hiroshima neutron doses may have been much lower than previously thought, suggesting that direct data for neutron-induced cancer in humans may in fact not be available. These recent developments make it urgent to determine the extent to which neutron cancer risk in man can be estimated from data that are available. Two approaches are proposed here that are anchored in particularly robust epidemiological and experimental data and appear most likely to provide reliable estimates of neutron cancer risk in man. The first approach uses gamma-ray dose-response relationships for human carcinogenesis, available from Nagasaki (Hiroshima data are also considered), together with highly characterized neutron and gamma-ray data for human cytogenetics. When tested against relevant experimental data, this approach either adequately predicts or somewhat overestimates neutron tumorigenesis (and mutagenesis) in animals. The second approach also uses the Nagasaki gamma-ray cancer data, but together with neutron RBEs from animal tumorigenesis studies. Both approaches give similar results and provide a basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards. They appear to be an improvement over previous approaches, including those that rely on highly uncertain maximum neutron RBEs and unnecessary extrapolations of gamma-ray data to very low doses. Results suggest that, at the presently accepted neutron dose limit of 0.5 rad/yr, the cancer mortality risk to radiation workers is not very different from accidental mortality risks to workers in various nonradiation occupations

  20. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nahum, A [Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  1. Single-Ion Microbeam for Applications in Radiobiology: State of the Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhiwen; Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    Single-Ion Microbeam (SIM) is uniquely capable of precisely delivering a predefined number of charged particles (precise doses of radiation) to individual cells or sub-cellular targets in situ. Since the early 1990's, there has been an ever-increasing interest in developing and applying the SIM technique to problems in radiobiology for studies of cell and tissue damaged by ionizing radiations. Potential applications for SIM in radiobiology continues to grow and have been diversified. There are currently more than 14 SIM facilities worldwide, and they have been in a constant state of evolution. This paper reviews the current state of SIM research worldwide and the related pivotal technological developments in the fields of both biophysics and radiobiology.Representative applications and the perspective of SIM are also introduced and discussed.

  2. Consequences of anorectal cancer atlas implementation in the cooperative group setting: Radiobiologic analysis of a prospective randomized in silico target delineation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to ascertain the subsequent radiobiological impact of using a consensus guideline target volume delineation atlas. Materials and methods: Using a representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed IMRT rectal cancer clinical trial, gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical/planning target volumes (CTV/PTV) were contoured by 13 physician observers (Phase 1). The observers were then randomly assigned to follow (atlas) or not-follow (control) a consensus guideline/atlas for anorectal cancers, and instructed to re-contour the same case (Phase 2). Results: The atlas group was found to have increased tumor control probability (TCP) after the atlas intervention for both the CTV (p < 0.0001) and PTV1 (p = 0.0011) with decreasing normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for small intestine, while the control group did not. Additionally, the atlas group had reduced variance in TCP for all target volumes and reduced variance in NTCP for the bowel. In Phase 2, the atlas group had increased TCP relative to the control for CTV (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Visual atlas and consensus treatment guideline usage in the development of rectal cancer IMRT treatment plans reduced the inter-observer radiobiological variation, with clinically relevant TCP alteration for CTV and PTV volumes

  3. Radiobiological parameters of four glioblastoma compared to four other histological types of human tumor xenografts in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor of the central nervous system with aggressive biological behavior and a fatal clinical outcome. Several radiobiological parameters might contribute to these poor results. In this study, we investigated seventeen biological parameters of four GBM xenografts and compared the results with four other histological types of human tumor xenografts in nude mice. Methods and Materials: Most of the xenografts retained the individual histological features of their original tumor types. Four GBM xenografts (U87, HP555, MMC1 and HGL21), two squamous cell carcinomas (SCC21 and FaDu), one soft tissue sarcoma (STS26T), and colon cancer (HCT15) xenografts were used. The tumors were implanted in the hindleg of 5-6 Gy WBI nude mice. The following parameters were investigated for most of the xenografts: fractionated TCD50 (the dose of radiation which controls 50% of the tumors) using 30 fractions in 15 days. The parameters pO2, IFP (interstitial fluid pressure), Tpot, SF2 (plastic and Courtenay), PE (plating efficiency), D0, GSH, TCD50 single dose in oxic and hypoxic conditions, the rate of metastasis in SCID mice, VDT (volume doubling time), spontaneous apoptosis, induced apoptosis after 30 and 60 Gy and p53 over-expression. Results: Using the t-test, there was a significantly less spontaneous apoptosis in GBM xenografts when compared with the other histological types. However, no significant difference was found between both groups of xenografts in the remaining biological parameters investigated. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that, with the exception of spontaneous apoptosis, no significant difference was found in fifteen biological parameters between GBM xenografts and the other histological types implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The data suggests that the classical radiobiological parameters cannot explain the poor response of GBM to radiation. Supported by NCI Grant CA13311

  4. Development of applicable software containing radiobiological and physical indices to evaluate radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seu Ran; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Yeon [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stafnord University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) provides more conformal dose distribution to the morphologically and physiologically changed tumor volumes during fractionated radiation therapy (RT). To develop an enhanced treatment plan evaluation tool based on multi-modality imaging which incorporates physical and radiobiological parameters, the software system was developed using MATLAB v.7.10.0499 (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). The application of plan evaluation can help the user choose more biologically optimal treatment plans and potentially predict treatment outcome more accurately. The radiotherapy planning based on the multi-modality images had more accurate results than that of based on only CT images in both physical and radiobiological perspectives.

  5. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part I: physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Berthold [Hospital Weiden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Weiden (Germany); Block, Andreas [Hospital Dortmund, Institute for Medical Radiation Physics and Radiation Protection, Dortmund (Germany); Schaefer, Ulrich [Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Bert, Christoph; Mueller, Reinhold [University Hospitals Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Jung, Horst [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Roedel, Franz [University Hospital Goethe-University, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2015-09-15

    Synopsis of the introductory paragraph of the DEGRO consensus S2e-guideline recommendations for the radiotherapy of benign disorders, including physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk. This work is based on the S2e-guideline recommendations published November 14, 2013. The basic principles of radiation physics and treatment delivery, evaluation of putative underlying radiobiological mechanisms, and the assessment of genetic and cancer risk following low-dose irradiation will be presented. Radiation therapy of benign diseases is performed according to similar physical principles as those governing treatment of malignant diseases in radiation oncology, using the same techniques and workflows. These methods comprise usage of orthovoltage X-ray units, gamma irradiation facilities, linear accelerators (LINACs), and brachytherapy. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models recently confirmed the clinically observed anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose X-irradiation, and implicated a multitude of radiobiological mechanisms. These include modulation of different immunological pathways, as well as the activities of endothelial cells, mono- and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and macrophages. The use of effective dose for radiogenic risk assessment and the corresponding tumor incidence rate of 5.5 %/Sv are currently controversially discussed. Some authors argue that the risk of radiation-induced cancers should be estimated on the basis of epidemiological data. However, such data are rarely available at present and associated with high variability. Current radiobiological studies clearly demonstrate a therapeutic effectiveness of radiation therapy used to treat benign diseases and implicate various molecular mechanisms. Radiogenic risks should be taken into account when applying radiation treatment for benign diseases. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung des einfuehrenden Kapitels der DEGRO-S2e-Leitlinie zur Strahlentherapie gutartiger Erkrankungen

  6. Index to the Journal of American Indian Education, Vol. 1, No. 1 - Vol. 8, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Charlotte Ann

    All articles (112) that appeared in the "Journal of American Indian Education" (JAIE), Vol. 1., No. 1 (June 1961) through Vol. 8, No 1 (October 1968) are indexed and annotated. The publication is divided into 3 parts: (1) annotations listed in order of appearance in JAIE by volume, number, and page; (2) author index; and (3) subject index. Later…

  7. A community call for a dedicated radiobiological research facility to support particle beam cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Dosanjh, Manjit;

    2012-01-01

    Recently more than one hundred researchers followed an invitation to a brainstorming meeting on the topic of a future dedicated radio-biological and radio-physical research center. 100 more joint the meeting via webcast. After a day of presentations and discussions it was clear, that an urgent need...

  8. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once

  9. Radiobiological evaluation of forward and inverse IMRT using different fractionations for head and neck tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capela Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To quantify the radiobiological advantages obtained by an Improved Forward Planning technique (IFP and two IMRT techniques using different fractionation schemes for the irradiation of head and neck tumours. The conventional radiation therapy technique (CONVT was used here as a benchmark. Methods Seven patients with head and neck tumours were selected for this retrospective planning study. The PTV1 included the primary tumour, PTV2 the high risk lymph nodes and PTV3 the low risk lymph nodes. Except for the conventional technique where a maximum dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed to the PTV1, 70.2 Gy, 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy were prescribed respectively to PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3. Except for IMRT2, all techniques were delivered by three sequential phases. The IFP technique used five to seven directions with a total of 15 to 21 beams. The IMRT techniques used five to nine directions and around 80 segments. The first, IMRT1, was prescribed with the conventional fractionation scheme of 1.8 Gy per fraction delivered in 39 fractions by three treatment phases. The second, IMRT2, simultaneously irradiated the PTV2 and PTV3 with 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively, while the PTV1 was boosted with six subsequent fractions of 1.8 Gy. Tissue response was calculated using the relative seriality model and the Poisson Linear-Quadratic-Time model to simulate repopulation in the primary tumour. Results The average probability of total tumour control increased from 38% with CONVT to 80% with IFP, to 85% with IMRT1 and 89% with IMRT2. The shorter treatment time and larger dose per fraction obtained with IMRT2 resulted in an 11% increase in the probability of control in the PTV1 with respect to IFP and 7% relatively to IMRT1 (p Conclusions A significant improvement in treatment outcome was obtained with IMRT compared to conventional radiation therapy. The practical and biological advantages of IMRT2, employing a shorter treatment time, may

  10. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated

  11. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory

  12. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C. [Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Pyakuryal, A [University Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Narayanasamy, Ganesh [UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  13. Crisis Communication (Handbooks of Communication Science Vol. 23)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vol. 23 - The Handbook of Communication Science General editors: Peter J. Schultz and Paul Cobley......Vol. 23 - The Handbook of Communication Science General editors: Peter J. Schultz and Paul Cobley...

  14. Dynamics of structures '89. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings, comprising 3 volumes published by the Plzen Centre of the Czechoslovak Society for Science and Technology (Vol. 1 and 2) and by Skoda Works in Plzen (Vol. 3), contain 107 papers, out of which 8 fall within the INIS Subject Scope; these deal with problems related to the earthquake resistance of nuclear power plants. Attention is paid to the evaluation of seismic characteristics of nuclear power plant equipment, to the equipment testing and to calculations of its dynamic characteristics under simulated seismic stress. (Z.M.)

  15. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy{sup −1} (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy{sup −1}), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 10{sup 6} (95% CI 1.5 × 10{sup 6}-2.1 × 10{sup 7}). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy.

  16. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex II: PSI life sciences and Institute for Medical Radiobiology Newsletter 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annex to the PSI Annual Report 1996 reports on the progress achieved by the PSI Department II during 1996 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography and medical radiobiology. figs., tab., refs

  17. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  19. Modeling detector response in solid-state systems for radiation therapy and radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugtenburg, R.P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    In order for the many advantageous properties of solid-state dosimeters to be realised in clinic, strategies must be evolved for the calibration of detector systems for an ever expanding range of radiation sources including spectrally complex and mixed radiation fields. Monte Carlo models of the source and detector systems provide a means to account in a precise way for energy absorbed in the detector allowing for primary and secondary radiation processes including multiple scattering. Solid- state dosimeters including Si diodes, MOSFET, diamond detectors and doped optical fibres have been calibrated for dose in monoenergetic synchrotron X-rays in the range 5-50 keV, for quasi monoenergetic X-rays sources from 20-200 keV and for megavoltage X-ray and proton sources, such as are used in radical radiation therapy. With careful consideration of the elemental composition of the detector it is possible to achieve high quality agreement (2-3%) between measurement and Monte Carlo models of the variation of the detector response over a wide energy range. This information is needed in radiation therapy dosimetry where, for large external X-ray beams, detectors see a mixture of high energy primary photons and low energy (e.g. Compton scattered and pair-production-annihilation) photons. Typically, for solid-state detectors, different cavity theories are required for the two energy groups. In addition, high-Z constituents in detectors lead to an enhanced photoelectric absorption, which in the case of pure silicon detectors is up to 8 times greater than the tissue equivalent response. Information from maps of the elemental composition in the detectors, obtained via XRF and PIXE, is used in the models. Monte Carlo models are also being developed for contributions to the response from electron transport, including the microdosimetric response of detectors. Current Monte Carlo codes are able to handle large variations in density that typify tissue equivalent gas

  20. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on shield design for a 60-day lunar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray exposure are analyzed to determine their effect on engineering designs for a first lunar outpost - a 60-day mission. Quantitative estimates of shield mass requirements as a function of a radiobiological uncertainty factor are given for a simplified vehicle structure. The additional shield mass required for compensation is calculated as a function of the uncertainty in galactic cosmic ray exposure, and this mass is found to be as large as a factor of 3 for a lunar transfer vehicle. The additional cost resulting from this mass is also calculated. These cost estimates are then used to exemplify the cost-effectiveness of research.

  1. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  2. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, X.; Penagaricano, J.; Zheng, D.; Morrill, S.; Zhang, X; Corry, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Han, E. Y.; Hardee, M.; Ratanatharathom, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dos...

  3. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  4. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Jac A Nickoloff

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilitie...

  5. Installation of a flow cytometry facility and some applications in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow cytometry has enormous potential in many areas of experimental pathology. Details of the installation and commissioning of a flow cytometer at the Harwell Laboratory are described. Following an explanation of the principles of flow cytometry, several applications to specific problems in radiobiology are discussed. Also included are results of some preliminary studies with the Harwell flow cytometer on samples such as blood, bone marrow, macrophages and cell cultures, and a discussion of future applications. (author)

  6. Radiobiological investigations of the accelerators at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) has the different accelerators of heavy charged particles for various energies. The radiobiological investigations at these machines have been commenced some tens years ago. The main task of scientific research at the Laboratory of Radiation Biology of JINR is connected with investigations of genetic effects of accelerated charged particles with wide spectrum of energies. Using accelerated heavy ions with low energy, the following directions of researches in radiobiology and radiation genetics were performed: study of RBE problem in connection with DNA repair processes; investigation of the molecular mechanisms of point and structural mutation induction in prokaryotic cells and the influence of the repair systems on the mutagenic processes after irradiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET); study of the SOS-response of bacterial cells by using SOS-chromo test, SOS-lux test and by criteria of α-prophage induction in lysogenic bacteria after irradiation by heavy ions; study of the regularities of gene mutation inductions in yeast cells under action of ionizing radiation with different LET; investigations of the regularities of unstable and stable chromosomal aberrations (translocations) in human cells under action of ionizing radiation with wide LET range; study of mutagenic (HPRT gene) effects in mammalian cells in culture after heavy charged particle irradiation and chromosomal instability in HPRT-mutant clones after irradiation; study of the cytogenetic effects in mammalian cells irradiated by heavy ions in low doses. The radiobiological investigations with high energy are carried out at the Nuclotron - the new JINR accelerator. The programme involves the most vital tasks of modern radiobiology: study of the regularities and mechanisms of stable and unstable chromosome aberration induction in human cells; genetic control of check-point regulation in low eukaryotic cells; study of the

  7. Radiobiological work using a negative pion beam at the Rutherford Laboratory 1971-76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed in two sections: physics experiments (including, inter alia, dose measurement, LET distribution, radiation products of spallation); radiobiological studies (including separate reports as follows: review of experimental programme; some in vivo effects of negative pions in mice; survival and recovery of Hela cells in vitro; negative pion dose-response curves for frozen Hela cells; response of vicia faba to irradiation with negative pions; pion experiments with chromosome aberrations). (U.K.)

  8. The impact of modeling nuclear fragmentation on delivered dose and radiobiology in ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Hansen, David C; Teiwes, Ricky; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Jäkel, Oliver; Bassler, Niels

    2012-08-21

    The importance of nuclear interactions for ion therapy arises from the influence of the particle spectrum on, first, radiobiology and therefore also on treatment planning, second, the accuracy of measuring dose and, third, the delivered dose distribution. This study tries to determine the qualitative as well as the quantitative influence of the modeling of inelastic nuclear interactions on ion therapy. Thereby, three key disciplines are investigated, namely dose delivery, dose assessment and radiobiology. In order to perform a quantitative analysis, a relative comparison between six different descriptions of nuclear interactions is carried out for carbon ions. The particle transport is simulated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT10A while dose planning and radiobiology are covered by the analytic treatment planning program for particles TRiP, which determines the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with the local effect model. The obtained results show that the physical dose distribution can in principle be significantly influenced by the modeling of fragmentation (about 10% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections for a target volume ranging from 15 to 25 cm). While the impact of nuclear fragmentation on stopping power ratios can be neglected, the fluence correction factor may be influenced by the applied nuclear models. In contrast to the results for the physical dose, the variation of the RBE is only small (about 1% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections) suggesting a relatively weak dependence of radiobiology on the detailed composition of the particle energy spectrum of the mixed radiation field. Also, no significant change (about 0.2 mm) of the lateral penumbra of the RBE-weighted dose is observed.

  9. Fast neutrons set the pace. [Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, J.H.; Slabbert, J.P. (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Accelerator Centre)

    1985-01-01

    Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons have been initiated at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria. It was proposed some years ago to create a neutron therapy facility using the CSIR cyclotron. Neutrons are classified as high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. Biological damage occurring in tissue is a direct function of the LET of the incident radiation. To quantify the biological effects of different types of radiation on mammalian cells, several procedures and concepts have evolved from radiobiological research. Probably the most significant laboratory techniques developed, were the derivation of cell survival curves which are obtained by determining the number of cell colonies that have survived a certain radiation dose. A semi-logarithmic plot of surviving fraction versus the absorbed dose yields the survival curve. Dose modifying factors such as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the radiation can be quantified in terms of this relationship. A radiobiological programme has to be undertaken before patients can receive neutron therapy at the CSIR cyclotron. The article is a discussion of this programme.

  10. Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a laser–plasma electron beam line for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development of a Monte Carlo application, based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the characterization and optimization of electron beams for clinical applications produced by a laser-driven plasma source. The GEANT4 application is conceived so as to represent in the most general way the physical and geometrical features of a typical laser-driven accelerator. It is designed to provide standard dosimetric figures such as percentage dose depth curves, two-dimensional dose distributions and 3D dose profiles at different positions both inside and outside the interaction chamber. The application was validated by comparing its predictions to experimental measurements carried out on a real laser-driven accelerator. The work is aimed at optimizing the source, by using this novel application, for radiobiological studies and, in perspective, for medical applications. - Highlights: • Development of a Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit. • Experimental measurements carried out with a laser-driven acceleration system. • Validation of Geant4 application comparing experimental data with the simulated ones. • Dosimetric characterization of the acceleration system

  11. Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a laser–plasma electron beam line for radiobiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, D., E-mail: debora.lamia@ibfm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR – LATO, Cefalù (Italy); Russo, G., E-mail: giorgio.russo@ibfm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR – LATO, Cefalù (Italy); Casarino, C.; Gagliano, L.; Candiano, G.C. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR – LATO, Cefalù (Italy); Labate, L. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL) – National Institute of Optics INO CNR, Pisa (Italy); National Institute for Nuclear Physics INFN, Pisa Section and Frascati National Laboratories LNF (Italy); Baffigi, F.; Fulgentini, L.; Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Palla, D. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL) – National Institute of Optics INO CNR, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL) – National Institute of Optics INO CNR, Pisa (Italy); National Institute for Nuclear Physics INFN, Pisa Section and Frascati National Laboratories LNF (Italy); Gilardi, M.C. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology IBFM CNR, Segrate (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-21

    We report on the development of a Monte Carlo application, based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the characterization and optimization of electron beams for clinical applications produced by a laser-driven plasma source. The GEANT4 application is conceived so as to represent in the most general way the physical and geometrical features of a typical laser-driven accelerator. It is designed to provide standard dosimetric figures such as percentage dose depth curves, two-dimensional dose distributions and 3D dose profiles at different positions both inside and outside the interaction chamber. The application was validated by comparing its predictions to experimental measurements carried out on a real laser-driven accelerator. The work is aimed at optimizing the source, by using this novel application, for radiobiological studies and, in perspective, for medical applications. - Highlights: • Development of a Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit. • Experimental measurements carried out with a laser-driven acceleration system. • Validation of Geant4 application comparing experimental data with the simulated ones. • Dosimetric characterization of the acceleration system.

  12. Hypo-fractionated treatment in radiotherapy: radio-biological models Tcp and NTCP; Tratamiento hipofraccionado en radioterapia: modelos radiobiologicos TCP y NTCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A. J.; Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G., E-mail: lydia.paredes@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Departamento de Radioterapia, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    At the present time the breast cancer in Mexico has the first place of incidence of the malignant neoplasia s in the women, and represents 11.34% of all the cancer cases. On the other hand, the treatments for cancer by means of ionizing radiations have been dominated under the approaches of the medical radio-oncologists which have been based on test and error by many years. The radio-biological models, as the Tcp, NTCP and dosimetric variables, for their clinical application in the conventional radiotherapy with hypo-fractionation have as purpose predicting personalized treatment plans that they present most probability of tumor control and minor probability of late reactions, becoming this way support tools in the decisions taking for the patient treatments planning of Medical Physicists and Radio-oncologists. (Author)

  13. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) with {sup 124}I PET for {sup 131}I therapy of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.; Wahl, Richard L. [Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Atkins, Francis B.; Nostrand, Douglas van [The Washington Hospital Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Ladenson, Paul W. [Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Department of Endocrinology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer was the first and remains among the most successful radiopharmaceutical (RPT) treatments of cancer although its clinical use is based on imprecise dosimetry. The positron emitting radioiodine, {sup 124}I, in combination with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has made it possible to measure the spatial distribution of radioiodine in tumors and normal organs at high resolution and sensitivity. The CT component of PET/CT has made it simpler to match the activity distribution to the corresponding anatomy. These developments have facilitated patient-specific dosimetry (PSD), utilizing software packages such as three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD), which can account for individual patient differences in pharmacokinetics and anatomy. We highlight specific examples of such calculations and discuss the potential impact of {sup 124}I PET/CT on thyroid cancer therapy. (orig.)

  14. Z Physics at LEP 1. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this final report from the Workshop on Z Physics at LEP can be divided into two parts. The first part, comprising Vols. 1 and 2, is a relatively concise but fairly complete handbook on the physics of e+e- annihilation near the Z peak (with normal LEP luminosity and unpolarized beams, appropriate for the first phase of LEP operation). The second part (Vol. 3) is devoted to a review of the existing Monte Carlo event generators for LEP physics. A special effort has been made to co-ordinate the different parts of this report, with the aim of achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than having simply a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  15. Z physics at LEP 1. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this final report from the Workshop on Z Physics at LEP can be divided into two parts. The first part, comprising Vols. 1 and 2, is a relatively concise but fairly complete handbook on the physics of e+e- annihilation near the Z peak (with normal LEP luminosity and unpolarized beams, appropriate for the first phase of LEP operation). The second part (Vol. 3) is devoted to a review of the existing Monte Carlo event generators for LEP physics. A special effort has been made to co-ordinate the different parts of this report, with the aim of achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than having simply a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  16. volBrain: An Online MRI Brain Volumetry System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V; Coupé, Pierrick

    2016-01-01

    The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es), which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results. PMID:27512372

  17. volBrain: An Online MRI Brain Volumetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    2016-01-01

    The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es), which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results.

  18. volBrain: an online MRI brain volumetry system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. Manjon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es, which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results.

  19. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the LCH workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  20. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentaiton and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  1. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol.1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol.2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol.3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  2. Radiobiology of Radiosurgery for the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Santacroce; Kamp, Marcel A.; Wilfried Budach; Daniel Hänggi

    2013-01-01

    According to Leksell radiosurgery is defined as “the delivery of a single, high dose of irradiation to a small and critically located intracranial volume through the intact skull.” Before its birth in the early 60s and its introduction in clinical therapeutic protocols in late the 80s dose application in radiation therapy of the brain for benign and malignant lesions was based on the administration of cumulative dose into a variable number of fractions. The rationale of dose fractionation is ...

  3. Radiobiological evaluation of forward and inverse IMRT using different fractionations for head and neck tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify the radiobiological advantages obtained by an Improved Forward Planning technique (IFP) and two IMRT techniques using different fractionation schemes for the irradiation of head and neck tumours. The conventional radiation therapy technique (CONVT) was used here as a benchmark. Seven patients with head and neck tumours were selected for this retrospective planning study. The PTV1 included the primary tumour, PTV2 the high risk lymph nodes and PTV3 the low risk lymph nodes. Except for the conventional technique where a maximum dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed to the PTV1, 70.2 Gy, 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy were prescribed respectively to PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3. Except for IMRT2, all techniques were delivered by three sequential phases. The IFP technique used five to seven directions with a total of 15 to 21 beams. The IMRT techniques used five to nine directions and around 80 segments. The first, IMRT1, was prescribed with the conventional fractionation scheme of 1.8 Gy per fraction delivered in 39 fractions by three treatment phases. The second, IMRT2, simultaneously irradiated the PTV2 and PTV3 with 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively, while the PTV1 was boosted with six subsequent fractions of 1.8 Gy. Tissue response was calculated using the relative seriality model and the Poisson Linear-Quadratic-Time model to simulate repopulation in the primary tumour. The average probability of total tumour control increased from 38% with CONVT to 80% with IFP, to 85% with IMRT1 and 89% with IMRT2. The shorter treatment time and larger dose per fraction obtained with IMRT2 resulted in an 11% increase in the probability of control in the PTV1 with respect to IFP and 7% relatively to IMRT1 (p < 0.05). The average probability of total patient complications was reduced from 80% with CONVT to 61% with IFP and 31% with IMRT. The corresponding probability of complications in the ipsilateral parotid was 63%, 42% and 20%; in the contralateral parotid it was 50%, 20

  4. Molecular genetic medicine. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, T. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    Theodore Friedmann has put together an interesting spectrum of articles for volume 2 of Molecular Genetic Medicine. Perhaps related to his own interest in the X chromosome, three articles deal with X-chromosomal topics, while two deal with autosomal disorders and two treat viral disorders. The fragile-X syndrome is thoroughly covered by Brown and Jenkins with an article that is heavily weighted to clinical aspects and now out-of-date RFLP approaches. The timeliness of the volume is insured by the coverage (albeit brief) that they give to the cloning of FMR-1. Gartler et al. present a balanced review of X inactivation - the oft-surveyed subject was comprehensively covered in a manner that provided new perspectives. Lambert et al. provide an exhaustive review of natural and induced mutation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. For autosomal disorders, an excellent review of the molecular genetics of hemoglobin syntheses and their alterations in disease is provided by Berg and Schecter. The level of detail presented seemed just right to this reviewer. A concise review of recent advances in the study of Down syndrome and its animal model, trisomy 16 mice, is provided by Holtzman and Epstein. With regard to viral topics, Chisari thoughtfully reviews hepatitis B virus structure and function and the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved in its induction of hepatocellular carcinoma. Wong-Staal and Haseltine's up-to-date review of the increasingly complex regulatory genes of HIV is marred by a mix-up in figure legends - an exception to an otherwise well-proofread book. In summary, this is a good volume of its type and is recommended for those who might benefit from reading such review articles.

  5. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-Su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying, Hong-Mei

    2013-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at one fraction per day, simulating a clinical dose-time-fractionation pattern. The longer the interval between the exposures, the more cells survived. To investigate the in vivoeffect, we used sixty-four nude mice implanted with A549 cells in the back legs, randomly assigned into eight groups. A 15 Gy radiation dose was divided into different subfractions. The maximum and minimum tumor diameters were recorded to determine tumor growth. Tumor growth was delayed for groups with prolonged delivery time (40 min) compared to the group receiving a single dose of 15 Gy (P< 0.05), and tumors with a 20 min delivery time had delayed growth compared to those with a 40 min delivery time [20' (7.5 Gy × 2 F) vs 40' (7.5 Gy × 2 F), P= 0.035; 20' (3 Gy × 5 F) vs 40' (3 Gy × 5 F); P= 0.054; 20' (1.67 Gy × 9 F) vs 40' (1.67 Gy × 9 F), P= 0.028]. A prolonged delivery time decreased the radiobiological effects, so we strongly recommend keeping the delivery time as short as possible. PMID:23090953

  6. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  7. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A.; Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G.; Posadas V, A. [Hospital Angeles Lomas, Av. Vialidad de la Barranca s/n, Col. Valle de las Palmas, 52763 Huixquilucan de Degallado, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan, Esq. Jesus Carranza s/n, Col. Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez L, A.; Flores C, J. M., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Tlalpan, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  8. Extrapolation ionisation chamber measurements on beta-emitting sources produced for the CEGB collaborative radiobiology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the structure and application of an extrapolation ionisation chamber used for measuring dose-rates from plane and point beta-emitting sources. These measurements form the basis of the dosimetry for a collaborative radiobiological study of skin to study both stochastic and non-stochastic effects. A small sample from the wide range of measurements undertaken in the programme has been selected to illustrate the procedures involved. The extrapolation chamber is currently being automated and it is intended that this report should provide a source reference to the basis of the measurements made between 1977-86. (author)

  9. Physical and cellular radiobiological properties of heavy ions in relation to cancer therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of experiments have been carried out in vitro on several mammalian cell lines with carbon, neon, silicon and argon beams at 14 and 24 cm depth penetration. The results of these experiments substantiate the conceptual basis for physical and radiobiological advantages of accelerated heavy-ion beams in cancer therapy. The best biologically effective depth dose ratio for situations corresponding to therapy needs can be obtained with accelerated carbon beams. The depression of the oxygen effect with silicon or argon ion beams is greater than that achievable with neutrons or pions, or with heavy ions of lower atomic number

  10. Research in radiobiology. Annual report of work in progress in the Internal Irradiation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival data on 160 nonirradiated control beagles of the University of Utah's Radiobiology Laboratory were analyzed. The animals died during a period from 1958 into 1979. The average age at death of animals which died during the 1958 to 1965 interval was significantly less than that of those whose deaths occurred in the 1965 to 1979 interval. The best estimate for average age at death for Super-Selected nonirradiated control beagles of the colony is 4864 +- 901 days. The Super-Selected dogs excluded those dying because of epilepsy, lymphosarcoma, lymphoma or accidents, and also excluded all dogs dying before 1966

  11. Environmental Research Division annual report: Center for Human Radiobiology, July 1982-June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fourteenth Annual Report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. New cases of bone cancer and carcinoma of head sinuses are occurring at a rate of about one per year in patients who acquired radium burdens 50 to 60 years ago. Several papers deal with dosimetry of alpha-emitting radionuclides in man, in animals, or in the environment. The report concludes with an appendix containing data on the exposure of 2312 persons whose radium content has been determined and an appendix listing the classical radium-related malignancies (osteosarcomas and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid)

  12. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed.

  13. [SMEAC Newsletters, Science Education, Vol. 1, No. 1--Vol. 2, No. 1, 1967-1968].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education, Columbus, OH.

    Each of these newsletters, produced by the ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education, contains information concerning center publications and other items considered of interest to researchers and educators of various education levels. Vol. 1, No. 1 highlights selected bibliographies (no longer produced…

  14. [SMEAC Newsletters, Science Education, Vol. 2, No. 2--Vol. 2, No. 3, 1969].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education, Columbus, OH.

    Each of these newsletters, produced by the ERIC Information Analysis Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education, Contains information concerning center publications and activities, as well as other items considered of interest to researchers and educators of various educational levels. One of the emphases in Vol. 2, No. 2, is a…

  15. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Kronenberg, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  16. Development of a soft X-ray microprobe for single cell radiobiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liang; YAN Jingwen; JIANG Shiping; YU Yang

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for radiobiological studies was developed which deliver precise doses of radiation to the selected individual cells. The facility used synchrotron radiation as soft X-ray source. A zone plate combining with a pinhole produced a fine probe from bending magnet for single cell irradiating with defined doses. The diameter of microprobe at the target position was about 2 μm by scanning a knife-edge with an AXUV photo diode. The fluxes of soft X-rays at 516.7 eV (2.4 nm) were about 5.4×104 photons/s.100mA measured with the photo diode. The absorbed dose rate for typical yeast cells was about 11.34 Gy/s with the storage current of 100 mA. A preliminary experiment for yeast cells irradiation has shown that the microprobe had a definite biological effect for radiobiological investigations. The soft X-ray microprobe at "water window" region has provided a useful tool for single cell irradiating damage and a capability of individually irradiating a certain numbers of cells each time.

  17. Preparatory study of a ground-based space radiobiology program in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has long been acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures, NASA initiated several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program, which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently established an ambitious exploration program (AURORA), and within this program it has been decided to include a space radiation research program. Europe has a long tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators, generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy. This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk. To support research in this field in Europe, ESA issued a call for tender in 2005 for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation (IBER). This study will provide guidance on future ESA-supported activities in space radiation research by identifying the most appropriate European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation, and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities. The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics, and a detailed proposal for experimental campaigns for the following 5 10 years.

  18. A model to describe potential effects of chemotherapy on critical radiobiological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Desco, M. M.; Antoranz, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Although chemo- and radiotherapy can annihilate tumors on their own. they are also used in coadjuvancy: improving local effects of radiotherapy using chemotherapy as a radiosensit.izer. The effects of radiotherapy are well described by current radiobiological models. The goal of this work is to describe a discrete radiotherapy model, that has been previously used describe high radiation dose response as well as unusual radio-responses of some types of tumors (e.g. prostate cancer), to obtain a model of chemo+radiotherapy that can describe how the outcome of their combination is a more efficient removal of the tumor. Our hypothesis is that, although both treatments haven different mechanisms, both affect similar key points of cell metabolism and regulation, that lead to cellular death. Hence, we will consider a discrete model where chemotherapy may affect a fraction of the same targets destroyed by radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy reaches all cells equally, chemotherapy diffuses through a tumor attaining lower concentration in its center and higher in its surface. With our simulations we study the enhanced effect of combined therapy treatment and how it depends on the tissue critical parameters (the parameters of the lion-extensive radiobiological model), the number of “targets” aimed at by chemotherapy, and the concentration and diffusion rate of the drug inside the tumor. The results show that an equivalent, cliemo-radio-dose can be computed that allows the prediction of the lower radiation dose that causes the same effect than a radio-only treatment.

  19. The effect of dose escalation on gastric toxicity when treating lower oesophageal tumours: a radiobiological investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using radiobiological modelling to estimate normal tissue toxicity, this study investigates the effects of dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in lower third oesophageal tumours on the stomach. 10 patients with lower third oesophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE 1 database (ISCRT47718479) with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 348 cm3. The original 3D conformal plans (50Gy3D) were compared to newly created RapidArc plans of 50GyRA and 60GyRA, the latter using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique using a boost volume, PTV2. Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were compared. There was a significant increase in NTCP of the stomach wall when moving from the 50GyRA to the 60GyRA plans (11–17 %, Wilcoxon signed rank test, p = 0.01). There was a strong correlation between the NTCP values of the stomach wall and the volume of the stomach wall/PTV 1 and stomach wall/PTV2 overlap structures (R = 0.80 and R = 0.82 respectively) for the 60GyRA plans. Radiobiological modelling suggests that increasing the prescribed dose to 60Gy may be associated with a significantly increased risk of toxicity to the stomach. It is recommended that stomach toxicity be closely monitored when treating patients with lower third oesophageal tumours with 60Gy

  20. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  1. Research in radiobiology: Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1950's the Atomic Energy Commission established at the University of Utah a large, long-term study designed to investigate the toxicity of internally deposited radionuclides in beagles. The first animals were injected on December 1, 1952 and thus began an odyssey unusual in modern science both for its duration and continued scientific interest and relevance. The original dogs were injected with 239Pu and 226Ra. Later, studies were initiated with 241Am, 249Cf, 252Cf, 253Es, 224Ra, 228Ra, 90Sr, and 228Th. These studies were unique and have and will continue to contribute valuable scientific information on the behavior and effects of these substances in biological systems. We feel that the data collected from these studies will be useful for many decades to come as we ask more demanding questions relative to radionuclides and environmental, biological and health issues. While this publication will be the last of our series Research in Radiobiology, the lifespan carcinogenesis studies are continuing under a collaborative arrangement with the I.T.R.I. Beginning in 1988, the colony status tables of dogs in the Utah studies and reports of research by the Radiobiology faculty will be included in the annual I.T.R.I. report. Under our new collaborative arrangements with the I.T.R.I. for the conduct of the lifespan carcinogenesis studies, we expect a continued high level of scientific productivity from our faculty

  2. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue. PMID:9806616

  3. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 3D conformal versus intensity modulated planning techniques for prostate bed radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I; Montana, Gustavo S; Oleson, James R

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  4. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yimei, E-mail: yhuang2@hfhs.org; Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  5. Physics at LEP2. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of the Workshop on Physics at LEP2, held at CERN during 1995. The first part of vol. 1 is devoted to aspects of machine physics of particular relevance to experiments, including the energy, luminosity and interaction regions, as well as the measurement of beam energy. The second part of vol. 1 is a relatively concise, but fairly complete, handbook on the physics of e+e- annihilation above the WW threshold and up to √s∼200 GeV. It contains discussions on WW cross-sections and distributions, W mass determination, Standard Model processes, QCD and gamma-gamma physics, as well as aspects of discovery physics, such as Higgs, new particle searches, triple gauge boson couplings and Z'. The second volume contains a review of the existing Monte Carlo generators for LEP2 physics. These include generators for WW physics, QCD and gamma-gamma processes, Bhabha scattering and discovery physics. A special effort was made to co-ordinate the different parts, with a view to achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than just publishing a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  6. Physics at LEP2. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is final report of the Workshop on Physics at LEP2, held at CERN during 1995. The first part of vol. 1 is devoted to aspects of machine physics of particular relevance to experiments, including the energy, luminosity and interaction regions, as well as the measurement of beam energy. The second part of vol. 1 is a relatively concise, but fairly complete, handbook on the physics of e+e- annihilation above the WW threshold and up to √s∼200 GeV. It contains discussions on WW cross-sections and distributions, W mass determination, Standard Model processes, QCD and gamma-gamma physics, as well as aspects of discovery physics, such as Higgs, new particle searches, triple gauge boson couplings and Z'. The second volume contains a review of the existing Monte Carlo generators for LEP2 physics. These include generators for WW physics, QCD and gamma-gamma processes, Bhabha scattering and discovery physics. A special effort was made to co-ordinate the different parts, with a view to achieving a systematic and balanced review of the subject, rather than just publishing a collection of separate contributions. (orig.)

  7. Literature study of the radiobiological parameters of Caesium-137 required for evaluating internal irradiation doses as a function of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reassembles information published in scientific literature on radiobiological parameters of Cs-137, necessary for the estimate of the internal irradiation dose of man according to his age (during growth). The data are completed by a commented review of the mathematical models, proposed in order to value the irradiation doses from ingested cesium and the biological parameters. (author)

  8. 77 FR 68155 - The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... NRC's E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to... filing requirements of the NRC's E-Filing Rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007) apply to appeals of NRC... COMMISSION The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No....

  9. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once. (KRM)

  10. Proton Radiobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Tommasino; Marco Durante

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming...

  11. Micro-and nanodosimetry for radiobiological planning in radiotherapy and cancer risk assessment in radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Microdosimetry and nanodosimetry can provide unique information for prediction of radiobiological properties of radiation, which is important in radiation therapy for accurate dose planning and in radiation protection for cancer induction risk assessment. This demand measurements of the pattern of energies deposited by ionizing radiation on cellular scale and DNA levels.Silicon microelectronics technology is offering a unique opportunity for replacing gas proportional counters (TEPC) with miniature detectors for regional microdosimetry. Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology has been used for the development of arrays of micron size sensitive volumes for modelling energy deposited in biological cells. The challenge in silicon microdosimetry is the development of well defined sensitive volume (SV) and full charge collection deposited by ionizing radiation in the SV. First generation SOI microdosimeters were developed at CMRP and investigated in a wide range of radiation fields for proton and neutron therapies and recently on isotopic neutron sources and heavy ions with energy up to lGeV/jj,m which are typical for deep space radiation environment. Microdosimetric spectra were obtained in a phantom that are well matched to TEPC and Monte Carlo simulations. Evidence that radiations with the same LET exhibit different biological effects demand development of new sensors sensitive to the track structure of ions or the type of particle for prediction of radiobiological effect of radiation using radiobiological models. New monolithic Si AE-E telescope of cellular size for simultaneous regional microdosimetry and particle identification will be presented and results will be discussed. The new design of the SOI microdosimeter is based on 3D micron and submicron size of Si SVs. This approach allows improvement in the accuracy of the Si microdosimetry because of full charge collection and the ability to measure low LET as low as 0.01 keV/jjm, which is similar to TEPC

  12. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  13. Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

  14. A background to risk analysis. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles, and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justification or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appendix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 4 treats human error in plant operation. (BP)

  15. A background to risk analysis. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justification or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appendix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 2 treats generic methods of qualitative failure analysis. (BP)

  16. A background to risk analysis. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles, and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justifi- cation or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appenix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 3 contains chapters on quantification of risk, failure and accident probability, risk analysis and design, and examles of risk analysis for process plant. (BP)

  17. A background risk analysis. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 4-volumes report gives a background of ideas, principles, and examples which might be of use in developing practical methods for risk analysis. Some of the risk analysis techniques, described are somewhat experimental. The report is written in an introductory style, but where some point needs further justification or evaluation, this is given in the form of a chapter appendix. In this way, it is hoped that the report can serve two purposes, - as a basis for starting risk analysis work and as a basis for discussing effectiveness of risk analysis procedures. The report should be seen as a preliminary stage, prior to a program of industrial trials of risk analysis methods. Vol. 1 contains a short history of risk analysis, and chapters on risk, failures, errors and accidents, and general procedures for risk analysis. (BP)

  18. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, G.A.; Schubert, W.W.; Marshall, T.M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represents a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space. (author).

  19. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  20. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, April-June 1985. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The following titles are included in this collection of reprints: Presence of a high-affinity Ca(s+) - and Mg(2+) - dependent ATPase in rat peritoneal mast-cell membranes; Prostanoid production by lipopolysaccharide stimulated Kupffer cells; Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines; WR-2721 inhibition of radiation-induced prostaglandin excretion in rats; Effects of mixed neutron-gamma total-body irradiation on physical activity performance of rhesus monkeys; Immunologic and hematologic perturbations in models of combined injury; Hematopoiesis in conventional mice after wound trauma; Carrier generation recombination, and transport in organic crystals; Energy transfer and molecular weight effects on polymer luminescence. Keywords: Radiobiology; Military research.

  1. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Marshall, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space.

  2. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  3. Transnational science and collaborative networks. The case of Genetics and Radiobiology in Mexico, 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The transnational approach of the science and technology studies (S&TS) abandons the nation as a unit of analysis in order to understand the development of science history. It also abandons Euro-US-centred narratives in order to explain the role of international collaborative networks and the circulation of knowledge, people, artefacts and scientific practices. It is precisely under this perspective that the development of genetics and radiobiology in Mexico shall be analyzed, together with the pioneering work of the Mexican physician-turned-geneticist Alfonso León de Garay who spent two years in the Galton Laboratory in London under the supervision of Lionel Penrose. Upon his return de Garay funded the Genetics and Radiobiology Program of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy based on local needs and the aim of working beyond geographical limitations to thus facilitate the circulation of knowledge, practices and people. The three main lines of research conducted in the years after its foundation that were in line with international projects while responding to the national context were, first, cytogenetic studies of certain abnormalities, and the cytogenetics and anthropological studies of the Olympic Games held in Mexico in 1968; second, the study of the effects of radiation on hereditary material; and third, the study of population genetics in Drosophila and in Mexican indigenous groups. The program played a key role in reshaping the scientific careers of Mexican geneticists, and in transferring locally sourced research into broader networks. This case shows the importance of international collaborative networks and circulation in the constitution of national scientific elites, and also shows the national and transnational concerns that shaped local practices.

  4. Radiobiological research for improving cancer therapy in India: rationale, problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is emerging as a very important health hazard in India. According to recent studies by the Indian Council of Medical Research, about 2.25 million patients are presently suffering from different types of cancer in India. Approximately one million new cases are diagnosed, and nearly 0.3 million deaths occur every year on account of this disease. About 2/3rd of the cancers are at an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. However, the allocation of funds for healthcare in India to support the research efforts for developing more potent radio-chemotherapy protocols for cancer treatment is too little. Studies by the W.H.O. have estimated that less developed countries including India use less than 5% of world resources destined for cancer control. It follows from the above discussions that it is imperative to further encourage and diversify the radiobiological research in India. This can be achieved by creating radiobiological research facilities, mainly in all the cancer centers and post graduate medical institutions, and further expanding the upcoming laboratories in the universities such as Bikaner. Collaborative research programs between laboratories at different centers could facilitate systematic evaluation of various pharmacological agents and neutraceuticals for potential application for treatment of different cancers. Our studies on combination of radiation with temozolomide and certain adjuvants with selective effects on brain tumour cells will be very briefly discussed in this presentation. Finally the possible administrative set up and multi dimensional collaborations for cost effective utilization of existing resources to further augment radiation biology research will also be discussed

  5. Chasing Ghosts in Space Radiobiology Research: The Lost Focus on Non-Targeted Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Saganti, Premkumar; Cacao, Eliedonna

    2016-07-01

    The doses and dose-rates of astronaut exposures to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are accurately known, and lead to particle hits per cell nucleus from high charge and energy (HZE) particles of much less than one hit per cell per week. A large number of experiments have shown that additivity of biological effects is a valid assumption for space radiation exposures, while experiments at higher doses and dose-rates than occur in space continue to be a focus of the majority of space radiobiology research. Furthermore HZE particle exposures with mono-energetic particles manifest themselves as a mixed-radiation field due to the contributions of delta-rays and the random impact parameter of a particles track core to DNA and non-DNA targets in cells and tissues. The mixed-field manifestation of mono-energetic HZE particle exposures is well known from theoretical studies of microdosimetry and track structure. Additional mixed-field effects occur for single species experiments due to nuclear fragmentation in particle accelerator beam-lines and biological samples along with energy straggling. In contrast to these well known aspects of space radiobiology there are many open questions on the contribution of non-targeted effects to low dose and dose-rate exposures. Non-targeted effects (NTEs) include bystander effects and genomic instability, and have been shown to be the most important outstanding question for reducing uncertainties in space radiation cancer risk assessment. The dose-rate and radiation quality dependence of NTE's has not been established, while there is an over-arching need to develop 21st century experimental models of human cancer risk. We review possible mechanisms of NTE's and how new experiments to address these issues could be designed.

  6. Direct relationship between radiobiological hypoxia in tumors and monoclonal antibody detection of EF5 cellular adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Siemann, D W; Koch, C J; Lord, E M

    1996-07-29

    While the potential importance of hypoxia in limiting the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation has long been appreciated, methods for accurately quantifying the number of radiation-resistant hypoxic cells within tumors have been lacking. We have used the pentafluorinated derivative [2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)-acet amide] of etanidazole (EF5), which binds selectively to hypoxic cells. The adducts formed between EF5 and cellular proteins in the hypoxic cells were detected using the specific monoclonal antibody (MAb), ELK3-51 conjugated to the flurochrome Cy3, and the number of hypoxic cells was quantified by flow cytometry. To verify the validity of this technique for the detection of hypoxic cells, mice bearing KHT sarcomas were treated with various agents to alter tumor oxygenation and hence vary the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells. The percentage of EF5 binding cells was then compared directly with the clonogenic survival of the tumor cells following radiation treatment under the various pretreatment conditions. The results showed that allowing the mice to breathe carbogen (5% CO2/95% O2) prior to irradiation reduced clonogenic cell survival approx. 6-fold and led to an absence of cells binding high levels of EF5. In contrast, pretreating the tumor-bearing animals with either hydralazine, which decreased tumor blood flow, or phenylhydrazine hydrochloride, which made the mice anemic, increased tumor cell survival following irradiation 2- to 4-fold, indicative of an increase in the fraction of hypoxic tumor cells. EF5 measurements made under identical conditions illustrated a shift in the cells in the tumor to high EF5 binding. Our results demonstrate that flow cytometric measurement by fluorescent MAb binding to EF5 adducts may relate directly to radiobiological hypoxia in KHT tumors measured by conventional methods. PMID:8707411

  7. Light ions radiobiological effects on human tumoral cells: measurements modelling and application to hadron-therapy; Mesures et modelisation des effets radiobiologiques des ions legers sur des cellules tumorales humaines: application a l'hadrontherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalade, P

    2005-11-15

    In classical radiotherapy, the characteristics of photons interactions undergo limits for the treatment of radioresistant and not well located tumours. Pioneering treatments of patients at the Lawrence Laboratory at Berkeley has demonstrated two advantages of hadrons beams: the Relative Biologic Effect (the RBE) and the ballistic of the beams. Since 1994, the clinical centre at Chiba, has demonstrated successfully the applicability of the method. A physics group, managed by G. Kraft, at Darmstadt in Germany, has underlined the advantages of carbon beams. An European pool, called ENGIGHT (European Network for LIGHt ion Therapy) has been created in which the French ETOILE project appeared. The purpose of the thesis concerns measurements and models of 'in vitro' human cells survival. In the first part, the nowadays situation in particles interactions, tracks and cells structures and radiobiology is presented here. The second is devoted to the models based on the beam tracks and localization of the physical dose. Discussion of sensitivity to various parameters of the model has been realized with the help of numerical simulations. Finally the predictions of the improved model has been compared to experimental irradiations of human cells with argon and carbon beams of the GANIL machine. Conclusion of such study shows the performance and limits of a local model for predicting the radiobiological efficiency of light ions in hadron-therapy. (author)

  8. Radiobiology for eye plaque brachytherapy and evaluation of implant duration and radionuclide choice using an objective function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical optimization of Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaque brachytherapy is currently limited to tumor coverage, consensus prescription dosage, and dose calculations to ocular structures. The biologically effective dose (BED) of temporary brachytherapy treatments is a function of both chosen radionuclide R and implant duration T. This study endeavored to evaluate BED delivered to the tumor volume and surrounding ocular structures as a function of plaque position P, prescription dose, R, and T. Methods: Plaque-heterogeneity-corrected dose distributions were generated with MCNP5 for the range of currently available COMS plaques loaded with sources using three available low-energy radionuclides. These physical dose distributions were imported into the PINNACLE{sup 3} treatment planning system using the TG-43 hybrid technique and used to generate dose volume histograms for a T = 7 day implant within a reference eye geometry including the ciliary body, cornea, eyelid, foveola, lacrimal gland, lens, optic disc, optic nerve, retina, and tumor at eight standard treatment positions. The equation of Dale and Jones was employed to create biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs), allowing for BED volumetric analysis of all ROIs. Isobiologically effective prescription doses were calculated for T = 5 days down to 0.01 days, with BEDVHs subsequently generated for all ROIs using correspondingly reduced prescription doses. Objective functions were created to evaluate the BEDVHs as a function of R and T. These objective functions are mathematically accessible and sufficiently general to be applied to temporary or permanent brachytherapy implants for a variety of disease sites. Results: Reducing T from 7 to 0.01 days for a 10 mm plaque produced an average BED benefit of 26%, 20%, and 17% for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively, for all P; 16 and 22 mm plaque results were more position-dependent. {sup 103}Pd produced a 16

  9. Radiation-induced cardiac damage in early left breast cancer patients: Risk factors, biological mechanisms, radiobiology, and dosimetric constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today there is general awareness of the potential damage to the heart in left-sided (more than in right-sided) breast cancer radiotherapy (RT). Historical changes in tumor and heart doses are presented here along with the impact of different RT techniques and volumes. Individual and pharmacological risk factors are also examined with respect to radiation damage. The biological mechanisms of harm are only partially understood, such as the radiobiology of heart damage due to the presence of various radiosensitive structures and their topographic heterogeneity. Furthermore, individual variability may expose patients to higher or lower risks of late cardiac damage or death. Damage mechanisms and radiobiological characteristics in heart irradiation are presented in relation to dosimetric and biological parameters.

  10. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology; Optimizacion en Braquiterapia con la implementacion de la Radiobiologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, M.P.; Bourel, V.J.; Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Caneva, S. [Braqui S.R.L. Viamonte 1861, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  11. Workshop Arboretum Volčji potok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Kučan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From its constitution onwards, the Volčji Potok Arboretum has been caught between various conflicting orientations. It is both a scientific, research and educational institution, and a cultural monument with exquisite garden and landscape design features and areas of great natural value and built cultural heritage, as well as commercial venue. At the same time, it functions as a park and an area for mass events, a garden centre and nursery. This variety of functions has helped Arboretum to survive the pressures of time; however, partial and uncoordinated interventions have threatened its original mission and its image and generated a number of conflicting situations. The workshop, organised on the initiative of the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, which involved students from the Faculty of Architecture and students from the Department of Landscape Architecture of the Biotechnical Faculty in mixed groups, generated eight proposals to solve some of the most urgent problems by introducing optimised development with clearly defined goals and priorities.

  12. Spinal cord response to altered fractionation and re-irradiation: Radiobiological considerations and role of bioeffect models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of radiation oncologist is to implement an uncomplicated loco regional control of cancer by radiation therapy. The bioeffect of a physical dose depends on the nature of the tissue, fractionation scheme, dose rate and treatment time. The transformation of absorbed dose into a bioeffect dose is controlled by treatment variables and the radiobiological characteristics of the relevant tissue. Various bioeffect models have been proposed to predict the biological effect of radiotherapy treatments. Dale has proposed extrapolated response dose (ERD equations for external beam therapy, intracavitary brachytherapy and interstitial brachytherapy. Within the context of the LQ model, the parameter which quantifies the overall biological effect on a given tissue is the biologically effective dose (BED which is obtained by applying repopulation correction to ERD (Orton,. Thames proposed the total effect (TE concept based on the incomplete repair LQ model which accounts for the biological effect of a fractionated course of radiotherapy. Spinal cord myelitis limits the dose to tumours in the head and neck, thoracic and upper abdominal regions resulting in reduction of tumour control probability. Radiation myelopathy is one of the most devastating complications of clinical radiotherapy. Treatment techniques that are designed to minimize the risk of spinal cord injury are likely to underdose the tumour consequent failure to control the disease. Since radiation myelopathy results in severe and irreversible morbidity, it is important to establish the tolerance dose of the spinal cord. A number of patients have recently been reported to have developed radiation myelopathy following hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy. As the survival rates of patients increase, radiation oncologists are more frequently faced with the problem of treatment of late recurrence or second tumours situated within or close to previously treated site. A rationale for taking a

  13. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD)0, and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V40 = 60%, V50 = 50%, and V70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD0, and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V70. The gEUD and mEUD0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  14. Dosimetric measurements and radiobiological consequences of radioimmunotherapy in tumor bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of the hybridoma technology, the production of highly specific tumor associated monoclonal antibodies has provided new optimism for the adjuvant delivery of therapeutic radiation doses via radioimmunotherapy. The authors have used a modified form of the well-established TL dosimetry technology to measure the dose resulting from radioimmunotherapy experiments in tumor bearing mice. Their laboratory has designed and tested a miniature CaSO4:D TLD which fits conveniently inside a 20 gauge needle for the direct implantation of the dosimeter in an animal model undergoing radiolabeled antibody therapy. Direct measurement of absorbed dose from beta and gamma radiation in the animals may be obtained upon removal of the dosimeter at animal sacrifice or by surgery. This absorbed dose data may then be related to antibody affinity and localization data obtained by serial biodistribution studies. Using p96.5 melanoma antibody with a Brown Tumor Model in athymic mice, localization indices measured in the range of 2 to 4 and scored 4 to 7 days post antibody injection, yielded a tumor dose/whole body dose ratio of 1.10 +/- 0.04 (no enhancement). The dose to liver showed marker time-dependent enhancement relative to the whole body, however. An outline of suggested control radiobiological experiments to be performed in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy experiments has been included in order to provide comparative dose response data. 11 references, 14 figures, 3 tables

  15. Impact of microgravity on radiobiological processes and efficiency of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horneck, G. [Radiation Biology Division, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, DLR German Aerospace Center, Linder Hohe, 51170 Cologne (Germany)

    1999-12-06

    To study the influence of microgravity on radiobiological processes in space, space experiments have been performed, using an on-board 1xg reference centrifuge as in-flight control. The trajectory of individual heavy ions was localized in relation to the biological systems by use of the Biostack concept, or an additional high dose of radiation was applied either before the mission or during the mission from an on-board radiation source. In embryonic systems, such as early developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster and Carausius morosus, the occurrence of chromosomal translocations and larval malformations was dramatically increased in response to microgravity and radiation. It has been hypothesized that these synergistic effects might be caused by an interference of microgravity with DNA repair processes. However, recent studies on bacteria, yeast cells and human fibroblasts suggest that a disturbance of cellular repair processes in the microgravity environment might not be a complete explanation for the reported synergism of radiation and microgravity. As an alternative explanation, an impact of microgravity on signal transduction, on the metabolic/physiological state or on the chromatin structure at the cellular level, or modification of self-assembly, intercellular communication, cell migration, pattern formation or differentiation at the tissue and organ level should be considered.

  16. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. PMID:26470205

  17. Environmental Research Division annual report: Center for Human Radiobiology, July 1983-June 1984. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies of the late effects of internal radium in man, and mechanistic investigations of those effects, have continued. The current status of the study is summarized. An experimental technique for preparing thin sections of bone and the application of that technique in studying the comparative distribution of radium and plutonium are described. Radiological dental changes due to radium in man and dog are compared. Survival of human fibroblasts irradiated with alpha particles in vitro was found to be higher when the average LET was higher. In the study of the late effects of thorium in man, the relative activities of the daughter products in the lung have been determined spectrometrically in vivo. The exhalation of thoron in these persons has been investigated in relation to lung burden of thorium and to personal factors such as smoking, age, and weight. The administration of two isotopes to large mammals has been used to demonstrate that the metabolism of plutonium is independent of route of entry and to determine the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium. The effect of thermoluminescence on a scintillation radon counting system has been investigated quantitatively. Data on the exposure of 88 persons to radium were added to the data base, bringing the total to 2400 radium cases under study by the Center for Human Radiobiology. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers

  18. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia TRIGA Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloni, D; Prata, M; Salvini, A; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. PMID:25958412

  19. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence—expressed in terms of total cross sections—as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies. (paper)

  20. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread.

  1. Radiobiological investigation on the ray induced sterilization of east worm (Grapholita molesta busc., lepidoptera:tortricidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of radiobiological investigations on the sterilizing effect of the ionizing radiation, used to treat pupae and imagines of the oriental fruit moth (G. molesta) are reported. The irradiation is realized with gamma rays (60Co) of 12-13 Gy/s (±5%). The parameters of the induced sterility are determined differently for male and female specimen. The sterilizing effect of gamma radiation on male specimen irradiated as pupae and adults results in lethal spermatozoa mutations. The functional interrelation (dose-dominant lethals) is described by curves of a mixed type, consisting of a linear and non-linear component. The established dynamics in the frequency of the mutations in the dose range suggests that the optimum sterilizing ray doses are in the range 400-500 Gy. Doses below 500 Gy (pupae) and 450 Gy (imago) do not reduce considerably the life of the male butterflies. The sterilizing effect on the female specimen after pupae and imagines irradiation is due to dominant lethal mutations in the oocytes. The interrelation (dose-dominant lethals) is described by curves of sigmoid configuration. The absolutely sterilizing dose for both ontogenic stages is 150 Gy. The irradiation of the female specimen causes partial sterility along with the induction of dominant lethals in the ovules

  2. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Weck, P F; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D

    2015-10-21

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence-expressed in terms of total cross sections-as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies. PMID:26406277

  3. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5–7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1–4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. (author)

  4. Radiobiology at ultra-high dose rates employing laser-driven ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanton, F.; Doria, D.; Kakolee, K. F.; Kar, S.; Litt, S. K.; Fiorini, F.; Ahmed, H.; Green, S.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Kavanagh, J.; Kirby, D.; Kirkby, K. J.; Lewis, C. L.; Merchant, M. J.; Nersisyan, G.; Prasad, R.; Prise, K.; Schettino, G.; Zpef, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2013-05-01

    The potential that laser based particle accelerators offer to solve sizing and cost issues arising with conventional proton therapy has generated great interest in the understanding and development of laser ion acceleration, and in investigating the radiobiological effects induced by laser accelerated ions. Laser-driven ions are produced in bursts of ultra-short duration resulting in ultra-high dose rates, and an investigation at Queen's University Belfast was carried out to investigate this virtually unexplored regime of cell rdaiobiology. This employed the TARANIS terawatt laser producing protons in the MeV range for proton irradiation, with dose rates exceeding 109 Gys-1 on a single exposure. A clonogenic assay was implemented to analyse the biological effect of proton irradiation on V79 cells, which, when compared to data obtained with the same cell line irradiated with conventionally accelerated protons, was found to show no significant difference. A Relative Biological effectiveness of 1.4+/-0.2 at 10 % Survival Fraction was estimated from a comparison with a 225 kVp X-ray source.

  5. Decontamination activities at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology in Havana, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology had a facility contaminated with 137Cs. The contamination was produced by a leaking source stored in the place. First decontamination work was performed in 1988. Some highly contaminated floor tiles and other contaminated items were removed. Spent sealed sources stored in the facility were collected. The facility was closed because of the remaining contamination. As the Regulatory Body allowed the unrestricted use of the facility, decontamination and decommissioning were needed. D and D activities were requested to the CPHR. Contamination surveys conducted in 1999 confirmed the extent of contamination with 137Cs. Items inside the contaminated area were carefully monitored and segregated. Six Radium sources were recovered. Physical and chemical methods of decontamination were used. For different reasons, the requirements established by the Regulatory Authority for decommissioning could not be achieved, and therefore the facility could not be released from regulatory control. A Radiological Status Report was done explaining the high cost of decontamination according to the established clearance levels. New alternatives were then proposed for decommissioning of this facility. (author)

  6. Light ion production for a future radiobiological facility at CERN: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford-Haworth, Joshua; Bellodi, Giulia; Küchler, Detlef; Lombardi, Alessandra; Röhrich, Jörg; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recent medical applications of ions such as carbon and helium have proved extremely effective for the treatment of human patients. However, before now a comprehensive study of the effects of different light ions on organic targets has not been completed. There is a strong desire for a dedicated facility which can produce ions in the range of protons to neon in order to perform this study. This paper will present the proposal and preliminary investigations into the production of light ions, and the development of a radiobiological research facility at CERN. The aims of this project will be presented along with the modifications required to the existing linear accelerator (Linac3), and the foreseen facility, including the requirements for an ion source in terms of some of the specification parameters and the flexibility of operation for different ion types. Preliminary results from beam transport simulations will be presented, in addition to some planned tests required to produce some of the required light ions (lithium, boron) to be conducted in collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Berlin.

  7. Biological effects of embedded depleted uranium (DU). Summary of Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Persian Gulf War resulted in injuries of US Coalition personnel by fragments of depleted uranium (DU). Fragments not immediately threatening the health of the individuals were allowed to remain in place, based on long-standing treatment protocols designed for other kinds of metal shrapnel injuries. However, questions were soon raised as to whether this approach is appropriate for a metal with the unique radiological and toxicological properties of DU. The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is investigating health effects of embedded fragments of DU to determine whether current surgical fragment removal policies remain appropriate for this metal. These studies employ rodents implanted with DU pellets as well as cultured human cells exposed to DU compounds. Results indicate uranium from implanted DU fragments distributed to tissues far-removed from implantation sites, including bone, kidney, muscle, and liver. Despite levels of uranium in the kidney that were nephrotoxic after acute exposure, no histological or functional kidney toxicity was observed. However, results suggest the need for further studies of long-term health impact, since DU was found to be mutagenic, and it transformed human osteoblast cells to a tumorigenic phenotype. It also altered neurophysiological parameters in rat hippocampus, crossed the placental barrier, and entered fetal tissue. This report summarizes AFRRI's depleted uranium research to date

  8. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia Triga Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. (authors)

  9. DOE/CEC [Department of Energy/Commission of the European Communities] workshop on critical evaluation of radiobiological data to biophysical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Radiation Protection Program support the majority of Research in the Field of Radiobiological Modeling. This field of science develops models based on scientifically sound principles to predict biological response (at the cellular, molecular, and animal level) to exposure to low level ionizing radiation. Biophysical models are an important tool for estimating response of ionizing radiation at low doses and dose rates. Generally speaking, the biophysical models can be classified into two groups: (1) mechanistic models and (2) phenomenological models. Mechanistic models are based on some assumptions about the physical, chemical, or biological mechanisms of action in association with radiobiological data whereas the phenomenological models are based solely on available experimental data on radiobiological effects with less emphasis on mechanisms of action. There are a number of these models which are being developed. Since model builders rely on radiobiological data available in the literature either to develop mechanistic or phenomenological models, it is essential that a critical evaluation of existing radiobiological data be made and data that is generally considered good and most appropriate for biophysical modeling be identified. A Workshop jointly sponsored by the DOE and the CEC was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee from June 23--25, 1988, to review the data available from physical and chemical, cellular and molecular and animal studies with ionizing radiation

  10. Proceedings of the 1. Arabic conference on chemical applications (Chemia 2). Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference of chemical application was held on 1-5 Nov 1997 in Cairo, This vol.2 contains of chemical application on nuclear materials. Studies on these vol.This second volume covers papers presented on the subjects

  11. Dynamics of structures '89. Vol. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings, comprising 3 volumes published by the Plzen Centre of the Czechoslovak Society for Science and Technology (Vol. 1 and 2) and by Skoda Works in Plzen (Vol. 3), contain 107 papers, out of which 8 fall within the INIS Subject Scope; these deal with problems related to the earthquake resistance of nuclear power plants. Attention is paid to the evaluation of seismic characteristics of nuclear power plant equipment, to the equipment testing and to calculations of its dynamic characteristics under simulated seismic stress. (Z.M.)

  12. Proceedings of the second international conference on environmental impact assessment of all economical activities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the conference consist of 3 volumes: Vol. 1 - 'Environmental Impact Assessment of all Economical Activities including Industry'; Vol. 2 - 'Air Pollution Control and Prevention'; Vol. 3 - Waste Management and Environmental Problems in Construction Industry'. Out of 32 papers contained in Vol. 1, 2 were inputted to INIS. They deal with models of radionuclide transport in food chains and the use of aerial monitoring in the study of environmental contamination. (Z.S.)

  13. Proceedings of the second international conference on environmental impact assessment of all economical activities. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the conference consist of 3 volumes: Vol. 1 - 'Environmental Impact Assessment of all Economical Activities including Industry'; Vol. 2 - 'Air Pollution Control and Prevention'; Vol. 3 - Waste Management and Environmental Problems in Construction Industry'. Out of 32 papers contained in Vol. 2, 4 were inputted to INIS. They deal with nuclear fusion as a potential energy source, with environmental aspects of disposal of ashes from power plants in the Czech Republic, and with land reclamation after mining activities. (Z.S.)

  14. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  15. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 60 Gy with 12 Gy per fraction. The plans were initially optimized using AAA algorithm, and then were recomputed using AXB using the same MUs and MLC files to compare with the dose distribution of the original plans and assess the radiobiological as well as dosimetric impact of the two different dose algorithms. The Poisson Linear-Quadatric (PLQ) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models were used for estimating the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), respectively. The influence of the model parameter uncertainties on the TCP differences and the NTCP differences between AAA and AXB plans were studied by applying different sets of published model parameters. Patients were grouped into peripheral and centrally-located tumors to evaluate the impact of tumor location. PTV dose was lower in the re-calculated AXB plans, as compared to AAA plans. The median differences of PTV(D95%) were 1.7 Gy (range: 0.3, 6.5 Gy) and 1.0 Gy (range: 0.6, 4.4 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. The median differences of PTV(mean) were 0.4 Gy (range: 0.0, 1.9 Gy) and 0.9 Gy (range: 0.0, 4.3 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. TCP was also found lower in AXB-recalculated plans compared with the AAA plans. The median (range) of the TCP differences for 30 month local control were 1.6 % (0.3 %, 5.8 %) for peripheral tumors and 1.3 % (0.5 %, 3.4 %) for centrally located tumors. The lower TCP

  16. In vitro and in vivo ion beam targeted micro-irradiation for radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of radiobiology is to understand the effects of ionizing radiations on the living. These past decades, ion microbeams have shown to be important tools to study for example the effects of low dose exposure, or the bystander effect. Since 2003, the CENBG has been equipped with a system to perform targeted micro-irradiation of living samples. Recently, microbeams applications on this subject have diversified and the study of DNA repair mechanisms at the cellular and multicellular scales, in vitro and in vivo, has become possible thanks to important evolutions of fluorescence imaging techniques and cellular biology. To take into account these new approaches, the CENBG micro-irradiation beamline has been entirely redesigned and rebuilt to implement new features and to improve the existing ones. My PhD objectives were i) commissioning the facility, ii) characterizing the system on track etch detectors, and on living samples, iii) implementing protocols to perform targeted irradiations of living samples with a con-trolled delivered dose, at the cellular and multicellular scales, and to visualize the early consequences online, iv) modelling these irradiations to explain the biological results using the calculated physical data. The work of these past years has allowed us i) to measure the performances of our system: a beam spot size of about 2 μm and a targeting accuracy of ± 2 μm, and to develop ion detection systems for an absolute delivered dose control, ii) to create highly localized radiation-induced DNA damages and to see online the recruitment of DNA repair proteins, iii) to apply these protocols to generate radiation-induced DNA damages in vivo inside a multicellular organism at the embryonic stage: Caenorhabditis elegans. These results have opened up many perspectives on the study of the interaction between ionizing radiations and the living, at the cellular and multicellular scales, in vitro and in vivo. (author)

  17. Radiobiological investigations at tumor cell lines by exploiting aspects of chronological dose administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Ulmer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Using 31P-NMR spectroscopy the chronological behavior of the ATP-metabolism of the tumor spheroids C3H-MA, 9L-Gliome and the mono-layer L1210 has been analyzed via increase and decrease of the β-peak. The goal of this study is to elaborate an optimal fractionation scheme with regard to the irradiation of tumor spheroids and possibly to human tumors.  Methods: The NMR-spectroscopy has been carried out by the FID technique (free induction decay, and the intensity of the β-peak provides a measure of the survival fraction S after radiation exposure with 30 kV X-rays. The linear-quadratic model has to be generalized in order to be valid for irradiation beyond the shoulder. Results and Conclusion: All three cell lines show characteristic periods, and a homeostatic control cannot be recognized. Essential components of these periods are circadian (i.e. one day, circa-semiseptan (i.e. 3.5 days and circa-septan (i.e. one week. The determination of the survival fractions provides an optimum exploitation of radiation damages, when the ATP-concentration assumes a maximum value. This optimum is reached, when all three cycles exhibit an ATP maximum, which is only possible by accounting for the circa-septan rhythm.--------------------------------------Cite this article as: Ulmer W. Radiobiological investigations at tumor cell lines by exploiting aspects of chronological dose administration. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:020312. DOI:10.14319/ijcto.0203.12 

  18. Functional and histological assessment of the radiobiology of normal rat lung in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the radiobiology and sensitivity of the normal rat lung to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiation. Rat thorax irradiations were carried out with x-rays or with neutrons in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Lung damage were assessed functionally with breathing rate measurement up to 180 days after irradiation and then histologically. Breathing rates 20% (∼3 σ) above the control group (sham-irradiated rats) mean were considered as positive responses to lung radiation damage. Though most responding animals demonstrated radiation induced pneumonitis (≤110 days) as well as pulmonary fibrosis (>110 days), some animals receiving neutrons plus BPA showed only the latter. The breathing rate dose response data were fit using probit analysis. The ED50 values measured for x-rays, neutron beam only, and neutrons plus BPA were 11.5±0.4 Gy, 9.2±0.5 Gy, and 6.7±0.4 Gy, respectively. The biological weighting factors for the neutron beam (n+γ), the thermal neutron dose component, and the 10B dose component were determined to be 1.2±0.1, 2.2±0.4, and 2.3±0.3, respectively. The histological dose response curves were linear. Consistent with the functional assay, the weighting factors measured histologically were 1.2±0.1 for the thermal neutron beam and 1.9±0.2 for the 10B dose component. (author)

  19. High value of the radiobiological parameter Dq correlates to expression of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in a panel of small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Krarup, M; Nørgaard, P;

    1998-01-01

    Our panel of SCLC cell lines have previously been examined for their radiobiological characteristics and sensitivity to treatment with TGF beta 1. In this study we examined the possible correlations between radiobiological parameters and the expression of the TGF beta type II receptor (TGF beta-r...... role for the repair of radiation induced DNA damage in SCLC....

  20. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Moertel, H; Eyrich, W; Fritsch, M; Distel, L

    2002-01-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  1. Schostakowitsch. Orchesterlieder (Vol. 2), Neeme Järvi / Werner Pfister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pfister, Werner

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Schostakowitsch. Orchesterlieder (Vol. 2): Sechs Romanzen op. 21, Sechs Gedichte op. 143a, Suite auf Verse von Michelangelo Buonarroti op. 145a. Göteborger Sinfoniker, Neeme Järvi". DG CD 447 085-2 (WD: 71'06") DDD

  2. Shostakovich: The Orchestral Songs Vol. 2 / Michael Tanner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tanner, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Shostakovich: The Orchestral Songs Vol. 2: Six Romances on texts by Japanese poets, Op. 21. Six Poems on Marina Tsvetayeva, Op. 143. Suite on Verses of Michelangelo, Op. 145. Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi". DG 447 085-2GH (71 minutes:DDD)

  3. Alpha Particle Emitter Radiolabeled Antibody for Metastatic Cancer: What Can We Learn from Heavy Ion Beam Radiobiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-particle emitter labeled monoclonal antibodies are being actively developed for treatment of metastatic cancer due to the high linear energy transfer (LET and the resulting greater biological efficacy of alpha-emitters. Our knowledge of high LET particle radiobiology derives primarily from accelerated heavy ion beam studies. In heavy ion beam therapy of loco-regional tumors, the modulation of steep transition to very high LET peak as the particle approaches the end of its track (known as the Bragg peak enables greater delivery of biologically potent radiation to the deep seated tumors while sparing normal tissues surrounding the tumor with the relatively low LET track segment part of the heavy ion beam. Moreover, fractionation of the heavy ion beam can further enhance the peak-to-plateau relative biological effectiveness (RBE ratio. In contrast, internally delivered alpha particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lack the control of Bragg peak energy deposition and the dose rate is determined by the administered activity, alpha-emitter half-life and biological kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. The therapeutic ratio of tumor to normal tissue is mainly achieved by tumor specific targeting of the carrier antibody. In this brief overview, we review the radiobiology of high LET radiations learned from ion beam studies and identify the features that are also applicable for the development of alpha-emitter labeled antibodies. The molecular mechanisms underlying DNA double strand break repair response to high LET radiation are also discussed.

  4. Studies of UV-cured CR-39 recording properties in view of its applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, Sylvain [Laboratoire de Microanalyses Nucleaires, UMR CEA E4, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Universite de Franche-Comte, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besancon cedex (France); Ross, Caroline J. [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Armbruster, Vincent [Laboratoire d' Optique P.M. DUFFIEUX, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Universite de Franche-Comte, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besancon cedex (France); Hill, Mark A. [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Stevens, David L. [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Gharbi, Tijani [Laboratoire d' Optique P.M. DUFFIEUX, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Universite de Franche-Comte, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besancon cedex (France); Fromm, Michel [Laboratoire de Microanalyses Nucleaires, UMR CEA E4, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Universite de Franche-Comte, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besancon cedex (France)

    2005-11-15

    In radiobiology, low doses of high-LET radiation correspond to a few particle traversals through the cell population. Therefore, for studies on cell monolayers irradiated with a low dose of {alpha}-particles, it is extremely useful if the number and position of particle traversals can be determined. In this study we describe a new method, based on UV-curing, to obtain a 10{mu}m thick CR-39 grafted onto a 2.5{mu}m thick PolyEthylene Terephtalate (PET). This thin double polymeric layer, used as a dish base, has a regular and reproducible detector thickness which can be traversed by 3.5MeV {alpha}-particles, with a sufficient residual energy to traverse mammalian cells attached to the base. The recording properties of a PET-CR-39 dish, together with a demonstration of its use for radiobiological experiments, are presented. This new tool allows the precise determination of single-track impact parameters at a sub-cellular level.

  5. SU-E-T-375: Passive Scattering to Pencil-Beam-Scanning Comparison for Medulloblastoma Proton Therapy: LET Distributions and Radiobiological Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D; MacDonald, S; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the linear energy transfer (LET) distributions between passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton radiation therapy techniques for medulloblastoma patients and study the potential radiobiological implications. Methods: A group of medulloblastoma patients, previously treated with passive scattering (PS) proton craniospinal irradiation followed by prosterior fossa or involved field boost, were selected from the patient database of our institution. Using the beam geometry and planning computed tomography (CT) image sets of the original treatment plans, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plans were generated for the cranial treatment for each patient, with average beam spot size of 8mm (sigma in air at isocenter). 3-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated by Monte Carlo methods (TOPAS) both for the original passive scattering and new pencil beam scanning treatment plans. LET volume histograms were calculated for the target and OARs and compared for the two delivery methods. Variable RBE weighted dose distributions and volume histograms were also calculated using a variable dose and LET-based model. Results: Better dose conformity was achieved with PBS planning compared to PS, leading to increased dose coverage for the boost target area and decreased average dose to the structures adjacent to it and critical structures outside the whole brain treatment field. LET values for the target were lower for PBS plans. Elevated LET values for OARs close to the boosted target areas were noticed, due to end of range of proton beams falling inside these structures, resulting in higher RBE weighted dose for these structures compared to the clinical RBE value of 1.1. Conclusion: Transitioning from passive scattering to pencil beam scanning proton radiation treatment can be dosimetrically beneficial for medulloblastoma patients. LET–guided treatment planning could contribute to better decision making for these cases, especially for

  6. Emerging issues in radiobiology and cancer research - the impact of non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the acceptance that non-targeted effects (NTE) can be measured in unirradiated cells or distant progeny of irradiated cells, the discussion has developed about the relevance of these effects for radiobiology and radiation protection since they increase the complexity of the radiation response and allow for outcomes which are not as predictable as they were under the 'old rules'. Specific examples will be presented and analysed which challenge accepted paradigms. 1. Data show that bystander mechanisms are either on or off in cells and that the 'on' threshold appears to be at a very low dose (mGy range). 2. Data suggest that adaptive responses are induced not only in neighbouring cells but in organisms which receive bystander signals. 3. Data show that chronic exposures to alpha or gamma irradiation lead to complex responses in organisms which can be adaptive and protective. 4. Evidence suggests that mixed contaminant exposures which include radiation can have sub-additive or synergistic effects. A key consequence of findings in NTE biology is that at any given level of organization, from gene to ecosystem - communication of stress signals and heritability of stress adaptations provide the bridges linking one hierarchical level to the next and enable the rapid propagation of change triggered by stress at one level, resulting in change at a higher (or lower?) level. Evolution could thus be regulated through communicated signals between cells, individuals, and populations which control and optimize responses coordinating the emergence of exquisitely tuned systems which can adapt rapidly to micro or macro environmental change. A current view of cancer is that it is a 'systems level' disease which can not be understood or treated by looking at individual genes or pathways in the traditional way. Rather, a system approach is required with looks at the environment at both cellular and organismal levels to understand what has been perturbed. We suggest that bystander

  7. Comparison of the radiobiological effects of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and conventional Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT is an experimental radiotherapeutic modality that uses the capacity of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons leading to the production of 4He and 7Li, particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The aim was to evaluate and compare in vitro the mechanisms of response to the radiation arising of BNCT and conventional gamma therapy. We measured the survival cell fraction as a function of the total physical dose and analyzed the expression of p27/Kip1 and p53 by Western blotting in cells of colon cancer (ARO81-1). Exponentially growing cells were distributed into the following groups: 1) BPA (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 2) BOPP (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 3) neutrons alone; 4) gamma-rays. A control group without irradiation for each treatment was added. The cells were irradiated in the thermal neutron beam of the RA-3 (flux= 7.5 109 n/cm2 sec) or with 60Co (1Gy/min) during different times in order to obtain total physical dose between 1-5 Gy (±10 %). A decrease in the survival fraction as a function of the physical dose was observed for all the treatments. We also observed that neutrons and neutrons + BOPP did not differ significantly and that BPA was the more effective compound. Protein extracts of irradiated cells (3Gy) were isolated to 24 h and 48 h post radiation exposure. The irradiation with neutrons in presence of 10BPA or 10BOPP produced an increase of p53 at 24 h maintain until 48 h. On the contrary, in the groups irradiated with neutrons alone or gamma the peak was observed at 48 hr. The level of expression of p27/Kip1 showed a reduction of this protein in all the groups irradiated with neutrons (neutrons alone or neutrons plus boron compound), being more marked at 24 h. These preliminary results suggest different radiobiological response for high and low let radiation. Future studies will permit establish the role of cell cycle in the tumor radio sensibility to BNCT. (author)

  8. 2. International conference. Radiobiological consequences of nuclear accidents; Russian-Norwegian Satellite Symposium on nuclear accidents, radioecology and health. Abstracts. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials on radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation under emergency situations are presented. The radiation contamination of environmental media after the Chernobyl NPP accident (ground, earth and water ecological systems), effect of external and internal irradiation on the inhabitants of the region are estimated. Time characteristic of radiation risk of originating tumors and genetic injuries is given

  9. Accidental tritium release from nuclear technologies and a radiobiological survey of the impact of low dose tritium on the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Atomic Energy Act, 1962 provides for the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy for the welfare of the people in India. The licensing policy adopted for nuclear power stations in India requires that the plants meet stringent requirements based on the system of dose limitation, recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). Currently, nuclear energy is contributing just 3% of the country's power generation. The share of nuclear power is proposed to be increased to 10% in the near future. With the introduction of nuclear energy, the need to assess the radioecological and radiobiological impact of radionuclides of long half- life existing in the environment for longer duration has appeared. Tritium, a radioactive by-product of power reactors is one of such major radionuclides of concern. In the world, routine releases and accidental spills of tritium from nuclear power plants pose a growing health and safety concern. Tritium has been observed in ground water in the vicinity of several nuclear stations. Exposure to tritium has been clinically proven to cause deleterious and detectable effects such as teratogenesis, cancer and life shortening in laboratory animals. There is, now, a growing emphasis on tritium in radiation protection as the challenge of nuclear fusion comes nearer. Present investigation is an attempt to elucidate the effects of low dose tritiated water exposure on developing mouse cerebellum. Pregnant Swiss albino mice (12-15 in number were given a priming injection 7.4 and 74 kBq/ml of body water) of tritiated water (HTO) on 16th day of gestation. From the same day onward, through parturition, till the last interval studied, the pregnant females were continuously maintained respectively on 11.1 and 111 kBq/ml of tritiated drinking water provided ad libidum. After cervical dislocation the litters were autopsied on 1, 3, 5 and 6 weeks post- partum. Brains were fixed and then cerebellum from each of

  10. Radiobiological Effects of Alpha-Particles from Astatine-211: From DNA Damage to Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, Kristina

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, the use of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for radiotherapeutic applications has gained increased interest. Astatine-211 (211At) is an alpha-particle emitting radionuclide, promising for targeted radioimmunotherapy of isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters. To improve development of safe radiotherapy using 211At it is important to increase our knowledge of the radiobiological effects in cells. During radiotherapy, both tumors and adjacent normal tissue will be irradiated and therefore, it is of importance to understand differences in the radio response between proliferating and resting cells. The aim of this thesis was to investigate effects in fibroblasts with different proliferation status after irradiation with alpha-particles from 211At or X-rays, from inflicted DNA damage, to cellular responses and biological consequences. Throughout this work, irradiation was performed with alpha-particles from 211A or X-rays. The induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human normal fibroblasts were investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and fragment analysis. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 211At for DSB induction varied between 1.4 and 3.1. A small increase of DSBs was observed in cycling cells compared to stationary cells. The repair kinetics was slower after 211At and more residual damage was found after 24 h. Comparison between cells with different proliferation status showed that the repair was inefficient in cycling cells with more residual damage, regardless of radiation quality. Activation of cell cycle arrests was investigated using immunofluorescent labeling of the checkpoint kinase Chk2 and by measuring cell cycle distributions with flow cytometry analysis. After alpha-particle irradiation, the average number of Chk2-foci was larger and the cells had a more affected cell cycle progression for several weeks compared with X-irradiated cells, indicating a more powerful arrest after 211At

  11. DOE life-span radiation effects studies in experimental animals at University of Utah Division of Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiobiology Laboratory at the University of Utah compared the long-term biological effects of 226Ra and 239Pu in adult beagles. The program includes the investigation of other radionuclides. More recently, groups of juvenile and aged beagles were added to the study to investigate the influence of age at exposure. These studies involved single intravenous injection of radionuclides to small groups of beagles, in graded doses from levels at which no effects were expected up to levels where a 100% incidence of bone tumors was sometimes found. Some of the principal effects were bone tumors, fractures, and other skeletal alterations observed radiographically and histologically; emphasis was placed on the detection of precancerous changes, hematological changes, and changes related to aging. Emphasis was also placed on metabolic and autoradiographic studies necessary for good radiation dosimetry

  12. Neutron field produced by 25 MeV deuteron on thick beryllium for radiobiological study; energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masashi; Mihara, Erika; Sasaki, Michiya; Nakamura, Takashi; Honma, Toshihiko; Kono, Koji; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2004-01-01

    Biological data is necessary for estimation of protection from neutrons, but there is a lack of data on biological effects of neutrons for radiation protection. Radiological study on fast neutrons has been done at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. An intense neutron source has been produced by 25 MeV deuterons on a thick beryllium target. The neutron energy spectrum, which is essential for neutron energy deposition calculation, was measured from thermal to maximum energy range by using an organic liquid scintillator and multi-sphere moderated 3He proportional counters. The spectrum of the gamma rays accompanying the neutron beam was measured simultaneously with the neutron spectrum using the organic liquid scintillator. The transmission by the shield of the spurious neutrons originating from the target was measured to be less than 1% by using the organic liquid scintillator placed behind the collimator. The measured neutron energy spectrum is useful in dose calculations for radiobiology studies.

  13. Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. Vol.1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for nuclear sciences and applications vol.1: (1) radiochemistry; (2) radiation chemistry; (3) isotope production; (4) waste management; vol.2: (1) nuclear and reactor; (2) physics; (3) plasma physics; (4) instrumentation and devices; (5) trace and ultra trace analysis; (6) environmental; vol.3: (1) radiation protection; (2) radiation health hazards; (3) nuclear safety; (4) biology; (5) agriculture

  14. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  15. Proceedings of the second international conference on environmental impact assessment of all economical activities. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the conference consist of 3 volumes: Vol. 1 - 'Environmental Impact Assessment of all Economical Activities including Industry'; Vol. 2 - 'Air Pollution Control and Prevention'; Vol. 3 - Waste Management and Environmental Problems in Construction Industry'. Out of 39 papers contained in Vol. 3, 3 were inputted to INIS. They deal with the use of portable radioisotope X-ray fluorescence analyzers in the determination of building material contamination by toxic elements, with underground waste repositories and ground water contamination, and the impact of the Temelin nuclear power plant on the hydrosphere and other environmental components. (Z.S.)

  16. Soil-structure interaction Vol.3. Influence of ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has been performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The study was conducted during the fiscal year 1965 on the program entitled 'Benchmarking of Structural Engineering Problems' sponsored by NRC. The program considered three separate but complementary problems, each associated with the soil-structure interaction (551) phase of the seismic response analysis of nuclear plant facilities. The reports, all entitled Soil-Structure Interaction, are presented in three separate volumes, namely: Vol. 1 Influence of Layering by AJ Philippacopoulos, Vol. 2 Influence of Lift-Off by C.A. Miller, Vol. 3 Influence of Ground Water by C.J. Costantino. The two problems presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were conducted at the City University of New York (CUNY) under subcontract to BNL. This report, Volume 3 of the report, presents a summary of the first year's effort on the subject of the influence of foundation ground water on the SSI phenomenon. A finite element computer program was developed for the two-phased formulation of the combined soil-water problem. This formulation is based on the Biot dynamic equations of motion for both the solid and fluid phases of a typical soil. Frequency dependent interaction coefficients were generated for the two-dimensional plane problem of a rigid surface footing moving against a saturated linear soil. The results indicate that interaction coefficients are significantly modified as compared to the comparable values for a dry soil, particularly for the rocking mode of response. Calculations were made to study the impact of the modified interaction coefficients on the response of a typical nuclear reactor building. The amplification factors for a stick model placed atop a dry and saturated soil were computed. It was found that pore water caused the rocking response to decrease and translational response to increase over the frequency range of interest, as

  17. Búsquedas en grandes volúmenes de datos

    OpenAIRE

    Britos, Luis; Di Gennaro, María E.; Gil Costa, Graciela Verónica; Kasián, Fernando; Lobos, Jair; Ludueña, Verónica; Molina, Romina; Printista, Alicia Marcela; Reyes, Nora Susana; Roggero, Patricia; Trabes, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    En la actualidad los sistemas de información demandan no sólo poder realizar búsquedas eficientes sobre distintos tipos de datos, tales como texto libre, audio, video, secuencias de ADN, etc., sino también poder manejar grandes volúmenes de estos datos. Dada una consulta, el objetivo de un sistema de recuperación de información es obtener lo que podría ser útil o relevante para el usuario, usando una estructura de almacenamiento especialmente diseñada para responderla eficientemente. Nuest...

  18. Reirradiation of normal tissues: Preclinical radiobiological data; Reirradiation des tissus sains: donnees radiobiologiques precliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Vozenin, M.C.; Deutsch, E. [Departement de radiotherapie et laboratoire Upres EA2710, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-10-15

    Reirradiation represent an unfrequent particular clinical situation. The risk/benefit ratio assessment must be taken into account, considering both clinical and dosimetric aspects. There is a relatively limited amount of preclinical data available to date and clinicians should cautiously perform re-irradiations in selected indications. This review summarizes the experimental data available on reirradiation of normal tissues, the consequences on early and late toxicities as well as the intrinsic limitations of these models. (authors)

  19. ECONOMICS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT (15 vols + 4 cdroms) by Gregory Zorzos

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Zorzos

    2002-01-01

    Research contains many ancient texts (Ancient Greek, Hebrews, Hieroglyphs, Assyrian, Sumerian, Babylonian, Latin, etc.). 1. (MICRO-MACRO ECONOMICS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT (5 vols + cdrom). Microeconomics and macroeconomics of Alexander the Great. Economic theories, feasibilities, economic plannings, general description of the campaign's business plan etc. 2. BANKS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT (2 vols + cdrom) Describes banking system, economists, financiers, investors, accountants, bookkeepers, etc,...

  20. Safety-Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Docket No. 50-170

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The reactor facility is located in Montgomery County, Maryland. This supplement reports on the status of the licensee's emergency plan that had not been reviewed at the time the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0882) was published

  1. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1977-02-23

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  2. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  3. Radioembolization of hepatocarcinoma with 90Y glass microspheres: development of an individualized treatment planning strategy based on dosimetry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dosimetric approach and to review the absorbed doses delivered, taking into account radiobiology, in order to identify the optimal methodology for an individualized treatment planning strategy based on 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We performed retrospective dosimetry of the standard TheraSphere registered treatment on 52 intermediate (n = 17) and advanced (i.e. portal vein thrombosis, n = 35) hepatocarcinoma patients with tumour burden < 50 % and without obstruction of the main portal vein trunk. Response was monitored with the densitometric radiological criterion (European Association for the Study of the Liver) and treatment-related liver decompensation was defined ad hoc with a time cut-off of 6 months. Adverse events clearly attributable to disease progression or other causes were not attributed to treatment. Voxel dosimetry was performed with the local deposition method on 99mTc-MAA SPECT images. The reconstruction protocol was optimized. Concordance of 99mTc-MAA and 90Y bremsstrahlung microsphere biodistributions was studied in 35 sequential patients. Two segmentation methods were used, based on SPECT alone (home-made code) or on coregistered SPECT/CT images (IMALYTICS trademark by Philips). STRATOS trademark absorbed dose calculation was validated for 90Y with a single time point. Radiobiology was used introducing other dosimetric variables besides the mean absorbed dose D: equivalent uniform dose (EUD), biologically effective dose averaged over voxel values (BEDave) and equivalent uniform biologically effective dose (EUBED). Two sets of radiobiological parameters, the first derived from microsphere irradiation and the second from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), were used. A total of 16 possible methodologies were compared. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were derived. The area under the curve (AUC

  4. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm−2 and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm−2, whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm−2 and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm−2, respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm−2, whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm−2. The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm−2) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm−2). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01). - Highlights: • Alpha emission rates in teeth from smokers slightly higher than non-smokers. • Difference between alpha rates in male and female tooth not statistically significant. • Alpha particles have the same effect at any age. • Difference between alpha rates in bones was statistically significant

  5. A radiobiology-based inverse treatment planning method for optimisation of permanent l-125 prostate implants in focal brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Annette; Mears, Christopher; Betts, John M.; Reynolds, Hayley M.; Tack, Guido; Leo, Kevin; Williams, Scott; Ebert, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment plans for ten patients, initially treated with a conventional approach to low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR, 145 Gy to entire prostate), were compared with plans for the same patients created with an inverse-optimisation planning process utilising a biologically-based objective. The ‘biological optimisation’ considered a non-uniform distribution of tumour cell density through the prostate based on known and expected locations of the tumour. Using dose planning-objectives derived from our previous biological-model validation study, the volume of the urethra receiving 125% of the conventional prescription (145 Gy) was reduced from a median value of 64% to less than 8% whilst maintaining high values of TCP. On average, the number of planned seeds was reduced from 85 to less than 75. The robustness of plans to random seed displacements needs to be carefully considered when using contemporary seed placement techniques. We conclude that an inverse planning approach to LDR treatments, based on a biological objective, has the potential to maintain high rates of tumour control whilst minimising dose to healthy tissue. In future, the radiobiological model will be informed using multi-parametric MRI to provide a personalised medicine approach.

  6. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almayahi, B A; Tajuddin, A A; Jaafar, M S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm(-2) and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm(-2), whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm(-2) and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm(-2), respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2), whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm(-2). The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01).

  7. Current (1984) status of the study of 226Ra and 228Ra in humans at the Center for Human Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Human Radiobiology has identified 5784 persons by name and type of exposure to 226Ra and 228Ra. Included are 4863 dial painters (mostly women) and non-laboratory employees of the radium dial industry, 410 laboratory workers, 399 persons who received radium for supposed therapeutic effects, and 112 in other categories. Body contents of radium have been measured in 1916 of the dial workers and about one-half of the subjects in the other groups. Bone sarcomas, carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoids, and deterioration of skeletal tissue are still the only effects unequivocally attributable to internal radium. Excess leukemias have not been observed and other malignancies, if in excess, appear more likely to be related to external gamma radiation or radon than to internal radium. Positive correlations with radium burdens have been found for the incidence of benign exostoses among subjects exposed to radium before age 18 and for shortened latency of ocular cataracts. 27 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  8. Radiobiological analysis of region with higher radiation background. The effect of the background on the isomorphism of some enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to establish the the time when the prolong impact of slightly increased radiation background get over the compensator mechanisms of living systems. The object of investigation was the ecosystem of the Bay of Wromos (Black Sea, BG) and its surroundings where the flotation slack from an uranium mine was disposed. radioactivity. The following radiobiological picture of the site is obtained according to measurements performed: the alpha-activity of the beach sands is higher than one of the slack and is different in plants; the beta-activity is higher compared to controls in all samples investigated; the gamma spectra show high concentration of the members of U-238 and Th-232 series. The biological effect provoked by this heightened radiation background is studied by means of the isoenzymes as indicators of changes on molecular level. The isoenzyme spectra of lactate dehydrogenase and butyrol dehydrogenase is studied by vertical electrophoresis. The following species are tested: Tettigonia candata charp, Galliptumus italicus, Grillus campestris and Lumbicus terrestrial. An increase in activity and quantity of enzymes as well as changes of their isoenzyme spectra is observed. Calliptumus italicus could be used as a bio indicator of contamination, as it show better separation of the LDH and BDH-isoforms of LDH and BDH, and is more wide-spread. The increase in activity and quantity of some isoenzyme fractions in the conditions of this experiment is one of the possible mechanisms for increase in radioresistance of the living systems. 3 tabs., 2 figs., 8 refs

  9. Current (1984) status of the study of 226Ra and 228Ra in humans at the Center for Human Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Human Radiobiology has identified 5784 persons by name and type of exposure to 226Ra and 228Ra. Included are 4863 dial painters (mostly women) and non-laboratory employees of the radium dial industry, 410 laboratory workers, 399 persons who received radium for supposed therapeutic effects, and 112 in other categories. Body contents of radium have been measured in 1916 of the dial workers and about one-half of the subjects in the other groups. Bone sarcomas, carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoids, and deterioration of skeletal tissue are still the only effects unequivocally attributable to internal radium. Excess leukemias have not been observed and other malignancies, if in excess, appear more likely to be related to external gamma radiation or radon than to internal radium. Positive correlations with radium burdens have been found for the incidence of benign exostoses among subjects exposed to radium before age 18 and for shortened latency of ocular cataracts. 26 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  10. Componentes volátiles de mamey (mammea americana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lucía Morales

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Los componentes volátiles del aroma de mamey (Mammea americana L, fueron extraídos utilizando el método de destilación por arrastre con vapor-extracción simultánea con solvente orgánico. El extracto fue prefraccionado por cromatografía en columna en silica gel con gradiente discontinuo Pentano: Éter etílico para obtener tres fracciones que fueron analizadas por CGAR y CGAR-EM. Se detectaron 34 compuestos, de los cuales fueron identificados 22, siendo los componentes mayoritarios: Furfural (7281 ^ig/kg y E-Famesol (2145 ng/kg

  11. Vers un contrôle de vol d'un oiseau artificiel

    OpenAIRE

    Lenoir, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Cet article concerne l'étude d'un drone à ailes battantes. Des observations du vol de grands oiseaux, notamment de la cinématique du cycle de leur battement, et la prise en compte de leurs capacités physiologiques ont conduit à un calcul simplifié des forces aérodynamiques engendéres par un oiseau en vol rectiligne stabilisé. Le résultat est utilisé pour trouver les contrôles de gauchissement (vrillage) des ailes assurant le maintien du vol horizontal. La valeur de la puissance moyenne requis...

  12. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  13. Arvustuse piirid ja auhinnad : mõtteid kirjanduskriitikast vol 2 / Jan Kaus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaus, Jan, 1971-

    2007-01-01

    Tänapäeva eesti kirjanduskriitikast. Vt. ka vol. 1: Kaus, Jan. Eetika, taburetiefekt ja jätkuv objektivisatsioon, Sirp, 15. juuni., lk. 7. Vastukaja: Raudam, Toomas. Arvustuse piiritused //Sirp (2007) 10. aug., lk. 9

  14. Siim Nestor soovitab : Tallinn Doom Night vol.1. Odessa Pop / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2006-01-01

    Soome doom-metal ansambel Reverend Bizarre üritusel "Tallinn Doom Night vol.1" 8. dets. klubis Rockstar's. Indipoppi viljelev Rootsi duo My Darling Yoy! üritusel "Odessa Pop" 9. dets. Tallinnas klubis KuKu

  15. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, N. Patrik (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Inst., Faculty of Sciences, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)), e-mail: brodin.patrik@gmail.com; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Kiil-Berthelsen, Anne (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Diagnostic Investigations, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Nilsson, Per; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas (Dept. of Oncology, Skaane Univ. Hospital and Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)); Lannering, Birgitta (Dept. of Paediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden))

    2011-08-15

    Introduction. The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc (RA)) or spot-scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The aim was also to find dose-volume toxicity parameters relevant to children undergoing RT to be used in the inverse planning of RA and IMPT, and to use in the risk estimations. Material and methods. Treatment plans were created for all three techniques on 10 pediatric patients that have been treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) at our institution in 2007-2009. Plans were generated for two prescription CSI doses, 23.4 Gy and 36 Gy. Risk estimates were based on childhood cancer survivor data when available and secondary cancer (SC) risks were estimated as a function of age at exposure and attained age according to the organ-equivalent dose (OED) concept. Results. Estimates of SC risk was higher for the RA plans and differentiable from the estimates for 3D CRT at attained ages above 40 years. The risk of developing heart failure, hearing loss, hypothyroidism and xerostomia was highest for the 3D CRT plans. The risks of all adverse effects were estimated as lowest for the IMPT plans, even when including secondary neutron (SN) irradiation with high values of the neutron radiation weighting factors (WR{sub neutron}). Conclusions. When comparing RA and 3D CRT treatment for pediatric MB it is a matter of comparing higher SC risk against higher risks of non-cancer adverse events. Considering time until onset of the different complications is necessary to fully assess patient benefit in such a comparison. The IMPT plans, including SN dose contribution, compared favorably to the photon techniques in terms of all radiobiological risk estimates

  16. Research trends in radiobiology since 40 years. a new approach: the enzymatic repair function of DNA, internal factor in evolution of biological systems under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of the report, the author attempts to draw an historical scheme of successive research working hypotheses in radiobiology since 1924. Less than a generation ago the effect of radiation exposure were viewed as being direct, immediate, irreparable and unmodifiable. Now it is generally accepted that radiation lesion can also be indirect, delayed, reparable and often modified with appropriate chemical or biochemical treatment. It was however in 1962-1964 that came the decisive breakthrough in radiobiology with the discovery that the cell possesses a natural active self-defense mechanism against whatever stress would affect the integrity of the genetic message contained in the DNA structure itself. The existence of what could be considered as a fourth DNA function i.e. self-repair by enzymatic action under genetic control-brings at least to radiobiology the missing molecular biology basis it needed to get out of its 'phenomenological night' after abandon of the generalization of Lea's theory through lack of experimental evidence. In the second part, which is a prospective one, the author tries to set an enlarged synthesis considering the possible role of DNA repair system not only in cell survival - in presence or absence of dose modifiers or mutagens - but also in the artificial and natural evolution of biological system exposed to sub-lethal doses of radiation. Most recent data from the literature fit well with what must be still considered as a general working hypothesis. Studies dealing with phenotypic and genotypic characters linked with the acquisition of gamma and UV radiation resistance in 'Escherichia coli K12' has been started by the author, in collaboration with O. Tremeau, in order to bring a new experimental contribution in this respect. (author)

  17. Reseña: Critical Studies on Corporate Responsibility, Governance and Sustainability, Vol. 4 y 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Zicari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Irresponsibility: A Challenging Concept. Series: Critical Studies on Corporate Responsibility, Governance and Sustainability, Vol. 4. Ralph Tench, William Sun and Brian Jones, 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 315 pages. Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility Perspectives and Practice. Series: Critical Studies on Corporate Responsibility, Governance and Sustainability, Vol. 6. Ralph Tench, William Sun and Brian Jones, 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 456 pages

  18. Editor's welcome, PORTAL, Vol. 1, No. 2, July 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Allatson

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the highly successful inauguration of PORTAL in January 2004, we have received many kind expressions of support from international studies practitioners in a range of fields, and from such places as Canada, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, New Zealand, Spain, Trinidad, the U.K., and the U.S.A. Particularly gratifying have been the endorsements of the journal and its publishing aims by people involved in their own electronic publishing enterprises. For their generous responses to PORTAL, the Editorial Committee would like to express its collective appreciation to the following people: Professor Jean-Marie Volet, of the University of Western Australia, and the guiding editor of the ground-breaking e-journal Mots Pluriels (www.arts.uwa.edu.au/MotsPluriels; and Francis Leo Collins, member of the Editorial Committee for the Graduate Journal of Asia Pacific Studies (GJAPS, based in Auckland, New Zealand. PORTAL's readers may be interested in the current call for papers from GJAPS (www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/gjaps, for a special issue on "Imagining the Asia-Pacific" (deadline October 31, 2004. This issue of PORTAL contains essays that cover wide terrain: the Chilean diasporic community in Australia; the world of German intellectuals; contemporary Mexican socio-political movements; rural-urban migration in China; and transnational advocacy networks and election monitoring in the Philippines, Chile, Nicaragua and Mexico. In the cultural section of this issue, we are delighted to present a short story from the noted German Studies scholar Anthony Stephens, and the first half of a beautiful, deeply poetic and haunting novel entitled Son, from the London-based writer and art-critic Jennifer Higgie. The novel’s second and final part will appear in PORTAL vol. 2, no. 1, in January 2005. On a different note, we would like to express our support for the inaugural Ubud Writers and Readers Festival, to be held in Ubud, Bali, from October 11 to 17, 2004. The Festival

  19. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  20. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11(1)--Vol. 18(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1978-04-11

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Vol. 18, No. 6 (November-December 1977). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 450 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last eight years are listed in this index.

  1. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1976-04-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  2. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives.

  3. The Radiobiological Basis for Improvements in Radiotherapy and Low Dose Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hei, Tom K

    2009-12-09

    Overall Goal: This conference grant was proposed to organize and host an international conference at Columbia University in New York to critically assess the cellular and molecular signaling events and tissue response following radiation damage. The conference would also serve as a venue to play tribute to the more than forty years contributions made by Professor Eric J. Hall to the radiation biology field. The goals of the meeting were to examine tumor hypoxia and sensitizer development; recent advances made in clinical radiotherapy; addressed several low dose phenomena, including genomic instability and bystander effects that are important in radiation risk assessment. Study and Results: The symposium was held on October 13th and 14th, 2008 at the Alfred Lerner Hall in the Morningside campus of Columbia University. The symposium, entitled “From Beans to Genes: A Forty Year Odyssey in Radiation Biology” was attended by more than 120 faculty, scientists, clinicians, fellows and students. The symposium, spanned over a day and a half, covered four scientific themes. These included tumor hypoxia and radiosensitizers; low dose radiation response; radiation biology in the practice of radiotherapy, and radiation hazard in space and genetic predisposition to cancer. The program of the symposium is as follow:

  4. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E.; Vasquez R, M. A. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G., E-mail: marcosalivasquez@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, α{sub s}pread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  5. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with 137Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u-1 in the dose range of 5- 40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. (authors)

  6. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. PMID:25969527

  7. Radiobiological analysis of the field in field technique in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry was performed in 6 unilateral breast cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy in order to evaluate the dose calculated by the radiotherapy treatment planning system (Xi O, ELEKTA). Results show a maximum difference of 0.473 Gy between the dose calculated by the treatment planning system and the dose measured in vivo using solid state detectors. Based on the DVHs statistics, tumor control probability (Tcp) was obtained using the Target-Poisson model, with the following Tcp parameters: α=0.288/Gy, αspread= 0.13 and α/β=4.9 Gy. Tcp average obtained for the Clinical Tumor Volume (Ctv) is 35.1% and for Supra Clavicle Volume (Scv) is 35.345%. Finally using Lyman model Normal Tissue Complication Probability (Ntcp) was obtained for the following endpoints: contralateral breast fibrosis, lung radiation pneumonitis and heart pericarditis. Nonetheless the Ntcp values are not high; the improvement of the Tcp based on this plan makes Ntcp for lung radiation pneumonitis reach the 100% of probability in some cases. (Author)

  8. Dose volume histogram analysis and comparison of different radiobiological models using in-house developed software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun S Oinam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB model versus Niemierko model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP calculation and Niemierko model versus Poisson-based model for tumor control probability (TCP calculation in the ranking of different treatment plans for a patient undergoing radiotherapy. The standard normal tissue tolerance data were used to test the NTCP models. LKB model can reproduce the same complication probability data of normal tissue response on radiation, whereas Niemierko model cannot reproduce the same complication probability. Both Poisson-based and Niemierko models equally reproduce the same standard TCP data in testing of TCP. In case of clinical data generated from treatment planning system, NTCP calculated using LKB model was found to be different from that calculated using Niemierko model. When the fractionation effect was considered in LKB model, the calculated values of NTCPs were different but comparable with those of Niemierko model. In case of TCP calculation using these models, Poisson-based model calculated marginally higher control probability as compared to Niemierko model.

  9. Radiobiological effect of abdominal X-ray hypo-fraction irradiation on Wistar rats liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Qi; Yongheng An; Hongsheng Yu; Xinjia He

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of abdominal hypo-fraction irradiation on liver dam-age in rats so as to provide a reference for its clinical application. Methods: A total of 100 Wistar rats were equally randomized to five groups as control, 4 Gy, 6 Gy, 8 Gy and 12 Gy group, and the corresponding fractionated doses were offered. Liver functions were examined at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week after irradiation. Morphological changes were observed by HE staining. Expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were examined by immunohistochemical technique. Results: In all irradiation groups, hepatocellular swell, degeneration, necrosis and even hepatic fibrosis could be seen. The differences of the liver coef-ficient, Glutamyl pyruvic transaminase (GPT), Glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) were significant among the groups and different time points (F = 11.833–781.972, F = 20.857–264.692, P < 0.001). Expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were signifi-cantly different between each group (F = 211.607, 116.577; P < 0. 001), and between each time point (F = 54.083, 68.749; P < 0. 001). Conclusion: Compare with conventional fraction, abdominal hypo-fraction irradiation may cause radiation damage to rat liver, being dose-and-time dependent. Up-regulation of activating apoptosis protein Bax and down-regulation of inhibiting apoptosis protein Bcl-2 may involve in the process.

  10. Marine environment news Vol. 4, no. 1, June 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last six months have been a frenetically busy time for us in Monaco. Our Marine Programmes have been positively reviewed by the Standing Advisory Group on Nuclear Applications (SAGNA) and by an External Evaluation of our Programme. Both Groups report to the Director General, Mr Mohammed ElBaradei, and we hope that new investment in personnel and equipment may eventually result from their evaluations and feedback. We were honoured by the visit of His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco in March 2006 to our facilities. HSH continues to take a personal interest in MEL's isotopic and pollutant analyses of biota and environmental samples from the Arctic environment which we sampled during His Highness' cruise in June 2005 (see Vol. 3. No 2. MEL Newsletter). This issue also shows that MEL has hosted several important workshops and meetings. The US Research Vessel Endeavour visited the port of Monaco in April and MEL hosted an informal reception for the crew. The visit was in connection with ongoing, joint MEL-US studies in ocean carbon sinks in the Mediterranean (the MEDFLUX programme). More recently, MEL has been involved in discussion with Gulf Member States for a Marine Radioactivity Baseline Study. Finally, I am pleased to note that our MEL Newsletter is clearly having a positive outreach with Member States, since we are currently witnessing a doubling in Member States requests through the TC Concept Proposals (2007-2008) for fellowships, courses and capacity building in marine environment

  11. Development of a tool computer to compensate for interruptions of treatment and radiobiological comparisons Tr in external radiotherapy; Desarrollo de una herramienta informatica para la compensacion de interrupciones de tratamiento y comparaciones radiobiologicas en radioterapia externa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Sena Espinel, E.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Perez Alvarez, M. E.; Delgado Apaaricio, J. M.; Martin Rincon, C.; Saez Beltran, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, N.; Cons Perez, N.

    2013-07-01

    Outages unscheduled in the course of external beam radiation treatments, and the loss of probability of tumour control (TCP), which make it necessary to have a tool that allows the adjustment of the compensation of the absorbed dose required to keep the biological effect on the tumor, controlling the possible impact on the organ at risk. In order to perform this radiobiological quickly setting has been developed a software application that also allows comparison of treatments with different subdivisions from the point of view of radiobiological. (Author)

  12. Patient-Specific Dosimetry and Radiobiological Modeling of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Grant - final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Sgouros, Ph.D.

    2007-03-20

    The broad, long-term objectives of this application are to 1. develop easily implementable tools for radionuclide dosimetry that can be used to predict normal organ toxicity and tumor response in targeted radionuclide therapy; and 2. to apply these tools to the analysis of clinical trial data in order to demonstrate dose-response relationships for radionuclide therapy treatment planning. The work is founded on the hypothesis that robust dose-response relationships have not been observed in targeted radionuclide therapy studies because currently available internal dosimetry methodologies are inadequate, failing to adequately account for individual variations in patient anatomy, radionuclide activity distribution/kinetics, absorbed dose-distribution, and absorbed dose-rate. To reduce development time the previously available software package, 3D-ID, one of the first dosimetry software packages to incorporate 3-D radionuclide distribution with individual patient anatomy; and the first to be applied for the comprehensive analysis of patient data, will be used as a platform to build the functionality listed above. The following specific aims are proposed to satisfy the long-term objectives stated above: 1. develop a comprehensive and validated methodology for converting one or more SPECT images of the radionuclide distribution to a 3-D representation of the cumulated activity distribution; 2. account for differences in tissue density and atomic number by incorporating an easily implementable Monte Carlo methodology for the 3-D dosimetry calculations; 3. incorporate the biologically equivalent dose (BED) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) models to convert the spatial distribution of absorbed dose and dose-rate into equivalent single values that account for differences in dose uniformity and rate and that may be correlated with tumor response and normal organ toxicity; 4. test the hypothesis stated above by applying the resulting package to patient trials of targeted

  13. Radiobiological Characterization of Two Photon-Beam Energies 6 and 15 MV used in Radiotherapy From Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study is to perform radiobiological characterization of two different photon beam energies, 6 MV and 15 MV, from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Two end-points, namely cell survival and micronucleus induction were used for the characterization. Chinese hamster V 79 lung fibroblast cell line to prepare cell culture and to perform the innervate experiments. chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell, this result is in complete agreement with expected 11 pairs of chromosomes representing the genome of this species. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beam energies, 6 and 15 MV respectively. Different dose rates were used for the two beam energies, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 Gy. Cells were counted immediately after irradiation and re seeded, the seeded number of cells was calculated to the dose rate used. Another set of unirradiated cells treated the same as the experimental set was used as a control group. The plating efficiency (PE) was calculated for the control group, then cells were incubated at 37oC for 6 days to construct the survival curve, five samples were counted per dose and the mean was calculated. The two survival curves are similar for photon beam energies (6 and 15 MV) and the surviving fraction was decreased with dose rate. The two curves showed similar values of α and β parameters, this result is expected for the same radiation type (X-ray). For the micronuclei assay three samples for each dose were seeded and incubated at 37oC for 24 hours then Cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis phase of the mitosis. The micronuclei number was counted and plotted with dose. A significant positive correlation was found between dose and micronuclei frequency (P=0.00), moreover, the micronuclei frequency is relatively higher with 15 MV compared with 6 MV energy. This indicates the presence

  14. Ion beam therapy fundamentals, technology, clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book provides a detailed, up-to-date account of the basics, the technology, and the clinical use of ion beams for radiation therapy. Theoretical background, technical components, and patient treatment schemes are delineated by the leading experts that helped to develop this field from a research niche to its current highly sophisticated and powerful clinical treatment level used to the benefit of cancer patients worldwide. Rather than being a side-by-side collection of articles, this book consists of related chapters. It is a common achievement by 76 experts from around the world. Their expertise reflects the diversity of the field with radiation therapy, medical and accelerator physics, radiobiology, computer science, engineering, and health economics. The book addresses a similarly broad audience ranging from professionals that need to know more about this novel treatment modality or consider to enter the field of ion beam therapy as a researcher. However, it is also written for the interested public an...

  15. Editor's welcome, PORTAL, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Allatson

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to the first appearance of PORTAL for 2006 (vol. 3, no. 1, a special issue entitled ‘Other Worlds’ guest edited by James Goodman and Christina Ho from the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Technology Sydney (UTS. The papers collected in this special issue focus on what the guest editors call “the transformative power of social movements” that respond to the processes and discourses of globalization and globalism by generating alternative sites and spaces of agency, or ‘other worlds.’ The contributors to the issue originally presented papers at a conference held in April 2005 in Sydney, with the title ‘Other Worlds: Social Movements and the Making of Alternatives.’ That conference was organized by the Research Initiative on International Activism at UTS, and supported by the Research Committee on Social Movements and Collective Action of the International Sociological Association. The Editorial Committee of PORTAL would like to thank both institutions for their support of the event that led to this special issue. I would also like to thank Wayne Peake, Kate Barclay, and Murray Pratt for their editorial efforts in seeing this issue through to publication. The Editorial Committee is pleased to showcase in the Cultural Works Section a short meditative piece by local writer Joel Scott, who is currently undertaking studies in Pamplona, Spain. When considered in the context of the special issue’s discussions of ‘other worlds’ that precede it, Scott’s ‘God, We’re Not Immigrants! A Reflection on Moving and Staying,’ provides an evocative insight into the sociocultural and imaginative limits that may preclude the construction of alternative ‘worlds.’

  16. Abstracts of papers of international scientific conference 'Fundamental and applied aspects of radiobiology: Biological effects of low doses and radioactive contamination of environment (Radioecological and medical biological consequences of the Chernobyl NPP accident)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of research works executed in Belarus, as well as in Ukraine and Russia, on various aspects of the Chernobyl problematic are given: radiation medicine and risks, radiobiological effects and their forecasting, radioecology and agricultural radiology, decontamination and radioactive wastes management, socio economic and psychological problems caused by the Chernobyl NPP accident

  17. Research in radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, W.S.S.

    1990-07-15

    This report discusses the technical progress made during the past year. Good progress has been made in the areas of bones cells at risk, bone cell morphometry, bone cell residence time, microdistribution of plutonium-239, and the calculation of cell-specific radiation dosimetry. 3 figs., 11 tabs. (KJD)

  18. Meson radiobiology and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-linear energy transfer radiation (neutrons, heavy ions, and pions) have a greater relative biological effectiveness than low-linear energy transfer radiation by depositing a high density of ionization in irradiated cells. This overcomes the protective effect of oxygen; decreases the variation in sensitivity among the several stages of the cell cycles; and, inhibits the repair of sublethal damage as compared to x-rays, gamma rays, electrons and protons. Negative pi mesons (pions), appear particularly suited for radiation therapy as their penetration and depth-dose profiles lend themselves to shaping the high dose area to the tumor size and location. Preliminary biological experiments with pions produced at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility studied cell survival at various radiation depths and cell cycle sensitivity. Histologic study of data from the first human experiments indicated severe tumor cell destruction by pions as compared to x-rays in treating malignant melanoma skin nodules, without increased effects on dermal elements. (U.S.)

  19. Monte Carlo dose calculations and radiobiological modelling: analysis of the effect of the statistical noise of the dose distribution on the probability of tumour control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of the statistical fluctuations of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions on the dose volume histograms (DVHs) and radiobiological models, in particular the Poisson model for tumour control probability (tcp). The MC matrix is characterized by a mean dose in each scoring voxel, d, and a statistical error on the mean dose, σd; whilst the quantities d and σd depend on many statistical and physical parameters, here we consider only their dependence on the phantom voxel size and the number of histories from the radiation source. Dose distributions from high-energy photon beams have been analysed. It has been found that the DVH broadens when increasing the statistical noise of the dose distribution, and the tcp calculation systematically underestimates the real tumour control value, defined here as the value of tumour control when the statistical error of the dose distribution tends to zero. When increasing the number of energy deposition events, either by increasing the voxel dimensions or increasing the number of histories from the source, the DVH broadening decreases and tcp converges to the 'correct' value. It is shown that the underestimation of the tcp due to the noise in the dose distribution depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the radiobiological parameters over the population; in particular this error decreases with increasing the biological heterogeneity, whereas it becomes significant in the hypothesis of a radiosensitivity assay for single patients, or for subgroups of patients. It has been found, for example, that when the voxel dimension is changed from a cube with sides of 0.5 cm to a cube with sides of 0.25 cm (with a fixed number of histories of 108 from the source), the systematic error in the tcp calculation is about 75% in the homogeneous hypothesis, and it decreases to a minimum value of about 15% in a case of high radiobiological heterogeneity. The possibility of using the error on the tcp to

  20. MANHATTAN DISTRICT HISTORY PROJECT Y THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT VOL. I INCEPTION UNTIL AUGUST 1945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, D.

    1961-12-01

    THESE TWO VOLUMES CONSTITUTE A RECORD OF THE TECHNICAL, ADMINISTRATIVE , AND POLICY-MAKING ACTIVITIES OF THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT (PROJECT Y) FROM ITS INCEPTION UNDER THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ATOMIC BOMB (VOL. I), AND DURING THE PERIOD FOLLOWING THE END OF WORLD WAR II UNTIL THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT RELINQUISHED CONTROL TO THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION AS OF JANUARY 1947 (VOL. II). ALTHOUGH SECURITY REGULATIONS HAVE REQUIRED SOME DELETIONS IN THE ORIGINAL TEXT OF THE TWO VOLUMES, EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO RETAIN THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE AND EXPRESSIONS OF THE AUTHORS.

  1. MANHATTAN DISTRICT HISTORY PROJECT Y THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT VOL. II AUGUST 1945 THROUGH DECEMBER 1946

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truslow, E. C.; Smith, R. C.

    1961-12-01

    THESE TWO VOLUMES CONSTITUTE A RECORD OF THE TECHNICAL, ADMINISTRATIVE , AND POLICY-MAKING ACTIVITIES OF THE LOS ALAMOS PROJECT (PROJECT Y) FROM ITS INCEPTION UNDER THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ATOMIC BOMB (VOL. I), AND DURING THE PERIOD FOLLOWING THE END OF WORLD WAR II UNTIL THE MANHATTAN DISTRICT RELINQUISHED CONTROL TO THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION AS OF JANUARY 1947 (VOL. II). ALTHOUGH SEC URITY REGULATIONS HAVE REQUIRED SOME DELETIONS IN THE ORIGINAL TEXT OF THE TWO VOLUMES, EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO RETAIN THE ORIGINAL LANGUGAGE AND EXPERSSIONS OF THE AUTHORS.

  2. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of CyberKnife M6™ InCise multileaf collimator over IRIS™ variable collimator in prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathriarachchi, Vindu; Shang, Charles; Evans, Grant; Leventouri, Theodora; Kalantzis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The impetus behind our study was to establish a quantitative comparison between the IRIS collimator and the InCise multileaf collimator (MLC) (Accuray Inc. Synnyvale, CA) for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Treatment plans for ten prostate cancer patients were performed on MultiPlan™ 5.1.2 treatment planning system utilizing MLC and IRIS for 36.25 Gy in five fractions. To reduce the magnitude of variations between cases, the planning tumor volume (PTV) was defined and outlined for treating prostate gland only, assuming no seminal vesicle or ex-capsule involvement. Evaluation indices of each plan include PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), Paddick's new CI, homogeneity index, and gradient index. Organ at risk (OAR) dose sparing was analyzed by the bladder wall Dmax and V37Gy, rectum Dmax and V36Gy. The radiobiological response was evaluated by tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability based on equivalent uniform dose. The dose delivery efficiency was evaluated on the basis of planned monitor units (MUs) and the reported treatment time per fraction. Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The studies indicated that CyberKnife M6™ IRIS and InCise™ MLC produce equivalent SBRT prostate treatment plans in terms of dosimetry, radiobiology, and OAR sparing, except that the MLC plans offer improvement of the dose fall-off gradient by 29% over IRIS. The main advantage of replacing the IRIS collimator with MLC is the improved efficiency, determined from the reduction of MUs by 42%, and a 36% faster delivery time. PMID:27217626

  3. Dosimetric and radiobiological characterizations of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A single-institution review of ninety cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Isa; Jiang, Runqing; Kiciak, Alexander; Ur Rehman, Jalil; Afzal, Muhammad; Chow, James C L

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans after prostate IMRT technique was replaced by VMAT in an institution. Characterizations of dosimetry and radiobiological variation in prostate were determined based on treatment plans of 40 prostate IMRT patients (planning target volume = 77.8-335 cm(3)) and 50 VMAT patients (planning target volume = 120-351 cm(3)) treated before and after 2013, respectively. Both IMRT and VMAT plans used the same dose-volume criteria in the inverse planning optimization. Dose-volume histogram, mean doses of target and normal tissues (rectum, bladder and femoral heads), dose-volume points (D99% of planning target volume; D30%, D50%, V30 Gy and V35 Gy of rectum and bladder; D5%, V14 Gy, V22 Gy of femoral heads), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), prostate tumor control probability (TCP), and rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher algorithm were calculated for each IMRT and VMAT plan. From our results, VMAT plan was found better due to its higher (1.05%) CI, lower (0.83%) HI and (0.75%) GI than IMRT. Comparing doses in normal tissues between IMRT and VMAT, it was found that IMRT mostly delivered higher doses of about 1.05% to the normal tissues than VMAT. Prostate TCP and rectal NTCP were found increased (1%) for VMAT than IMRT. It is seen that VMAT technique can decrease the dose-volume evaluation criteria for the normal tissues. Based on our dosimetric and radiobiological results in treatment plans, it is concluded that our VMAT implementation could produce comparable or slightly better target coverage and normal tissue sparing with a faster treatment time in prostate radiotherapy. PMID:27651562

  4. A Review of Soviet Studies in the Psychology of Learning and Teaching Mathematics (6 Volumes). Proceedings of the National Academy of Education, Vol. 4, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen, Johan C.; Freudenthal, Hans

    The English translations of the first six volumes of Studies on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics in the Soviet Union are viewed in this document. The contents of each volume are briefly described: vol. 1, The Learning of Mathematical Concepts; vol. 2, The Structure of Mathematical Abilities; vol. 3, Problem Solving in Arithmetic and…

  5. Baltische Musik für Streichorchester (Vol. 2) / Hans-Christian Dadelsen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Dadelsen, Hans-Christian

    1995-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Baltische Musik für Streichorchester (Vol. 2). Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra, Juha Kangas". Finlandia/East West Records CD 4509-9789-2 (WD: 64'34") Plaadil ka Erkki-Sven Tüüri teos "Insula Deserta"

  6. 49. Meeting of the Chemical Societies: Proceedings of the contributions. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication has been set up as a abstracts of the meeting dealing with chemical problems. The book (Vol. 2) consists of the sections: (C) Physical chemistry; (D) History of the chemistry; (E) Food chemistry and technology; (D) Environmental chemistry; (E) Nuclear chemistry and radioecology; (H) Synthetic polymers

  7. Book review: Vetter, H. 2005. Terralog. Turtles of the World. Vol. 3. Central and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Book review: Vetter, H. 2005. Terralog. Turtles of the World. Vol. 3. Central and South America/Schildkröten der Welt Band 3. Mittel- und Südamerika: 1-128, color pictures 606 + 9. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt, Germany.ISBN 3-930612-82-8; 29.7 x 20.8 cm

  8. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students’ knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students’ prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61–66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80–83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1–9; 95% CI, 7.3–9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5–9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6–9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  9. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  10. Role of French teams in the development of clinical and translational research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many clinical studies have showed the key role of radiotherapy in anticancer treatment strategy. Radiations are delivered alone or in combination with systemic therapies. In recent years, the main goal of all clinical developments has focused on improving clinical benefit, with an increased tumour control and a higher normal tissue protection. This research was designed to reduce local recurrences, to increase recurrence-free or overall survival and to decrease acute and late effects. Technological and biological evolutions (or revolutions) accompanied clinicians to improve clinical benefit, namely with strong progress in radiology and better understanding of radiobiology, particularly at the molecular level. Differences in tumour and normal tissues radiosensitivity are nowadays integrated in daily clinical practice of radiation oncologists. The current report details the last 5-year developments of clinical and translational research in radiation oncology, especially the role of French teams in the development of personalized treatment. (authors)

  11. Almanac of the contributions of the 49. meeting of the chemical societies. Selected papers from Vol. 1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication has been set up as a abstracts of the meeting dealing with chemical problems. The book (Vol. 1) consists of the sections: (A) Analytical chemistry; (B) Inorganic chemistry. The book (Vol. 2) consists of the sections: (C) Physical chemistry; (D) History of the chemistry; (E) Food chemistry and technology; (D) Environmental chemistry; (E) Nuclear chemistry and radioecology; (H) Synthetic polymers. The book (Vol. 3) consists of the sections: (I) Fibres, Textile and foil materials; (J) Wood, pulp, paper; (K) Organic Chemistry; (L) Bio-organic chemistry; (M) Didactic of the chemistry

  12. Efecto del aceite de sacha inchi (plukenetia volúbilis l sobre el perfil lipídico en pacientes con hiperlipoproteinemia Effect of sacha inchi oil (plukenetia volúbilis l on the lipid profile of patients with hyperlipoproteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Garmendia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente es un trabajo experimental piloto, abierto, para conocer el efecto, dosis efectiva y efectos secundarios del aceite de sacha inchi (Plukenetia volúbilis L en el perfil lipídico de pacientes con hipercolesterolemia; para ello, se incluyó a 24 pacientes de 35 a 75 años, en quienes se determinó los valores sanguíneos de colesterol total (CT, HDL, triglicéridos (Tg, glucosa, ácidos grasos no esterificados (AGNE e insulina Se aleatorizó a los participantes para recibir 5 mL o 10 mL de una suspensión conteniendo 2gr/5ml de aceite de sacha inchi, durante cuatro meses. La ingesta del aceite produjo caída en los valores promedio del CT, y AGNE con elevación del c-HDL en ambos grupos. La dosis de 10 mL se asoció a mayores niveles de insulina en el grupo aleatorizado a recibir 10 ml. El aceite de sacha inchi parece tener efectos benéficos sobre el perfil lipídico en pacientes con dislipidemia, requiriéndose la evaluación de su eficacia y seguridad en ensayos clínicos aleatorizados.We performed a pilot, experimental, open study in order to know the effect, effective dosage and secondary effects of sacha inchi´s (Plukenetia volúbilis L oil on the lipid profiles of patients with hypercholesterolemia. We included 24 patients of ages 35 to 75, to whom we measured total cholesterol (TC, HDL, triglycerides (Tg, glucose (G, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and insulin (I levels in blood, then we randomized them to receive sacha inchi oil orally 5 ml or 10 ml of a suspension of sacha inchi oil (2gr/5ml for four months. The oil intake produced a decrease in the mean values of TC, and NEFA, and a rise in HDL in both subgroups. The subgroup receiving 10 ml was associated to an increase in the insulin levels. Sacha inchi oil appears to have beneficial effects on the lipid profile of patients with dyslipidemia, but their efficacy and security should be evaluated in randomized clinical trials.

  13. Radioembolization of hepatocarcinoma with {sup 90}Y glass microspheres: development of an individualized treatment planning strategy based on dosimetry and radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiesa, C.; Maccauro, M.; Aliberti, G.; Padovano, B.; Seregni, E.; Crippa, F. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Nuclear Medicine Division, Milan (Italy); Mira, M.; Negri, A. [University of Milan, Postgraduate Health Physics School, Milan (Italy); Spreafico, C.; Morosi, C.; Civelli, E.; Lanocita, R.; Marchiano, A. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Radiology 2, Milan (Italy); Romito, R.; Sposito, C.; Bhoori, S.; Facciorusso, A.; Mazzaferro, V. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Surgery 1, Milan (Italy); Camerini, T. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Scientific Direction, Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Health Physics, Milan (Italy); Pellizzari, S. [University La Sapienza, Engineering Faculty, Rome (Italy); Migliorisi, M. [Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Nuclear Medicine Division, Milan (Italy); Foundation IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Clinical Engineering, Milan (Italy); De Nile, M.C. [University of Pavia, Physics Faculty, Pavia, Lombardy (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dosimetric approach and to review the absorbed doses delivered, taking into account radiobiology, in order to identify the optimal methodology for an individualized treatment planning strategy based on {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We performed retrospective dosimetry of the standard TheraSphere registered treatment on 52 intermediate (n = 17) and advanced (i.e. portal vein thrombosis, n = 35) hepatocarcinoma patients with tumour burden < 50 % and without obstruction of the main portal vein trunk. Response was monitored with the densitometric radiological criterion (European Association for the Study of the Liver) and treatment-related liver decompensation was defined ad hoc with a time cut-off of 6 months. Adverse events clearly attributable to disease progression or other causes were not attributed to treatment. Voxel dosimetry was performed with the local deposition method on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT images. The reconstruction protocol was optimized. Concordance of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA and {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung microsphere biodistributions was studied in 35 sequential patients. Two segmentation methods were used, based on SPECT alone (home-made code) or on coregistered SPECT/CT images (IMALYTICS trademark by Philips). STRATOS trademark absorbed dose calculation was validated for {sup 90}Y with a single time point. Radiobiology was used introducing other dosimetric variables besides the mean absorbed dose D: equivalent uniform dose (EUD), biologically effective dose averaged over voxel values (BED{sub ave}) and equivalent uniform biologically effective dose (EUBED). Two sets of radiobiological parameters, the first derived from microsphere irradiation and the second from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), were used. A total of 16 possible methodologies were compared. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were

  14. Clinical peculiarities of the brain damage in the liquidators of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation into the features of the brain damage by the liquidators of the Chernobyl accident has become an urgent issue of today due to a number of circumstances. According to the classical concept dominating radiobiology until recently, the brain being composed of highly - differentiated nerve cells, present a radioresistant structure responsive to radiation injury induced by high and very high radiation doses (10000 rem and higher) only. The results of clinical examinations given to the Chernobyl accident recovery workers at Kiev Institute of Neurosurgery, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, show that even the so - called ''small - dose'' radiation, when consumed continuously, produces neurological sings of brain damage. 6 figs

  15. Wooden windows and doors. Vol. 2. Construction, connections, surfaces, energy conservation; Holzfenster und -tueren. Bd. 2. Konstruktion, Anschluesse, Oberflaechen, Energieeinsparung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Ulrich; Huckfeldt, Tobias; Wenk, Hans-Joachim (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    Vol. II supplements and complements Vol. I with much additional information. While Vol. I focused exclusively on wooden windows, Vol. II goes into wooden doors, frames, connections, armature technology, folding and rolling shutters, skylights, wooden replacement parts, replacement parts made of other materials, and energy conservation. Other subjects like armatures, glazing, damage, repair, restoration, maintenance and regulations are presented in more detail. [German] Als Band II ergaenzt und komplettiert das Buch den ersten Band ''Holzfenster'' mit zahlreichen flankierenden Themenbereichen. Waehrend sich Band I ausschliesslich auf Holzfenster konzentriert, erschliesst Band II neue Bereiche, wie Holztueren, Rahmenkonstruktionen, Anschluesse, Beschlagtechnik, Fenster- und Rolllaeden, Dachflaechenfenster, Vollholzergaenzungen, Holzersatzmaterialien oder Energieeinsparung. Weitere Themen, wie Beschlaege, Verglasungen, Schaeden, Sanierung, Restaurierung, Wartung und Regelwerke, werden vertieft und ergaenzt.

  16. 51. Meeting of the Chemical Societies: Almanac of Contributions, Vol. Program, 1, 2, 3, 4 Molecular Models (Workshop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication has been set up as a abstracts of the meeting dealing with different chemical problems. The book (Vol. 1) consists of the sections: All-plenary lectures (9 papers); (D) History of the chemistry (14); (K) Didactics of chemistry (32); The book (Vol. 2) consists of the sections: (A) Analytical chemistry (48); (B) Inorganic chemistry (75); (C) Physical chemistry (27); (F) Nuclear chemistry and radioecology (12); (L) Environmental chemistry and toxicology (33); (M) Agricultural chemistry (20). The book (Vol. 3) consists of the sections: (E) Wood, pulp, paper (15); (G) Macromolecular chemistry (42); (H) Organic chemistry, bio-organic chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry (96); (I) Food chemistry and biochemistry (34); (J) Textile, fibres and foil materials (9). The book (Vol. 4) consists of the workshop Molecular models (3 papers)

  17. International congress on forest decline research: State of knowledge and perspectives. Vol. 1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the two lecture volumes of the Proceedings of the International Congress on Forest Decline Research the papers are presented according to the topics of the plenary and poster sessions. The sessions had been devoted to the damage symptoms in forest decline, to the main stressors (atmosphere, climate, soil, biota), to the effects of the stressors (on rhizosphere, on decomposers, and on plants) (see vol. 1), to case studies (in Germany and abroad), to regional comparisons, to critical loads, and to silvicultural measures (see vol. 2). Additionally personal impressions about the forest decline phenomen in Germany and its causes and opinions about the perspective in regard to research needs, to silvicultural practices and to emission control are given. (orig./vhe)

  18. VolGraph-A PC-Based Visualization System for Three-Dimensional Medical Reconstructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张加万; 孙志刚; 孙济洲

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions from tomography slices are paid great attention in medical applications nowadays. This paper introduces the design and the implement of VolGraph system: a new, inexpensive, PC-based visualization tool for three-dimensional medical reconstructions, which fully integrates the latest popular visualization algorithms ranging from classical surface rendering algorithm (Marching Cubes) to volume rendering algorithms, such as Ray Casting, Splatting, and Shear-Warp.The input of VolGraph can be medical ima-ges including CT, MRI, etc, and the output can be in common image, VRML/XML or animation formats. Practice proves that the realization of a medical volume visualization system is now feasible on desktop PCs.

  19. International congress on forest decline research: State of knowledge and perspectives. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the two lecture volumes of the Proceedings of the International Congress on Forest Decline Research the papers are presented according to the topics of the plenary and poster sessions. The sessions had been devoted to the damage symptoms in forest decline, to the main stressors (atmosphere, climate, soil, biota), to the effects of the stressors (on rhizosphere, on decomposers, and on plants) (see vol. 1), to case studies (in Germany and abroad), to regional comparisons, to critical loads, and to silvicultural measures (see vol. 2). Additionally personal impressions about the forest decline phenomen in Germany and its causes and opinions about the perspective in regard to research needs, to silvicultural practices and to emission control are given. (orig./vhe)

  20. Substâncias voláteis em mel floral e mel de melato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMPOS Gisélia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Embora pareça existir um "flavor" característico de mel, a grande variedade de flores disponíveis para a abelha, possibilita uma grande diversidade de flavor e aroma, indicando a presença de vários componentes voláteis. Alguns destes dependem da fisiologia da abelha, dos procedimentos após a colheita e no mel de melato há também a interferência de insetos sugadores e das formigas. Várias substâncias voláteis já foram identificadas, sendo algumas características de determinados méis uniflorais. Com o objetivo de encontrar uma substância volátil característica do mel de melato, seis amostras deste tipo de mel e seis amostras de mel floral foram analisadas usando extração por arraste de gás hidrogênio e cromatografia a gás acoplada a espectrometria de massas. Ácido acético foi encontrado em quatro amostras de mel de melato e em uma amostra de mel floral porém, com menor abundância.

  1. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives. PMID:27619249

  2. 30th and 29th anniversary of reactor accidents in A-1 nuclear power plant Jaslovske Bohunice - radioecological and radiobiological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper authors present facts about construction, operation and reactor accidents in A-1 Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice, Slovakia. There was the reactor KS 150 (HWGCR) cooled with carbon dioxide and moderated with heavy water. A-1 NPP was commissioned on December 25, 1972. The first reactor accident happened on January 5, 1976 during fuel loading. Two persons of personal died by suffocation with carbon dioxide. This accident has been not evaluated according to the INES scale up to present time. The second serious accident in A-1 NPP occurred in February 22, 1977 also during fuel loading. This INES level 4 of reactor accident resulted in damaged fuel integrity with extensive corrosion damage of fuel cladding and release of radioactivity into the plant area. The A-1 NPP was consecutively shut down and is being decommissioned in the present time. Both reactor accidents are described in this paper. Some radioecological and radiobiological consequences of accidents and contamination of area of A-1 NPP as well as of Manivier canal and Dudvah River as result of flooding during the decommissioning are presented. (authors)

  3. The world's high background natural radiation areas (HBNRAs) revisited: A broad overview of the dosimetric, epidemiological and radiobiological issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residents of the world's high background natural radiation areas (HBNRAs), such as Ramsar (in Iran), Guarapari (in Brazil), Orissa and Kerala (in India) and Yangjiang (in China) have lived in these areas for generations under extraordinary radiation fields. The failure of earlier epidemiological studies to report any substantial increase in cancer incidence in HBNRAs has raised some controversy regarding the validity of the linear no-threshold hypothesis. This paper reviews some of the most recent studies of HBNRAs with the intent of stimulating greater research interest in the dosimetric, epidemiological and radiobiological issues related to the world's HBNRAs and proposes solutions to the challenges facing HBNRA studies. This paper may serve as a useful reference for some of the harder-to-find literature. - Highlights: • Some of the challenging issues of HBNRAs have not been resolved. • A literature review of the most recent studies of HBNRAs has been conducted. • An overview of some of the challenging issues and viable solutions are presented

  4. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying,, Hong-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at on...

  5. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  6. Comparison of cytogenetic effects in bone marrow of mice after the flight on the biosatellite "BION-M1" and the ground-based radiobiological experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Vorozhtsova, Svetlana; Ivanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    During space flight, the astronauts are exposed to radiation exposure at low doses with low dose rates, so one of the actual areas of Radiobiology is research of action of ionizing radiation in low and ultra-low doses. Violation of the chromosome apparatus of living biosystems, ranging from viruses and bacteria to humans, is the most reliable evidence of exposure to ionizing radiation. In this regard, the study of cytogenetic damage in the cells of humans and animals is central to space radiobiology (Fedorenko B.S., 2006). In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" (Sychev V.N. et al., 2014) was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite by method of cervical dislocation. The level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. The content of animals in the experiment with onboard equipment led to some increase in aberrant mitosis (2,3 ± 0,4%) and reduction of the mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION-M1" was a statistically significant increase in level of chromosome aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). According to VA Shurshakova (2014), the radiation dose to mice ranged from 32 to 72 mGy and relate to a range of small doses (ICRP, 2012). In this connection we conducted a series of experiments in the ground conditions, the aim of which was the study of earliest effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in mice irradiated with low doses of γ-irradiation of 10 to 200 mGy in the first 24 hours after exposure, i.e. within the first post-radiation exposure cell cycle. Studies were carried out on adult female mice outbred ICR (CD-1) - SPF category at the age of 4-4.5 months with an average

  7. Expansão volêmica em raquianestesia para cesariana. Como realizá-la?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Maria Siaulys Capel Cardoso

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Em pacientes não obstétricas, demonstrou-se que a expansão volêmica rápida realizada imediatamente após a injeção subaracnóidea do anestésico local era mais efetiva que a expansão volêmica lenta, realizada previamente à instalação do bloqueio para se reduzir a incidência e a gravidade da hipotensão arterial após raquianestesia. O objetivo do estudo foi comparar a incidência de hipotensão arterial e o consumo de vasopressores em gestantes submetidas à cesariana sob raquianestesia com diferentes regimes de expansão volêmica. MÉTODO: Foram avaliadas prospectivamente 60 gestantes de termo submetidas à cesariana sob raquianestesia. As pacientes receberam expansão volêmica com 10 ml.kg-1 de solução de Ringer com lactato como segue: Grupo 1 (n = 20, antes da raquianestesia através de cateter 18G; Grupo 2 (n = 20, após a raquianestesia e com cateter 18G e Grupo 3 (n = 20 após a raquianestesia com cateter 16G sob ação de pressurizador. A pressão arterial (PA foi monitorizada a cada minuto e administrou-se 0,2 mg de metaraminol para qualquer diminuição de PA, a partir do valor de controle e 0,4 mg para diminuição > 20%. A PA controle foi definida como a média de três valores sucessivos de pressão arterial sistólica obtidos antes da expansão volêmica e do bloqueio. Estudou-se a velocidade de infusão de fluidos, incidência de hipotensão arterial materna, náusea e vômito, consumo de metaraminol, índice de Apgar e pH da artéria umbilical. RESULTADOS: A velocidade de administração de fluidos foi maior no Grupo 3 do que nos Grupos 1 e 2 (201 ± 61 vs 56 ± 13 e 59 ± 21 ml.min-1, p < 0,05. Os grupos foram semelhantes em relação à incidência de hipotensão arterial, náusea, vômito, consumo de metaraminol, índice de Apgar e pH da artéria umbilical. CONCLUSÕES: A expansão volêmica, realizada antes ou após a instalação da raquianestesia, de maneira rápida ou lenta, n

  8. Expansão volêmica em raquianestesia para cesariana. Como realizá-la?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Mônica Maria Siaulys Capel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Em pacientes não obstétricas, demonstrou-se que a expansão volêmica rápida realizada imediatamente após a injeção subaracnóidea do anestésico local era mais efetiva que a expansão volêmica lenta, realizada previamente à instalação do bloqueio para se reduzir a incidência e a gravidade da hipotensão arterial após raquianestesia. O objetivo do estudo foi comparar a incidência de hipotensão arterial e o consumo de vasopressores em gestantes submetidas à cesariana sob raquianestesia com diferentes regimes de expansão volêmica. MÉTODO: Foram avaliadas prospectivamente 60 gestantes de termo submetidas à cesariana sob raquianestesia. As pacientes receberam expansão volêmica com 10 ml.kg-1 de solução de Ringer com lactato como segue: Grupo 1 (n = 20, antes da raquianestesia através de cateter 18G; Grupo 2 (n = 20, após a raquianestesia e com cateter 18G e Grupo 3 (n = 20 após a raquianestesia com cateter 16G sob ação de pressurizador. A pressão arterial (PA foi monitorizada a cada minuto e administrou-se 0,2 mg de metaraminol para qualquer diminuição de PA, a partir do valor de controle e 0,4 mg para diminuição > 20%. A PA controle foi definida como a média de três valores sucessivos de pressão arterial sistólica obtidos antes da expansão volêmica e do bloqueio. Estudou-se a velocidade de infusão de fluidos, incidência de hipotensão arterial materna, náusea e vômito, consumo de metaraminol, índice de Apgar e pH da artéria umbilical. RESULTADOS: A velocidade de administração de fluidos foi maior no Grupo 3 do que nos Grupos 1 e 2 (201 ± 61 vs 56 ± 13 e 59 ± 21 ml.min-1, p < 0,05. Os grupos foram semelhantes em relação à incidência de hipotensão arterial, náusea, vômito, consumo de metaraminol, índice de Apgar e pH da artéria umbilical. CONCLUSÕES: A expansão volêmica, realizada antes ou após a instalação da raquianestesia, de maneira rápida ou lenta, n

  9. Revising the Radiobiological Model of Synchronous Chemotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A New Analysis Examining Reduced Weighting of Accelerated Repopulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Previous studies of synchronous chemoradiation therapy have modeled the additional effect of chemotherapy as additional radiation therapy biologically effective dose (BED). Recent trials of accelerated versus conventional fractionation chemoradiation have cast doubt on such modeling. The purpose of this study was to identify alternative models. Methods and Materials: Nine trials of platinum-based chemoradiation were identified. In radiation therapy-alone arms, the radiation therapy BED for tumor was calculated using standard parameters. In chemoradiation arms, 3 methods were used to calculate tumor BED (tBED): additional BED, addition of 9.3 Gy BED for tumor to the radiation therapy BED; zero repopulation, BED with no correction for repopulation; variable tp (the average doubling time during accelerated repopulation), values of tp 3-10 were used to examine a partial suppression of repopulation. The correlations between the calculated percentage change in tBED for each method and observed percentage change in local control were assessed using the Pearson product moment correlation. Results: Significant correlations were obtained for all 3 methods but were stronger with zero repopulation (P=.0002) and variable tp (tp = 10) (P=.0005) than additional BED (P=.02). Conclusions: Radiobiological models using modified parameters for accelerated repopulation seem to correlate strongly with outcome in chemoradiation studies. The variable tp method shows strong correlation for outcome in local control and is potentially a more suitable model in the chemoradiation setting. However, a lack of trials with an overall treatment time of more than 46 days inhibits further differentiation of the optimal model

  10. The in vivo study on the radiobiologic effect of prolonged delivery time to tumor control in C57BL mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guo-Pei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-precision radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT or sterotactic radiosurgery, delivers more complex treatment fields than conventional techniques. The increased complexity causes longer dose delivery times for each fraction. The purpose of this work is to explore the radiobiologic effect of prolonged fraction delivery time on tumor response and survival in vivo. Methods 1-cm-diameter Lewis lung cancer tumors growing in the legs of C57BL mice were used. To evaluate effect of dose delivery prolongation, 18 Gy was divided into different subfractions. 48 mice were randomized into 6 groups: the normal control group, the single fraction with 18 Gy group, the two subfractions with 30 min interval group, the seven subfractions with 5 min interval group, the two subfractions with 60 min interval group and the seven subfractions with 10 min interval group. The tumor growth tendency, the tumor growth delay and the mice survival time were analyzed. Results The tumor growth delay of groups with prolonged delivery time was shorter than the group with single fraction of 18 Gy (P 0.05. Compared to the group with single fraction of 18 Gy, the groups with prolonged delivery time shorten the mice survival time while there was no significant difference between the groups with prolonged delivery time 30 min and the groups with prolonged delivery time 60 min. Conclusions The prolonged delivery time with same radiation dose shorten the tumor growth delay and survival time in the mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer. The anti-tumor effect decreased with elongation of the total interfractional time.

  11. Constituyentes volátiles del mango de azúcar

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar Bautista; Carmenza Duque; Rafael Torres

    2010-01-01

    Empleando Extracción de Volátiles por Espacio de Cabeza Dinámico y Extracción Líquido-Líquido, se estudió el aroma del mango de azúcar (Mangifera indica L), variedad nativa Colombiana apreciada por su exquisito aroma y sabor. Estos dos métodos complementarios permifieron la identificación, por Cromatografía de Gases de Alta resolución y Cromatografía de Gases de Alta Resolución - Espectrometría de Masas, de 52 coinponentes, entre los cuales sobresalieron como mayoritarios el 3-careno, el b...

  12. Cálculo de volúmenes de pilas de madera

    OpenAIRE

    FERRER ROZALÉN, SERGIO

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto consiste en una aplicación para dispositivos móviles Android que permite automatizar la medición de volúmenes de pilas de madera. Se consigue creando una imagen panorámica a partir de varias fotografías tomadas y aplicando posteriormente varios métodos de tratamiento de imagen que nos proporciona OpenCV. Gracias a la aplicación las empresas dedicadas a la madera ahorran un valioso tiempo, ya que no tienen que recurrir a métodos más arcaicos como medir cada tronco individual y manu...

  13. 英文文摘%Logic in Vol. 4 of 'Das Kapital' : Cognitive Development Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract : The practical logic of Vol. 4 of ' Das Kapital' is the cognitive development mechanism of category of ' Das Kapital' In this sense, this logic makes the ' production' of categories practical, the dominant principle is that understanding is made of history. Historical part and theoretical part construct the general writing logic togeth-er, historical part sets up theoretical direction for research afterwards. The implications are of the following: (1) Based on ' organic growth' of historical productive mode, the core of the category is surplus value ; (2) From the movement of category production to disclose historical structural growth ; ( 3 ) Through the general ' production' of theories, it shows the internal integration between critique on methodology and critique on epistemology. Thus Vol. 4 of ' Das Kapital' rejected the wrong demand in ' History of the Theory of Surplus Value' edited by Kautsky. ' Das Kapital' integrated the logic of historical development and the logic of development in understanding, inte-grated historical method and categorical method, which sets an example in the methodology in political economy.%Abstract : The practical logic of Vol. 4 of ' Das Kapital' is the cognitive development mechanism of category of ' Das Kapital' In this sense, this logic makes the ' production' of categories practical, the dominant principle is that understanding is made of history. Historical part and theoretical part construct the general writing logic togeth-er, historical part sets up theoretical direction for research afterwards. The implications are of the following: (1) Based on ' organic growth' of historical productive mode, the core of the category is surplus value ; (2) From the movement of category production to disclose historical structural growth ; ( 3 ) Through the general ' production' of theories, it shows the internal integration between critique on methodology and critique on epistemology. Thus

  14. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments

  15. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  16. Detection of hypoxic cells in murine tumors using the comet assay. Comparison with a conventional radiobiological assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet (single-cell electrophoresis) assay has been developed as a method for measuring DNA damage in single cells after irradiation. We have developed our own methods and image analysis system for the comet assay to identify hypoxic fractions. In vitro, we tested our system using a cultured tumor cell line (SCCVII). In vivo, we compared the hypoxic fractions detected by this assay with those determined by the in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay using two rodent tumors (SCCVII/C3H, EMT6/KU/balb/c), which exhibit different types of hypoxia: acute and chronic. In vitro, our method could differentiate hypoxic cells from oxic cells, using the parameter of tail moment. In vivo, there were good correlations between the hypoxic fractions determined by the comet assay and by the clonogenic assay, in SCCVII/C3H (r=0.85) and in EMT6/KU/balb/c (r=0.75) tumors. By comparison of the two methods in chronically hypoxic and acutely hypoxic tumors, we further confirmed that the comet assay is clinically useful for estimating hypoxic fractions of solid tumors. (author)

  17. Vol. 385

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A Comparative Study of Family Migi'ation in Floating Population Between the Generations -80' s and Post-80' s Shao Cen & Zhang Before Yi(1) Abstract: Based on the data of "Nationwide Dynamic Monitoring of Floating Population in the Second Half of 2010", the difference of family migration behavior between two generations of floating population--be- fore - 80' s and post - 80' s is discussed under the analytical framework of Classical Migration Theory and NELM in this paper. The study has found that the significant intergenerational differences exist in educa- tion levels and employment, which exerts significant influence on family migration behavior. On the other side, there is no significant difference in influential factors on family migration as residence time, the fam- ily income in immigrant city, remittance between two generations of floating population, in which the in- tergenerational consistency is noticeable. Key Words:Floating Population Intergenerational Difference Family Migration

  18. Soil-structure interaction Vol.2. Influence of lift-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has been performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The study was conducted during the fiscal year 1985 on the program entitled 'Benchmarking of Structural Engineering Problems' sponsored by NRC. The program considered three separate but complementary problems, each associated with the soil-structure interaction (SSI) phase of the seismic response analysis of nuclear plant facilities. The reports are presented in three separate volumes. The general title for the reports is 'Soil Structure Interaction' with the following subtitles: Vol. 1 Influence of Layering by A.J. Philippacopoulos, Vol. 2 Influence of Lift-Off by C.A. Miller, Vol. 3 Influence of Ground Water by C.J. Costantino. The two problems presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were conducted at the City University of New York (CUNY) under subcontract to BNL. This report, Volume 2 of the report, presents a summary of the work performed defining the influence liftoff has on the seismic response of nuclear power plant structures. The standard lumped parameter analysis method was modified by representing the lumped soil/structure interaction horizontal and rocking dampers with distributed (over the foundation area) springs and dampers. The distributed springs and dampers are then modified so that they can only transmit compressive stresses. Additional interaction damping is included to account for the energy dissipated as a portion of the foundation which has separated comes back into contact with the soil. The validity of the model is evaluated by comparing predictions made with it to data measured during the SIMQUAKE II experiment. The predictions were found to correlate quite well with the measured data except for some discrepancies at the higher frequencies (greater than 10 cps). This discrepancy was attributed to the relatively crude model used for impact effects. Data is presented which identifies the peak

  19. Electricity from MHD. Vol. III. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation jointly organized by the IAEA and ENEA and held in Salzburg, 4-8 July 1966. It shows the substantial progress made in MHD generator development, in particular the advances in high-temperature materials, the development of large, high-intensity, superconducting magnets, and the improved understanding of the detailed behaviour of such systems under various operating conditions with a resulting clarification of the technical problems still outstanding. The difficulties of making costing surveys realistic enough to justify a choice being made between conventional plant and one of the MHD generating plant configurations are increased by lack of large-scale prototypes from which data can be obtained under operating conditions approaching those needed in a commercial plant. Contents: (Vol.1) 1. General Physical Problems Related to MHD, (a) Diagnostics (10 papers); (b) Shock tubes (7 papers); (c) Flow and field distribution (19 papers); (d) Auxiliary ionization and relaxation (16 papers). (Vol.11) 2. Closed Cycle, (a) Non-equilibrium theory and measurements (13 papers); (b) Conformal mapping and electrode leakage (12 papers); (c) Flow and non-equilibrium ionization (10 papers); (d) Closed cycle experiments (13 papers); (e) Prospects (12 papers); (f) Round table discussion on closed cycle systems: 3. Liquid Metal, (a) Flows and methods for liquid acceleration (7 papers); (b) Generators (8 papers); (c) Overall cycle considerations (5 papers); (d) Round table discussion on liquid metal systems. (Vol.Ill) 4. Open Cycle, (a) Combustion plasma physics (8 papers); (b) Magnets (6 papers); (c) Materials (19 papers); (d) Striated flows (7 papers); (e) Experiments and measurements on open cycle systems (13 papers); (f) Prospects (17 papers); (g) Round table discussion on open cycle systems. Each sub-set of papers is preceded by a rapporteur's paper and the subsequent discussion (both in English). The papers

  20. Electricity from MHD. Vol. I. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation jointly organized by the IAEA and ENEA and held in Salzburg, 4-8 July 1966. It shows the substantial progress made in MHD generator development, in particular the advances in high-temperature materials, the development of large, high-intensity, superconducting magnets, and the improved understanding of the detailed behaviour of such systems under various operating conditions with a resulting clarification of the technical problems still outstanding. The difficulties of making costing surveys realistic enough to justify a choice being made between conventional plant and one of the MHD generating plant configurations are increased by lack of large-scale prototypes from which data can be obtained under operating conditions approaching those needed in a commercial plant. Contents: (Vol.1) 1. General Physical Problems Related to MHD, (a) Diagnostics (10 papers); (b) Shock tubes (7 papers); (c) Flow and field distribution (19 papers); (d) Auxiliary ionization and relaxation (16 papers). (Vol.11) 2. Closed Cycle, (a) Non-equilibrium theory and measurements (13 papers); (b) Conformal mapping and electrode leakage (12 papers); (c) Flow and non-equilibrium ionization (10 papers); (d) Closed cycle experiments (13 papers); (e) Prospects (12 papers); (f) Round table discussion on closed cycle systems: 3. Liquid Metal, (a) Flows and methods for liquid acceleration (7 papers); (b) Generators (8 papers); (c) Overall cycle considerations (5 papers); (d) Round table discussion on liquid metal systems. (Vol.Ill) 4. Open Cycle, (a) Combustion plasma physics (8 papers); (b) Magnets (6 papers); (c) Materials (19 papers); (d) Striated flows (7 papers); (e) Experiments and measurements on open cycle systems (13 papers); (f) Prospects (17 papers); (g) Round table discussion on open cycle systems. Each sub-set of papers is preceded by a rapporteur's paper and the subsequent discussion (both in English). The papers

  1. Electricity from MHD. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation jointly organized by the IAEA and ENEA and held in Salzburg, 4-8 July 1966. It shows the substantial progress made in MHD generator development, in particular the advances in high-temperature materials, the development of large, high-intensity, superconducting magnets, and the improved understanding of the detailed behaviour of such systems under various operating conditions with a resulting clarification of the technical problems still outstanding. The difficulties of making costing surveys realistic enough to justify a choice being made between conventional plant and one of the MHD generating plant configurations are increased by lack of large-scale prototypes from which data can be obtained under operating conditions approaching those needed in a commercial plant. Contents: (Vol.1) 1. General Physical Problems Related to MHD, (a) Diagnostics (10 papers); (b) Shock tubes (7 papers); (c) Flow and field distribution (19 papers); (d) Auxiliary ionization and relaxation (16 papers). (Vol.11) 2. Closed Cycle, (a) Non-equilibrium theory and measurements (13 papers); (b) Conformal mapping and electrode leakage (12 papers); (c) Flow and non-equilibrium ionization (10 papers); (d) Closed cycle experiments (13 papers); (e) Prospects (12 papers); (f) Round table discussion on closed cycle systems: 3. Liquid Metal, (a) Flows and methods for liquid acceleration (7 papers); (b) Generators (8 papers); (c) Overall cycle considerations (5 papers); (d) Round table discussion on liquid metal systems. (Vol.Ill) 4. Open Cycle, (a) Combustion plasma physics (8 papers); (b) Magnets (6 papers); (c) Materials (19 papers); (d) Striated flows (7 papers); (e) Experiments and measurements on open cycle systems (13 papers); (f) Prospects (17 papers); (g) Round table discussion on open cycle systems. Each sub-set of papers is preceded by a rapporteur's paper and the subsequent discussion (both in English). The papers

  2. Roentgenology, radiology, radiobiology. 7. national congress on roentgenology, radiology, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    339 abstracts of papers read at the congress are presented. They deal with the application of the conventional and modern diagnostic techniques like biomedical radiography, computerized tomography, ultrasonography, NMR imaging, DSA; radiotherapy; radiation hygiene and radiology. Some investigations concerning Kozloduj-NPP environment and post-Chernobyl impact on Bulgarian population are included as well. (I.M.)

  3. Coloured Petri Nets: Basic Concepts, Analysis Methods and Practical Use. Vol. 3, Practical Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    for operations that are used in many arc expressions. These modifications make the CP-nets more appropriate as study material, but they do not change the essential behaviour of the CPN models. The terminology in the original material has been modified to fit the terminology introduced in the first two volumes...... of the CPN models and some of the analysis results. This has been possible since, Vols. 1 and 2 have given the readers a much more thorough knowledge of CP-nets than readers of ordinary research papers. Finally, it is discussed how some of the problems from the projects can be overcome or circumvented. Many...... of these problems have already been removed, e.g., by improvements of the CPN tools. Other problems can be avoided by a careful choice of modelling and analysis techniques. The material has been modified in cooperation with the original authors and the final result has been approved by them. The conclusions...

  4. 养成记Vol.2初步入选的十人公布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    受到众多读者喜爱的“Shiningstar养成记“在经历了三个月的报名后,最终有十位美眉通过了“海选”,即将等待由专业团队组成的审核小组进行第二轮淘汰。Vol.2的“养成记”正在紧张地筹划着全新操作方式,最后入选的美眉除了接受改造出现在杂志上以外,更有机会参与到现场活动中去!

  5. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  6. Antjie Krog se vertaling van Henk van Woerden se roman Een mond vol glas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P. van Coller

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Antjie Krog’s translation of Henk van Woerden’s novel Een mond vol glas (A mouth full of glass Against a historical backdrop several critical approaches to translational theory are explicated. Traditional criticism seems to imply positioning between the Source Text (ST and the Target Text (TT. A functionalist approach (as propagated among others by Snell-Hornby, Nord and Naaijkens is a descriptive rather than a normative approach that focuses almost exclusively on the ST. This approach is consequently adopted in the evaluation of Krog’s translation; yet even within this more relativistic paradigm, a comparison between ST and TT should not be evaded. In the case of Krog’s translation, this comparison leads to the identification of scores of lexical, grammatical and stylistic errors.

  7. High Temperature Tensile Properties of 30 vol. pct ZrCp/W Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve the high temperature strength of tungsten, 30 vol. Pct ZrC particles were added to the tungsten matrix to form a 30ZrCp/W composite. The tensile properties from 20℃ to 1880℃ of the composite were examined.It was shown that with increasing testing temperature, the nonlinearity of the stress strain curve of 30ZrCp/W composite becames obvious over 1200℃ and the Young's modulus decreases and the elongation increases. The ultimate tensile strength increases at first and then decreases with increasing testing temperature. The maximum strength of 431 Mpa was obtained at 1000℃. The strengthening mechanism at high temperatures is the load transfer to ZrC particles and dislocation strengthening of the tungsten matrix with an effect of grain boundary strengthening.

  8. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

  9. Análisis de los compuestos volátiles de la ciruela amarilla (Prunus domestica L. ssp. domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yineth Ruiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El aroma de las frutas se debe a los constituyentes volátiles presentes que, aunque se encuentran en muy bajas concentraciones, contribuyen al aroma global en grados muy diversos. Se hace necesario usar técnicas de aislamiento y concentración que garanticen el análisis de una composición química semejante a la de la fruta. Este trabajo tuvo como objetivo el análisis de los compuestos volátiles de la ciruela amarilla (Prunus domestica L. ssp. domestica por el método de evaporación del aroma asistida por solvente (SAFE. Este método utiliza un equipo de destilación conectado a una bomba de alto vacío que ofrece la posibilidad de aislar rápidamente compuestos volátiles sin daño térmico en diferentes matrices alimentarias. La separación e identificación de los compuestos volátiles se realizó por cromatografía de gases-espectrometría de masas (GC-MS. Se identificaron 47 compuestos (6,55 mg/kg de pulpa de fruta, entre ellos 14 alcoholes, 8 aldehídos, 7 ésteres, 5 cetonas, 4 ácidos carboxílicos, 4 hidrocarburos aromáticos, 3 lactonas, un compuesto azufrado y una hidroxicetona; 16 de ellos se informan por primera vez. El acetato de etilo (2,88 mg/kg, etanol (1 mg/kg y ácido octanoico (0,78 mg/kg fueron los constituyentes volátiles mayoritarios de esta variedad de ciruela.

  10. Análisis de los compuestos volátiles de la ciruela amarilla (Prunus domestica L. ssp. domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yineth Ruiz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El aroma de las frutas se debe a los constituyentes volátiles presentes que, aunque se encuentran en muy bajas concentraciones, contribuyen al aroma global en grados muy diversos. Se hace necesario usar técnicas de aislamiento y concentración que garanticen el análisis de una composición química semejante a la de la fruta. Este trabajo tuvo como objetivo el análisis de los compuestos volátiles de la ciruela amarilla (Prunus domestica L. ssp.domestica por el método de evaporación del aroma asistida por solvente (SAFE. Este método utiliza un equipo de destilación conectado a una bomba de alto vacío que ofrece la posibilidad de aislar rápidamente compuestos volátiles sin daño térmico en diferentes matrices alimentarias. La separación e identificación de los compuestos volátiles se realizó por cromatografía de gases-espectrometría de masas (GC-MS. Se identificaron 47 compuestos (6,55 mg/kg de pulpa de fruta, entre ellos 14 alcoholes, 8 aldehídos, 7 ésteres, 5 cetonas, 4 ácidos carboxílicos, 4 hidrocarburos aromáticos, 3 lactonas, un compuesto azufrado y una hidroxicetona; 16 de ellos se informan por primera vez. El acetato de etilo (2,88 mg/kg, etanol (1 mg/kg y ácido octanoico (0,78 mg/kg fueron los constituyentes volátiles mayoritarios de esta variedad de ciruela.

  11. Radiobiological and genetic effects of Bromus inermis seed progeny from populations of the East-Ural Radioactive Trace (Russia, Kyshtym accident) - Radiobiological and genetic effects for Bromus inermis Leyss. Populations at the East-Ural radioactive trace (Russia, Kyshtym accident in 1957)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, Elena V.; Pozolotna, Vera N. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology UB RAS, 8 Marta str. 202, 620144, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Karimullina, Elina M. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology UB RAS, 8 Marta str. 202, 620144, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, 2011 Biological Sciences III, Irvine, CA 92697-2300 (United States); Roeder, Marion S. [Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstrasse 3, D-06466, Gatersleben (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    This investigation dedicates the problem of remote consequences of radiation impact on plant populations. This is a part of a complex research, which includes the classic triad of radioecology (Timofeev-Ressovsky 1963): 'accumulation and migration of radionuclides in different components of ecosystems - assessment of radiation dose - investigation of radiobiological effects'. We used the populations of smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss.) as a model system for the investigation of radiobiological and genetic effects. It is radiosensitive plant (Preobrazhenskaya 1971). These species may be used as objects for bio-indication at the radioactive contaminated areas, and as well as large-scale radioecological studies, because the adaptation processes are faster for radiosensitive species (Shevchenko et al., 1992; Pozolotina et al. 2005). We calculated external and internal whole-body dose rates by ERICA Tool (Karimullina et al., 2013). The total dose rate for brome was under 100 mGy h{sup -1} at the most polluted site but 43-110 times (Tier 3) exceeded the background along the pollution gradient. Therefore it can be concluded that herbaceous plant populations currently exist under low level chronic exposure at the EURT area. During seven years we have studied variability of viability, mutability and radioresistance of brome seed progeny. The combined effects of radiation exposure and weather conductions at the EURT area were absent. It may be connect with wide variability of inter-population test parameters. At the same time the weather conductions had an influence on the quality of seed progeny at the background area. We analyzed also correlation between original viability and radioresistance of seed progeny from the all plots. This dependence was positive. It was shown negative dependence between original viability of seed progeny and low weight molecular antioxidants content too. Ionizing radiation is a mutagenic factor and, accordingly, elevated mutation

  12. Statistical mechanics formulation of radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Santos-Miranda, J A; Antoranz, J C; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is empirical and based on probabilistic assumptions. We obtain it either from the maximum entropy principle for the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy and/or from the Tsallis entropy. Empiric models are found to be particular cases of the obtained expression. The survival factor exhibits a phase transition behaviour. This formulation supports different tissues grouped as universality classes.

  13. Geometric domains in cellular radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint consideration of experimental findings and microdosimetric facts leads to the conclusion that the biological effects of ionizing radiations are determined by local concentration of absorbed energy at two types of sites that differ greatly in magnitude. They are of the scale of nanometres in primary DNA damage, and of micrometres in the especially deleterious combinations of damaged DNA fragments. Both kinds depend on LET; however, at the nanometre level the dependence is much smaller. Depending on the relative contribution of the two types, the RBE values for observed biological effects can vary considerably but they may be assumed to be larger for cell transformation than for cell killing. (author)

  14. Radiobiological basis of radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short introduction on radiation sources and population doses, the early and late effects of ionizing radiations on man are surveyed with reference to dose dependence. Extrapolation from known data on cancerogenesis by 50 rad or higher, to lower doses is possible, and recommended by ICRP. (Auth.)

  15. Studies of kinetics of diffusion of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), ehtylenediamine (EDA), and NMP + EDA (1:1, vol/vol) mixed solvent system in Chinakuri coal by solvent swelling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, S.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India). Centre for Energy Studies

    2001-10-01

    Kinetics of swelling of Chinakuri coal in NMP, EDA, and NMP + EDA (1:1) (vol/vol) mixed solvent system were studied at temperatures ranging from 15 to 60{degree}C. The result obtained indicated that the diffusion of NMP, EDA, and NMP + EDA (1:1) in coal was described by Fickian diffusion. The values of diffusion exponent 'n' was even as low as 0.3. The activation energies for the combined diffusion and swelling process were in the range 20-30 kJ/mol suggesting that the activation energy barrier may be associated with the disruption of hydrogen-bonding interactions in coal. The present paper reports the details of the studies. 37 refs., 8 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Juha Manninen and Friedrich Stadtler (eds.), The Vienna Circle and the Nordic countries : networks and transformations of logical empiricism (Vienna: Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook vol.14, Springer, 2010)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo Penco

    2013-01-01

    A discussion of The Vienna Circle and the Nordic Countries. Networks and Transformations of Logical Empiricism, edited by Juha Manninen and Friedrich Stadtler, Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook vol.14, Springer, 2010.

  17. Juha Manninen and Friedrich Stadtler (eds., The Vienna Circle and the Nordic Countries. Networks and Transformations of Logical Empiricism (Vienna: Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook vol.14, Springer, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Penco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of The Vienna Circle and the Nordic Countries. Networks and Transformations of Logical Empiricism, edited by Juha Manninen and Friedrich Stadtler, Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook vol.14, Springer, 2010.

  18. Michele Renee Salzman, Marvina A. Sweeney & William Adler (eds., The Cambridge History of Religions in the Ancient World (2 vols. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Baruchello

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Michele Renee Salzman, Marvina A. Sweeney & William Adler (eds., The Cambridge History of Religions in the Ancient World (2 vols. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

  19. Buffer AVL Alone Does Not Inactivate Ebola Virus in a Representative Clinical Sample Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Weller, Simon A; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn M; Steward, Jackie; Lonsdale, Steve G; Lever, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Rapid inactivation of Ebola virus (EBOV) is crucial for high-throughput testing of clinical samples in low-resource, outbreak scenarios. The EBOV inactivation efficacy of Buffer AVL (Qiagen) was tested against marmoset serum (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(8) 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter [TCID50 · ml(-1)]) and murine blood (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(7) TCID50 · ml(-1)) at 4:1 vol/vol buffer/sample ratios. Posttreatment cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that treatment with Buffer AVL did not inactivate EBOV in 67% of samples, indicating that Buffer AVL, which is designed for RNA extraction and not virus inactivation, cannot be guaranteed to inactivate EBOV in diagnostic samples. Murine blood samples treated with ethanol (4:1 [vol/vol] ethanol/sample) or heat (60°C for 15 min) also showed no viral inactivation in 67% or 100% of samples, respectively. However, combined Buffer AVL and ethanol or Buffer AVL and heat treatments showed total viral inactivation in 100% of samples tested. The Buffer AVL plus ethanol and Buffer AVL plus heat treatments were also shown not to affect the extraction of PCR quality RNA from EBOV-spiked murine blood samples. PMID:26179307

  20. Buffer AVL Alone Does Not Inactivate Ebola Virus in a Representative Clinical Sample Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Weller, Simon A; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn M; Steward, Jackie; Lonsdale, Steve G; Lever, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Rapid inactivation of Ebola virus (EBOV) is crucial for high-throughput testing of clinical samples in low-resource, outbreak scenarios. The EBOV inactivation efficacy of Buffer AVL (Qiagen) was tested against marmoset serum (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(8) 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter [TCID50 · ml(-1)]) and murine blood (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(7) TCID50 · ml(-1)) at 4:1 vol/vol buffer/sample ratios. Posttreatment cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that treatment with Buffer AVL did not inactivate EBOV in 67% of samples, indicating that Buffer AVL, which is designed for RNA extraction and not virus inactivation, cannot be guaranteed to inactivate EBOV in diagnostic samples. Murine blood samples treated with ethanol (4:1 [vol/vol] ethanol/sample) or heat (60°C for 15 min) also showed no viral inactivation in 67% or 100% of samples, respectively. However, combined Buffer AVL and ethanol or Buffer AVL and heat treatments showed total viral inactivation in 100% of samples tested. The Buffer AVL plus ethanol and Buffer AVL plus heat treatments were also shown not to affect the extraction of PCR quality RNA from EBOV-spiked murine blood samples.

  1. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm3; optional 5 and 10 cm3. Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm3. Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD2)-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Pötter R, Van Limbergen E et al. Recommendations from

  2. Retraction: On the origin of power-law distributions in systems with constrained phase space [Condens. Matter Phys., 2013, vol. 16, 43802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article Condens. Matter Phys., 2013, vol. 16, 43802 ( DOI:10.5488/CMP.16.43802 has been retracted by the decision of the Editorial Board. There is a significant overlap with an article: Phys. Rev. E, 2006, vol. 74, 036120 ( DOI:10.1103/PhysRevE.74.036120. Appologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  3. Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, 17 - 21 July 1967. The meeting was attended by 143 participants from 24 Member States and one international organization. Contents: (Vol.I) Theory of neutron thermalization (15 papers); Scattering law (20 papers); Angular, space, temperature and time dependence of neutron spectra (9 papers). (Vol.II) Measurement of thermal neutron spectra and spectral indices, and comparison with theory (17 papers); Time-dependent problems in neutron thermalization (12 papers). Each paper is in its original language (61 English, 1 French and 11 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  4. Fast Reactor Physics Vol. I. Proceedings of a Symposium on Fast Reactor Physics and Related Safety Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Karlsruhe, 30 October - 3 November 1967. The meeting was attended by 183 scientists from 23 countries and three international organizations. Contents: (Vol.1) Review of national programmes (5 papers); Nuclear data for fast reactors (12 papers); Experimental methods (3 papers); Zoned systems (7 papers); Kinetics (7 papers). (Vol.11) Fast critical experiments (8 papers); Heterogeneity in fast critical experiments (5 papers); Fast power reactors (13 papers); Fast pulsed reactors (3 papers); Panel discussion. Each paper is in its original language (50 English, 11 French and 3 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  5. Fast Reactor Physics. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Symposium on Fast Reactor Physics and Related Safety Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Karlsruhe, 30 October - 3 November 1967. The meeting was attended by 183 scientists from 23 countries and three international organizations. Contents: (Vol.1) Review of national programmes (5 papers); Nuclear data for fast reactors (12 papers); Experimental methods (3 papers); Zoned systems (7 papers); Kinetics (7 papers). (Vol.11) Fast critical experiments (8 papers); Heterogeneity in fast critical experiments (5 papers); Fast power reactors (13 papers); Fast pulsed reactors (3 papers); Panel discussion. Each paper is in its original language (50 English, 11 French and 3 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  6. The Avenging Females: A Comparative Analysis of Kill Bill Vol.1-2, Death Proof and Sympathy for Lady Vengeance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basak Göksel Demiray

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comparative analysis of Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill Vol.1-2 (2003, 2004, Death Proof (2007 and Park Chan Wook’s Sympathy for Lady Vengeance (Chinjeolhan Geumjassi, 2005. The primary objectives of this study are: (1 to reveal the gender-biases inherent to the fundamental discursive structures of the foregoing films; (2 to compare and contrast the films through an analysis of the ‘gaze(s’ and possible ‘pleasures’,  which are inherent in their narratives, in relation to Laura Mulvey’s and Carol Clover’s approaches; and (3 to distinguish Kill Bill Vol.1-2 from the foregoing two and the ‘avenging female’ clichés of the other horror/violence movies in the context of the replaced positionings of its protagonist and antagonist inherent in its distinct narrative style.

  7. Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, 17 - 21 July 1967. The meeting was attended by 143 participants from 24 Member States and one international organization. Contents: (Vol.I) Theory of neutron thermalization (15 papers); Scattering law (20 papers); Angular, space, temperature and time dependence of neutron spectra (9 papers). (Vol.II) Measurement of thermal neutron spectra and spectral indices, and comparison with theory (17 papers); Time-dependent problems in neutron thermalization (12 papers). Each paper is in its original language (61 English, 1 French and 11 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English.

  8. 发现美丽真我养成记VOL.2预备开跑!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘俣宁

    2009-01-01

    “Shiningstar养成记”第二阶段的主角终于确定,在吸取了VOL.1的成功经验与不足后,养成记VOL.2将以崭新姿态全力开跑。迷人的外表固然重要,美丽的内心更是我们不懈努力的目标。

  9. Análise qualitativa de compostos voláteis do headspace de carne cozida de ovinos e caprinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossiê Zamperetti Donadel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar qualitativamente os compostos voláteis (CV do headspace de diferentes músculos de carne cozida de ovinos e caprinos da região do Alto Camaquã, Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil. Os CV do headspace dos músculos cozidos, L. dorsi e V. lateralis de cinco ovinos machos (idade de 6 meses e cinco cabritos machos castrados (idade de 8-9 meses foram analisados pela técnica de microextração em fase sólida (HS-SPME e cromatógrafo a gás acoplado a espectrômetro de massas (GC/MS. Foram encontrados 73 compostos voláteis, dentre eles aldeídos, cetonas e compostos sulfurados, característicos de carne processada termicamente. A partir da fração volátil, foi possível encontrar marcadores que discriminassem as espécies animais estudadas, caracterizando os caprinos por apresentarem, entre outros compostos, terpenos (β-pineno, α-gurjuneno, α-muuroleno, ausentes em ovinos. Alguns compostos discriminaram V. lateralis e L. dorsi de ovinos, como álcool isopropílico, α-pineno, o-xileno, porém não foi possível obter uma diferenciação entre os músculos de caprinos.

  10. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  11. QSAR Study and VolSurf Characterization of Human Intestinal Absorption of Druge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡桂香; 商志才; 等

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design,optimization,and selection of candidates for the develoment of oral drugs.In this study,a computerized method(VolSurf with GRID) was used as a novel tool for predicting human intestinal absorption of test compound,and for determining the critical molecular properties needed for human intestinal absorption.The tested molecules consisted of 20 diverse drug-like compounds.Partial least squares(PLS) discriminant analysis was used to correlate the experimental data with the theoretical molecular properties of human intestinal absorption.A good correlation(r2=0.95,q2=0.86) between the molecular modeling results and the experimental data demonstrated that human intestinal absorption could be predicted from the three-dimensional(3D) molecular structure of a compound .Favorable structureal properties identified for the potent intestinal absorption of drugs included strong imbalance between the center of mass of a molecule and the barycentre of its hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions and a definitive hydrophobic region as well as less hydrogen bonding donors and acceptors in the molecule.

  12. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  13. Electricity from MHD, 1968. Vol. IV. Open-Cycle MHD. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation held by the IAEA at Warsaw, 24-30 July 1968. The meeting was attended by some 300 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. In contrast to the Symposium held two years ago, much more emphasis was placed on the economic aspects of using MHD generators in large-scale power generation. Among closed- cycle systems, the prospects of linking an ultra-high-temperature reactor with an MHD generator were explored, and the advantages gained by having a liquid-metal generator as a 'topper' in a conventional steam generating plant were presented. Comments were made about the disproportionate effect of end and boundary conditions in experimental MHD generators on the main plasma parameters, and estimates were made of the interrelationship to be expected in real generators. The estimates will have to await confirmation until results are obtained on large-scale prototype MHD systems. Progress in materials research, in design and construction of auxiliary equipment such as heat exchangers, supercooled magnets (which are- now commercially available), etc., is accompanied by sophisticated ideas of plant design. The Proceedings are complemented by three Round Table Discussions in which chosen experts from various countries discuss the outlook for closed-cycle gas, closed-cycle liquid-metal and open-cycle MHD, and give their views as to the most fruitful course to follow to achieve economic full-scale power generation. Contents: (Vol. I) 1. Closed-Cycle MHD with Gaseous Working Fluids: (a) Diagnostics (3 papers); (b) Steady-state non-equilibrium ionization (8 papers); (c) Transient non-equilibrium ionization (7 papers); (d) Pre-ionization and gas discharge (4 papers); (e) Fields and flow in MHD channels (10 papers); (0 Instabilities (8 papers); (g) Generator design and performance studies (6 papers); (Vol. II) (h) Shock waves (6 papers); (i) Power generation experiments (13 papers

  14. Bystander effects and their implications for clinical radiation therapy: Insights from multiscale in silico experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powathil, Gibin G; Munro, Alastair J; Chaplain, Mark A J; Swat, Maciej

    2016-07-21

    Radiotherapy is a commonly used treatment for cancer and is usually given in varying doses. At low radiation doses relatively few cells die as a direct response to radiation but secondary radiation effects, such as DNA mutation or bystander phenomena, may affect many cells. Consequently it is at low radiation levels where an understanding of bystander effects is essential in designing novel therapies with superior clinical outcomes. In this paper, we use a hybrid multiscale mathematical model to study the direct effects of radiation as well as radiation-induced bystander effects on both tumour cells and normal cells. We show that bystander responses play a major role in mediating radiation damage to cells at low-doses of radiotherapy, doing more damage than that due to direct radiation. The survival curves derived from our computational simulations showed an area of hyper-radiosensitivity at low-doses that are not obtained using a traditional radiobiological model. PMID:27084360

  15. Biological Effects of Neutron and Proton Irradiations. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological Effects of Neutron Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years the interest in biological effects caused by neutrons has been increasing steadily as a result of the rapid development of neutron technology and the great number of neutron sources being used. Neutrons, because of their specific physical characteristics and biological effects, form a special type of radiation hazard but, at the same time, are a prospective tool for applied radiobiology. This Symposium, held in Brookhaven at the invitation of the United States Government from 7-11 October 1963, provided an opportunity for scientists to discuss the experimental information at present available on the biological action of neutrons and to evaluate future possibilities. It was a sequel to the Symposium on Neutron Detection, Dosimetry and Standardization, which was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in December 1962 at Harwell. The Symposium was attended by 128 participants from 17 countries and 6 international organizations. Fifty-four papers were presented. The following subjects were discussed in various sessions: (1) Dosimetry. Estimation of absorbed dose of neutrons in biological material. (2) Biological effects of high-energy protons. (3) Cellular and genetic effects. (4) Pathology of neutron irradiation, including acute and chronic radiation syndromes (mortality, anatomical and histological changes, biochemical and metabolic disturbances) and delayed consequences. (5) Relative biological effectiveness of neutrons evaluated by different biological tests. A Panel on Biophysical Considerations in Neutron Experimentation, with special emphasis on informal discussions, was organized during the Symposium. The views of the Panel are recorded in Volume II of the Proceedings. Many reports were presented on the important subject of the relative effectiveness of the biological action of neutrons, as well as on the general pathology of neutron irradiation and the cellular and genetic effects related to it. Three survey papers considered

  16. Biological Effects of Neutron and Proton Irradiations. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological Effects of Neutron Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years the interest in biological effects caused by neutrons has been increasing steadily as a result of the rapid development of neutron technology and the great number of neutron sources being used. Neutrons, because of their specific physical characteristics and biological effects, form a special type of radiation hazard but, at the same time, are a prospective tool for applied radiobiology. This Symposium, held in Brookhaven at the invitation of the United States Government from 7-11 October 1963, provided an opportunity for scientists to discuss the experimental information at present available on the biological action of neutrons and to evaluate future possibilities. It was a sequel to the Symposium on Neutron Detection, Dosimetry and Standardization, which was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in December 1962 at Harwell. The Symposium was attended by 128 participants from 17 countries and 6 international organizations. Fifty-four papers were presented. The following subjects were discussed in various sessions: (1) Dosimetry. Estimation of absorbed dose of neutrons in biological material. (2) Biological effects of high-energy protons. (3) Cellular and genetic effects. (4) Pathology of neutron irradiation, including acute and chronic radiation syndromes (mortality, anatomical and histological changes, biochemical and metabolic disturbances) and delayed consequences. (5) Relative biological effectiveness of neutrons evaluated by different biological tests. A Panel on Biophysical Considerations in Neutron Experimentation, with special emphasis on informal discussions, was organized during the Symposium. The views of the Panel are recorded in Volume II of the Proceedings. Many reports were presented on the important subject of the relative effectiveness of the biological action of neutrons, as well as on the general pathology of neutron irradiation and the cellular and genetic effects related to it. Three survey papers considered

  17. Efecto del aceite de sacha inchi (plukenetia volúbilis l) sobre el perfil lipídico en pacientes con hiperlipoproteinemia Effect of sacha inchi oil (plukenetia volúbilis l) on the lipid profile of patients with hyperlipoproteinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Fausto Garmendia; Rosa Pando; Gerardo Ronceros

    2011-01-01

    El presente es un trabajo experimental piloto, abierto, para conocer el efecto, dosis efectiva y efectos secundarios del aceite de sacha inchi (Plukenetia volúbilis L) en el perfil lipídico de pacientes con hipercolesterolemia; para ello, se incluyó a 24 pacientes de 35 a 75 años, en quienes se determinó los valores sanguíneos de colesterol total (CT), HDL, triglicéridos (Tg), glucosa, ácidos grasos no esterificados (AGNE) e insulina Se aleatorizó a los participantes para recibir 5 mL o 10 mL...

  18. Image quality and volume computed tomography air kerma index (C{sub vol}) evaluation in Recife; Avaliacao da qualidade de imagem e do indice volumetrico de Kerma ar em tomografia computadorizada (C{sub vol}) em Recife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marcos Ely Almeida

    2008-07-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) is an important diagnostic imaging method, widely used. However, in spite of all the advantages and technologic advances within the CT scanners, the tomographic procedures result in high absorbed doses to patients. The main objective of this work was to perform a dosimetric study of CT scanners located at Recife and to evaluate the image quality on CT examinations in these equipment. The volume CT air kerma index (C{sub VOL}) and air kerma length product (P{sub KL,CT}) were estimated. These values were calculated using normalized weighted air kerma indexes in CT standard dosimetry phantoms ({sub n}C{sub W}), supplied by ImPACT group for several CT scanners, and the scan parameters of routine head, routine chest and hi-resolution chest CT exams performed at 20 institutions. The irradiation parameters of 15 adult patients for each CT procedure were registered at six participating centres, at which the phantom from the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation protocol was used for the image quality measurements. For routine head exams, the C{sub VOL} values varied between 12 and 58 mGy (at the posterior fossa) and 15 to 58 mGy (at the cerebrum) and the P{sub KL,CT}, from 150 to 750 mGy{center_dot}cm. The C{sub VOL} values for routine chest procedures varied from 3 to 26 mGy and the P{sub KL,CT}, between 120 and 460 mGy{center_dot}cm. In relation to Hi-resolution chest exams, C{sub VOL} values were from 1.0 to 2.7 mGy and the P{sub KL,CT} values varied between 24 and 67 mGy{center_dot}cm. The image quality evaluations results showed that almost all scanners presented at least one inadequacy. One of the equipment presented faults at 70% of the tests. With regard to the image noise, only two scanners presented acceptable results. From these results, it is possible to conclude that the volume CT air kerma index values are lower than the European reference levels. However, the image quality of these CT scanners does not attend the

  19. Modeling clinical radiation responses in the IMRT era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

  20. Handbook on criticality. Vol. 1. Criticality and nuclear safety; Handbuch zur Kritikalitaet. Bd. 1. Kritikalitaet und nukleare Sicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-04-15

    This handbook was prepared primarily with the aim to provide information to experts in industry, authorities or research facilities engaged in criticality-safety-related problems that will allow an adequate and rapid assessment of criticality safety issues already in the planning and preparation of nuclear facilities. However, it is not the intention of the authors of the handbook to offer ready solutions to complex problems of nuclear safety. Such questions have to remain subject to an in-depth analysis and assessment to be carried out by dedicated criticality safety experts. Compared with the previous edition dated December 1998, this handbook has been further revised and supplemented. The proven basic structure of the handbook remains unchanged. The handbook follows in some ways similar criticality handbooks or instructions published in the USA, UK, France, Japan and the former Soviet Union. The expedient use of the information given in this handbook requires a fundamental understanding of criticality and the terminology of nuclear safety. In Vol. 1, ''Criticality and Nuclear Safety'', therefore, first the most important terms and fundamentals are introduced and explained. Subsequently, experimental techniques and calculation methods for evaluating criticality problems are presented. The following chapters of Vol. 1 deal i. a. with the effect of neutron reflectors and absorbers, neutron interaction, measuring methods for criticality, and organisational safety measures and provide an overview of criticality-relevant operational experience and of criticality accidents and their potential hazardous impact. Vol. 2 parts 1 and 2 finally compile criticality parameters in graphical and tabular form. The individual graph sheets are provided with an initially explained set of identifiers, to allow the quick finding of the information of current interest. Part 1 includes criticality parameters for systems with {sup 235}U as fissile material, while part

  1. Análisis cualitativo de sustancias orgánicas volátiles en muestras de sangre

    OpenAIRE

    D. Olano; M.P. Giménez

    2005-01-01

    El análisis de sustancias volátiles, aunque no tan importante por el número de casos como otras sustancias, es importante en toxicología sobre todo por el fácil acceso que se tiene a dichas sustancias. En este trabajo presentamos un método de análisis sencillo, basado en la SPME y cromatografía de gases-espectrometría de masas, que cubre un gran número de ellos

  2. An investigation of the thermal cycling damage of 25 vol. pct SiCw/alumina ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William D.; Taya, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was made of the thermal cycling damage of a 25 vol pct SiC whisker/alumina (SiCw/Al2O3) composite. Thermal cycling tests were conducted by subjecting a composite specimen to two different fluidized beds. After thermal cycling the composite specimens were subjected to elastic modulus and effective fracture toughness measurements. The thermal cycled specimens were investigated with SEM and TEM studies. It was found that this composite has a relatively high resistance to thermal cycling.

  3. Comments on Letter (Phys. Rev. L, Vol.89, No. 10,2002) by D. Shapira and M. Saltmarsh

    CERN Document Server

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P; Cho, JaeSeon; Lahey, Richard T; Nigmatulin, Robert I; Block, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on correcting several factual errors and critiques in the previously published Letter in Phys. Rev. L, Vol. 89, No. 10, 2022, by D. Shapira and M. Saltmarsh. The authors of the Letter did not perform their own "independent" experiments as claimed; they did not perform control experiments with normal acetone; and, neither did they monitor for tritium. It their Letter, the authors (D. Shapira and M. Saltmarsh) failed to disclose that the data they collected actually confirmed our claims of having observed statistically significant nuclear emissions in chilled, cavitated deuterated acetone.

  4. Caracterización de los compuestos volátiles activos olfativamente en uchuva (physalis peruviana l.)

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, Doris; Sinuco, Diana Cristina; Osorio, Coralia

    2011-01-01

    Durante el estudio de los compuestos activos olfativamente en el aroma de la uchuva (Physalis peruviana L.) se identificaron los compuestos volátiles, obtenidos por 3 técnicas, extracción líquido-líquido con pentano-diclorometano (1:1) (LL), Solvent-Assisted Flavor Evaporation (SAFE) y Headspace-Microextracción en fase sólida (HS-MEFS), y se encontraron diferencias en la calidad del aroma de los extractos mediante el análisis olfatométrico. La técnica SAFE per...

  5. Atracción del picudo del chile a compuestos volátiles de sus hospederos.

    OpenAIRE

    Múñiz Merino, Manolo

    2014-01-01

    El picudo del chile (Anthonomus eugenii Cano), principal plaga del chile (Capsicum spp.) en América, responde a los aromas de sus plantas hospederas, por lo que estos podrían ser de utilidad como fuentes de atrayentes. En la presente investigación se analizaron los compuestos volátiles de las yemas florales y frutos de cinco hospederos de A. eugenii: chile jalapeño (Capsicum annuum L.), pimiento morrón (C. annuum), chile manzano (C. pubescens Ruiz y Pav), chile chiltepe (C. frutescens L) y hi...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  7. The Nasa space radiation school, an excellent training in radiobiology and space radiation protection; La NASA space radiation summer school, une formation d'excellence en radiobiologie et radioprotection spatiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogin, G. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    The astronauts have to spend more time in space and the colonization of the moon and Mars are in the cross hairs of international agencies. The cosmic radiation from which we are protected on ground by atmosphere and by the terrestrial magnetosphere (.4 mSv/year according to Who) become really threatening since 20 km altitude, delivering an average radiation dose of a therapeutic kind to astronauts with peaks related to solar events. It is composed in majority of hadrons: protons (85%) and heavy ions (13%), but also photons (2%) of high energy (GeV/n)). the incurred risks are multiple: early ones(cataract, central nervous system damages, whole body irradiation) but especially delayed ones (carcinogenesis). The astronauts radiation protection turns poor and the rate of death risk by cancer returning from a mission on Mars has been estimated at 5%. The Nasa created in 2004 a summer school aiming to awareness young researchers to the space radiobiology specificities. Areas concerned as follow: radioinduced DNA damage and repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, bystander effect, genome instability, neuro degeneration, delayed effects and carcinogenesis in relation with radiation exposure. (N.C.)

  8. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the NICHD Staff Directory ... Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Clinical research is research that directly involves a ...

  9. Efeito do processamento na composição de voláteis de suco clarificado de maçã Fuji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janzantti Natália S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Os compostos voláteis são responsáveis pelo sabor característico dos alimentos, são termolábeis e também facilmente perdidos ou modificados durante o processamento. Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar o efeito do processamento na composição de voláteis do suco clarificado de maçãs Fuji. O isolamento dos voláteis foi feito por enriquecimento do "headspace" em polímero poroso e eluição com hexano. Oitenta e quatro compostos voláteis foram detectados na maçã Fuji, por cromatografia gasosa de alta resolução, dos quais 30 foram identificados por espectrometria de massas, aliada aos índices de Kovats. A classe química predominante na maçã Fuji, dentre os compostos identificados, foi a dos ésteres, compreendendo ao todo 28 voláteis. Os compostos majoritários na fruta foram a-farneseno, acetato de 2-metil butila, acetato de butila e acetato de hexila. Após a prensagem, o aldeído hexanal aumentou drasticamente e se tornou majoritário. A clarificação foi a etapa que menos causou modificações na composição de voláteis, mantendo o aldeído como majoritário. A pasteurização foi a etapa crítica do processamento, como esperado. Nesta etapa, além de ocorrer a diminuição da área de todos os componentes voláteis, ocorreu a perda total do éster octanoato de isoamila e de 15 compostos não identificados. No entanto, os compostos voláteis majoritários após a prensagem e em todas as etapas do processamento foram os mesmos: acetato de butila, acetato de 2-metil butila, acetato de hexila e um composto não identificado.

  10. Preferencia de anastrepha ludens (loew) (diptera: tephritidae) por volátiles de frutos verdes o amarillos de mango y naranja

    OpenAIRE

    María de Jesús García Ramírez; Juan Cibrián Tovar; René Arzufí Barrera; José López Collado; Marcos Soto Hernández

    2004-01-01

    Se evaluó la respuesta de la mosca mexicana de la fruta, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), a volátiles de frutos verdes y amarillos de mango (Mangifera indica L. var. Haden), y naranja (Citrus aurantium L. var. Valencia). Grupos de moscas hembras y machos fueron evaluados en estado de precópula y postcópula. En los resultados de preferencia, los volátiles de los frutos verdes de mango y naranja atrajeron un mayor número de moscas en comparación con las otras opciones (p #8804;0.05). Las hembras y los...

  11. Procedimiento y dispositivo para determinar el contenido de gases y volátiles en materiales sólidos o recubrimientos de superficie

    OpenAIRE

    Román, E.; Segovia, J. L. de; Nevshupa, R. A.; Konovalov, Pavel; Menshikov, Ilia

    2007-01-01

    Procedimiento y dispositivo para determinar el contenido de gases y volátiles en materiales sólidos o recubrimientos de superficie. La presente invención describe un procedimiento y un dispositivo para determinar la cantidad de gases y volátiles contenido en materiales sólidos y en recubrimientos de superficies, por ejemplo hidrógeno, utilizando un dispositivo mecánico en vacío. El procedimiento consiste en medir la cantidad de gases liberados en una cámara de vacío ...

  12. Effects of hot rolling on microstructure and properties of a 20 vol.% SiCp/Al composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Shoujiang; GENG Lin; MENG Qingchang; FENG Aihan; LEI Tingquan

    2005-01-01

    A 20 vol.% SiCp/Al composite was fabricated by squeeze casting, of which a new process for fabricating the preform was used by blending Al powder and SiC particulates with average diameters of 10 and 3.5 μm, respectively. The microstructure of the as-cast and the hot-rolled composite was investigated by using TEM, EDS, and SEM, and their tensile properties were measured at room temperature. The results show that the ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation of the hot-rolled composite are 80% and 140% higher than those of the as-cast one. The TEM observation result indicates that there are high density of dislocations and dislocation tangles in the hot-rolled composite. Al2O3 layers in the composite resulting from the surface oxidation of the aluminum powders were damaged to spherical particles during hot rolling. All the results indicate that hot-rolling can improve the mechanical properties of the composite and, therefore, engineering components of the 20 vol.% SiCp/Al composite can be produced by squeeze casting followed by hot-rolling.

  13. Effects of radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease in a child with ataxia telangiectasia: a clinical, biological and pathologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stage I lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed in a 44-month-old girl. Although immune deficiency was suspected and IgA deficiency demonstrated, the diagnosis of an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT)-like syndrome was not confirmed until eight weeks later when results of studies on the radiosensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts were available. The child had none of the usual physical stigmata of AT. Severe acute radiation damage followed the treatment of this child with standard doses of radiation therapy. Clinical, pathologic, and radiobiologic correlations are drawn. The diagnosis of a malignant lymphoma disorder in children under the age of five should alert clinicians to the possibility of immune deficiency and, even in the absence of classical physical signs, to AT in particular. Suggestions for the management of future similar cases are put forward

  14. Clinical experience of therapy with cyclotron neutrons at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proper clinical evaluation of fast neutron teletherapy of human cancers will be difficult and time-consuming and will require extension over many years. Fast neutron teletherapy may not have significant advantage over modern conventional supervoltage/megavoltage radiation therapy. A negative answer will be acceptable only if based on sound evidence. If fast neutron teletherapy has an advantage over modern conventional radiation therapy, the advantage may be small and tumor- and site-specific. Detection of a small advantage will require study of a large number of patients and this will be possible only in carefully planned cooperative clinical trials. The study of a large number of patients over a long period will require installation of dedicated neutron generators in research-oriented medical centers. Cooperative clinical trials must be preceded by careful definition of target tumors, normal tissue tolerances, reasonable doses and advantageous patterns of application. Any improvement in local tumor control attributed to fast neutron teletherapy might be dissipated by a concurrent increase in treatment-related sequelae. Much related physics and radiobiology remains to be done and must be supported concurrent with the clinical programs

  15. Actividad antioxidante de compuestos aislados del residuo no-volátil del aceite esencial de naranja.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Arispuro, L.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing interest in the food industry and in preventive medicine to search for «natural antioxidants». Therefore the objetive of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the non-volatile residue of essential orange oil in the oxidation of unrefined and freshly extracted olive oil. Essential orange oil was distilled to obtain a non-volatile residue and fracctionated on a Silica Gel 60 column. The antioxidant activity was determined by measuring peroxide value obtained after heating olive oil at 70 °C for 48 h. Six compounds were isolated and purified, four of these had antioxidant activity, α-tocopherol and three methoxylated flavones were identified using spectroscopic methods. This study confirmed that non-volatile fractions of essential orange oil contain natural antioxidants diferent from α-tocopherol.

    Existe un creciente interés en la industria alimentaria y en la medicina preventiva por la búsqueda de «antioxidantes naturales», por lo que nos planteamos evaluar la actividad antioxidante del residuo no volátil del aceite esencial de naranja contra la oxidación del aceite de oliva sin retinar y de reciente extracción. Mediante destilación del aceite esencial de naranja se obtuvo el residuo no-volátil, el cual se fraccionó en columna de silica gel 60. La actividad antioxidante fue medida por el valor de peróxidos producidos por el aceite de oliva al provocar la oxidación por calentamiento a 70 °C durante 48 h. Se aislaron seis compuestos mediante HPLC preparativo de los cuales cuatro tuvieron actividad antioxidante. Usando métodos espectroscópicos se identificaron α-tocoferol y tres flavonas metoxiladas. Con este estudio se confirmó que la fracción no volátil del aceite esencial de naranja contiene antioxidantes naturales diferentes al α-tocoferol.

  16. Influence of organic component on geometry and stability of the Dy(3) complexes with benzoic and aminobenzoic acids in water-80 vol.% DMSO(DMFA) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data of pH-metric and magnetooptical analyses were used to evaluate stability and structure of benzoate and aminobenzoate dysprosium (3) complexes in water and water - 80 vol.% DMSO (DMFA) mixtures. Factors, dictating change of complex structure and stability when passing from water to organic water solvents, are discussed. 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Renewable energies. Vol. 2. Surrogate fuels, biomass and biogas, solar and wind energy; Erneuerbare Energien. Bd. 2. Ersatzbrennstoffe, Biomasse und Biogas, Solar- und Windenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome-Kozmiensky, Karl J.; Beckmann, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The book on renewable energies, vol.2, surrogate fuels, biomass and biogas, solar and wind energy, covers the following chapters: analytics and sampling concerning the biogenic carbon content of surrogate fuels; processing of surrogate fuels for the energetic utilization; energetic utilization of surrogate fuels; energetic utilization of biomass; fermentation and biogas; solar energy (solar thermal power plant, photovoltaics); wind energy.

  18. The Model Intercomparison Project on the Climatic Response to Volcanic Forcing (VolMIP): Experimental Design and Forcing Input Data for CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Khodri, Myriam; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Gerber, Edwin P.; Hegerl, Gabriele; Robock, Alan; Pausata, Francesco; Ball, William T.; Bauer, Susanne E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions induces a complex set of responses causing global and regional climate effects on a broad range of timescales. Uncertainties exist regarding the climatic response to strong volcanic forcing identified in coupled climate simulations that contributed to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In order to better understand the sources of these model diversities, the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP) has defined a coordinated set of idealized volcanic perturbation experiments to be carried out in alignment with the CMIP6 protocol. VolMIP provides a common stratospheric aerosol data set for each experiment to minimize differences in the applied volcanic forcing. It defines a set of initial conditions to assess how internal climate variability contributes to determining the response. VolMIP will assess to what extent volcanically forced responses of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system are robustly simulated by state-of-the-art coupled climate models and identify the causes that limit robust simulated behavior, especially differences in the treatment of physical processes. This paper illustrates the design of the idealized volcanic perturbation experiments in the VolMIP protocol and describes the common aerosol forcing input data sets to be used.

  19. The Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP): experimental design and forcing input data for CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Khodri, Myriam; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Gerber, Edwin P.; Hegerl, Gabriele; Robock, Alan; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Ball, William T.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bekki, Slimane; Dhomse, Sandip S.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Mann, Graham W.; Marshall, Lauren; Mills, Michael; Marchand, Marion; Niemeier, Ulrike; Poulain, Virginie; Rozanov, Eugene; Rubino, Angelo; Stenke, Andrea; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Tummon, Fiona

    2016-08-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions induces a complex set of responses causing global and regional climate effects on a broad range of timescales. Uncertainties exist regarding the climatic response to strong volcanic forcing identified in coupled climate simulations that contributed to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In order to better understand the sources of these model diversities, the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP) has defined a coordinated set of idealized volcanic perturbation experiments to be carried out in alignment with the CMIP6 protocol. VolMIP provides a common stratospheric aerosol data set for each experiment to minimize differences in the applied volcanic forcing. It defines a set of initial conditions to assess how internal climate variability contributes to determining the response. VolMIP will assess to what extent volcanically forced responses of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system are robustly simulated by state-of-the-art coupled climate models and identify the causes that limit robust simulated behavior, especially differences in the treatment of physical processes. This paper illustrates the design of the idealized volcanic perturbation experiments in the VolMIP protocol and describes the common aerosol forcing input data sets to be used.

  20. Uudised : Volüüm tuleb uue väljaandega! Lauluvõistlusega 1500 eurot! Raadio 2 valib Aastahitti!

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Kodumaisest hip-hopmuusika kogumikust Vol. 3. Lauluvõistlusest, milles võivad osaleda autorid Euroopa Liidust ja Lõuna-Vahemere riikidest (info: www.europa.eu.int/youth). R2 koduleheküljel www.r2.ee/aastahitt saab valida aasta parimat laulu

  1. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological assessment among a nonstandard RapidArc, standard RapidArc, classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 3D brachytherapy for the treatment of the vaginal vault in patients affected by gynecologic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Califano, Giorgia [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Barbieri, Viviana; Sanpaolo, Piero; Castaldo, Giovanni [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumors of Romagna IRST, Meldola (Italy); Fusco, Vincenzo [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a nonstandard RapidArc (RA) modality as alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) or IMRT treatments of the vaginal vault in patients with gynecological cancer (GC). Nonstandard (with vaginal applicator) and standard (without vaginal applicator) RapidArc plans for 27 women with GC were developed to compare with HDR-BRT and IMRT. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison were performed by means of dose-volume histogram and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). In addition, the integral dose and the overall treatment times were evaluated. RA, as well as IMRT, results in a high uniform dose on PTV compared with HDR-BRT. However, the average of EUD for HDR-BRT was significantly higher than those with RA and IMRT. With respect to the OARs, standard RA was equivalent of IMRT but inferior to HDR-BRT. Furthermore, nonstandard RA was comparable with IMRT for bladder and sigmoid and better than HDR-BRT for the rectum because of a significant reduction of d{sub 2cc}, d{sub 1cc}, and d{sub max} (p < 0.01). Integral doses were always higher than HDR-BRT, although the values were very low. Delivery times were about the same and more than double for HDR-BRT compared with IMRT and RA, respectively. In conclusion, the boost of dose on vaginal vault in patients affected by GC delivered by a nonstandard RA technique was a reasonable alternative to the conventional HDR-BRT because of a reduction of delivery time and rectal dose at substantial comparable doses for the bladder and sigmoid. However HDR-BRT provides better performance in terms of PTV coverage as evidenced by a greater EUD.

  2. Clinical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    for years to come. This paper seeks to provide insights into ramp-up management studies through providing an agenda for conducting collaborative clinical research and extend this area by proposing how clinical research could be designed and executed in the Ramp- up management setting.......This paper is about the logic of problem solving and the production of scientific knowledge through the utilisation of clinical research perspective. Ramp-up effectiveness, productivity, efficiency and organizational excellence are topics that continue to engage research and will continue doing so...

  3. [CO2-stunning of slaughter pigs: effects on EEG, catecholamines and clinical reflexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, J; Nowak, B; Waldmann, K H; Ellerbrock, S

    2002-03-01

    Investigations were carried out on the response of slaughter pigs to CO2 stunning with two different gas concentrations (80 vol%, 90 vol%, 73 s) under practical conditions in a one gondola-dip-lift system. EEG measurements were performed and blood constituents such as catecholamines (adrenaline, nor-adrenaline) and lactate as well as clinical reactions (nasal septum and corneal reflex, heart beats) investigated. Special EEG-electrodes were adapted for the measurement on pigs and a mobile data logger was prepared for the use in the lairage of the slaughter house and in the stunning unit. The CO2 concentrations were measured continuously close to the head of the pigs when transported up and down in the stunning gondola. The results show that the technique is suited to monitor the effects of different CO2 gas concentrations on the EEG of the pigs under practical conditions. There is strong evidence that CO2 concentrations of 80 vol% applied over 70 s as required by law are not sufficient to stun pigs properly. A large part of the animals still showed typical reflexes when leaving the stunning pit. When an atmosphere of 90 vol% CO2 is applied, most animals are already dead before bleeding commences. This may create problems in respect to meat hygiene. The blood analysis revealed very high concentrations of catecholamines after stunning. The values for adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in the sticking blood rose by a factor of about 1000 as compared to the concentrations in blood samples taken in the lairage before stunning. It seems necessary to revise the current legislation on gas stunning and to look in greater detail in the effects of CO2 stunning on the welfare of slaughter pigs.

  4. Clinical photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowenko, Janelle

    2009-01-01

    Digital cameras, when used correctly, can provide the basis for telemedicine services. The increasing sophistication of digital cameras, combined with the improved speed and availability of the Internet, make them an instrument that every health-care professional should be familiar with. Taking satisfactory images of patients requires clinical photography skills. Photographing charts, monitors, X-ray films and specimens also requires expertise. Image capture using digital cameras is often done with insufficient attention, which can lead to inaccurate study results. The procedures in clinical photography should not vary from camera to camera, or from country to country. Taking a photograph should be a standardised process. There are seven main scenarios in clinical photography and health professionals who use cameras should be familiar with all of them. Obtaining informed consent prior to photography should be a normal part of the clinical photography routine.

  5. Clinical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorapah, D

    1997-05-01

    The introduction of clinical supervision to a wider sphere of nursing is being considered from a professional and organizational point of view. Positive views are being expressed about adopting this concept, although there are indications to suggest that there are also strong reservations. This paper examines the potential for its success amidst the scepticism that exists. One important question raised is whether clinical supervision will replace or run alongside other support systems.

  6. Functional imaging in oncology. Biophysical basis and technical approaches. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Vilanova, Joan C. [Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina, Girona (Spain); Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. (ed.) [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This well-illustrated two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including preclinical and clinical imaging techniques, based on US, CT, MRI, PET and hybrid modalities. This first volume explains the biophysical basis for these functional imaging techniques and describes the techniques themselves. Detailed information is provided on the imaging of cancer hallmarks, including angiogenesis, tumor metabolism, and hypoxia. The techniques and their roles are then discussed individually, covering the full range of modalities in clinical use as well as new molecular and functional techniques. The value of a multiparametric approach is also carefully considered.

  7. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  8. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  9. Clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about clinical cases and the contribution of the PET - CT Fag application in the diagnosis and treatment of different types of cancer. The cases presented were: neck diseases, epidermoid carcinoma, liver damage and metastasize, lymphoma, thrombosis, colonic cancer and lung disease

  10. [Clinical pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Jovan

    2006-05-01

    This work describes the basic elements of pathology used in clinical practice. Pathology plays an important role in clinical and scientific work, but only a few areas of pathology will be covered. Although the contribution of oncological and surgical pathology to therapy is the most well known, the cases chosen here will involve infectious pathology, diseases of the kidney and the liver, autoimmune diseases, as well as organ transplantation. Especially important is the description of methods that enable more accurate morphological diagnoses, such as histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and electronic microscopy. Previous experience and joint work with clinical doctors have enabled the definition of significant morphological elements as well as of essential methods of pathohistological diagnosis. Besides, as is often the case, although disease symptoms are difficult to discern and biochemical results do not show significant changes compared to normal values, the results of biopsy come as a surprise to clinical doctors. For example, in virus hepatitis B involving so-called asymptomatic HBsAg carriers, we discovered every morphological form of hepatitis, from minimal lesions to chronic, persistent, and active hepatitis. With hepatitis C, certain morphological lesions point to the etiopathogenesis of this disease and thus help to confirm the diagnosis and to instigate therapy on time. Another significant experience involves kidney biopsies in cases when clinical findings are asymptomatic. Often, in such cases, morphological findings point to glomerulonephritis and glomerulopathy at different stages. Timely and subtle morphological diagnostics offer a more precise explanation for the pathological injury of tissues than other diagnostic methods. In this way, by adopting new methods, the work of pathologists is included more and more in everyday clinical practice. The inclusion of pathologists in a transplantation team makes sure a proper selection of

  11. Fluorescence Microscopy and Fluorescent Probes, Vol. 2, Edited by Jan Slavík 1998. Plenum Press, New York and London. 292 pages. (hardback, $95.00).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Brian

    1999-03-01

    In June of 1995, the first conference on Fluorescent Microscopy and Fluorescent Probes was held in the beautiful city of Prague in the Czech Republic and the proceedings of that meeting were published by Plenum Press in 1996 (Fluorescence Microscopy and Fluorescent Probes, Vol. 1, edited by Jan Slavík). Based on the success of the first conference, a second conference was held two years later again in Prague, and this book is the proceedings of that meeting.

  12. Dislocation Behavior in ZrC Particles during Elevated Temperature Compressive Deformation of a 30 vol.% ZrCp/W Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taiquan Zhang; Qingchang Meng; Yujin Wang; Yu Zhou; Guiming Song

    2011-01-01

    A 30 vol.% ZrCP/W composite has been deformed in compression in the temperature range of 1200-1600℃.Dislocation nucleation mechanism in ZrC particles is discussed by analyzing the harmonious deformation between tungsten-matrix and ZrC particles. Thermal activation apparently increases the mobility of screw segments, resulting in the formation of many kinetics jogs and thermodynamics jogs above 1300℃. The formation mechanisms of the dislocation configurations are studied.

  13. Volátiles generados por hidrólisis enzimática de glicósidos de hojas de lulo (Solanum quitoense L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Osorio R.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available La fracción glicosídica de hojas de lulo (Solanum quitoense L. fue obtenida por adsorción sobre Amberlita XAD-2 y posterior elución con metanol. Los glicósidos así extraídos se hidrolizaron enzimáticamente con una glicosidasa no selectiva (Rohapect D5-L y las agliconas (volátiles enlazados glicosídicamente producidas fueron caracterizadas químicamente por CGAR (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución, CGAR-EM (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución acoplada a espectrometría de masas y analizadas sensorialmente (nota olfativa por CGAR-O (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución acoplada a olfatometría. Se detectaron en total 25 compuestos volátiles y de ellos, se identificaron 21, los cuales representan el 90 % de todas las agliconas generadas. Los volátiles identificados presentaron diversas estructuras químicas que pueden agruparse en Ci3-norisoprenoides (38.1 %, 15 mg/kg hojas, compuestos aromáticos (30.5 %, alcoholes monoterpénicos (12.3 % y compuestos alifáticos Cg (9.3 %. El extracto de volátiles producido por hidrólisis enzimática presentó un olor a verde amaderado agradable, con fuertes notas dulces parecidas a la miel.

  14. Addendum to “Cross-Validating Regression Models in Marketing Research” Vol. 12, No. 4, Fall 1993, pp. 415–427

    OpenAIRE

    Joel H. Steckel; Vanhonacker, Wilfried R.

    1996-01-01

    In our paper, “Cross-Validating Regression Models in Marketing Research,” which appeared in the Vol. 12, No. 4, Fall 1993 issue of Marketing Science, pp. 415–427, we develop a formal statistical test for cross-validating regression models under the simple random splitting framework. The original publication neglected to present definitions for two of the parameters used. We present these in this Addendum.

  15. TAI CHI CHUAN: STATE OF THE ART IN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH: VOL 52 (MEDICINE & SPORT SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youlian Hong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised into four sections, each containing four to seven chapters: the first section focuses on biomechanical and physiological aspects of Tai Chi in seven chapters, the second section addresses the benefits of the sport in terms of sensory motor control and fall prevention in five chapters, the third section highlights the psychological and social aspects in four chapters, and in the last section the application of Tai Chi in clinical intervention such as in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes is demonstrated in six chapters. AUDIENCE This is a thorough reference book for students, researchers, teachers and healthcare professionals in exercise science and medicine. In fact, anyone already practicing Tai Chi Chuan or considering it up would benefit from this book. ASSESSMENT This 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal on Tai Chi Chuan is a valuable and essential source of information brought together by recognized researchers around the Globe. The book is for everybody who is interested in understanding the effects and application of this fascinating form of exercise which has been developed as a form of martial arts and used for health exercise for centuries in China.

  16. Effect of alumina nanoparticles on hot strength and deformation behaviour of AI-5vol% Al2O3 nanocomposite: experimental study and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesabi, Z Razavi; Sanjari, M; Simchi, A; Reihani, S M Seyed; Simancik, F

    2010-04-01

    Hot deformation behaviour of as-extruded Al-5vol% Al2O3 nanocomposite was investigated at temperatures range 350 to 450 degrees C and initial strain rates of 5.5 x 10(-4) to 10(-1) s(-1) and compared with those of monolithic (unreinforced) aluminium. Both extruded materials exhibited work-softening during hot deformation. The results showed that with the addition of 5 vol% alumina nanoparticles with an average particle size of 35 nm, a significant increase in compressive strength of aluminium was obtained. For instance, at 350 degrees C an abrupt rise of approximately 340% in hot strength of the nanocomposite relative to monolithic aluminium was achieved. TEM investigation of microstructure of the nanocomposite after hot deformation showed formation of equiaxed grains from elongated ones indicating the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. Considering experimental data, deformation behaviour of Al-5vol% Al2O3 nanocomposite and monolithic Al was modelled via trained artificial neural network (ANN). The results showed that ANN can predict complex flow behaviour of the nanocomposite as well as the monolithic aluminium. PMID:20355477

  17. Self-organizing maps and VolSurf approach to predict aldose reductase inhibition by flavonoid compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Scotti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aldose Reductase (AR is the polyol pathway key enzyme which converts glucose to sorbitol. High glucose availability in insulin resistant tissues in diabetes leads into an accumulation of sorbitol, which has been associated with typical chronic complications of this disease, such as neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy. In this study, 71 flavonoids AR inhibitors were subjected to two methods of SAR to verify crucial substituents. The first method used the PCA (Principal Component Analysis to elucidate physical and chemical characteristics in the molecules that would be essential for the activity, employing VolSurf descriptors. The rate obtained explained 53% of the system total variance and revealed that a hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance in the molecules is required, since very polar or nonpolar substituents decrease the activity. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs was also employed to determine key substituents by evaluating substitution patterns, using NMR data. This study had a high success rate (85% accuracy in the training set and 88% accuracy in the test set and showed polihydroxilations are essential for high activity and methoxylations and glicosilations primarily at positions C7, C3' and C4' decrease the activity.

  18. Técnicas de aislamiento y concentración de volátiles de aceites vegetales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales, M. T.

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the methods for food flavor evaluation is the analysis of volatile components. First step in this kind of analysis Is the isolation and concentration of volatiles. A review is carried out about different techniques applied in foods and especially in vegetable oils. Very different methods have been used, an explication of each one with its different cases are presented. Likewise the applications carried out in vegetable oils during last years are discussed.

    Uno de los métodos de evaluación del flavor de los alimentos consiste en la determinación de sus componentes volátiles. La primera etapa necesaria para realizar este tipo de análisis es el aislamiento y concentración de los mismos. Se ha realizado una revisión bibliográfica sobre las diferentes técnicas utilizadas para este fin en diferentes alimentos y especialmente en aceites vegetales. Los métodos utilizados son muy diversos, se ofrece una explicación de cada uno de ellos considerando las diferentes variantes existentes. Asimismo se detallan las aplicaciones realizadas en aceites vegetales durante los últimos años.

  19. Clinical biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  20. Medical Radioisotope Scanning, Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of radioisotopes continue to grow in number and importance and medical centres in almost all countries of the world are now using radioactive materials both in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. An increasing proportion of these applications involves studies of the spatial distribution of radioactive material within the human body, for which purpose highly specialized scanning methods have been elaborated. By these methods it is possible to study the position, size and functional state of different organs, to detect tumours, cysts and other abnormalities and to obtain much useful information about regions of the body that are otherwise inaccessible, except by surgery. Progress in scanning methods in recent years has been very rapid and there have been many important advances in instrumentation and technique. The development of new forms of the gamma camera and of colour-scanning techniques are but two examples of recent improvements. The production of new radioisotopes and new labelled compounds has further extended the scope of these methods. To survey these new advances the International Atomic Energy Agency held a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Athens from 20-24 April 1964. The scientific programme of the meeting covered all aspects of scanning methods including theoretical principles, instrumentation, techniques and clinical applications. The World Health Organization assisted in the selection of papers by providing a consultant to the selection committee. The meeting followed the earlier IAEA/WHO Seminar on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Vienna in 1959, which was attended by 36 participants and at which 14 papers were presented. Some idea of the growth of interest in the subject may be gained from the fact that the Symposium was attended by 160 participants from 26 countries and 4 international organizations, and that 58 papers were presented. The published proceedings, comprising two volumes, contain all the

  1. Medical Radioisotope Scanning. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of radioisotopes continue to grow in number and importance and medical centres in almost all countries of the world are now using radioactive materials both in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. An increasing proportion of these applications involves studies of the spatial distribution of radioactive material within the human body, for which purpose highly specialized scanning methods have been elaborated. By these methods it is possible to study the position, size and functional state of different organs, to detect tumours, cysts and other abnormalities and to obtain much useful information about regions of the body that are otherwise inaccessible, except by surgery. Progress in scanning methods in recent years has been very rapid and there have been many important advances in instrumentation and technique. The development of new forms of the gamma camera and of colour-scanning techniques are but two examples of recent improvements. The production of new radioisotopes and new labelled compounds has further extended the scope of these methods. To survey these new advances the International Atomic Energy Agency held a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Athens from 20 - 24 April 1964. The scientific programme of the meeting covered all aspects of scanning methods including theoretical principles, instrumentation, techniques and clinical applications. The World Health Organization assisted in the selection of papers by providing a consultant to the selection committee. The meeting followed the earlier IAEA/WHO Seminar on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Vienna in 1959, which was attended by 36 participants and at which 14 papers were presented. Some idea of the growth of interest in the subject may be gained from the fact that the Symposium was attended by 160 participants from 26 countries and 4 international organizations, and that 58 papers were presented. The published proceedings, comprising two volumes, contain all the

  2. Study of the Clinical Proton Beam Relative Biological Effectiveness at the JINR Phasotron, Dubna

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanova, A; Gaevskii, V N; Molokonov, A G; Spurny, F; Fadeeva, T A; Shmakova, N L

    2002-01-01

    Proton clinical beams contain particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Secondary heavy charged particles produced from nuclear interactions and degraded protons at the Bragg peak region are particles with high LET. These particles could enhance the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of the proton beam. We have carried out two radiobiological experiments to investigate the RBE of 150 MeV clinical proton beam. The irradiation of the Chinese Hamster V79 cells were performed at two points of the depth-dose distribution - at the beam entrance and at the Bragg peak. The contribution of the high LET particles to dosimetric and microdosimetric characteristics in the various depth of proton beam was also experimentally studied using the CR-39 track etched detectors. The LET spectra between 10 and 700 keV/{\\mu}m were measured by means of track detectors and the automatic optical image analyzer LUCIA-II. The relative contribution of the high LET particles to ab! sorbed dose increases from several per cent ...

  3. 5. workshop on heavy charged particles in biology and medicine. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains about 90% of the abstracts of the papers presented at the workshop. The headings were as follows: DNA, mutations and chromosomal aberrations, cellular radiobiology, modelling in radiobiology, space research, clinical radiobiology, status reports of heavy ion radiotherapy, dosimetry and instrumentation and finally, 3-D-planning and clinical indications. (MG)

  4. Instruments and scope of possible action of the Federal States for global climate protection. Vol. 1: Analysis. Vol. 2: Baseline data. Vol. 3: Legal opinion; Instrumente und Handlungsmoeglichkeiten der Bundeslaender zum Klimaschutz. Bd. 1: Analyseband. Bd. 2: Materialband. Bd. 3: Rechtsgutachten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blechschmidt, K.; Herbert, W.; Barzantny, K.; Dittmann, W.; Gehm, C.; Menges, R.; Moehring-Hueser, W.; Wortmann, K.; Herbert, W. [Energiestiftung Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Penschke, A. [Zentrum fuer Rationelle Energieanwendung und Umwelt GmbH, Regensburg (Germany); Groth, A.; Kusche, C.

    2001-07-01

    In the analysis volume, (vol. 1), the legal and political frameworks governing the greenhouse gas reduction policy adopted by the Federal states of Germany are explained. The evolution of the policies, goals pursued and points of major emphasis, the orientation for the future and existing impediments for implementation are analysed. Volume 2 contains a comprehensive baseline data library characterising the present situation, as well as examples selected by the Federal states, illustrating policy schemes which proved to be successful. The legal opinion presented in volume 3 explains the distribution of competences for climate policy of the Federal Government and the state governments in accordance with constitutional law, as well as channels of implementing policy schemes via legislation issued by the Federal states, or administrative action in execution of the law, or other administrative action. (orig./CB) [German] Im Analyseband (Band 1) werden die rechtlichen und politischen Rahmenbedingungen der Landesklimaschutzpolitik dargestellt, gefolgt von einer Analyse dieser Politik hinsichtlich ihrer Entwicklung, Ziele und Schwerpunkte, bestehenden Hindernissen, zukuenftiger Ausrichtung, Handlungsoptionen und Beispiele fuer die Erschliessung neuer Taetigkeitsgebiete der Laender. Der Materialband (Band 2) enthaelt neben umfassenden Daten zur Schilderung der Situation auch von den Laendern ausgewaehlte, erfolgreiche Beispiele fuer die Durchfuehrung von Klimaschutzmassnahmen. In einem Rechtsgutachten (Band 3) werden die verfassungsrechtlichen Grundlagen der Kompetenzverteilung zwischen Bund und Laendern auf dem Gebiet des Klimaschutzes detailliert dargelegt und Moeglichkeiten der Umsetzung von Klimaschutzpolitik durch Landesgesetzgebung sowie gesetzesvollziehende und nicht-gesetzesvollziehende Verwaltungstaetigkeit untersucht. (orig./CB)

  5. Electricity from MHD, 1968. Vol. II. Closed-Cycle MHD with Gaseous Working Fluids. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation held by the IAEA at Warsaw, 24-30 July 1968. The meeting was attended by some 300 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. In contrast to the Symposium held two years ago, much more emphasis was placed on the economic aspects of using MHD generators in large-scale power generation. Among closed- cycle systems, the prospects of linking an ultra-high-temperature reactor with an MHD generator were explored, and the advantages gained by having a liquid-metal generator as a 'topper' in a conventional steam generating plant were presented. Comments were made about the disproportionate effect of end and boundary conditions in experimental MHD generators on the main plasma parameters, and estimates were made of the interrelationship to be expected in real generators. The estimates will have to await confirmation until results are obtained on large-scale prototype MHD systems. Progress in materials research, in design and construction of auxiliary equipment such as heat exchangers, supercooled magnets (which are- now commercially available), etc., is accompanied by sophisticated ideas of plant design. The Proceedings are complemented by three Round Table Discussions in which chosen experts from various countries discuss the outlook for closed-cycle gas, closed-cycle liquid-metal and open-cycle MHD, and give their views as to the most fruitful course to follow to achieve economic full-scale power generation. Contents: (Vol. I) 1. Closed-Cycle MHD with Gaseous Working Fluids: (a) Diagnostics (3 papers); (b) Steady-state non-equilibrium ionization (8 papers); (c) Transient non-equilibrium ionization (7 papers); (d) Pre-ionization and gas discharge (4 papers); (e) Fields and flow in MHD channels (10 papers); (0 Instabilities (8 papers); (g) Generator design and performance studies (6 papers); (Vol. II) (h) Shock waves (6 papers); (i) Power generation experiments (13 papers

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  7. Development of radiobiological dentistry in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History of the radiological dentistry progress in Russia from the first report on the application of biomedical radiography techniques to dental practice in Russia in 1901 is briefly described. The first special X-ray room was open in 1921 in Petrograd. First scientific papers and guides on the radiological dentistry made their appearance. The second period in the development of Russian radiological dentistry was connected with the World War 2 and wounds of maxillo-facial wounds. Postwar time is characterized by application of the novel techniques, wide range of scientific researches in the radiological dentistry. The modern history of radiological dentistry began from 1983 due to computerized tomography used in case of malignant tumors of maxilla and nose cavity

  8. Radiobiological modelling with MarCell software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Jones introduced a bone marrow radiation cell kinetics model with great potential for application in the fields of health physics, radiation research, and medicine. However, until recently, only the model developers have been able to apply it because of the complex array of biological and physical assignments needed for evaluation of a particular radiation exposure protocol. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the use of MarCell (MARrow CELL Kinetics) software for MS-DOS, a user-friendly computer implementation of that mathematical model that allows almost anyone with an elementary knowledge of radiation physics and/or medical procedures to apply the model. A hands-on demonstration of the software will be given by guiding the user through evaluation of a medical total body irradiation protocol and a nuclear fallout scenario. A brief overview of the software is given in the Appendix.

  9. Radiobiological aspects of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of an oncological treatment is to eradicate the tumor without inducing unacceptable side effects. The optimization of a dose distribution with external beams requires the selection of the radiation type and energy, the number of fields, their sizes and incidence angles of the beams and then the possible use of wedges or compensating filters. The goal of optimal treatment planning is to provide maximum tumor killing while sparing normal tissues as much as possible. New, more sophisticated planning systems, based on three dimensional dose distribution calculations, require simplified data interpretation techniques. Dose volume histograms represent a convenient and useful tool to summarize dose distribution information through the entire volume of a given anatomic structure and to quickly highlight characteristics such as dose uniformity and hot and cold spots. It is difficult however to choose among competing histograms concerning different organs when they cross one another. This paper discusses the development of a computerized treatment planning system in which dose volume histograms are used to estimate tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities

  10. Fast neutron dosimetry ip radiobiological experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of absorbed dose in organs and tissues of animals and other biological ob ects irradiated with fast neutrons in WWR-M nuclear reactor is studied. The method of differential homogeneous ionization chambers suggested for the separate determination of neutron and γ-components of tissue dose, is used. To determine the value of tissue dose at this or that depth of the subject investigated, appropriate phanthoms and the technique of microcondensator chambers are used. Sources of errors of measurements are analyzed. The study of distribution of deep absorbed doses in tissue-equivalent phanthoms has permitted to make definite conclusions and recommendations relatively to optimum conditions of irradiation with fast neutrons of different biological objects

  11. Radiobiological modeling with MarCell software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

    1999-01-01

    A nonlinear system of differential equations that models the bone marrow cellular kinetics associated with radiation injury, molecular repair, and compensatory cell proliferation has been extensively documented. Recently, that model has been implemented as MarCell, a user-friendly MS-DOS computer program that allows users with little knowledge of the original model to evaluate complex radiation exposure scenarios. The software allows modeling with the following radiations: tritium beta, 100 kVp X, 250 kVp X, 22 MV X, {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, 2 MeV electrons, triga neutrons, D-T neutrons, and 3 blends of mixed-field fission radiations. The possible cell lineages are stem, stroma, and leukemia/lymphoma, and the available species include mouse, rat, dog, sheep, swine, burro, and man. An attractive mathematical feature is that any protracted protocol can be expressed as an equivalent prompt dose for either the source used or for a reference, such as 250 kVp X rays or {sup 60}Co. Output from MarCell includes: risk of 30-day mortality; risk of cancer and leukemia based either on cytopenia or compensatory cell proliferation; cell survival plots as a function of time or dose; and 4-week recovery kinetics following treatment. In this article, the program`s applicability and ease of use are demonstrated by evaluating a medical total body irradiation protocol and a nuclear fallout scenario.

  12. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  13. Literature study of the radiobiological parameters of Caesium-137 required for evaluating internal irradiation doses as a function of age; Etude bibliographique des parametres radiobiologiques du cesium-137 necessaires a l'evaluation des doses d'irradiation interne en fonction de l'age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    This document reassembles information published in scientific literature on radiobiological parameters of Cs-137, necessary for the estimate of the internal irradiation dose of man according to his age (during growth). The data are completed by a commented review of the mathematical models, proposed in order to value the irradiation doses from ingested cesium and the biological parameters. (author) [French] Ce document rassemble les informations publiees dans la litterature scientifique, concernant les parametres radiobiologiqueo du cesium-137, necessaires a l'evaluation des doses d'irradiation interne de l'homme en fonction de l'age. Ces donnees sont completees par une revue commentee des modeles mathematiques proposes en vue de l'evaluation des doses d'irradiation a partir des quantites de cesium ingerees et des parametres biologiques. (auteur)

  14. Caracterización de los compuestos volátiles obtenidos durante la desalcoholización a vacio de la cerveza tipo Lager

    OpenAIRE

    Villacorta Frontela, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se pretende caracterizar los compuestos responsables de las particularidades sensoriales, en las cervezas convencionales, eliminados mediante un método de destilación a vacío. La caracterización de dichos compuestos volátiles se realizará mediante cromatografía de gases con detector de llama (GC/FID), posibilitando el análisis cuantitativo de los compuestos. Para ello, mediante la técnica mencionada se ha trabajado con dieciséis cervezas convencionales, tipo lager. ...

  15. Pocket book of the metal trade. Vol. 1. Metals and trading conditions. 11. rev. ed.; Taschenbuch des Metallhandels. Bd. 1. Metalle und Handelsbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Ralf (ed.); Dietz, Ferdinand; Kammer, Catrin; Mohr, Heinz; Zocher, Nadine

    2008-07-01

    Vol. 1 of the pocket book on metals and trading conditions comprises the following chapters: 1. Metal, a raw material; 2. Metal stock exchanges; 3. Trading conditions and standards; 4. Addresses, organisations, associations; 5. Metals dictionary D-E-F; 6. List of commodities for external trading; 7. Statistics (prices, production, consumption). [German] Der erste Band ueber Metalle und Handelsbedingungen ist in folgende Kapitel unterteilt: 1. Der Rohstoff Metall; 2. Die Metallboersen; 3. Handelsbedingungen/Normen; 4. Anschriften, Organisationen, Verbaende; 5. Metall Woerterbuch: Deutsch-Englisch Franzoesisch; 6. Warenverzeichnis fuer den Aussenhandel und 7. Statistik (Preis-, Produktions- und Verbrauchsstatistik).

  16. Componentes volátiles libres y glicosídicamente enlazados del aroma de la piña (ananas comosus l.) variedad perolera

    OpenAIRE

    Sinuco, Diana C.; Alicia L. Morales; Duque, Carmenza

    2008-01-01

    Los componentes volátiles del aroma de la piña perolera fueron obtenidos mediante extracción L-L y analizados por CGAR, CGAR-EM (IE, IQP) y CGAR-O. En esta forma se identificaron 67 compuestos, siendo 2-metilbutanoato de metilo, hexanoatode metilo, 4- acetoxi-hexanoato de metilo, 5-acetoxi-hexanoato de metilo y 3-metiltiopropanoato de metilo los componentesmayoritarios. Mediante el análisis por CGAR-O no se detectaron compuestos impacto.La fracción glicosídica se obtuvo por adsorción sobre Am...

  17. The evidence base for the use of internal dosimetry in the clinical practice of molecular radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular radiotherapy (MRT) has demonstrated unique therapeutic advantages in the treatment of an increasing number of cancers. As with other treatment modalities, there is related toxicity to a number of organs at risk. Despite the large number of clinical trials over the past several decades, considerable uncertainties still remain regarding the optimization of this therapeutic approach and one of the vital issues to be answered is whether an absorbed radiation dose-response exists that could be used to guide personalized treatment. There are only limited and sporadic data investigating MRT dosimetry. The determination of dose-effect relationships for MRT has yet to be the explicit aim of a clinical trial. The aim of this article was to collate and discuss the available evidence for an absorbed radiation dose-effect relationships in MRT through a review of published data. Based on a PubMed search, 92 papers were found. Out of 79 studies investigating dosimetry, an absorbed dose-effect correlation was found in 48. The application of radiobiological modelling to clinical data is of increasing importance and the limited published data on absorbed dose-effect relationships based on these models are also reviewed. Based on National Cancer Institute guideline definition, the studies had a moderate or low rate of clinical relevance due to the limited number of studies investigating overall survival and absorbed dose. Nevertheless, the evidence strongly implies a correlation between the absorbed doses delivered and the response and toxicity, indicating that dosimetry-based personalized treatments would improve outcome and increase survival. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear Fragmentation in Clinical Heavy Ion Beams, Should We Worry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Toftegaard, Jakob;

    Particle therapy with fast ions is increasingly applied as a treatment option for localized inoperable tumour sites. One of the reasons for the increased complications of understanding heavy ion dosimetry and radiobiology stems from the mixed particle spectrum which occurs due to nuclear fragment...

  19. [The French project ETOILE: review of clinical data for light ion hadrontherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, P; Balosso, J; Bolla, M; Gérard, J P

    2002-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was the pioneer in light ions hadrontherapy with almost 2500 patients treated between 1957 and 1993 with Helium and Neon. The NIRS (National Institute For Radiological Science, Chiba, Japan) was the first dedicated medical centre for cancer with more than 1200 patients exclusively treated with carbon ion from 1994. A three-year 70 to 100% local control was reported for radio-resistant cancers, supporting the use of high LET particles. Hypo-fractionation was particularly explored for lung cancers and hepatocarcinoma (4 sessions only). Dose escalation studies demonstrated a tumour dose-effect and permitted to precise dose constraints for healthy tissues especially for the rectum. More than 140 patients were treated with carbon ion exclusively or associated with photons since 1997 in the GSI laboratory Gesellschaft Für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany). A very high local control was also obtained for radioresistant cancer of the base of the skull. Preliminary clinical data seem to confirm the expected therapeutic gain with light ions, due to their ballistic and radio-biological properties, and justify the European projects for the construction of dedicated medical facilities for cancers. The French "Etoile" project will be integrated in the European hadrontherapy network "Enlight", with the objectives to coordinate technologic, medical and economic features.

  20. The French project Etoile: review of clinical data for light ion hadron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was the pioneer in light ions hadron-therapy with almost 2500 patients treated between 1957 and 1993 with Helium and Neon. The NIRS (National Institute For Radiological Science Chiba, Japan) was the first dedicated medical centre for cancer with more than 1200 patients exclusively treated with carbon ion from 1994. A three-year 70 to 1200 patients exclusively treated with carbon ion from 1994. A three-year 70 to 100% local control was reported for radio-resistant cancers, supporting the use of high LET particles. Hypo-fractionation was particularly explored for lung cancers and hepato-carcinoma (4 sessions only). Dose escalation studies demonstrated a tumor dose-effect and permitted to precise dose constraints for healthy tissues especially for the rectum. More than 140 patients were treated with carbon ion exclusively or associated with photons since 1997 in the GSI laboratory Gesellschaft Fur Schwerionenforschung. Darmstadt, Germany). A very high local control was also obtained for radioresistant cancer of the base of the skull. Preliminary clinical data sem to confirm the expected therapeutic gain with light ions, due to their ballistic and radio-biological properties, and justify the European projects for the construction of dedicated medical facilities for cancers. The French 'Etoile' project will be integrated in the European hadron-therapy network 'English', with the objectives to coordinate technologic, medical and economic features. (authors)

  1. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the ''Holy Gray''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brans, B. [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bodei, L. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Giammarile, F. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Linden, O.; Tennvall, J. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Lund (Sweden); Luster, M. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Oyen, W.J.G. [University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. (orig.)

  2. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the “Holy Gray”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W. J. G.; Tennvall, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. Review This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose–response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. Developments In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. PMID:17268773

  3. Estabelecimento do perfil metabolómico volátil da urina e saliva, como estratégia não-invasiva, para a deteção de potenciais biomarcadores de diferentes tipos de cancro

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaco, Carina Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Com este trabalho pretendeu-se estabelecer o perfil metabolómico volátil de amostras de fluidos biológicos, nomeadamente saliva e urina, de pacientes com cancro da mama e do pulmão e de indivíduos saudáveis (grupo controlo), utilizando a Microextração em Fase Sólida em modo headspace (HS-SPME) seguida de Cromatografia Gasosa acoplada à Espectrometria de Massa (GC-MS). Efetuou-se a comparação entre os perfis voláteis dos grupos estudados com o objetivo de identificar metabolitos que possam ser...

  4. Caracterización de la Especie Ilex Paraguariensis mediante Análisis por Cromatografía Gaseosa de sus Componentes Volátiles Characterization of Ilex Paraguariensis using Gas Chromatography of the Volatile Components

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos R Romero; Nelly L Jorge; Manuel E Gómez

    2006-01-01

    Se han estudiado los componentes volátiles de las hojas de especies de Ilex paraguariensis por cromatografía gaseosa, utilizando una columna capilar con metilfenilsilicona como fase estacionaria, a fin de contribuir a su caracterización taxonómica. Se compararon dos métodos de extracción de componentes volátiles: destilación por arrastre con vapor de agua y muestreo estático de la cámara ocupada por el vapor en equilibrio con el material (Headspace Analysis, HSA). La técnica de HSA es la que ...

  5. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the Third Conference on this matter convened by the IAEA and held at Novosibirsk, 1-7 August 1968. The meeting was attended by more than 400 participants from 24 countries. Contents: (Vol. I) Summary of the Conference (4 papers); Shock waves (8 papers); Toroidal confinement I (Tokamak, Zeta, etc.) (11 papers); Toroidal confinement II (Multipoles, etc.) (9 papers) ; Toroidal confinement III (Stellarators) (9 papers) ; Drift waves and non-linear phenomena (15 papers); Toroidal confinement IV (Theory), Laser-produced plasmas, Astron (9 papers). (Vol. II) Plasma focus, Confinement by neutral gas. Instabilities and waves (6 papers); Open-ended systems I (Mirrors) (11 papers) ; HF heating, confinement and stabilization (13 papers); Open-ended systemsII (Theta pinch)(12 papers); Turbulent heating, Beam-plasma interaction (10 papers). Each paper is in its original language (80 English, 37 Russian and 10 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with one in the original language if this is not English. The discussions are in English. (author)

  6. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the Third Conference on this matter convened by the IAEA and held at Novosibirsk, 1-7 August 1968. The meeting was attended by more than 400 participants from 24 countries. Contents: (Vol. I) Summary of the Conference (4 papers); Shock waves (8 papers); Toroidal confinement I (Tokamak, Zeta, etc.) (11 papers); Toroidal confinement II (Multipoles, etc.) (9 papers); Toroidal confinement III (Stellarators) (9 papers); Drift waves and non-linear phenomena (15 papers); Toroidal confinement IV (Theory) , Laser-produced plasmas, Astron (9 papers). (Vol. II) Plasma focus, Confinement by neutral gas. Instabilities and waves (16 papers); Open-ended systems I (Mirrors) (11 papers); HF heating, confinement and stabilization (13 papers); Open-ended systems II (Theta pinch) (12 papers); Turbulent heating, Beam-plasma interaction (10 papers). Each paper is in its original language (80 English, 37 Russian and 10 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with one in the original language if this is not English. The discussions are in English. (author)

  7. Composição de voláteis e perfil de aroma e sabor de méis de eucalipto e laranja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos Deborah Helena Markowicz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram analisados os compostos voláteis de amostras de mel de eucalipto e laranja colhidos nos estados de São Paulo e de Minas Gerais. O isolamento dos voláteis foi realizado empregando-se uma técnica de ''headspace'' dinâmico, a separação efetuada por cromatografia gasosa de alta resolução e a identificação por espectrometria de massas, Índices de Kovats e padrões, quando disponíveis. Foram identificados no mel de laranja o benzaldeído, o óxido cis de linalol, n-heptanal, 6-metil-5-hepten-2-ona, octanal e fenilacetaldeído, e em mel de eucalipto, o nonanal, 2-heptanona, 2-heptanol, octanol e nonanol. A caracterização sensorial desses méis foi obtida por Análise Descritiva Quantitativa e a aplicação de Análise dos Componentes Principais aos dados revelou que os descritores ''queimado'' e ''sabor residual'' caracterizam o mel de eucalipto, enquanto ''floral'' e ''cera'' caracterizam o mel de laranja. Entre os compostos identificados, o nonanal e o nonanol apresentaram contribuição sensorial importante ao mel de eucalipto, enquanto o fenilacetaldeído e o benzaldeído foram relacionados com os principais descritores do mel de laranja.

  8. Vol. 2: Nuclear Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of modern physics and the situation with physical research in Ukraine are considered. Programme of the conference includes scientific and general problems. Its proceedings are published in 6 volumes. The papers presented in this volume refer to nuclear physics

  9. Mathematics, Vol. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The second of three volumes of a mathematics training course for Navy personnel, this document contains material primarily found at the college level. Beginning with logarithms and trigonometry, the text moves into vectors and static equilibrium (physics). Coordinate geometry, conic sections, and the tangents, normals, and slopes of curves follow.…

  10. Vol. 6: Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of modern physics and the situation with physical research in Ukraine are considered. Programme of the conference includes scientific and general problems. Its proceeding are published in 6 volumes. The papers presented in this volume refer to plasma physics

  11. Structural Dynamics, Vol. 9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    This book has been prepared for the course on Computational Dynamics given at the 8th semester at the structural program in civil engineering at Aalborg University.......This book has been prepared for the course on Computational Dynamics given at the 8th semester at the structural program in civil engineering at Aalborg University....

  12. Apache, Vol. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodiroga, Ronald, Comp.; And Others

    The short stories, poems, and cultural descriptions about American Indians (volume 1 of two) are the result of a combined effort of the 7th grade students of Rice School District (Sacaton, Arizona), their teacher, and the parents and friends of the students of the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation (Arizona). The 24 student contributors prepared…

  13. Apache, Vol. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodiroga, Ronald, Comp.; And Others

    The short stories, poems, songs, and cultural descriptions about American Indians (volume 2 of two) are the result of a combined effort of the 7th grade students of Rice School District (Sacaton, Arizona), their teacher, and the parents and friends of the students of the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation (Arizona). The 24 student contributors…

  14. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 4th edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration...

  15. Vibration Theory, Vol. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present textbook has been written based on previous lecture notes for a course on stochastic vibration theory that is being given on the 9th semester at Aalborg University for M. Sc. students in structural engineering. The present 2nd edition of this textbook on linear stochastic vibration...

  16. Vibration Theory, Vol. 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwankiewicz, R.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    This text is based on the lecture notes for the courses on advanced methods in stochastic dynamics of non-linear systems taught in November 1994, February 1995 and December 1997 for Ph.D. students at the Department of Building Technology and Structural Engineering at Aalborg University and in 199...

  17. Compostos voláteis de três cultivares de manga (Mangifera indica L. Volatile composition of three cultivars of mango (Mangifera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.B. Franco

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Os compostos voláteis de três cultivares de manga (Haden, Tommy-Atkins e Keitt procedentes do Estado de São Paulo, foram isolados por uma técnica de headspace dinâmico, envolvendo sucção em polímero poroso. A separação da mistura complexa de voláteis foi efetuada por cromatografia gasosa de alta resolução. Alguns compostos voláteis foram identificados por cromatografia gasosa-espectrometria de massas e índices de Kovats. Os hidrocarbonetos monoterpênicos foram os compostos mais abundantes no headspace das amostras. Car-3-eno foi o componente majoritário dos cultivares Haden e Keitt, enquanto a Tommy-Atkins mostrou predominância de car-3-eno e alfa-pineno. Outros compostos identificados foram alfa-fencheno, alfa-canfeno, p-cimeno, beta-mirceno, beta-felandreno, limoneno, alfa-terpinoleno, beta-cariofileno e alfa-humuleno. Os três lotes analisados para cada cultivar mostraram grande homogeneidade, não havendo diferença significativa ao nível de 5%.The volatile compounds of three mango cultivars (Haden, Tommy-Atkins and Keitt, from the State of São Paulo, were isolated by a dynamic headspace technique involving suction on a porous polymer. The complex mixture of volatile compounds was separated by high-resolution gas chromatography. Some volatiles were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats Indices. The monoterpene hydrocarbons were the most abundant in the headspace of the fruits. Car-3-ene was the major component of the cultivars Haden and Keitt, while the Tommy Atkins mango exhibited predominance of two constituents, car-3-ene and alpha-pinene. Other identified compounds were alpha-fenchene, alpha-camphene, p-cimene, beta-mircene, beta-phellandrene, limonene, alpha-terpinolene, beta-caryophyllene e alpha-humulene. Samples of the same cultivar demonstrated great homogeneity, with no statistically significant difference being observed among the three lots analyzed for each cultivar.

  18. Substituting environmentally relevant flame retardants: assessment fundamentals. Vol. 1: results and summary overview; Erarbeitung von Bewertungsgrundlagen zur Substitution umweltrelevanter Flammschutzmittel. Bd. 1: Ergebnisse und zusammenfassende Uebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisewitz, A.; Kruse, H.; Schramm, E.

    2001-04-01

    The study examines the status, trends and alternatives (substitution and reduction potentials) in the use of flame retardants in selected product sectors: construction; electronics and electrical engineering; rail vehicles; textiles/upholstery. In addition, the study characterises thirteen flame retardants in terms of material flows, applications and toxicology/ecotoxicology. Vol. I: Summary overview of flame retardant applications in Germany in 1999/2000; characterisation of 13 flame retardants in terms of substance properties and application-specific characteristics, range of applications and quantities; derivation of assessment fundamentals for flame retardants, focussing on toxicology/ecotoxicology, suitability for closed-loop substance management, and potential for substitution and reduction; summary assessment of 13 flame retardants; summary overview of flame retardant applications. Vol. II: Analysis of flame retardant applications (state of the art, trends, alternatives) in: unsaturated polyester (UP) resins (rail vehicles); polyurethane (PU) insulating foams and one component foams (OCF) (construction sector); plastics for generic uses in electronic and electrical equipment, in casings for electronic and electrical equipment and in printed circuit boards (electronics/electrical engineering); and in upholstery and mattresses (textile applications). Vol. III: Toxicological/ecotoxicological profiles of substances: Decabromodiphenyl oxide; Tetrabromobisphenol A; Bis[pentabromophenyl]ethane; Hexabromocyclodo-decane, Tris[chloropropyl]phosphate, Resorcinol-bis-diphenylphosphate; N-Hydroxymethyl-3-dimethylphosphonopropionamide, Red phosphorus, Ammonium polyphosphate, Melamin cyanurate, Aluminiumtrihydroxide, Sodium borate decahydrate, Antimony trioxide. (orig.) [German] Untersucht werden Stand, Trends und Alternativen (Substitutions- und Minderungspotentiale) beim Einsatz von Flammschutzmitteln (FSM) in ausgewaehlten Produkten aus: Baubereich, Elektrotechnik

  19. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms ... with Your Doctor Taking Medicines The information in this topic was provided by the National Library of ...

  20. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study that involves human subjects. The purpose of ...

  1. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms to Know Finding a Clinical ... researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, their risks, and how well they work compare existing therapies ...

  2. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks ... centers across the country. The National Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials ...

  3. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study that involves human subjects. The purpose ...

  4. Preparación de una esencia de lulo (solanum vestissimun d. a partir del estudio de la contribución de los componentes volátiles al aroma de la fruta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Los constituyentes volátiles del aroma del lulo (Solanum vestissimum D. fueron extraídos y caracterizados química y olfatométricamente, encontrándose que el aroma de esta fruta no es debida a unos pocos componentes sino a una mezcla compleja de 32 compuestos volátiles mayoritarios, de los cuales el butanoato de metilo, (E-2-butenoato de metilo, butanoato de etilo, (Z-3-hexenol, hexanoato de metilo, hexanoato de etilo, acetato de (Z-3-hexenilo, limoneno, 7- terpineneno, benzoato de metilo, lonalol y o-terpineol parecen contribuir de manera más efectiva a este exótico y delicioso aroma. Debido a que no se encontró un solo compuesto(s responsable de aroma típico de esta fruta, se utilizó el extracto completo de volátiles para preparar una buena esencia de lulo (utilizando como mejor matriz propilénglicol en solución acuosa al 10% y extracto de volátiles al 2%, la cual fue luego incorporada como aromatizante y saborizante en un helado de crema. El producto así preparado tuvo una gran aceptación por quienes lo consumieron

  5. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear Information sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear Information and computer applications

  6. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear technology economy and management modernization

  7. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.4--nuclear material sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about nuclear material.

  8. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.6--computational physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the sixth one, the content is about computational physics

  9. Future requirements. Clinical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.

    2002-01-01

    Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics......Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics...

  10. Volátiles generados por hidrólisis enzimática de glicósidos de hojas de lulo (Solanum quitoense L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Osorio R.; Carmenza Duque B.

    2010-01-01

    La fracción glicosídica de hojas de lulo (Solanum quitoense L.) fue obtenida por adsorción sobre Amberlita XAD-2 y posterior elución con metanol. Los glicósidos así extraídos se hidrolizaron enzimáticamente con una glicosidasa no selectiva (Rohapect D5-L) y las agliconas (volátiles enlazados glicosídicamente) producidas fueron caracterizadas químicamente por CGAR (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución), CGAR-EM (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución acoplada a espectrometría de masas)...

  11. Volátiles generados por hidrólisis enzimática de glicósidos de hojas de lulo {solanum quitoense l.)

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio R., Carolina; Duque B., Carmenza

    2010-01-01

    La fracción glicosídica de hojas de lulo (Solanum quitoense L.) fue obtenida por adsorción sobre Amberlita XAD-2 y posterior elución con metanol. Los glicósidos así extraídos se hidrolizaron enzimáticamente con una glicosidasa no selectiva (Rohapect D5-L) y las agliconas (volátiles enlazados glicosídicamente) producidas fueron caracterizadas químicamente por CGAR (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución), CGAR-EM (cromatografía de gases de alta resolución acoplada a espectrometría de ...

  12. Effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol. pct SiC composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozak, G. A.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Wallace, J. F.; Altmisoglu, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on the mechanical properties of unreinforced A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol pct SiC composite were investigated by tensile properties in these compounds fabricated by either sand casting or squeeze casting techniques followed by hot working to 33, 50, 90, and 95 percent reductions. The evolution of the microstructure and values of tensile properties were evaluated for the cast materials in each of the hot worked conditions. It was found that, while the deformation processing of the sand-cast composite resulted in banding of the Al and SiC particles within the microstructure, such features were not observed in the squeeze-cast microstructure. The tensile strengths of the squeeze cast materials was found to be higher than those of the sand cast materials, for both the unreinforced and composite samples, while increased amounts of deformation were found to improve the ductility of the composite.

  13. L'orientation des vols d'Adonia variegata Goeze, Coccinella septempunctata L. et Propylea quatuordecimpunctata L. (Col., Coccinellidae) vers un champ de ble au printemps

    OpenAIRE

    Ferran, A.; Iperti, G.; Lapchin, L.; Rabasse, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Des pièges englués ont été disposés autour d’un champ de blé pour étudier les modalités de sa colonisation par les coccinelles au printemps. Dans cette agrobiocénose particulière, les adultes d’Adonia variegata, de Coccinella septempunctata et de Propylea quatuordecimpunctata arrivent globalement suivant le sens nord-sud et plus précisément selon 2 directions, du nord-est vers le sud-ouest et du nord-ouest vers le sud-est. Ces vols de colonisation se font contre le vent dominant et sont de fa...

  14. Volúmenes pulmonares normales en pacientes con fibrosis pulmonar idiopática y enfisema Normal lung volumes in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Casas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La fibrosis pulmonar idiopática (FPI es una enfermedad que se caracteriza por presentar un compromiso pulmonar de tipo restrictivo, resultante de una reducción en la complacencia pulmonar secundaria a fibrosis difusa. En el enfisema, la pérdida de elasticidad pulmonar y el colapso de las vías aéreas periféricas generan obstrucción e hiperinflación. El efecto simultáneo que ambas enfermedades producen sobre la fisiología pulmonar no es del todo claro y se han descripto volúmenes pulmonares normales o casi normales. Presentamos 4 pacientes de sexo masculino de 64, 60, 73 y 70 años, con antecedentes de tabaquismo e historia de disnea progresiva, tres de ellos con grave limitación en su calidad de vida al momento de la consulta. En la tomografía de tórax de alta resolución todos los pacientes presentaban signos de enfermedad intersticial pulmonar avanzada, con cambios de tipo fibrótico con predominio basal y subpleural, que coexistían con enfisema centroacinar con predominio en lóbulos superiores. Uno de ellos tuvo confirmación diagnóstica de ambas condicioes por biopsia pulmonar a cielo abierto. En los cuatro pacientes la espirometría y volúmenes pulmonares fueron normales, pero tenían importante compromiso del intercambio gaseoso evaluado mediante el test de caminata de 6 minutos. Tres de los pacientes tenían hipertensión pulmonar grave diagnosticado por ecocardiograma. La presencia de volúmenes pulmonares normales no excluye un diagnóstico de fibrosis pulmonar idiopática en pacientes fumadores si coexisten evidencias tomográficas de enfisema. En estos pacientes el grado de compromiso funcional, determinado por la reducción de los volúmenes pulmonares, no debería ser considerado en la evaluación de la gravedad.Pulmonary function tests in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern, resulting from reduction of pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive

  15. Compuestos volátiles libres y enlazados glicosídicamente en la pulpa de la uva Caimarona (Pourouma cecropiifolia Mart. Compostos voláteis livres e enlaçados glicosídicamente na polpa da uva Caimarona (Pourouma cecropiifolia Mart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Constanza Barrios Guio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Los componentes volátiles presentes en la pulpa de la uva Caimarona se estudiaron mediante GC-MS. Éstos se extrajeron por tres técnicas: evaporación del aroma asistida con solvente (Solvent Assisted Flavour Evaporation SAFE, extracción continua líquido-líquido (LL y destilación por arrastre con vapor-extracción simultanea con solvente orgánico (DES. En general los componentes volátiles predominantes en la pulpa fueron alcoholes alifáticos y terpénicos. Las notas olfativas del extracto SAFE fueron descritas como floral tenue y verde herbal similares a las exhibidas por la pulpa fresca. Este extracto presentó como componentes mayoritarios linalol 1,2-propanodiol y salicilato de metilo. En contraste, el extracto LL presentó notas que recuerdan la uva pasa y el vino moscatel y sus componentes mayoritarios fueron el ácido acético, el salicilato de metilo y el 2,6-dimetil-2(Z,7-octadien-1,6-diol. El extracto DES fue descrito con notas fresca, floral, cereal y amargo y está constituido por un reducido número de componentes mostrando el efecto negativo de la temperatura en la extracción; sus componentes mayoritarios fueron 1,2-propanodiol, linalol y salicilato de metilo. Adicionalmente, los componentes volátiles mayoritarios liberados por hidrólisis enzimática (Rohapect D5L de los glicósidos de la pulpa fueron ácido acético, ácido benzoico y vainillina. Cabe destacar que aunque el linalol no se encontró entre las agliconas volátiles, se detectaron los dioles biogenéticamente relacionados: 3,7-dimetil-1,5-octadien-3,7-diol y los isómeros E y Z del 2,6-dimetil-2,7-octadien-1,6-diol.Os componentes voláteis presentes na polpa da uva Caimarona foram estudados mediante GC-MS. Estes foram extraídos por três técnicas: evaporação de aroma assistida com solvente (Solvent Assisted Flavour Evaporation SAFE, extração continua líquido-líquido (LL e destilação por arraste com vapor-extração simultânea com solvente org

  16. Development of a single ion micro-irradiation facility for experimental radiobiology at cell level; Developpement d'une ligne d'irradiation microfaisceau en mode ion par ion pour la radiobiologie experimentale a l'echelle cellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberet, Ph

    2003-10-01

    A micro-irradiation device has been developed for radiobiology applications at the scale of the cell. This device is based on an upgrade of an existing micro-beam line that was already able to deliver a 1 to 3 MeV proton or alpha beam of low intensity and whose space resolution is lower than 1 micrometer in vacuum. The important part of this work has been the development of an irradiation stage designed to fit on the micro-probe and able to deliver ions in the air with an absolute accuracy of a few micrometers. A program has been set up to monitor the complete irradiation line in testing and in automatic irradiation operating phases. Simulation tools based on Monte-Carlo calculations have been validated through comparisons with experimental data particularly in the field of spatial resolution and of the number of ions delivered. The promising results show the possibility in a near future to use this tool to study the response of cells to very low irradiation doses down to the extreme limit of one ion per cell.

  17. Clinical and physiological study of the phenomenon of blindness after local irradiaton of animal heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of radiobiological, ophtalmological, pharmacological, biochemical, neurobistological, and electron microscopic methods has been used to study certain likey mechanisms of sight disturbance arising after gamma-irradiation of animal head. The radiobiological effect observed is a complicated polyethiological phenomenon, reflecting multiple structural and functional effects in central nervous system. The main of these effects are the disturbance in integrative activity of neural structures resulting from damaging the synapses of nervous cells, changes in hydratation and electrolythic profile of brain as a result of shift in hematoencephalic barrier permeability, and, finally, disturbance in functioning of cholinereactive structures of central nervous system

  18. HISTIOCYTOSIS X: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical cases of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis X have been analyzed demonstrating lung and other inner organ pathology, common clinical and X-ray features but different life prognosis.

  19. HISTIOCYTOSIS X: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    E. Y. Ponomareva; A. P. Rebrov; E. E. Archangelskaja; A. A. Roshchina; R. N. Steshenko; A. S. Bukia; N. V. Dvornikova; N. N. Moskaleva

    2014-01-01

    Two clinical cases of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis X have been analyzed demonstrating lung and other inner organ pathology, common clinical and X-ray features but different life prognosis.

  20. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are ...

  1. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  2. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  3. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  4. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  5. Spina Bifida Clinic Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bifida Clinic Children’s Hospital New Orleans 200 Henry Clay Avenue (Pediatric-22) New Orleans, LA 70118 504- ... www.reach-clinic.org Back to top Oregon Child Development & Rehabilitation Center Oregon Health & Science University (pediatric ...

  6. Evolution of Clinical Enzymology

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, J

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of clinical enzymology is discussed in relation to the history of general enzymology and clinical chemistry. The discussion is limited to the period from 1835 (definition of catalysis by Berzelius) to 1935 (description of the optical test by Warburg). In conclusion, a general account is given of the introduction of the concept of quantitative enzyme activity determination into clinical medicine.

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... was provided by the National Library of Medicine Topic last reviewed: December 2013 For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is ...

  8. Clinical document architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Kai

    2003-01-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a standard developed by the Health Level Seven organisation (HL7), is an ANSI approved document architecture for exchange of clinical information using XML. A CDA document is comprised of a header with associated vocabularies and a body containing the structural clinical information. PMID:15061557

  9. A stupid plagiarism in the article « Ethnopharmacology and phytochemical screening of bioactive extracts of Limoniastrum feei ( plombagenaceae » Asian Journal of Natural & Applied Sciences, Vol. 2(1, 5-9, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. CHERITI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It’s well known that plagiarism is considered mis­conduct research, unethical, perturb and damage the integrity and knowledge of the scientific community. In addition that is a form of violation of copyright law and is therefore illegal. Whereas matching an integral article (Copy and paste from another scientific journal is a potential plagiarism qualified unjustified attitude and a stupid practice. The most striking case, is the copy and paste of our article published since 2012 in this journal (PhytoChem & BioSub Journal Vol. 6 N° 2, 83-87, 2012 by another “ scientists” - L. Ziane, H. A. Lazouni, A. Moussaoui, N. Hamidi - and published in Asian Journal of Natural & Applied Sciences, Vol. 2(1, 5-9, 2013. Thus, any one, authors or publisher not condemn and promote these practices should be automatically disqualified from scientific research.

  10. Caracterización de especies de Tilia mediante perfiles cromatográficos en fase gaseosa de los componentes volátiles extraídos del vapor en equilibrio con el material vegetal ( "headspace analysis" )

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Gabriela; Mandrile, Eloy L.; Cafferata, Lázaro F.R.

    1992-01-01

    Se han estudiado los componentes volátiles de brácteas y flores de 3 especies de Tilia (Tilo), por cromatografía gaseosa, utilizando una columna rellena con "Porapak Q" a fin de contribuir a su caracterización quimiotaxonómica. Se compararon las eficiencias relativas de los métodos de extracción de compuestos volátiles: destilación por arrastre con vapor de agua, destilación a presión reducida y de muestreo estático de la cámara ocupada por el vapor en equilibrio con el material a 80 "C ("Hea...

  11. Reducing CT radiation dose with iterative reconstruction algorithms: The influence of scan and reconstruction parameters on image quality and CTDI{sub vol}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klink, Thorsten, E-mail: klink_t1@ukw.de [Inselspital – Bern University Hospital, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); University of Würzburg, Insitute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Oberdürrbacher Str. 6, 97080 Würzburg (Germany); Obmann, Verena, E-mail: verena.obmann@insel.ch [Inselspital – Bern University Hospital, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Heverhagen, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.heverhagen@insel.ch [Inselspital – Bern University Hospital, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Stork, Alexander, E-mail: a.stork@roentgeninstitut.de [Roentgeninstitut Duesseldorf, Kaiserswerterstrasse 89, 40476 Duesseldorf (Germany); Adam, Gerhard, E-mail: g.adam@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Begemann, Philipp, E-mail: p.begemann@roentgeninstitut.de [Roentgeninstitut Duesseldorf, Kaiserswerterstrasse 89, 40476 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP) were compared. • CT image noise was reduced by 12.4%–52.2% using IR in comparison to FBP. • IR did not affect high- and low-contrast resolution. • CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 26–50% using hybrid IR at comparable image quality levels. • IR produced good to excellent image quality in patients. - Abstract: Objectives: In this phantom CT study, we investigated whether images reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) with reduced tube voltage and current have equivalent quality. We evaluated the effects of different acquisition and reconstruction parameter settings on image quality and radiation doses. Additionally, patient CT studies were evaluated to confirm our phantom results. Methods: Helical and axial 256 multi-slice computed tomography scans of the phantom (Catphan{sup ®}) were performed with varying tube voltages (80–140 kV) and currents (30–200 mAs). 198 phantom data sets were reconstructed applying FBP and IR with increasing iterations, and soft and sharp kernels. Further, 25 chest and abdomen CT scans, performed with high and low exposure per patient, were reconstructed with IR and FBP. Two independent observers evaluated image quality and radiation doses of both phantom and patient scans. Results: In phantom scans, noise reduction was significantly improved using IR with increasing iterations, independent from tissue, scan-mode, tube-voltage, current, and kernel. IR did not affect high-contrast resolution. Low-contrast resolution was also not negatively affected, but improved in scans with doses <5 mGy, although object detectability generally decreased with the lowering of exposure. At comparable image quality levels, CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 26–50% using IR. In patients, applying IR vs. FBP resulted in good to excellent image quality, while tube voltage and current settings could be significantly decreased

  12. University cardiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  13. Zinner, Tibor. 2013-2014. "A nagy politikai affér." A Rajk-Brankov-ügy ('“The Great Political Affair” - the Rajk-Brankov Case', vols. I-II. Budapest: Saxum. 646/702 pp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Vukman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinner, Tibor. 2013-2014. "A nagy politikai affér." A Rajk-Brankov-ügy ('“The Great Political Affair” - the Rajk-Brankov Case', vols. I-II. Budapest: Saxum. 646/702 pp.[1] Reviewed by Péter Vukman, University of Szeged [1] Peter Vukman is currently researching the history of Yugoslav political emigrants in Hungary between 1948-56. His research is financed by the National Scientific Research Fund (OTKA PD 108386.

  14. Constituintes voláteis de cafés "gourmet" e mole do cerrado do triângulo mineiro em função da torra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento Evandro Afonso do

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foi estudada a variação da composição dos voláteis de dois cafés "gourmet" e de um café mole em função do grau de torrefação. Os cafés provenientes de Araguari, cerrado do Triângulo Mineiro, foram submetidos à torra americana (grãos marrons claros, média (grãos marrons e forte (grãos pretos e, em seguida, moídos e submetidos a uma destilação por arraste de vapor em contra-corrente com diclorometano. A análise de cromatografia gasosa acoplada à espectrometria de massas (CG-EM dos constituintes voláteis mostrou que piridina, pirazina e derivados, furfural e derivados são os principais constituintes voláteis dos cafés analisados. Mostrou ainda que não é possível diferenciar os três tipos de café pelos compostos dominantes (concentração acima de 1% no aroma. Foi observado também que a torra afeta sensivelmente os resultados, sendo que a torra americana, usada normalmente na prova da xícara para classificação sensorial de cafés, produz alguns voláteis de forte impacto no aroma que não aparecem na torra média nem na forte, além de apresentar concentrações dos componentes mais comuns muito diferentes daquelas observadas nas outras duas torras.

  15. Salles, Sergio. Paul Ricoeur e o humanismo jurídico moderno: O reconhecimento do sujeito de direito. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies vol. 2, no. 2 (2011: 106–117

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERRS ERRS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As published, the authorship for this article is incorrect. Coauthor Hilda Helena Soares Bentes was omitted due to an editorial error. The correct citation is:Bentes, Hilda and Salles, Sergio. Paul Ricoeur e o humanismo jurídico moderno: O reconhecimento do sujeito de direito. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies vol. 2, no. 2 (2011: 106–117.The online version reflects these changes.

  16. Clinical Process Intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup Pedersen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    knowledge to the point of care in a proactive manner. Attention has been on the translation of guidelines and the integration with the elec-tronic medical record (EMR). Less attention has been paid to the evaluation of clinical practice in relation to clinical guide-lines. I claim that single patient cases......, generalized processes de-ducted from many patient cases and clinical guidelines, are all guidelines that may be used in clinical reasoning. The differ-ence is the validity of the suggested actions and decisions. In the case of generalized processes deducted from EMRs, we have "what we usually do" practice i......Ideally, clinical guidelines are created from evidence based medicine. Translating the narrative semi-structured article for-mat of the clinical guidelines into a computable language makes it possible to utilize this information in IT-supported clinical reasoning, and thereby bring the relevant...

  17. Learning clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Ralph; Welch, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Errors in clinical reasoning continue to account for significant morbidity and mortality, despite evidence-based guidelines and improved technology. Experts in clinical reasoning often use unconscious cognitive processes that they are not aware of unless they explain how they are thinking. Understanding the intuitive and analytical thinking processes provides a guide for instruction. How knowledge is stored is critical to expertise in clinical reasoning. Curricula should be designed so that trainees store knowledge in a way that is clinically relevant. Competence in clinical reasoning is acquired by supervised practice with effective feedback. Clinicians must recognise the common errors in clinical reasoning and how to avoid them. Trainees can learn clinical reasoning effectively in everyday practice if teachers provide guidance on the cognitive processes involved in making diagnostic decisions.

  18. Integrating clinical research into clinical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Tonelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine has placed a general priority on knowledge gained from clinical research for clinical decision making. However, knowledge derived from empiric, population-based research, while valued for its ability to limit bias, is not directly applicable to the care of individual patients. The gap between clinical research and individual patient care centers on the fact that empiric research is not generally designed to answer questions of direct relevance to individual patients. Clinicians must utilize other forms of medical knowledge, including pathophysiologic rationale and clinical experience, in order to arrive at the best medical decision for a particular patient. In addition, clinicians must also elucidate and account for the goals and values of individual patients as well as barriers and facilitators of care inherent in the system in which they practice. Evidence-based guidelines and protocols, then, can never be prescriptive. Clinicians must continue to rely on clinical judgment, negotiating potentially conflicting warrants for action, in an effort to arrive at the best decision for a particular patient.

  19. Dynamic and static softening of sintered MgO-PSZ/TRIP-matrix composites with up to 10 vol.-% ZrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanina, A.; Guk, S.; Mueller, W.; Kawalla, R. [Institute of Metal Forming, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Weigelt, C. [Institute of Ceramic, Glass and Construction Materials, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel with up to 10 vol.-% MgO-PSZ was produced by a powder metallurgic process through sintering at 1300 C and 1390 C. The hot working of sintered samples was conducted between 900 C and 1100 C. The behaviour of softening kinetics was investigated using flow curve recording methods (dynamic softening) and the double-hit method (static softening). The influence of the deformation parameters such as temperature, strain rate, inter-pass time and relative density of the samples was determined. The microstructure development of the sintered composite after hot forming was determined by optical microscopy and SEM and was interpreted with the help of qualitative microstructure analysis. The results show a general acceleration of softening processes with increasing temperature and strain rate, with the addition of ZrO{sub 2} particles and a decrease in the density of composite materials. A mathematical-physical model was developed to predict the softening behaviour and optimize the forming processes of the composite in the light of these results. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. The impact on the radiobiological effect of lung squamous cancer cell line H520 with prolonged fraction delivery time%照射时间延长对肺鳞癌细胞株H520放射生物效应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 孟玲楠; 高纯子; 林珊; 李瑛; 韩波

    2013-01-01

    目的观察常规剂量分割照射模式下单次照射时间延长对肺癌细胞系H520放射生物效应的影响.方法 (1)肺鳞癌细胞株H520离体培养,分组进行照射,利用克隆形成实验计算细胞存活比率(SF);(2)细胞给予总剂量为2Gy、4Gy、6Gy、8Gy的照射,并按照每日单次照射时间的不同分为A组(照射2分钟组)、B1组(照射10分钟组)、B2组(照射30分钟组).观察延长照射时间对肺鳞癌细胞株H520存活比率的影响.结果 伴随单次照射总时间的延长,实验细胞的存活比率逐渐提高,接受照射总剂量为8Gy的H520细胞株,A组细胞存活比率为1.9%;B1组和B2组存活比率分别为2.35%和3.42%.A组与B2组之间的差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 常规剂量分割模式下延长单次照射时间,显著降低了放射治疗对H520细胞的生物效应.%Objective The purpose of this study was to observe the radiobiological effects of lung squamous cancer cell line H520 irradiated over prolonged single fraction delivery time in the conventional dose fractionated mode. Methods (1)The H520 cell lines were cultured in vitro, and then irradiated by groups. Its survival fractions(SF)were calculated with standard clonogenic assays.( 2 )The total doses of 2 Gy,4 Gy,6 Gy,8 Gy were given to the cells,which were divided into groups by different single fraction delivery time:group A( group irradiated for 2 mins ),group Bl( group irradiated for 10 mins ),and group B2( group irradiated for 30 mins ),and observed the impact on the survival fractions of H520 cell line with prolonged fraction delivery time. Results The cell surviving fractions increased when the interfraction interval was longer. The values of SF 8 Gy were 1. 9% in group A,2.35% in group B1,and increased to 3. 42% in group B2 ,respectively. The difference between group A and group B2 was statistically significant(P<0.05 ). Conclusion The prolonged fraction delivery time would significantly decrease the