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Sample records for clinical proteomic technology

  1. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  2. Clinical proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Frederiksen, Hanne; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2018-01-01

    Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS)-platforms...... standards and calibrants. The present challenge is to examine if targeted proteomics of IGF-I can truly measure up to the routine performance that must be expected from a clinical testing platform.......Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS......)-platforms already implemented in many clinical laboratories for routine quantitation of small molecules (i.e. uHPLC coupled to triple-quadrupole MS). Progress in targeted proteomics of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) have provided valuable insights about tryptic peptides, transitions, internal...

  3. NIH Common Fund - Disruptive Proteomics Technologies - Challenges and Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Request for Information (RFI) is directed toward determining how best to accelerate research in disruptive proteomics technologies. The Disruptive Proteomics Technologies (DPT) Working Group of the NIH Common Fund wishes to identify gaps and opportunities in current technologies and methodologies related to proteome-wide measurements.  For the purposes of this RFI, “disruptive” is defined as very rapid, very significant gains, similar to the "disruptive" technology development that occurred in DNA sequencing technology.

  4. Clinical proteomics in kidney disease as an exponential technology: heading towards the disruptive phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Exponential technologies double in power or processing speed every year, whereas their cost halves. Deception and disruption are two key stages in the development of exponential technologies. Deception occurs when, after initial introduction, technologies are dismissed as irrelevant, while they continue to progress, perhaps not as fast or with so many immediate practical applications as initially thought. Twenty years after the first publications, clinical proteomics is still not available in most hospitals and some clinicians have felt deception at unfulfilled promises. However, there are indications that clinical proteomics may be entering the disruptive phase, where, once refined, technologies disrupt established industries or procedures. In this regard, recent manuscripts in CKJ illustrate how proteomics is entering the clinical realm, with applications ranging from the identification of amyloid proteins in the pathology lab, to a new generation of urinary biomarkers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) assessment and outcome prediction. Indeed, one such panel of urinary peptidomics biomarkers, CKD273, recently received a Food and Drug Administration letter of support, the first ever in the CKD field. In addition, a must-read resource providing information on kidney disease-related proteomics and systems biology databases and how to access and use them in clinical decision-making was also recently published in CKJ .

  5. Clinical proteomics in kidney disease as an exponential technology: heading towards the disruptive phase

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Ni?o, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B.; Ramos, Adrian M.; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Exponential technologies double in power or processing speed every year, whereas their cost halves. Deception and disruption are two key stages in the development of exponential technologies. Deception occurs when, after initial introduction, technologies are dismissed as irrelevant, while they continue to progress, perhaps not as fast or with so many immediate practical applications as initially thought. Twenty years after the first publications, clinical proteomics is still not ava...

  6. Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have pushed the field forward. Additionally, the review provides a vision for moving the field forward through linking advances in genomic and proteomic analysis to develop new, molecularly targeted interventions.

  7. Opportunities for Cancer-relevant Innovative Technologies with Transformative Potential | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking input from the community on identifying priorities with regards to supporting innovative technology development for cancer-relevant research. While the NCI provides support for technology development through a variety of mechanisms, it is important to understand whether or not these are sufficient for catalyzing and supporting the development of tools with significant potential for advancing important fields of cancer research or clinical care.

  8. Clinical veterinary proteomics: Techniques and approaches to decipher the animal plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodasara, P; Sadowski, P; Satake, N; Kopp, S; Mills, P C

    2017-12-01

    Over the last two decades, technological advancements in the field of proteomics have advanced our understanding of the complex biological systems of living organisms. Techniques based on mass spectrometry (MS) have emerged as powerful tools to contextualise existing genomic information and to create quantitative protein profiles from plasma, tissues or cell lines of various species. Proteomic approaches have been used increasingly in veterinary science to investigate biological processes responsible for growth, reproduction and pathological events. However, the adoption of proteomic approaches by veterinary investigators lags behind that of researchers in the human medical field. Furthermore, in contrast to human proteomics studies, interpretation of veterinary proteomic data is difficult due to the limited protein databases available for many animal species. This review article examines the current use of advanced proteomics techniques for evaluation of animal health and welfare and covers the current status of clinical veterinary proteomics research, including successful protein identification and data interpretation studies. It includes a description of an emerging tool, sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH-MS), available on selected mass spectrometry instruments. This newly developed data acquisition technique combines advantages of discovery and targeted proteomics approaches, and thus has the potential to advance the veterinary proteomics field by enhancing identification and reproducibility of proteomics data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies Program Funding Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI is very pleased to announce that the Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program funding opportunity announcements have been posted for calendar year (CY) 2013. Please visit this website for more information on these announcements. For your convenience, a link to each solicitation is provided below with associated submission deadlines for new applications and resubmissions. Please contact the NCI IMAT program director, Dr.

  10. Examining hemodialyzer membrane performance using proteomic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonomini M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mario Bonomini,1 Luisa Pieroni,2 Lorenzo Di Liberato,1 Vittorio Sirolli,1 Andrea Urbani2,3 1Department of Medicine, G. d’Annunzio University, Chieti, 2Proteomic and Metabonomic Units, IRCCS S. Lucia Foundation, Rome, 3Faculty of Medicine, Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry Institute, Catholic University of the “Sacred Heart”, Rome, Italy Abstract: The success and the quality of hemodialysis therapy are mainly related to both clearance and biocompatibility properties of the artificial membrane packed in the hemodialyzer. Performance of a membrane is strongly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire during the extracorporeal procedure. Recognition that a number of medium–high molecular weight solutes, including proteins and protein-bound molecules, are potentially toxic has prompted the development of more permeable membranes. Such membrane engineering, however, may cause loss of vital proteins, with membrane removal being nonspecific. In addition, plasma proteins can be adsorbed onto the membrane surface upon blood contact during dialysis. Adsorption can contribute to the removal of toxic compounds and governs the biocompatibility of a membrane, since surface-adsorbed proteins may trigger a variety of biologic blood pathways with pathophysiologic consequences. Over the last years, use of proteomic approaches has allowed polypeptide spectrum involved in the process of hemodialysis, a key issue previously hampered by lack of suitable technology, to be assessed in an unbiased manner and in its full complexity. Proteomics has been successfully applied to identify and quantify proteins in complex mixtures such as dialysis outflow fluid and fluid desorbed from dialysis membrane containing adsorbed proteins. The identified proteins can also be characterized by their involvement in metabolic and signaling pathways, molecular networks, and biologic processes through application of bioinformatics tools. Proteomics may

  11. Clinical proteomics: Current status, challenges, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Horng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This account will give an overview and evaluation of the current advances in mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics platforms and technology. A general review of some background information concerning the application of these methods in the characterization of molecular sizes and related protein expression profiles associated with different types of cells under varied experimental conditions will be presented. It is intended to provide a concise and succinct overview to those clinical researchers first exposed to this foremost powerful methodology in modern life sciences of postgenomic era. Proteomic characterization using highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation of MS has been used to characterize biological samples of complex protein mixtures with vastly different protein structure and composition. These systems are then used to highlight the versatility and potential of the MS-based proteomic strategies for facilitating protein expression analysis of various disease-related organisms or tissues of interest. Major MS-based strategies reviewed herein include (1 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MS and electron-spray ionization proteomics; (2 one-dimensional or two-dimensional gel-based proteomics; (3 gel-free shotgun proteomics in conjunction with liquid chromatography/tandem MS; (4 Multiple reaction monitoring coupled tandem MS quantitative proteomics and; (5 Phosphoproteomics based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-MS/MS.

  12. Statistical methods for mass spectrometry-based clinical proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakourou, A.

    2018-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis focuses on methods for the construction of diagnostic rules based on clinical mass spectrometry proteomic data. Mass spectrometry has become one of the key technologies for jointly measuring the expression of thousands of proteins in biological samples.

  13. Proteomic Technologies for the Study of Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie D. Byrum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone cancer of children and is established during stages of rapid bone growth. The disease is a consequence of immature osteoblast differentiation, which gives way to a rapidly synthesized incompletely mineralized and disorganized bone matrix. The mechanism of osteosarcoma tumorogenesis is poorly understood, and few proteomic studies have been used to interrogate the disease thus far. Accordingly, these studies have identified proteins that have been known to be associated with other malignancies, rather than being osteosarcoma specific. In this paper, we focus on the growing list of available state-of-the-art proteomic technologies and their specific application to the discovery of novel osteosarcoma diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The current signaling markers/pathways associated with primary and metastatic osteosarcoma that have been identified by early-stage proteomic technologies thus far are also described.

  14. Clinical proteomic analysis of scrub typhus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Edmond Changkyun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Song, Hyun Seok; Jun, Sangmi; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Seop; Kim, Seung Il

    2018-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an acute and febrile infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative α-proteobacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi from the family Rickettsiaceae that is widely distributed in Northern, Southern and Eastern Asia. In the present study, we analysed the serum proteome of scrub typhus patients to investigate specific clinical protein patterns in an attempt to explain pathophysiology and discover potential biomarkers of infection. Serum samples were collected from three patients (before and after treatment with antibiotics) and three healthy subjects. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify differentially abundant proteins using quantitative proteomic approaches. Bioinformatic analysis was then performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Proteomic analysis identified 236 serum proteins, of which 32 were differentially expressed in normal subjects, naive scrub typhus patients and patients treated with antibiotics. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the identified proteins revealed up-regulation of proteins involved in immune responses, especially complement system, following infection with O. tsutsugamushi , and normal expression was largely rescued by antibiotic treatment. This is the first proteomic study of clinical serum samples from scrub typhus patients. Proteomic analysis identified changes in protein expression upon infection with O. tsutsugamushi and following antibiotic treatment. Our results provide valuable information for further investigation of scrub typhus therapy and diagnosis.

  15. Aptamer-based multiplexed proteomic technology for biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Larry; Ayers, Deborah; Bertino, Jennifer; Bock, Christopher; Bock, Ashley; Brody, Edward N; Carter, Jeff; Dalby, Andrew B; Eaton, Bruce E; Fitzwater, Tim; Flather, Dylan; Forbes, Ashley; Foreman, Trudi; Fowler, Cate; Gawande, Bharat; Goss, Meredith; Gunn, Magda; Gupta, Shashi; Halladay, Dennis; Heil, Jim; Heilig, Joe; Hicke, Brian; Husar, Gregory; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale; Jennings, Susan; Katilius, Evaldas; Keeney, Tracy R; Kim, Nancy; Koch, Tad H; Kraemer, Stephan; Kroiss, Luke; Le, Ngan; Levine, Daniel; Lindsey, Wes; Lollo, Bridget; Mayfield, Wes; Mehan, Mike; Mehler, Robert; Nelson, Sally K; Nelson, Michele; Nieuwlandt, Dan; Nikrad, Malti; Ochsner, Urs; Ostroff, Rachel M; Otis, Matt; Parker, Thomas; Pietrasiewicz, Steve; Resnicow, Daniel I; Rohloff, John; Sanders, Glenn; Sattin, Sarah; Schneider, Daniel; Singer, Britta; Stanton, Martin; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Alex; Stratford, Suzanne; Vaught, Jonathan D; Vrkljan, Mike; Walker, Jeffrey J; Watrobka, Mike; Waugh, Sheela; Weiss, Allison; Wilcox, Sheri K; Wolfson, Alexey; Wolk, Steven K; Zhang, Chi; Zichi, Dom

    2010-12-07

    The interrogation of proteomes ("proteomics") in a highly multiplexed and efficient manner remains a coveted and challenging goal in biology and medicine. We present a new aptamer-based proteomic technology for biomarker discovery capable of simultaneously measuring thousands of proteins from small sample volumes (15 µL of serum or plasma). Our current assay measures 813 proteins with low limits of detection (1 pM median), 7 logs of overall dynamic range (~100 fM-1 µM), and 5% median coefficient of variation. This technology is enabled by a new generation of aptamers that contain chemically modified nucleotides, which greatly expand the physicochemical diversity of the large randomized nucleic acid libraries from which the aptamers are selected. Proteins in complex matrices such as plasma are measured with a process that transforms a signature of protein concentrations into a corresponding signature of DNA aptamer concentrations, which is quantified on a DNA microarray. Our assay takes advantage of the dual nature of aptamers as both folded protein-binding entities with defined shapes and unique nucleotide sequences recognizable by specific hybridization probes. To demonstrate the utility of our proteomics biomarker discovery technology, we applied it to a clinical study of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We identified two well known CKD biomarkers as well as an additional 58 potential CKD biomarkers. These results demonstrate the potential utility of our technology to rapidly discover unique protein signatures characteristic of various disease states. We describe a versatile and powerful tool that allows large-scale comparison of proteome profiles among discrete populations. This unbiased and highly multiplexed search engine will enable the discovery of novel biomarkers in a manner that is unencumbered by our incomplete knowledge of biology, thereby helping to advance the next generation of evidence-based medicine.

  16. Aptamer-based multiplexed proteomic technology for biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Gold

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The interrogation of proteomes ("proteomics" in a highly multiplexed and efficient manner remains a coveted and challenging goal in biology and medicine.We present a new aptamer-based proteomic technology for biomarker discovery capable of simultaneously measuring thousands of proteins from small sample volumes (15 µL of serum or plasma. Our current assay measures 813 proteins with low limits of detection (1 pM median, 7 logs of overall dynamic range (~100 fM-1 µM, and 5% median coefficient of variation. This technology is enabled by a new generation of aptamers that contain chemically modified nucleotides, which greatly expand the physicochemical diversity of the large randomized nucleic acid libraries from which the aptamers are selected. Proteins in complex matrices such as plasma are measured with a process that transforms a signature of protein concentrations into a corresponding signature of DNA aptamer concentrations, which is quantified on a DNA microarray. Our assay takes advantage of the dual nature of aptamers as both folded protein-binding entities with defined shapes and unique nucleotide sequences recognizable by specific hybridization probes. To demonstrate the utility of our proteomics biomarker discovery technology, we applied it to a clinical study of chronic kidney disease (CKD. We identified two well known CKD biomarkers as well as an additional 58 potential CKD biomarkers. These results demonstrate the potential utility of our technology to rapidly discover unique protein signatures characteristic of various disease states.We describe a versatile and powerful tool that allows large-scale comparison of proteome profiles among discrete populations. This unbiased and highly multiplexed search engine will enable the discovery of novel biomarkers in a manner that is unencumbered by our incomplete knowledge of biology, thereby helping to advance the next generation of evidence-based medicine.

  17. Examining hemodialyzer membrane performance using proteomic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Pieroni, Luisa; Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Sirolli, Vittorio; Urbani, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The success and the quality of hemodialysis therapy are mainly related to both clearance and biocompatibility properties of the artificial membrane packed in the hemodialyzer. Performance of a membrane is strongly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire during the extracorporeal procedure. Recognition that a number of medium-high molecular weight solutes, including proteins and protein-bound molecules, are potentially toxic has prompted the development of more permeable membranes. Such membrane engineering, however, may cause loss of vital proteins, with membrane removal being nonspecific. In addition, plasma proteins can be adsorbed onto the membrane surface upon blood contact during dialysis. Adsorption can contribute to the removal of toxic compounds and governs the biocompatibility of a membrane, since surface-adsorbed proteins may trigger a variety of biologic blood pathways with pathophysiologic consequences. Over the last years, use of proteomic approaches has allowed polypeptide spectrum involved in the process of hemodialysis, a key issue previously hampered by lack of suitable technology, to be assessed in an unbiased manner and in its full complexity. Proteomics has been successfully applied to identify and quantify proteins in complex mixtures such as dialysis outflow fluid and fluid desorbed from dialysis membrane containing adsorbed proteins. The identified proteins can also be characterized by their involvement in metabolic and signaling pathways, molecular networks, and biologic processes through application of bioinformatics tools. Proteomics may thus provide an actual functional definition as to the effect of a membrane material on plasma proteins during hemodialysis. Here, we review the results of proteomic studies on the performance of hemodialysis membranes, as evaluated in terms of solute removal efficiency and blood-membrane interactions. The evidence collected indicates that the information provided by proteomic

  18. Examining hemodialyzer membrane performance using proteomic technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bonomini M; Pieroni L; Di Liberato L; Sirolli V; Urbani A

    2017-01-01

    Mario Bonomini,1 Luisa Pieroni,2 Lorenzo Di Liberato,1 Vittorio Sirolli,1 Andrea Urbani2,3 1Department of Medicine, G. d’Annunzio University, Chieti, 2Proteomic and Metabonomic Units, IRCCS S. Lucia Foundation, Rome, 3Faculty of Medicine, Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry Institute, Catholic University of the “Sacred Heart”, Rome, Italy Abstract: The success and the quality of hemodialysis therapy are mainly related to both clearance and biocompat...

  19. Advancement of mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to explore triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Sayem; Banks, Charles A S; Adams, Mark K; Florens, Laurence; Lukong, Kiven E; Washburn, Michael P

    2016-12-20

    Understanding the complexity of cancer biology requires extensive information about the cancer proteome over the course of the disease. The recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies have led to the accumulation of an incredible amount of such proteomic information. This information allows us to identify protein signatures or protein biomarkers, which can be used to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. For example, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used in breast cancer research for over two decades to elucidate protein function. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases with distinct molecular features that are reflected in tumour characteristics and clinical outcomes. Compared with all other subtypes of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer is perhaps the most distinct in nature and heterogeneity. In this review, we provide an introductory overview of the application of advanced proteomic technologies to triple-negative breast cancer research.

  20. Quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP) using mass spectrometry: general characteristics and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sylvain; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Hochstrasser, Denis; Brede, Cato; Glueckmann, Matthias; Cocho, José A; Ceglarek, Uta; Lenz, Christof; Vialaret, Jérôme; Scherl, Alexander; Hirtz, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Proteomics studies typically aim to exhaustively detect peptides/proteins in a given biological sample. Over the past decade, the number of publications using proteomics methodologies has exploded. This was made possible due to the availability of high-quality genomic data and many technological advances in the fields of microfluidics and mass spectrometry. Proteomics in biomedical research was initially used in 'functional' studies for the identification of proteins involved in pathophysiological processes, complexes and networks. Improved sensitivity of instrumentation facilitated the analysis of even more complex sample types, including human biological fluids. It is at that point the field of clinical proteomics was born, and its fundamental aim was the discovery and (ideally) validation of biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, or therapeutic monitoring of disease. Eventually, it was recognized that the technologies used in clinical proteomics studies [particularly liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)] could represent an alternative to classical immunochemical assays. Prior to deploying MS in the measurement of peptides/proteins in the clinical laboratory, it seems likely that traditional proteomics workflows and data management systems will need to adapt to the clinical environment and meet in vitro diagnostic (IVD) regulatory constraints. This defines a new field, as reviewed in this article, that we have termed quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP).

  1. Mass Spectrometry for Translational Proteomics: Progress and Clinical Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-08-31

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics measurements have become increasingly utilized in a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, and have significantly enhanced the understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of the proteome and its connections to biology and diseases. While some MS techniques such as those for targeted analysis are increasingly applied with great success, others such as global quantitative analysis (for e.g. biomarker discovery) are more challenging and continue to be developed and refined to provide the desired throughput, sensitivity and/ or specificity. New MS capabilities and proteomics-based pipelines/strategies also keep enhancing for the advancement of clinical proteomics applications such as protein biomarker discovery and validation. Herein, we provide a brief review to summarize the current state of MS-based proteomics with respect to its advantages and present limitations, while highlighting its potential in future clinical applications.

  2. A comprehensive proteomics study on platelet concentrates: Platelet proteome, storage time and Mirasol pathogen reduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Papadopoulos, Petros; van der Meer, Pieter F; Daal, Brunette B; Villa-Fajardo, María; de Korte, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2018-03-19

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) represent a blood transfusion product with a major concern for safety as their storage temperature (20-24°C) allows bacterial growth, and their maximum storage time period (less than a week) precludes complete microbiological testing. Pathogen inactivation technologies (PITs) provide an additional layer of safety to the blood transfusion products from known and unknown pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites. In this context, PITs, such as Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology (PRT), have been developed and are implemented in many countries. However, several studies have shown in vitro that Mirasol PRT induces a certain level of platelet shape change, hyperactivation, basal degranulation, and increased oxidative damage during storage. It has been suggested that Mirasol PRT might accelerate what has been described as the platelet storage lesion (PSL), but supportive molecular signatures have not been obtained. We aimed at dissecting the influence of both variables, that is, Mirasol PRT and storage time, at the proteome level. We present comprehensive proteomics data analysis of Control PCs and PCs treated with Mirasol PRT at storage days 1, 2, 6, and 8. Our workflow was set to perform proteomics analysis using a gel-free and label-free quantification (LFQ) approach. Semi-quantification was based on LFQ signal intensities of identified proteins using MaxQuant/Perseus software platform. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD008119. We identified marginal differences between Mirasol PRT and Control PCs during storage. However, those significant changes at the proteome level were specifically related to the functional aspects previously described to affect platelets upon Mirasol PRT. In addition, the effect of Mirasol PRT on the platelet proteome appeared not to be exclusively due to an accelerated or enhanced PSL. In summary, semi-quantitative proteomics allows to discern between proteome changes due to

  3. Advances in mass spectrometry-based cancer research and analysis: from cancer proteomics to clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, John F; Hale, Oliver J; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The last 20 years have seen significant improvements in the analytical capabilities of biological mass spectrometry (MS). Studies using advanced MS have resulted in new insights into cell biology and the etiology of diseases as well as its use in clinical applications. This review discusses recent developments in MS-based technologies and their cancer-related applications with a focus on proteomics. It also discusses the issues around translating the research findings to the clinic and provides an outline of where the field is moving. Expert commentary: Proteomics has been problematic to adapt for the clinical setting. However, MS-based techniques continue to demonstrate potential in novel clinical uses beyond classical cancer proteomics.

  4. Integrating proteomic and functional genomic technologies in discovery-driven translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina

    2003-01-01

    The application of state-of-the-art proteomics and functional genomics technologies to the study of cancer is rapidly shifting toward the analysis of clinically relevant samples derived from patients, as the ultimate aim of translational research is to bring basic discoveries closer to the bedside...

  5. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, P.; Celis, J.E.; Gromova, I.

    2008-01-01

    -based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis...... dissease, is driving scientists to increasingly use clinically relevant samples for biomarker and target discovery. Tissues are heterogeneous and as a result optimization of sample preparation is critical for generating accurate, representative, and highly reproducible quantitative data. Although a large...... number of protocols for preparation of tissue lysates has been published, so far no single recipe is able to provide a "one-size fits all" solubilization procedure that can be used to analyse the same lysate using different proteomics technologies. Here we present evidence showing that cell lysis buffer...

  6. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. CPTAC Collaborates with Molecular & Cellular Proteomics to Address Reproducibility in Targeted Assay Development | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (MCP), in collaboration with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announce new guidelines and requirements for papers describing the development and application of targeted mass spectrometry measurements of peptides, modified peptides and proteins (Mol Cell Proteomics 2017; PMID: 28183812).  NCI’s participation is part of NIH’s overall effort to address the r

  8. RAPID PROCESSING OF ARCHIVAL TISSUE SAMPLES FOR PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS USING PRESSURE-CYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuth N. Puttamallesh1,2

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advent of mass spectrometry based proteomics has revolutionized our ability to study proteins from biological specimen in a high-throughput manner. Unlike cell line based studies, biomedical research involving tissue specimen is often challenging due to limited sample availability. In addition, investigation of clinically relevant research questions often requires enormous amount of time for sample collection prospectively. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE archived tissue samples are a rich source of tissue specimen for biomedical research. However, there are several challenges associated with analysing FFPE samples. Protein cross-linking and degradation of proteins particularly affects proteomic analysis. We demonstrate that barocycler that uses pressure-cycling technology enables efficient protein extraction and processing of small amounts of FFPE tissue samples for proteomic analysis. We identified 3,525 proteins from six 10µm esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC tissue sections. Barocycler allows efficient protein extraction and proteolytic digestion of proteins from FFPE tissue sections at par with conventional methods.

  9. Computational Omics Funding Opportunity | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and the NVIDIA Foundation are pleased to announce funding opportunities in the fight against cancer. Each organization has launched a request for proposals (RFP) that will collectively fund up to $2 million to help to develop a new generation of data-intensive scientific tools to find new ways to treat cancer.

  10. Combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries (ProteoMiner): an innovative fractionation tool for differential quantitative clinical proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Sonja; Czibere, Akos; Kotzka, Jorg; Passlack, Waltraud; Haas, Rainer; Eckel, Jürgen; Lehr, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Blood serum samples are the major source for clinical proteomics approaches, which aim to identify diagnostically relevant or treatment-response related proteins. But, the presence of very high-abundance proteins and the enormous dynamic range of protein distribution hinders whole serum analysis. An innovative tool to overcome these limitations, utilizes combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries (ProteoMiner). Here, we demonstrate that ProteoMiner can be used for comparative and quantitative analysis of complex proteomes. We spiked serum samples with increasing amounts (3 microg to 300 microg) of whole E. coli lysate, processed it with ProteoMiner and performed quantitative analyses of 2D-gels. We found, that the concentration of the spiked bacteria proteome, reflected by the maintained proportional spot intensities, was not altered by ProteoMiner treatment. Therefore, we conclude that the ProteoMiner technology can be used for quantitative analysis of low abundant proteins in complex biological samples.

  11. Proteomic analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus - clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Nicola M; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitous saprophytic fungus capable of producing small airborne spores, which are frequently inhaled by humans. In healthy individuals, the fungus is rapidly cleared by innate mechanisms, including immune cells. However, in individuals with impaired lung function or immunosuppression the spores can germinate and prompt severe allergic responses, and disease with limited or extensive invasiveness. The traits that make A. fumigatus a successful colonizer and pathogen of humans are multi-factorial. Thus, a global investigative approach is required to elucidate the mechanisms utilized by the fungus to cause disease. Expert commentary: In doing so, a better understanding of disease pathology can be achieved with improved therapeutic/diagnostic solutions, thereby improving patient outcome. Proteomic analysis permits such investigations and recent work has yielded insight into these mechanisms.

  12. Clinical proteomics: Applications for prostate cancer biomarker discovery and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Ornstein, David K; Liotta, Lance A

    2004-01-01

    The science of proteomics comprises much more than simply generating lists of proteins that change in expression as a cause of or consequence of pathophysiology. The goal of proteomics should be to characterize the information flow through the intercellular protein circuitry that communicates with the extracellular microenvironment and then ultimately to the serum/plasma macroenvironment. Serum proteomic pattern diagnostics is a new type of proteomic concept in which patterns of ion signatures generated from high dimensional mass spectrometry data are used as diagnostic classifiers. This recent approach has exciting potential for clinical utility of diagnostic patterns because low molecular weight metabolites, peptides, and protein fragments may have higher accuracy than traditional biomarkers of cancer detection. Intriguingly, we now have discovered that this diagnostic information exists in a bound state, complexed with circulating highly abundant carrier proteins. These diagnostic fragments may one day be harvested by circulating nanoparticles, designed to absorb, enrich, and amplify the repertoire of diagnostic biomarkers generated-even at the critical, initial stages of carcinogenesis. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Adapting mass spectrometry-based platforms for clinical proteomics applications: The capillary electrophoresis coupled mass spectrometry paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jochen; Luppa, Peter B.; Good, David M.; Mischak, Harald

    2018-01-01

    Single biomarker detection is common in clinical laboratories due to the currently available method spectrum. For various diseases, however, no specific single biomarker could be identified. A strategy to overcome this diagnostic void is to shift from single analyte detection to multiplexed biomarker profiling. Mass spectrometric methods were employed for biomarker discovery in body fluids. The enormous complexity of biofluidic proteome compartments implies upstream fractionation. For this reason, mass spectrometry (MS) was coupled to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization, or capillary electrophoresis (CE). Differences in performance and operating characteristics make them differentially suited for routine laboratory applications. Progress in the field of clinical proteomics relies not only on the use of an adequate technological platform, but also on a fast and efficient proteomic workflow including standardized sample preparation, proteomic data processing, statistical validation of biomarker selection, and sample classification. Based on CE-MS analysis, we describe how proteomic technology can be implemented in a clinical laboratory environment. In the last part of this review, we give an overview of CE-MS-based clinical studies and present information on identity and biological significance of the identified peptide biomarkers providing evidence of disease-induced changes in proteolytic processing and posttranslational modification. PMID:19404829

  14. Unlocking biomarker discovery: large scale application of aptamer proteomic technology for early detection of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M Ostroff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. New diagnostics are needed to detect early stage lung cancer because it may be cured with surgery. However, most cases are diagnosed too late for curative surgery. Here we present a comprehensive clinical biomarker study of lung cancer and the first large-scale clinical application of a new aptamer-based proteomic technology to discover blood protein biomarkers in disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a multi-center case-control study in archived serum samples from 1,326 subjects from four independent studies of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in long-term tobacco-exposed populations. Sera were collected and processed under uniform protocols. Case sera were collected from 291 patients within 8 weeks of the first biopsy-proven lung cancer and prior to tumor removal by surgery. Control sera were collected from 1,035 asymptomatic study participants with ≥ 10 pack-years of cigarette smoking. We measured 813 proteins in each sample with a new aptamer-based proteomic technology, identified 44 candidate biomarkers, and developed a 12-protein panel (cadherin-1, CD30 ligand, endostatin, HSP90α, LRIG3, MIP-4, pleiotrophin, PRKCI, RGM-C, SCF-sR, sL-selectin, and YES that discriminates NSCLC from controls with 91% sensitivity and 84% specificity in cross-validated training and 89% sensitivity and 83% specificity in a separate verification set, with similar performance for early and late stage NSCLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is a significant advance in clinical proteomics in an area of high unmet clinical need. Our analysis exceeds the breadth and dynamic range of proteome interrogated of previously published clinical studies of broad serum proteome profiling platforms including mass spectrometry, antibody arrays, and autoantibody arrays. The sensitivity and specificity of our 12-biomarker panel improves upon published protein and gene expression panels

  15. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  16. Announcing the Launch of CPTAC’s Proteogenomics DREAM Challenge | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This week, we are excited to announce the launch of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) Proteogenomics Computational DREAM Challenge.  The aim of this Challenge is to encourage the generation of computational methods for extracting information from the cancer proteome and for linking those data to genomic and transcriptomic information.  The specific goals are to predict proteomic and phosphoproteomic data from other multiple data types including transcriptomics and genetics.

  17. Marine proteomics: a critical assessment of an emerging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Corrales, Jone; Marsh-Hunkin, K Erica; Gochfeld, Deborah J; Willett, Kristine L; Rimoldi, John M

    2012-10-26

    The application of proteomics to marine sciences has increased in recent years because the proteome represents the interface between genotypic and phenotypic variability and, thus, corresponds to the broadest possible biomarker for eco-physiological responses and adaptations. Likewise, proteomics can provide important functional information regarding biosynthetic pathways, as well as insights into mechanism of action, of novel marine natural products. The goal of this review is to (1) explore the application of proteomics methodologies to marine systems, (2) assess the technical approaches that have been used, and (3) evaluate the pros and cons of this proteomic research, with the intent of providing a critical analysis of its future roles in marine sciences. To date, proteomics techniques have been utilized to investigate marine microbe, plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate physiology, developmental biology, seafood safety, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental change. However, marine proteomics studies often suffer from poor experimental design, sample processing/optimization difficulties, and data analysis/interpretation issues. Moreover, a major limitation is the lack of available annotated genomes and proteomes for most marine organisms, including several "model species". Even with these challenges in mind, there is no doubt that marine proteomics is a rapidly expanding and powerful integrative molecular research tool from which our knowledge of the marine environment, and the natural products from this resource, will be significantly expanded.

  18. NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Challenge (Registration Now Open) | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteogenomics, integration of proteomics, genomics, and transcriptomics, is an emerging approach that promises to advance basic, translational and clinical research.  By combining genomic and proteomic information, leading scientists are gaining new insights due to a more complete and unified understanding of complex biological processes.

  19. Recent 5-year Findings and Technological Advances in the Proteomic Study of HIV-associated Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Jin, Jun-O; Lu, Hongzhou; Tan, Zhimi

    2017-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) mainly relies on host factors to complete its life cycle. Hence, it is very important to identify HIV-regulated host proteins. Proteomics is an excellent technique for this purpose because of its high throughput and sensitivity. In this review, we summarized current technological advances in proteomics, including general isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), as well as subcellular proteomics and investigation of posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, we reviewed the applications of proteomics in the discovery of HIV-related diseases and HIV infection mechanisms. Proteins identified by proteomic studies might offer new avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection and the related diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily I Chen

    Full Text Available Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9 and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8. MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2 suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  1. Recent 5-year Findings and Technological Advances in the Proteomic Study of HIV-associated Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Jin, Jun-O; Lu, Hongzhou; Tan, Zhimi

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) mainly relies on host factors to complete its life cycle. Hence, it is very important to identify HIV-regulated host proteins. Proteomics is an excellent technique for this purpose because of its high throughput and sensitivity. In this review, we summarized current technological advances in proteomics, including general isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), as wel...

  2. VIDEO: Dr. Henry Rodriguez - Proteogenomics in Cancer Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Henry Rodriguez, director of the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) at NCI, speaks with ecancer television at WIN 2017 about the translation of the proteins expressed in a patient's tumor into a map for druggable targets. By combining genomic and proteomic information (proteogenomics), leading scientists are gaining new insights into ways to detect and treat cancer due to a more complete and unified understanding of complex biological processes.

  3. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: basic principles and emerging technologies and directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Riper, Susan K; de Jong, Ebbing P; Carlis, John V; Griffin, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    As the main catalytic and structural molecules within living systems, proteins are the most likely biomolecules to be affected by radiation exposure. Proteomics, the comprehensive characterization of proteins within complex biological samples, is therefore a research approach ideally suited to assess the effects of radiation exposure on cells and tissues. For comprehensive characterization of proteomes, an analytical platform capable of quantifying protein abundance, identifying post-translation modifications and revealing members of protein complexes on a system-wide level is necessary. Mass spectrometry (MS), coupled with technologies for sample fractionation and automated data analysis, provides such a versatile and powerful platform. In this chapter we offer a view on the current state of MS-proteomics, and focus on emerging technologies within three areas: (1) New instrumental methods; (2) New computational methods for peptide identification; and (3) Label-free quantification. These emerging technologies should be valuable for researchers seeking to better understand biological effects of radiation on living systems.

  4. A novel multidimensional protein identification technology approach combining protein size exclusion prefractionation, peptide zwitterion-ion hydrophilic interaction chromatography, and nano-ultraperformance RP chromatography/nESI-MS2 for the in-depth analysis of the serum proteome and phosphoproteome: application to clinical sera derived from humans with benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbis, Spiros D; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Tyritzis, Stavros I; Zorpas, Kostas M; Pavlakis, Kitty; Constantinides, Constantinos A

    2011-02-01

    The current proof-of-principle study was aimed toward development of a novel multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach for the in-depth proteome analysis of human serum derived from patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) using rational chromatographic design principles. This study constituted an extension of our published work relating to the identification and relative quantification of potential clinical biomarkers in BPH and prostate cancer (PCa) tissue specimens. The proposed MudPIT approach encompassed the use of three distinct yet complementary liquid chromatographic chemistries. High-pressure size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used for the prefractionation of serum proteins followed by their dialysis exchange and solution phase trypsin proteolysis. The tryptic peptides were then subjected to offline zwitterion-ion hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ZIC-HILIC) fractionation followed by their online analysis with reversed-phase nano-ultraperformance chromatography (RP-nUPLC) hyphenated to nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry using an ion trap mass analyzer. For the spectral processing, the sequential use of the SpectrumMill, Scaffold, and InsPecT software tools was applied for the tryptic peptide product ion MS(2) spectral processing, false discovery rate (FDR) assessment, validation, and protein identification. This milestone serum analysis study allowed the confident identification of over 1955 proteins (p ≤ 0.05; FDR ≤ 5%) with a broad spectrum of biological and physicochemical properties including secreted, tissue-specific proteins spanning approximately 12 orders of magnitude as they occur in their native abundance levels in the serum matrix. Also encompassed in this proteome was the confident identification of 375 phosphoproteins (p ≤ 0.05; FDR ≤ 5%) with potential importance to cancer biology. To demonstrate the performance characteristics of this novel MudPIT approach, a comparison

  5. Mobile technology in clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, B J; Anderson, J; Harding, T

    2017-01-01

    Technology is having a profound effect on education in the 21st century and nurse educators are being challenged to integrate technological innovation to assist students in their learning. This paper reports a study on the introduction of smart mobile technology to support student learning in the clinical environment. In a climate of collaborative inquiry, clinical lecturers and two researchers from the same department carried out a project in three phases: formation, implementation and analysis. Following the formation phase, six clinical lecturers adopted iPads to support their clinical teaching (implementation phase). At this time they also kept reflective journals. In the analysis phase a thematic analysis of the data from the journals and from a focus group found both enabling and constraining factors influenced the use of iPads by clinical lecturers. The themes categorised as enablers were: resources and technology; and, management and technology support. Those identified as barriers or constraining factors were: clinical staff engagement; and lecturer experience with technology. Student engagement and learning, and connectivity were both enabling and constraining factors. This paper concludes that the use of a mobile device such as an iPad can enhance teaching in clinical settings but that in order for such devices to be successfully integrated into clinical teaching consideration needs to be given to professional development needs, adequate resourcing and technology support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Leaderboard Now Open: CPTAC’s DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce the opening of the leaderboard to its Proteogenomics Computational DREAM Challenge. The leadership board remains open for submissions during September 25, 2017 through October 8, 2017, with the Challenge expected to run until November 17, 2017.

  7. Important options available - from start to finish -for translating proteomics results to clinical chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Ostergaard, Ole; Bahl, Justyna M C

    2015-01-01

    assay development downstream. Putative new assay candidates generated by proteomics discovery projects compete with well-established assays with known indications, well-described performance, and of known value in specific clinical settings. Careful attention to the many options available in the design...

  8. Identification of Biomarkers for Endometriosis Using Clinical Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We investigated possible biomarkers for endometriosis (EM using the ClinProt technique and proteomics methods. Methods: We enrolled 50 patients with EM, 34 with benign ovarian neoplasms and 40 healthy volunteers in this study. Serum proteomic spectra were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS combined with weak cationic exchange (WCX magnetic beads. Possible biomarkers were analyzed by a random and repeat pattern model-validation method that we designed, and ClinProtools software, results were refined using online liquid chromatography-tandem MS. Results: We found a cluster of 5 peptides (4210, 5264, 2660, 5635, and 5904 Da, using 3 peptides (4210, 5904, 2660 Da to discriminate EM patients from healthy volunteers, with 96.67% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We selected 4210 and 5904 m/z, which differed most between patients with EM and controls, and identified them as fragments of ATP1B4, and the fibrinogen alpha (FGA isoform 1/2 of the FGA chain precursor, respectively. Conclusions: ClinProt can identify EM biomarkers, which - most notably - distinguish even early-stage or minimal disease. We found 5 stable peaks at 4210, 5264, 2660, 5635, and 5904 Da as potential EM biomarkers, the strongest of which were associated with ATP1B4 (4210 Da and FGA (5904 Da; this indicates that ATP1B4 and FGA are associated with EM pathogenesis.

  9. NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to

  10. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rígel Licier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  11. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licier, Rígel; Miranda, Eric; Serrano, Horacio

    2016-10-17

    The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  12. Application of Proteomics in Food Technology and Food Biotechnology: Process Development, Quality Control and Product Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Gašo-Sokač

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human food is a very complex biological mixture and food processing and safety are very important and essential disciplines. Proteomics technology using different high-performance separation techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, one-dimensional and multidimensional chromatography, combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry has the power to monitor the protein composition of foods and their changes during the production process. The use of proteomics in food technology is presented, especially for characterization and standardization of raw materials, process development, detection of batch-to-batch variations and quality control of the final product. Further attention is paid to the aspects of food safety, especially regarding biological and microbial safety and the use of genetically modified foods.

  13. Determination of variation parameters as a crucial step in designing TMT-based clinical proteomics experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Maes

    Full Text Available In quantitative shotgun proteomic analyses by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, a rigid study design is necessary in order to obtain statistically relevant results. Hypothesis testing, sample size calculation and power estimation are fundamental concepts that require consideration upon designing an experiment. For this reason, the reproducibility and variability of the proteomic platform needs to be assessed. In this study, we evaluate the technical (sample preparation, labeling (isobaric labels, and total (biological + technical + labeling + experimental variability and reproducibility of a workflow that employs a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach in combination with TMT peptide labeling for the quantification of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC proteome. We illustrate that the variability induced by TMT labeling is small when compared to the technical variation. The latter is also responsible for a substantial part of the total variation. Prior knowledge about the experimental variability allows for a correct design, a prerequisite for the detection of biologically significant disease-specific differential proteins in clinical proteomics experiments.

  14. Data in support of proteomic analysis of pneumococcal pediatric clinical isolates to construct a protein array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Olaya-Abril

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface proteins play key roles in the interaction between cells and their environment, and in pathogenic microorganisms they are the best targets for drug or vaccine discovery and/or development. In addition, surface proteins can be the basis for serodiagnostic tools aiming at developing more affordable techniques for early diagnosis of infection in patients. We carried out a proteomic analysis of a collection of pediatric clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen responsible for more than 1.5 million child deaths worldwide. For that, cultured live bacterial cells were “shaved” with trypsin, and the recovered peptides were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. We selected 95 proteins to be produced as recombinant polypeptides, and printed them on an array. We probed the protein array with a collection of patient sera to define serodiagnostic antigens. The mass spectrometry proteomics data correspond to those published in [1] and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium [2] via the PRIDE partner repository [3] with the dataset identifier http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD001740. The protein array raw data are provided as supplemental material in this article. Keywords: Pneumococcus, Protein arrays, Proteomics, Diagnostics

  15. High throughput and accurate serum proteome profiling by integrated sample preparation technology and single-run data independent mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Zheng, Jiaxin; Yu, Quan; Chen, Wendong; Xing, Jinchun; Chen, Chenxi; Tian, Ruijun

    2018-03-01

    , because the usage of small sample amounts makes blood testing much less invasive, the fully integrated sample preparation by the SISPROT technology greatly improve sample preparation throughput and reproducibility, and the scan feature of DIA method provides a way to convert nonrenewable clinical specimens into permanent digital proteome maps which could be easily reanalyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimized Clinical Use of RNALater and FFPE Samples for Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives The availability of patient samples is essential for clinical proteomic research. Biobanks worldwide store mainly samples stabilized in RNAlater as well as formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies. Biobank material is a potential source for clinical...... we compare to FFPE and frozen samples being the control. Methods From the sigmoideum of two healthy participants’ twenty-four biopsies were extracted using endoscopy. The biopsies was stabilized either by being directly frozen, RNAlater, FFPE or incubated for 30 min at room temperature prior to FFPE...... information. Conclusion We have demonstrated that quantitative proteome analysis and pathway mapping of samples stabilized in RNAlater as well as by FFPE is feasible with minimal impact on the quality of protein quantification and post-translational modifications....

  17. Proteomics insights into DNA damage response and translating this knowledge to clinical strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Stechow, Louise; Olsen, Jesper V

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability is a critical driver in the process of cancer formation. At the same time, inducing DNA damage by irradiation or genotoxic compounds constitutes a key therapeutic strategy to kill fast-dividing cancer cells. Sensing of DNA lesions initiates a complex set of signalling pathways......) in the DDR. Finally, we provide an outlook on how proteomics studies of the DDR could aid clinical developments on multiple levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  18. Computational Omics Pre-Awardees | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce the pre-awardees of the Computational Omics solicitation. Working with NVIDIA Foundation's Compute the Cure initiative and Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., the NCI, through this solicitation, seeks to leverage computational efforts to provide tools for the mining and interpretation of large-scale publicly available ‘omics’ datasets.

  19. Urine Proteomics in the Era of Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Beasley-Green

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With the technological advances of mass spectrometry (MS-based platforms, clinical proteomics is one of the most rapidly growing areas in biomedical research. Urine proteomics has become a popular subdiscipline of clinical proteomics because it is an ideal source for the discovery of noninvasive disease biomarkers. The urine proteome offers a comprehensive view of the local and systemic physiology since the proteome is primarily composed of proteins/peptides from the kidneys and plasma. The emergence of MS-based proteomic platforms as prominent bioanalytical tools in clinical applications has enhanced the identification of protein-based urinary biomarkers. This review highlights the characteristics of urine that make it an attractive biofluid for biomarker discovery and the impact of MS-based technologies on the clinical assessment of urinary protein biomarkers.

  20. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling as diagnostic tool in oncology: current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics analysis has been heralded as a novel tool for identifying new and specific biomarkers that may improve diagnosis and monitoring of various disease states. Recent years have brought a number of proteomics profiling technologies. Although proteomics profiling has resulted in the detection of disease-associated differences and modification of proteins, current proteomics technologies display certain limitations that are hampering the introduction of these new technologies into clinical laboratory diagnostics and routine applications. In this review, we summarize current advances in mass spectrometry based biomarker discovery. The promises and challenges of this new technology are discussed with particular emphasis on diagnostic perspectives of mass-spectrometry based proteomics profiling for malignant diseases.

  1. Translating epithelial mesenchymal transition markers into the clinic: Novel insights from proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergara Daniele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT may represent a potential source of clinical markers. Despite EMT drivers have not yet emerged as candidate markers in the clinical setting, their association with established clinical markers may improve their specificity and sensitivity. Mass spectrometry-based platforms allow analyzing multiple samples for the expression of EMT candidate markers, and may help to diagnose diseases or monitor treatment efficiently. This review highlights proteomic approaches applied to elucidate the differences between epithelial and mesenchymal tumors and describes how these can be used for target discovery and validation.

  2. CPTC and NIST-sponsored Yeast Reference Material Now Publicly Available | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yeast protein extract (RM8323) developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the auspices of NCI's CPTC initiative is currently available to the public at https://www-s.nist.gov/srmors/view_detail.cfm?srm=8323. The yeast proteome offers researchers a unique biological reference material. RM8323 is the most extensively characterized complex biological proteome and the only one associated with several large-scale studies to estimate protein abundance across a wide concentration range.

  3. Studying Different Clinical Syndromes Of Paediatric Severe Malaria Using Plasma Proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-08-01

    Background- Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. Severe malaria manifests itself as three main clinical syndromes-impaired consciousness (cerebral malaria), respiratory distress and severe malarial anaemia. Cerebral malaria and respiratory distress are major contributors to malaria mortality but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Motivation/Objectives- Most children with severe malaria die within the first 24 hours of admission to a hospital because of their pathophysiological conditions. Thus, along with anti-malarial drugs, various adjuvant therapies such as fluid bolus (for hypovolaemia) and anticonvulsants (for seizures) are given to alleviate the sick child’s condition. But these therapies can sometimes have adverse effects. Hence, a clear understanding of severe malaria pathophysiology is essential for making an informed decision regarding adjuvant therapies. Methodology- We used mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics to study plasma samples from Gambian children with severe malaria. We compared the proteomic profiles of different severe malaria syndromes and generated hypotheses regarding the underlying disease mechanisms. Results/Conclusions- The main challenges of studying the severe malaria syndromes using proteomics were the high complexity and variability among the samples. We hypothesized that hepatic injury and nitric oxide play roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria and respiratory distress.

  4. A Miniaturized Chemical Proteomic Approach for Target Profiling of Clinical Kinase Inhibitors in Tumor Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamrád, Ivo; Rix, Uwe; Stukalov, Alexey; Gridling, Manuela; Parapatics, Katja; Müller, André C.; Altiok, Soner; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2014-01-01

    While targeted therapy based on the idea of attenuating the activity of a preselected, therapeutically relevant protein has become one of the major trends in modern cancer therapy, no truly specific targeted drug has been developed and most clinical agents have displayed a degree of polypharmacology. Therefore, the specificity of anticancer therapeutics has emerged as a highly important but severely underestimated issue. Chemical proteomics is a powerful technique combining postgenomic drug-affinity chromatography with high-end mass spectrometry analysis and bioinformatic data processing to assemble a target profile of a desired therapeutic molecule. Due to high demands on the starting material, however, chemical proteomic studies have been mostly limited to cancer cell lines. Herein, we report a down-scaling of the technique to enable the analysis of very low abundance samples, as those obtained from needle biopsies. By a systematic investigation of several important parameters in pull-downs with the multikinase inhibitor bosutinib, the standard experimental protocol was optimized to 100 µg protein input. At this level, more than 30 well-known targets were detected per single pull-down replicate with high reproducibility. Moreover, as presented by the comprehensive target profile obtained from miniaturized pull-downs with another clinical drug, dasatinib, the optimized protocol seems to be extendable to other drugs of interest. Sixty distinct human and murine targets were finally identified for bosutinib and dasatinib in chemical proteomic experiments utilizing core needle biopsy samples from xenotransplants derived from patient tumor tissue. Altogether, the developed methodology proves robust and generic and holds many promises for the field of personalized health care. PMID:23901793

  5. Rodriguez Recognized as Recipient of the MSSS AACC Chair’s Inspirational Award | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Henry Rodriguez, director of the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, has been recognized as the recipient of the Chair’s Inspirational Award by the Mass Spectrometry and Separation Sciences for Laboratory Medicine Division (MSSS), American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC).

  6. Mass spectral analysis of urine proteomic profiles of dairy cows suffering from clinical ketosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Shu, Shi; Xia, Cheng; Wang, Pengxian; Sun, Yuhang; Xu, Chuchu; Li, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    Ketosis is an important metabolic disorder in dairy cows during the transition period. The urine proteomics of ketosis has not been investigated using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). The aim is to determine differences between urine proteomic profiles of healthy cows and those with clinical ketosis, and facilitate studies of the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms that lead to liver pathology in ketosis. We analyzed the urine samples of 20 cows with clinical ketosis (group 1) and 20 control cows (group 2) using SELDI-TOF-MS. Thirty-nine peptide peaks differed between both groups. Polypeptides corresponding to 26 of these differential peptide peaks were identified using the SWISS-PROT protein database. We found that the peaks of 11 distinct polypeptides from the urine samples of the ketosis group were significantly reduced, compared with those of the control group as based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Among these were VGF (non-acronymic) protein, amyloid precursor protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, C1INH, apolipoprotein C-III, cystatin C, transthyretin, hepcidin, human neutrophil peptides, and osteopontin. These proteins may represent novel biomarkers of the metabolic changes that occur in dairy cows with ketosis. Our results will help to better understand the physiological changes and pathogenesis observed in cows with ketosis. The SELDI-TOF-MS can be used to understand the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of ketosis and identify biomarkers of the disease.

  7. The Urine Proteome Profile Is Different in Neuromyelitis Optica Compared to Multiple Sclerosis: A Clinical Proteome Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle H Nielsen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS comprise a broad spectrum of diseases like neuromyelitis optica (NMO, NMO spectrum disorders (NMO-SD and multiple sclerosis (MS. Despite clear classification criteria, differentiation can be difficult. We hypothesized that the urine proteome may differentiate NMO from MS.The proteins in urine samples from anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4 seropositive NMO/NMO-SD patients (n = 32, patients with MS (n = 46 and healthy subjects (HS, n = 31 were examined by quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS after trypsin digestion and iTRAQ labelling. Immunoglobulins (Ig in the urine were validated by nephelometry in an independent cohort (n = 9-10 pr. groups.The analysis identified a total of 1112 different proteins of which 333 were shared by all 109 subjects. Cluster analysis revealed differences in the urine proteome of NMO/NMO-SD compared to HS and MS. Principal component analysis also suggested that the NMO/NMO-SD proteome profile was useful for classification. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a 3-protein profile for the NMO/NMO-SD versus HS discrimination, a 6-protein profile for NMO/NMO-SD versus MS discrimination and an 11-protein profile for MS versus HS discrimination. All protein panels yielded highly significant ROC curves (AUC in all cases >0.85, p≤0.0002. Nephelometry confirmed the presence of increased Ig-light chains in the urine of patients with NMO/NMO-SD.The urine proteome profile of patients with NMO/NMO-SD is different from MS and HS. This may reflect differences in the pathogenesis of NMO/NMO-SD versus MS and suggests that urine may be a potential source of biomarkers differentiating NMO/NMO-SD from MS.

  8. Ultra-sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-laser-induced fluorescence based proteomics for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V B; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-09-08

    An ultra-sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) based technique has been developed by our group at Manipal, for screening, early detection, and staging for various cancers, using protein profiling of clinical samples like, body fluids, cellular specimens, and biopsy-tissue. More than 300 protein profiles of different clinical samples (serum, saliva, cellular samples and tissue homogenates) from volunteers (normal, and different pre-malignant/malignant conditions) were recorded using this set-up. The protein profiles were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) to achieve objective detection and classification of malignant, premalignant and healthy conditions with high sensitivity and specificity. The HPLC-LIF protein profiling combined with PCA, as a routine method for screening, diagnosis, and staging of cervical cancer and oral cancer, is discussed in this paper. In recent years, proteomics techniques have advanced tremendously in life sciences and medical sciences for the detection and identification of proteins in body fluids, tissue homogenates and cellular samples to understand biochemical mechanisms leading to different diseases. Some of the methods include techniques like high performance liquid chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF-MS, SELDI-TOF-MS, CE-MS and LC-MS techniques. We have developed an ultra-sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence (HPLC-LIF) based technique, for screening, early detection, and staging for various cancers, using protein profiling of clinical samples like, body fluids, cellular specimens, and biopsy-tissue. More than 300 protein profiles of different clinical samples (serum, saliva, cellular samples and tissue homogenates) from healthy and volunteers with different malignant conditions were recorded by using this set-up. The protein profile data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) for objective

  9. Technological advances and proteomic applications in drug discovery and target deconvolution: identification of the pleiotropic effects of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Cristina; Baetta, Roberta; Gianazza, Erica; Tremoli, Elena

    2017-06-01

    Proteomic-based techniques provide a powerful tool for identifying the full spectrum of protein targets of a drug, elucidating its mechanism(s) of action, and identifying biomarkers of its efficacy and safety. Herein, we outline the technological advancements in the field, and illustrate the contribution of proteomics to the definition of the pharmacological profile of statins, which represent the cornerstone of the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Statins act by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, thus reducing cholesterol biosynthesis and consequently enhancing the clearance of low-density lipoproteins from the blood; however, HMG-CoA reductase inhibition can result in a multitude of additional effects beyond lipid lowering, known as 'pleiotropic effects'. The case of statins highlights the unique contribution of proteomics to the target profiling of a drug molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel microduplication of ARID1B: Clinical, genetic, and proteomic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Catarina M; Szoko, Nicholas; Erdin, Serkan; Ragavendran, Ashok; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Maciel, Patrícia; Lundberg, Kathleen; Schlatzer, Daniela; Smith, Janice; Talkowski, Michael E; Gusella, James F; Natowicz, Marvin R

    2017-09-01

    Genetic alterations of ARID1B have been recently recognized as one of the most common mendelian causes of intellectual disability and are associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic phenotypes. The ARID1B protein, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF-A, is involved in the regulation of transcription and multiple downstream cellular processes. We report here the clinical, genetic, and proteomic phenotypes of an individual with a unique apparent de novo mutation of ARID1B due to an intragenic duplication. His neurodevelopmental phenotype includes a severe speech/language disorder with full scale IQ scores 78-98 and scattered academic skill levels, expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B mutations. Haploinsufficiency of ARID1B was determined both by RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis supported an intragenic localization of the ARID1B copy number gain. Principal component analysis revealed marked differentiation of the subject's lymphoblast proteome from that of controls. Of 3426 proteins quantified, 1014 were significantly up- or down-regulated compared to controls (q constitutional haploinsufficiency of ARID1B causes syndromic and non-syndromic developmental disabilities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Morbility, clinical data and proteomic analysis of IUGR and AGA newborns at different gestational ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Ruiz-González

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The data are related to the proteomic analysis of 43 newborns with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR and 45 newborns with appropriate weight for gestational age (AGA carried out by separation via 2DE and analyzed by MS–TOF/TOF. All newborns were separated into three gestational age groups, "Very Preterm" 29–32 weeks, "Moderate Preterm" 33–36 weeks, and, "Term" ≥37weeks. From each newborn, blood was drawn three times from birth to 1 month life. High-abundant serum proteins were depleted, and the minority ones were separated by 2DE and analyzed for significant expression differences. The data reflect analytic and clinic variables analyzed globally and categorized by gestational age in relation to IUGR and the optimization of conditions for 2-DE separation. The data from this study are related to the research article entitled "Alterations of Protein Expression in Serum of Infants with Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Different Gestational Ages" (M.D. Ruis-González, M.D. Cañete, J.L. Gómez-Chaparro, N. Abril, R. Cañete, J. López-Barea, 2015 [1]. The present dataset of serum IUGR newborn proteome can be used as a reference for any study involving intrauterine growth restriction during the first month of life.

  12. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore......, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead...

  13. The Urine Proteome as a Biomarker of Radiation Injury: Submitted to Proteomics- Clinical Applications Special Issue: "Renal and Urinary Proteomics (Thongboonkerd)"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukut; Halligan, Brian D; Wakim, Bassam T; Savin, Virginia J; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E

    2008-06-18

    Terrorist attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation, and early biomarkers of radiation injury would be critical for triage, treatment and follow-up of such individuals. However, no such biomarkers have yet been proven to exist. We tested the potential of high throughput proteomics to identify protein biomarkers of radiation injury after total body X-ray irradiation in a rat model. Subtle functional changes in the kidney are suggested by an increased glomerular permeability for macromolecules measured within 24 hours after TBI. Ultrastructural changes in glomerular podocytes include partial loss of the interdigitating organization of foot processes. Analysis of urine by LC-MS/MS and 2D-GE showed significant changes in the urine proteome within 24 hours after TBI. Tissue kallikrein 1-related peptidase, cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C and oxidized histidine were found to be increased while a number of proteinase inhibitors including kallikrein-binding protein and albumin were found to be decreased post-irradiation. Thus, TBI causes immediately detectable changes in renal structure and function and in the urinary protein profile. This suggests that both systemic and renal changes are induced by radiation and it may be possible to identify a set of biomarkers unique to radiation injury.

  14. Proteomics of inflammatory and oxidative stress response in cows with subclinical and clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Romana; Piras, Cristian; Kovačić, Mislav; Samardžija, Marko; Ahmed, Hany; De Canio, Michele; Urbani, Andrea; Meštrić, Zlata Flegar; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Roncada, Paola

    2012-07-19

    Cow serum proteome was evaluated by three different complementary approaches in the control group, subclinical and clinical mastitis in order to possibly find differential protein expression useful for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of mastitis as well as for an early diagnosis of the disease. The systemic inflammatory and oxidative stress response in cows with subclinical and clinical mastitis were observed. The collected evidence shows a differential protein expression of serpin A3-1, vitronectin-like protein and complement factor H in subclinical mastitis in comparison with the control. It was also found a differential protein expression of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, serpin A3-1, C4b-binding protein alpha chain, haptoglobin and apolipoprotein A-I in clinical mastitis compared to the control. Among the inflammatory proteins up-regulated in clinical mastitis, vitronectin is over-expressed in both subclinical and clinical mastitis indicating a strong bacterial infection. This suggests vitronectin as an important mediator in the pathogenesis of the onset of mastitis as well as a valuable marker for diagnosis of the subclinical form of the disease. Obtained data could be useful for the detection of mastitis during the subclinical phase and for a better comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset of the disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CSF Proteomics Identifies Specific and Shared Pathways for Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timucin Avsar

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immune-mediated, neuro-inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. There is a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in MS, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain unknown. We aimed to investigate further the etiopathogenesis related molecular pathways in subclinical types of MS using proteomic and bioinformatics approaches in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS and progressive MS (n=179. Comparison of disease groups with controls revealed a total of 151 proteins that are differentially expressed in clinically different MS subtypes. KEGG analysis using PANOGA tool revealed the disease related pathways including aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption (p=8.02x10-5 which is important in the immune cell migration, renin-angiotensin (p=6.88x10-5 system that induces Th17 dependent immunity, notch signaling (p=1.83x10-10 pathway indicating the activated remyelination and vitamin digestion and absorption pathways (p=1.73x10-5. An emerging theme from our studies is that whilst all MS clinical forms share common biological pathways, there are also clinical subtypes specific and pathophysiology related pathways which may have further therapeutic implications.

  16. Comparative proteome analysis of Helicobacter pylori clinical strains by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-nan; Ding, Shi-gang; Huang, Liu-huan; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Yan-yan; Zhong, Li-jun

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the pathogenic properties of Helicobacter pylori by comparing the proteome map of H. pylori clinical strains. Two wild-type H. pylori strains, YN8 (isolated from biopsy tissue of a gastric cancer patient) and YN14 (isolated from biopsy tissue of a gastritis and duodenal ulcer patient), were used. Proteomic analysis, using a pH range of 3-10 and 5-8, was performed. The individual proteins were identified by quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer and protein database search. Variation in spot patterns directed towards differential protein expression levels was observed between the strains. The gel revealed prominent proteins with several protein "families". The comparison of protein expressions of the two strains reveals a high variability. Differentially present or absent spots were observed. Nine differentially expressed protein spots identified by Q-TOF included adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding protein, disulfide oxidoreductase B (DsbB)-like protein, N utilization substance A (NusA), ATP-dependent protease binding subunit/heat shock protein, hydantoin utilization protein A, seryl-tRNA synthetase, molybdenum ABC transporter ModD, and hypothetical proteins. This study suggests that H. pylori strains express/repress protein variation, not only in terms of the virulence proteins, but also in terms of physiological proteins, when they infect a human host. The difference of protein expression levels between H. pylori strains isolated from gastric cancer and gastritis may be the initiator of inflammation, and result in the different clinical presentation. In this preliminary study, we report seven differential proteins between strains, with molecule weights from approximately 10 kDa to approximately 40 kDa. Further studies are needed to investigate those proteins and their function associated with H. pylori colonization and adaptation to host environment stress.

  17. Semen proteomics and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Meritxell; Soler-Ventura, Ada; Oliva, Rafael

    2017-06-06

    Semen is a complex body fluid containing an admixture of spermatozoa suspended in secretions from the testes and epididymis which are mixed at the time of ejaculation with secretions from other accessory sex glands such as the prostate and seminal vesicles. High-throughput technologies have revealed that, contrary to the idea that sperm cells are simply a silent delivery vehicle of the male genome to the oocyte, the sperm cells in fact provide both a specific epigenetically marked DNA together with a complex population of proteins and RNAs crucial for embryogenesis. Similarly, -omic technologies have also enlightened that seminal fluid seems to play a much greater role than simply being a medium to carry the spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract. In the present review, we briefly overview the sperm cell biology, consider the key issues in sperm and seminal fluid sample preparation for high-throughput proteomic studies, describe the current state of the sperm and seminal fluid proteomes generated by high-throughput proteomic technologies and provide new insights into the potential communication between sperm and seminal fluid. In addition, comparative proteomic studies open a window to explore the potential pathogenic mechanisms of infertility and the discovery of potential biomarkers with clinical significance. The review updates the numerous proteomics studies performed on semen, including spermatozoa and seminal fluid. In addition, an integrative analysis of the testes, sperm and seminal fluid proteomes is also included providing insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation, maturation and transit of spermatozoa. Furthermore, the compilation of several differential proteomic studies focused on male infertility reveals potential pathways disturbed in specific subtypes of male infertility and points out towards future research directions in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical diagnosis and typing of systemic amyloidosis in subcutaneous fat aspirates by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Julie A; Theis, Jason D; Dasari, Surendra; Mereuta, Oana M; Dispenzieri, Angela; Zeldenrust, Steven R; Gertz, Morie A; Kurtin, Paul J; Grogg, Karen L; Dogan, Ahmet

    2014-07-01

    Examination of abdominal subcutaneous fat aspirates is a practical, sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis. Here we describe the development and implementation of a clinical assay using mass spectrometry-based proteomics to type amyloidosis in subcutaneous fat aspirates. First, we validated the assay comparing amyloid-positive (n=43) and -negative (n=26) subcutaneous fat aspirates. The assay classified amyloidosis with 88% sensitivity and 96% specificity. We then implemented the assay as a clinical test, and analyzed 366 amyloid-positive subcutaneous fat aspirates in a 4-year period as part of routine clinical care. The assay had a sensitivity of 90%, and diverse amyloid types, including immunoglobulin light chain (74%), transthyretin (13%), serum amyloid A (%1), gelsolin (1%), and lysozyme (1%), were identified. Using bioinformatics, we identified a universal amyloid proteome signature, which has high sensitivity and specificity for amyloidosis similar to that of Congo red staining. We curated proteome databases which included variant proteins associated with systemic amyloidosis, and identified clonotypic immunoglobulin variable gene usage in immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, and the variant peptides in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis. In conclusion, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of subcutaneous fat aspirates offers a powerful tool for the diagnosis and typing of systemic amyloidosis. The assay reveals the underlying pathogenesis by identifying variable gene usage in immunoglobulin light chains and the variant peptides in hereditary amyloidosis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  20. Data from a targeted proteomics approach to discover biomarkers in saliva for the clinical diagnosis of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Orti

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the search for new biomarkers based on liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM proteomics profiling of whole saliva from patients with periodontitis compared to healthy subjects. The LC-MRM profiling approach is a new and innovative method that has already been validated for the absolute and multiplexed quantification of biomarkers in several diseases. The dataset for this study was produced using LC-MRM to monitor protein levels in a multiplex assay, it provides clinical information on salivary biomarkers of periodontitis. The data presented here is an extension of our recently published research article (Mertens et al., 2017 [1]. Keywords: Clinical chemistry, Mass spectrometry, Proteomics, Saliva biochemistry, Oral disease, Periodontitis

  1. Integration of technology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    It is an exciting time in clinical microbiology. New advances in technology are revolutionizing every aspect of the microbiology laboratory, from processing of specimens to bacterial identification; as a result, the microbiology laboratory is rapidly changing. With this change comes the challenge of selecting and implementing the technology that is most appropriate for each laboratory and clinical setting. This review focuses on issues surrounding implementation of new technology such that the improvements to clinical care are maximized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NCI Releases Video: Proteogenomics Research - On the Frontier of Precision Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the release of an educational video titled “Proteogenomics Research: On the Frontier of Precision Medicine."  Launched at the HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala Dinner, catalyzed in part by the Cancer Moonshot initiative and featuring as keynote speaker the 47th Vice President of the United States of America Joseph R.

  3. Best Performers Announced for the NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce that teams led by Jaewoo Kang (Korea University), and Yuanfang Guan with Hongyang Li (University of Michigan) as the best performers of the NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge. Over 500 participants from 20 countries registered for the Challenge, which offered $25,000 in cash awards contributed by the NVIDIA Foundation through its Compute the Cure initiative.

  4. Proteomic profiling in multiple sclerosis clinical courses reveals potential biomarkers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Liguori

    Full Text Available The aim of our project was to perform an exploratory analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteomic profiles of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients, collected in different phases of their clinical course, in order to investigate the existence of peculiar profiles characterizing the different MS phenotypes. The study was carried out on 24 Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS, 16 Relapsing Remitting (RR MS, 11 Progressive (Pr MS patients. The CSF samples were analysed using the Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer in linear mode geometry and in delayed extraction mode (m/z range: 1000-25000 Da. Peak lists were imported for normalization and statistical analysis. CSF data were correlated with demographic, clinical and MRI parameters. The evaluation of MALDI-TOF spectra revealed 348 peak signals with relative intensity ≥ 1% in the study range. The peak intensity of the signals corresponding to Secretogranin II and Protein 7B2 were significantly upregulated in RRMS patients compared to PrMS (p<0.05, whereas the signals of Fibrinogen and Fibrinopeptide A were significantly downregulated in CIS compared to PrMS patients (p<0.04. Additionally, the intensity of the Tymosin β4 peak was the only signal to be significantly discriminated between the CIS and RRMS patients (p = 0.013. Although with caution due to the relatively small size of the study populations, and considering that not all the findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, in our opinion this mass spectrometry evaluation confirms that this technique may provide useful and important information to improve our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of MS.

  5. Urinary proteomic diagnosis of coronary artery disease: identification and clinical validation in 623 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delles, Christian; Schiffer, Eric; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2010-01-01

    We studied the urinary proteome in a total of 623 individuals with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) in order to characterize multiple biomarkers that enable prediction of the presence of CAD....

  6. Studying Different Clinical Syndromes Of Paediatric Severe Malaria Using Plasma Proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-01-01

    challenges of studying the severe malaria syndromes using proteomics were the high complexity and variability among the samples. We hypothesized that hepatic injury and nitric oxide play roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria and respiratory

  7. NCI Blog Post: CPTAC, the Complementary Sibling of TCGA (An Interview with Dr. Henry Rodriguez about NCI’s Proteomics Program) | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is proteomics? Proteomics is a highly automated and rapid method for measuring all the proteins in a biological sample. Proteins are the molecules that actually do most of the work inside a cell. When researchers develop cancer drugs, those drugs typically target proteins, so scientists and clinicians really have to understand what the proteins are doing. Proteomics researchers are now able to measure up to 10,000 proteins per tumor sample.

  8. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Effective use of technology in clinical supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical supervision is integral to continuing professional development of health professionals. With advances in technology, clinical supervision too can be undertaken using mediums such as videoconference, email and teleconference. This mode of clinical supervision is termed as telesupervision. While telesupervision could be useful in any context, its value is amplified for health professionals working in rural and remote areas where access to supervisors within the local work environment is often diminished. While telesupervision offers innovative means to undertake clinical supervision, there remain gaps in the literature in terms of its parameters of use in clinical practice. This article outlines ten evidence-informed, practical tips stemming from a review of the literature that will enable health care stakeholders to use technology effectively and efficiently while undertaking clinical supervision. By highlighting the “how to” aspect, telesupervision can be delivered in the right way, to the right health professional, at the right time.

  10. Blockchain technology for improving clinical research quality

    OpenAIRE

    Benchoufi, Mehdi; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Reproducibility, data sharing, personal data privacy concerns and patient enrolment in clinical trials are huge medical challenges for contemporary clinical research. A new technology, Blockchain, may be a key to addressing these challenges and should draw the attention of the whole clinical research community. Blockchain brings the Internet to its definitive decentralisation goal. The core principle of Blockchain is that any service relying on trusted third parties can be built in a transpar...

  11. A proteomic network approach across the ALS-FTD disease spectrum resolves clinical phenotypes and genetic vulnerability in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Mfon E; Dammer, Eric B; Dai, Jingting; Duong, Duc M; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Gearing, Marla; Glass, Jonathan D; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative diseases with overlap in clinical presentation, neuropathology, and genetic underpinnings. The molecular basis for the overlap of these disorders is not well established. We performed a comparative unbiased mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of frontal cortical tissues from postmortem cases clinically defined as ALS, FTD, ALS and FTD (ALS/FTD), and controls. We also included a subset of patients with the C9orf72 expansion mutation, the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD Our systems-level analysis of the brain proteome integrated both differential expression and co-expression approaches to assess the relationship of these differences to clinical and pathological phenotypes. Weighted co-expression network analysis revealed 15 modules of co-expressed proteins, eight of which were significantly different across the ALS-FTD disease spectrum. These included modules associated with RNA binding proteins, synaptic transmission, and inflammation with cell-type specificity that showed correlation with TDP-43 pathology and cognitive dysfunction. Modules were also examined for their overlap with TDP-43 protein-protein interactions, revealing one module enriched with RNA-binding proteins and other causal ALS genes that increased in FTD/ALS and FTD cases. A module enriched with astrocyte and microglia proteins was significantly increased in ALS cases carrying the C9orf72 mutation compared to sporadic ALS cases, suggesting that the genetic expansion is associated with inflammation in the brain even without clinical evidence of dementia. Together, these findings highlight the utility of integrative systems-level proteomic approaches to resolve clinical phenotypes and genetic mechanisms underlying the ALS-FTD disease spectrum in human brain. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2 involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters.

  13. Deep imaging: how much of the proteome does current top-down technology already resolve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise P Wright

    Full Text Available Effective proteome analyses are based on interplay between resolution and detection. It had been claimed that resolution was the main factor limiting the use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Improved protein detection now indicates that this is unlikely to be the case. Using a highly refined protocol, the rat brain proteome was extracted, resolved, and detected. In order to overcome the stain saturation threshold, high abundance protein species were excised from the gel following standard imaging. Gels were then imaged again using longer exposure times, enabling detection of lower abundance, less intensely stained protein species. This resulted in a significant enhancement in the detection of resolved proteins, and a slightly modified digestion protocol enabled effective identification by standard mass spectrometric methods. The data indicate that the resolution required for comprehensive proteome analyses is already available, can assess multiple samples in parallel, and preserve critical information concerning post-translational modifications. Further optimization of staining and detection methods promises additional improvements to this economical, widely accessible and effective top-down approach to proteome analysis.

  14. Technological advances for deciphering the complexity of psychiatric disorders: merging proteomics with cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Guest, Paul C; Lago, Santiago G; Bahn, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Proteomic studies have increased our understanding of the molecular pathways affected in psychiatric disorders. Mass spectrometry and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses of post-mortem brain samples from psychiatric patients have revealed effects on synaptic, cytoskeletal, antioxidant and mitochondrial protein networks. Multiplex immunoassay profiling studies have found alterations in hormones, growth factors, transport and inflammation-related proteins in serum and plasma from living first-onset patients. Despite these advances, there are still difficulties in translating these findings into platforms for improved treatment of patients and for discovery of new drugs with better efficacy and side effect profiles. This review describes how the next phase of proteomic investigations in psychiatry should include stringent replication studies for validation of biomarker candidates and functional follow-up studies which can be used to test the impact on physiological function. All biomarker candidates should now be tested in series with traditional and emerging cell biological approaches. This should include investigations of the effects of post-translational modifications, protein dynamics and network analyses using targeted proteomic approaches. Most importantly, there is still an urgent need for development of disease-relevant cellular models for improved translation of proteomic findings into a means of developing novel drug treatments for patients with these life-altering disorders.

  15. Proteomic landscape in Central and Eastern Europe: the 9th Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference, Poznań, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Marczak, Łukasz; Łuczak, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej; Widlak, Piotr; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Every year since 2007, the Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) has excelled in representing state-of-the-art proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe, and linking it to international institutions worldwide. Its mission remains to contribute to all approaches of proteomics including traditional and often-revisited methodologies as well as the latest technological achievements in clinical, quantitative and structural proteomics with a view to systems biology of a variety of processes. The 9th CEEPC was held from June 15th to 18th, 2015, at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań, Poland. The scientific program stimulated exchange of proteomic knowledge whilst the spectacular venue of the conference allowed participants to enjoy the cobblestoned historical city of Poznań.

  16. A draft map of the human ovarian proteome for tissue engineering and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouni, Emna; Vertommen, Didier; Chiti, Maria Costanza; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; Amorim, Christiani Andrade

    2018-02-23

    Fertility preservation research in women today is increasingly taking advantage of bioengineering techniques to develop new biomimetic materials and solutions to safeguard ovarian cell function and microenvironment in vitro and in vivo. However, available data on the human ovary are limited and fundamental differences between animal models and humans are hampering researchers in their quest for more extensive knowledge of human ovarian physiology and key reproductive proteins that need to be preserved. We therefore turned to multi-dimensional label-free mass spectrometry to analyze human ovarian cortex, as it is a high-throughput and conclusive technique providing information on the proteomic composition of complex tissues like the ovary. In-depth proteomic profiling through two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, western blot, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, and data mining helped us to confidently identify 1,508 proteins. Moreover, our method allowed us to chart the most complete representation so far of the ovarian matrisome, defined as the ensemble of extracellular matrix proteins and associated factors, including more than 80 proteins. In conclusion, this study will provide a better understanding of ovarian proteomics, with a detailed characterization of the ovarian follicle microenvironment, in order to enable bioengineers to create biomimetic scaffolds for transplantation and three-dimensional in vitro culture. By publishing our proteomic data, we also hope to contribute to accelerating biomedical research into ovarian health and disease in general. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Blockchain technology for improving clinical research quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchoufi, Mehdi; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-07-19

    Reproducibility, data sharing, personal data privacy concerns and patient enrolment in clinical trials are huge medical challenges for contemporary clinical research. A new technology, Blockchain, may be a key to addressing these challenges and should draw the attention of the whole clinical research community.Blockchain brings the Internet to its definitive decentralisation goal. The core principle of Blockchain is that any service relying on trusted third parties can be built in a transparent, decentralised, secure "trustless" manner at the top of the Blockchain (in fact, there is trust, but it is hardcoded in the Blockchain protocol via a complex cryptographic algorithm). Therefore, users have a high degree of control over and autonomy and trust of the data and its integrity. Blockchain allows for reaching a substantial level of historicity and inviolability of data for the whole document flow in a clinical trial. Hence, it ensures traceability, prevents a posteriori reconstruction and allows for securely automating the clinical trial through what are called Smart Contracts. At the same time, the technology ensures fine-grained control of the data, its security and its shareable parameters, for a single patient or group of patients or clinical trial stakeholders.In this commentary article, we explore the core functionalities of Blockchain applied to clinical trials and we illustrate concretely its general principle in the context of consent to a trial protocol. Trying to figure out the potential impact of Blockchain implementations in the setting of clinical trials will shed new light on how modern clinical trial methods could evolve and benefit from Blockchain technologies in order to tackle the aforementioned challenges.

  18. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Plasma membrane proteomics and its application in clinical cancer biomarker discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins that are exposed on the cell surface have important biological functions, such as signaling into and out of the cells, ion transport, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression level of many of the plasma membrane proteins involved in these key functions...... targeted by protein drugs, such as human antibodies, that have enhanced survival of several groups of cancer patients. The combination of novel analytical approaches and subcellular fractionation procedures has made it possible to study the plasma membrane proteome in more detail, which will elucidate...... cancer biology, particularly metastasis, and guide future development of novel drug targets. The technical advances in plasma membrane proteomics and the consequent biological revelations will be discussed herein. Many of the advances have been made using cancer cell lines, but because the main goal...

  20. Correspondence between salivary proteomic pattern and clinical course in primary Sjögren syndrome and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldini Chiara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last years human proteomic has represented a promising tool to promote the communication between basic and clinical science. Methods To explore the correspondence between salivary proteomic profile and clinical response, herein, we used a proteomic approach to analyse the whole saliva of a patient with primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS and non-Hodgkin's-MALT type parotid lymphoma before, during and after a standard treatment with cyclophosphamide (CTX and rituximab (RTX. To identify any discriminatory therapeutic salivary biomarker patient's whole saliva was collected at the baseline, after the fourth infusion of rituximab, and on remission and analysed combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Results Proteomic results obtained from the comparison of salivary samples indicated several qualitative and quantitative modifications in the salivary expression of putative albumin, immunoglobulin J chain, Ig kappa chain C region, alpha-1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin and Ig alpha-1 chain C region. Conclusion This study suggests that clinical and functional changes of the salivary glands driven by autoimmune and lymphoproliferative processes might be reflected in patients' whole saliva proteins, shedding new light on the potential usefulness of salivary proteomic analysis in the identification of prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers for patients with pSS and non Hodgkin's lymphomas.

  1. Uses of internet technology in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, I.

    2001-01-01

    The practice of medicine has extended itself to vast areas and requires active clinicians to systematize and organize their workload through the use of the most up-to-date digital and computer communication technologies. Computerization and worldwide accessibility of information has especially provided great assistance in this regard. The explosive growth of medical information increases the need for the use of these new methods of organizing and accessing data. This article briefly summarizes a few of the vital tools that internet technology has provided clinical practice, with the aid of basic concepts of internet, database systems, hospital systems and data security and reliability. (author)

  2. Current status, new frontiers and challenges in radiation biodosimetry using cytogenetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenech, Michael, E-mail: michael.fenech@csiro.au [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Gate 13 Kintore Avenue, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    Biodosimetric methods for determining exposure dose in individuals following a radiation accident are important for the health management of the exposed cohort and prioritisation of high dose exposure cases to receive emergency medical treatment. This brief review provides a succinct outline of (i) the current status of standard cytogenetic methods used in radiation biodosimetry; (ii) development of high-throughput systems for current standard cytogenetic methods; (iii) emerging minimally invasive methods; (iv) the impact of nutrition and genotype on observed dose-response relationships and (v) new frontiers in biodosimetry using molecular biology techniques such as transcriptomics and proteomics.

  3. Respiratory Proteomics Today: Are Technological Advances for the Identification of Biomarker Signatures Catching up with Their Promise? A Critical Review of the Literature in the Decade 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglio, Simona; Stolk, Jan; Iadarola, Paolo; Giuliano, Serena; Luisetti, Maurizio; Salvini, Roberta; Fumagalli, Marco; Bardoni, Anna

    2014-01-22

    To improve the knowledge on a variety of severe disorders, research has moved from the analysis of individual proteins to the investigation of all proteins expressed by a tissue/organism. This global proteomic approach could prove very useful: (i) for investigating the biochemical pathways involved in disease; (ii) for generating hypotheses; or (iii) as a tool for the identification of proteins differentially expressed in response to the disease state. Proteomics has not been used yet in the field of respiratory research as extensively as in other fields, only a few reproducible and clinically applicable molecular markers, which can assist in diagnosis, having been currently identified. The continuous advances in both instrumentation and methodology, which enable sensitive and quantitative proteomic analyses in much smaller amounts of biological material than before, will hopefully promote the identification of new candidate biomarkers in this area. The aim of this report is to critically review the application over the decade 2004-2013 of very sophisticated technologies to the study of respiratory disorders. The observed changes in protein expression profiles from tissues/fluids of patients affected by pulmonary disorders opens the route for the identification of novel pathological mediators of these disorders.

  4. PODCAST: From Lost in Translation to Paradise Found: Enabling Protein Biomarker Method Transfer by Mass Spectrometry | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Translation of novel biomarkers into clinical care for the evaluation of therapeutic safety and efficacy has been slow, partly attributable to the cost and complexity of immunoassay development.  The potential for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to streamline the translation of novel protein biomarkers is profound.  Drs. Henry Rodriguez and Andrew Hoofnagle discuss what the future may be for clinical proteomics. This is an American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) podcast.

  5. Multidimensional electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) for quantitative analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome in clinical and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loroch, Stefan; Schommartz, Tim; Brune, Wolfram; Zahedi, René Peiman; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics have become key disciplines in understanding cellular processes. Fundamental research can be done using cell culture providing researchers with virtually infinite sample amounts. In contrast, clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research is often restricted to minute sample amounts and requires an efficient analysis with only micrograms of protein. To address this issue, we generated a highly sensitive workflow for combined LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics by refining an ERLIC-based 2D phosphoproteomics workflow into an ERLIC-based 3D workflow covering the global proteome as well. The resulting 3D strategy was successfully used for an in-depth quantitative analysis of both, the proteome and the phosphoproteome of murine cytomegalovirus-infected mouse fibroblasts, a model system for host cell manipulation by a virus. In a 2-plex SILAC experiment with 150 μg of a tryptic digest per condition, the 3D strategy enabled the quantification of ~75% more proteins and even ~134% more peptides compared to the 2D strategy. Additionally, we could quantify ~50% more phosphoproteins by non-phosphorylated peptides, concurrently yielding insights into changes on the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Beside its sensitivity, our novel three-dimensional ERLIC-strategy has the potential for semi-automated sample processing rendering it a suitable future perspective for clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Ion beam therapy fundamentals, technology, clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book provides a detailed, up-to-date account of the basics, the technology, and the clinical use of ion beams for radiation therapy. Theoretical background, technical components, and patient treatment schemes are delineated by the leading experts that helped to develop this field from a research niche to its current highly sophisticated and powerful clinical treatment level used to the benefit of cancer patients worldwide. Rather than being a side-by-side collection of articles, this book consists of related chapters. It is a common achievement by 76 experts from around the world. Their expertise reflects the diversity of the field with radiation therapy, medical and accelerator physics, radiobiology, computer science, engineering, and health economics. The book addresses a similarly broad audience ranging from professionals that need to know more about this novel treatment modality or consider to enter the field of ion beam therapy as a researcher. However, it is also written for the interested public an...

  7. Emerging Technologies for the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Blake W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this review we examine the literature related to emerging technologies that will help to reshape the clinical microbiology laboratory. These topics include nucleic acid amplification tests such as isothermal and point-of-care molecular diagnostics, multiplexed panels for syndromic diagnosis, digital PCR, next-generation sequencing, and automation of molecular tests. We also review matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry methods and their role in identification of microorganisms. Lastly, we review the shift to liquid-based microbiology and the integration of partial and full laboratory automation that are beginning to impact the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:25278575

  8. Cytosolic proteome profiling of aminoglycosides resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates using MALDI-TOF/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Sharma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB is the consequence of the failure of second line TB treatment. Aminoglycosides are the important second line anti-TB drugs used to treat the multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. Main known mechanism of action of aminoglycosides is to inhibit the protein synthesis by inhibiting the normal functioning of ribosome. Primary target of aminoglycosides are the ribosomal RNA and its associated proteins. Various mechanisms have been proposed for aminoglycosides resistance but still some are unsolved. As proteins are involved in most of the biological processes, these act as a potential diagnostic markers and drug targets. In the present study we analyzed the purely cytosolic proteome of amikacin (AK and kanamycin (KM resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Twenty protein spots were found to have over expressed in resistant isolates and were identified. Among these Rv3208A, Rv2623, Rv1360, Rv2140c, Rv1636 and Rv2185c are six proteins with unknown functions or undefined role. Docking results showed that AK and KM binds to the conserved domain (DUF, USP-A, Luciferase, PEBP and Polyketidecyclase/dehydrase domain of these hypothetical proteins and over expression of these proteins might neutralize/modulate the effect of drug molecules. TBPred and GPS-PUP predicted cytoplasmic nature and potential pupylation sites within these identified proteins respectively. String analysis also suggested that over expressed proteins along with their interactive partners might be involved in aminoglycosides resistance. Cumulative effect of these over expressed proteins could be involved in AK and KM resistance by mitigating the toxicity, repression of drug target and neutralizing affect. These findings need further exploitation for the expansion of newer therapeutics or diagnostic markers against AK and KM resistance so that an extreme condition like XDR-TB can

  9. Cytosolic Proteome Profiling of Aminoglycosides Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates Using MALDI-TOF/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divakar; Lata, Manju; Singh, Rananjay; Deo, Nirmala; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is the consequence of the failure of second line TB treatment. Aminoglycosides are the important second line anti-TB drugs used to treat the multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Main known mechanism of action of aminoglycosides is to inhibit the protein synthesis by inhibiting the normal functioning of ribosome. Primary target of aminoglycosides are the ribosomal RNA and its associated proteins. Various mechanisms have been proposed for aminoglycosides resistance but still some are unsolved. As proteins are involved in most of the biological processes, these act as a potential diagnostic markers and drug targets. In the present study we analyzed the purely cytosolic proteome of amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Twenty protein spots were found to have over expressed in resistant isolates and were identified. Among these Rv3208A, Rv2623, Rv1360, Rv2140c, Rv1636, and Rv2185c are six proteins with unknown functions or undefined role. Docking results showed that AK and KM binds to the conserved domain (DUF, USP-A, Luciferase, PEBP and Polyketidecyclase/dehydrase domain) of these hypothetical proteins and over expression of these proteins might neutralize/modulate the effect of drug molecules. TBPred and GPS-PUP predicted cytoplasmic nature and potential pupylation sites within these identified proteins, respectively. String analysis also suggested that over expressed proteins along with their interactive partners might be involved in aminoglycosides resistance. Cumulative effect of these over expressed proteins could be involved in AK and KM resistance by mitigating the toxicity, repression of drug target and neutralizing affect. These findings need further exploitation for the expansion of newer therapeutics or diagnostic markers against AK and KM resistance so that an extreme condition like XDR-TB can be prevented.

  10. Quantitative proteomic analysis of ofloxacin resistant and sensitive clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-yu HUANG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the proteins related to ofloxacin (OFX resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. Methods Standard MTB H37Rv strain, clinical isolates of OFX resistant strain (OFXR and sensitive strain (OFXS were obtained from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and they were cultured in Sauton's medium, and then inactivated by 60Co. Whole cellular proteins were extracted from OFXR, OFXS and H37Rv strain of MTB, respectively. The peptides were labeled, separated and identified by isobaric tags of relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ combined with Nano LCMS/MS technology. Results One hundred and seventy-five and 134 differential expression proteins were identified in MTB OFXR compared with MTB OFXS and H37Rv, respectively. One hundred and four common differential expression proteins were identified in MTB OFXR compared with both MTB OFXS and H37Rv. The isoelectric point and theoretic relative molecular mass of differential expression proteins were widely distributed. The majority of the common differential expression proteins were involved in intermediary metabolism, respiration, and lipid metabolism. Twelve common differential expression proteins showed significant differences (the ratio>1.2 or <0.55 in MTB OFXR, including Rv0106, Rv0895, Rv2185c, Rv3248c and Rv3841 up-regulation and Rv2524c, Rv2986c, Rv3118 and Rv3597c down-regulation. Conclusion iTRAQ has been used to identify the common differential expression proteins in MTB OFXR compared with both MTB OFXS and H37Rv, which provides a basis for further study of the mechanism of OFX-resistance. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.09.06

  11. Proteomic workflow for analysis of archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded clinical samples to a depth of 10 000 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Duś, Kamila; Mann, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded clinical samples represent a very diverse source of material for proteomic investigation of diseases, often with follow-up patient information. Here, we describe an analytical workflow for analysis of laser-capture microdissected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples that allows studying proteomes to a depth of 10 000 proteins per sample. The workflow involves lysis of tissue in SDS-containing buffer, detergent removal, and consecutive digestion of the proteins with two enzymes by the multienzyme digestion filter-aided sample preparation method. Resulting peptides are fractionated by pipette-tip based strong anion exchange into six fractions and analyzed by LC-MS/MS on a bench top quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Analysis of the data using the MaxQuant software resulted in the identification of 9502 ± 28 protein groups per a 110 nL sample of microdissected cells from human colonic adenoma. This depth of proteome analysis enables systemic insights into the organization of the adenoma cells and an estimation of the abundances of known biomarkers. It also allows the identification of proteins expressed from tumor suppressors, oncogenes, and other key players in the development and progression of the colorectal cancer. Our proteomic platform can be used for quantitative comparisons between samples representing different stages of diseases and thus can be applied to the discovery of biomarkers or drug targets. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Establishing research strategies, methodologies and technologies to link genomics and proteomics to seagrass productivity, community metabolism, and ecosystem carbon fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Silvia; Björk, M; Beer, S; Felisberto, P; Gobert, S; Procaccini, G; Runcie, J; Silva, J; Borges, A V; Brunet, C; Buapet, P; Champenois, W; Costa, M M; D'Esposito, D; Gullström, M; Lejeune, P; Lepoint, G; Olivé, I; Rasmusson, L M; Richir, J; Ruocco, M; Serra, I A; Spadafora, A; Santos, Rui

    2013-01-01

    A complete understanding of the mechanistic basis of marine ecosystem functioning is only possible through integrative and interdisciplinary research. This enables the prediction of change and possibly the mitigation of the consequences of anthropogenic impacts. One major aim of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action ES0609 "Seagrasses productivity. From genes to ecosystem management," is the calibration and synthesis of various methods and the development of innovative techniques and protocols for studying seagrass ecosystems. During 10 days, 20 researchers representing a range of disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, botany, ecology, oceanography, and underwater acoustics) gathered at The Station de Recherches Sous-marines et Océanographiques (STARESO, Corsica) to study together the nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow. STARESO is located in an oligotrophic area classified as "pristine site" where environmental disturbances caused by anthropogenic pressure are exceptionally low. The healthy P. oceanica meadow, which grows in front of the research station, colonizes the sea bottom from the surface to 37 m depth. During the study, genomic and proteomic approaches were integrated with ecophysiological and physical approaches with the aim of understanding changes in seagrass productivity and metabolism at different depths and along daily cycles. In this paper we report details on the approaches utilized and we forecast the potential of the data that will come from this synergistic approach not only for P. oceanica but for seagrasses in general.

  13. Proteome-based bacterial identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A revolutionary shift in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumio

    2015-06-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms, a prerequisite for appropriate patient care and infection control, is a critical function of any clinical microbiology laboratory. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a quick and reliable method for identification of microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast, molds, and mycobacteria. Indeed, there has been a revolutionary shift in clinical diagnostic microbiology. In the present review, the state of the art and advantages of MALDI-TOF MS-based bacterial identification are described. The potential of this innovative technology for use in strain typing and detection of antibiotic resistance is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  15. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    The datasets presented in this article are related to the research articles entitled “Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis: A Proteome Analysis of Intestinal Biopsies” (Bennike et al., 2015 [1]), and “Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa” (Bennike et al., 2017 [2])...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  16. Hemodiafiltration history, technology, and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio; Cruz, Dinna

    2007-07-01

    Hemodiafiltration (HDF) is an extracorporeal renal-replacement technique using a highly permeable membrane, in which diffusion and convection are conveniently combined to enhance solute removal in a wide spectrum of molecular weights. In this modality, ultrafiltration exceeds the desired fluid loss in the patient, and replacement fluid must be administered to achieve the target fluid balance. Over the years, various HDF variants have emerged, including acetate-free biofiltration, high-volume HDF, internal HDF, paired-filtration dialysis, middilution HDF, double high-flux HDF, push-pull HDF, and online HDF. Recent technology has allowed online production of large volumes of microbiologically ultrapure fluid for reinfusion, greatly simplifying the practice of HDF. Several advantages of HDF over purely diffusive hemodialysis techniques have been described in the literature, including a greater clearance of urea, phosphate, beta(2)-microglobulin and other larger solutes, reduction in dialysis hypotension, and improved anemia management. Although randomized controlled trials have failed to show a survival benefit of HDF, recent data from large observational studies suggest a positive effect of HDF on survival. This article provides a brief review of the history of HDF, the various HDF techniques, and summary of their clinical effects.

  17. Proteomics in pulmonary research: selected methodical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Petrek

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent years witness rapid expansion of applications of proteomics to clinical research including non-malignant lung disorders. These developments bring along the need for standardisation of proteomic experiments. This paper briefly reviews basic methodical aspects of appliedproteomic studies using SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform as example but also emphasizes general aspects of quality assurance in proteomics. Key-words: lung proteome, quality assurance, SELDI-TOF MS

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based Serum Proteomics for Biomarker Discovery and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Santosh D; Moulder, Robert; Kouvonen, Petri; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Goodlett, David R

    2017-01-01

    Blood protein measurements are used frequently in the clinic in the assessment of patient health. Nevertheless, there remains the need for new biomarkers with better diagnostic specificities. With the advent of improved technology for bioanalysis and the growth of biobanks including collections from specific disease risk cohorts, the plasma proteome has remained a target of proteomics research toward the characterization of disease-related biomarkers. The following protocol presents a workflow for serum/plasma proteomics including details of sample preparation both with and without immunoaffinity depletion of the most abundant plasma proteins and methodology for selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry validation.

  19. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  20. Open Source Software Tool Skyline Reaches Key Agreement with Mass Spectrometer Vendors | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full proteomics analysis of a small tumor sample (similar in mass to a few grains of rice) produces well over 500 megabytes of unprocessed "raw" data when analyzed on a mass spectrometer (MS). Thus, for every proteomics experiment there is a vast amount of raw data that must be analyzed and interrogated in order to extract biological information. Moreover, the raw data output from different MS vendors are generally in different formats inhibiting the ability of labs to productively work together.

  1. Biomarker discovery in mass spectrometry-based urinary proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Samuel; Hao, Ling; Ricke, William A; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Urinary proteomics has become one of the most attractive topics in disease biomarker discovery. MS-based proteomic analysis has advanced continuously and emerged as a prominent tool in the field of clinical bioanalysis. However, only few protein biomarkers have made their way to validation and clinical practice. Biomarker discovery is challenged by many clinical and analytical factors including, but not limited to, the complexity of urine and the wide dynamic range of endogenous proteins in the sample. This article highlights promising technologies and strategies in the MS-based biomarker discovery process, including study design, sample preparation, protein quantification, instrumental platforms, and bioinformatics. Different proteomics approaches are discussed, and progresses in maximizing urinary proteome coverage and standardization are emphasized in this review. MS-based urinary proteomics has great potential in the development of noninvasive diagnostic assays in the future, which will require collaborative efforts between analytical scientists, systems biologists, and clinicians. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Proteomics Big Challenge for Biomarkers and New Drug-Targets Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Rocco; Paduano, Sergio; Preianò, Mariaimmacolata; Terracciano, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    In the modern process of drug discovery, clinical, functional and chemical proteomics can converge and integrate synergies. Functional proteomics explores and elucidates the components of pathways and their interactions which, when deregulated, lead to a disease condition. This knowledge allows the design of strategies to target multiple pathways with combinations of pathway-specific drugs, which might increase chances of success and reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. Chemical proteomics, by analyzing the drug interactome, strongly contributes to accelerate the process of new druggable targets discovery. In the research area of clinical proteomics, proteome and peptidome mass spectrometry-profiling of human bodily fluid (plasma, serum, urine and so on), as well as of tissue and of cells, represents a promising tool for novel biomarker and eventually new druggable targets discovery. In the present review we provide a survey of current strategies of functional, chemical and clinical proteomics. Major issues will be presented for proteomic technologies used for the discovery of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis and identification of new drug targets. PMID:23203042

  3. Transformative Impact of Proteomics on Cardiovascular Health and Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Merry L; Mayr, Manuel; Gomes, Aldrin V; Delles, Christian; Arrell, D Kent; Murphy, Anne M; Lange, Richard A; Costello, Catherine E; Jin, Yu-Fang; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Sam, Flora; Terzic, Andre; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Srinivas, Pothur R

    2015-09-01

    The year 2014 marked the 20th anniversary of the coining of the term proteomics. The purpose of this scientific statement is to summarize advances over this period that have catalyzed our capacity to address the experimental, translational, and clinical implications of proteomics as applied to cardiovascular health and disease and to evaluate the current status of the field. Key successes that have energized the field are delineated; opportunities for proteomics to drive basic science research, facilitate clinical translation, and establish diagnostic and therapeutic healthcare algorithms are discussed; and challenges that remain to be solved before proteomic technologies can be readily translated from scientific discoveries to meaningful advances in cardiovascular care are addressed. Proteomics is the result of disruptive technologies, namely, mass spectrometry and database searching, which drove protein analysis from 1 protein at a time to protein mixture analyses that enable large-scale analysis of proteins and facilitate paradigm shifts in biological concepts that address important clinical questions. Over the past 20 years, the field of proteomics has matured, yet it is still developing rapidly. The scope of this statement will extend beyond the reaches of a typical review article and offer guidance on the use of next-generation proteomics for future scientific discovery in the basic research laboratory and clinical settings. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José; Gromova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis...... the translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens....

  5. Sample preparation and fractionation for proteome analysis and cancer biomarker discovery by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2009-03-01

    Sample preparation and fractionation technologies are one of the most crucial processes in proteomic analysis and biomarker discovery in solubilized samples. Chromatographic or electrophoretic proteomic technologies are also available for separation of cellular protein components. There are, however, considerable limitations in currently available proteomic technologies as none of them allows for the analysis of the entire proteome in a simple step because of the large number of peptides, and because of the wide concentration dynamic range of the proteome in clinical blood samples. The results of any undertaken experiment depend on the condition of the starting material. Therefore, proper experimental design and pertinent sample preparation is essential to obtain meaningful results, particularly in comparative clinical proteomics in which one is looking for minor differences between experimental (diseased) and control (nondiseased) samples. This review discusses problems associated with general and specialized strategies of sample preparation and fractionation, dealing with samples that are solution or suspension, in a frozen tissue state, or formalin-preserved tissue archival samples, and illustrates how sample processing might influence detection with mass spectrometric techniques. Strategies that dramatically improve the potential for cancer biomarker discovery in minimally invasive, blood-collected human samples are also presented.

  6. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  7. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40...... oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell......-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were...

  8. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  9. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    patients (Morgan et al., 2012; Abraham and Medzhitov, 2011; Bennike, 2014) [8–10. Therefore, we characterized the proteome of colon mucosa biopsies from 10 inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, 11 gastrointestinal healthy rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and 10 controls. We...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  10. ESWT for tendinopathy: technology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Henk; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Schie, Hans; Zwerver, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    The general consensus that tendinopathy, at least in the chronic stage, is mainly a degenerative condition and inflammation plays a minor role has led to a shift from treatments that target inflammation towards treatment options that promote regeneration. One of these treatments is extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), a physical therapy modality that uses pressure waves to treat tendinopathy. This review was undertaken to give an overview of the literature concerning this treatment, and special attention is given to the differences between focused and radial ESWT. A narrative description of wave characteristics, generation methods and in vitro effects of ESWT is given. The literature on ESWT as a treatment for one common tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, was systematically reviewed. Waves that are generated for focused and radial ESWT have very different physical characteristics. It is unclear how these characteristics are related to clinical effectiveness. Studies into the biological effects of ESWT have mainly used focused shockwave therapy, showing a number of effects of shockwaves on biological tissue. The systematic review of studies into the clinical effects of ESWT for patellar tendinopathy showed conflicting evidence for its effectiveness. Physical characteristics of focused and radial waves differ substantially, but effect on clinical effectiveness is unclear. Whereas in vitro studies often show the effects of ESWT on tendon tissue, results of clinical studies are inconsistent. Based on the review of the literature, suggestions are given for the use of ESWT in clinical practice regarding timing and treatment parameters.

  11. Clinical operations generation next… The age of technology and outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkar, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Huge cost pressures and the need to drive faster approvals has driven a technology transformation in the clinical trial (CT) industry. The CT industry is thus leveraging mobile data, cloud computing, social media, robotic automation, and electronic source to drive efficiencies in a big way. Outsourcing of clinical operations support services to technology companies with a clinical edge is gaining tremendous importance. This paper provides an overview of current technology trends, applicable Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, basic challenges that the pharma industry is facing in trying to implement such changes and its shift towards outsourcing these services to enable it to focus on site operations. PMID:26623386

  12. Clinical operations generation next… The age of technology and outsourcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Temkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Huge cost pressures and the need to drive faster approvals has driven a technology transformation in the clinical trial (CT industry. The CT industry is thus leveraging mobile data, cloud computing, social media, robotic automation, and electronic source to drive efficiencies in a big way. Outsourcing of clinical operations support services to technology companies with a clinical edge is gaining tremendous importance. This paper provides an overview of current technology trends, applicable Food and Drug Administration (FDA guidelines, basic challenges that the pharma industry is facing in trying to implement such changes and its shift towards outsourcing these services to enable it to focus on site operations.

  13. Clinical operations generation next… The age of technology and outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkar, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Huge cost pressures and the need to drive faster approvals has driven a technology transformation in the clinical trial (CT) industry. The CT industry is thus leveraging mobile data, cloud computing, social media, robotic automation, and electronic source to drive efficiencies in a big way. Outsourcing of clinical operations support services to technology companies with a clinical edge is gaining tremendous importance. This paper provides an overview of current technology trends, applicable Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, basic challenges that the pharma industry is facing in trying to implement such changes and its shift towards outsourcing these services to enable it to focus on site operations.

  14. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  15. Advanced microarray technologies for clinical diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Anke

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarrays become increasingly important in the field of clinical diagnostics. These microarrays, also called DNA chips, are small solid substrates, typically having a maximum surface area of a few cm2, onto which many spots are arrayed in a pre-determined pattern. Each of these spots contains

  16. [Technologies for Complex Intelligent Clinical Data Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Smirnov, I V; Devyatkin, D A; Shelmanov, A O; Vishneva, E A; Antonova, E V; Smirnov, V I

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the system for intelligent analysis of clinical information. Authors describe methods implemented in the system for clinical information retrieval, intelligent diagnostics of chronic diseases, patient's features importance and for detection of hidden dependencies between features. Results of the experimental evaluation of these methods are also presented. Healthcare facilities generate a large flow of both structured and unstructured data which contain important information about patients. Test results are usually retained as structured data but some data is retained in the form of natural language texts (medical history, the results of physical examination, and the results of other examinations, such as ultrasound, ECG or X-ray studies). Many tasks arising in clinical practice can be automated applying methods for intelligent analysis of accumulated structured array and unstructured data that leads to improvement of the healthcare quality. the creation of the complex system for intelligent data analysis in the multi-disciplinary pediatric center. Authors propose methods for information extraction from clinical texts in Russian. The methods are carried out on the basis of deep linguistic analysis. They retrieve terms of diseases, symptoms, areas of the body and drugs. The methods can recognize additional attributes such as "negation" (indicates that the disease is absent), "no patient" (indicates that the disease refers to the patient's family member, but not to the patient), "severity of illness", disease course", "body region to which the disease refers". Authors use a set of hand-drawn templates and various techniques based on machine learning to retrieve information using a medical thesaurus. The extracted information is used to solve the problem of automatic diagnosis of chronic diseases. A machine learning method for classification of patients with similar nosology and the methodfor determining the most informative patients'features are

  17. New Strategies and Challenges in Lung Proteomics and Metabolomics. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Russell P; Wendt, Chris H; Fessler, Michael B; Foster, Matthew W; Kelly, Rachel S; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Rogers, Angela J; Stringer, Kathleen A; Winston, Brent W

    2017-12-01

    This document presents the proceedings from the workshop entitled, "New Strategies and Challenges in Lung Proteomics and Metabolomics" held February 4th-5th, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. It was sponsored by the National Heart Lung Blood Institute, the American Thoracic Society, the Colorado Biological Mass Spectrometry Society, and National Jewish Health. The goal of this workshop was to convene, for the first time, relevant experts in lung proteomics and metabolomics to discuss and overcome specific challenges in these fields that are unique to the lung. The main objectives of this workshop were to identify, review, and/or understand: (1) emerging technologies in metabolomics and proteomics as applied to the study of the lung; (2) the unique composition and challenges of lung-specific biological specimens for metabolomic and proteomic analysis; (3) the diverse informatics approaches and databases unique to metabolomics and proteomics, with special emphasis on the lung; (4) integrative platforms across genetic and genomic databases that can be applied to lung-related metabolomic and proteomic studies; and (5) the clinical applications of proteomics and metabolomics. The major findings and conclusions of this workshop are summarized at the end of the report, and outline the progress and challenges that face these rapidly advancing fields.

  18. Application of virtual reality technology in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Dongquan; Shi, Jianping; Tian, Zongjun; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the application of virtual reality (VR) technology in clinical medicine, especially in surgical training, pain management and therapeutic treatment of mental illness. We introduce the common types of VR simulators and their operational principles in aforementioned fields. The clinical effects are also discussed. In almost every study that dealt with VR simulators, researchers have arrived at the same conclusion that both doctors and patients could benefit from this novel technology. Moreover, advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of VR technology in each field were discussed, and the future research directions were proposed.

  19. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation: Technology and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdunnur, Shane V; Kim, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a technique used to reanimate the diaphragm of patients with central nervous system etiologies of respiratory insufficiency. Current clinical indications include congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, spinal cord injury above C4, brain stem injury, and idiopathic severe sleep apnea. Presurgical evaluation ensures proper patient selection by validating the intact circuit from the phrenic nerve through alveolar oxygenation. The procedure involves placing leads around the phrenic nerves bilaterally and attaching these leads to radio receivers in a subcutaneous pocket. The rate and amplitude of the current is adjusted via an external radio transmitter. After implantation, each patient progresses through a conditioning phase that strengthens the diaphragm and progressively provides independence from the mechanical ventilator. Studies indicate that patients and families experience an improved quality of life and are satisfied with the results. Phrenic nerve stimulation provides a safe and effective means for reanimating the diaphragm for certain patients with respiratory insufficiency, providing independence from mechanical ventilation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kazuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis-related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance-related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will be

  1. Single-cell proteomics: potential implications for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavasso, Sonia; Gullaksen, Stein-Erik; Skavland, Jørn; Gjertsen, Bjørn T

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell proteomics in cancer is evolving and promises to provide more accurate diagnoses based on detailed molecular features of cells within tumors. This review focuses on technologies that allow for collection of complex data from single cells, but also highlights methods that are adaptable to routine cancer diagnostics. Current diagnostics rely on histopathological analysis, complemented by mutational detection and clinical imaging. Though crucial, the information gained is often not directly transferable to defined therapeutic strategies, and predicting therapy response in a patient is difficult. In cancer, cellular states revealed through perturbed intracellular signaling pathways can identify functional mutations recurrent in cancer subsets. Single-cell proteomics remains to be validated in clinical trials where serial samples before and during treatment can reveal excessive clonal evolution and therapy failure; its use in clinical trials is anticipated to ignite a diagnostic revolution that will better align diagnostics with the current biological understanding of cancer.

  2. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  3. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  4. A decade of proteomics accomplished! Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) celebrates its 10th Anniversary in Budapest, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Drahos, László; Vékey, Károly; Kovarova, Hana

    2017-07-01

    The Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) proudly celebrated its 10th Anniversary with an exciting scientific program inclusive of proteome, proteomics and systems biology in Budapest, Hungary. Since 2007, CEEPC has represented 'state-of the-art' proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe and these series of conferences have become a well-recognized event in the proteomic calendar. Fresher challenges and global healthcare issues such as ageing and chronic diseases are driving clinical and scientific research towards regenerative, reparative and personalized medicine. To this end, proteomics may enable diverse intertwining research fields to reach their end goals. CEEPC will endeavor to facilitate these goals.

  5. Rodriguez and Pennington Address Proteogenomics and Data Sharing in the Journal Cell | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine is an approach that allows doctors to understand how a patient's genetic profile may cause cancer to grow and spread, leading to a more personalized treatment strategy based on molecular characterization of a person's tumor. However, precision medicine as a genomics-based approach does not yet apply to all patients because genetic mutations do not always lead to changes of the corresponding proteins. Therefore, integrating genomics and proteomics data, or proteogenomics, presents as a new approach that may help make precision medicine a more effective treatment option for patients.

  6. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    No field in science and medicine today remains untouched by Big Data, and psychiatry is no exception. Proteomics is a Big Data technology and a next generation biomarker, supporting novel system diagnostics and therapeutics in psychiatry. Proteomics technology is, in fact, much older than genomics and dates to the 1970s, well before the launch of the international Human Genome Project. While the genome has long been framed as the master or "elite" executive molecule in cell biology, the proteome by contrast is humble. Yet the proteome is critical for life-it ensures the daily functioning of cells and whole organisms. In short, proteins are the blue-collar workers of biology, the down-to-earth molecules that we cannot live without. Since 2010, proteomics has found renewed meaning and international attention with the launch of the Human Proteome Project and the growing interest in Big Data technologies such as proteomics. This article presents an interdisciplinary technology foresight analysis and conceptualizes the terms "environtome" and "social proteome". We define "environtome" as the entire complement of elements external to the human host, from microbiome, ambient temperature and weather conditions to government innovation policies, stock market dynamics, human values, political power and social norms that collectively shape the human host spatially and temporally. The "social proteome" is the subset of the environtome that influences the transition of proteomics technology to innovative applications in society. The social proteome encompasses, for example, new reimbursement schemes and business innovation models for proteomics diagnostics that depart from the "once-a-life-time" genotypic tests and the anticipated hype attendant to context and time sensitive proteomics tests. Building on the "nesting principle" for governance of complex systems as discussed by Elinor Ostrom, we propose here a 3-tiered organizational architecture for Big Data science such as

  7. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  8. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Pedro M.; Silva, Tomé S.; Dias, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous...... growth in production is still expected for decades to come. Aquaculture is, though, a very competitive market, and a global awareness regarding the use of scientific knowledge and emerging technologies to obtain a better farmed organism through a sustainable production has enhanced the importance...... questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined...

  9. The proteome of human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    Human saliva holds tremendous potential for transforming disease and health diagnostics given its richness of molecular information and non-invasive collection. Enumerating its molecular constituents is an important first step towards reaching this potential. Among the molecules in saliva, proteins and peptides arguably have the most value: they can directly indicate biochemical functions linked to a health condition/disease state, and they are attractive targets for biomarker assay development. However, cataloging and defining the human salivary proteome is challenging given the dynamic, chemically heterogeneous and complex nature of the system. In addition, the overall human saliva proteome is composed of several "sub-proteomes" which include: intact full length proteins, proteins carrying post-translational modifications (PTMs), low molecular weight peptides, and the metaproteome, derived from protein products from nonhuman organisms (e.g. microbes) present in the oral cavity. Presented here will be a summary of communal efforts to meet the challenge of characterizing the multifaceted saliva proteome, focusing on the use of mass spectrometry as the proteomic technology of choice. Implications of these efforts to characterize the salivary proteome in the context of disease diagnostics will also be discussed.

  10. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tonry, Claire L

    2016-07-18

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i) might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease); (ii) would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii) those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and\\/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i) provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii) address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii) make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  11. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Tonry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate Cancer (PCa is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease; (ii would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  12. Integration of new technology into clinical practice after FDA approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govil, Ashul; Hao, Steven C

    2016-10-01

    Development of new medical technology is a crucial part of the advancement of medicine and our ability to better treat patients and their diseases. This process of development is long and arduous and requires a significant investment of human, financial and material capital. However, technology development can be rewarded richly by its impact on patient outcomes and successful sale of the product. One of the major regulatory hurdles to technology development is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, which is necessary before a technology can be marketed and sold in the USA. Many businesses, medical providers and consumers believe that the FDA approval process is the only hurdle prior to use of the technology in day-to-day care. In order for the technology to be adopted into clinical use, reimbursement for both the device as well as the associated work performed by physicians and medical staff must be in place. Work and coverage decisions require Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code development and Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) valuation determination. Understanding these processes is crucial to the timely availability of new technology to patients and providers. Continued and better partnerships between physicians, industry, regulatory bodies and payers will facilitate bringing technology to market sooner and ensure appropriate utilization.

  13. After the clinic? Researching sexual health technology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    There is great interest in what testing, pharmaceutical, information and social media technology can do for sexual health. Much programmatic and research activity is focused on assessing how these technologies can be used to best effect. Less obvious are analyses that place technology into historical, political and real-world settings. Developing an 'in-context' analysis of sexual health technology, this paper draws on interviews with leading community advocates, researchers and clinicians in Australia, Canada and the UK and looks across examples, including social media, rapid HIV testing, pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV and polymerase chain reaction Chlamydia testing. The analysis is framed by studies of techno-society and the dialectics of sex-affirmative advocacy with biomedical authority and attends to: the rationalistic and affective dimensions of the imaginary associated with technology; the role of technology in the re-spatialisation and re-temporalisation of the sexual health clinic; and the re-invention of technology in its real-world contexts. This in-context approach is important for: the effective implementation of new technology; strengthening the social science contribution to the field; and enriching social theory in general on life in techno-societies.

  14. Clinical Simulation: A Protocol for Evaluation of Mobile Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Jensen, Sanne; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    For mobile technology to be accepted at point of care in healthcare environments there is a need to demonstrate benefits whilst ameliorating the risks and challenges. To provide a standardised approach to evaluation of mobile technology a simulation protocol was developed to provide guidance for its use in healthcare environments. Simulated conditions provide the opportunity to assess intended and unintended consequences and identify potential workarounds when using technology. The protocol can also be used to demonstrate the importance of the development of digital professionalism by end-users prior to students entering the clinical practice setting. The mobile technology protocol was adapted from a health information systems protocol developed and used at the ITX Lab, Denmark for use in other simulation laboratories. Use case scenarios were developed to enable evaluation of mobile technology for mobile learning of nurses, nurse supervisors, students and patients. The scenarios can be used in a range of simulated environments including hospital bedside, outpatient clinic or community settings. A case study exemplar of a nurse and patient is included to demonstrate how the mobile technology protocol can be applied.

  15. Coronary Stents: The Impact of Technological Advances on Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennuni, Marco G; Pagnotta, Paolo A; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2016-02-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were proposed in the late 1970s as an alternative to surgical coronary artery bypass grafting for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Important technological progress has been made since. Balloon angioplasty was replaced by bare metal stents, which allowed to permanently scaffold the coronary vessel avoiding acute recoil and abrupt occlusion. Thereafter, the introduction of early generation drug-eluting stents (DES) has significantly improved clinical outcomes, primarily by markedly reducing the risk of restenosis. New generation DES with thinner stent struts, novel durable or biodegradable polymer coatings, and new limus antiproliferative agents, have further improved upon the safety and efficacy profile of early generation DES. The present article aims to review the impact of technological advances on clinical outcomes in the field of PCI with coronary stents, and to provide a brief overview on clinical margins of improvement and unmet needs of available DES.

  16. Toxicoproteomics: serum proteomic pattern diagnostics for early detection of drug induced cardiac toxicities and cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Rajapaske, Vinodh; Herman, Eugene H; Arekani, Ali M; Ross, Sally; Johann, Donald; Knapton, Alan; Zhang, J; Hitt, Ben A; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Liotta, Lance A; Sistare, Frank D

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is more than just generating lists of proteins that increase or decrease in expression as a cause or consequence of pathology. The goal should be to characterize the information flow through the intercellular protein circuitry which communicates with the extracellular microenvironment and then ultimately to the serum/plasma macroenvironment. The nature of this information can be a cause, or a consequence, of disease and toxicity based processes as cascades of reinforcing information percolate through the system and become reflected in changing proteomic information content of the circulation. Serum Proteomic Pattern Diagnostics is a new type of proteomic platform in which patterns of proteomic signatures from high dimensional mass spectrometry data are used as a diagnostic classifier. While this approach has shown tremendous promise in early detection of cancers, detection of drug-induced toxicity may also be possible with this same technology. Analysis of serum from rat models of anthracycline and anthracenedione induced cardiotoxicity indicate the potential clinical utility of diagnostic proteomic patterns where low molecular weight peptides and protein fragments may have higher accuracy than traditional biomarkers of cardiotoxicity such as troponins. These fragments may one day be harvested by circulating nanoparticles designed to absorb, enrich and amplify the diagnostic biomarker repertoire generated even at the critical initial stages of toxicity.

  17. Automation, parallelism, and robotics for proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, Gil; Liu, Jonathan; Chow, Jijun; Ramoni, Marco F

    2006-07-01

    The speed of the human genome project (Lander, E. S., Linton, L. M., Birren, B., Nusbaum, C. et al., Nature 2001, 409, 860-921) was made possible, in part, by developments in automation of sequencing technologies. Before these technologies, sequencing was a laborious, expensive, and personnel-intensive task. Similarly, automation and robotics are changing the field of proteomics today. Proteomics is defined as the effort to understand and characterize proteins in the categories of structure, function and interaction (Englbrecht, C. C., Facius, A., Comb. Chem. High Throughput Screen. 2005, 8, 705-715). As such, this field nicely lends itself to automation technologies since these methods often require large economies of scale in order to achieve cost and time-saving benefits. This article describes some of the technologies and methods being applied in proteomics in order to facilitate automation within the field as well as in linking proteomics-based information with other related research areas.

  18. [The clinical application of three dimention printing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, S Z; Fang, C H

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the three-dimentional(3D)printing technology is gradually applied in medicine.Now, the 3D printing has already play an important role in medical education, surgical device development, prosthesis implantation and so on.There are still many challenges and difficulties in the clinical overall application of 3D printing for some time, but it also contains a huge application prospect.Once with appropriate applications of this technology, it will be a major breakthrough in iatrical history once more.

  19. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  20. Clinical Implications of Technological Advances in Screening for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nikhil; Chun, Sung; Hadley, David; Froelicher, Victor

    The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) continues to increase worldwide as people live longer. AF is the leading cause of stroke among patients older than 75 years and is responsible for at least 15% of all strokes. Industry has responded to this problem with a plethora of monitoring devices. These include single lead ECG adhesive sensors, implantable loop recorders, smartphone attachments and wearables. This review will concentrate on clinical studies using these technologies. There are wearables including watches and watch-like devices that will be mentioned but these have not been validated for clinical use. This review will begin with a background regarding screening for AF and at the end present findings from Cardiac Implantable devices that could influence use of the new mobile health technologies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancement of Environmental Hazard Degradation in the Presence of Lignin: a Proteomics Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Su; Xie, Shangxian; Cheng, Yanbing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhao, Honglu; Li, Muzi; Li, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2017-01-01

    Proteomics studies of fungal systems have progressed dramatically based on the availability of more fungal genome sequences in recent years. Different proteomics strategies have been applied toward characterization of fungal proteome and revealed important gene functions and proteome dynamics. Presented here is the application of shot-gun proteomic technology to study the bio-remediation of environmental hazards by white-rot fungus. Lignin, a naturally abundant component of the plant biomass,...

  2. Establishing research strategies, methodologies and technologies to link genomics and proteomics to seagrass productivity, community metabolism and ecosystem carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMazzuca

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A complete understanding of the mechanistic basis of marine ecosystem functioning is only possible through integrative and interdisciplinary research. This enables the prediction of change and possibly the mitigation of the consequences of anthropogenic impacts. One major aim of the COST Action ES0609 Seagrasses productivity. From genes to ecosystem management, is the calibration and synthesis of various methods and the development of innovative techniques and protocols for studying seagrass ecosystems.During ten days, twenty researchers representing a range of disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, botany, ecology, oceanography, underwater acoustics gathered at the marine station of STARESO (Corsica to study together the nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow. The Station de Recherches Sous-marine et Océanographiques (STARESO is located in an oligotrophic area classified as "pristine site" where environmental disturbances caused by anthropogenic pressure are exceptionally low. The healthy P. oceanica meadow, that grows in front of the lab, colonizes the sea bottom from the surface to 37 m depth. During the study, genomic and proteomic approaches were integrated with ecophysiological and physical approaches with the aim of understanding changes in seagrass productivity and metabolism at different depths and along daily cycles. In this paper we report details on the approaches utilized and we forecast the potential of the data that will come from this synergistic approach not only for P. oceanica but for seagrasses in general.

  3. Clinical applications of robotic technology in vascular and endovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, George A; Riga, Celia V; Mayer, Erik K; Cheshire, Nicholas J W; Bicknell, Colin D

    2011-02-01

    Emerging robotic technologies are increasingly being used by surgical disciplines to facilitate and improve performance of minimally invasive surgery. Robot-assisted intervention has recently been introduced into the field of vascular surgery to potentially enhance laparoscopic vascular and endovascular capabilities. The objective of this study was to review the current status of clinical robotic applications in vascular surgery. A systematic literature search was performed in order to identify all published clinical studies related to robotic implementation in vascular intervention. Web-based search engines were searched using the keywords "surgical robotics," "robotic surgery," "robotics," "computer assisted surgery," and "vascular surgery" or "endovascular" for articles published between January 1990 and November 2009. An evaluation and critical overview of these studies is reported. In addition, an analysis and discussion of supporting evidence for robotic computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems in relation to their applications in laparoscopic vascular and endovascular surgery was undertaken. Seventeen articles reporting on clinical applications of robotics in laparoscopic vascular and endovascular surgery were detected. They were either case reports or retrospective patient series and prospective studies reporting laparoscopic vascular and endovascular treatments for patients using robotic technology. Minimal comparative clinical evidence to evaluate the advantages of robot-assisted vascular procedures was identified. Robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic procedures have been reported by several studies with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the use of robotic technology as a sole modality for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and expansion of its applications to splenic and renal artery aneurysm reconstruction have been described. Robotically steerable endovascular catheter systems have potential advantages over conventional catheterization systems

  4. Identification of altered plasma proteins by proteomic study in valvular heart diseases and the potential clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about genetic basis and proteomics in valvular heart disease (VHD including rheumatic (RVD and degenerative (DVD valvular disease. The present proteomic study examined the hypothesis that certain proteins may be associated with the pathological changes in the plasma of VHD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Differential protein analysis in the plasma identified 18 differentially expressed protein spots and 14 corresponding proteins or polypeptides by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in 120 subjects. Two up-regulated (complement C4A and carbonic anhydrase 1 and three down-regulated proteins (serotransferrin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and vitronectin were validated by ELISA in enlarging samples. The plasma levels (n = 40 for each of complement C4A in RVD (715.8±35.6 vs. 594.7±28.2 ng/ml, P = 0.009 and carbonic anhydrase 1 (237.70±15.7 vs. 184.7±10.8 U/L, P = 0.007 in DVD patients were significantly higher and that of serotransferrin (2.36±0.20 vs. 2.93±0.16 mg/ml, P = 0.025 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (370.0±13.7 vs. 413.0±11.6 µg/ml, P = 0.019 in RVD patients were significantly lower than those in controls. The plasma vitronectin level in both RVD (281.3±11.0 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.006 and DVD (283.6±11.4 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.011 was significantly lower than those in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have for the first time identified alterations of 14 differential proteins or polypeptides in the plasma of patients with various VHD. The elevation of plasma complement C4A in RVD and carbonic anhydrase 1 in DVD and the decrease of serotransferrin and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in RVD patients may be useful biomarkers for these valvular diseases. The decreased plasma level of vitronectin - a protein related to the formation of valvular structure - in both RVD and DVD patients might indicate the possible genetic deficiency in these patients.

  5. Clinical utility of RapidArc™ radiotherapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infusino, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    RapidArc™ is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360°) and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords “RapidArc”, “Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy”, and “Intensity-modulated radiotherapy”

  6. Plasma proteome analysis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Malaysia and University of Malaya Centre For Proteomics Research (UMCPR), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department of Clinical Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry; Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Universiti Kebangsaan ...

  7. Combined serum and EPS-urine proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology for discovery of potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mo; Chen, Lizhu; Yuan, Zhengwei; Yang, Zeyu; Li, Yue; Shan, Liping; Yin, Bo; Fei, Xiang; Miao, Jianing; Song, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignant tumors and a major cause of cancer-related death for men worldwide. The aim of our study was to identify potential non-invasive serum and expressed prostatic secretion (EPS)-urine biomarkers for accurate diagnosis of PCa. Here, we performed a combined isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to compare protein profiles using pooled serum and EPS-urine samples from 4 groups of patients: benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), localized PCa and metastatic PCa. The differentially expressed proteins were rigorously selected and further validated in a large and independent cohort using classical ELISA and Western blot assays. Finally, we established a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of 3 proteins (serum PF4V1, PSA, and urinary CRISP3) with an excellent diagnostic capacity to differentiate PCa from BPH [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.941], which showed an evidently greater discriminatory ability than PSA alone (AUC, 0.757) (P<0.001). Importantly, even when PSA level was in the gray zone (4-10 ng/mL), a combination of PF4V1 and CRISP3 could achieve a relatively high diagnostic efficacy (AUC, 0.895). Furthermore, their combination also had the potential to distinguish PCa from HGPIN (AUC, 0.934). Our results demonstrated that the combined application of serum and EPS-urine biomarkers can improve the diagnosis of PCa and provide a new prospect for non-invasive PCa detection.

  8. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2017-05-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Proteomic explorations of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoko, Nicholas; McShane, Adam J; Natowicz, Marvin R

    2017-09-01

    Proteomics, the large-scale study of protein expression in cells and tissues, is a powerful tool to study the biology of clinical conditions and has provided significant insights in many experimental systems. Herein, we review the basics of proteomic methodology and discuss challenges in using proteomic approaches to study autism. Unlike other experimental approaches, such as genomic approaches, there have been few large-scale studies of proteins in tissues from persons with autism. Most of the proteomic studies on autism used blood or other peripheral tissues; few studies used brain tissue. Some studies found dysregulation of aspects of the immune system or of aspects of lipid metabolism, but no consistent findings were noted. Based on the challenges in using proteomics to study autism, we discuss considerations for future studies. Apart from the complex technical considerations implicit in any proteomic analysis, key nontechnical matters include attention to subject and specimen inclusion/exclusion criteria, having adequate sample size to ensure appropriate powering of the study, attention to the state of specimens prior to proteomic analysis, and the use of a replicate set of specimens, when possible. We conclude by discussing some potentially productive uses of proteomics, potentially coupled with other approaches, for future autism research including: (1) proteomic analysis of banked human brain specimens; (2) proteomic analysis of tissues from animal models of autism; and (3) proteomic analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells that are differentiated into various types of brain cells and neural organoids. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1460-1469. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Benefits of Outsourcing Strategy and IT Technology in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-09-01

    Aim of this paper is to describe some of models of outsourcing (numerous and response to different types of risks and increment of quality is based on individual problem and situation). Defining whether to outsource or not and whether to build or buy new information technology (IT) is question for contract research organization (CRO) and Pharma companies dealing with clinical trials, so the aim of this paper is to show business model that could make process of decision making less time consuming, less segmented and more efficient. This paper has a descriptive character, and represents a review of the literature that deals with the described issues. Outsourcing should enable optimal capacity flexibility (technology that is outsourced should be done only optimally not entirely). The goal with CRO partners is to establish equivalent levels of global quality, as extensions of other research and development activities (by unification of standards of performance of alliance partners with best standards of industry). IT is gaining greater significance at each stage of clinical study and represent an inevitable element of the quality of a clinical study (for the purpose of monitoring of clinical site activities, data collection and management, medical monitoring, statistical programming, statistical analysis, clinical study reporting). CROs are able to maximize work within the CRO global development, to support the notion of a fully integrated outsourced company; facilitate the use of similar business processes and norms, reusing established CRO standards and improve CRO operational decision making within outsourced studies by providing consistent and current information across outsourced and in-house activities.

  11. Benefits of Outsourcing Strategy and IT Technology in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this paper is to describe some of models of outsourcing (numerous and response to different types of risks and increment of quality is based on individual problem and situation). Defining whether to outsource or not and whether to build or buy new information technology (IT) is question for contract research organization (CRO) and Pharma companies dealing with clinical trials, so the aim of this paper is to show business model that could make process of decision making less time consuming, less segmented and more efficient. Material and methods: This paper has a descriptive character, and represents a review of the literature that deals with the described issues. Results: Outsourcing should enable optimal capacity flexibility (technology that is outsourced should be done only optimally not entirely). The goal with CRO partners is to establish equivalent levels of global quality, as extensions of other research and development activities (by unification of standards of performance of alliance partners with best standards of industry). IT is gaining greater significance at each stage of clinical study and represent an inevitable element of the quality of a clinical study (for the purpose of monitoring of clinical site activities, data collection and management, medical monitoring, statistical programming, statistical analysis, clinical study reporting). Conclusion: CROs are able to maximize work within the CRO global development, to support the notion of a fully integrated outsourced company; facilitate the use of similar business processes and norms, reusing established CRO standards and improve CRO operational decision making within outsourced studies by providing consistent and current information across outsourced and in-house activities. PMID:29114116

  12. Advancing medication infusion safety through the clinical integration of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, Donald; O'Shea, Kristen; Muller, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug events resulting from errors in prescribing or administering medications are preventable. Within a hospital system, numerous technologies are employed to address the common sources of medication error, including the use of electronic medical records, physician order entry, smart infusion pumps, and barcode medication administration systems. Infusion safety is inherently risky because of the high-risk medications administered and the lack of integration among the stand-alone systems in most institutions. Intravenous clinical integration (IVCI) is a technology that connects electronic medical records, physician order entry, smart infusion pumps, and barcode medication administration systems. It combines the safety features of an automatically programmed infusion pump (drug, concentration, infusion rate, and patient weight, all auto-programmed into the device) with software that provides visibility to real-time clinical infusion data. Our article describes the characteristics of IVCI at WellSpan Health and its impact on patient safety. The integrated infusion system has the capability of reducing medication errors, improving patient care, reducing in-facility costs, and supporting asset management. It can enhance continuous quality improvement efforts and efficiency of clinical work flow. After implementing IVCI, the institution realized a safer patient environment and a more streamlined work flow for pharmacy and nursing.

  13. Clinical proteomics identifies urinary CD14 as a potential biomarker for diagnosis of stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a key role in coronary artery disease (CAD and other manifestations of atherosclerosis. Recently, urinary proteins were found to be useful markers for reflecting inflammation status of different organs. To identify potential biomarker for diagnosis of CAD, we performed one-dimensional SDS-gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Among the proteins differentially expressed in urine samples, monocyte antigen CD14 was found to be consistently expressed in higher amounts in the CAD patients as compared to normal controls. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to analyze the concentrations of CD14 in urine and serum, we confirmed that urinary CD14 levels were significantly higher in patients (n = 73 with multi-vessel and single vessel CAD than in normal control (n = 35 (P < 0.001. Logistic regression analysis further showed that urinary CD14 concentration level is associated with severity or number of diseased vessels and SYNTAX score after adjustment for potential confounders. Concomitantly, the proportion of CD14+ monocytes was significantly increased in CAD patients (59.7 ± 3.6% as compared with healthy controls (14.9 ± 2.1% (P < 0.001, implicating that a high level of urinary CD14 may be potentially involved in mechanism(s leading to CAD pathogenesis. By performing shotgun proteomics, we further revealed that CD14-associated inflammatory response networks may play an essential role in CAD. In conclusion, the current study has demonstrated that release of CD14 in urine coupled with more CD14+ monocytes in CAD patients is significantly correlated with severity of CAD, pointing to the potential application of urinary CD14 as a novel noninvasive biomarker for large-scale diagnostic screening of susceptible CAD patients.

  14. Whole transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of an isogenic M. tuberculosis clinical strain with a naturally occurring 15 Kb genomic deletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Duncan

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the most difficult to control infectious diseases in the world. Many different factors contribute to the complexity of this disease. These include the ability of the host to control the infection which may directly relate to nutritional status, presence of co-morbidities and genetic predisposition. Pathogen factors, in particular the ability of different Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to respond to the harsh environment of the host granuloma, which includes low oxygen and nutrient availability and the presence of damaging radical oxygen and nitrogen species, also play an important role in the success of different strains to cause disease. In this study we evaluated the impact of a naturally occurring 12 gene 15 Kb genomic deletion on the physiology and virulence of M. tuberculosis. The strains denominated ON-A WT (wild type and ON-A NM (natural mutant were isolated from a previously reported TB outbreak in an inner city under-housed population in Toronto, Canada. Here we subjected these isogenic strains to transcriptomic (via RNA-seq and proteomic analyses and identified several gene clusters with differential expression in the natural mutant, including the DosR regulon and the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis genes, both of which were found in lower abundance in the natural mutant. We also demonstrated lesser virulence of the natural mutant in the guinea pig animal model. Overall, our findings suggest that the ON-A natural mutant is less fit to cause disease, but nevertheless has the potential to cause extended transmission in at-risk populations.

  15. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic quest for diabetes biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shiying; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. Early diagnosis and complication prevention of DM are helpful for disease treatment. However, currently available DM diagnostic markers fail to achieve the goals. Identification of new diabetic biomarkers assisted by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics may offer solution for the clinical challenges. Here, we review the current status of biomarker discovery in DM, and describe the pressure cycling technology (PCT)-Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical fragment-ion (SWATH) workflow for sample-processing, biomarker discovery and validation, which may accelerate the current quest for DM biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing clinical presence of mobile communication technology: avoiding the pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, Akila; Gibb, Alan P; Brady, Richard R W

    2011-10-01

    Mobile communication technologies are employed in many diverse areas of healthcare delivery to provide improved quality and efficiency of communication and facilitate increased rapidity of data or information transfer. Mobile phones enable healthcare professionals to possess a portable platform from which to provide many healthcare-related applications and are a popular means to directly communicate with colleagues and patients. As involvement of mobile communication technology in healthcare delivery continues to rapidly expand, there are also important considerations of relevance to patient safety and security as a result. Here, we review the previous evidence of reported clinical risks associated with mobile communication technology, such as electromagnetic interference, confidentiality and data security, distraction/noise, infection control, and cross contamination. In conclusion, although mobile phones provide much putative potential improvement to healthcare delivery, further evaluation and research are required to both inform and protect health professionals and users of such technology in the healthcare environment and provide the evidence base to support the provision of clear and comprehensive guidelines.

  17. Technological advances in perioperative monitoring: Current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Minimal mandatory monitoring in the perioperative period recommended by Association of Anesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and American Society of Anesthesiologists are universally acknowledged and has become an integral part of the anesthesia practice. The technologies in perioperative monitoring have advanced, and the availability and clinical applications have multiplied exponentially. Newer monitoring techniques include depth of anesthesia monitoring, goal-directed fluid therapy, transesophageal echocardiography, advanced neurological monitoring, improved alarm system and technological advancement in objective pain assessment. Various factors that need to be considered with the use of improved monitoring techniques are their validation data, patient outcome, safety profile, cost-effectiveness, awareness of the possible adverse events, knowledge of technical principle and ability of the convenient routine handling. In this review, we will discuss the new monitoring techniques in anesthesia, their advantages, deficiencies, limitations, their comparison to the conventional methods and their effect on patient outcome, if any.

  18. P-MartCancer–Interactive Online Software to Enable Analysis of Shotgun Cancer Proteomic Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Kobold, Markus A.; Stratton, Kelly G.; White, Amanda M.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2017-10-31

    P-MartCancer is a new interactive web-based software environment that enables biomedical and biological scientists to perform in-depth analyses of global proteomics data without requiring direct interaction with the data or with statistical software. P-MartCancer offers a series of statistical modules associated with quality assessment, peptide and protein statistics, protein quantification and exploratory data analyses driven by the user via customized workflows and interactive visualization. Currently, P-MartCancer offers access to multiple cancer proteomic datasets generated through the Clinical Proteomics Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) at the peptide, gene and protein levels. P-MartCancer is deployed using Azure technologies (http://pmart.labworks.org/cptac.html), the web-service is alternatively available via Docker Hub (https://hub.docker.com/r/pnnl/pmart-web/) and many statistical functions can be utilized directly from an R package available on GitHub (https://github.com/pmartR).

  19. The landscape of viral proteomics and its potential to impact human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Wendler, Jason P.; McDermott, Jason E.; White III, Richard A.; Powell, Joshua D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2016-05-06

    Translating the intimate discourse between viruses and their host cells during infection is a challenging but critical task for development of antiviral interventions and diagnostics. Viruses commandeer cellular processes at every step of their life cycle, altering expression of genes and proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies are enhancing studies of viral pathogenesis by identifying virus-induced changes in the protein repertoire of infected cells or extracellular fluids. Interpretation of proteomics results using knowledge of cellular pathways and networks leads to identification of proteins that influence a range of infection processes, thereby focusing efforts for clinical diagnoses and therapeutics development. Herein we discuss applications of global proteomic studies of viral infections with the goal of providing a basis for improved studies that will benefit community-wide data integration and interpretation.

  20. Nanodroplet processing platform for deep and quantitative proteome profiling of 10-100 mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Piehowski, Paul D; Zhao, Rui; Chen, Jing; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J; Shukla, Anil K; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Mathews, Clayton E; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun; Kelly, Ryan T

    2018-02-28

    Nanoscale or single-cell technologies are critical for biomedical applications. However, current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches require samples comprising a minimum of thousands of cells to provide in-depth profiling. Here, we report the development of a nanoPOTS (nanodroplet processing in one pot for trace samples) platform for small cell population proteomics analysis. NanoPOTS enhances the efficiency and recovery of sample processing by downscaling processing volumes to 3000 proteins are consistently identified from as few as 10 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate quantification of ~2400 proteins from single human pancreatic islet thin sections from type 1 diabetic and control donors, illustrating the application of nanoPOTS for spatially resolved proteome measurements from clinical tissues.

  1. Drug delivery system innovation and Health Technology Assessment: Upgrading from Clinical to Technological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzitta, Michele; Bruno, Giorgio; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Mendicino, Francesca R; Ricci, Maurizio

    2015-11-30

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a multidisciplinary health political instrument that evaluates the consequences, mainly clinical and economical, of a health care technology; the HTA aim is to produce and spread information on scientific and technological innovation for health political decision making process. Drug delivery systems (DDS), such as nanocarriers, are technologically complex but they have pivotal relevance in therapeutic innovation. The HTA process, as commonly applied to conventional drug evaluation, should upgrade to a full pharmaceutical assessment, considering the DDS complexity. This is useful to study more in depth the clinical outcome and to broaden its critical assessment toward pharmaceutical issues affecting the patient and not measured by the current clinical evidence approach. We draw out the expertise necessary to perform the pharmaceutical assessment and we propose a format to evaluate the DDS technological topics such as formulation and mechanism of action, physicochemical characteristics, manufacturing process. We integrated the above-mentioned three points in the Evidence Based Medicine approach, which is data source for any HTA process. In this regard, the introduction of a Pharmaceutics Expert figure in the HTA could be fundamental to grant a more detailed evaluation of medicine product characteristics and performances and to help optimizing DDS features to overcome R&D drawbacks. Some aspects of product development, such as manufacturing processes, should be part of the HTA as innovative manufacturing processes allow new products to reach more effectively patient bedside. HTA so upgraded may encourage resource allocating payers to invest in innovative technologies and providers to focus on innovative material properties and manufacturing processes, thus contributing to bring more medicines in therapy in a sustainable manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical application and developmental trend of radiofrequency ablation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongfeng

    2009-01-01

    For recent two decades, radiofrequency ablation technology has made great progress in the field of the treatment for neoplasm. At the very beginning, radiofrequency ablation was adopted in treating the hepatic carcinoma, and since then it has been gradually practiced in treating malignancies of lung, bone, kidney, breast, prostate and other solid tumors. Statistical report of the year 2008 has indicated that in the aspect of similar therapeutic measures radiofrequency ablation therapy for tumors holds a 9% market share. Moreover, in the coming years the clinical use of this kind of therapy for tumors will be steadily increasing by 13% every year. (authors)

  3. Regional differences of the urinary proteomes in healthy Chinese individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Weiwei; Wu, Jianqiang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Fanshuang; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Biao; Shan, Guangliang; Gao, Youhe

    2017-01-01

    Urine is a promising biomarker source for clinical proteomics studies. Although regional physiological differences are common in multi-center clinical studies, the presence of significant differences in the urinary proteomes of individuals from different regions remains unknown. In this study, morning urine samples were collected from healthy urban residents in three regions of China and urinary proteins were preserved using a membrane-based method (Urimem). The urine proteomes of 27 normal s...

  4. [Applications of MALDI-TOF technology in clinical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, S; Nassif, X; Ferroni, A

    2015-02-01

    Until now, the identification of micro-organisms has been based on the cultural and biochemical characteristics of bacterial and fungal species. Recently, Mass Spectrometry type Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF MS) was developed in clinical microbiology laboratories. This new technology allows identification of micro-organisms directly from colonies of bacteria and fungi within few minutes. In addition, it can be used to identify germs directly from positive blood culture bottles or directly from urine samples. Other ways are being explored to expand the use of MALDI-TOF in clinical microbiology laboratories. Indeed, some studies propose to detect bacterial antibiotic resistance while others compare strains within species for faster strain typing. The main objective of this review is to update data from the recent literature for different applications of MALDI-TOF technique in microbiological diagnostic routine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  6. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies required...... for detailed functional and comparative analysis of the dynamic plasma membrane proteome....

  7. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias

    2004-01-01

    Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... contributing to late diagnosis of this deadly disease. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive characterization of the "pancreatic juice proteome" in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pancreatic juice was first fractionated by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequently analyzed by liquid...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  8. Challenges for proteomics core facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Kathryn S; Deery, Michael J; Gatto, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Many analytical techniques have been executed by core facilities established within academic, pharmaceutical and other industrial institutions. The centralization of such facilities ensures a level of expertise and hardware which often cannot be supported by individual laboratories. The establishment of a core facility thus makes the technology available for multiple researchers in the same institution. Often, the services within the core facility are also opened out to researchers from other institutions, frequently with a fee being levied for the service provided. In the 1990s, with the onset of the age of genomics, there was an abundance of DNA analysis facilities, many of which have since disappeared from institutions and are now available through commercial sources. Ten years on, as proteomics was beginning to be utilized by many researchers, this technology found itself an ideal candidate for being placed within a core facility. We discuss what in our view are the daily challenges of proteomics core facilities. We also examine the potential unmet needs of the proteomics core facility that may also be applicable to proteomics laboratories which do not function as core facilities. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mass Spectrometry–based Proteomic Profiling of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Sebahat; Chaurand, Pierre; Massion, Pierre P.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to further our understanding of lung cancer biology and to identify new candidate biomarkers to be used in the management of lung cancer, we need to probe these tissues and biological fluids with tools that address the biology of lung cancer directly at the protein level. Proteins are responsible of the function and phenotype of cells. Cancer cells express proteins that distinguish them from normal cells. Proteomics is defined as the study of the proteome, the complete set of proteins produced by a species, using the technologies of large-scale protein separation and identification. As a result, new technologies are being developed to allow the rapid and systematic analysis of thousands of proteins. The analytical advantages of mass spectrometry (MS), including sensitivity and high-throughput, promise to make it a mainstay of novel biomarker discovery to differentiate cancer from normal cells and to predict individuals likely to develop or recur with lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the progress made in clinical proteomics as it applies to the management of lung cancer. We will focus our discussion on how MS approaches may advance the areas of early detection, response to therapy, and prognostic evaluation. PMID:19349484

  10. Internet technology for clinical application in a digital radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, B.; Pietsch, M.; Vogl, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Problem: To provide an overview and to assess the clinical feasibility of internet technology-based systems for hospital-wide image and report distribution as well as for video conferencing. Methods: The paper describes the theoretical concept behind, the various technical approaches and the experience gained from different systems. Results: Image and report distribution: Advantages include the universal availability of images and reports inside and outside hospitals; ease of use; security features; image and report integration; cost savings by reducing support and training efforts and by optimising available hardware. The main critical issues are performance and workflow integration with RIS and PACS. Video conferencing: Main advantages are the standardised, software-based approach and the low investments for hard- and software. Depending on the desired usage the communication performance can be seen as inappropriate. Conclusion: Today, internet technology-based systems appear to satisfy the main clinical needs in radiology. The mentioned drawbacks could be eliminated by means of modified software implementation and focused standardisation efforts. Considering the numerous advantages of these systems a further distribution can be expected for the future. (orig.) [de

  11. Acceptance of clinical decision support surveillance technology in the clinical pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Dan; Ankem, Kalyani; English, Kathleen

    2017-03-01

    There are clinical and economic benefits to incorporating clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) in patient care interventions in the clinical pharmacy setting. However, user dissatisfaction and resistance to HIT can prevent optimal use of such systems, particularly when users employ system workarounds and overrides. The present study applied a modified version of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to evaluate the disposition and satisfaction with CDSS among clinical pharmacists who perform surveillance to identify potential medication therapy interventions on patients in the hospital setting. A survey of clinical pharmacists (N = 48) was conducted. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to analyze the influence of the UTAUT-related variables on behavioral intention and satisfaction with CDSS among clinical pharmacists. While behavioral intention did not predict actual use of HIT, facilitating conditions had a direct effect on pharmacists' use of CDSS. Likewise, satisfaction with CDSS was found to have a direct effect on use, with more satisfied users being less inclined to employ workarounds or overrides of the system. Based on the findings, organizational structures that facilitate CDSS use and user satisfaction affect the extent to which pharmacy and health care management maximize use in the clinical pharmacy setting.

  12. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of g...

  13. Analysis of proteomes released from in vitro cultured eight Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes revealed specific expression in PCR ribotypes 027 and 176 confirming their genetic relatedness and clinical importance at the proteomic level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dresler, J.; Krůtová, M.; Fučíková, A.; Klimentová, J.; Hrůzová, V.; Ďuráčová, M.; Houdková, K.; Salovská, B.; Matějková, J.; Hubálek, Martin; Pajer, P.; Píša, L.; Nyč, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, Aug 14 (2017), č. článku 45. ISSN 1757-4749 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Clostridium difficile * label-free quantification * proteome * PCR ribotype 027 * PCR ribotype 176 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.756, year: 2016 https://gutpathogens.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13099-017-0194-9

  14. Proteome Profiling Outperforms Transcriptome Profiling for Coexpression Based Gene Function Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Zihao; Carr, Steven A.; Mertins, Philipp; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Townsend, R. Reid; Smith, Richard D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Chen, Xian; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Boja, Emily S.; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-11-11

    Coexpression of mRNAs under multiple conditions is commonly used to infer cofunctionality of their gene products despite well-known limitations of this “guilt-by-association” (GBA) approach. Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have enabled global expression profiling at the protein level; however, whether proteome profiling data can outperform transcriptome profiling data for coexpression based gene function prediction has not been systematically investigated. Here, we address this question by constructing and analyzing mRNA and protein coexpression networks for three cancer types with matched mRNA and protein profiling data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). Our analyses revealed a marked difference in wiring between the mRNA and protein coexpression networks. Whereas protein coexpression was driven primarily by functional similarity between coexpressed genes, mRNA coexpression was driven by both cofunction and chromosomal colocalization of the genes. Functionally coherent mRNA modules were more likely to have their edges preserved in corresponding protein networks than functionally incoherent mRNA modules. Proteomic data strengthened the link between gene expression and function for at least 75% of Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes and 90% of KEGG pathways. A web application Gene2Net (http://cptac.gene2net.org) developed based on the three protein coexpression networks revealed novel gene-function relationships, such as linking ERBB2 (HER2) to lipid biosynthetic process in breast cancer, identifying PLG as a new gene involved in complement activation, and identifying AEBP1 as a new epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker. Our results demonstrate that proteome profiling outperforms transcriptome profiling for coexpression based gene function prediction. Proteomics should be integrated if not preferred in gene function and human disease studies

  15. Overview of bladder heating technology: matching capabilities with clinical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; van Rhoon, Gerard C.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate temperature hyperthermia (40–450°C for one hour) is emerging as an effective treatment to enhance best available chemotherapy strategies for bladder cancer. A rapidly increasing number of clinical trials have investigated the feasibility and efficacy of treating bladder cancer with combined intravesical chemotherapy and moderate temperature hyperthermia. To date, most studies have concerned treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) limited to the interior wall of the bladder. Following the promising results of initial clinical trials, investigators are now considering protocols for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). This paper provides a brief overview of the devices and techniques used for heating bladder cancer. Systems are described for thermal conduction heating of bladder wall via circulation of hot fluid, intravesical microwave antenna heating, capacitively coupled RF current heating, and radiofrequency phased array deep regional heating of the pelvis. Relative heating characteristics of the available technologies are compared based on published feasibility studies, and the systems correlated with clinical requirements for effective treatment of MIBC and NMIBC. PMID:26939993

  16. [Application progress of proteomic in pharmacological study of Chinese medicinal formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Qian; Zhan, Shu-Yu; Ruan, Yu-Er; Zuo, Zhi-Yan; Ji, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shuai-Jie; Ding, Bao-Yue

    2017-10-01

    Chinese medicinal formulae are the important means of clinical treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. It is urgent to use modern advanced scientific and technological means to reveal the complicated mechanism of Chinese medicinal formulae because they have the function characteristics of multiple components, multiple targets and integrated regulation. The systematic and comprehensive research model of proteomic is in line with the function characteristics of Chinese medicinal formulae, and proteomic has been widely used in the study of pharmacological mechanism of Chinese medicinal formulae. The recent applications of proteomic in pharmacological study of Chinese medicinal formulae in anti-cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, anti-liver disease, antidiabetic, anticancer, anti-rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases were reviewed in this paper, and then the future development direction of proteomic in pharmacological study of Chinese medicinal formulae was put forward. This review is to provide the ideas and method for proteomic research on function mechanism of Chinese medicinal formulae. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Information technology for clinical, translational and comparative effectiveness research. Findings from the section clinical research informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, C; Choquet, R

    2013-01-01

    To summarize advances of excellent current research in the new emerging field of Clinical Research Informatics. Synopsis of four key articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2013. The selection was performed by querying PubMed and Web of Science with predefined keywords. From the original set of 590 papers, a first subset of 461 articles which was in the scope of Clinical Research Informatics was refined into a second subset of 79 relevant articles from which 15 articles were retained for peer-review. The four selected articles exemplify current research efforts conducted in the areas of data representation and management in clinical trials, secondary use of EHR data for clinical research, information technology platforms for translational and comparative effectiveness research and implementation of privacy control. The selected articles not only illustrate how innovative information technology supports classically organized randomized controlled trials but also demonstrate that the long promised benefits of electronic health care data for research are becoming a reality through concrete platforms and projects.

  18. Technology for enhancing chest auscultation in clinical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeffrey J; Wattier, Bryan A

    2011-06-01

    The ability to use an acoustic stethoscope to detect lung and/or heart sounds, and then to then communicate one's interpretation of those sounds is an essential skill for many medical professionals. Interpretation of lung and heart sounds, in the context of history and other examination findings, often aids the differential diagnosis. Bedside assessment of changing auscultation findings may also guide treatment. Learning lung and heart auscultation skills typically involves listening to pre-recorded normal and adventitious sounds, often followed by laboratory instruction to guide stethoscope placement, and finally correlating the sounds with the associated pathophysiology and pathology. Recently, medical simulation has become an important tool for teaching prior to clinical practice, and for evaluating bedside auscultation skills. When simulating cardiovascular or pulmonary problems, high-quality lung and heart sounds should be able to accurately corroborate other findings such as vital signs, arterial blood gas values, or imaging. Digital audio technology, the Internet, and high-fidelity simulators have increased opportunities for educators and learners. We review the application of these technologies and describe options for reproducing lung and heart sounds, as well as their advantages and potential limitations.

  19. The clinical application of mobile technology to disaster medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Timothy; Morrison, Cecily; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2012-10-01

    Mobile health care technology (mHealth) has the potential to improve communication and clinical information management in disasters. This study reviews the literature on health care and computing published in the past five years to determine the types and efficacy of mobile applications available to disaster medicine, along with lessons learned. Five types of applications are identified: (1) disaster scene management; (2) remote monitoring of casualties; (3) medical image transmission (teleradiology); (4) decision support applications; and (5) field hospital information technology (IT) systems. Most projects have not yet reached the deployment stage, but evaluation exercises show that mHealth should allow faster processing and transport of patients, improved accuracy of triage and better monitoring of unattended patients at a disaster scene. Deployments of teleradiology and field hospital IT systems to disaster zones suggest that mHealth can improve resource allocation and patient care. The key problems include suitability of equipment for use in disaster zones and providing sufficient training to ensure staff familiarity with complex equipment. Future research should focus on providing unbiased observations of the use of mHealth in disaster medicine.

  20. [Proteomics and transfusion medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, N; Prudent, M; Crettaz, D; Tissot, J-D

    2011-04-01

    The term "proteomics" covers tools and techniques that are used to analyze and characterize complex mixtures of proteins from various biological samples. In this short review, a typical proteomic approach, related to the study of particular and illustrative situation related to transfusion medicine is reported. This "case report" will allow the reader to be familiar with a practical proteomic approach of a real situation, and will permit to describe the tools that are usually used in proteomic labs, and, in a second part, to present various proteomic applications in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap......, Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale...

  2. Monitoring CSF proteome alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: obstacles and perspectives in translating a novel marker panel to the clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils von Neuhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal disorder of the motor neuron system with poor prognosis and marginal therapeutic options. Current clinical diagnostic criteria are based on electrophysiological examination and exclusion of other ALS-mimicking conditions. Neuroprotective treatments are, however, most promising in early disease stages. Identification of disease-specific CSF biomarkers and associated biochemical pathways is therefore most relevant to monitor disease progression, response to neuroprotective agents and to enable early inclusion of patients into clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CSF from 35 patients with ALS diagnosed according to the revised El Escorial criteria and 23 age-matched controls was processed using paramagnetic bead chromatography for protein isolation and subsequently analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. CSF protein profiles were integrated into a Random Forest model constructed from 153 mass peaks. After reducing this peak set to the top 25%, a classifier was built which enabled prediction of ALS with high accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Further analysis of the identified peptides resulted in a panel of five highly sensitive ALS biomarkers. Upregulation of secreted phosphoprotein 1 in ALS-CSF samples was confirmed by univariate analysis of ELISA and mass spectrometry data. Further quantitative validation of the five biomarkers was achieved in an 80-plex Multiple Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry assay. CONCLUSIONS: ALS classification based on the CSF biomarker panel proposed in this study could become a valuable predictive tool for early clinical risk stratification. Of the numerous CSF proteins identified, many have putative roles in ALS-related metabolic processes, particularly in chromogranin-mediated secretion signaling pathways. While a stand-alone clinical application of this classifier will only be possible after further validation and a multicenter trial, it could be

  3. Proteomic approaches in brain research and neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Freya G G; Bergeron, John J M; Vandesande, Frans; Arckens, Lut; Quirion, Rémi

    2004-10-01

    Numerous applications of genomic technologies have enabled the assembly of unprecedented inventories of genes, expressed in cells under specific physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Complementing the valuable information generated through functional genomics with the integrative knowledge of protein expression and function should enable the development of more efficient diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents. Proteomic analyses are particularly suitable to elucidate posttranslational modifications, expression levels and protein-protein interactions of thousands of proteins at a time. In this review, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) investigations of brain tissues in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome and schizophrenia, and the construction of 2D-PAGE proteome maps of the brain are discussed. The role of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) as an international coordinating organization for proteomic efforts, as well as challenges for proteomic technologies and data analysis are also addressed. It is expected that the use of proteomic strategies will have significant impact in neuropharmacology over the coming decade.

  4. Addressing the Challenge of Defining Valid Proteomic Biomarkers and Classifiers

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dakna, Mohammed

    2010-12-10

    Abstract Background The purpose of this manuscript is to provide, based on an extensive analysis of a proteomic data set, suggestions for proper statistical analysis for the discovery of sets of clinically relevant biomarkers. As tractable example we define the measurable proteomic differences between apparently healthy adult males and females. We choose urine as body-fluid of interest and CE-MS, a thoroughly validated platform technology, allowing for routine analysis of a large number of samples. The second urine of the morning was collected from apparently healthy male and female volunteers (aged 21-40) in the course of the routine medical check-up before recruitment at the Hannover Medical School. Results We found that the Wilcoxon-test is best suited for the definition of potential biomarkers. Adjustment for multiple testing is necessary. Sample size estimation can be performed based on a small number of observations via resampling from pilot data. Machine learning algorithms appear ideally suited to generate classifiers. Assessment of any results in an independent test-set is essential. Conclusions Valid proteomic biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis only can be defined by applying proper statistical data mining procedures. In particular, a justification of the sample size should be part of the study design.

  5. Revisiting biomarker discovery by plasma proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    slow rate. As described in this review, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology in biological research and it is now poised to allow the characterization of the plasma proteome in great depth. Previous "triangular strategies" aimed at discovering single biomarker...

  6. A community proposal to integrate proteomics activities in ELIXIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Walzer, Mathias; Jiménez, Rafael C; Bittremieux, Wout; Bouyssié, David; Carapito, Christine; Corrales, Fernando; Ferro, Myriam; Heck, Albert J R; Horvatovich, Peter; Hubalek, Martin; Lane, Lydie; Laukens, Kris; Levander, Fredrik; Lisacek, Frederique; Novak, Petr; Palmblad, Magnus; Piovesan, Damiano; Pühler, Alfred; Schwämmle, Veit; Valkenborg, Dirk; van Rijswijk, Merlijn; Vondrasek, Jiri; Eisenacher, Martin; Martens, Lennart; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Computational approaches have been major drivers behind the progress of proteomics in recent years. The aim of this white paper is to provide a framework for integrating computational proteomics into ELIXIR in the near future, and thus to broaden the portfolio of omics technologies supported by this

  7. Proteomic profile of acute myeloid leukaemia: A review update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attention to the progress and advancements in cancer proteomics technology with the aim of simplifying ... hematopoietic cells leading to distinct differences ... procedures like bone marrow and tissue biopsies. [7,8]. .... patients who were subjected to transplantation ..... Boyd RS, Dyer MJ, Cain K. Proteomic analysis of b-cell.

  8. Proteomic profile of acute myeloid leukaemia: A review update ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review draws attention to the progress and advancements in cancer proteomics technology with the aim of simplifying the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease and to contribute to detection of biomarkers in addition to the development of novel treatments. Given that proteome is a dynamic entity of ...

  9. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Seizure reporting technologies for epilepsy treatment: A review of clinical information needs and supporting technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Jonathan; Khuwatsamrit, Thanin; Askew, Brittain; Ehrenberg, Joshua Andrew; Helmers, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    This review surveys current seizure detection and classification technologies as they relate to aiding clinical decision-making during epilepsy treatment. Interviews and data collected from neurologists and a literature review highlighted a strong need for better distinguishing between patients exhibiting generalized and partial seizure types as well as achieving more accurate seizure counts. This information is critical for enabling neurologists to select the correct class of antiepileptic drugs (AED) for their patients and evaluating AED efficiency during long-term treatment. In our questionnaire, 100% of neurologists reported they would like to have video from patients prior to selecting an AED during an initial consultation. Presently, only 30% have access to video. In our technology review we identified that only a subset of available technologies surpassed patient self-reporting performance due to high false positive rates. Inertial seizure detection devices coupled with video capture for recording seizures at night could stand to address collecting seizure counts that are more accurate than current patient self-reporting during day and night time use. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The Path to Enlightenment: Making Sense of Genomic and Proteomic Information

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas genomics describes the study of genome, mainly represented by its gene expression on the DNA or RNA level, the term proteomics denotes the study of the proteome, which is the protein complement encoded by the genome. In recent years, the number of proteomic experiments increased tremendously. While all fields of proteomics have made major technological advances, the biggest step was seen in bioinformatics. Biological information management relies on sequence and structure databases an...

  12. 蛋白质组技术在中药配伍药理学和毒理学机制研究中的应用%Application of proteomics technologies pharmacology and toxicology mechanismsof in traditional Chinese medicine compatibility study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程汉兴; 孙爱华; 姜颖

    2015-01-01

    配伍用药是中药遣药组方、辨证施治的主要形式和应用特点。组方的宜忌多来自前人经验的总结,大多缺少相应的分子机制研究做配伍的理论支撑。作为规模化研究蛋白质的工具,蛋白质组技术可以从整体水平,较全面地呈现中药多种有效成分进入机体后发挥的多途径、多靶点调控过程,进而揭示中药配伍发挥宜忌作用的分子机制。本文对近年蛋白质组技术,包括双向电泳、荧光双向差异凝胶电泳技术和基于稳定同位素标记的相对和绝对定量技术在中药配伍宜忌和相应的药理毒理学机制研究中的应用进行综述,为进一步探讨中药配伍宜忌原理,更好地实现中药现代化和实际临床用药发展提供理论指导基础。%Traditional Chinese medicine(TCM)compatibility is related to the safety of clinical use of drugs and embodies the essence of interactions between drugs and organisms. This is a scientific problem thatr has attracted more attention. Currently, most of the knowledge on TCM compatibility is from predecessors′ experience. The corresponding molecular biology mechanism is poorly understood. As a powerful tool to identify a large number of proteins simultaneously,proteomics technology has the potential to reveal the protein alterations under certain conditions,and to provide more direct insights into biological processes during TCM compatibility. In this paper,we introduced the main technology of proteomics,including two dimensional gel electrophoresis,2D-DIGE,iTRAQ, QconCAT/MRM and chemical proteomics. Also,the applications of these technologies in the field of TCMM compatibility study were reviewed.

  13. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Triplex DNA-binding proteins are associated with clinical outcomes revealed by proteomic measurements in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Laura D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in mammalian genomes can induce formation of alternative non-B DNA structures such as triplexes and guanine (G-quadruplexes. These structures can induce mutagenesis, chromosomal translocations and genomic instability. We wanted to determine if proteins that bind triplex DNA structures are quantitatively or qualitatively different between colorectal tumor and adjacent normal tissue and if this binding activity correlates with patient clinical characteristics. Methods Extracts from 63 human colorectal tumor and adjacent normal tissues were examined by gel shifts (EMSA for triplex DNA-binding proteins, which were correlated with clinicopathological tumor characteristics using the Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s rho, Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox log-rank tests. Biotinylated triplex DNA and streptavidin agarose affinity binding were used to purify triplex-binding proteins in RKO cells. Western blotting and reverse-phase protein array were used to measure protein expression in tissue extracts. Results Increased triplex DNA-binding activity in tumor extracts correlated significantly with lymphatic disease, metastasis, and reduced overall survival. We identified three multifunctional splicing factors with biotinylated triplex DNA affinity: U2AF65 in cytoplasmic extracts, and PSF and p54nrb in nuclear extracts. Super-shift EMSA with anti-U2AF65 antibodies produced a shifted band of the major EMSA H3 complex, identifying U2AF65 as the protein present in the major EMSA band. U2AF65 expression correlated significantly with EMSA H3 values in all extracts and was higher in extracts from Stage III/IV vs. Stage I/II colon tumors (p = 0.024. EMSA H3 values and U2AF65 expression also correlated significantly with GSK3 beta, beta-catenin, and NF- B p65 expression, whereas p54nrb and PSF expression correlated with c-Myc, cyclin D1, and CDK4. EMSA values and expression of all three splicing factors correlated

  15. Polyphemus, Odysseus and the ovine milk proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Fasoli, Elisa; Di Francesco, Antonella; Saletti, Rosaria; Muccilli, Vera; Gallina, Serafina; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Foti, Salvatore

    2017-01-30

    In the last years the amount of ovine milk production, mainly used to formulate a wide range of different and exclusive dairy products often categorized as gourmet food, has been progressively increasing. Taking also into account that sheep milk (SM) also appears to be potentially less allergenic than cow's one, an in-depth information about its protein composition is essential to improve the comprehension of its potential benefits for human consumption. The present work reports the results of an in-depth characterization of SM whey proteome, carried out by coupling the CPLL technology with SDS-PAGE and high resolution UPLC-nESI MS/MS analysis. This approach allowed the identification of 718 different protein components, 644 of which are from unique genes. Particularly, this identification has expanded literature data about sheep whey proteome by 193 novel proteins previously undetected, many of which are involved in the defence/immunity mechanisms or in the nutrient delivery system. A comparative analysis of SM proteome known to date with cow's milk proteome, evidenced that while about 29% of SM proteins are also present in CM, 71% of the identified components appear to be unique of SM proteome and include a heterogeneous group of components which seem to have health-promoting benefits. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteomics in Argentina - limitations and future perspectives: A special emphasis on meat proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Silvina; Almeida, André M

    2015-11-01

    Argentina is one of the most relevant countries in Latin America, playing a major role in regional economics, culture and science. Over the last 80 years, Argentinean history has been characterized by several upward and downward phases that had major consequences on the development of science in the country and most recently on proteomics. In this article, we characterize the evolution of Proteomics sciences in Argentina over the last decade and a half. We describe the proteomics publication output of the country in the framework of the regional and international contexts, demonstrating that Argentina is solidly anchored in a regional context, showing results similar to other emergent and Latin American countries, albeit still far from the European, American or Australian realities. We also provide a case-study on the importance of Proteomics to a specific sector in the area of food science: the use of bacteria of technological interest, highlighting major achievements obtained by Argentinean proteomics scientists. Finally, we provide a general picture of the endeavors being undertaken by Argentinean Proteomics scientists and their international collaborators to promote the Proteomics-based research with the new generation of scientists and PhD students in both Argentina and other countries in the Southern cone. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. [Methods of quantitative proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A T; Zgoda, V G

    2007-01-01

    In modern science proteomic analysis is inseparable from other fields of systemic biology. Possessing huge resources quantitative proteomics operates colossal information on molecular mechanisms of life. Advances in proteomics help researchers to solve complex problems of cell signaling, posttranslational modification, structure and functional homology of proteins, molecular diagnostics etc. More than 40 various methods have been developed in proteomics for quantitative analysis of proteins. Although each method is unique and has certain advantages and disadvantages all these use various isotope labels (tags). In this review we will consider the most popular and effective methods employing both chemical modifications of proteins and also metabolic and enzymatic methods of isotope labeling.

  18. Network analysis of quantitative proteomics on asthmatic bronchi: effects of inhaled glucocorticoid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihlbom Carina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomic studies of respiratory disorders have the potential to identify protein biomarkers for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Utilisation of sensitive quantitative proteomic methods creates opportunities to determine individual patient proteomes. The aim of the current study was to determine if quantitative proteomics of bronchial biopsies from asthmatics can distinguish relevant biological functions and whether inhaled glucocorticoid treatment affects these functions. Methods Endobronchial biopsies were taken from untreated asthmatic patients (n = 12 and healthy controls (n = 3. Asthmatic patients were randomised to double blind treatment with either placebo or budesonide (800 μg daily for 3 months and new biopsies were obtained. Proteins extracted from the biopsies were digested and analysed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation combined with a nanoLC-LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Spectra obtained were used to identify and quantify proteins. Pathways analysis was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to identify significant biological pathways in asthma and determine how the expression of these pathways was changed by treatment. Results More than 1800 proteins were identified and quantified in the bronchial biopsies of subjects. The pathway analysis revealed acute phase response signalling, cell-to-cell signalling and tissue development associations with proteins expressed in asthmatics compared to controls. The functions and pathways associated with placebo and budesonide treatment showed distinct differences, including the decreased association with acute phase proteins as a result of budesonide treatment compared to placebo. Conclusions Proteomic analysis of bronchial biopsy material can be used to identify and quantify proteins using highly sensitive technologies, without the need for pooling of samples from several patients. Distinct pathophysiological features of asthma can be

  19. Towards understanding healthcare professionals' adoption and use of technologies in clinical practice: Using Qmethodology and models of technology acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladan, Muhammad Awwal; Wharrad, Heather; Windle, Richard

    2018-03-09

    Technologies have globally been recognised to improve productivity across different areas of practice including healthcare. This has been achieved due to the expansion of computers and other forms of information technologies. Despite this advancement, there has also been the growing challenge of the adoption and use of these technologies within practice and especially in healthcare. The evolution of information technologies and more specifically e-health within the healthcare practice has its own barriers and facilitators. This paper describes a pilot study to explore these factors that influence information and technology adoption and use by health professionals in the clinical area in Sub-Saharan Africa. We report on the use of Q-methodology and the models of technology acceptance used in combination for the first time. The methodology used for this study aims to explore the subjectivity of healthcare professionals and present their shared views (factors) on their adoption and use of e-health within clinical practice.

  20. Anthelmintic metabolism in parasitic helminths: proteomic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Peter M; MacKintosh, Neil; Morphew, Russell M

    2012-08-01

    Anthelmintics are the cornerstone of parasitic helminth control. Surprisingly, understanding of the biochemical pathways used by parasitic helminths to detoxify anthelmintics is fragmented, despite the increasing global threat of anthelmintic resistance within the ruminant and equine industries. Reductionist biochemistry has likely over-estimated the enzymatic role of glutathione transferases in anthelmintic metabolism and neglected the potential role of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily (CYPs). Proteomic technologies offers the opportunity to support genomics, reverse genetics and pharmacokinetics, and provide an integrated insight into both the cellular mechanisms underpinning response to anthelmintics and also the identification of biomarker panels for monitoring the development of anthelmintic resistance. To date, there have been limited attempts to include proteomics in anthelmintic metabolism studies. Optimisations of membrane, post-translational modification and interaction proteomic technologies in helminths are needed to especially study Phase I CYPs and Phase III ABC transporter pumps for anthelmintics and their metabolites.

  1. The Use of Proteomics in Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteria, Ioanna; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Chrousos, George P; Tsangaris, George T

    2017-01-01

    Despite the explosive increase in the use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) over the last 30 years, their success rates remain suboptimal. Proteomics is a rapidly-evolving technology-driven science that has already been widely applied in the exploration of human reproduction and fertility, providing useful insights into its physiology and leading to the identification of numerous proteins that may be potential biomarkers and/or treatment targets of a successful ART pregnancy. Here we present a brief overview of the techniques used in proteomic analyses and attempt a comprehensive presentation of recent data from mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies in humans, regarding all components of ARTs, including the male and female gamete, the derived zygote and embryo, the endometrium and, finally, the ART offspring both pre- and postnatally. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. The Design and Development of a Technology Based Orientation Manual for Clinical Research Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to use technology to develop an on-line orientation manual for clinical research coordinators. Many clinical research coordinators begin their careers as staff nurses and have little knowledge related to clinical research. As such, when they transition to a career in clinical research they lack the knowledge…

  3. Access to augmentative and alternative communication: new technologies and clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fager, Susan; Bardach, Lisa; Russell, Susanne; Higginbotham, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Children with severe physical impairments require a variety of access options to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and computer technology. Access technologies have continued to develop, allowing children with severe motor control impairments greater independence and access to communication. This article will highlight new advances in access technology, including eye and head tracking, scanning, and access to mainstream technology, as well as discuss future advances. Considerations for clinical decision-making and implementation of these technologies will be presented along with case illustrations.

  4. The Modified Technology Acceptance Model for Private Clinical Physicians: A Case Study in Malaysia, Penang

    OpenAIRE

    Annie Ng Cheng San; Choy Johnn Yee

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia’s private clinic is wealth creator. To enhance its sustainable future, healthcare Information Technology (IT) change is inevitable. However, its’ IT acceptance is limited. The past literatures showed physicians have different technology acceptance decision as compare to common users. Hence, understanding the physicians’ technology acceptance is critical for technology management success. This study aims to gauge the factors influence technology acceptance decision among the physician...

  5. Patient- and Provider-Centered Design of an Outpatient Diabetes Technology Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, Angela M.; Scalzo, Patricia; Bach, Sarah M.; Kudva, Yogish C.

    2016-01-01

    The number of US patients using diabetes technology is increasing, and sophisticated technologies continue to emerge. Patients using diabetes technology require access to providers prepared to offer care in this rapidly changing field. The authors sought to identify factors important to both patients using diabetes technology and providers caring for such patients. They redesigned the Diabetes Technology Clinic at an academic group practice in response to the needs of patients and providers. ...

  6. Spermatogenesis in mammals: proteomic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocu, Sophie; Calvel, Pierre; Rolland, Antoine D; Pineau, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly sophisticated process involved in the transmission of genetic heritage. It includes halving ploidy, repackaging of the chromatin for transport, and the equipment of developing spermatids and eventually spermatozoa with the advanced apparatus (e.g., tightly packed mitochondrial sheat in the mid piece, elongating of the tail, reduction of cytoplasmic volume) to elicit motility once they reach the epididymis. Mammalian spermatogenesis is divided into three phases. In the first the primitive germ cells or spermatogonia undergo a series of mitotic divisions. In the second the spermatocytes undergo two consecutive divisions in meiosis to produce haploid spermatids. In the third the spermatids differentiate into spermatozoa in a process called spermiogenesis. Paracrine, autocrine, juxtacrine, and endocrine pathways all contribute to the regulation of the process. The array of structural elements and chemical factors modulating somatic and germ cell activity is such that the network linking the various cellular activities during spermatogenesis is unimaginably complex. Over the past two decades, advances in genomics have greatly improved our knowledge of spermatogenesis, by identifying numerous genes essential for the development of functional male gametes. Large-scale analyses of testicular function have deepened our insight into normal and pathological spermatogenesis. Progress in genome sequencing and microarray technology have been exploited for genome-wide expression studies, leading to the identification of hundreds of genes differentially expressed within the testis. However, although proteomics has now come of age, the proteomics-based investigation of spermatogenesis remains in its infancy. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of large-scale proteomic analyses of spermatogenesis, from germ cell development during sex determination to spermatogenesis in the adult. Indeed, a few laboratories have undertaken differential protein profiling

  7. Proteomics of Rice Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongli eHe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seed is a condensed form of plant. Under suitable environmental conditions, it can resume the metabolic activity from physiological quiescent status, and mobilize the reserves, biosynthesize new proteins, regenerate organelles and cell membrane, eventually protrude the radicle and enter into seedling establishment. So far, how these activities are regulated in a coordinated and sequential manner is largely unknown. With the availability of more and more genome sequence information and the development of mass spectrometry (MS technology, proteomics has been widely applied in analyzing the mechanisms of different biological processes, and proved to be very powerful. Regulation of rice seed germination is critical for rice cultivation. In recent years, a lot of proteomic studies have been conducted in exploring the gene expression regulation, reserves mobilization and metabolisms reactivation, which brings us new insights on the mechanisms of metabolism regulation during this process. Nevertheless, it also invokes a lot of questions. In this mini-review, we summarized the progress in the proteomic studies of rice seed germination. The current challenges and future perspectives were also discussed, which might be helpful for the following studies.

  8. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bonomini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(incompatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research.

  9. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Sirolli, Vittorio; Pieroni, Luisa; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Urbani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(in)compatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research. PMID:26690416

  10. Proteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a methodological outline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fey, S J; Nawrocki, A; Görg, A

    1997-01-01

    Proteome analysis offers a unique means of identifying important proteins, characterizing their modifications and beginning to describe their function. This is achieved through the combination of two technologies: protein separation and selection by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and protei...

  11. 75 FR 62844 - Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... state of device systems for autonomous systems for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, the challenges in...] Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial Pancreas (an... a public workshop entitled ``Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical...

  12. Health information technology: integration of clinical workflow into meaningful use of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowens, Felicia M; Frye, Patricia A; Jones, Warren A

    2010-10-01

    This article examines the role that clinical workflow plays in successful implementation and meaningful use of electronic health record (EHR) technology in ambulatory care. The benefits and barriers of implementing EHRs in ambulatory care settings are discussed. The researchers conclude that widespread adoption and meaningful use of EHR technology rely on the successful integration of health information technology (HIT) into clinical workflow. Without successful integration of HIT into clinical workflow, clinicians in today's ambulatory care settings will continue to resist adoption and implementation of EHR technology.

  13. Video Release: 47th Vice President of the United States Joseph R. Biden Jr. Speech at HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) has released a video of the keynote speech given by the 47th Vice President of the United States of America Joseph R. Biden Jr. at the HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala. Under the gala theme “International Cooperation in the Fight Against Cancer,” Biden recognized cancer as a collection of related diseases, the importance of data sharing and harmonization, and the need for collaboration across scientific disciplines as inflection points in cancer research.

  14. Proteomic and metallomic strategies for understanding the mode of action of anticancer metallodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, Chiara; Magherini, Francesca; Modesti, Alessandra; Messori, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin and its introduction in the clinics, metal compounds have been intensely investigated in view of their possible application in cancer therapy. In this frame, a deeper understanding of their mode of action, still rather obscure, might turn crucial for the design and the obtainment of new and better anticancer agents. Due to the extreme complexity of the biological systems, it is now widely accepted that innovative and information-rich methods are absolutely needed to afford such a goal. Recently, both proteomic and metallomic strategies were successfully implemented for the elucidation of specific mechanistic features of anticancer metallodrugs within an innovative "Systems Biology" perspective. Particular attention was paid to the following issues: i) proteomic studies of the molecular basis of platinum resistance; ii) proteomic analysis of cellular responses to cytotoxic metallodrugs; iii) metallomic studies of the transformation and fate of metallodrugs in cellular systems. Notably, those pioneering studies, that are reviewed here, allowed a significant progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of metal based drugs at the cellular level. A further extension of those studies and a closer integration of proteomic and metallomic strategies and technologies might realistically lead to rapid and significant advancements in the mechanistic knowledge of anticancer metallodrugs.

  15. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  16. Reconciling proteomics with next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teck Yew; Heck, Albert Jr

    2015-01-01

    Both genomics and proteomics technologies have matured in the last decade to a level where they are able to deliver system-wide data on the qualitative and quantitative abundance of their respective molecular entities, that is DNA/RNA and proteins. A next logical step is the collective use of these

  17. Impact of Virgin Olive Oil and Phenol-Enriched Virgin Olive Oils on the HDL Proteome in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects: A Double Blind, Randomized, Controlled, Cross-Over Clinical Trial (VOHF Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pedret

    Full Text Available The effects of olive oil phenolic compounds (PCs on HDL proteome, with respect to new aspects of cardioprotective properties, are still unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on the HDL protein cargo of the intake of virgin olive oil (VOO and two functional VOOs, enriched with their own PCs (FVOO or complemented with thyme PCs (FVOOT, in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Eligible volunteers were recruited from the IMIM-Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (Spain from April 2012 to September 2012. Thirty-three hypercholesterolemic participants (total cholesterol >200 mg/dL; 19 men and 14 women; aged 35 to 80 years were randomized in the double-blind, controlled, cross-over VOHF clinical trial. The subjects received for 3 weeks 25 mL/day of: VOO, FVOO, or FVOOT. Using a quantitative proteomics approach, 127 HDL-associated proteins were identified. Among these, 15 were commonly differently expressed after the three VOO interventions compared to baseline, with specific changes observed for each intervention. The 15 common proteins were mainly involved in the following pathways: LXR/RXR activation, acute phase response, and atherosclerosis. The three VOOs were well tolerated by all participants. Consumption of VOO, or phenol-enriched VOOs, has an impact on the HDL proteome in a cardioprotective mode by up-regulating proteins related to cholesterol homeostasis, protection against oxidation and blood coagulation while down-regulating proteins implicated in acute-phase response, lipid transport, and immune response. The common observed protein expression modifications after the three VOOs indicate a major matrix effect.International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials ISRCTN77500181.

  18. Impact of Virgin Olive Oil and Phenol-Enriched Virgin Olive Oils on the HDL Proteome in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects: A Double Blind, Randomized, Controlled, Cross-Over Clinical Trial (VOHF Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedret, Anna; Catalán, Úrsula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Farràs, Marta; Valls, Rosa-M; Rubió, Laura; Canela, Núria; Aragonés, Gerard; Romeu, Marta; Castañer, Olga; de la Torre, Rafael; Covas, Maria-Isabel; Fitó, Montse; Motilva, Maria-José; Solà, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The effects of olive oil phenolic compounds (PCs) on HDL proteome, with respect to new aspects of cardioprotective properties, are still unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on the HDL protein cargo of the intake of virgin olive oil (VOO) and two functional VOOs, enriched with their own PCs (FVOO) or complemented with thyme PCs (FVOOT), in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Eligible volunteers were recruited from the IMIM-Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (Spain) from April 2012 to September 2012. Thirty-three hypercholesterolemic participants (total cholesterol >200 mg/dL; 19 men and 14 women; aged 35 to 80 years) were randomized in the double-blind, controlled, cross-over VOHF clinical trial. The subjects received for 3 weeks 25 mL/day of: VOO, FVOO, or FVOOT. Using a quantitative proteomics approach, 127 HDL-associated proteins were identified. Among these, 15 were commonly differently expressed after the three VOO interventions compared to baseline, with specific changes observed for each intervention. The 15 common proteins were mainly involved in the following pathways: LXR/RXR activation, acute phase response, and atherosclerosis. The three VOOs were well tolerated by all participants. Consumption of VOO, or phenol-enriched VOOs, has an impact on the HDL proteome in a cardioprotective mode by up-regulating proteins related to cholesterol homeostasis, protection against oxidation and blood coagulation while down-regulating proteins implicated in acute-phase response, lipid transport, and immune response. The common observed protein expression modifications after the three VOOs indicate a major matrix effect. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials ISRCTN77500181.

  19. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  20. Proteomics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, P

    2000-04-01

    The techniques of proteomics (high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein characterisation) are widely used for microbiological research to analyse global protein synthesis as an indicator of gene expression. The rapid progress in microbial proteomics has been achieved through the wide availability of whole genome sequences for a number of bacterial groups. Beyond providing a basic understanding of microbial gene expression, proteomics has also played a role in medical areas of microbiology. Progress has been made in the use of the techniques for investigating the epidemiology and taxonomy of human microbial pathogens, the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms and the analysis of drug resistance. In each of these areas, proteomics has provided new insights that complement genomic-based investigations. This review describes the current progress in these research fields and highlights some of the technical challenges existing for the application of proteomics in medical microbiology. The latter concern the analysis of genetically heterogeneous bacterial populations and the integration of the proteomic and genomic data for these bacteria. The characterisation of the proteomes of bacterial pathogens growing in their natural hosts remains a future challenge.

  1. ProteomicsDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Samaras, Patroklos; Frejno, Martin; Gessulat, Siegfried; Barnert, Maximilian; Kienegger, Harald; Krcmar, Helmut; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Kuster, Bernhard; Wilhelm, Mathias

    2018-01-04

    ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is a protein-centric in-memory database for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. ProteomicsDB was first released in 2014 to enable the interactive exploration of the first draft of the human proteome. To date, it contains quantitative data from 78 projects totalling over 19k LC-MS/MS experiments. A standardized analysis pipeline enables comparisons between multiple datasets to facilitate the exploration of protein expression across hundreds of tissues, body fluids and cell lines. We recently extended the data model to enable the storage and integrated visualization of other quantitative omics data. This includes transcriptomics data from e.g. NCBI GEO, protein-protein interaction information from STRING, functional annotations from KEGG, drug-sensitivity/selectivity data from several public sources and reference mass spectra from the ProteomeTools project. The extended functionality transforms ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource connecting quantification and meta-data for each protein. The rich user interface helps researchers to navigate all data sources in either a protein-centric or multi-protein-centric manner. Several options are available to download data manually, while our application programming interface enables accessing quantitative data systematically. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Recent technological advances in computed tomography and the clinical impact therein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M; Marquez, Herman; Andreisek, Gustav; Valavanis, Anton; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2015-02-01

    Current technological advances in CT, specifically those with a major impact on clinical imaging, are discussed. The intent was to provide for both medical physicists and practicing radiologists a summary of the clinical impact of each advance, offering guidance in terms of utility and day-to-day clinical implementation, with specific attention to radiation dose reduction.

  3. Knowledge Translation: Moving Proteomics Science to Innovation in Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Christina; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-06-01

    Proteomics is one of the pivotal next-generation biotechnologies in the current "postgenomics" era. Little is known about the ways in which innovative proteomics science is navigating the complex socio-political space between laboratory and society. It cannot be assumed that the trajectory between proteomics laboratory and society is linear and unidirectional. Concerned about public accountability and hopes for knowledge-based innovations, funding agencies and citizens increasingly expect that emerging science and technologies, such as proteomics, are effectively translated and disseminated as innovation in society. Here, we describe translation strategies promoted in the knowledge translation (KT) and science communication literatures and examine the use of these strategies within the field of proteomics. Drawing on data generated from qualitative interviews with proteomics scientists and ethnographic observation of international proteomics conferences over a 5-year period, we found that proteomics science incorporates a variety of KT strategies to reach knowledge users outside the field. To attain the full benefit of KT, however, proteomics scientists must challenge their own normative assumptions and approaches to innovation dissemination-beyond the current paradigm relying primarily on publication for one's scientific peers within one's field-and embrace the value of broader (interdisciplinary) KT strategies in promoting the uptake of their research. Notably, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is paying increasing attention to a broader range of KT strategies, including targeted dissemination, integrated KT, and public outreach. We suggest that increasing the variety of KT strategies employed by proteomics scientists is timely and would serve well the omics system sciences community.

  4. Human Saliva Collection Devices for Proteomics: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in the interest and adaptation of saliva as a diagnostic specimen over the last decade, and in the last few years in particular, there have been major developments involving the application of saliva as a clinically relevant specimen. Saliva provides a “window” into the oral and systemic health of an individual, and like other bodily fluids, saliva can be analyzed and studied to diagnose diseases. With the advent of new, more sensitive technologies to detect smaller concentrations of analytes in saliva relative to blood levels, there have been a number of critical developments in the field that we will describe. In particular, recent advances in standardized saliva collection devices that were not available three to four years ago, have made it easy for safe, simple, and non-invasive collection of samples to be carried out from patients. With the availability of these new technologies, we believe that in the next decade salivary proteomics will make it possible to predict and diagnose oral as well as systemic diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases, among others. The aim of this article is to review recent developments and advances in the area of saliva specimen collection devices and applications that will advance the field of proteomics.

  5. Proteomic approaches in cancer risk and response assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A

    2004-02-01

    Proteomics is more than just a list-generating exercise where increases or decreases in protein expression are identified. Proteomic technologies will ultimately characterize information-flow through the protein circuitry that interconnects the extracellular microenvironment to the serum or plasma macroenvironment through intracellular signaling systems and their control of gene transcription. The nature of this information can be a cause or a consequence of disease processes and how patients respond to therapy. Analysis of human cancer as a model for how proteomics can have an impact at the bedside can take advantage of several promising new proteomic technologies. These technologies are being developed for early detection and risk assessment, therapeutic targeting and patient-tailored therapy.

  6. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture: applications and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Pedro M; Silva, Tomé S; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming

    2012-07-19

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5 million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous growth in production is still expected for decades to come. Aquaculture is, though, a very competitive market, and a global awareness regarding the use of scientific knowledge and emerging technologies to obtain a better farmed organism through a sustainable production has enhanced the importance of proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adoption of health information technologies by physicians for clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villalba-Mora, Elena; Casas, Isabel; Lupiañez-Villanueva, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated the level of adoption of Health Information Technologies (HIT) services, and the factors that influence this, amongst specialised and primary care physicians; in Andalusia, Spain. METHODS: We analysed the physicians' responses to an online survey. First, we performed...... Technologies: Electronic Health Records (EHR), ePrescription and patient management and telemedicine services. Results from an ordered logit model showed that the frequency of use of HIT is associated with the physicians' perceived usefulness. Lack of financing appeared as a common barrier to the adoption...

  8. Global proteomics profiling improves drug sensitivity prediction: results from a multi-omics, pan-cancer modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mehreen; Khan, Suleiman A; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero

    2018-04-15

    Proteomics profiling is increasingly being used for molecular stratification of cancer patients and cell-line panels. However, systematic assessment of the predictive power of large-scale proteomic technologies across various drug classes and cancer types is currently lacking. To that end, we carried out the first pan-cancer, multi-omics comparative analysis of the relative performance of two proteomic technologies, targeted reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and global mass spectrometry (MS), in terms of their accuracy for predicting the sensitivity of cancer cells to both cytotoxic chemotherapeutics and molecularly targeted anticancer compounds. Our results in two cell-line panels demonstrate how MS profiling improves drug response predictions beyond that of the RPPA or the other omics profiles when used alone. However, frequent missing MS data values complicate its use in predictive modeling and required additional filtering, such as focusing on completely measured or known oncoproteins, to obtain maximal predictive performance. Rather strikingly, the two proteomics profiles provided complementary predictive signal both for the cytotoxic and targeted compounds. Further, information about the cellular-abundance of primary target proteins was found critical for predicting the response of targeted compounds, although the non-target features also contributed significantly to the predictive power. The clinical relevance of the selected protein markers was confirmed in cancer patient data. These results provide novel insights into the relative performance and optimal use of the widely applied proteomic technologies, MS and RPPA, which should prove useful in translational applications, such as defining the best combination of omics technologies and marker panels for understanding and predicting drug sensitivities in cancer patients. Processed datasets, R as well as Matlab implementations of the methods are available at https://github.com/mehr-een/bemkl-rbps. mehreen

  9. Teachers' Use of Technology in a Reading Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Reuber, Kristin; Robinson, Corrine

    2001-01-01

    Explains results when graduate students studying to become reading specialists tutored struggling readers in one-on-one sessions in which the clinicians were required to make significant use of technology in their instruction. Concludes that clinicians often did not have clear reading or literacy objectives when using computer-based instruction.…

  10. Biological ageing and clinical consequences of modern technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriazis, Marios

    2017-08-01

    The pace of technology is steadily increasing, and this has a widespread effect on all areas of health and society. When we interact with this technological environment we are exposed to a wide variety of new stimuli and challenges, which may modulate the stress response and thus change the way we respond and adapt. In this Opinion paper I will examine certain aspects of the human-computer interaction with regards to health and ageing. There are practical, everyday effects which also include social and cultural elements. I will discuss how human evolution may be affected by this new environmental change (the hormetic immersion in a virtual/technological environment). Finally, I will also explore certain biological aspects which have direct relevance to the ageing human. By embracing new technologies and engaging with a techno-social ecosystem (which is no longer formed by several interacting species, but by just two main elements: humans and machines), we may be subjected to beneficial hormetic effects, which upregulate the stress response and modulate adaptation. This is likely to improve overall health as we age and, as I speculate here, may also result in the reduction of age-related dysfunction.

  11. Health Technology Assessment of pathogen reduction technologies applied to plasma for clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Americo; Berrino, Alexandra; Casini, Marina; Codella, Paola; Facco, Giuseppina; Fiore, Alessandra; Marano, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Marco; Midolo, Emanuela; Minacori, Roberta; Refolo, Pietro; Romano, Federica; Ruggeri, Matteo; Sacchini, Dario; Spagnolo, Antonio G.; Urbina, Irene; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains. Plasma treated with amotosalen + UV light, riboflavin + UV light, methylene blue or a solvent/detergent process was compared to fresh-frozen plasma with regards to current use, technical features, effectiveness, safety, economic and organisational impact, and ethical, social and legal implications. The available evidence is not sufficient to state which of the techniques compared is superior in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. Evidence on efficacy is only available for the solvent/detergent method, which proved to be non-inferior to untreated fresh-frozen plasma in the treatment of a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. With regards to safety, the solvent/detergent technique apparently has the most favourable risk-benefit profile. Further research is needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the cost-effectiveness profile of the different pathogen-reduction techniques. The wide heterogeneity of results and the lack of comparative evidence are reasons why more comparative studies need to be performed. PMID:27403740

  12. Factors shaping effective utilization of health information technology in urban safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Garth, Belinda; Fish, Allison; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Urban safety-net clinics are considered prime targets for the adoption of health information technology innovations; however, little is known about their utilization in such safety-net settings. Current scholarship provides limited guidance on the implementation of health information technology into safety-net settings as it typically assumes that adopting institutions have sufficient basic resources. This study addresses this gap by exploring the unique challenges urban resource-poor safety-net clinics must consider when adopting and utilizing health information technology. In-depth interviews (N = 15) were used with key stakeholders (clinic chief executive officers, medical directors, nursing directors, chief financial officers, and information technology directors) from staff at four clinics to explore (a) nonhealth information technology-related clinic needs, (b) how health information technology may provide solutions, and (c) perceptions of and experiences with health information technology. Participants identified several challenges, some of which appear amenable to health information technology solutions. Also identified were requirements for effective utilization of health information technology including physical infrastructural improvements, funding for equipment/training, creation of user groups to share health information technology knowledge/experiences, and specially tailored electronic billing guidelines. We found that despite the potential benefit that can be derived from health information technologies, the unplanned and uninformed introduction of these tools into these settings might actually create more problems than are solved. From these data, we were able to identify a set of factors that should be considered when integrating health information technology into the existing workflows of low-resourced urban safety-net clinics in order to maximize their utilization and enhance the quality of health care in such settings.

  13. Proteomic profile of serum of pregnant women carring a fetus with Down syndrome using nano uplc Q-tof ms/ms technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Uriarte, Graciela Arelí; Burciaga Flores, Carlos Horacio; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Medina Aguado, María Magdalena; Gómez Puente, Viviana Maricela; Romero Gutiérrez, Liliana Nayeli; Martínez de Villarreal, Laura Elia

    2018-06-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS) is based on the calculated risk of maternal age, biochemical and ultrasonographic markers and recently by cfDNA. Differences in proteomic profiles may give an opportunity to find new biomarkers. Characterize proteome of serum of mothers carrying DS fetus. Blood serum samples of three groups of women were obtained, (a) 10 non-pregnant, (b) 10 pregnant with healthy fetus by ultrasound evaluation, (c) nine pregnant with DS fetus. Sample preparation was as follows: Albumin/IgG depletion, desalting, and trypsin digestion; the process was performed in nanoUPLC MS/MS. Data analysis was made with Mass Lynx 4.1 and ProteinLynx Global Server 3.0, peptide and protein recognition by MASCOT algorithm and UNIPROT-Swissprot database. Each group showed different protein profiles. Some proteins were shared between groups. Only sera from pregnant women showed proteins related to immune and clot pathways. Mothers with DS fetus had 42 specific proteins. We found a different serum protein profile in mothers carrying DS fetuses that do not reflect expression of genes in the extra chromosome. Further studies will be necessary to establish the role of these proteins in aneuploid fetus and analyze their possible use as potential biomarkers.

  14. Technology and the evolution of clinical methods for stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Ann; Meredith, Grant

    2011-06-01

    The World Wide Web (WWW) was 20 years old last year. Enormous amounts of information about stuttering are now available to anyone who can access the Internet. Compared to 20 years ago, people who stutter and their families can now make more informed choices about speech-language interventions, from a distance. Blogs and chat rooms provide opportunities for people who stutter to share their experiences from a distance and to support one another. New technologies are also being adopted into speech-language pathology practice and service delivery. Telehealth is an exciting development as it means that treatment can now be made available to many rural and remotely located people who previously did not have access to it. Possible future technological developments for speech-language pathology practice include Internet based treatments and the use of Virtual Reality. Having speech and CBT treatments for stuttering available on the Internet would greatly increase their accessibility. Second Life also has exciting possibilities for people who stutter. The reader will (1) explain how people who stutter and their families can get information about stuttering from the World Wide Web, (2) discuss how new technologies have been applied in speech-language pathology practice, and (3) summarize the principles and practice of telehealth delivery of services for people who stutter and their families. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Careers "Fact Sheets" for clinical engineering & biomedical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacela, A F

    1991-01-01

    Three Careers "Fact Sheets" include information on CE and BMET job titles, job descriptions, and certification. These materials are intended to aid in furthering professional recognition for Clinical Engineers and BMETs, and may be useful in communicating with Administration or Human Resources departments.

  16. EHDViz: clinical dashboard development using open-source technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgeley, Marcus A; Shameer, Khader; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Tomlinson, Max S; Levin, Matthew A; McCormick, Patrick J; Kasarskis, Andrew; Reich, David L; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-03-24

    To design, develop and prototype clinical dashboards to integrate high-frequency health and wellness data streams using interactive and real-time data visualisation and analytics modalities. We developed a clinical dashboard development framework called electronic healthcare data visualization (EHDViz) toolkit for generating web-based, real-time clinical dashboards for visualising heterogeneous biomedical, healthcare and wellness data. The EHDViz is an extensible toolkit that uses R packages for data management, normalisation and producing high-quality visualisations over the web using R/Shiny web server architecture. We have developed use cases to illustrate utility of EHDViz in different scenarios of clinical and wellness setting as a visualisation aid for improving healthcare delivery. Using EHDViz, we prototyped clinical dashboards to demonstrate the contextual versatility of EHDViz toolkit. An outpatient cohort was used to visualise population health management tasks (n=14,221), and an inpatient cohort was used to visualise real-time acuity risk in a clinical unit (n=445), and a quantified-self example using wellness data from a fitness activity monitor worn by a single individual was also discussed (n-of-1). The back-end system retrieves relevant data from data source, populates the main panel of the application and integrates user-defined data features in real-time and renders output using modern web browsers. The visualisation elements can be customised using health features, disease names, procedure names or medical codes to populate the visualisations. The source code of EHDViz and various prototypes developed using EHDViz are available in the public domain at http://ehdviz.dudleylab.org. Collaborative data visualisations, wellness trend predictions, risk estimation, proactive acuity status monitoring and knowledge of complex disease indicators are essential components of implementing data-driven precision medicine. As an open-source visualisation

  17. Healthcare Technology Management (HTM) of mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshioka, Jun; Nakane, Masaki; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilator failures expose patients to unacceptable risks, and maintaining mechanical ventilator safety is an important issue. We examined the usefulness of maintaining mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers (CEs) using a specialized calibrator. These evaluations and the ability to make in-house repairs proved useful for obviating the need to rent ventilators which, in turn, might prove faulty themselves. The CEs' involvement in maintaining mechanical ventilators is desirable...

  18. Healthcare Technology Management (HTM) of mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Jun; Nakane, Masaki; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilator failures expose patients to unacceptable risks, and maintaining mechanical ventilator safety is an important issue. We examined the usefulness of maintaining mechanical ventilators by clinical engineers (CEs) using a specialized calibrator. These evaluations and the ability to make in-house repairs proved useful for obviating the need to rent ventilators which, in turn, might prove faulty themselves. The CEs' involvement in maintaining mechanical ventilators is desirable, ensures prompt service, and, most importantly, enhances safe management of mechanical ventilators.

  19. Technological innovations in the development of cardiovascular clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Chen; Chang, Chung-Yi; Lee, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Jeen-Chen; Chan, Chien-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that computerized clinical case management and decision support systems can be used to assist surgeons in the diagnosis of disease, optimize surgical operation, aid in drug therapy and decrease the cost of medical treatment. Therefore, medical informatics has become an extensive field of research and many of these approaches have demonstrated potential value for improving medical quality. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based cardiovascular clinical information system (CIS) based on innovative techniques, such as electronic medical records, electronic registries and automatic feature surveillance schemes, to provide effective tools and support for clinical care, decision-making, biomedical research and training activities. The CIS developed for this study contained monitoring, surveillance and model construction functions. The monitoring layer function provided a visual user interface. At the surveillance and model construction layers, we explored the application of model construction and intelligent prognosis to aid in making preoperative and postoperative predictions. With the use of the CIS, surgeons can provide reasonable conclusions and explanations in uncertain environments.

  20. Advancing Porous Silicon Biosensor Technology for Use in Clinical Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Lisa Marie

    Inexpensive and robust analytical techniques for detecting molecular recognition events are in great demand in healthcare, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Despite vast research in this area, challanges remain to develop practical biomolecular platforms that, meet the rigorous demands of real-world applications. This includes maintaining low-cost devices that are sensitive and specific in complex test specimens, are stable after storage, have short assay time, and possess minimal complexity of instrumentation for readout. Nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) material has been identified as an ideal candidate towards achieving these goals and the past decade has seen diverse proof-of-principle studies developing optical-based sensing techniques. In Part 1 of this thesis, the impact of surface chemistry and PSi morphology on detection sensitivity of target molecules is investigated. Initial proof-of-concept that PSi devices facilitate detection of protein in whole blood is demonstrated. This work highlights the importance of material stability and blocking chemistry for sensor use in real world biological samples. In addition, the intrinisic filtering capability of the 3-D PSi morphology is shown as an advantage in complex solutions, such as whole blood. Ultimately, this initial work identified a need to improve detection sensitivity of the PSI biosensor technique to facilitate clinical diagnostic use over relevant target concentration ranges. The second part of this thesis, builds upon sensitivity challenges that are highlighted in the first part of the thesis and development of a surface-bound competitive inhibition immunoassay facilitated improved detection sensitivity of small molecular weight targets (opiates) over a relevant clinical concentration range. In addition, optimization of assay protocol addressed issues of maintaining stability of sensors after storage. Performance of the developed assay (specificity and sensitivity) was then validated in a

  1. Piloting Augmented Reality Technology to Enhance Realism in Clinical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jacqueline; Lister, Michael; Shaw, Ryan J

    2016-09-01

    We describe a pilot study that incorporated an innovative hybrid simulation designed to increase the perception of realism in a high-fidelity simulation. Prelicensure students (N = 12) cared for a manikin in a simulation lab scenario wearing Google Glass, a wearable head device that projected video into the students' field of vision. Students reported that the simulation gave them confidence that they were developing skills and knowledge to perform necessary tasks in a clinical setting and that they met the learning objectives of the simulation. The video combined visual images and cues seen in a real patient and created a sense of realism the manikin alone could not provide.

  2. Proteomic-coupled-network analysis of T877A-androgen receptor interactomes can predict clinical prostate cancer outcomes between White (non-Hispanic and African-American groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Zaman

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR remains an important contributor to the neoplastic evolution of prostate cancer (CaP. CaP progression is linked to several somatic AR mutational changes that endow upon the AR dramatic gain-of-function properties. One of the most common somatic mutations identified is Thr877-to-Ala (T877A, located in the ligand-binding domain, that results in a receptor capable of promiscuous binding and activation by a variety of steroid hormones and ligands including estrogens, progestins, glucocorticoids, and several anti-androgens. In an attempt to further define somatic mutated AR gain-of-function properties, as a consequence of its promiscuous ligand binding, we undertook a proteomic/network analysis approach to characterize the protein interactome of the mutant T877A-AR in LNCaP cells under eight different ligand-specific treatments (dihydrotestosterone, mibolerone, R1881, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, dexamethasone, and cyproterone acetate. In extending the analysis of our multi-ligand complexes of the mutant T877A-AR we observed significant enrichment of specific complexes between normal and primary prostatic tumors, which were furthermore correlated with known clinical outcomes. Further analysis of certain mutant T877A-AR complexes showed specific population preferences distinguishing primary prostatic disease between white (non-Hispanic vs. African-American males. Moreover, these cancer-related AR-protein complexes demonstrated predictive survival outcomes specific to CaP, and not for breast, lung, lymphoma or medulloblastoma cancers. Our study, by coupling data generated by our proteomics to network analysis of clinical samples, has helped to define real and novel biological pathways in complicated gain-of-function AR complex systems.

  3. "Does understanding the brain need proteomics and does understanding proteomics need brains?"--Second HUPO HBPP Workshop hosted in Paris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Michael; Klose, Joachim; Rossier, Jean; Marcus, Katrin; Meyer, Helmut E

    2004-07-01

    The second Human Brain Proteome Project (HBPP) Workshop of the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) took place at the Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (ESPCI) from April 23-24, 2004. During two days, more than 70 attendees from Europe, Asia and the US came together to decide basic strategic approaches, standards and the beginning of a pilot phase prior to further studies of the human brain proteome. The international consortium presented the technological and scientific portfolio and scheduled the time table for the next year.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based bacterial proteomics: focus on dermatological associated microbial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef eSoufi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition of human skin acts as a natural habitat for various bacterial species that function in a commensal and symbiotic fashion. In a healthy individual, bacterial flora serves to protect the host. Under certain conditions such as minor trauma, impaired host immunity, or environmental factors, the risk of developing skin infections is increased. Although a large majority of bacterial associated skin infections are common, a portion can potentially manifest into clinically significant morbidity. For example, Gram positive species that typically reside on the skin such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus can cause numerous epidermal (impetigo, ecthyma and dermal (cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, erysipelas skin infections. Moreover, the increasing incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance represents a serious challenge to modern medicine and threatens the health care system. Therefore, it is critical to develop tools and strategies that can allow us to better elucidate the nature and mechanism of bacterial virulence. To this end, mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics has been revolutionizing biomedical research, and has positively impacted the microbiology field. Advances in MS technologies have paved the way for numerous bacterial proteomes and their respective post translational modifications (PTMs to be accurately identified and quantified in a high throughput and robust fashion. This technological platform offers critical information with regards to signal transduction, adherence, and microbial-host interactions associated with bacterial pathogenesis. This mini-review serves to highlight the current progress proteomics has contributed towards the understanding of bacteria that are associated with skin related diseases, infections, and antibiotic resistance.

  5. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Setsuko

    2017-05-10

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max ‘Enrei’). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. Biological significanceThe Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all

  6. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Wang, Xin; Yin, Xiaojian; Nanjo, Yohei; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakata, Katsumi

    2017-06-23

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max 'Enrei'). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. The Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all predicted proteins from

  7. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Wang, Xin; Yin, Xiaojian; Nanjo, Yohei; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakata, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max ‘Enrei’). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. Biological significanceThe Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all

  8. Theoretical and practical considerations for teaching diagnostic electronic-nose technologies to clinical laboratory technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of new electronic technologies and instruments, utilized to perform many current clinical operations in the biomedical field, is changing the way medical health care is delivered to patients. The majority of test results from laboratory analyses, performed with these analytical instruments often prior to clinical examinations, are frequently used...

  9. A survey of clinical performance skills requirements in medical radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowntree, P.A.; Veitch, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper outlines the reasons behind carry out a study of clinical performance skills requirements and the method being used to gather data. It describes the changes which have occurred in radiographer education in Queensland, the broader impact brought about by changes in professional body requirements and the development of a Competency based Standards Document for the profession. The paper provides examples of the survey design and layout being developed for distribution to third year students in the Medical Imaging Technology major of the Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Radiation Technology) Queensland University of Technology, graduates and clinical departments in Queensland. 1 tab., 1 fig

  10. Technological features and clinical feasibility of megavoltage CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Aoki, Yukimasa; Akanuma, Atsuo; Sakata, Kouichi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Terahara, Atsurou; Onogi, Yuzou; Hasezawa, Kenji; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    1992-01-01

    Megavoltage CT scanning using 4-MV and 6-MV radiotherapy beams has been developed and applied to verify errors in patient positioning. A detector system composed of 120 pairs of cadmium tungstate scintillators with photodiodes is mounted to the treatment unit at a distance of 160 cm from the beam source. Image reconstruction is performed with a standard filtered back-projection algorithm. Scanning time and reconstruction time for a slice is approximately 35 s and 60 s respectively. Although spatial resolution is as large as 4 mm, it has sufficient image quality to be applied for treatment planning and verification. The delivered dose with 4 MV and 6 MV is about 1.4 cGy and 2.8 cGy respectively. When a megavoltage CT image is taken in treatment position, the positioning errors are easily detected by comparing it with diagnostic CT sections for treatment planning. Several clinical examples are presented. (orig.)

  11. Proteomics - new analytical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, W.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Recent developments in the sequencing of the human genome have indicated that the number of coding gene sequences may be as few as 30,000. It is clear, however, that the complexity of the human species is dependent on the much greater diversity of the corresponding protein complement. Estimates of the diversity (discrete protein species) of the human proteome range from 200,000 to 300,000 at the lower end to 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 at the high end. In addition, proteomics (the study of the protein complement to the genome) has been subdivided into two main approaches. Global proteomics refers to a high throughput examination of the full protein set present in a cell under a given environmental condition. Focused proteomics refers to a more detailed study of a restricted set of proteins that are related to a specified biochemical pathway or subcellular structure. While many of the advances in proteomics will be based on the sequencing of the human genome, de novo characterization of protein microheterogeneity (glycosylation, phosphorylation and sulfation as well as the incorporation of lipid components) will be required in disease studies. To characterize these modifications it is necessary to digest the protein mixture with an enzyme to produce the corresponding mixture of peptides. In a process analogous to sequencing of the genome, shot-gun sequencing of the proteome is based on the characterization of the key fragments produced by such a digest. Thus, a glycopeptide and hence a specific glycosylation motif will be identified by a unique mass and then a diagnostic MS/MS spectrum. Mass spectrometry will be the preferred detector in these applications because of the unparalleled information content provided by one or more dimensions of mass measurement. In addition, highly efficient separation processes are an absolute requirement for advanced proteomic studies. For example, a combination of the orthogonal approaches, HPLC and HPCE, can be very powerful

  12. Establishing the proteome of normal human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal.We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject.Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features.

  13. Proteomics Insights into Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, Emmanuel K; Saleh, Tareq; Hawkridge, Adam M; Gewirtz, David A

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy, a conserved cellular process by which cells recycle their contents either to maintain basal homeostasis or in response to external stimuli, has for the past two decades become one of the most studied physiological processes in cell biology. The 2016 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Biology awarded to Dr. Ohsumi Yoshinori, one of the first scientists to characterize this cellular mechanism, attests to its importance. The induction and consequent completion of the process of autophagy results in wide ranging changes to the cellular proteome as well as the secretome. MS-based proteomics affords the ability to measure, in an unbiased manner, the ubiquitous changes that occur when autophagy is initiated and progresses in the cell. The continuous improvements and advances in mass spectrometers, especially relating to ionization sources and detectors, coupled with advances in proteomics experimental design, has made it possible to study autophagy, among other process, in great detail. Innovative labeling strategies and protein separation techniques as well as complementary methods including immuno-capture/blotting/staining have been used in proteomics studies to provide more specific protein identification. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in proteomics studies focused on autophagy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Translational plant proteomics: A perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, G.K.; Pedreschi, R.; Barkla, B.J.; Bindschedler, L.V.; Cramer, R.; Sarkar, A.; Renaut, J.; Job, D.; Rakwal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Translational proteomics is an emerging sub-discipline of the proteomics field in the biological sciences. Translational plant proteomics aims to integrate knowledge from basic sciences to translate it into field applications to solve issues related but not limited to the recreational and economic

  15. The Proteome of Primary Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias-Gato, Diego; Wikström, Pernilla; Tyanova, Stefka

    2016-01-01

    for disease aggressiveness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Mass spectrometry was used for genome-scale quantitative proteomic profiling of 28 prostate tumors (Gleason score 6-9) and neighboring nonmalignant tissue in eight cases, obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostatectomy samples. Two...... changes occurring during prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression can result in clinically relevant discoveries. OBJECTIVES: To study cellular processes altered in PCa using system-wide quantitative analysis of changes in protein expression in clinical samples and to identify prognostic biomarkers......BACKGROUND: Clinical management of the prostate needs improved prognostic tests and treatment strategies. Because proteins are the ultimate effectors of most cellular reactions, are targets for drug actions and constitute potential biomarkers; a quantitative systemic overview of the proteome...

  16. A community proposal to integrate proteomics activities in ELIXIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Walzer, Mathias; Jiménez, Rafael C; Bittremieux, Wout; Bouyssié, David; Carapito, Christine; Corrales, Fernando; Ferro, Myriam; Heck, Albert J R; Horvatovich, Peter; Hubalek, Martin; Lane, Lydie; Laukens, Kris; Levander, Fredrik; Lisacek, Frederique; Novak, Petr; Palmblad, Magnus; Piovesan, Damiano; Pühler, Alfred; Schwämmle, Veit; Valkenborg, Dirk; van Rijswijk, Merlijn; Vondrasek, Jiri; Eisenacher, Martin; Martens, Lennart; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Computational approaches have been major drivers behind the progress of proteomics in recent years. The aim of this white paper is to provide a framework for integrating computational proteomics into ELIXIR in the near future, and thus to broaden the portfolio of omics technologies supported by this European distributed infrastructure. This white paper is the direct result of a strategy meeting on 'The Future of Proteomics in ELIXIR' that took place in March 2017 in Tübingen (Germany), and involved representatives of eleven ELIXIR nodes. These discussions led to a list of priority areas in computational proteomics that would complement existing activities and close gaps in the portfolio of tools and services offered by ELIXIR so far. We provide some suggestions on how these activities could be integrated into ELIXIR's existing platforms, and how it could lead to a new ELIXIR use case in proteomics. We also highlight connections to the related field of metabolomics, where similar activities are ongoing. This white paper could thus serve as a starting point for the integration of computational proteomics into ELIXIR. Over the next few months we will be working closely with all stakeholders involved, and in particular with other representatives of the proteomics community, to further refine this paper.

  17. Implementation of proteomics for cancer research: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Parisa; Shahrokni, Armin; Ranjbar, Mohammad R Nezami

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of the death, accounts for about 13% of all annual deaths worldwide. Many different fields of science are collaborating together studying cancer to improve our knowledge of this lethal disease, and find better solutions for diagnosis and treatment. Proteomics is one of the most recent and rapidly growing areas in molecular biology that helps understanding cancer from an omics data analysis point of view. The human proteome project was officially initiated in 2008. Proteomics enables the scientists to interrogate a variety of biospecimens for their protein contents and measure the concentrations of these proteins. Current necessary equipment and technologies for cancer proteomics are mass spectrometry, protein microarrays, nanotechnology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we provide a brief review on proteomics and its application in cancer research. After a brief introduction including its definition, we summarize the history of major previous work conducted by researchers, followed by an overview on the role of proteomics in cancer studies. We also provide a list of different utilities in cancer proteomics and investigate their advantages and shortcomings from theoretical and practical angles. Finally, we explore some of the main challenges and conclude the paper with future directions in this field.

  18. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  19. Prediction of skin anti-aging clinical benefits of an association of ingredients from marine and maritime origins: Ex vivo evaluation using a label-free quantitative proteomic and customized data processing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameury, Sebastien; Borderie, Laurent; Monneuse, Jean-Marc; Skorski, Gilbert; Pradines, Dominique

    2018-05-23

    The application of ingredients from marine and maritime origins is increasingly common in skin care products, driven by consumer expectations for natural ingredients. However, these ingredients are typically studied for a few isolated in vitro activities. The purpose of this study was to carry out a comprehensive evaluation of the activity on the skin of an association of ingredients from marine and maritime origins using label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, in order to predict the clinical benefits if used in a skin care product. An aqueous gel containing 6.1% of ingredients from marine and maritime origins (amino acid-enriched giant kelp extract, trace element-enriched seawater, dedifferentiated sea fennel cells) was topically applied on human skin explants. The skin explants' proteome was analyzed in a label-free manner by high-performance liquid nano-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A specific data processing pipeline (CORAVALID) providing an objective and comprehensive interpretation of the statistically relevant biological activities processed the results. Compared to untreated skin explants, 64 proteins were significantly regulated by the gel treatment (q-value ≤ 0.05). Computer data processing revealed an activity of the ingredients on the epidermis and the dermis. These significantly regulated proteins are involved in gene expression, cell survival and metabolism, inflammatory processes, dermal extracellular matrix synthesis, melanogenesis and keratinocyte proliferation, migration, and differentiation. These results suggest that the tested ingredients could help to preserve a healthy epidermis and dermis, and possibly to prevent the visible signs of skin aging. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mobile technology and its use in clinical nursing education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Nursing students face a variety of challenges to learning in clinical practice, from the theory-practice gap, to a lack of clinical supervision and the ad hoc nature of learning in clinical environments. Mobile technology is proposed as one way to address these challenges. This article comprehensively summarizes and critically reviews the available literature on mobile technology used in undergraduate clinical nursing education. It identifies the lack of clear definitions and theory in the current body of evidence; the variety of mobile devices and applications used; the benefits of mobile platforms in nursing education; and the complexity of sociotechnical factors, such as the cost, usability, portability, and quality of mobile tools, that affect their use in undergraduate clinical nursing education. Implications for nursing education and practice are outlined, and recommendations for future research are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson David R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI.

  2. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  3. Repeatability and Reproducibility in Proteomic Identifications by Liquid Chromatography—Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, David L.; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo; Rudnick, Paul A.; Variyath, Asokan Mulayath; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Bunk, David M.; Kilpatrick, Lisa E.; Billheimer, Dean D.; Blackman, Ronald K.; Cardasis, Helene L.; Carr, Steven A.; Clauser, Karl R.; Jaffe, Jacob D.; Kowalski, Kevin A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Regnier, Fred E.; Schilling, Birgit; Tegeler, Tony J.; Wang, Mu; Wang, Pei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Fisher, Susan J.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Stein, Steven E.; Tempst, Paul; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Spiegelman, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of proteomic instrumentation for LC-MS/MS introduces many possible sources of variability. Data-dependent sampling of peptides constitutes a stochastic element at the heart of discovery proteomics. Although this variation impacts the identification of peptides, proteomic identifications are far from completely random. In this study, we analyzed interlaboratory data sets from the NCI Clinical Proteomic Technology Assessment for Cancer to examine repeatability and reproducibility in peptide and protein identifications. Included data spanned 144 LC-MS/MS experiments on four Thermo LTQ and four Orbitrap instruments. Samples included yeast lysate, the NCI-20 defined dynamic range protein mix, and the Sigma UPS 1 defined equimolar protein mix. Some of our findings reinforced conventional wisdom, such as repeatability and reproducibility being higher for proteins than for peptides. Most lessons from the data, however, were more subtle. Orbitraps proved capable of higher repeatability and reproducibility, but aberrant performance occasionally erased these gains. Even the simplest protein digestions yielded more peptide ions than LC-MS/MS could identify during a single experiment. We observed that peptide lists from pairs of technical replicates overlapped by 35–60%, giving a range for peptide-level repeatability in these experiments. Sample complexity did not appear to affect peptide identification repeatability, even as numbers of identified spectra changed by an order of magnitude. Statistical analysis of protein spectral counts revealed greater stability across technical replicates for Orbitraps, making them superior to LTQ instruments for biomarker candidate discovery. The most repeatable peptides were those corresponding to conventional tryptic cleavage sites, those that produced intense MS signals, and those that resulted from proteins generating many distinct peptides. Reproducibility among different instruments of the same type lagged behind

  4. Integration of technology-based outcome measures in clinical trials of Parkinson and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artusi, Carlo Alberto; Mishra, Murli; Latimer, Patricia; Vizcarra, Joaquin A; Lopiano, Leonardo; Maetzler, Walter; Merola, Aristide; Espay, Alberto J

    2018-01-01

    We sought to review the landscape of past, present, and future use of technology-based outcome measures (TOMs) in clinical trials of neurodegenerative disorders. We systematically reviewed PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov for published and ongoing clinical trials in neurodegenerative disorders employing TOMs. In addition, medical directors of selected pharmaceutical companies were surveyed on their companies' ongoing efforts and future plans to integrate TOMs in clinical trials as primary, secondary, or exploratory endpoints. We identified 164 published clinical trials indexed in PubMed that used TOMs as outcome measures in Parkinson disease (n = 132) or other neurodegenerative disorders (n = 32). The ClinicalTrials.gov search yielded 42 clinical trials using TOMs, representing 2.7% of ongoing trials. Sensor-based technology accounted for over 75% of TOMs applied. Gait and physical activity were the most common targeted domains. Within the next 5 years, 83% of surveyed pharmaceutical companies engaged in neurodegenerative disorders plan to deploy TOMs in clinical trials. Although promising, TOMs are underutilized in clinical trials of neurodegenerative disorders. Validating relevant endpoints, standardizing measures and procedures, establishing a single platform for integration of data and algorithms from different devices, and facilitating regulatory approvals should advance TOMs integration into clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Task-technology fit of video telehealth for nurses in an outpatient clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Finkelstein, Stanley M

    2014-07-01

    Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task-technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task-technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time-motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task-technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task-technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task-technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology.

  6. Proteomic analyses of host and pathogen responses during bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Jamie L

    2011-12-01

    The pursuit of biomarkers for use as clinical screening tools, measures for early detection, disease monitoring, and as a means for assessing therapeutic responses has steadily evolved in human and veterinary medicine over the past two decades. Concurrently, advances in mass spectrometry have markedly expanded proteomic capabilities for biomarker discovery. While initial mass spectrometric biomarker discovery endeavors focused primarily on the detection of modulated proteins in human tissues and fluids, recent efforts have shifted to include proteomic analyses of biological samples from food animal species. Mastitis continues to garner attention in veterinary research due mainly to affiliated financial losses and food safety concerns over antimicrobial use, but also because there are only a limited number of efficacious mastitis treatment options. Accordingly, comparative proteomic analyses of bovine milk have emerged in recent years. Efforts to prevent agricultural-related food-borne illness have likewise fueled an interest in the proteomic evaluation of several prominent strains of bacteria, including common mastitis pathogens. The interest in establishing biomarkers of the host and pathogen responses during bovine mastitis stems largely from the need to better characterize mechanisms of the disease, to identify reliable biomarkers for use as measures of early detection and drug efficacy, and to uncover potentially novel targets for the development of alternative therapeutics. The following review focuses primarily on comparative proteomic analyses conducted on healthy versus mastitic bovine milk. However, a comparison of the host defense proteome of human and bovine milk and the proteomic analysis of common veterinary pathogens are likewise introduced.

  7. The Redox Proteome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation, and signaling during the life cycle and has a central role in the tolerance and adaptability to diet and environmental challenges. PMID:23861437

  8. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Rasmussen, Luke V; Oberg, Ryan; Starren, Justin B

    2011-04-10

    Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. We describe an implementation of a free workflow technology

  9. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of

  10. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nainita; Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Pallavi, Rani; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Chandran, Syama; Kumar, Rajender; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Yadav, Suresh Chandra; Tatu, Utpal

    2010-03-22

    Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO) prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS). Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more. Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a glimpse into the

  11. Proteomics of Trypanosoma evansi infection in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nainita Roy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi infections, commonly called 'surra', cause significant economic losses to livestock industry. While this infection is mainly restricted to large animals such as camels, donkeys and equines, recent reports indicate their ability to infect humans. There are no World Animal Health Organization (WAHO prescribed diagnostic tests or vaccines available against this disease and the available drugs show significant toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop improved methods of diagnosis and control measures for this disease. Unlike its related human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi whose genomes have been fully sequenced T. evansi genome sequence remains unavailable and very little efforts are being made to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. With a view to identify potential diagnostic markers and drug targets we have studied the clinical proteome of T. evansi infection using mass spectrometry (MS.Using shot-gun proteomic approach involving nano-lc Quadrupole Time Of Flight (QTOF mass spectrometry we have identified over 160 proteins expressed by T. evansi in mice infected with camel isolate. Homology driven searches for protein identification from MS/MS data led to most of the matches arising from related Trypanosoma species. Proteins identified belonged to various functional categories including metabolic enzymes; DNA metabolism; transcription; translation as well as cell-cell communication and signal transduction. TCA cycle enzymes were strikingly missing, possibly suggesting their low abundances. The clinical proteome revealed the presence of known and potential drug targets such as oligopeptidases, kinases, cysteine proteases and more.Previous proteomic studies on Trypanosomal infections, including human parasites T. brucei and T. cruzi, have been carried out from lab grown cultures. For T. evansi infection this is indeed the first ever proteomic study reported thus far. In addition to providing a

  12. Translational plant proteomics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Pedreschi, Romina; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Cramer, Rainer; Sarkar, Abhijit; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Rakwal, Randeep

    2012-08-03

    Translational proteomics is an emerging sub-discipline of the proteomics field in the biological sciences. Translational plant proteomics aims to integrate knowledge from basic sciences to translate it into field applications to solve issues related but not limited to the recreational and economic values of plants, food security and safety, and energy sustainability. In this review, we highlight the substantial progress reached in plant proteomics during the past decade which has paved the way for translational plant proteomics. Increasing proteomics knowledge in plants is not limited to model and non-model plants, proteogenomics, crop improvement, and food analysis, safety, and nutrition but to many more potential applications. Given the wealth of information generated and to some extent applied, there is the need for more efficient and broader channels to freely disseminate the information to the scientific community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Student use and perceptions of mobile technology in clinical clerkships - Guidance for curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Joanna K; Thome, Parker A; Lindeman, Brenessa; Jackson, Daren C; Lidor, Anne O

    2018-01-01

    We examined the types of technology used by medical students in clinical clerkships, and the perception of technology implementation into the curriculum. An online survey about technology use was completed prior to general surgery clinical clerkship. Types of devices and frequency/comfort of use were recorded. Perceptions of the benefits and barriers to technology use in clerkship learning were elicited. 125/131 (95.4%) students responded. Most students owned a smart phone (95.2%), tablet (52.8%), or both (50%); 61.6% spent > 11 h/week learning on a device at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for educational purposes. Technology use was seen as beneficial by 97.6% of students. Classes that used technology extensively were preferred by 54% of students, although 47.2% perceived decreased faculty/classmate interaction. Students use mobile technology to improve how they learn new material, and prefer taking classes that incorporate information technology. However, in-person/blended curricula are preferable to completely online courses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteomics and circadian rhythms: It’s all about signaling!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauvoisin, Daniel; Dayon, Loïc; Gachon, Frédéric; Kussmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    1. Abstract Proteomic technologies using mass spectrometry (MS) offer new perspectives in circadian biology, in particular the possibility to study posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To date, only very few studies have been carried out to decipher the rhythmicity of protein expression in mammals with large-scale proteomics. Although signaling has been shown to be of high relevance, comprehensive characterization studies of PTMs are even more rare. This review aims at describing the actual landscape of circadian proteomics and the opportunities and challenges appearing on the horizon. Emphasis was given to signaling processes for their role in metabolic heath as regulated by circadian clocks and environmental factors. Those signaling processes are expected to be better and more deeply characterized in the coming years with proteomics. PMID:25103677

  15. Contemporary Aspects of Marketing in Clinical Trials Including Segments of IT and Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra; Smajlovic, Mersiha

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the marketing strategy and the application of management (marketing management) and advertising in order to increase the efficiency of innovative approach in clinical trials that include and involve the use of new technologies and transfer of technologies. This paper has a descriptive character and represents a narrative review of the literature and new model implementation. Marketing models are primarily used to improve the inclusion of a larger (and appropriate) number of patients, but they can be credited for the stay and monitoring of patients in the trial. Regulatory mechanisms play an important role in the application of various marketing strategies within clinical trials. The value for the patient as the most important stakeholder is defined in the field of clinical trials according to Kotler's value model for the consumer. In order to achieve the best results it is important to adequately examine all the elements of clinical trials and apply this knowledge in creation of a marketing plan that will be made in accordance with the legal regulations defined globally and locally. In this paper, two challenges have been highlighted for the adequate application of marketing tools in the field of clinical trials, namely: defining business elements in order to provide an adequate marketing approach for clinical trials and technology transfer and ensuring uniformity and regulatory affirmation of marketing attitudes in clinical trials in all regions in which they are carried out in accordance with ICH-GCP and valid regulations.

  16. Highlights of recent articles on data mining in genomics & proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial elaborates on investigations consisting of different “OMICS” technologies and their application to biological sciences. In addition, advantages and recent development of the proteomic, genomic and data mining technologies are discussed. This information will be useful to scientists ...

  17. Can eye-tracking technology improve situational awareness in paramedic clinical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Quested, Andrew; Cooper, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Human factors play a significant part in clinical error. Situational awareness (SA) means being aware of one's surroundings, comprehending the present situation, and being able to predict outcomes. It is a key human skill that, when properly applied, is associated with reducing medical error: eye-tracking technology can be used to provide an objective and qualitative measure of the initial perception component of SA. Feedback from eye-tracking technology can be used to improve the understanding and teaching of SA in clinical contexts, and consequently, has potential for reducing clinician error and the concomitant adverse events.

  18. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun; Olsen, Jesper V; Shi, Rong; de Souza, Gustavo; Pasini, Erica; Foster, Leonard J; Macek, Boris; Zougman, Alexandre; Kumar, Chanchal; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Jun, Wang; Mann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and stringent validation criteria, false positive identification rates in MAPU are lower than 1:1000. Thus MAPU datasets can serve as reference proteomes in biomarker discovery. MAPU contains the peptides identifying each protein, measured masses, scores and intensities and is freely available at http://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic annotation information and links to other public databases are provided in MAPU and we plan to add further analysis tools.

  19. Proteomic approach to nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Magdalena; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Brzóska, Kamil; Gutleb, Arno C; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2016-03-30

    In recent years a large number of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been developed with promising technical benefits for consumers and medical appliances. In addition to already known potentially advantageous biological properties (antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activity) of NMs, many new medical applications of NMs are foreseen, such as drug carriers, contrast agents, radiopharmaceuticals and many others. However, there is increasing concern about potential environmental and health effects due to NMs exposure. An increasing body of evidence suggests that NMs may trigger undesirable hazardous interactions with biological systems with potential to generate harmful effects. In this review we summarized a current state of knowledge on the proteomics approaches to nanotoxicity, including protein corona formation, in vitro and in vivo effects of exposure to NMs on proteome of different classes of organisms, from bacteria and plants to mammals. The effects of NMs on the proteome of environmentally relevant organisms are also described. Despite the benefit that development of nanotechnology may bring to the society, there are still major gaps of knowledge on the influence of nanomaterials on human health and the environment. Thus, it seems necessary to conduct further interdisciplinary research to fill the knowledge gaps in NM toxicity, using more holistic approaches than offered by conventional biological techniques. “OMICS” techniques will certainly help researchers in this field. In this paper we summarized the current stage of knowledge of the effects of nanoparticles on the proteome of different organisms, including those commonly used as an environmentally relevant indicator organisms.

  20. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bussell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, there remains a considerable gap between peroxisomes and chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches.

  1. Xylem sap proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernonville, Thomas Dugé; Albenne, Cécile; Arlat, Matthieu; Hoffmann, Laurent; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of xylem sap has recently become a major field of interest to understand several biological questions related to plant development and responses to environmental clues. The xylem sap appears as a dynamic fluid undergoing changes in its proteome upon abiotic and biotic stresses. Unlike cell compartments which are amenable to purification in sufficient amount prior to proteomic analysis, the xylem sap has to be collected in particular conditions to avoid contamination by intracellular proteins and to obtain enough material. A model plant like Arabidopsis thaliana is not suitable for such an analysis because efficient harvesting of xylem sap is difficult. The analysis of the xylem sap proteome also requires specific procedures to concentrate proteins and to focus on proteins predicted to be secreted. Indeed, xylem sap proteins appear to be synthesized and secreted in the root stele or to originate from dying differentiated xylem cells. This chapter describes protocols to collect xylem sap from Brassica species and to prepare total and N-glycoprotein extracts for identification of proteins by mass spectrometry analyses and bioinformatics.

  2. Cutting edge proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Espadas, Guadalupe; Molina, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Tryptic digestion is an important component of most proteomics experiments, and trypsin is available from many sources with a cost that varies by more than 1000-fold. This high-mass-accuracy LC-MS study benchmarks six commercially available trypsins with respect to autolytic species and sequence ...

  3. Systemic sclerosis biomarkers discovered using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălănescu, Paul; Lădaru, Anca; Bălănescu, Eugenia; Băicuş, Cristian; Dan, Gheorghe Andrei

    2014-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease with incompletely known physiopathology. There is a great challenge to predict its course and therapeutic response using biomarkers. To critically review proteomic biomarkers discovered from biological specimens from systemic sclerosis patients using mass spectrometry technologies. Medline and Embase databases were searched in February 2014. Out of the 199 records retrieved, a total of 20 records were included, identifying 116 candidate proteomic biomarkers. Research in SSc proteomic biomarkers should focus on biomarker validation, as there are valuable mass-spectrometry proteomics studies in the literature.

  4. Proteomics in the investigation of HIV-1 interactions with host proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Productive HIV-1 infection depends on host machinery, including a broad array of cellular proteins. Proteomics has played a significant role in the discovery of HIV-1 host proteins. In this review, after a brief survey of the HIV-1 host proteins that were discovered by proteomic analyses, I focus on analyzing the interactions between the virion and host proteins, as well as the technologies and strategies used in those proteomic studies. With the help of proteomics, the identification and characterization of HIV-1 host proteins can be translated into novel antiretroviral therapeutics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cardiovascular proteomics in the era of big data: experimental and computational advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Maggie P Y; Lau, Edward; Ng, Dominic C M; Wang, Ding; Ping, Peipei

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics plays an increasingly important role in our quest to understand cardiovascular biology. Fueled by analytical and computational advances in the past decade, proteomics applications can now go beyond merely inventorying protein species, and address sophisticated questions on cardiac physiology. The advent of massive mass spectrometry datasets has in turn led to increasing intersection between proteomics and big data science. Here we review new frontiers in technological developments and their applications to cardiovascular medicine. The impact of big data science on cardiovascular proteomics investigations and translation to medicine is highlighted.

  6. Proteomic approaches to understanding the role of the cytoskeleton in host-defense mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Marko; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a cellular scaffolding system whose functions include maintenance of cellular shape, enabling cellular migration, division, intracellular transport, signaling and membrane organization. In addition, in immune cells, the cytoskeleton is essential for phagocytosis. Following the advances in proteomics technology over the past two decades, cytoskeleton proteome analysis in resting and activated immune cells has emerged as a possible powerful approach to expand our understanding of cytoskeletal composition and function. However, so far there have only been a handful of studies of the cytoskeleton proteome in immune cells. This article considers promising proteomics strategies that could augment our understanding of the role of the cytoskeleton in host-defense mechanisms. PMID:21329431

  7. Medical technology companies broaden role to support the financial success of clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Soren

    2003-01-01

    Market challenges continue to mount for hospitals and clinics, causing an unparalleled focus on profitability and return on investment for services. To support these challenges, technology suppliers that were once content to deliver and install equipment have become partners with the institutions they serve. Savvy technology companies are offering an extensive array of services that assist facilities in the planning, cost justification, implementation and ongoing support of their technology. The result is a marriage of progress and profit, resulting in solutions that enhance both the quality of care and the bottom line.

  8. The path to enlightenment: making sense of genomic and proteomic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Martin H

    2004-05-01

    Whereas genomics describes the study of genome, mainly represented by its gene expression on the DNA or RNA level, the term proteomics denotes the study of the proteome, which is the protein complement encoded by the genome. In recent years, the number of proteomic experiments increased tremendously. While all fields of proteomics have made major technological advances, the biggest step was seen in bioinformatics. Biological information management relies on sequence and structure databases and powerful software tools to translate experimental results into meaningful biological hypotheses and answers. In this resource article, I provide a collection of databases and software available on the Internet that are useful to interpret genomic and proteomic data. The article is a toolbox for researchers who have genomic or proteomic datasets and need to put their findings into a biological context.

  9. Proteomics and aging : studying the influence of aging on endothelial cells and human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eman, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    In general, human aging is considered one of the most complex and less-well understood process in biology. In this thesis the possibilities of proteomics technology in the field of aging were explored. The complexity of the aging process was supposed to accompanied by relatively subtle proteome

  10. MSQuant, an Open Source Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Gouw, Joost W; Olsen, Jesper V

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics critically depends on algorithms for data interpretation. A current bottleneck in the rapid advance of proteomics technology is the closed nature and slow development cycle of vendor-supplied software solutions. We have created an open source software environment...

  11. Effective representation and storage of mass spectrometry-based proteomic data sets for the scientific community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as a technology of choice for global analysis of cell signaling networks. However, reporting and sharing of MS data are often haphazard, limiting the usefulness of proteomics to the signaling community. We argue that raw data should always be provided...... mechanisms for community-wide sharing of these data....

  12. The quest of the human proteome and the missing proteins: digging deeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Ray, Sandipan; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-05-01

    Given the diverse range of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation, the estimates of the human proteome is likely subject to scientific surprises as the field of proteomics has gained momentum worldwide. In this regard, the establishment of the "Human Proteome Draft" using high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), tissue microarrays, and immunohistochemistry by three independent research groups (laboratories of Pandey, Kuster, and Uhlen) accelerated the pace of proteomics research. The Chromosome Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) has taken initiative towards the completion of the Human Proteome Project (HPP) so as to understand the proteomics correlates of common complex human diseases and biological diversity, not to mention person-to-person and population differences in response to drugs, nutrition, vaccines, and other health interventions and host-environment interactions. Although high-resolution MS-based and antibody microarray approaches have shown enormous promises, we are still unable to map the whole human proteome due to the presence of numerous "missing proteins." In December 2014, at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai the 6(th) Annual Meeting of the Proteomics Society, India (PSI) and the International Proteomics Conference was held. As part of this interdisciplinary summit, a panel discussion session on "The Quest of the Human Proteome and Missing Proteins" was organized. Eminent scientists in the field of proteomics and systems biology, including Akhilesh Pandey, Gilbert S. Omenn, Mark S. Baker, and Robert L. Mortiz, shed light on different aspects of the human proteome drafts and missing proteins. Importantly, the possible reasons for the "missing proteins" in shotgun MS workflow were identified and debated by experts as low tissue expression, lack of enzymatic digestion site, or protein lost during extraction, among other contributing factors. To capture the missing proteins, the experts' collective

  13. Double-Loop Health Technology: Enabling Socio-technical Design of Personal Health Technology in Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Frost, Mads

    2018-01-01

    present a case of designing personal health technology for mental health, which is integrated into hospital-based treatment. This system helps patients to manage their disease by tracking and correlation behavior and disease progression and provide feedback to them, while also deployed as part......Personal health technology is rapidly emerging as a response to the challenges associated with significant increase in chronic noncommunicable diseases. The overall design paradigm behind most of these applications is to manually and automatically sample data from sensors and smartphones and use...... this to provide patients with an awareness of their illness and give recommendation for treatment, care, and healthy living. Few of these systems are, however, designed to be part of a complex socio-technical care and treatment processes in existing healthcare systems and clinical pathways. In this chapter, we...

  14. Detailed clinical models: representing knowledge, data and semantics in healthcare information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, William T F

    2014-07-01

    This paper will present an overview of the developmental effort in harmonizing clinical knowledge modeling using the Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs), and will explain how it can contribute to the preservation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) data. Clinical knowledge modeling is vital for the management and preservation of EHR and data. Such modeling provides common data elements and terminology binding with the intention of capturing and managing clinical information over time and location independent from technology. Any EHR data exchange without an agreed clinical knowledge modeling will potentially result in loss of information. Many attempts exist from the past to model clinical knowledge for the benefits of semantic interoperability using standardized data representation and common terminologies. The objective of each project is similar with respect to consistent representation of clinical data, using standardized terminologies, and an overall logical approach. However, the conceptual, logical, and the technical expressions are quite different in one clinical knowledge modeling approach versus another. There currently are synergies under the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) in order to create a harmonized reference model for clinical knowledge models. The goal for the CIMI is to create a reference model and formalisms based on for instance the DCM (ISO/TS 13972), among other work. A global repository of DCMs may potentially be established in the future.

  15. Advanced methods for teaching electronic-nose technologies to diagnosticians and clinical laboratory technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-detection technologies and instruments increasingly are being utilized in the biomedical field to perform a wide variety of clinical operations and laboratory analyses to facilitate the delivery of health care to patients. The introduction of improved electronic instruments for diagnosing diseases and for administering treatments has required new training of...

  16. The role of technology in clinical trials using stereotactic body radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne; Romero, Alejandra Méndez; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2017-01-01

    , the crucial point for the next generation of SABR clinical trials is that today's technology is used correctly and close to its optimal potential for accuracy. The credentialing procedure of SABR needs to be extensive, but this investment will benefit the trial itself, the patients and the professionals...

  17. Use of Clinical Health Information Technology in Nursing Homes: Nursing Home Characteristics and Quality Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli-Moraski, Carla

    2014-01-01

    This study compares quality measures among nursing homes that have adopted different levels of clinical health information technology (HIT) and examines the perceived barriers and benefits of the adoption of electronic health records as reported by Nursing Home Administrators and Directors of Nursing. A cross-sectional survey distributed online to…

  18. Proteomics: A Biotechnology Tool for Crop Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa eEldakak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A sharp decline in the availability of arable land and sufficient supply of irrigation water along with a continuous steep increase in food demands have exerted a pressure on farmers to produce more with fewer resources. A viable solution to release this pressure is to speed up the plant breeding process by employing biotechnology in breeding programs. The majority of biotechnological applications rely on information generated from various -omic technologies. The latest outstanding improvements in proteomic platforms and many other but related advances in plant biotechnology techniques offer various new ways to encourage the usage of these technologies by plant scientists for crop improvement programs. A combinatorial approach of accelerated gene discovery through genomics, proteomics, and other associated -omic branches of biotechnology, as an applied approach, is proving to be an effective way to speed up the crop improvement programs worldwide. In the near future, swift improvements in -omic databases are becoming critical and demand immediate attention for the effective utilization of these techniques to produce next-generation crops for the progressive farmers. Here, we have reviewed the recent advances in proteomics, as tools of biotechnology, which are offering great promise and leading the path towards crop improvement for sustainable agriculture.

  19. Recent technological updates and clinical applications of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diecke, Sebastian; Jung, Seung Min; Lee, Jaecheol; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2014-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were first described in 2006 and have since emerged as a promising cell source for clinical applications. The rapid progression in iPSC technology is still ongoing and directed toward increasing the efficacy of iPSC production and reducing the immunogenic and tumorigenic potential of these cells. Enormous efforts have been made to apply iPSC-based technology in the clinic, for drug screening approaches and cell replacement therapy. Moreover, disease modeling using patient-specific iPSCs continues to expand our knowledge regarding the pathophysiology and prospective treatment of rare disorders. Furthermore, autologous stem cell therapy with patient-specific iPSCs shows great propensity for the minimization of immune reactions and the provision of a limitless supply of cells for transplantation. In this review, we discuss the recent updates in iPSC technology and the use of iPSCs in disease modeling and regenerative medicine.

  20. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology. A bidirectional translational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillner, Falk; Buetof, Rebecca; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden; Technische Univ. Dresden; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden

    2014-01-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  1. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology--a bidirectional translational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Bütof, Rebecca; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology. A bidirectional translational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillner, Falk; Buetof, Rebecca [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Thute, Prasad [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Krause, Mechthild [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Enghardt, Wolfgang [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiooncology

    2014-07-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  3. Examining the role of technology in learning: an evaluation of online clinical conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cathy; Taft, Lois B; Thelen, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of instructional technology requires faculty openness to new teaching and learning situations. This study compared two instructional methods of conducting clinical conferences for baccalaureate nursing students: online versus face-to-face. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 77 students in 10 clinical sections of a senior capstone nursing course. Mean scores for all 11 items on the clinical evaluation tool were higher for students who had conferences online than those in face-to-face conferences. Four of the 11 items were statistically significant, reflecting greater participation and convenience for online participants. Online students also reported greater opportunities to reflect on ethical issues. There were no significant differences in quiz scores between the groups when students were tested on content covered in their clinical conferences. Students identified advantages including opportunities for flexibility and equal participation. Barriers included unfamiliarity with technology and lack of face-to-face-contact. The findings suggest that students can successfully achieve the intended purpose of clinical conferences through an online instructional technique. Ongoing research in the use of technology is necessary to meet student needs, enhance student learning, and support evidence-based practice in nursing education.

  4. NMR in the SPINE Structural Proteomics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab, E; Atkinson, A R; Banci, L; Bertini, I; Ciofi-Baffoni, S; Brunner, K; Diercks, T; Dötsch, V; Engelke, F; Folkers, G E; Griesinger, C; Gronwald, W; Günther, U; Habeck, M; de Jong, R N; Kalbitzer, H R; Kieffer, B; Leeflang, B R; Loss, S; Luchinat, C; Marquardsen, T; Moskau, D; Neidig, K P; Nilges, M; Piccioli, M; Pierattelli, R; Rieping, W; Schippmann, T; Schwalbe, H; Travé, G; Trenner, J; Wöhnert, J; Zweckstetter, M; Kaptein, R

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the developments, role and contributions of the NMR spectroscopy groups in the Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) consortium. Focusing on the development of high-throughput (HTP) pipelines for NMR structure determinations of proteins, all aspects from sample preparation, data acquisition, data processing, data analysis to structure determination have been improved with respect to sensitivity, automation, speed, robustness and validation. Specific highlights are protonless (13)C-direct detection methods and inferential structure determinations (ISD). In addition to technological improvements, these methods have been applied to deliver over 60 NMR structures of proteins, among which are five that failed to crystallize. The inclusion of NMR spectroscopy in structural proteomics pipelines improves the success rate for protein structure determinations.

  5. A perspective on extracellular vesicles proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Fernandes, Livia; Rocha, Victória Bombarda; Carregari, Victor Corasolla; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieve from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  6. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Choi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  7. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models. PMID:26015880

  8. Proteomics Standards Initiative: Fifteen Years of Progress and Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W; Orchard, Sandra; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Bittremieux, Wout; Eisenacher, Martin; Hermjakob, Henning; Kawano, Shin; Lam, Henry; Mayer, Gerhard; Menschaert, Gerben; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Salek, Reza M; Tabb, David L; Tenzer, Stefan; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Walzer, Mathias; Jones, Andrew R

    2017-12-01

    The Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) has now been developing and promoting open community standards and software tools in the field of proteomics for 15 years. Under the guidance of the chair, cochairs, and other leadership positions, the PSI working groups are tasked with the development and maintenance of community standards via special workshops and ongoing work. Among the existing ratified standards, the PSI working groups continue to update PSI-MI XML, MITAB, mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, mzTab, and the MIAPE (Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment) guidelines with the advance of new technologies and techniques. Furthermore, new standards are currently either in the final stages of completion (proBed and proBAM for proteogenomics results as well as PEFF) or in early stages of design (a spectral library standard format, a universal spectrum identifier, the qcML quality control format, and the Protein Expression Interface (PROXI) web services Application Programming Interface). In this work we review the current status of all of these aspects of the PSI, describe synergies with other efforts such as the ProteomeXchange Consortium, the Human Proteome Project, and the metabolomics community, and provide a look at future directions of the PSI.

  9. Assessment of Clinical Education in the Alborz University of Medical Sciences from Surgical Technology and Anesthesiology Students’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bahrami Babaheidary

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: Because of surgical technology and anesthesiology students needs to acquire clinical skills along with theoretical training, providing suitable clinical environment seems to be critical to achieve essential in-depth experience in professional aspects.

  10. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper Foged; Chen, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are called the powerhouses of the cell. To better understand the role of mitochondria in maintaining and regulating metabolism in storage tissues, highly purified mitochondria were isolated from dormant potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum 'Folva') and their proteome investigated. Proteins...... manner using normalized spectral counts including as many as 5-fold more "extreme" proteins (low mass, high isoelectric point, hydrophobic) than previous mitochondrial proteome studies. We estimate that this compendium of proteins represents a high coverage of the potato tuber mitochondrial proteome...

  11. Translational proteomics in neurodegenerative diseases--16th HUPO BPP workshop September 5, 2011 Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröttrup, Bernd; Böckmann, Miriam; Stephan, Christian; Marcus, Katrin; Grinberg, Lea T; Meyer, Helmut E; Park, Young Mok

    2012-02-01

    The HUPO Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) held its 16th workshop in Geneva, Switzerland, on September 5, 2011 during the 10th HUPO World Congress. The focus was on launching the Human Brain Proteome Atlas as well as ideas, strategies and methodological aspects in clinical neuroproteomics. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs......In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  13. Awareness and using of medical students about mobile health technology in clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi; Rezazadeh, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test-retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology.

  14. Awareness and Using of Medical Students About Mobile Health Technology in Clinical Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. Method The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test–retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. Findings The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. Conclusion The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology. PMID:24058250

  15. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  16. Contemporary Aspects of Marketing in Clinical Trials Including Segments of IT and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra; Smajlovic, Mersiha

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this paper is to present the marketing strategy and the application of management (marketing management) and advertising in order to increase the efficiency of innovative approach in clinical trials that include and involve the use of new technologies and transfer of technologies. Material and Methods: This paper has a descriptive character and represents a narrative review of the literature and new model implementation. Results: Marketing models are primarily used to improve the inclusion of a larger (and appropriate) number of patients, but they can be credited for the stay and monitoring of patients in the trial. Regulatory mechanisms play an important role in the application of various marketing strategies within clinical trials. The value for the patient as the most important stakeholder is defined in the field of clinical trials according to Kotler’s value model for the consumer. Conclusion: In order to achieve the best results it is important to adequately examine all the elements of clinical trials and apply this knowledge in creation of a marketing plan that will be made in accordance with the legal regulations defined globally and locally. In this paper, two challenges have been highlighted for the adequate application of marketing tools in the field of clinical trials, namely: defining business elements in order to provide an adequate marketing approach for clinical trials and technology transfer and ensuring uniformity and regulatory affirmation of marketing attitudes in clinical trials in all regions in which they are carried out in accordance with ICH-GCP and valid regulations. PMID:29719318

  17. Using the Technology: Introducing Point of View Video Glasses Into the Simulated Clinical Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Helene; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana; Saunders, Rosemary; Dugmore, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The introduction of learning technologies into educational settings continues to grow alongside the emergence of innovative technologies into the healthcare arena. The challenge for health professionals such as medical, nursing, and allied health practitioners is to develop an improved understanding of these technologies and how they may influence practice and contribute to healthcare. For nurse educators to remain contemporary, there is a need to not only embrace current technologies in teaching and learning but to also ensure that students are able to adapt to this changing pedagogy. One recent technological innovation is the use of wearable computing technology, consisting of video recording with the capability of playback analysis. The authors of this article discuss the introduction of the use of wearable Point of View video glasses by a cohort of nursing students in a simulated clinical learning laboratory. Of particular interest was the ease of use of the glasses, also termed the usability of this technology, which is central to its success. Students' reflections were analyzed together with suggestions for future use.

  18. Quality Assurance Issues in Conducting Multi-Institutional Advanced Technology Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute-sponsored Advanced Technology Quality Assurance (QA) Consortium, which consisted of the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiological Physics Center, Quality Assurance Review Center, and Resource Center for Emerging Technologies, has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials that requires volumetric digital data submission of a protocol patient's treatment plan and verification data. In particular, the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center has nearly 15 years experience in facilitating QA review for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trials. This QA process includes (1) a data integrity review for completeness of protocol required elements, the format of data, and possible data corruption, and recalculation of dose-volume histograms; (2) a review of compliance with target volume and organ-at-risk contours by study chairs; and (3) a review of dose prescription and dose heterogeneity compliance by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Headquarters Dosimetry Group or the Radiological Physics Center dosimetrists (for brachytherapy protocols). This report reviews the lessons learned and the QA challenges presented by the use of advanced treatment modalities in clinical trials requiring volumetric digital data submission

  19. Lessons from the proteomic study of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Calamia, Valentina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic pathology and one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. It is a very complex disease whose etiopathogenesis is not fully understood. Furthermore, there are serious limitations for its management, since it lacks specific and sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. Proteomic approaches performed in the last few decades have contributed to the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that participate in this pathology and they have also led to interesting panels of putative biomarker candidates. In the next few years, further efforts should be made for translating these findings into the clinical routines. It is expected that targeted proteomics strategies will be highly valuable for the verification and qualification of biomarkers of osteoarthritis.

  20. Technology insight: metabonomics in gastroenterology-basic principles and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Nielsen, Ole H; Wang, Yulan L

    2008-01-01

    Metabonomics-the study of metabolic changes in an integrated biologic system-is an emerging field. This discipline joins the other 'omics' (genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics) to give rise to a comprehensive, systems-biology approach to the evaluation of holistic in vivo function. Metabonom......Metabonomics-the study of metabolic changes in an integrated biologic system-is an emerging field. This discipline joins the other 'omics' (genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics) to give rise to a comprehensive, systems-biology approach to the evaluation of holistic in vivo function...

  1. The challenges of clinical education in a baccalaureate surgical technology students in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardosht, Roghayeh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Razavi, Mohammad Etezad; Ahmady, Soleiman

    2018-02-01

    Clinical education is an integral part of the surgical technology curriculum, in which students combine and integrate knowledge, skills, attitudes, values and philosophies of the profession. It is difficult to learn and adapt to different types of skills and roles in the operating room environment. This qualitative study examines the difference between the clinical education of Surgical Technology and other clinical settings, and the challenges faced by students in the field, within the course. This was a qualitative content analysis study conducted in 2016. The participants in this study were 16 baccalaureate surgical technology students of the University for Medical Sciences in Khorasan Razavi province. A semi-structured interview method was run to collect the required data. The sampling was initially purposive, then in the snowball method which continued until data saturation. All interviews were recorded, then transcribed, and analyzed using a continuous comparative method and conventional qualitative content analysis method. From the deep and rich descriptions of the participants, three themes including "stressful environment", "controversy between anticipation of role and reality", and "humiliating experiences" as well as a general theme of "bitter education" were obtained. Students' orientation before attending the operating room, accompanying, supporting, and a full-time attendance of the specialist instructor, strengthening the prerequisite knowledge and skills for the students in this field, teaching ethics, and professional interactions, play an important role in the student's acceptance of the operating room, in the surgery team and the improvement of the quality of clinical education of these students.

  2. Characterization of the canine urinary proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Laura E; Ehrhart, E J; Scherman, Hataichanok; Olver, Christine S; Bohn, Andrea A; Prenni, Jessica E

    2014-06-01

    Urine is an attractive biofluid for biomarker discovery as it is easy and minimally invasive to obtain. While numerous studies have focused on the characterization of human urine, much less research has focused on canine urine. The objectives of this study were to characterize the universal canine urinary proteome (both soluble and exosomal), to determine the overlap between the canine proteome and a representative human urinary proteome study, to generate a resource for future canine studies, and to determine the suitability of the dog as a large animal model for human diseases. The soluble and exosomal fractions of normal canine urine were characterized using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Biological Networks Gene Ontology (BiNGO) software was utilized to assign the canine urinary proteome to respective Gene Ontology categories, such as Cellular Component, Molecular Function, and Biological Process. Over 500 proteins were confidently identified in normal canine urine. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that exosomal proteins were largely derived from an intracellular location, while soluble proteins included both extracellular and membrane proteins. Exosome proteins were assigned to metabolic processes and localization, while soluble proteins were primarily annotated to specific localization processes. Several proteins identified in normal canine urine have previously been identified in human urine where these proteins are related to various extrarenal and renal diseases. The results of this study illustrate the potential of the dog as an animal model for human disease states and provide the framework for future studies of canine renal diseases. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  3. Complete Dentures Fabricated with CAD/CAM Technology and a Traditional Clinical Recording Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeva, Nadica; Kovacevska, Gordana; Janev, Edvard

    2017-10-15

    The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture (CD) fabrication ushered in a new era in removable prosthodontics. Commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems are expected to improve upon the disadvantages associated with conventional fabrication. The purpose of this report is to present the workflow involved in fabricating a CD with a traditional clinical recording method and CAD/CAM technology and to summarize the advantages to the dental practitioner and the patient.

  4. Improving clinical outcomes in psychiatric care with touch-screen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Elizabeth A; Doyle, Emma L; Sng, Adelln A H; Hooke, Geoffrey R; Page, Andrew C

    2012-05-01

    Patient-focused research, which uses clinical characteristics to predict outcomes, is a field in which information technology has been effectively integrated with practice. The present research used touch-screen technology to monitor the daily self-report measures of 1,308 consecutive inpatients and day patients participating in a 2-week cognitive-behavioral therapy group. Providing regular feedback was effective in reducing symptoms for patients at risk of poor outcomes (Newnham, Hooke, & Page, 2010b). The use of touch screens in psychiatric monitoring encourages a collaborative dialogue between patients and therapists and promotes engagement in the process of progress monitoring and treatment evaluation.

  5. Transcriptomics in cancer diagnostics: developments in technology, clinical research and commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Monica; Yeat, Nai Chien; Pajaro-Van der Stadt, Stefan; Lin, Charlotte; Ren, Qiuyin; Lin, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomic technologies are evolving to diagnose cancer earlier and more accurately to provide greater predictive and prognostic utility to oncologists and patients. Digital techniques such as RNA sequencing are replacing still-imaging techniques to provide more detailed analysis of the transcriptome and aberrant expression that causes oncogenesis, while companion diagnostics are developing to determine the likely effectiveness of targeted treatments. This article examines recent advancements in molecular profiling research and technology as applied to cancer diagnosis, clinical applications and predictions for the future of personalized medicine in oncology.

  6. The impact of clinical leadership on health information technology adoption: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Georgiou, Andrew; Clay-Williams, Robyn; Magrabi, Farah; Hordern, Antonia; Prgomet, Mirela; Li, Julie; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    To conduct a systematic review to examine evidence of associations between clinical leadership and successful information technology (IT) adoption in healthcare organisations. We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and Business Source Premier for articles published between January 2000 to May 2013 with keywords and subject terms related to: (1) the setting--healthcare provider organisations; (2) the technology--health information technology; (3) the process--adoption; and (4) the intervention--leadership. We identified 3121 unique citations, of which 32 met our criteria and were included in the review. Data extracted from the included studies were assessed in light of two frameworks: Bassellier et al.'s IT competence framework; and Avgar et al.'s health IT adoption framework. The results demonstrate important associations between the attributes of clinical leaders and IT adoption. Clinical leaders who have technical informatics skills and prior experience with IT project management are likely to develop a vision that comprises a long-term commitment to the use of IT. Leaders who possess such a vision believe in the value of IT, are motivated to adopt it, and can maintain confidence and stability through the adversities that IT adoptions often entail. This leads to proactive leadership behaviours and partnerships with IT professionals that are associated with successful organisational and clinical outcomes. This review provides evidence that clinical leaders can positively contribute to successful IT adoption in healthcare organisations. Clinical leaders who aim for improvements in the processes and quality of care should cultivate the necessary IT competencies, establish mutual partnerships with IT professionals, and execute proactive IT behaviours to achieve successful IT adoption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Opportunities and Challenges for Nutritional Proteomics in Cancer Prevention12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Milner, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge gaps persist about the efficacy of cancer prevention strategies based on dietary food components. Adaptations to nutrient supply are executed through tuning of multiple protein networks that include transcription factors, histones, modifying enzymes, translation factors, membrane and nuclear receptors, and secreted proteins. However, the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative measurement of all proteins that regulate cancer processes is not practical using traditional protein methodologies. Proteomics offers an attractive opportunity to fill this knowledge gap and unravel the effects of dietary components on protein networks that impinge on cancer. The articles presented in this supplement are from talks proffered in the “Nutrition Proteomics and Cancer Prevention” session at the American Institute for Cancer Research Annual Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer held in Washington, DC on October 21 and 22, 2010. Recent advances in MS technologies suggest that studies in nutrition and cancer prevention may benefit from the adoption of proteomic tools to elucidate the impact on biological processes that govern the transition from normal to malignant phenotype; to identify protein changes that determine both positive and negative responses to food components; to assess how protein networks mediate dose-, time-, and tissue-dependent responses to food components; and, finally, for predicting responders and nonresponders. However, both the limited accessibility to proteomic technologies and research funding appear to be hampering the routine adoption of proteomic tools in nutrition and cancer prevention research. PMID:22649262

  8. Validation and Assessment of a Technology Familiarity Score in Patients Attending a Symptomatic Breast Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C; Kelly, J; Lehane, E A; Livingstone, V; Cotter, B; Butt, A; Kelly, L; Corrigan, M A

    2015-10-01

    New media technologies (computers, mobile phones and the internet) have the potential to transform the healthcare information needs of patients with breast disease (Ferlay et al. in Eur J Cancer 49:1374-1403, 2013). However, patients' current level of use and their willingness to accept new media for education and communication remain unknown. This was a single-centre clinic-based prospective cross-sectional study. A previously developed instrument was modified, validated and tested on patients attending a symptomatic breast clinic. The instrument was evaluated on 200 symptomatic breast patients. The commonest outlets for education were staff (95 %), leaflets (69 %) and websites (59 %). Websites are more likely to be consulted by younger patients (higher education were more likely to favour apps, websites and email (p technology use among breast patients is expanding as expected along generational trends. As such its' further integration into healthcare systems can potentially ameliorate patient education and communication.

  9. Metacognitive factors that impact student nurse use of point of care technology in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, RuthAnne

    2010-01-01

    The utility of personal digital assistants (PDA) as a point of care resource in health care practice and education presents new challenges for nursing faculty. While there is a plethora of PDA resources available, little is known about the variables that effect student learning and technology adoption. In this study nursing students used PDA software programs which included a drug guide, medical dictionary, laboratory manual and nursing diagnosis manual during acute care clinical experiences. Analysis of student journals comparative reflective statements about the PDA as an adjunct to other available resources in clinical practice are presented. The benefits of having a PDA included readily available data, validation of thinking processes, and facilitation of care plan re-evaluation. Students reported increased frequency of use and independence. Significant correlations between user perceptions and computer self-efficacy suggested greater confidence in abilities with technology resulting in increased self-awareness and achievement of learning outcomes.

  10. FDA Regulation of Clinical Applications of CRISPR-CAS Gene-Editing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evita V

    Scientists have repurposed an adaptive immune system of single cell organisms to create a new type of gene-editing tool: CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas technology. Scientists in China have reported its use in the genome modification of non-viable human embryos. This has ignited a spirited debate about the moral, ethical, scientific, and social implications of human germline genome engineering. There have also been calls for regulations; however, FDA has yet to formally announce its oversight of clinical applications of CRISPR-Cas systems. This paper reviews FDA regulation of previously controversial biotechnology breakthroughs, recombinant DNA and human cloning. It then shows that FDA is well positioned to regulate CRISPR-Cas clinical applications, due to its legislative mandates, its existing regulatory frameworks for gene therapies and assisted reproductive technologies, and other considerations.

  11. From genomes to vaccines via the proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Alan Wilson

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An effective vaccine against schistosomiasis mansoni would be a valuable control tool and the high levels of protection elicited in rodents and primates by radiation-attenuated cercariae provide proof of principle. A major obstacle to vaccine development is the difficulty of identifying the antigens that mediate protection, not least because of the size of the genome at 280Mb DNA encoding 14,000 to 20,000 genes. The technologies collectively called proteomics, including 2D electrophoresis, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, now permit any protein to be identified provided there is extensive DNA data, and preferably a genome sequence. Applied to soluble (cytosolic proteins from schistosomes, proteomics reveals the great similarity in composition between life cycle stages, with several WHO vaccine candidates amongst the most abundant constituents. The proteomic approach has been successfully applied to identify the secretions used by cercaria to penetrate host skin, the gut secretions of adult worms and the proteins exposed on the tegument surface. Soluble proteins can also be separated by 2D electrophoresis before western blotting to identify the full range of antigenic targets present in a parasite preparation. The next step is to discover which target proteins represent the weak points in the worm's defences.

  12. Systems toxicology: applications of toxicogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics in toxicology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne, W.H.M.; Kienhuis, A.S.; Ommen, van B.; Stierum, R.; Groten, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Toxicogenomics can facilitate the identification and characterization of toxicity, as illustrated in this review. Toxicogenomics, the application of the functional genomics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) in toxicology enables the study of adverse effects of xenobiotic

  13. Optimized method for identification of the proteomes secreted by cardiac cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1005, č. 1005 (2013), s. 225-235 ISSN 1940 -6029 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : cardiac cells * secreted proteins * proteomic technology Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Optimized method for identification of the proteomes secreted by cardiac cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1005, č. 1005 (2013), s. 225-235 ISSN 1940-6029 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : cardiac cells * secreted proteins * proteomic technology Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  15. Using Technology, Clinical Workflow Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home LTC Nicole Kerkenbush, MHA, MN Army Medical Department, Office of the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using Technology, Clinical Workflow Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home 5a. CONTRACT...Describe how these tools are being used to implement the Patient Centered Medical Home care model 2 2011 MHS Conference MEDCOM AHLTA Provider Satisfaction

  16. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of small renal masses: Clinical effectiveness and technological advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, G.; Goodman, C.; Melzer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The review summarises the technological advances in the application of high-intensity focused ultrasound for small renal masses presumed to be cancer including the systematic review of its clinical application. Current progress in the area of magnetic resonance image guided ultrasound ablation is also appraised. Specifically, organ tracking and real time monitoring of temperature changes during the treatment are discussed. Finally, areas of future research interest are outlined. PMID:21116349

  17. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of small renal masses: Clinical effectiveness and technological advances

    OpenAIRE

    Nabi, G.; Goodman, C.; Melzer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The review summarises the technological advances in the application of high-intensity focused ultrasound for small renal masses presumed to be cancer including the systematic review of its clinical application. Current progress in the area of magnetic resonance image guided ultrasound ablation is also appraised. Specifically, organ tracking and real time monitoring of temperature changes during the treatment are discussed. Finally, areas of future research interest are outlined.

  18. At the United Nation Foundation's Social Good Summit, Vice President Biden Announces New Cancer Moonshot International Cooperation and Investments | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This week, Vice President Joe Biden announced progress on his global vision for the Cancer Moonshot.  Announced were 10 new Memoranda of Understanding or Memoranda of Cooperation for international cancer research and care, as well as new efforts in the emerging scientific areas of precision oncology, the funding of collaborative research centers to address cancer disparities in low- and middle- income (LMIC) countries, and a strengthening of existing U.S. bilateral science and technology engagements around cancer.  

  19. Sensor-based supporting mobile system Parkinson disease clinical tests utilising biomedical and RFID technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses method and tool for assisting clinical tests of pharmaceutical drugs utilising sensors and mobile technologies. Emerging sensor and mobile technologies deliver new opportunities to gather and process medical data. Presented analytical approach implements such observations and delivers new, convenient means for remote patient monitoring. Clinical tests are highly specialised process requiring methodology and tools to support such research. Currently available methods rely mostly on analogue approach (booklets, requiring the clinical test participant to fill in health state daily. Such approach often can be biased by unpunctual, not precise reporting. The mobile device can support this process by automatic scheduling and recording an actual time of reports and most of all it can record the inertial and biometric sensor data during the survey process. Presented analytical method (tremors recognition and mobile tool offers consistent approach to clinical test assistance transforming and Android smartphone into remote reporting and notification tool. The tool offers additionally features for sensor based diagnostics support for PD tremor recognition as well as specific clonic and tonic symptoms (dedicated for further system extensions towards epilepsy. Capabilities of the system delivers also RFID mechanisms for efficient on-site clinical test authorisation and configuration. This feature simplifies application installation and automatic set-up considering the participant, clinical test configuration, schedule, smartphone and sensor data. Such a composition delivers convenient and reliable tool which can assist patients and medical staff during the process objectifying the clinical tests results and helping to ensure good quality of the data, quickly available and easily accessible.

  20. A social-technological epistemology of clinical decision-making as mediated by imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baalen, Sophie; Carusi, Annamaria; Sabroe, Ian; Kiely, David G

    2017-10-01

    In recent years there has been growing attention to the epistemology of clinical decision-making, but most studies have taken the individual physicians as the central object of analysis. In this paper we argue that knowing in current medical practice has an inherently social character and that imaging plays a mediating role in these practices. We have analyzed clinical decision-making within a medical expert team involved in diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), a rare disease requiring multidisciplinary team involvement in diagnosis and management. Within our field study, we conducted observations, interviews, video tasks, and a panel discussion. Decision-making in the PH clinic involves combining evidence from heterogeneous sources into a cohesive framing of a patient, in which interpretations of the different sources can be made consistent with each other. Because pieces of evidence are generated by people with different expertise and interpretation and adjustments take place in interaction between different experts, we argue that this process is socially distributed. Multidisciplinary team meetings are an important place where information is shared, discussed, interpreted, and adjusted, allowing for a collective way of seeing and a shared language to be developed. We demonstrate this with an example of image processing in the PH service, an instance in which knowledge is distributed over multiple people who play a crucial role in generating an evaluation of right heart function. Finally, we argue that images fulfill a mediating role in distributed knowing in 3 ways: first, as enablers or tools in acquiring information; second, as communication facilitators; and third, as pervasively framing the epistemic domain. With this study of clinical decision-making in diagnosis and treatment of PH, we have shown that clinical decision-making is highly social and mediated by technologies. The epistemology of clinical decision-making needs

  1. Imaging of Mucosal Inflammation: Current Technological Developments, Clinical Implications, and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian J. Waldner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various technological developments markedly improved imaging of mucosal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Although technological developments such as high-definition-, chromo-, and autofluorescence-endoscopy led to a more precise and detailed assessment of mucosal inflammation during wide-field endoscopy, probe-based and stationary confocal laser microscopy enabled in vivo real-time microscopic imaging of mucosal surfaces within the gastrointestinal tract. Through the use of fluorochromes with specificity against a defined molecular target combined with endoscopic techniques that allow ultrastructural resolution, molecular imaging enables in vivo visualization of single molecules or receptors during endoscopy. Molecular imaging has therefore greatly expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern innovative endoscopy, which include the diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment of disease as well as the prediction of the therapeutic response of individual patients. Furthermore, non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, scintigraphy, and ultrasound provide helpful information as supplement to invasive endoscopic procedures. In this review, we provide an overview on the current status of advanced imaging technologies for the clinical non-invasive and endoscopic evaluation of mucosal inflammation. Furthermore, the value of novel methods such as multiphoton microscopy, optoacoustics, and optical coherence tomography and their possible future implementation into clinical diagnosis and evaluation of mucosal inflammation will be discussed.

  2. Proteomics Development and Application for Bioforensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Karen L.; Wunschel, David S.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2010-09-15

    Proteomics is a relatively new scientific discipline dedicated to the comprehensive study of the protein composition of biological systems. While genomic sequencing is an invaluable tool for bioforensic sample identification, proteomics complements genomics in that the genes present in an organism code for the proteins that can be present in a microorganism. Many proteins are conserved for general identification while other protein expression varies with environment/growth state/growth conditions (i.e. not all proteins are expressed at any given time or condition) providing additional information beyond genomic analysis. This expression specificity and the relative stability of proteins with respect to genetic material make them attractive targets for microorganism identification and forensic applications to complement genomic approaches. Proteomic analysis depends upon the availability of genome sequences of the relevant organisms or their near relatives. The known amino acid sequences for potential proteins within the database can be compared to amino acid sequences of actual proteins present in a sample as determined with high mass accuracy by mass spectrometry for identification of the proteins in the sample. With the development of technology for rapid genome sequencing of organisms, the known protein database is growing, supporting improved identification of the proteins present in a sample. Recent developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation and microbial sequencing are leading to an increased growth in application of proteomics to microbiology, pathogen detection, disease diagnosis and microbial forensics as well as other biological disciplines. Mass spectrometry analysis does not require a priori knowledge of the sample or expected targets to gain meaningful.

  3. Clinical case in digital technology for nursing students' learning: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Cristina Yuri Nakata; Aredes, Natália Del Angelo; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira; Camargo, Rosangela Andrade Aukar; de Goes, Fernanda Santos Nogueira

    2016-03-01

    This review aimed to analyze the available evidences in literature about clinical case studies inserted in digital technologies for nursing education, characterizing the technology resources and cognitive, procedural and attitudinal learnings. Integrative review of literature with the following steps: development of the research problem, data collection, data extraction and critic evaluation, data analysis and interpretation and presentation of results. The research question was: how does the clinical case study inserted in educational digital technology collaborate for cognitive, attitudinal and procedural learning of nursing students? data bases LILACS, PUBMED, CINAHL and Scopus. the search resulted in 437 studies: 136 from LILACS, 122 from PUBMED, 104 from Scopus and 75 from CINAHL. Of these, 143 did not meet the including criteria, 93 were duplicated and four studies were unavailable. After analyzing all abstracts based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, there were selected 197 studies and after full text analysis the final sample resulted in 21 primary studies. Case study use in educational digital technologies allowed the students to build different types of learning: cognitive learning (n 16 studies), attitudinal learning (n=12 studies) and procedural learning (n=8 studies). It is possible to conclude that case studies can collaborate with the students to develop different learnings which can be built integrate, continuous, informative and formative, aiming integral formation and aligned to policies of formation in nursing, both national and international. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. BioinformatiqTM - integrating data types for proteomic discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, J.W.; Harrison, M.; Manoharan, A.; Traini, M.; Shaw, E.; Wilkins, M.

    2001-01-01

    Proteomics (Wilkins et al. 1997) involves the large-scale analysis of expressed proteins. At each stage of the discovery process the researcher accumulates large volumes of data. These include: clinical or biological data about the sample being studied; details of sample purification and separation; images of 2D gels and associated information; MALDI mass spectra; MS/MS and PSD spectra; as well as meta-data relating to the projects undertaken and experiments performed. All this must be combined with existing databases of protein and EST sequences, post-translational modifications, and protein glycosylation, then processed with sophisticated bioinformatics tools in order to extract meaningful answers to questions of biological, clinical, and agricultural significance. BioinformatlQ TM is a web-based application for the storage, management, and automated bioinformatic analysis of proteomic information. This poster will demonstrate the integration of these disparate data sources in proteomics

  5. Farm animal proteomics - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke; Danielsen, Marianne; Hollung, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    In agricultural sciences as in all other areas of life science, the implementation of proteomics and other post-genomic tools is an important step towards more detailed understanding of the complex biological systems that control physiology and pathology of living beings. Farm animals are raised...... and cattle are relevant not only for farm animal sciences, but also for adding to our understanding of complex biological mechanisms of health and disease in humans. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the specific topics of interest within farm animal proteomics, and to highlight some...... of the areas where synergy between classic model organism proteomics and farm animal proteomics is rapidly emerging. Focus will be on introducing the special biological traits that play an important role in food production, and on how proteomics may help optimize farm animal production...

  6. Proteomics research in India: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Atak, Apurva; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Kumar, Saurabh; Gupta, Shabarni; Prasad, T S Keshava; Zingde, Surekha M; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-08

    After a successful completion of the Human Genome Project, deciphering the mystery surrounding the human proteome posed a major challenge. Despite not being largely involved in the Human Genome Project, the Indian scientific community contributed towards proteomic research along with the global community. Currently, more than 76 research/academic institutes and nearly 145 research labs are involved in core proteomic research across India. The Indian researchers have been major contributors in drafting the "human proteome map" along with international efforts. In addition to this, virtual proteomics labs, proteomics courses and remote triggered proteomics labs have helped to overcome the limitations of proteomics education posed due to expensive lab infrastructure. The establishment of Proteomics Society, India (PSI) has created a platform for the Indian proteomic researchers to share ideas, research collaborations and conduct annual conferences and workshops. Indian proteomic research is really moving forward with the global proteomics community in a quest to solve the mysteries of proteomics. A draft map of the human proteome enhances the enthusiasm among intellectuals to promote proteomic research in India to the world.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mass-spectrometric exploration of proteome structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    , the structures and functions of selected proteins have been studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. However, the properties and behaviour of the proteome as an integrated system have largely remained elusive. Powerful mass-spectrometry-based technologies now provide unprecedented insights...

  8. The time is right: proteome biology of stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whetton, A.D.; Williamson, A.J.K.; Krijgsveld, J.; Lee, B.H.; Lemischka, I.; Oh, S.; Pera, M.; Mummery, C.L.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2008-01-01

    In stem cell biology, there is a growing need for advanced technologies that may help to unravel the molecular mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation. Proteomics, the comprehensive analysis of proteins, is such an emerging technique. To facilitate interactions between specialists in

  9. Wall Street's assessment of plastic surgery--related technology: a clinical and financial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-02-01

    Many plastic surgeons develop technologies that are manufactured by Wall Street-financed companies. Others participate in the stock market as investors. This study examines the bioengineered skin industry to determine whether it integrates clinical and financial information as Wall Street tenets would predict, and to see whether the financial performance of these companies provides any lessons for practicing plastic surgeons. In efficient markets, the assumptions on which independent financial analysts base their company sales and earnings projections are clinically reasonable, the volatility of a company's stock price does not irrationally differ from that of its industry sector, and the buy/sell recommendations of analysts are roughly congruent. For the companies in this study, these key financial parameters were compared with a benchmark index of 69 biotech companies of similar age and annual revenues (Student's t test). Five bioengineered skin companies were included in the study. Analysts estimated that each company would sell its product to between 24 and 45 percent of its target clinical population. The average stock price volatility was significantly higher for study companies than for those in the benchmark index (p companies were significantly less congruent than those for the benchmark companies (p invest in the stock market, because of their unique clinical experience, may sometimes be in the position to evaluate new technologies and companies better than Wall Street experts. Well-timed trades that use this expertise can result in opportunities for profit.

  10. Telerehabilitation Clinical and Vocational Applications for Assistive Technology: Research, Opportunities, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Schmeler

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation service providers in rural or underserved areas are often challenged in meeting the needs of their complex patients due to limited resources in their geographical area. Recruitment and retention of the rural clinical workforce are beset by the ongoing problems associated with limited continuing education opportunities, professional isolation, and the challenges inherent in coordinating rural community healthcare. People with disabilities who live in rural communities also face challenges accessing healthcare. Traveling long distances to a specialty clinic for necessary expertise may be troublesome due to inadequate or unavailable transportation, disability specific limitations, and financial limitations. Distance and lack of access are just two threats to quality of care that now being addressed by the use of videoconferencing, information exchange, and other telecommunication technologies that facilitate telerehabilitation. This white paper illustrates and summarizes clinical and vocational applications of telerehabilitation. We provide definitions related to the fields of telemedicine, telehealth, and telerehabilitation, and consider the impetus for telerehabilitation. We review the telerehabilitation literature for assistive technology applications; pressure ulcer prevention; virtual reality applications; speech-language pathology applications; seating and wheeled mobility applications; vocational rehabilitation applications; and cost effectiveness. We then discuss external telerehabilitation influencers, such as the positions of professional organizations. Finally, we summarize clinical and policy issues in a limited context appropriate to the scope of this paper. Keywords: Telerehabilitation, Telehealth, Telemedicine, Telepractice

  11. Telerehabilitation clinical and vocational applications for assistive technology: research, opportunities, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeler, Mark R; Schein, Richard M; McCue, Michael; Betz, Kendra

    2009-01-01

    Rehabilitation service providers in rural or underserved areas are often challenged in meeting the needs of their complex patients due to limited resources in their geographical area. Recruitment and retention of the rural clinical workforce are beset by the ongoing problems associated with limited continuing education opportunities, professional isolation, and the challenges inherent in coordinating rural community healthcare. People with disabilities who live in rural communities also face challenges accessing healthcare. Traveling long distances to a specialty clinic for necessary expertise may be troublesome due to inadequate or unavailable transportation, disability specific limitations, and financial limitations. Distance and lack of access are just two threats to quality of care that now being addressed by the use of videoconferencing, information exchange, and other telecommunication technologies that facilitate telerehabilitation. This white paper illustrates and summarizes clinical and vocational applications of telerehabilitation. We provide definitions related to the fields of telemedicine, telehealth, and telerehabilitation, and consider the impetus for telerehabilitation. We review the telerehabilitation literature for assistive technology applications; pressure ulcer prevention; virtual reality applications; speech-language pathology applications; seating and wheeled mobility applications; vocational rehabilitation applications; and cost-effectiveness. We then discuss external telerehabilitation influencers, such as the positions of professional organizations. Finally, we summarize clinical and policy issues in a limited context appropriate to the scope of this paper.

  12. Exploring the use of mobile technologies for the acquisition of clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Collette A

    2011-08-01

    Mobile learning has the potential to supplement information communication technology (ICT), online learning and the traditional teaching and learning methods to educate practitioners in the clinical practice area. Following the development of several Post Graduate modules of learning for the theory and clinical skills required to undertake the Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE), a small research study was undertaken to combine mobile learning and NIPE. The research study explored the hypothesis that mobile devices could be used in pedagogically effective ways to support and enhance the learning and acquisition of clinical skills in the clinical arena. Participants in the study each received a handheld mobile device (iPod) that had been loaded with several Reusable Learning Objects (RLO) outlining each aspect of the physical examination to be performed. At the end of the module (12 weeks in duration), each participant completed an evaluation questionnaire. Participants confirmed that mobile learning afforded flexibility in time and place of learning and captured their interest in the learning material. This study reports that the use of mobile technology for skill acquisition is creative and innovative, placing learning firmly in the hands of the learner. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An introduction to statistical process control in research proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell, David

    2013-12-16

    Statistical process control is a well-established and respected method which provides a general purpose, and consistent framework for monitoring and improving the quality of a process. It is routinely used in many industries where the quality of final products is critical and is often required in clinical diagnostic laboratories [1,2]. To date, the methodology has been little utilised in research proteomics. It has been shown to be capable of delivering quantitative QC procedures for qualitative clinical assays [3] making it an ideal methodology to apply to this area of biological research. To introduce statistical process control as an objective strategy for quality control and show how it could be used to benefit proteomics researchers and enhance the quality of the results they generate. We demonstrate that rules which provide basic quality control are easy to derive and implement and could have a major impact on data quality for many studies. Statistical process control is a powerful tool for investigating and improving proteomics research work-flows. The process of characterising measurement systems and defining control rules forces the exploration of key questions that can lead to significant improvements in performance. This work asserts that QC is essential to proteomics discovery experiments. Every experimenter must know the current capabilities of their measurement system and have an objective means for tracking and ensuring that performance. Proteomic analysis work-flows are complicated and multi-variate. QC is critical for clinical chemistry measurements and huge strides have been made in ensuring the quality and validity of results in clinical biochemistry labs. This work introduces some of these QC concepts and works to bridge their use from single analyte QC to applications in multi-analyte systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Standardization and Quality Control in Proteomics. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier

  14. Clinical Computer Systems Survey (CLICS): learning about health information technology (HIT) in its context of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Valentina; Cornford, Tony; Klecun, Ela

    2013-01-01

    Successful health information technology (HIT) implementations need to be informed on the context of use and on users' attitudes. To this end, we developed the CLinical Computer Systems Survey (CLICS) instrument. CLICS reflects a socio-technical view of HIT adoption, and is designed to encompass all members of the clinical team. We used the survey in a large English hospital as part of its internal evaluation of the implementation of an electronic patient record system (EPR). The survey revealed extent and type of use of the EPR; how it related to and integrated with other existing systems; and people's views on its use, usability and emergent safety issues. Significantly, participants really appreciated 'being asked'. They also reminded us of the wider range of administrative roles engaged with EPR. This observation reveals pertinent questions as to our understanding of the boundaries between administrative tasks and clinical medicine - what we propose as the field of 'administrative medicine'.

  15. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieselbach

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT and leukotoxin (LtxA into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  16. Using Digital Technologies in Clinical HIV Research: Real-World Applications and Considerations for Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriesen, Jessica; Bull, Sheana; Dietrich, Janan; Haberer, Jessica E; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Voronin, Yegor; Wall, Kristin M; Whalen, Christopher; Priddy, Frances

    2017-07-31

    Digital technologies, especially if used in novel ways, provide a number of potential advantages to clinical research in trials related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and may greatly facilitate operations as well as data collection and analysis. These technologies may even allow answering questions that are not answerable with older technologies. However, they come with a variety of potential concerns for both the participants and the trial sponsors. The exact challenges and means for alleviation depend on the technology and on the population in which it is deployed, and the rapidly changing landscape of digital technologies presents a challenge for creating future-proof guidelines for technology application. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize some common themes that are frequently encountered by researchers in this context and highlight those that should be carefully considered before making a decision to include these technologies in their research. In April 2016, the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise surveyed the field for research groups with recent experience in novel applications of digital technologies in HIV clinical research and convened these groups for a 1-day meeting. Real-world uses of various technologies were presented and discussed by 46 attendees, most of whom were researchers involved in the design and conduct of clinical trials of biomedical HIV prevention and treatment approaches. After the meeting, a small group of organizers reviewed the presentations and feedback obtained during the meeting and categorized various lessons-learned to identify common themes. A group of 9 experts developed a draft summary of the findings that was circulated via email to all 46 attendees for review. Taking into account the feedback received, the group finalized the considerations that are presented here. Meeting presenters and attendees discussed the many successful applications of digital

  17. Making use of research: clinical views on an evaluation of everyday technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Louise; Kottorp, Anders; Rosenberg, Lena

    2015-01-01

    The study aim was to investigate how and when an evaluation of perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology (Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, ETUQ) could be used in clinical occupational therapy. Eight focus-group interviews were undertaken with a total of 42 participants (occupational therapists), and data were analysed with a constant comparative approach. The findings are presented in four main categories, including (i) appropriate purposes and contexts for using ETUQ, (ii) standardization versus individual flexibility, (iii) approaching everyday technology use and occupation as one whole, and (iv) synthesizing and documentation. In conclusion, the participants considered ability to use technology to be an important topic for occupational therapy, particularly in investigations of clients with subtle disabilities and in connection with discharge from hospital - but not in inpatient care. They had different views on how to integrate ETUQ with evaluations of occupational performance, and new ideas on how information about clients' ability to use technology could be utilized in interventions. They held standardized evaluations in high regard, but a paradox appeared in that many of them would use ETUQ in a non-standardized way, while simultaneously asking for a standardized output to be used in clients' medical files and to guide interventions.

  18. Locating assistive technology research in a clinical setting: an occupational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler-Davis, Sally; Evans, Laura; Cudd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peer research was used to identify the experience and perceptions of assistive technology and telecare adoption in a UK healthcare context. A narrative account of participation and learning is intended to provoke further dialogue. There have been a range of policy and implementation initiatives that are within the direct experience of organisational actors over the last 15 years and this engagement allows for specific reflection on the service achievements and some of the barriers to implementation of technology changes in rehabilitation practice and service design. Insights are presented that suggest a reification of research priorities and a need to align technology, through patient and public engagement, to provider priorities. In addition, an improvement in adoption would be based on sustained capacity building within the Occupational Therapy workforce and a re-focus on specific knowledge sharing and learning about technology. Given the shared desire to promote the sustained adoption of appropriate technology for assistance and rehabilitation it is suggested the voice of practitioners is strengthened through research and knowledge exchange in the clinical setting.

  19. Positional proteomics in the era of the human proteome project on the doorstep of precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Marino, Giada; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Proteolytic processing is a pervasive and irreversible post-translational modification that expands the protein universe by generating new proteoforms (protein isoforms). Unlike signal peptide or prodomain removal, protease-generated proteoforms can rarely be predicted from gene sequences. Positional proteomic techniques that enrich for N- or C-terminal peptides from proteomes are indispensable for a comprehensive understanding of a protein's function in biological environments since protease cleavage frequently results in altered protein activity and localization. Proteases often process other proteases and protease inhibitors which perturbs proteolytic networks and potentiates the initial cleavage event to affect other molecular networks and cellular processes in physiological and pathological conditions. This review is aimed at researchers with a keen interest in state of the art systems level positional proteomic approaches that: (i) enable the study of complex protease-protease, protease-inhibitor and protease-substrate crosstalk and networks; (ii) allow the identification of proteolytic signatures as candidate disease biomarkers; and (iii) are expected to fill the Human Proteome Project missing proteins gap. We predict that these methodologies will be an integral part of emerging precision medicine initiatives that aim to customize healthcare, converting reactive medicine into a personalized and proactive approach, improving clinical care and maximizing patient health and wellbeing, while decreasing health costs by eliminating ineffective therapies, trial-and-error prescribing, and adverse drug effects. Such initiatives require quantitative and functional proteome profiling and dynamic disease biomarkers in addition to current pharmacogenomics approaches. With proteases at the pathogenic center of many diseases, high-throughput protein termini identification techniques such as TAILS (Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates) and COFRADIC (COmbined

  20. Proteomic profiling of exosomes: Current perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Richard J; Jensen, Søren S; Lim, Justin W E

    2008-01-01

    for the spread of morphogens in epithelia. The advent of current MS-based proteomic technologies has contributed significantly to our understanding of the molecular composition of exosomes. In addition to a common set of membrane and cytosolic proteins, it is becoming increasingly apparent that exosomes harbor...... distinct subsets of proteins that may be linked to cell-type associated functions. The secretion of exosomes by tumor cells and their implication in the transport and propagation of infectious cargo such as prions and retroviruses such as HIV suggest their participation in pathological situations...

  1. Proteomics of Maize Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochholdinger, Frank; Marcon, Caroline; Baldauf, Jutta A; Yu, Peng; Frey, Felix P

    2018-01-01

    Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  2. Proteomics of Maize Root Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hochholdinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  3. Proteomic Signatures of Thymomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linan Wang

    Full Text Available Based on the histological features and outcome, the current WHO classification separates thymomas into A, AB, B1, B2 and B3 subtypes. It is hypothesized that the type A thymomas are derived from the thymic medulla while the type B thymomas are derived from the cortex. Due to occasional histological overlap between the tumor subtypes creating difficulties in their separation, the aim of this study was to provide their proteomic characterization and identify potential immunohistochemical markers aiding in tissue diagnosis. Pair-wise comparison of neoplastic and normal thymus by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue revealed 61 proteins differentially expressed in thymomas compared to normal tissue. Hierarchical clustering showed distinct segregation of subtypes AB, B1 and B2 from that of A and B3. Most notably, desmoyokin, a protein that is encoded by the AHNAK gene, was associated with type A thymomas and medulla of normal thymus, by LC-MS/MS and immunohistochemistry. In this global proteomic characterization of the thymoma, several proteins unique to different thymic compartments and thymoma subtypes were identified. Among differentially expressed proteins, desmoyokin is a marker specific for thymic medulla and is potentially promising immunohistochemical marker in separation of type A and B3 thymomas.

  4. Childhood obstructive sleep-disordered breathing: a clinical update and discussion of technological innovations and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbower, Ann C; Ishman, Stacey L; McGinley, Brian M

    2007-12-01

    Childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been known to be associated with health and cognitive impacts for more than a century, and yet our understanding of this disorder is in its infancy. Neuropsychological consequences in children with snoring or subtle breathing disturbances not meeting the traditional definition of sleep apnea suggest that "benign, or primary snoring" may be clinically significant, and that the true prevalence of SDB might be underestimated. There is no standard definition of SDB in children. The polysomnographic technology used in many sleep laboratories may be inadequate to diagnose serious but subtle forms of clinically important airflow limitation. In the last several years, advances in digital technology as well as new observational studies of respiratory and arousal patterns in large populations of healthy children have led to alternative views of what constitutes sleep-related breathing and arousal abnormalities that may refine our diagnostic criteria. This article reviews our knowledge of childhood SDB, highlights recent advances in technology, and discusses diagnostic and treatment strategies that will advance the management of children with pediatric SDB.

  5. Changes to the Aqueous Humor Proteome during Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Andrea Kaeslin

    Full Text Available To investigate the aqueous humor proteome in patients with glaucoma and a control group.Aqueous humor was obtained from five human donors diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and five age- and sex-matched controls undergoing cataract surgery. Quantitative proteome analysis of the aqueous humor by hyper reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HRM-MS based on SWATH technology was performed.Expression levels of 87 proteins were found to be different between glaucomatous and control aqueous humor. Of the 87 proteins, 34 were significantly upregulated, whereas 53 proteins were downregulated in the aqueous humor from glaucoma patients compared to controls. Differentially expressed proteins were found to be involved in cholesterol-related, inflammatory, metabolic, antioxidant as well as proteolysis-related processes.Glaucoma leads to profound changes to the aqueous humor proteome consistent with an altered metabolic state, an inflammatory response and impaired antioxidant defense.

  6. Sherlock Holmes and the proteome--a detective story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Boschetti, Egisto

    2007-02-01

    The performance of a hexapeptide ligand library in capturing the 'hidden proteome' is illustrated and evaluated. This library, insolubilized on an organic polymer and available under the trade name 'Equalizer Bead Technology', acts by capturing all components of a given proteome, by concentrating rare and very rare proteins, and simultaneously diluting the abundant ones. This results in a proteome of 'normalized' relative abundances, amenable to analysis by MS and any other analytical tool. Examples are given of analysis of human urine and serum, as well as cell and tissue lysates, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts. Another important application is impurity tracking and polishing of recombinant DNA products, especially biopharmaceuticals meant for human consumption.

  7. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Bonner

    Full Text Available Mitosis is a fundamental process in the development of all organisms. The mitotic spindle guides the cell through mitosis as it mediates the segregation of chromosomes, the orientation of the cleavage furrow, and the progression of cell division. Birth defects and tissue-specific cancers often result from abnormalities in mitotic events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1155 proteins and used Gene Ontology (GO analysis to categorize proteins into cellular component groups. We then compared our data to the previously published CHO midbody proteome and identified proteins that are unique to the CHO spindle. Our data represent the first mitotic spindle proteome in CHO cells, which augments the list of mitotic spindle components from mammalian cells.

  8. Changes to the Aqueous Humor Proteome during Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeslin, Martha Andrea; Killer, Hanspeter Ezriel; Fuhrer, Cyril Adrian; Zeleny, Nauke; Huber, Andreas Robert; Neutzner, Albert

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the aqueous humor proteome in patients with glaucoma and a control group. Aqueous humor was obtained from five human donors diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and five age- and sex-matched controls undergoing cataract surgery. Quantitative proteome analysis of the aqueous humor by hyper reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HRM-MS) based on SWATH technology was performed. Expression levels of 87 proteins were found to be different between glaucomatous and control aqueous humor. Of the 87 proteins, 34 were significantly upregulated, whereas 53 proteins were downregulated in the aqueous humor from glaucoma patients compared to controls. Differentially expressed proteins were found to be involved in cholesterol-related, inflammatory, metabolic, antioxidant as well as proteolysis-related processes. Glaucoma leads to profound changes to the aqueous humor proteome consistent with an altered metabolic state, an inflammatory response and impaired antioxidant defense.

  9. PACOM: A Versatile Tool for Integrating, Filtering, Visualizing, and Comparing Multiple Large Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; López-García, Miguel Ángel; González-Tejedo, Carmen; Prieto, Gorka; Navajas, Rosana; Salazar-Donate, Emilio; Fernández-Costa, Carolina; Yates, John R; Albar, Juan Pablo

    2018-04-06

    Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics has evolved into a high-throughput technology in which numerous large-scale data sets are generated from diverse analytical platforms. Furthermore, several scientific journals and funding agencies have emphasized the storage of proteomics data in public repositories to facilitate its evaluation, inspection, and reanalysis. (1) As a consequence, public proteomics data repositories are growing rapidly. However, tools are needed to integrate multiple proteomics data sets to compare different experimental features or to perform quality control analysis. Here, we present a new Java stand-alone tool, Proteomics Assay COMparator (PACOM), that is able to import, combine, and simultaneously compare numerous proteomics experiments to check the integrity of the proteomic data as well as verify data quality. With PACOM, the user can detect source of errors that may have been introduced in any step of a proteomics workflow and that influence the final results. Data sets can be easily compared and integrated, and data quality and reproducibility can be visually assessed through a rich set of graphical representations of proteomics data features as well as a wide variety of data filters. Its flexibility and easy-to-use interface make PACOM a unique tool for daily use in a proteomics laboratory. PACOM is available at https://github.com/smdb21/pacom .

  10. Transformation of standardized clinical models based on OWL technologies: from CEM to OpenEHR archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Chute, Christopher G; Tao, Cui

    2015-05-01

    The semantic interoperability of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) systems is a major challenge in the medical informatics area. International initiatives pursue the use of semantically interoperable clinical models, and ontologies have frequently been used in semantic interoperability efforts. The objective of this paper is to propose a generic, ontology-based, flexible approach for supporting the automatic transformation of clinical models, which is illustrated for the transformation of Clinical Element Models (CEMs) into openEHR archetypes. Our transformation method exploits the fact that the information models of the most relevant EHR specifications are available in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). The transformation approach is based on defining mappings between those ontological structures. We propose a way in which CEM entities can be transformed into openEHR by using transformation templates and OWL as common representation formalism. The transformation architecture exploits the reasoning and inferencing capabilities of OWL technologies. We have devised a generic, flexible approach for the transformation of clinical models, implemented for the unidirectional transformation from CEM to openEHR, a series of reusable transformation templates, a proof-of-concept implementation, and a set of openEHR archetypes that validate the methodological approach. We have been able to transform CEM into archetypes in an automatic, flexible, reusable transformation approach that could be extended to other clinical model specifications. We exploit the potential of OWL technologies for supporting the transformation process. We believe that our approach could be useful for international efforts in the area of semantic interoperability of EHR systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Standard guidelines for the chromosome-centric human proteome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Young-Ki; Omenn, Gilbert S; Uhlen, Mathias; Hanash, Samir; Marko-Varga, György; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bairoch, Amos; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Legrain, Pierre; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Na, Keun; Jeong, Seul-Ki; He, Fuchu; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Nishimura, Toshihide; Keown, Paul; Baker, Mark S; Yoo, Jong Shin; Garin, Jerome; Archakov, Alexander; Bergeron, John; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Hancock, William S

    2012-04-06

    The objective of the international Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is to map and annotate all proteins encoded by the genes on each human chromosome. The C-HPP consortium was established to organize a collaborative network among the research teams responsible for protein mapping of individual chromosomes and to identify compelling biological and genetic mechanisms influencing colocated genes and their protein products. The C-HPP aims to foster the development of proteome analysis and integration of the findings from related molecular -omics technology platforms through collaborations among universities, industries, and private research groups. The C-HPP consortium leadership has elicited broad input for standard guidelines to manage these international efforts more efficiently by mobilizing existing resources and collaborative networks. The C-HPP guidelines set out the collaborative consensus of the C-HPP teams, introduce topics associated with experimental approaches, data production, quality control, treatment, and transparency of data, governance of the consortium, and collaborative benefits. A companion approach for the Biology and Disease-Driven HPP (B/D-HPP) component of the Human Proteome Project is currently being organized, building upon the Human Proteome Organization's organ-based and biofluid-based initiatives (www.hupo.org/research). The common application of these guidelines in the participating laboratories is expected to facilitate the goal of a comprehensive analysis of the human proteome.

  12. Recent advances and opportunities in proteomic analyses of tumour heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Conrads, Thomas P

    2018-04-01

    Solid tumour malignancies comprise a highly variable admixture of tumour and non-tumour cellular populations, forming a complex cellular ecosystem and tumour microenvironment. This tumour heterogeneity is not incidental, and is known to correlate with poor patient prognosis for many cancer types. Indeed, non-malignant cell populations, such as vascular endothelial and immune cells, are known to play key roles supporting and, in some cases, driving aggressive tumour biology, and represent targets of emerging therapeutics, such as antiangiogenesis and immune checkpoint inhibitors. The biochemical interplay between these cellular populations and how they contribute to molecular tumour heterogeneity remains enigmatic, particularly from the perspective of the tumour proteome. This review focuses on recent advances in proteomic methods, namely imaging mass spectrometry, single-cell proteomic techniques, and preanalytical sample processing, that are uniquely positioned to enable detailed analysis of discrete cellular populations within tumours to improve our understanding of tumour proteomic heterogeneity. This review further emphasizes the opportunity afforded by the application of these techniques to the analysis of tumour heterogeneity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tumour tissues, as these represent an invaluable resource for retrospective analyses that is now routinely accessible, owing to recent technological and methodological advances in tumour tissue proteomics. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Time lapse imaging: is it time to incorporate this technology into routine clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, Priya; Maheshwari, Abha; Cutting, Rachel; Seenan, Susan; Patel, Anita; Khan, Khalid; Homburg, Roy

    2017-06-01

    Time-lapse imaging (TLI) systems for embryo incubation, assessment and selection are a novel technology available to in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. However, there is uncertainty about their clinical and cost-effectiveness and insufficient good quality evidence to warrant their routine use. Despite this, enthusiastic commercial marketing and slipping clinical equipoise have led to the widespread hasty introduction of this technology into practice, often at a considerable expense to the patient. We have reviewed the published literature and aim to summarize the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of these systems. These specialized incubators provide undisturbed embryo culture conditions and, by almost continuous monitoring of embryo development, generate morphokinetic parameters to aid embryo selection. They are thus hypothesized to improve outcomes following IVF. Although literature reports improved reproductive outcomes, these outcomes are largely surrogate and there is a paucity of studies reporting live births. The use of time lapse systems may reduce early pregnancy loss, increase elective single embryo transfers and limit multiple pregnancies through better embryo selection. However, the quality of the studies and hence the evidence so far, is low to moderate quality. We recommend further research producing robust high-quality evidence for and against the use of these systems.

  14. Treatment of clinical solid waste using a steam autoclave as a possible alternative technology to incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Sohrab; Balakrishnan, Venugopal; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam; Kadir, Mohd Omar Ab

    2012-03-01

    A steam autoclave was used to sterilize bacteria in clinical solid waste in order to determine an alternative to incineration technology in clinical solid waste management. The influence of contact time (0, 5, 15, 30 and 60 min) and temperature (111 °C, 121 °C and 131 °C) at automated saturated steam pressure was investigated. Results showed that with increasing contact time and temperature, the number of surviving bacteria decreased. The optimum experimental conditions as measured by degree of inactivation of bacteria were 121 °C for 15 minutes (min) for Gram negative bacteria, 121 °C and 131 °C for 60 and 30 min for Gram positive bacteria, respectively. The re-growth of bacteria in sterilized waste was also evaluated in the present study. It was found that bacterial re-growth started two days after the inactivation. The present study recommends that the steam autoclave cannot be considered as an alternative technology to incineration in clinical solid waste management.

  15. Treatment of Clinical Solid Waste Using a Steam Autoclave as a Possible Alternative Technology to Incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab; Balakrishnan, Venugopal; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Sarker, Md. Zaidul Islam; Kadir, Mohd Omar Ab

    2012-01-01

    A steam autoclave was used to sterilize bacteria in clinical solid waste in order to determine an alternative to incineration technology in clinical solid waste management. The influence of contact time (0, 5, 15, 30 and 60 min) and temperature (111 °C, 121 °C and 131 °C) at automated saturated steam pressure was investigated. Results showed that with increasing contact time and temperature, the number of surviving bacteria decreased. The optimum experimental conditions as measured by degree of inactivation of bacteria were 121 °C for 15 minutes (min) for Gram negative bacteria, 121 °C and 131 °C for 60 and 30 min for Gram positive bacteria, respectively. The re-growth of bacteria in sterilized waste was also evaluated in the present study. It was found that bacterial re-growth started two days after the inactivation. The present study recommends that the steam autoclave cannot be considered as an alternative technology to incineration in clinical solid waste management. PMID:22690168

  16. PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Judy; Schneider, Susan; Horvath, Monica; Hammond, Julia; Jackson, Jason; Ginsberg, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Medication errors account for 20% of medical errors in the United States with the largest risk at prescribing and administration. Analgesics or opioids are frequently used medications that can be associated with patient harm when prescribed or administered improperly. In an effort to decrease medication errors, Duke University Hospital implemented clinical decision support via computer provider order entry (CPOE) and "smart pump" technology, 2/2008, with the goal to decrease patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) adverse events. This project evaluated PCA safety events, reviewing voluntary report system and adverse drug events via surveillance (ADE-S), on intermediate and step-down units preimplementation and postimplementation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pumps for the prescribing and administration of opioids therapy in the adult patient requiring analgesia for acute pain. Voluntary report system and ADE-S PCA events decreased based upon 1000 PCA days; ADE-S PCA events per 1000 PCA days decreased 22%, from 5.3 (pre) to 4.2 (post) (P = 0.09). Voluntary report system events decreased 72%, from 2.4/1000 PCA days (pre) to 0.66/1000 PCA days (post) and was statistically significant (P PCA events between time periods in both the ADE-S and voluntary report system data, thus supporting the recommendation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pump technology.

  17. Shotgun Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hayes McDonald

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Coupling large-scale sequencing projects with the amino acid sequence information that can be gleaned from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS has made it much easier to analyze complex mixtures of proteins. The limits of this “shotgun” approach, in which the protein mixture is proteolytically digested before separation, can be further expanded by separating the resulting mixture of peptides prior to MS/MS analysis. Both single dimensional high pressure liquid chromatography (LC and multidimensional LC (LC/LC can be directly interfaced with the mass spectrometer to allow for automated collection of tremendous quantities of data. While there is no single technique that addresses all proteomic challenges, the shotgun approaches, especially LC/LC-MS/MS-based techniques such as MudPIT (multidimensional protein identification technology, show advantages over gel-based techniques in speed, sensitivity, scope of analysis, and dynamic range. Advances in the ability to quantitate differences between samples and to detect for an array of post-translational modifications allow for the discovery of classes of protein biomarkers that were previously unassailable.

  18. An attempt to understand kidney's protein handling function by comparing plasma and urine proteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the help of proteomics technology, the human plasma and urine proteomes, which closely represent the protein compositions of the input and output of the kidney, respectively, have been profiled in much greater detail by different research teams. Many datasets have been accumulated to form "reference profiles" of the plasma and urine proteomes. Comparing these two proteomes may help us understand the protein handling aspect of kidney function in a way, however, which has been unavailable until the recent advances in proteomics technology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After removing secreted proteins downstream of the kidney, 2611 proteins in plasma and 1522 in urine were identified with high confidence and compared based on available proteomic data to generate three subproteomes, the plasma-only subproteome, the plasma-and-urine subproteome, and the urine-only subproteome, and they correspond to three groups of proteins that are handled in three different ways by the kidney. The available experimental molecular weights of the proteins in the three subproteomes were collected and analyzed. Since the functions of the overrepresented proteins in the plasma-and-urine subproteome are probably the major functions that can be routinely regulated by excretion from the kidney in physiological conditions, Gene Ontology term enrichment in the plasma-and-urine subproteome versus the whole plasma proteome was analyzed. Protease activity, calcium and growth factor binding proteins, and coagulation and immune response-related proteins were found to be enriched. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The comparison method described in this paper provides an illustration of a new approach for studying organ functions with a proteomics methodology. Because of its distinctive input (plasma and output (urine, it is reasonable to predict that the kidney will be the first organ whose functions are further elucidated by proteomic methods in the near future. It

  19. Recent development of mass spectrometry and proteomics applications in identification and typing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Keding; Chui, Huixia; Domish, Larissa; Hernandez, Drexler; Wang, Gehua

    2016-04-01

    Identification and typing of bacteria occupy a large fraction of time and work in clinical microbiology laboratories. With the certification of some MS platforms in recent years, more applications and tests of MS-based diagnosis methods for bacteria identification and typing have been created, not only on well-accepted MALDI-TOF-MS-based fingerprint matches, but also on solving the insufficiencies of MALDI-TOF-MS-based platforms and advancing the technology to areas such as targeted MS identification and typing of bacteria, bacterial toxin identification, antibiotics susceptibility/resistance tests, and MS-based diagnostic method development on unique bacteria such as Clostridium and Mycobacteria. This review summarizes the recent development in MS platforms and applications in bacteria identification and typing of common pathogenic bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Bjerg Bennike

    2015-12-01

    In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935.

  1. Detecting differential protein expression in large-scale population proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Soyoung; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-06-17

    Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics shows great potential in clinical biomarker studies, identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins in biological samples. However, methods are needed to appropriately handle issues/challenges unique to mass spectrometry data in order to detect as many biomarker proteins as possible. One issue is that different mass spectrometry experiments generate quite different total numbers of quantified peptides, which can result in more missing peptide abundances in an experiment with a smaller total number of quantified peptides. Another issue is that the quantification of peptides is sometimes absent, especially for less abundant peptides and such missing values contain the information about the peptide abundance. Here, we propose a Significance Analysis for Large-scale Proteomics Studies (SALPS) that handles missing peptide intensity values caused by the two mechanisms mentioned above. Our model has a robust performance in both simulated data and proteomics data from a large clinical study. Because varying patients’ sample qualities and deviating instrument performances are not avoidable for clinical studies performed over the course of several years, we believe that our approach will be useful to analyze large-scale clinical proteomics data.

  2. Policies for fostering health science, technology and innovation in Brazil and the role of clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Marge; Mello, Guilherme Arantes; Viana, Ana Luiza D'Ávila

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight a number of underlying issues that may be useful for a comprehensive review of the management of Health-Related Science, Technology and Innovation policies (ST&I/H), and its strategies and priorities. It is an analytical study supported by an extensive review of the technical and journalistic literature, clippings, legislation and federal government directives. The results show that the Healthcare Production Complex undeniably and increasingly needs science to maintain itself. One may infer that a framework of institutional milestones is being built in Brazil, to strengthen, guide and encourage Research and Development, and that clinical research creates scientific knowledge to address public healthcare issues by generating new inputs or enhancing existing techniques, processes and technologies that will be produced, marketed and used in the different segments, thus feeding the Healthcare Productive Complex.

  3. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterly, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care

  4. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to m...

  5. A commentary on the role of molecular technology and automation in clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ciara; Fitzgibbon, Marie; Powell, James; Barron, Denis; O'Mahony, Jim; Power, Lorraine; O'Connell, Nuala H; Dunne, Colum

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the identification of bacterial or yeast isolates has been based on phenotypic characteristics such as growth on defined media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions, with significant delay in diagnosis. Clinical microbiology as a medical specialty has embraced advances in molecular technology for rapid species identification with broad-range 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption and/or ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry demonstrated as accurate, rapid, and cost-effective methods for the identification of most, but not all, bacteria and yeasts. Protracted conventional incubation times previously necessary to identify certain species have been mitigated, affording patients quicker diagnosis with associated reduction in exposure to empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy and shortened hospital stay. This short commentary details such molecular advances and their implications in the clinical microbiology setting.

  6. Proteomic profiles in hyperandrogenic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiti, S; Stigliano, A; Borro, M; Gentile, G; Michienzi, S; Cerquetti, L; Bucci, B; Argese, N; Brunetti, E; Simmaco, M; Toscano, V

    2010-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) represent the most common causes of hyperandrogenism. Although the etiopathogeneses of these syndromes are different, they share many clinical and biochemical signs, such as hirsutism, acne, and chronic anovulation. Experimental data have shown that peripheral T-lymphocytes function as molecular sensors, being able to record molecular signals either at staminal and mature cell levels, or hormones at systemic levels. Twenty PCOS women and 10 CAH with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, aged between 18-35 yr, were studied. T-cells purified from all patients and 20 healthy donors have been analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Silver-stained proteomic map of each patient was compared with a control map obtained by pooling protein samples of the 20 healthy subjects. Spots of interest were identified by peptide mass fingerprint. Computer analysis evidenced several peptidic spots significantly modulated in all patients examined. Some proteins were modulated in both syndromes, others only in PCOS or in CAH. These proteins are involved in many physiological processes as the functional state of immune system, the regulation of the cytoskeleton structure, the oxidative stress, the coagulation process, and the insulin resistance. Identification of the physiological function of these proteins could help to understand ethiopathogenetic mechanisms of hyperandrogenic syndromes and its complications.

  7. Participation of nurses in the execution of clinical research protocol about technological innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Patrícia Andreani Cabral

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo report the nurse's experience of inclusion in interdisciplinary clinical study about technological innovation, involving people with spinal cord injury.METHODDescriptive experience report. The empirical support was based on notes about perspectives and practice of clinical research, with a multi-professional nursing, physical education, physiotherapy and engineering staff.RESULTThe qualification includes the elaboration of the document for the Ethics Committee, familiarization among the members of staff and with the studied topic, and also an immersion into English. The nurse's knowledge gave support to the uptake of participants and time adequacy for data collection, preparation and assistance of the participants during the intervention and after collection. Nursing theories and processes have contributed to reveal risky diagnoses and the plan of care. It was the nurse's role to monitor the risk of overlapping methodological strictness to the human aspect. The skills for the clinical research must be the object of learning, including students in multidisciplinary researches.CONCLUSIONTo qualify the nurse for clinical research and to potentialize its caregiver essence, some changes are needed in the educational system, professional behavior, attitude and educational assistance.

  8. Problematic Technology Use in a clinical sample of children and adolescents. Personality and behavioral problems associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Romero, Estrella

    2017-03-01

    In parallel to the rapid growth of access to new technologies (NT) there has been an increase in the problematic use of the same, especially among children and adolescents. Although research in this field is increasing, the studies have mainly been developed in the community, and the characteristics associated with the problematic use of NT are unknown in samples that require clinical care. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between problematic use of video games (UPV) and Internet (UPI) and personality traits and behavior problems in a clinical sample of children and adolescents. The sample consists of 88 patients who were examined in the clinical psychology consultation in the Mental Health Unit for Children and Adolescents of the University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela. Data were obtained from self-reports and rating scales filled out by parents. 31.8% of the participants present UPI and 18.2%, UPV. The children and adolescents with UPNT have lower levels of Openness to experience, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness and higher levels of Emotional instability, global Impulsivity and Externalizing behavior problems, as well as Attention and Thought problems. UPNT is a problem that emerges as an important issue in clinical care for children and adolescents, so its study in child and youth care units is needed. Understanding the psychopathological profile of children and adolescents with UPNT will allow for the development of differential and more specific interventions.

  9. Video chat technology to remotely quantify dietary, supplement and medication adherence in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Courtney M; Apolzan, John W; Wright, Courtney; Martin, Corby K

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two studies to test the validity, reliability, feasibility and acceptability of using video chat technology to quantify dietary and pill-taking (i.e. supplement and medication) adherence. In study 1, we investigated whether video chat technology can accurately quantify adherence to dietary and pill-taking interventions. Mock study participants ate food items and swallowed pills, while performing randomised scripted 'cheating' behaviours to mimic non-adherence. Monitoring was conducted in a cross-over design, with two monitors watching in-person and two watching remotely by Skype on a smartphone. For study 2, a twenty-two-item online survey was sent to a listserv with more than 20 000 unique email addresses of past and present study participants to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. For the dietary adherence tests, monitors detected 86 % of non-adherent events (sensitivity) in-person v. 78 % of events via video chat monitoring (P=0·12), with comparable inter-rater agreement (0·88 v. 0·85; P=0·62). However, for pill-taking, non-adherence trended towards being more easily detected in-person than by video chat (77 v. 60 %; P=0·08), with non-significantly higher inter-rater agreement (0·85 v. 0·69; P=0·21). Survey results from study 2 (n 1076 respondents; ≥5 % response rate) indicated that 86·4 % of study participants had video chatting hardware, 73·3 % were comfortable using the technology and 79·8 % were willing to use it for clinical research. Given the capability of video chat technology to reduce participant burden and outperform other adherence monitoring methods such as dietary self-report and pill counts, video chatting is a novel and promising platform to quantify dietary and pill-taking adherence.

  10. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    , of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle......Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence...

  11. The Succinated Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  12. iMidwife: midwifery students' use of smartphone technology as a mediated educational tool in clinical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeo, Annemarie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-12-18

    The increasing use of smartphone technology in health care provides midwifery students with unprecedented access to online resources that facilitates the optimal care of women and supports ongoing learning. A small pilot study was conducted in Western Australia, with 29 undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery students to explore the use of smartphone technology whilst in clinical practice. This study aimed to define the impact of smartphones in clinical decision-making and learning whilst in clinical areas, by midwifery students at the point of care. An online survey was used to collect data. Five consistent themes were identified from the results. Smartphone technology encourages self-directed learning, consolidation of theory, engagement through blended learning, complements online education in clinical practice and is a trend in the future of midwifery curriculum. Smartphones enhance the learning and mobility of supportive resources that consolidate midwifery students' clinical experience in workplace environments.

  13. The Human Proteome Organization Chromosome 6 Consortium: integrating chromosome-centric and biology/disease driven strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C H; Kast, J; Foster, L J; Siu, K W M; Overall, C M; Binkowski, T A; Hildebrand, W H; Scherer, A; Mansoor, M; Keown, P A

    2014-04-04

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) is designed to generate a comprehensive map of the protein-based molecular architecture of the human body, to provide a resource to help elucidate biological and molecular function, and to advance diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Within this framework, the chromosome-based HPP (C-HPP) has allocated responsibility for mapping individual chromosomes by country or region, while the biology/disease HPP (B/D-HPP) coordinates these teams in cross-functional disease-based groups. Chromosome 6 (Ch6) provides an excellent model for integration of these two tasks. This metacentric chromosome has a complement of 1002-1034 genes that code for known, novel or putative proteins. Ch6 is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, many with high population prevalence, devastating clinical impact and profound societal consequences. The unique combination of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, phenomic and health services data being drawn together within the Ch6 program has enormous potential to advance personalized medicine by promoting robust biomarkers, subunit vaccines and new drug targets. The strong liaison between the clinical and laboratory teams, and the structured framework for technology transfer and health policy decisions within Canada will increase the speed and efficacy of this transition, and the value of this translational research. Canada has been selected to play a leading role in the international Human Proteome Project, the global counterpart of the Human Genome Project designed to understand the structure and function of the human proteome in health and disease. Canada will lead an international team focusing on chromosome 6, which is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, including immune and inflammatory disorders affecting the brain, skeletal system, heart and blood vessels, lungs, kidney, liver, gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. Many of these chronic and persistent

  14. Asymmetric proteome equalization of the skeletal muscle proteome using a combinatorial hexapeptide library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Rivers

    Full Text Available Immobilized combinatorial peptide libraries have been advocated as a strategy for equalization of the dynamic range of a typical proteome. The technology has been applied predominantly to blood plasma and other biological fluids such as urine, but has not been used extensively to address the issue of dynamic range in tissue samples. Here, we have applied the combinatorial library approach to the equalization of a tissue where there is also a dramatic asymmetry in the range of abundances of proteins; namely, the soluble fraction of skeletal muscle. We have applied QconCAT and label-free methodology to the quantification of the proteins that bind to the beads as the loading is progressively increased. Although some equalization is achieved, and the most abundant proteins no longer dominate the proteome analysis, at high protein loadings a new asymmetry of protein expression is reached, consistent with the formation of complex assembles of heat shock proteins, cytoskeletal elements and other proteins on the beads. Loading at different ionic strength values leads to capture of different subpopulations of proteins, but does not completely eliminate the bias in protein accumulation. These assemblies may impair the broader utility of combinatorial library approaches to the equalization of tissue proteomes. However, the asymmetry in equalization is manifest at either low and high ionic strength values but manipulation of the solvent conditions may extend the capacity of the method.

  15. Basic research and 12 years of clinical experience in computer-assisted navigation technology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, R; Schicho, K; Undt, G; Wanschitz, F; Truppe, M; Seemann, R; Wagner, A

    2005-01-01

    Computer-aided surgical navigation technology is commonly used in craniomaxillofacial surgery. It offers substantial improvement regarding esthetic and functional aspects in a range of surgical procedures. Based on augmented reality principles, where the real operative site is merged with computer generated graphic information, computer-aided navigation systems were employed, among other procedures, in dental implantology, arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint, osteotomies, distraction osteogenesis, image guided biopsies and removals of foreign bodies. The decision to perform a procedure with or without computer-aided intraoperative navigation depends on the expected benefit to the procedure as well as on the technical expenditure necessary to achieve that goal. This paper comprises the experience gained in 12 years of research, development and routine clinical application. One hundred and fifty-eight operations with successful application of surgical navigation technology--divided into five groups--are evaluated regarding the criteria "medical benefit" and "technical expenditure" necessary to perform these procedures. Our results indicate that the medical benefit is likely to outweight the expenditure of technology with few exceptions (calvaria transplant, resection of the temporal bone, reconstruction of the orbital floor). Especially in dental implantology, specialized software reduces time and additional costs necessary to plan and perform procedures with computer-aided surgical navigation.

  16. Application of proteomics to translational research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liotta, L.A.; Petricoin, E.; Garaci, E.; De Maria, R.; Belluco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving public benefit from basic biomedical research requires a dedicated and highly coordinated effort between basic scientists, physicians, bioinformaticians, clinical trial coordinators, MD and PhD trainees and fellows, and a host of other skilled participants. The Istituto Superiore di Sanita/George Mason University US-Italy Oncoproteomics program, established in 2005, is a successful example of a synergistic creative collaboration between basic scientists and clinical investigators conducting translational research. This program focuses on the application of the new field of proteomics to three urgent and fundamental clinical needs in cancer medicine: 1.) Biomarkers for early diagnosis of cancer, when it is still treatable, 2.) Individualizing patient therapy for molecular targeted inhibitors that block signal pathways driving cancer pathogenesis and 3.) Cancer Progenitor Cells (CSCs): When do the lethal progenitors of cancer first emerge, and how can we treat these CSCs with molecular targeted inhibitors

  17. Integration of a central protein repository into a standard data processing application for mining proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzemeier, Kai; Kristensen, Jakob; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    efficient data mining and categorizing of large data sets. Methods All samples were analyzed on an Orbitrap mass Spectrometer coupled to a nano Easy LC. The proteomics repository database is built using the Sun Java technology and the Microsoft mySQL database technology for optimal performance. Proteome......Novel Aspect All major protein repositories integrated into a central domain for direct analyses and interpretation in a standard proteomics data analysis software. Introduction Modern proteomics must face the challenge of performing bioinformatics analysis and comparison of large datasets....... It is a time consuming and at times nearly impossible task to distinguish known proteins from novel proteins in these data sets without proper annotation and comparison with literature sources. Tools are needed that can handle the complexity of these data including: redundancy (same protein but different...

  18. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Ksenia J., E-mail: ksenia.groh@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Suter, Marc J.-F. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Systems Science, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  19. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Ksenia J.; Suter, Marc J.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  20. Microbial proteomics: a mass spectrometry primer for biologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ciaren

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is now more than 10 years since the publication of the first microbial genome sequence and science is now moving towards a post genomic era with transcriptomics and proteomics offering insights into cellular processes and function. The ability to assess the entire protein network of a cell at a given spatial or temporal point will have a profound effect upon microbial science as the function of proteins is inextricably linked to phenotype. Whilst such a situation is still beyond current technologies rapid advances in mass spectrometry, bioinformatics and protein separation technologies have produced a step change in our current proteomic capabilities. Subsequently a small, but steadily growing, number of groups are taking advantage of this cutting edge technology to discover more about the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms. From this research it will be possible to move towards a systems biology understanding of a microorganism. Where upon researchers can build a comprehensive cellular map for each microorganism that links an accurately annotated genome sequence to gene expression data, at a transcriptomic and proteomic level. In order for microbiologists to embrace the potential that proteomics offers, an understanding of a variety of analytical tools is required. The aim of this review is to provide a basic overview of mass spectrometry (MS and its application to protein identification. In addition we will describe how the protein complexity of microbial samples can be reduced by gel-based and gel-free methodologies prior to analysis by MS. Finally in order to illustrate the power of microbial proteomics a case study of its current application within the Bacilliaceae is given together with a description of the emerging discipline of metaproteomics.

  1. Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroe Ohnishi, Yasuaki Oda and Hajime Ohgushi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells. A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  3. Guidelines for reporting quantitative mass spectrometry based experiments in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Deutsch, Eric W; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Jones, Andrew R; Eisenacher, Martin; Mayer, Gerhard; Campos, Alex; Canals, Francesc; Bech-Serra, Joan-Josep; Carrascal, Montserrat; Gay, Marina; Paradela, Alberto; Navajas, Rosana; Marcilla, Miguel; Hernáez, María Luisa; Gutiérrez-Blázquez, María Dolores; Velarde, Luis Felipe Clemente; Aloria, Kerman; Beaskoetxea, Jabier; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan P

    2013-12-16

    Mass spectrometry is already a well-established protein identification tool and recent methodological and technological developments have also made possible the extraction of quantitative data of protein abundance in large-scale studies. Several strategies for absolute and relative quantitative proteomics and the statistical assessment of quantifications are possible, each having specific measurements and therefore, different data analysis workflows. The guidelines for Mass Spectrometry Quantification allow the description of a wide range of quantitative approaches, including labeled and label-free techniques and also targeted approaches such as Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM). The HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) has invested considerable efforts to improve the standardization of proteomics data handling, representation and sharing through the development of data standards, reporting guidelines, controlled vocabularies and tooling. In this manuscript, we describe a key output from the HUPO-PSI-namely the MIAPE Quant guidelines, which have developed in parallel with the corresponding data exchange format mzQuantML [1]. The MIAPE Quant guidelines describe the HUPO-PSI proposal concerning the minimum information to be reported when a quantitative data set, derived from mass spectrometry (MS), is submitted to a database or as supplementary information to a journal. The guidelines have been developed with input from a broad spectrum of stakeholders in the proteomics field to represent a true consensus view of the most important data types and metadata, required for a quantitative experiment to be analyzed critically or a data analysis pipeline to be reproduced. It is anticipated that they will influence or be directly adopted as part of journal guidelines for publication and by public proteomics databases and thus may have an impact on proteomics laboratories across the world. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Standardization and

  4. Transcriptome and proteomic analysis of mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-xia; Jia, Hui-min; Ma, Xiao-wei; Wang, Song-biao; Yao, Quan-sheng; Xu, Wen-tian; Zhou, Yi-gang; Gao, Zhong-shan; Zhan, Ru-lin

    2014-06-13

    Here we used Illumina RNA-seq technology for transcriptome sequencing of a mixed fruit sample from 'Zill' mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruit pericarp and pulp during the development and ripening stages. RNA-seq generated 68,419,722 sequence reads that were assembled into 54,207 transcripts with a mean length of 858bp, including 26,413 clusters and 27,794 singletons. A total of 42,515(78.43%) transcripts were annotated using public protein databases, with a cut-off E-value above 10(-5), of which 35,198 and 14,619 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and clusters of orthologous groups respectively. Functional annotation against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database identified 23,741(43.79%) transcripts which were mapped to 128 pathways. These pathways revealed many previously unknown transcripts. We also applied mass spectrometry-based transcriptome data to characterize the proteome of ripe fruit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the mango fruit proteome was using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in an LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Thermo) coupled online to the HPLC. This approach enabled the identification of 7536 peptides that matched 2754 proteins. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of transcriptome during mango fruit development and the most comprehensive fruit proteome to date, which are useful for further genomics research and proteomic studies. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of both the transcriptome and proteome of mango fruit, and a valuable reference for further research on gene expression and protein identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics of non-model organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Urine proteome analysis in Dent's disease shows high selective changes potentially involved in chronic renal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Anglani, Franca; Bruschi, Maurizio; Tosetto, Enrica; Cremasco, Daniela; Murer, Luisa; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Petretto, Andrea; Caridi, Gianluca; Rossi, Roberta; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Definition of the urinary protein composition would represent a potential tool for diagnosis in many clinical conditions. The use of new proteomic technologies allows detection of genetic and post-trasductional variants that increase sensitivity of the approach but complicates comparison within a heterogeneous patient population. Overall, this limits research of urinary biomarkers. Studying monogenic diseases are useful models to address this issue since genetic variability is reduced among first- and second-degree relatives of the same family. We applied this concept to Dent's disease, a monogenic condition characterised by low-molecular-weight proteinuria that is inherited following an X-linked trait. Results are presented here on a combined proteomic approach (LC-mass spectrometry, Western blot and zymograms for proteases and inhibitors) to characterise urine proteins in a large family (18 members, 6 hemizygous patients, 6 carrier females, and 6 normals) with Dent's diseases due to the 1070G>T mutation of the CLCN5. Gene ontology analysis on more than 1000 proteins showed that several clusters of proteins characterised urine of affected patients compared to carrier females and normal subjects: proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodelling were the major group. Specific analysis on metalloproteases and their inhibitors underscored unexpected mechanisms potentially involved in renal fibrosis. Studying with new-generation techniques for proteomic analysis of the members of a large family with Dent's disease sharing the same molecular defect allowed highly repetitive results that justify conclusions. Identification in urine of proteins actively involved in interstitial matrix remodelling poses the question of active anti-fibrotic drugs in Dent's patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Urinary proteomics to support diagnosis of stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Dawson

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis in suspected ischaemic stroke can be difficult. We explored the urinary proteome in patients with stroke (n = 69, compared to controls (n = 33, and developed a biomarker model for the diagnosis of stroke. We performed capillary electrophoresis online coupled to micro-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Potentially disease-specific peptides were identified and a classifier based on these was generated using support vector machine-based software. Candidate biomarkers were sequenced by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We developed two biomarker-based classifiers, employing 14 biomarkers (nominal p-value <0.004 or 35 biomarkers (nominal p-value <0.01. When tested on a blinded test set of 47 independent samples, the classification factor was significantly different between groups; for the 35 biomarker model, median value of the classifier was 0.49 (-0.30 to 1.25 in cases compared to -1.04 (IQR -1.86 to -0.09 in controls, p<0.001. The 35 biomarker classifier gave sensitivity of 56%, specificity was 93% and the AUC on ROC analysis was 0.86. This study supports the potential for urinary proteomic biomarker models to assist with the diagnosis of acute stroke in those with mild symptoms. We now plan to refine further and explore the clinical utility of such a test in large prospective clinical trials.

  7. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp: proteomics of human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The unique pulp-dentin complex demonstrates strong regenerative potential, which enables it to respond to disease and traumatic injury. Identifying the proteins of the pulp-dentin complex is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of regeneration, tissue calcification, defense processes, and the reparation of dentin by dental pulp. The lack of knowledge of these proteins limits the development of more efficient therapies. The proteomic profile of human tooth pulp was investigated and compared with the proteome of human dentin and blood. The samples of tooth pulp were obtained from 5 sound permanent human third molars of 5 adults (n = 5). The extracted proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and identified by correlating mass spectra to the proteomic databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 2 proteins were detected for the first time in an actual human sample. The identified tooth pulp proteins have a variety of functions: structural, catalytic, transporter, protease activity, immune response, and many others. In a comparison with dentin and blood plasma, 140 (pulp/dentin) shared proteins were identified, 37 of which were not observed in plasma. It can be suggested that they might participate in the unique pulp-dentin complex. This proteomic investigation of human tooth pulp, together with the previously published study of human dentin, is one of the most comprehensive proteome lists of human teeth to date. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Free and open source enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, T Y; Kaiser, K; Miksch, S

    2007-01-01

    Guideline-based clinical decision support is an emerging paradigm to help reduce error, lower cost, and improve quality in evidence-based medicine. The free and open source (FOS) approach is a promising alternative for delivering cost-effective information technology (IT) solutions in health care. In this paper, we survey the current FOS enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based care, and discuss the current trends and future directions of their role in clinical decision support. We searched PubMed, major biomedical informatics websites, and the web in general for papers and links related to FOS health care IT systems. We also relied on our background and knowledge for specific subtopics. We focused on the functionalities of guideline modeling tools, and briefly examined the supporting technologies for terminology, data exchange and electronic health record (EHR) standards. To effectively support patient-centric, guideline-based care, the computerized guidelines and protocols need to be integrated with existing clinical information systems or EHRs. Technologies that enable such integration should be accessible, interoperable, and scalable. A plethora of FOS tools and techniques for supporting different knowledge management and quality assurance tasks involved are available. Many challenges, however, remain in their implementation. There are active and growing trends of deploying FOS enabling technologies for integrating clinical guidelines, protocols, and pathways into the main care processes. The continuing development and maturation of such technologies are likely to make increasingly significant contributions to patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support.

  9. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jia-Xuan Qiu,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou, 3,4 Zhi-Xu He,4 Ruan Jin Zhao,5 Xueji Zhang,6 Lun Yang,7 Shu-Feng Zhou,3,4 Zong-Fu Mao11School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China; 5Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sarasota, FL, USA; 6Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Plumbagin (PLB has exhibited a potent anticancer effect in preclinical studies, but the molecular interactome remains elusive. This study aimed to compare the quantitative proteomic responses to PLB treatment in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells using the approach of stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. The data were finally validated using Western blot assay. First, the bioinformatic analysis predicted that PLB could interact with 78 proteins that were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis, immunity, and signal transduction. Our quantitative proteomic study using SILAC revealed that there were at least 1,225 and 267 proteins interacting with PLB and there were 341 and 107 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by PLB in PC-3 and DU145 cells, respectively. These proteins and pathways played a

  10. A scheme for the audit of scientific and technological standards in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Jarritt, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Audit is the process whereby the quality of a service is monitored and optimised. It forms an essential component of the quality assurance process, whether by self-assessment or by external peer review. In the UK the British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) has undertaken external organisational audit of departments providing clinical nuclear medicine services. This work aimed to develop a more thorough and service specific process for the audit of scientific and technological standards in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: The audit process has been implemented using written audit documents to facilitate the audit procedure. A questionnaire forms part of the formal documentation for audit of the scientific and technical standards of a clinical service. Scientific and technical standards were derived from a number of sources including legal requirements, regulatory obligations, notes for guidance, peer reviewed publications and accepted good clinical practice (GCP). Results: The audit process graded the standards of an individual department according to legal or safety requirements (Grade A), good practice (Grade B) and desirable aspects of service delivery (Grade C). The standards have been allocated into eight main categories. These are: Instrumentation; Software and data protection; Electrical Safety; Mechanical Safety; Workstation Safety; The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH); Radiation Protection; Scientific and Technical staffing levels. During the audit visit a detailed inspection of clinical and laboratory areas and department written documentation is also necessary to validate the data obtained. Conclusion: The printed scheme now provides a means for external audit or self-assessment. There should be evidence of a well-organised and safe environment for both patients and staff. Health and Safety legislation requires written local rules and these records should be available to demonstrate the standard of service provision. Other

  11. In the Palm of Your Hand - Normalizing the Use of Mobile Technology for Nurse Practitioner Education and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Kimberley; Park, Caroline; Fraser, Shawn; Rich, Mariann; MacKenzie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile devices by nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet an evolving technological landscape is expanding rapidly. A longitudinal study of the ways NP students "normalize" the use of mobile devices in clinical education was completed. This study used researcher-designed survey tools, including sociodemographic questions, and the numerical picture was augmented and interpreted in light of the textual data in the form of selected interviews. Data indicate that mobile technology is normalized in the social realm but still developing in the clinical realm. Progress is hindered by non-modelling by faculty, inconsistent healthcare policy and lack of understanding of the affordances available through this technology. Overall, mobile technology is utilized and normalized in practice; this in turn has influenced their ability to prepare students for practice. Data presented can assist educators and clinicians alike in developing a more fulsome understanding on how to appropriately incorporate mobile technology into education and practice.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama

    2012-01-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimens......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...

  13. Computerised mirror therapy with Augmented Reflection Technology for early stroke rehabilitation: clinical feasibility and integration as an adjunct therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Simon; Ferreira Dos Santos, Luara; Morkisch, Nadine; Jettkowski, Katrin; Sillis, Moran; Devan, Hemakumar; Kanagasabai, Parimala S; Schmidt, Henning; Krüger, Jörg; Dohle, Christian; Regenbrecht, Holger; Hale, Leigh; Cutfield, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    New rehabilitation strategies for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation employing visual stimulation show promising results, however, cost-efficient and clinically feasible ways to provide these interventions are still lacking. An integral step is to translate recent technological advances, such as in virtual and augmented reality, into therapeutic practice to improve outcomes for patients. This requires research on the adaptation of the technology for clinical use as well as on the appropriate guidelines and protocols for sustainable integration into therapeutic routines. Here, we present and evaluate a novel and affordable augmented reality system (Augmented Reflection Technology, ART) in combination with a validated mirror therapy protocol for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. We evaluated components of the therapeutic intervention, from the patients' and the therapists' points of view in a clinical feasibility study at a rehabilitation centre. We also assessed the integration of ART as an adjunct therapy for the clinical rehabilitation of subacute patients at two different hospitals. The results showed that the combination and application of the Berlin Protocol for Mirror Therapy together with ART was feasible for clinical use. This combination was integrated into the therapeutic plan of subacute stroke patients at the two clinical locations where the second part of this research was conducted. Our findings pave the way for using technology to provide mirror therapy in clinical settings and show potential for the more effective use of inpatient time and enhanced recoveries for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Computerised Mirror Therapy is feasible for clinical use Augmented Reflection Technology can be integrated as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention for subacute stroke patients in an inpatient setting Virtual Rehabilitation devices such as Augmented Reflection Technology have considerable potential to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

  14. Review of the clinical applications and technological advances of circulating tumor DNA in cancer monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi; Tolani, Bhairavi; Nie, Xiuhong; Zhi, Xiuyi; Hu, Mu; He, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released by tumor cells, termed ctDNA, closely reflects the heterogeneity of primary cancers and their metastases. As a noninvasive, real-time monitoring biomarker, ctDNA is a promising tool for detecting driver gene mutations, assessing tumor burden and acquired resistance, and early diagnosis. However, isolation and enrichment of cfDNA is a big challenge due to the high degree of DNA fragmentation and its relatively low abundance in the bloodstream. This review aims to provide insights into the recent technological advances in acquisition of optimal quality cfDNA, the use of preservatives, isolation methods, processing timelines, and detection techniques. It also describes clinical applications of ctDNA in cancer patient management.

  15. Differential Proteome Analysis of the Preeclamptic Placenta Using Optimized Protein Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Centlow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The human placenta is a difficult tissue to work with using proteomic technology since it contains large amounts of lipids and glycogen. Both lipids and glycogen are known to interfere with the first step in the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE, the isoelectric focusing. In order to gain the best possible protein separation on 2D-PAGE, an optimized sample preparation protocol for placental proteins was developed. Two different buffers, urea/CHAPS and Hepes, were used for solubilization in combination with six different precipitation methods. The removal of glycogen from the samples by centrifugation was crucial for the final proteome maps. Solubilization with urea/CHAPS in combination with dichloromethane/methanol or acidified acetone proved to be the best precipitation procedures. When applied to clinical placenta samples apolipoprotein A1 was found to be accumulated in the preeclamptic placenta, where it may either have a nutritional effect or act as a modifier of signal transduction.

  16. Nanodroplet processing platform for deep and quantitative proteome profiling of 10–100 mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ying; Piehowski, Paul D.; Zhao, Rui; Chen, Jing; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Shukla, Anil K.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Mathews, Clayton E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2018-02-28

    Nanoscale or single cell technologies are critical for biomedical applications. However, current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches require samples comprising a minimum of thousands of cells to provide in-depth profiling. Here, we report the development of a nanoPOTS (Nanodroplet Processing in One pot for Trace Samples) platform as a major advance in overall sensitivity. NanoPOTS dramatically enhances the efficiency and recovery of sample processing by downscaling processing volumes to <200 nL to minimize surface losses. When combined with ultrasensitive LC-MS, nanoPOTS allows identification of ~1500 to ~3,000 proteins from ~10 to ~140 cells, respectively. By incorporating the Match Between Runs algorithm of MaxQuant, >3000 proteins were consistently identified from as few as 10 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate robust quantification of ~2400 proteins from single human pancreatic islet thin sections from type 1 diabetic and control donors, illustrating the application of nanoPOTS for spatially resolved proteome measurements from clinical tissues.

  17. Tools for monitoring system suitability in LC MS/MS centric proteomic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereman, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    With advances in liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry technologies combined with the continued goals of biomarker discovery, clinical applications of established biomarkers, and integrating large multiomic datasets (i.e. "big data"), there remains an urgent need for robust tools to assess instrument performance (i.e. system suitability) in proteomic workflows. To this end, several freely available tools have been introduced that monitor a number of peptide identification (ID) and/or peptide ID free metrics. Peptide ID metrics include numbers of proteins, peptides, or peptide spectral matches identified from a complex mixture. Peptide ID free metrics include retention time reproducibility, full width half maximum, ion injection times, and integrated peptide intensities. The main driving force in the development of these tools is to monitor both intra- and interexperiment performance variability and to identify sources of variation. The purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate these tools based on versatility, automation, vendor neutrality, metrics monitored, and visualization capabilities. In addition, the implementation of a robust system suitability workflow is discussed in terms of metrics, type of standard, and frequency of evaluation along with the obstacles to overcome prior to incorporating a more proactive approach to overall quality control in liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry based proteomic workflows. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Maillard Proteomics: Opening New Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Soboleva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein glycation is a ubiquitous non-enzymatic post-translational modification, formed by reaction of protein amino and guanidino groups with carbonyl compounds, presumably reducing sugars and α-dicarbonyls. Resulting advanced glycation end products (AGEs represent a highly heterogeneous group of compounds, deleterious in mammals due to their pro-inflammatory effect, and impact in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease and ageing. The body of information on the mechanisms and pathways of AGE formation, acquired during the last decades, clearly indicates a certain site-specificity of glycation. It makes characterization of individual glycation sites a critical pre-requisite for understanding in vivo mechanisms of AGE formation and developing adequate nutritional and therapeutic approaches to reduce it in humans. In this context, proteomics is the methodology of choice to address site-specific molecular changes related to protein glycation. Therefore, here we summarize the methods of Maillard proteomics, specifically focusing on the techniques providing comprehensive structural and quantitative characterization of glycated proteome. Further, we address the novel break-through areas, recently established in the field of Maillard research, i.e., in vitro models based on synthetic peptides, site-based diagnostics of metabolism-related diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus, proteomics of anti-glycative defense, and dynamics of plant glycated proteome during ageing and response to environmental stress.

  19. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323

  20. Proteomics of Eosinophil Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane F. Mosher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified and quantified >7,000 proteins in non-activated human peripheral blood eosinophils using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS and described phosphoproteomic changes that accompany acute activation of eosinophils by interleukin-5 (IL5 (1. These data comprise a treasure trove of information about eosinophils. We illustrate the power of label-free LC–MS/MS quantification by considering four examples: complexity of eosinophil STATs, contribution of immunoproteasome subunits to eosinophil proteasomes, complement of integrin subunits, and contribution of platelet proteins originating from platelet–eosinophil complexes to the overall proteome. We describe how isobaric labeling enables robust sample-to-sample comparisons and relate the 220 phosphosites that changed significantly upon treatment with IL5 to previous studies of eosinophil activation. Finally, we review previous attempts to leverage the power of mass spectrometry to discern differences between eosinophils of healthy subjects and those with eosinophil-associated conditions and point out features of label-free quantification and isobaric labeling that are important in planning future mass spectrometric studies.

  1. Financial incentives, quality improvement programs, and the adoption of clinical information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Casalino, Lawrence P; Gillies, Robin R; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen S; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara

    2009-04-01

    Physician use of clinical information technology (CIT) is important for the management of chronic illness, but has lagged behind expectations. We studied the role of health insurers' financial incentives (including pay-for-performance) and quality improvement initiatives in accelerating adoption of CIT in large physician practices. National survey of all medical groups and independent practice association (IPA) physician organizations with 20 or more physicians in the United States in 2006 to 2007. The response rate was 60.3%. Use of 19 CIT capabilities was measured. Multivariate statistical analysis of financial and organizational factors associated with adoption and use of CIT. Use of information technology varied across physician organizations, including electronic access to laboratory test results (medical groups, 49.3%; IPAs, 19.6%), alerts for potential drug interactions (medical groups, 33.9%; IPAs, 9.5%), electronic drug prescribing (medical groups, 41.9%; IPAs, 25.1%), and physician use of e-mail with patients (medical groups, 34.2%; IPAs, 29.1%). Adoption of CIT was stronger for physician organizations evaluated by external entities for pay-for-performance and public reporting purposes (P = 0.042) and for those participating in quality improvement initiatives (P < 0.001). External incentives and participation in quality improvement initiatives are associated with greater use of CIT by large physician practices.

  2. Accuracy of flash glucose monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring technologies: Implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjan, Ramzi A; Cummings, Michael H; Jennings, Peter; Leelarathna, Lalantha; Rayman, Gerry; Wilmot, Emma G

    2018-02-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring and flash glucose monitoring technologies measure glucose in the interstitial fluid and are increasingly used in diabetes care. Their accuracy, key to effective glycaemic management, is usually measured using the mean absolute relative difference of the interstitial fluid sensor compared to reference blood glucose readings. However, mean absolute relative difference is not standardised and has limitations. This review aims to provide a consensus opinion on assessing accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose sensing technologies. Mean absolute relative difference is influenced by glucose distribution and rate of change; hence, we express caution on the reliability of comparing mean absolute relative difference data from different study systems and conditions. We also review the pitfalls associated with mean absolute relative difference at different glucose levels and explore additional ways of assessing accuracy of interstitial fluid devices. Importantly, much data indicate that current practice of assessing accuracy of different systems based on individualised mean absolute relative difference results has limitations, which have potential clinical implications. Healthcare professionals must understand the factors that influence mean absolute relative difference as a metric for accuracy and look at additional assessments, such as consensus error grid analysis, when evaluating continuous glucose monitoring and flash glucose monitoring systems in diabetes care. This in turn will ensure that management decisions based on interstitial fluid sensor data are both effective and safe.

  3. [Manufacture method and clinical application of minimally invasive dental implant guide template based on registration technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zeming; He, Bingwei; Chen, Jiang; D u, Zhibin; Zheng, Jingyi; Li, Yanqin

    2012-08-01

    To guide doctors in precisely positioning surgical operation, a new production method of minimally invasive implant guide template was presented. The mandible of patient was scanned by CT scanner, and three-dimensional jaw bone model was constructed based on CT images data The professional dental implant software Simplant was used to simulate the plant based on the three-dimensional CT model to determine the location and depth of implants. In the same time, the dental plaster models were scanned by stereo vision system to build the oral mucosa model. Next, curvature registration technology was used to fuse the oral mucosa model and the CT model, then the designed position of implant in the oral mucosa could be determined. The minimally invasive implant guide template was designed in 3-Matic software according to the design position of implant and the oral mucosa model. Finally, the template was produced by rapid prototyping. The three-dimensional registration technology was useful to fuse the CT data and the dental plaster data, and the template was accurate that could provide the doctors a guidance in the actual planting without cut-off mucosa. The guide template which fabricated by comprehensive utilization of three-dimensional registration, Simplant simulation and rapid prototyping positioning are accurate and can achieve the minimally invasive and accuracy implant surgery, this technique is worthy of clinical use.

  4. Technological Advances in Cardiovascular Safety Assessment Decrease Preclinical Animal Use and Improve Clinical Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Brian R; Schultze, A Eric; Heyen, Jon R; Searfoss, George H; Sarazan, R Dustan

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) safety liabilities are significant concerns for drug developers and preclinical animal studies are predominately where those liabilities are characterized before patient exposures. Steady progress in technology and laboratory capabilities is enabling a more refined and informative use of animals in those studies. The application of surgically implantable and telemetered instrumentation in the acute assessment of drug effects on CV function has significantly improved historical approaches that involved anesthetized or restrained animals. More chronically instrumented animals and application of common clinical imaging assessments like echocardiography and MRI extend functional and in-life structural assessments into the repeat-dose setting. A growing portfolio of circulating CV biomarkers is allowing longitudinal and repeated measures of cardiac and vascular injury and dysfunction better informing an understanding of temporal pathogenesis and allowing earlier detection of undesirable effects. In vitro modeling systems of the past were limited by their lack of biological relevance to the in vivo human condition. Advances in stem cell technology and more complex in vitro modeling platforms are quickly creating more opportunity to supplant animals in our earliest assessments for liabilities. Continuing improvement in our capabilities in both animal and nonanimal modeling should support a steady decrease in animal use for primary liability identification and optimize the translational relevance of the animal studies we continue to do. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Technology transfer from biomedical research to clinical practice: measuring innovation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, E Andrew; Elkin, Peter L

    2013-12-01

    Studies documented 17 years of transfer time from clinical trials to practice of care. Launched in 2002, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) translational research initiative needs to develop metrics for impact assessment. A recent White House report highlighted that research and development productivity is declining as a result of increased research spending while the new drugs output is flat. The goal of this study was to develop an expanded model of research-based innovation and performance thresholds of transfer from research to practice. Models for transfer of research to practice have been collected and reviewed. Subsequently, innovation pathways have been specified based on common characteristics. An integrated, intellectual property transfer model is described. The central but often disregarded role of research innovation disclosure is highlighted. Measures of research transfer and milestones of progress have been identified based on the Association of University Technology Managers 2012 performance reports. Numeric milestones of technology transfer are recommended at threshold (top 50%), target (top 25%), and stretch goal (top 10%) performance levels. Transfer measures and corresponding target levels include research spending to disclosure (0.81), patents to start-up (>0.1), patents to licenses (>2.25), and average per license income (>$48,000). Several limitations of measurement are described. Academic institutions should take strategic steps to bring innovation to the center of scholarly discussions. Research on research, particularly on pathways to disclosures, is needed to improve R&D productivity. Researchers should be informed about the technology transfer performance of their institution and regulations should better support innovators.

  6. Workshop on body composition in basic and clinical research and the emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.

    2000-12-14

    A special one-day workshop was held to review the status, the need for, and the future role of BNL in the Body Composition Analysis Program (BCAP). Two speakers succinctly outlined the status and future new developments using gamma nuclear resonance technology as it applies to BCAP. Seven speakers from three institutions outlined the continued need for BCAP and presented new clinical applications of BCAP in theirs respective fields of expertise. Extensive increase in the use of surrogate instrumentation, e.g., DXA and BIA, in BCAP was recognized as a significant contributing factor to the growth in BCAP. The growing role of MRI in BCAP was also emphasized. In light of these developments BCAP at BNL, with its specialized In Vivo Neutron Activation (IVNA) facilities, was recognized as a unique user oriented resource that may serve the community hospitals in the area. Three regional large institutions expressed their desire to use these facilities. In addition, IVNA provides direct measure of the human compartments in vivo, thus providing a gold standard for the surrogate methodologies that are in use or to be developed. It was strongly felt that there is a need for a calibration center with a national stature for the different methodologies for in vivo measurements, a role that befits very well a national laboratory. This offers an exquisite justification for DOE to support this orphan technology and to develop BCAP at BNL to, 1, provide a user oriented regional resource, 2, provide a national reference laboratory, and 3, develop new advanced technologies for BCAP.

  7. A community proposal to integrate proteomics activities in ELIXIR [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Vizcaíno

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches have been major drivers behind the progress of proteomics in recent years. The aim of this white paper is to provide a framework for integrating computational proteomics into ELIXIR in the near future, and thus to broaden the portfolio of omics technologies supported by this European distributed infrastructure. This white paper is the direct result of a strategy meeting on ‘The Future of Proteomics in ELIXIR’ that took place in March 2017 in Tübingen (Germany, and involved representatives of eleven ELIXIR nodes.   These discussions led to a list of priority areas in computational proteomics that would complement existing activities and close gaps in the portfolio of tools and services offered by ELIXIR so far. We provide some suggestions on how these activities could be integrated into ELIXIR’s existing platforms, and how it could lead to a new ELIXIR use case in proteomics. We also highlight connections to the related field of metabolomics, where similar activities are ongoing. This white paper could thus serve as a starting point for the integration of computational proteomics into ELIXIR. Over the next few months we will be working closely with all stakeholders involved, and in particular with other representatives of the proteomics community, to further refine this paper.

  8. Development and standardization of multiplexed antibody microarrays for use in quantitative proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorette M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics is an emerging field that encompasses multiplexed measurement of many known proteins in groups of experimental samples in order to identify differences between groups. Antibody arrays are a novel technology that is increasingly being used for quantitative proteomics studies due to highly multiplexed content, scalability, matrix flexibility and economy of sample consumption. Key applications of antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics studies are identification of novel diagnostic assays, biomarker discovery in trials of new drugs, and validation of qualitative proteomics discoveries. These applications require performance benchmarking, standardization and specification. Results Six dual-antibody, sandwich immunoassay arrays that measure 170 serum or plasma proteins were developed and experimental procedures refined in more than thirty quantitative proteomics studies. This report provides detailed information and specification for manufacture, qualification, assay automation, performance, assay validation and data processing for antibody arrays in large scale quantitative proteomics studies. Conclusion The present report describes development of first generation standards for antibody arrays in quantitative proteomics. Specifically, it describes the requirements of a comprehensive validation program to identify and minimize antibody cross reaction under highly multiplexed conditions; provides the rationale for the application of standardized statistical approaches to manage the data output of highly replicated assays; defines design requirements for controls to normalize sample replicate measurements; emphasizes the importance of stringent quality control testing of reagents and antibody microarrays; recommends the use of real-time monitors to evaluate sensitivity, dynamic range and platform precision; and presents survey procedures to reveal the significance of biomarker findings.

  9. Deep coverage of the beer proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochalová, Martina; Konečná, Hana; Stejskal, Karel; Potěšil, David; Fridrichová, Danuše; Srbová, Eva; Ornerová, Kateřina; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2017-06-06

    We adopted an approach based on peptide immobilized pH gradient-isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) separation, coupled with LC-MS/MS, in order to maximize coverage of the beer proteome. A lager beer brewed using traditional Czech technology was degassed, desalted and digested. Tryptic peptides were separated by isoelectric focusing on an immobilized pH gradient strip and, after separation, the gel strip was divided into seven equally sized parts. Peptides extracted from gel fractions were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. This approach resulted in a three-fold increase in the number of proteins identified (over 1700) when compared to analysis of unfractionated beer processed by a filter-aided sample preparation (FASP). Over 1900 protein groups (PGs) in total were identified by both approaches. The study significantly extends knowledge about the beer proteome and demonstrates its complexity. Detailed knowledge of the protein content, especially gluten proteins, will enhance the evaluation of potential health risks related to beer consumption (coeliac disease) and will contribute to improving beer quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cigarette smoking impairs clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction technologies: a meta-analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budani, Maria Cristina; Fensore, Stefania; Di Marzio, Marco; Tiboni, Gian Mario

    2018-06-12

    There is convincing evidence that cigarette smoking can impair female reproductive potential. This meta-analysis updates the knowledge regarding the effects of cigarette smoking on clinical outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Twenty-six studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results were expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and statistical heterogeneity between the studies was evaluated with Higgins (I 2 ), Breslow (τ 2 ), Birge's ratio (H 2 ) indices and Chi-square test (χ 2 ). A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The analysis showed a significant decrease in live birth rate per cycle for smoking patients (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.44-0.79; P = 0.0005), a significant lower clinical pregnancy rate per cycle for smoking women (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.41-0.68; P < 0.0001), and a significant increase in terms of spontaneous miscarriage rate (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.10-4.48; P = 0.025) for smokers. These findings demonstrate clear negative effects of cigarette smoking on the outcome of ART programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent Progress in Lab-on-a-Chip Technology and Its Potential Application to Clinical Diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nae Yoon Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of the lab-on-a-chip (LOC system, a state-of-the-art technology that uses polymer materials (i.e., poly[dimethylsiloxane] for the miniaturization of conventional laboratory apparatuses, and show the potential use of these microfluidic devices in clinical applications. In particular, we introduce the independent unit components of the LOC system and demonstrate how each component can be functionally integrated into one monolithic system for the realization of a LOC system. In specific, we demonstrate microscale polymerase chain reaction with the use of a single heater, a microscale sample injection device with a disposable plastic syringe and a strategy for device assembly under environmentally mild conditions assisted by surface modification techniques. In this way, we endeavor to construct a totally integrated, disposable microfluidic system operated by a single mode, the pressure, which can be applied on-site with enhanced device portability and disposability and with simple and rapid operation for medical and clinical diagnoses, potentially extending its application to urodynamic studies in molecular level.

  12. Basic Technology and Clinical Applications of the Updated Model of Laser Speckle Flowgraphy to Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Sugiyama

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG allows for quantitative estimation of blood flow in the optic nerve head (ONH, choroid and retina, utilizing the laser speckle phenomenon. The basic technology and clinical applications of LSFG-NAVI, the updated model of LSFG, are summarized in this review. For developing a commercial version of LSFG, the special area sensor was replaced by the ordinary charge-coupled device camera. In LSFG-NAVI, the mean blur rate (MBR has been introduced as a new parameter. Compared to the original LSFG model, LSFG-NAVI demonstrates a better spatial resolution of the blood flow map of human ocular fundus. The observation area is 24 times larger than the original system. The analysis software can separately calculate MBRs in the blood vessels and tissues (capillaries of an entire ONH and the measurements have good reproducibility. The absolute values of MBR in the ONH have been shown to linearly correlate with the capillary blood flow. The Analysis of MBR pulse waveform provides parameters including skew, blowout score, blowout time, rising and falling rates, flow acceleration index, acceleration time index, and resistivity index for comparing different eyes. Recently, there have been an increasing number of reports on the clinical applications of LSFG-NAVI to ocular diseases, including glaucoma, retinal and choroidal diseases.

  13. Optical coherence tomography-current technology and applications in clinical and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Sander, Birgit; Mogensen, Mette; Jørgensen, Thomas M; Andersen, Peter E

    2011-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. By mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample. In addition, functional properties such as birefringence, motion, or the distributions of certain substances can be detected with high spatial resolution. Its main field of application is biomedical imaging and diagnostics. In ophthalmology, OCT is accepted as a clinical standard for diagnosing and monitoring the treatment of a number of retinal diseases, and OCT is becoming an important instrument for clinical cardiology. New applications are emerging in various medical fields, such as early-stage cancer detection, surgical guidance, and the early diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases. OCT has also proven its value as a tool for developmental biology. The number of companies involved in manufacturing OCT systems has increased substantially during the last few years (especially due to its success in opthalmology), and this technology can be expected to continue to spread into various fields of application.

  14. Can the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) be used to accurately report clinic total reproductive potential (TRP)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Hickman, Timothy N; Kinzer, Donna; Penzias, Alan S; Ball, G David; Gibbons, William E

    2012-04-01

    To assess whether total reproductive potential (TRP), the chance of a live birth from each fresh cycle (fresh cycle plus frozen transfers), could be calculated from the national Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) database and whether information not available in SART CORS resulted in significant changes to the TRP calculation. Retrospective study using SART CORS and clinic data. Three assisted reproductive technology clinics. Women undergoing ART. None. Two- and three-year TRPs for 2005 and 2006 were calculated according to patient age at cycle start by linking fresh to frozen cycles up to first live birth. Clinic records were used to adjust for (remove) frozen cycles that used more than one fresh cycle as a source of embryos and for any embryos donated to other patients or research or shipped to another facility before a live birth. TRP was higher than fresh per-cycle rates for most ages at all clinics, although accuracy was compromised when there were fewer than 20 cycles per category. Two- and 3-year TRPs differed in only 2 of 24 calculations. Adjusted TRPs differed less than three percentage points from unadjusted TRPs when volume was sufficient. Clinic TRP can be calculated from SART CORS. Data suggest that calculations of clinic TRP from the national dataset would be meaningful. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Technology transfer for the implementation of a clinical trials network on drug abuse and mental health treatment in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigian, Viviana E; Marín-Navarrete, Rodrigo A; Verdeja, Rosa E; Alonso, Elizabeth; Perez, María A; Fernández-Mondragón, José; Berlanga, Carlos; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Szapocznik, José

    2015-09-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) lack the research infrastructure and capacity to conduct rigorous substance abuse and mental health effectiveness clinical trials to guide clinical practice. A partnership between the Florida Node Alliance of the United States National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network and the National Institute of Psychiatry in Mexico was established in 2011 to improve substance abuse practice in Mexico. The purpose of this partnership was to develop a Mexican national clinical trials network of substance abuse researchers and providers capable of implementing effectiveness randomized clinical trials in community-based settings. A technology transfer model was implemented and ran from 2011-2013. The Florida Node Alliance shared the "know how" for the development of the research infrastructure to implement randomized clinical trials in community programs through core and specific training modules, role-specific coaching, pairings, modeling, monitoring, and feedback. The technology transfer process was bi-directional in nature in that it was informed by feedback on feasibility and cultural appropriateness for the context in which practices were implemented. The Institute, in turn, led the effort to create the national network of researchers and practitioners in Mexico and the implementation of the first trial. A collaborative model of technology transfer was useful in creating a Mexican researcher-provider network that is capable of changing national practice in substance abuse research and treatment. Key considerations for transnational technology transfer are presented.

  16. Plant plasma membrane proteomics for improving cold tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eTakahashi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants are always exposed to various stresses. We have focused on freezing stress, which causes serious problems for agricultural management. When plants suffer freeze-induced damage, the plasma membrane is thought to be the primary site of injury because of its central role in regulation of various cellular processes. Cold tolerant species, however, adapt to such freezing conditions by modifying cellular components and functions (cold acclimation. One of the most important adaptation mechanisms to freezing is alteration of plasma membrane compositions and functions. Advanced proteomic technologies have succeeded in identification of many candidates that may play roles in adaptation of the plasma membrane to freezing stress. Proteomics results suggest that adaptations of plasma membrane functions to low temperature are associated with alterations of protein compositions during cold acclimation. Some of proteins identified by proteomic approaches have been verified their functional roles in freezing tolerance mechanisms further. Thus, accumulation of proteomic results in the plasma membrane is of importance for application to molecular breeding efforts to increase cold tolerance in crops.

  17. Proteomics technique opens new frontiers in mobilome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew D; Matthews, David A; Maringer, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of the genome of most eukaryotic organisms consists of highly repetitive mobile genetic elements. The sum of these elements is called the "mobilome," which in eukaryotes is made up mostly of transposons. Transposable elements contribute to disease, evolution, and normal physiology by mediating genetic rearrangement, and through the "domestication" of transposon proteins for cellular functions. Although 'omics studies of mobilome genomes and transcriptomes are common, technical challenges have hampered high-throughput global proteomics analyses of transposons. In a recent paper, we overcame these technical hurdles using a technique called "proteomics informed by transcriptomics" (PIT), and thus published the first unbiased global mobilome-derived proteome for any organism (using cell lines derived from the mosquito Aedes aegypti ). In this commentary, we describe our methods in more detail, and summarise our major findings. We also use new genome sequencing data to show that, in many cases, the specific genomic element expressing a given protein can be identified using PIT. This proteomic technique therefore represents an important technological advance that will open new avenues of research into the role that proteins derived from transposons and other repetitive and sequence diverse genetic elements, such as endogenous retroviruses, play in health and disease.

  18. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-04-19

    There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with higher rates of chronic diseases such as obesity

  19. The Seed Proteome Web Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eGalland

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Seed Proteome Web Portal (SPWP; http://www.seedproteome.com/ gives access to information both on quantitative seed proteomic data and on seed-related protocols. Firstly, the SPWP provides access to the 475 different Arabidopsis seed proteins annotated from 2 dimensional electrophoresis (2DE maps. Quantitative data are available for each protein according to their accumulation profile during the germination process. These proteins can be retrieved either in list format or directly on scanned 2DE maps. These proteomic data reveal that 40% of seed proteins maintain a stable abundance over germination, up to radicle protrusion. During sensu stricto germination (24 h upon imbibition about 50% of the proteins display quantitative variations, exhibiting an increased abundance (35% or a decreasing abundance (15%. Moreover, during radicle protrusion (24 h to 48 h upon imbibition, 41% proteins display quantitative variations with an increased (23% or a decreasing abundance (18%. In addition, an analysis of the seed proteome revealed the importance of protein post-translational modifications as demonstrated by the poor correlation (r2 = 0.29 between the theoretical (predicted from Arabidopsis genome and the observed protein isoelectric points. Secondly, the SPWP is a relevant technical resource for protocols specifically dedicated to Arabidopsis seed proteome studies. Concerning 2D electrophoresis, the user can find efficient procedures for sample preparation, electrophoresis coupled with gel analysis and protein identification by mass spectrometry, which we have routinely used during the last 12 years. Particular applications such as the detection of oxidized proteins or de novo synthetized proteins radiolabeled by [35S]-methionine are also given in great details. Future developments of this portal will include proteomic data from studies such as dormancy release and protein turnover through de novo protein synthesis analyses during germination.

  20. Proteomic analysis of minute amount of colonic biopsies by enteroscopy sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xing [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Xu, Yanli [Fuyang People’s Hospital (China); Meng, Qian [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zheng, Qingqing [Digestive Endoscopic Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital (China); Wu, Jianhong [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang, Chen; Jia, Weiping [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Diabetes Institute, Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital (China); Figeys, Daniel [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, and Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa (Canada); Chang, Ying, E-mail: emulan@163.com [Digestive Endoscopic Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital (China); Zhou, Hu, E-mail: zhouhu@simm.ac.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2016-08-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common types of malignant tumor worldwide. Currently, although many researchers have been devoting themselves in CRC studies, the process of locating biomarkers for CRC early diagnosis and prognostic is still very slow. Using a centrifugal proteomic reactor-based proteomic analysis of minute amount of colonic biopsies by enteroscopy sampling, 2620 protein groups were quantified between cancer mucosa and adjacent normal colorectal mucosa. Of which, 403 protein groups were differentially expressed with statistic significance between cancer and normal tissues, including 195 up-regulated and 208 down-regulated proteins in cancer tissues. Three proteins (SOD3, PRELP and NGAL) were selected for further Western blot validation. And the resulting Western blot experimental results were consistent with the quantitative proteomic data. SOD3 and PRELP are down-regulated in CRC mucosa comparing to adjacent normal tissue, while NGAL is up-regulated in CRC mucosa. In conclusion, the centrifugal proteomic reactor-based label-free quantitative proteomic approach provides a highly sensitive and powerful tool for analyzing minute protein sample from tiny colorectal biopsies, which may facilitate CRC biomarkers discovery for diagnoses and prognoses. -- Highlights: •Minute amount of colonic biopsies by endoscopy is suitable for proteomic analysis. •Centrifugal proteomic reactor can be used for processing tiny clinic biopsy sample. •SOD3 and PRELP are down-regulated in CRC, while NGAL is up-regulated in CRC.

  1. Proteomic analysis of minute amount of colonic biopsies by enteroscopy sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xing; Xu, Yanli; Meng, Qian; Zheng, Qingqing; Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Chen; Jia, Weiping; Figeys, Daniel; Chang, Ying; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common types of malignant tumor worldwide. Currently, although many researchers have been devoting themselves in CRC studies, the process of locating biomarkers for CRC early diagnosis and prognostic is still very slow. Using a centrifugal proteomic reactor-based proteomic analysis of minute amount of colonic biopsies by enteroscopy sampling, 2620 protein groups were quantified between cancer mucosa and adjacent normal colorectal mucosa. Of which, 403 protein groups were differentially expressed with statistic significance between cancer and normal tissues, including 195 up-regulated and 208 down-regulated proteins in cancer tissues. Three proteins (SOD3, PRELP and NGAL) were selected for further Western blot validation. And the resulting Western blot experimental results were consistent with the quantitative proteomic data. SOD3 and PRELP are down-regulated in CRC mucosa comparing to adjacent normal tissue, while NGAL is up-regulated in CRC mucosa. In conclusion, the centrifugal proteomic reactor-based label-free quantitative proteomic approach provides a highly sensitive and powerful tool for analyzing minute protein sample from tiny colorectal biopsies, which may facilitate CRC biomarkers discovery for diagnoses and prognoses. -- Highlights: •Minute amount of colonic biopsies by endoscopy is suitable for proteomic analysis. •Centrifugal proteomic reactor can be used for processing tiny clinic biopsy sample. •SOD3 and PRELP are down-regulated in CRC, while NGAL is up-regulated in CRC.

  2. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  3. Scientific Workflow Management in Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Jeroen S.; Deelder, André M.; Palmblad, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Data processing in proteomics can be a challenging endeavor, requiring extensive knowledge of many different software packages, all with different algorithms, data format requirements, and user interfaces. In this article we describe the integration of a number of existing programs and tools in Taverna Workbench, a scientific workflow manager currently being developed in the bioinformatics community. We demonstrate how a workflow manager provides a single, visually clear and intuitive interface to complex data analysis tasks in proteomics, from raw mass spectrometry data to protein identifications and beyond. PMID:22411703

  4. The emergence of diagnostic imaging technologies in breast cancer: discovery, regulatory approval, reimbursement, and adoption in clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Laura S; Klein, Gregory; Carr, Lauren; Kessler, Larry; Sullivan, Sean D

    2012-01-25

    In this article, we trace the chronology of developments in breast imaging technologies that are used for diagnosis and staging of breast cancer, including mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and positron emission tomography. We explore factors that affected clinical acceptance and utilization of these technologies from discovery to clinical use, including milestones in peer-reviewed publication, US Food and Drug Administration approval, reimbursement by payers, and adoption into clinical guidelines. The factors driving utilization of new imaging technologies are mainly driven by regulatory approval and reimbursement by payers rather than evidence that they provide benefits to patients. Comparative effectiveness research can serve as a useful tool to investigate whether these imaging modalities provide information that improves patient outcomes in real-world settings.

  5. An Investigation About Attitude of Clinical Physicians in the Implementation of Telemedicine Technology in TUMS Hospitals 2003-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Dargahi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This research have presented focuses upon the cultural side of managerial coordination and control as manifested in Telemedicine Technology. Specifically, the research seeks to analyze and determines the attitude of clinical physicians about the role of specific dimensions of organizational culture and organizational structure may have upon effective managerial coordination and control in Telemedicine Technology in TUMS hospitals. Materials and methods: We assessed the attitude of 82 clinical physicians in five randomly selected TUMS teaching hospitals in a mixed method of pooling Quantitative and Qualitative data using unstructured interview technique. Results: For successful telemedicine utilization, most of clinical physicians believed that we need organic organizations that have involved leadership, open and free communication of mistakes and success, desire to experiment with new ideas, support for continuing education, support for new things, clear rules to follow and acknowledge performance goals. Conclusion: The data indicate that organizational is most important to utilize successfur telemedicine technology.

  6. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Identification and characterization of N-glycosylated proteins using proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selby, David S; Larsen, Martin R; Calvano, Cosima Damiana

    2008-01-01

    and analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. Combinations of affinity-enrichment techniques, chemical and biochemical protocols, and advanced mass spectrometry facilitate detailed glycoprotein analysis in proteomics, from fundamental biological studies to biomarker discovery in biomedicine....... is a complex task and is currently achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that enable identification of glycoproteins and localization, classification, and analysis of individual glycan structures on proteins. In this chapter we briefly introduce a range of analytical technologies for recovery...

  8. Integrating Interactive Web-Based Technology to Assess Adherence and Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Crosby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that the quality of the adherence assessment is one of the best predictors for improving clinical outcomes. Newer technologies represent an opportunity for developing high quality standardized assessments to assess clinical outcomes such as patient experience of care but have not been tested systematically in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD. The goal of the current study was to pilot an interactive web-based tool, the Take-Charge Program, to assess adherence to clinic visits and hydroxyurea (HU, barriers to adherence, solutions to overcome these barriers, and clinical outcomes in 43 patients with SCD age 6–21 years. Results indicate that the web-based tool was successfully integrated into the clinical setting while maintaining high patient satisfaction (>90%. The tool provided data consistent with the medical record, staff report, and/or clinical lab data. Participants reported that forgetting and transportation were major barriers for adherence to both clinic attendance and HU. A greater number of self-reported barriers (P<.01 and older age (P<.05 were associated with poorer clinic attendance and HU adherence. In summary, the tool represents an innovative approach to integrate newer technology to assess adherence and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with SCD.

  9. Self-reported "communication technology" usage in patients attending a cardiology outpatient clinic in a remote regional hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandiya, Tariro; Dua, Anahita; King, Gerry; Mazzocco, Thomas; Hussain, Amir; Leslie, Stephen J

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the perceived usage of, and attitudes toward, communication technologies (mobile phone and texting, e-mail, and the World Wide Web) in patients attending a cardiology clinic with a view to guiding future health service redesign. This was performed in a remote regional hospital serving both urban and rural populations. A self-completion questionnaire was completed by a convenience sample of 221 patients attending a general cardiology clinic. The questions asked about patients' access to and use of technology at home. Data collected also included age, gender, travel time to the clinic, mode of travel, and whether the respondent was accompanied to the clinic. Appropriate statistical tests were used with significance taken at the 0.05 level. Age was the strongest predictor of use of communication technologies, with younger patients more likely to use e-mail, Web, mobile phone, and texting. However, frequency of use of e-mail was not related to age. It is encouraging that over 99% of patients used at least one communication technology. This study has highlighted that there may be several potential barriers to the widespread implementation of communication technologies in general cardiology patients. Cognizance should be taken of these findings when attempting service redesign.

  10. Proteomics in the fruit tree science arena: new insights into fruit defense, development, and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, Athanassios; Tanou, Georgia; Filippou, Panagiota; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2013-06-01

    Fruit tree crops are agricultural commodities of high economic importance, while fruits also represent one of the most vital components of the human diet. Therefore, a great effort has been made to understand the molecular mechanisms covering fundamental biological processes in fruit tree physiology and fruit biology. Thanks to the development of cutting-edge "omics" technologies such as proteomic analysis, scientists now have powerful tools to support traditional fruit tree research. Such proteomic analyses are establishing high-density 2DE reference maps and peptide mass fingerprint databases that can lead fruit science into a new postgenomic research era. Here, an overview of the application of proteomics in key aspects of fruit tree physiology as well as in fruit biology, including defense responses to abiotic and biotic stress factors, is presented. A panoramic view of ripening-related proteins is also discussed, as an example of proteomic application in fruit science.

  11. MASPECTRAS: a platform for management and analysis of proteomics LC-MS/MS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rader Robert

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advancements of proteomics technologies have led to a rapid increase in the number, size and rate at which datasets are generated. Managing and extracting valuable information from such datasets requires the use of data management platforms and computational approaches. Results We have developed the MAss SPECTRometry Analysis System (MASPECTRAS, a platform for management and analysis of proteomics LC-MS/MS data. MASPECTRAS is based on the Proteome Experimental Data Repository (PEDRo relational database schema and follows the guidelines of the Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI. Analysis modules include: 1 import and parsing of the results from the search engines SEQUEST, Mascot, Spectrum Mill, X! Tandem, and OMSSA; 2 peptide validation, 3 clustering of proteins based on Markov Clustering and multiple alignments; and 4 quantification using the Automated Statistical Analysis of Protein Abundance Ratios algorithm (ASAPRatio. The system provides customizable data retrieval and visualization tools, as well as export to PRoteomics IDEntifications public repository (PRIDE. MASPECTRAS is freely available at http://genome.tugraz.at/maspectras Conclusion Given the unique features and the flexibility due to the use of standard software technology, our platform represents significant advance and could be of great interest to the proteomics community.

  12. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle: Focus on Insulin Resistance and Exercise Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul S. Deshmukh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle proteomics are challenging. This review describes the technical limitations of skeletal muscle proteomics as well as emerging developments in proteomics workflow with respect to samples preparation, liquid chromatography (LC, MS and computational analysis. These technologies have not yet been fully exploited in the field of skeletal muscle proteomics. Future studies that involve state-of-the-art proteomics technology will broaden our understanding of exercise-induced adaptations as well as molecular pathogenesis of insulin resistance. This could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  13. Making sense of a new technology in clinical practice: a qualitative study of patient and physician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Regitze A S; Hansen, Ulla M; Johansen, Clea B; Hansen, Christian S; Jørgensen, Marit E; Fleischer, Jesper; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-09-22

    The number of new technologies for risk assessment available in health care is increasing. These technologies are intended to contribute to both improved care practices and improved patient outcomes. To do so however, there is a need to study how new technologies are understood and interpreted by users in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to explore patient and physician perspectives on the usefulness of a new technology to detect Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) in a specialist diabetes clinic. The technology is a handheld device that measures resting heart rate and conducts three cardiac autonomic reflex tests to evaluate heart rate variability. The study relied on three sources of data: observations of medical consultations where results of the CAN test were reported (n = 8); interviews with patients who had received the CAN test (n = 19); and interviews with physicians who reported results of the CAN test (n = 9). Data were collected at the specialist diabetes clinic between November 2013 and January 2014. Data were analysed using the concept of technological frames which is used to assess how physicians and patients understand and interpret the new technology. Physicians generally found it difficult to communicate test results to patients in terms that patients could understand and to translate results into meaningful implications for the treatment of patients. Results of the study indicate that patients did not recall having done the CAN test nor recall receiving the results. Furthermore, patients were generally unsure about the purpose of the CAN test and the implications of the results. Involving patients and physicians is essential when a new technology is introduced in clinical practice. This particularly includes the interpretation and communication processes related to its use. The integration of a new risk assessment technology into clinical practice can be accompanied by several challenges. It is suggested that

  14. Proteomics for discovery of candidate colorectal cancer biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Chaver, Paula; Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and other Western countries, mainly due to the lack of well-validated clinically useful biomarkers with enough sensitivity and specificity to detect this disease at early stages. Although it is well known that the pathogenesis of CRC is a progressive accumulation of mutations in multiple genes, much less is known at the proteome level. Therefore, in the last years many proteomic studies have been conducted to find new candidate protein biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and as therapeutic targets for this malignancy, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis. An important advantage of the proteomic approaches is the capacity to look for multiple differentially expressed proteins in a single study. This review provides an overview of the recent reports describing the different proteomic tools used for the discovery of new protein markers for CRC such as two-dimensional electrophoresis methods, quantitative mass spectrometry-based techniques or protein microarrays. Additionally, we will also focus on the diverse biological samples used for CRC biomarker discovery such as tissue, serum and faeces, besides cell lines and murine models, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and summarize the most frequently identified candidate CRC markers. PMID:24744574

  15. Experimental application of Business Process Management technology to manage clinical pathways: a pediatric kidney transplantation follow up case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andellini, Martina; Fernandez Riesgo, Sandra; Morolli, Federica; Ritrovato, Matteo; Cosoli, Piero; Petruzzellis, Silverio; Rosso, Nicola

    2017-11-03

    To test the application of Business Process Management technology to manage clinical pathways, using a pediatric kidney transplantation as case study, and to identify the benefits obtained from using this technology. Using a Business Process Management platform, we implemented a specific application to manage the clinical pathway of pediatric patients, and monitored the activities of the coordinator in charge of the case management during a 6-month period (from June 2015 to November 2015) using two methodologies: the traditional procedure and the one under study. The application helped physicians and nurses to optimize the amount of time and resources devoted to management purposes. In particular, time reduction was close to 60%. In addition, the reduction of data duplication, the integrated event management and the efficient data collection improved the quality of the service. The use of Business Process Management technology, usually related to well-defined processes with high management costs, is an established procedure in multiple environments; its use in healthcare, however, is innovative. The use of already accepted clinical pathways is known to improve outcomes. The combination of these two techniques, well established in their respective areas of application, could represent a revolution in clinical pathway management. The study has demonstrated that the use of this technology in a clinical environment, using a proper architecture and identifying a well-defined process, leads to real benefits in terms of resources optimization and quality improvement.

  16. State of the Art for Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy in Movement Disorders: A Clinical and Technological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Okun, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is a widely used brain surgery that can be applied for many neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS is American Food and Drug Administration approved for medication refractory Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia. Although DBS has shown consistent success in many clinical trials, the therapy has limitations and there are well-recognized complications. Thus, only carefully selected patients are ideal candidates for this surgery. Over the last two decades, there have been significant advances in clinical knowledge on DBS. In addition, the surgical techniques and technology related to DBS has been rapidly evolving. The goal of this review is to describe the current status of DBS in the context of movement disorders, outline the mechanisms of action for DBS in brief, discuss the standard surgical and imaging techniques, discuss the patient selection and clinical outcomes in each of the movement disorders, and finally, introduce the recent advancements from a clinical and technological perspective.

  17. Genomes, Proteomes and the Central Dogma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Sarah; Vondriska, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology, with its associated technologies of proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, is driving the evolution of our understanding of cardiovascular physiology. Rather than studying individual molecules or even single reactions, a systems approach allows integration of orthogonal datasets from distinct tiers of biological data, including gene, RNA, protein, metabolite and other component networks. Together these networks give rise to emergent properties of cellular function and it is their reprogramming that causes disease. We present five observations regarding how systems biology is guiding a revisiting of the central dogma: (i) de-emphasizing the unidirectional flow of information from genes to proteins; (ii) revealing the role of modules of molecules as opposed to individual proteins acting in isolation; (iii) enabling discovery of novel emergent properties; (iv) demonstrating the importance of networks in biology; and (v) adding new dimensionality to the study of biological systems. PMID:22010165

  18. Genomes, proteomes, and the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Sarah; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Systems biology, with its associated technologies of proteomics, genomics, and metabolomics, is driving the evolution of our understanding of cardiovascular physiology. Rather than studying individual molecules or even single reactions, a systems approach allows integration of orthogonal data sets from distinct tiers of biological data, including gene, RNA, protein, metabolite, and other component networks. Together these networks give rise to emergent properties of cellular function, and it is their reprogramming that causes disease. We present 5 observations regarding how systems biology is guiding a revisiting of the central dogma: (1) It deemphasizes the unidirectional flow of information from genes to proteins; (2) it reveals the role of modules of molecules as opposed to individual proteins acting in isolation; (3) it enables discovery of novel emergent properties; (4) it demonstrates the importance of networks in biology; and (5) it adds new dimensionality to the study of biological systems.

  19. Integrating Pharmacoproteomics into Early-Phase Clinical Development: State-of-the-Art, Challenges, and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Nandal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacoproteomics is the study of disease-modifying and toxicity parameters associated with therapeutic drug administration, using analysis of quantitative and temporal changes to specific, predetermined, and select proteins, or to the proteome as a whole. Pharmacoproteomics is a rapidly evolving field, with progress in analytic technologies enabling processing of complex interactions of large number of unique proteins and effective use in clinical trials. Nevertheless, our analysis of clinicaltrials.gov and PubMed shows that the application of proteomics in early-phase clinical development is minimal and limited to few therapeutic areas, with oncology predominating. We review the history, technologies, current usage, challenges, and potential for future use, and conclude with recommendations for integration of pharmacoproteomic in early-phase drug development.

  20. Service quality and perceived value of technology-based service encounters: evaluation of clinical staff satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Jye; Chang, Hsin Hsin; Eng, Cheng Joo; Wong, Kit Hong

    Previous research has evaluated technology-based service encounters (TBSEs) in the delivery of health care by assessing patient satisfaction. This study examined service quality and perceived value of TBSEs used in health organisations from the perspective of clinical staff, with staff technology readiness as a moderator. A quantitative survey was conducted in Taiwan, across private and public healthcare organisations. Results showed that TBSEs had a direct effect on service quality and perceived value, which in turn had a direct effect on staff satisfaction in using TBSEs. However, service quality had no effect on perceived value when moderated by technology readiness. Theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Upcoming strategies in obstetrics: how the technology of clinical audit may reduce cesarean birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paracchini, Sara; Masturzo, Bianca; Tangolo, Domenico; Roletti, Enrica; Piazzese, Annalisa; Attini, Rossella; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia

    2017-12-01

    The rate of cesarean delivery is currently increasing all over Europe. In Italy it reaches 38% of all child births. Therefore, it is important to identify the clinical and organizational variables that determine the appropriateness of elective cesarean delivery. With this aim we chose the technology of clinical audit, a process that promotes improvement in clinical practice through systematic review of clinical care in relation with explicit standards derived from scientific literature. This is a prospective audit: in the period March 2014-July 2014 we analyzed the medical records of 150 women who underwent elective cesarean delivery at Gynecological and Obstetrical University Hospital Sant'Anna, Turin. We collected data related to five quality criteria derived from scientific literature. Each criterion was stratified by indicators and matched with respective standards of adequate care. Criteria and indicators are: 1) cesarean section (CS) rate in twin pregnancies with both cephalic fetal presentation (stratified by dichorionic diamniotic and monochorionic diamniotic); 2) CS rates in preterm births (stratified by gestational age ≤32, ≤34 and ≤37 week); 3) CS rates on maternal request due to tokophobia in patients who received a psychological support during pregnancy; 4) repeated CS rates; 5) multidisciplinary evaluation of the indication to CS for non-obstetric reasons (orthopedic, ophthalmologic, psychiatric and neurological). The rate of CSs found in each criterion was compared with the respective standard in literature. The value obtained for each indicator was tested for statistical significance (CI 95%). We considered performing indicators whose final rate was found to be better or equal to the reference standard. The majority of the indicators result to be performant. CS rate for previous CS was 84% (73/86), far more frequent than the standard of optimal care fixed at ≤30% (Paudit because of the high gap between observed and adequate scores, the

  2. Current technological advances in magnetic resonance with critical impact for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M

    2013-12-01

    The last 5 years of technological advances with major impact on clinical magnetic resonance (MR) are discussed, with greater emphasis on those that are most recent. These developments have already had a critical positive effect on clinical diagnosis and therapy and presage continued rapid improvements for the next 5 years. This review begins with a discussion of 2 topics that encompass the breadth of MR, in terms of anatomic applications, contrast media, and MR angiography. Subsequently, innovations are discussed by anatomic category, picking the areas with the greatest development, starting with the brain, moving forward to the liver and kidney, and concluding with the musculoskeletal system, breast, and prostate. Two final topics are then considered, which will likely, with time, become independent major fields in their own right, interventional MR and MR positron emission tomography (PET).The next decade will bring a new generation of MR contrast media, with research focused on substantial improvements (>100-fold) in relaxivity (contrast effect), thus providing greater efficacy, safety, and tissue targeting. Magnetic resonance angiography will see major advances because of the use of compressed sensing, in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, with movement away from nondynamic imaging. The breadth of available techniques and tissue contrast has greatly expanded in brain imaging, benefiting both from the introduction of new basic categories of imaging techniques, such as readout-segmented echo planar imaging and 3D fast spin echo imaging with variable flip angles, and from new refinements specific to anatomic areas, such as double inversion recovery and MP2RAGE. Liver imaging has benefited from the development of techniques to easily and rapidly assess lipid, and will see, overall, a marked improvement in the next 5 years from new techniques on the verge of clinical introduction, such as controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration

  3. Proteomic Approaches in Biomarker Discovery: New Perspectives in Cancer Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocevar, Nina; Komel, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in proteomic methods, including improved detection limits and sensitivity, these methods have not yet been established in routine clinical practice. The main limitations, which prevent their integration into clinics, are high cost of equipment, the need for highly trained personnel, and last, but not least, the establishment of reliable and accurate protein biomarkers or panels of protein biomarkers for detection of neoplasms. Furthermore, the complexity and heterogeneity of most solid tumours present obstacles in the discovery of specific protein signatures, which could be used for early detection of cancers, for prediction of disease outcome, and for determining the response to specific therapies. However, cancer proteome, as the end-point of pathological processes that underlie cancer development and progression, could represent an important source for the discovery of new biomarkers and molecular targets for tailored therapies. PMID:24550697

  4. Opportunities in proteomics to understand hepatitis C and HIV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Eric G; Suffredini, Anthony F; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2012-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection. However, coinfection with HCV results in a more complicated disease course for both infections. HIV infection dramatically impacts the natural history of chronic liver disease due to HCV. Coinfected patients not on antiretroviral therapy for HIV develop liver fibrosis and cirrhosis at a faster rate, clear acute infection less commonly and respond to IFN-α-based therapy for chronic infection less often than HCV-monoinfected patients. The interaction between these two viruses, the immune system and the fibrotic machinery of the liver remains incompletely understood. In this review, we discuss recent advances in proteomics as applied to HCV and HIV and highlight issues in coinfection that are amenable to further discovery through proteomic approaches. We focus on clinical predictors of liver fibrosis and treatment outcome as these have the greatest potential clinical applicability.

  5. Unravelling the nuclear matrix proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear matrix (NM) model posits the presence of a protein/RNA scaffold that spans the mammalian nucleus. The NM proteins are involved in basic nuclear function and are a promising source of protein biomarkers for cancer. Importantly, the NM proteome is operationally defined as the proteins...

  6. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel González-Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection.

  7. Quantitative proteomics of Chlorobaculum tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenby, Lasse Gaarde; Szymanska, Monika; Holkenbrink, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate for photosynthetic growth. To gain insight into the sulfur metabolism, the proteome of Cba. tepidum cells sampled under different growth conditions has been quantified using a rapid g...

  8. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  9. Clinical photography in dermatology: ethical and medico-legal considerations in the age of digital and smartphone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunde, Lauren; McMeniman, Erin; Parker, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    Clinical photography has long been an important aspect in the management of dermatological pathology and has many applications in contemporary dermatology practice. With the continuous evolution of digital and smartphone technology, clinicians must maintain ethical and medico-legal standards. This article reviews how dermatology trainees are utilising this technology in their clinical practice and what procedures they follow when taking photos of patients. We review the ethical and legal considerations of clinical photography in dermatology and present a hypothetical medico-legal scenario. Dermatology registrars were surveyed on their use of personal smartphones and digital equipment for photographing patients in their clinical practice. Numerous medico-legal providers were approached to provide medico-legal advice about a hypothetical scenario. We found that the use of these technologies is prevalent among dermatology registrars and all respondents reported regular use. Clinicians should routinely obtain and document adequate patient consent in relation to clinical photography, utilise strict privacy settings on smartphones and other digital devices and ensure that the images are stored on these devices for minimal periods. Express consent documentation in the clinical file puts the clinician in a more defensible position if a complaint is made to the medical board or privacy commissioner. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  10. Diversification of the muscle proteome through alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakka, Kiran; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2018-03-06

    Skeletal muscles express a highly specialized proteome that allows the metabolism of energy sources to mediate myofiber contraction. This muscle-specific proteome is partially derived through the muscle-specific transcription of a subset of genes. Surprisingly, RNA sequencing technologies have also revealed a significant role for muscle-specific alternative splicing in generating protein isoforms that give specialized function to the muscle proteome. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge with respect to the mechanisms that allow pre-mRNA transcripts to undergo muscle-specific alternative splicing while identifying some of the key trans-acting splicing factors essential to the process. The importance of specific splicing events to specialized muscle function is presented along with examples in which dysregulated splicing contributes to myopathies. Though there is now an appreciation that alternative splicing is a major contributor to proteome diversification, the emergence of improved "targeted" proteomic methodologies for detection of specific protein isoforms will soon allow us to better appreciate the extent to which alternative splicing modifies the activity of proteins (and their ability to interact with other proteins) in the skeletal muscle. In addition, we highlight a continued need to better explore the signaling pathways that contribute to the temporal control of trans-acting splicing factor activity to ensure specific protein isoforms are expressed in the proper cellular context. An understanding of the signal-dependent and signal-independent events driving muscle-specific alternative splicing has the potential to provide us with novel therapeutic strategies to treat different myopathies.

  11. Quantum molecular resonance technology in hard-to-heal extremity wounds: histological and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Salomone, Marco; Di Santo, Claudia; Ruka, Erind; Morozzo, Umberto; Bruschi, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Chronic wounds are commonly associated with high morbidity rates due to the patient's need of frequent dressing changes and repeated visits to the outpatient wound clinic. Furthermore, chronic wounds are often characterised by severe pain, which can cause significant disability to the patient. New technologies aim to develop an optimal device to reduce discomfort of the patient and to heal wounds. The device Rexon-age ® is introduced for the first time in wound healing, and preliminary data on clinical and histological results are shown. From April 2014 to April 2015, 11 patients - 7 females and 4 males - were enrolled in the present study. The study was conducted at the Plastic and Reconstructive Institute of the Università degli Studi di Torino, Città della Salute e della Scienza of Torino, Italy. For histological characterisation, pre- and post-treatment biopsies on the wound bed were performed. Data regarding age, gender, weight, height, comorbidity, drug therapy and topical pre-treatment and dressings of the wound were collected as well. Moreover, local factors regarding the wound data were as follows: aetiology, time of the wound formation until first Rexon-age treatment, wound dimensions, wound bed, moisture, margins and anatomical region of the wound. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to monitor the pain before and after each treatment. Rexon-age treatment resulted in improvement in granulation tissue and wound contraction. Moreover, a significant reduction of pain was observed with the reduction of painkillers drug usage. Among these Rexon-age-treated patients, three patients displayed 60-80% reduction in pain intensity, and two patients showed complete pain relief. In outpatient follow-up appointments, we registered long-term durability of pain relief. As assessed by histological analyses, post-treatment biopsies of all nine patients revealed a decreased amount of inflammatory cells and lower expression levels of metalloproteinases (e.g. MMP9). We

  12. Technology Use Among Patients in a Nonurban Southern U.S. HIV Clinic in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Ava Lena; Ritterband, Lee; Dillingham, Rebecca; Bullock, Linda; Ingersoll, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Behavioral interventions can be delivered over the Internet, but nonurban subpopulations living with HIV may still have inadequate Internet access to make this feasible. Methods: We report on a survey conducted in 2015 among 150 patients receiving care at a university-based Infectious Disease Clinic serving a nonurban and rural population in central Virginia. Our aim was to determine the rate of computer, tablet, and smartphone usage, as well as Internet access, to inform the delivery of a novel intervention using Internet and mobile technology. Results: The participants' mean age was 46; 111 patients used computers, 101 used smartphones, and 41 used tablets. The results showed that 87% of patients had Internet access. Of those, 49 reported daily Internet use, while 18% reported weekly Internet use, and 33% reported less frequent Internet use. Conclusions: The survey study data suggest that Internet access among nonurban and rural patients with HIV is adequate to support trials testing Internet-delivered interventions. It is time to develop and deliver Internet interventions tailored for this often isolated subpopulation. PMID:27123688

  13. Proteomic Contributions to Medicinal Plant Research: From Plant Metabolism to Pharmacological Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Hashiguchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is a clinical practice of utilizing medicinal plant derivatives for therapeutic purposes. It has an enduring history worldwide and plays a significant role in the fight against various diseases. Herbal drug combinations often exhibit synergistic therapeutic action compared with single-constituent dosage, and can also enhance the cytotoxicity induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. To explore the mechanism underlying the pharmacological action of herbs, proteomic approaches have been applied to the physiology of medicinal plants and its effects on animals. This review article focuses on the existing proteomics-based medicinal plant research and discusses the following topics: (i plant metabolic pathways that synthesize an array of bioactive compounds; (ii pharmacological action of plants tested using in vivo and in vitro studies; and (iii the application of proteomic approaches to indigenous plants with scarce sequence information. The accumulation of proteomic information in a biological or medicinal context may help in formulating the effective use of medicinal plants.

  14. Do adjunctive flap-monitoring technologies impact clinical decision making? An analysis of microsurgeon preferences and behavior by body region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Justin L; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Flores, José M; Wimmers, Eric G; Yalanis, Georgia C; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Sacks, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    Multiple perfusion assessment technologies exist to identify compromised microvascular free flaps. The effectiveness, operability, and cost of each technology vary. The authors investigated surgeon preference and clinical behavior with several perfusion assessment technologies. A questionnaire was sent to members of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery concerning perceptions and frequency of use of several technologies in varied clinical situations. Demographic information was also collected. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated using multinomial logistic regression accounting for clustering of similar practices within institutions/regions. The questionnaire was completed by 157 of 389 participants (40.4 percent response rate). Handheld Doppler was the most commonly preferred free flap-monitoring technology (56.1 percent), followed by implantable Doppler (22.9 percent) and cutaneous tissue oximetry (16.6 percent). Surgeons were significantly more likely to opt for immediate take-back to the operating room when presented with a concerning tissue oximetry readout compared with a concerning handheld Doppler signal (OR, 2.82; p decision making did not significantly differ by demographics, training, or practice setup. Although most surgeons still prefer to use standard handheld Doppler for free flap assessment, respondents were significantly more likely to opt for immediate return to the operating room for a concerning tissue oximetry reading than an abnormal Doppler signal. This suggests that tissue oximetry may have the greatest impact on clinical decision making in the postoperative period.

  15. Current technological clinical practice in breast radiotherapy; results of a survey in EORTC-Radiation Oncology Group affiliated institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Hurkmans, Coen W; Kuten, Abraham; Westenberg, Helen A

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the current technological clinical practice of radiation therapy of the breast in institutions participating in the EORTC-Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey was conducted between August 2008 and January 2009 on behalf of the Breast Working

  16. Utility of proteomics in obstetric disorders: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Núñez J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jónathan Hernández-Núñez,1 Magel Valdés-Yong21Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Alberto Fernández-Valdés, Santa Cruz del Norte, Mayabeque, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Luis Díaz Soto, Habana del Este, La Habana, CubaAbstract: The study of proteomics could explain many aspects of obstetric disorders. We undertook this review with the aim of assessing the utility of proteomics in the specialty of obstetrics. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, BVS Bireme, and SciELO, using various search terms with the assistance of a librarian. We considered cohort studies, case-control studies, case series, and systematic review articles published until October 2014 in the English or Spanish language, and evaluated their quality and the internal validity of the evidence provided. Two reviewers extracted the data independently, then both researchers simultaneously revised the data later, to arrive at a consensus. The search retrieved 1,158 papers, of which 965 were excluded for being duplicates, not relevant, or unrelated studies. A further 86 papers were excluded for being guidelines, protocols, or case reports, along with another 64 that did not contain relevant information, leaving 43 studies for inclusion. Many of these studies showed the utility of proteomic techniques for prediction, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, monitoring, and prognosis of pre-eclampsia, perinatal infection, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and ectopic pregnancy. Proteomic techniques have enormous clinical significance and constitute an invaluable weapon in the management of obstetric disorders that increase maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality.Keywords: proteomic techniques, obstetrics, diagnosis, prediction

  17. Comparison of fingerprint and facial biometric verification technologies for user access and patient identification in a clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Documet, Jorge; Liu, Brent; Lee, Jasper; Shrestha, Rasu; Wang, Kevin; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    As clinical imaging and informatics systems continue to integrate the healthcare enterprise, the need to prevent patient mis-identification and unauthorized access to clinical data becomes more apparent especially under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) mandate. Last year, we presented a system to track and verify patients and staff within a clinical environment. This year, we further address the biometric verification component in order to determine which Biometric system is the optimal solution for given applications in the complex clinical environment. We install two biometric identification systems including fingerprint and facial recognition systems at an outpatient imaging facility, Healthcare Consultation Center II (HCCII). We evaluated each solution and documented the advantages and pitfalls of each biometric technology in this clinical environment.

  18. Implementation of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology: integration of clinical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Dinesen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore how the implementation of the concept ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology influences the integration of clinical tasks across healthcare sectors. Theory: Inter-organisational theory. Methods: The case study approach was applied. Triangulations of data collection techniques were used: documentary materials, participant observation, qualitative and focus group interviews. Results: The clinical decision-making and task solving became multidisciplinary and integrated with the implementation of telehomecare and, therefore, complex in terms of the prescription and adjustment of patient medicine. Workflows between healthcare professionals across sectors